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Sample records for mouse infection model

  1. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Bray, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study. PMID:23170168

  2. Mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Malachowa, Natalia; Kobayashi, Scott D; Braughton, Kevin R; DeLeo, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial skin and soft tissue infections are abundant worldwide and many are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Indeed, S. aureus is the leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the USA. Here, we describe a mouse model of skin and soft tissue infection induced by subcutaneous inoculation of S. aureus. This animal model can be used to investigate a number of factors related to the pathogenesis of skin and soft tissue infections, including strain virulence and the contribution of specific bacterial molecules to disease, and it can be employed to test the potential effectiveness of antibiotic therapies or vaccine candidates.

  3. Mouse models of rhinovirus infection and airways disease.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Singanayagam, Aran; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are invaluable tools for gaining insight into host immunity during virus infection. Until recently, no practical mouse model for rhinovirus infection was available. Development of infection models was complicated by the existence of distinct groups of viruses that utilize different host cell surface proteins for binding and entry. Here, we describe mouse infection models, including virus purification and measurement of host immune responses, for representative viruses from two of these groups: (1) infection of unmodified Balb/c mice with minor group rhinovirus serotype 1B (RV-1B) and (2) infection of transgenic Balb/c mice with major group rhinovirus serotype 16 (RV-16).

  4. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  5. Generation and Analysis of Humanized Mouse Model of EBV Infection.

    PubMed

    Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The recent development of severely immunodeficient mouse strains enabled the production of new-generation humanized mice, in which major components of the human immune system are reconstituted. These new-generation humanized mice can be infected with human pathogenic viruses that do not infect regular mice and target cells of the hematoimmune system. Here we describe the method for preparing humanized mice, infecting them with EBV, and for their virological and immunological analyses. The results obtained from our own mouse models are briefly described.

  6. Mouse models of dengue virus infection for vaccine testing.

    PubMed

    Sarathy, Vanessa V; Milligan, Gregg N; Bourne, Nigel; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four serologically and genetically related viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. With an annual global burden of approximately 390 million infections occurring in the tropics and subtropics worldwide, an effective vaccine to combat dengue is urgently needed. Historically, a major impediment to dengue research has been development of a suitable small animal infection model that mimics the features of human illness in the absence of neurologic disease that was the hallmark of earlier mouse models. Recent advances in immunocompromised murine infection models have resulted in development of lethal DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 models in AG129 mice that are deficient in both the interferon-α/β receptor (IFN-α/β R) and the interferon-γ receptor (IFN-γR). These models mimic many hallmark features of dengue disease in humans, such as viremia, thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and cytokine storm. Importantly AG129 mice develop lethal, acute, disseminated infection with systemic viral loads, which is characteristic of typical dengue illness. Infected AG129 mice generate an antibody response to DENV, and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) models have been established by both passive and maternal transfer of DENV-immune sera. Several steps have been taken to refine DENV mouse models. Viruses generated by peripheral in vivo passages incur substitutions that provide a virulent phenotype using smaller inocula. Because IFN signaling has a major role in immunity to DENV, mice that generate a cellular immune response are desired, but striking the balance between susceptibility to DENV and intact immunity is complicated. Great strides have been made using single-deficient IFN-α/βR mice for DENV-2 infection, and conditional knockdowns may offer additional approaches to provide a panoramic view that includes viral virulence and host immunity. Ultimately, the DENV AG129 mouse models result in reproducible lethality and offer multiple

  7. Mouse Model of Respiratory Tract Infection Induced by Waddlia chondrophila

    PubMed Central

    Pilloux, Ludovic; LeRoy, Didier; Brunel, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Waddlia chondrophila, an obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, is considered as an emerging pathogen. Some clinical studies highlighted a possible role of W. chondrophila in bronchiolitis, pneumonia and miscarriage. This pathogenic potential is further supported by the ability of W. chondrophila to infect and replicate within human pneumocytes, macrophages and endometrial cells. Considering that W. chondrophila might be a causative agent of respiratory tract infection, we developed a mouse model of respiratory tract infection to get insight into the pathogenesis of W. chondrophila. Following intranasal inoculation of 2 x 108 W. chondrophila, mice lost up to 40% of their body weight, and succumbed rapidly from infection with a death rate reaching 50% at day 4 post-inoculation. Bacterial loads, estimated by qPCR, increased from day 0 to day 3 post-infection and decreased thereafter in surviving mice. Bacterial growth was confirmed by detecting dividing bacteria using electron microscopy, and living bacteria were isolated from lungs 14 days post-infection. Immunohistochemistry and histopathology of infected lungs revealed the presence of bacteria associated with pneumonia characterized by an important multifocal inflammation. The high inflammatory score in the lungs was associated with the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both serum and lungs at day 3 post-infection. This animal model supports the role of W. chondrophila as an agent of respiratory tract infection, and will help understanding the pathogenesis of this strict intracellular bacterium. PMID:26950066

  8. A mouse model for Chlamydia suis genital infection.

    PubMed

    Donati, Manuela; Di Paolo, Maria; Favaroni, Alison; Aldini, Rita; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Ostanello, Fabio; Biondi, Roberta; Cremonini, Eleonora; Ginocchietti, Laura; Cevenini, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    A mouse model for Chlamydia suis genital infection was developed. Ninety-nine mice were randomly divided into three groups and intravaginally inoculated with chlamydia: 45 mice (group 1) received C. suis purified elementary bodies (EBs), 27 (group 2) were inoculated with C. trachomatis genotype E EBs and 27 mice (group 3) with C. trachomatis genotype F EBs. Additionally, 10 mice were used as a negative control. At seven days post-infection (dpi) secretory anti-C. suis IgA were recovered from vaginal swabs of all C. suis inoculated mice. Chlamydia suis was isolated from 93, 84, 71 and 33% vaginal swabs at 3, 5, 7 and 12 dpi. Chlamydia trachomatis genotype E and F were isolated from 100% vaginal swabs up to 7 dpi and from 61 and 72%, respectively, at 12 dpi. Viable C. suis and C. trachomatis organisms were isolated from uterus and tubes up to 16 and 28 dpi, respectively. The results of the present study show the susceptibility of mice to intravaginal inoculation with C. suis. A more rapid course and resolution of C. suis infection, in comparison to C. trachomatis, was highlighted. The mouse model could be useful for comparative investigations involving C. suis and C. trachomatis species.

  9. Photodynamic therapy of oral Candida infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Freire, Fernanda; Ferraresi, Cleber; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Species of the fungal genus Candida, can cause oral candidiasis especially in immunosuppressed patients. Many studies have investigated the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill fungi in vitro, but this approach has seldom been reported in animal models of infection. This study investigated the effects of PDT on Candida albicans as biofilms grown in vitro and also in an immunosuppressed mouse model of oral candidiasis infection. We used a luciferase-expressing strain that allowed non-invasive monitoring of the infection by bioluminescence imaging. The phenothiazinium salts, methylene blue (MB) and new methylene blue (NMB) were used as photosensitizers (PS), combined or not with potassium iodide (KI), and red laser (660nm) at four different light doses (10J, 20J, 40J and 60J). The best in vitro log reduction of CFU/ml on biofilm grown cells was: MB plus KI with 40J (2.31 log; p<0.001); and NMB without KI with 60J (1.77 log; p<0.001). These conditions were chosen for treating the in vivo model of oral Candida infection. After 5days of treatment the disease was practically eradicated, especially using MB plus KI with 40J. This study suggests that KI can potentiate PDT of fungal infection using MB (but not NMB) and could be a promising new approach for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  10. Tracking vaginal, anal and oral infection in a mouse papillomavirus infection model

    PubMed Central

    Budgeon, Lynn R.; Cladel, Nancy M.; Balogh, Karla; Myers, Roland; Cooper, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and practical techniques to longitudinally track viral infection are sought after in clinical practice. We report a proof-of-principle study to monitor the viral DNA copy number using a newly established mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1) mucosal infection model. We hypothesized that viral presence could be identified and quantified by collecting lavage samples from cervicovaginal, anal and oral sites. Nude mice infected at these sites with infectious MmuPV1 were tracked for up to 23 weeks starting at 6 weeks post-infection. Viral DNA copy number was determined by SYBR Green Q-PCR analysis. In addition, we tracked viral DNA load through three complete oestrous cycles to pinpoint whether there was a correlation between the DNA load and the four stages of the oestrous cycle. Our results showed that high viral DNA copy number was reproducibly detected from both anal and cervicovaginal lavage samples. The infection and disease progression were further confirmed by histology, cytology, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, the viral copy number fluctuated over the oestrous cycle, with the highest level at the oestrus stage, implying that multiple sampling might be necessary to provide a reliable diagnosis. Virus DNA was detected in oral lavage samples at a later time after infection. Lower viral DNA load was found in oral samples when compared with those in anal and vaginal tracts. To our knowledge, our study is the first in vivo study to sequentially monitor papillomavirus infection from mucosal anal, oral and vaginal tracts in a preclinical model. PMID:26399579

  11. Mouse Model of Neurological Complications Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Shannon E.; Smith, Jeanon; Koma, Takaaki; Miller, Magda M.; Yun, Nadezhda; Dineley, Kelly T.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Long-term neurological complications, termed sequelae, can result from viral encephalitis, which are not well understood. In human survivors, alphavirus encephalitis can cause severe neurobehavioral changes, in the most extreme cases, a schizophrenic-like syndrome. In the present study, we aimed to adapt an animal model of alphavirus infection survival to study the development of these long-term neurological complications. Upon low-dose infection of wild-type C57B/6 mice, asymptomatic and symptomatic groups were established and compared to mock-infected mice to measure general health and baseline neurological function, including the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition paradigm. Prepulse inhibition is a robust operational measure of sensorimotor gating, a fundamental form of information processing. Deficits in prepulse inhibition manifest as the inability to filter out extraneous sensory stimuli. Sensory gating is disrupted in schizophrenia and other mental disorders, as well as neurodegenerative diseases. Symptomatic mice developed deficits in prepulse inhibition that lasted through 6 months post infection; these deficits were absent in asymptomatic or mock-infected groups. Accompanying prepulse inhibition deficits, symptomatic animals exhibited thalamus damage as visualized with H&E staining, as well as increased GFAP expression in the posterior complex of the thalamus and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These histological changes and increased GFAP expression were absent in the asymptomatic and mock-infected animals, indicating that glial scarring could have contributed to the prepulse inhibition phenotype observed in the symptomatic animals. This model provides a tool to test mechanisms of and treatments for the neurological sequelae of viral encephalitis and begins to delineate potential explanations for the development of such sequelae post infection. PMID:28223982

  12. Mouse Model of Neurological Complications Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ronca, Shannon E; Smith, Jeanon; Koma, Takaaki; Miller, Magda M; Yun, Nadezhda; Dineley, Kelly T; Paessler, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Long-term neurological complications, termed sequelae, can result from viral encephalitis, which are not well understood. In human survivors, alphavirus encephalitis can cause severe neurobehavioral changes, in the most extreme cases, a schizophrenic-like syndrome. In the present study, we aimed to adapt an animal model of alphavirus infection survival to study the development of these long-term neurological complications. Upon low-dose infection of wild-type C57B/6 mice, asymptomatic and symptomatic groups were established and compared to mock-infected mice to measure general health and baseline neurological function, including the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition paradigm. Prepulse inhibition is a robust operational measure of sensorimotor gating, a fundamental form of information processing. Deficits in prepulse inhibition manifest as the inability to filter out extraneous sensory stimuli. Sensory gating is disrupted in schizophrenia and other mental disorders, as well as neurodegenerative diseases. Symptomatic mice developed deficits in prepulse inhibition that lasted through 6 months post infection; these deficits were absent in asymptomatic or mock-infected groups. Accompanying prepulse inhibition deficits, symptomatic animals exhibited thalamus damage as visualized with H&E staining, as well as increased GFAP expression in the posterior complex of the thalamus and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These histological changes and increased GFAP expression were absent in the asymptomatic and mock-infected animals, indicating that glial scarring could have contributed to the prepulse inhibition phenotype observed in the symptomatic animals. This model provides a tool to test mechanisms of and treatments for the neurological sequelae of viral encephalitis and begins to delineate potential explanations for the development of such sequelae post infection.

  13. Humanized-BLT mouse model of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Kang, Guobin; Kumar, Pankaj; Lu, Wuxun; Li, Yue; Zhou, You; Li, Qingsheng; Wood, Charles

    2014-02-25

    Lack of an effective small-animal model to study the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection in vivo has hampered studies on the pathogenesis and transmission of KSHV. The objective of our study was to determine whether the humanized BLT (bone marrow, liver, and thymus) mouse (hu-BLT) model generated from NOD/SCID/IL2rγ mice can be a useful model for studying KSHV infection. We have tested KSHV infection of hu-BLT mice via various routes of infection, including oral and intravaginal routes, to mimic natural routes of transmission, with recombinant KSHV over a 1- or 3-mo period. Infection was determined by measuring viral DNA, latent and lytic viral transcripts and antigens in various tissues by PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemical staining. KSHV DNA, as well as both latent and lytic viral transcripts and proteins, were detected in various tissues, via various routes of infection. Using double-labeled immune-fluorescence confocal microscopy, we found that KSHV can establish infection in human B cells and macrophages. Our results demonstrate that KSHV can establish a robust infection in the hu-BLT mice, via different routes of infection, including the oral mucosa which is the most common natural route of infection. This hu-BLT mouse not only will be a useful model for studying the pathogenesis of KSHV in vivo but can potentially be used to study the routes and spread of viral infection in the infected host.

  14. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, Emma; Atkinson, Barry; Hall, Graham; Watson, Robert J.; Bosworth, Andrew; Bonney, Laura C.; Kitchen, Samantha; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129) mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev) after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals. PMID:27149521

  15. A Susceptible Mouse Model for Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dowall, Stuart D; Graham, Victoria A; Rayner, Emma; Atkinson, Barry; Hall, Graham; Watson, Robert J; Bosworth, Andrew; Bonney, Laura C; Kitchen, Samantha; Hewson, Roger

    2016-05-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen which has recently spread beyond Africa and into Pacific and South American regions. Despite first being detected in 1947, very little information is known about the virus, and its spread has been associated with increases in Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly. There are currently no known vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV infection. Progress in assessing interventions will require the development of animal models to test efficacies; however, there are only limited reports on in vivo studies. The only susceptible murine models have involved intracerebral inoculations or juvenile animals, which do not replicate natural infection. Our report has studied the effect of ZIKV infection in type-I interferon receptor deficient (A129) mice and the parent strain (129Sv/Ev) after subcutaneous challenge in the lower leg to mimic a mosquito bite. A129 mice developed severe symptoms with widespread viral RNA detection in the blood, brain, spleen, liver and ovaries. Histological changes were also striking in these animals. 129Sv/Ev mice developed no clinical symptoms or histological changes, despite viral RNA being detectable in the blood, spleen and ovaries, albeit at lower levels than those seen in A129 mice. Our results identify A129 mice as being highly susceptible to ZIKV and thus A129 mice represent a suitable, and urgently required, small animal model for the testing of vaccines and antivirals.

  16. Development of a Mouse Model of Helicobacter pylori Infection that Mimics Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Marta; Arico, Beatrice; Burroni, Daniela; Figura, Natale; Rappuoli, Rino; Ghiara, Paolo

    1995-03-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. The pathogenesis of H. pylori infection in vivo was studied by adapting fresh clinical isolates of bacteria to colonize the stomachs of mice. A gastric pathology resembling human disease was observed in infections with cytotoxin-producing strains but not with noncytotoxic strains. Oral immunization with purified H. pylori antigens protected mice from bacterial infection. This mouse model will allow the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines against H. pylori infection in humans.

  17. Immune Response to Human Metapneumovirus Infection: What We Have Learned from the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheemarla, Nagarjuna R.; Guerrero-Plata, Antonieta

    2015-01-01

    Human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading respiratory viral pathogen associated with bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma exacerbation in young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The development of a potential vaccine against hMPV requires detailed understanding of the host immune system, which plays a significant role in hMPV pathogenesis, susceptibility and vaccine efficacy. As a result, animal models have been developed to better understand the mechanisms by which hMPV causes disease. Several animal models have been evaluated and established so far to study the host immune responses and pathophysiology of hMPV infection. However, inbred laboratory mouse strains have been one of the most used animal species for experimental modeling and therefore used for the studies of immunity and immunopathogenesis to hMPV. This review summarizes the contributions of the mouse model to our understanding of the immune response against hMPV infection. PMID:26393657

  18. Pharmacodynamics of isavuconazole in an Aspergillus fumigatus mouse infection model.

    PubMed

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Meis, Jacques F; Melchers, Willem J G; Verweij, Paul E; Mouton, Johan W

    2015-05-01

    Azole resistance is an emerging problem in Aspergillus fumigatus which translates into treatment failure. Alternative treatments with new azoles may improve therapeutic outcome in invasive aspergillosis (IA) even for strains with decreased susceptibility to current azoles. The in vivo efficacy of 0.25, 1, 4, 16, 64, 128, 256, and 512 mg/kg of body weight/day prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate (BAL8557) (isavuconazole [ISA]-equivalent doses of 0.12, 0.48, 1.92, 7.68, 30.7, 61.4, 122.9, and 245.8 mg/kg/day, respectively) administered by oral gavage was assessed in an immunocompetent murine model of IA against four clinical A. fumigatus isolates: a wild-type isolate (ISA MICEUCAST, 0.5 mg/liter) and three azole-resistant isolates harboring substitutions in the cyp51A gene: G54W (ISA MIC(EUCAST), 0.5 mg/liter), M220I (ISA MIC(EUCAST), 4 mg/liter), and TR34/L98H (ISA MIC(EUCAST), 8 mg/liter). The maximum effect (100% survival) was reached at a prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate dose of 64 mg/kg for the wild-type isolate, 128 mg/kg for the G54W mutant, and 256 mg/kg two times per day (q12) for the M220I mutant. A maximum response was not achieved with the TR34/L98H isolates with the highest dose of prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate (256 mg/kg q12). For a survival rate of 50%, the effective AUC(0-24)/MIC(EUCAST) ratio for ISA total drug was 24.73 (95% confidence interval, 22.50 to 27.18). The efficacy of isavuconazole depended on both the drug exposure and the isavuconazole MIC of the isolates. The quantitative relationship between exposure and effect (AUC(0-24)/MIC) can be used to optimize the treatment of human infections by A. fumigatus, including strains with decreased susceptibility.

  19. Characterization of Mouse Models of Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection and Evaluation of Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Deepak V.; Tyagi, Sandeep; Converse, Paul J.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease worldwide; yet, an optimal treatment regimen for M. avium complex infection has not been established. Clarithromycin is accepted as the cornerstone drug for treatment of M. avium lung disease; however, good model systems, especially animal models, are needed to evaluate the most effective companion drugs. We performed a series of experiments to evaluate and use different mouse models (comparing BALB/c, C57BL/6, nude, and beige mice) of M. avium infection and to assess the anti-M. avium activity of single and combination drug regimens, in vitro, ex vivo, and in mice. In vitro, clarithromycin and moxifloxacin were most active against M. avium, and no antagonism was observed between these two drugs. Nude mice were more susceptible to M. avium infection than the other mouse strains tested, but the impact of treatment was most clearly seen in M. avium-infected BALB/c mice. The combination of clarithromycin-ethambutol-rifampin was more effective in all infected mice than moxifloxacin-ethambutol-rifampin; the addition of moxifloxacin to the clarithromycin-containing regimen did not increase treatment efficacy. Clarithromycin-containing regimens are the most effective for M. avium infection; substitution of moxifloxacin for clarithromycin had a negative impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:25624335

  20. Decreased Na+ influx lowers hippocampal neuronal excitability in a mouse model of neonatal influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoyong; Eun Yu, Ji; Kim, Sungmin; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Chung, ChiHye

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus infection is one of common infectious diseases occurring worldwide. The human influenza virus can infect the central nervous system and cause brain dysfunctions affecting cognition and spatial memory. It has been previously shown that infection with the influenza viral protein within the hippocampus decreases Ca2+ influx and reduces excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, the neuronal properties of animals surviving neonatal infection have not been investigated. Using a mouse model of neonatal influenza infection, we performed thorough electrophysiological analyses of hippocampal neurotransmission. We found that animals surviving the infection exhibited reduced spontaneous transmission with no significant defects in evoked neurotransmission. Interestingly, the hippocampus of the infected group conducted synaptic transmission with less fidelity upon repeated stimulations and failed to generate action potentials faithfully upon step current injections primarily due to reduced Na+ influx. The reversal potential for the Na+ current was hyperpolarized and the activation of Na+ channels was slower in the infected group while the inactivation process was minimally disturbed. Taken together, our observations suggest that neonatally infected offsprings exhibit noticeable deficits at rest and severe failures when higher activity is required. This study provides insight into understanding the cellular mechanisms of influenza infection-associated functional changes in the brain. PMID:26310542

  1. Filifactor alocis Infection and Inflammatory Responses in the Mouse Subcutaneous Chamber Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Jotwani, Ravi; Le, Junyi; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Potempa, Jan; Coventry, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent microbiome studies have implicated a role for Filifactor alocis in periodontal disease. In this study, we investigated the colonization and survival properties of F. alocis in a mouse subcutaneous chamber model of infection and characterized host innate immune responses. An infection of 109 F. alocis successfully colonized all chambers; however, the infection was cleared after 72 h. F. alocis elicited a local inflammatory response with neutrophils recruited into the chambers at 2 h postinfection along with an increase in levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). F. alocis also induced apoptosis in chamber epithelial cells and neutrophils. Consistent with resolution of infection, neutrophil numbers and cytokine levels returned to baseline by 72 h. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR demonstrated that F. alocis exited the chambers and spread to the spleen, liver, lung, and kidney. Massive neutrophil infiltration was observed in the spleen and lungs, and the recruited neutrophils were in close proximity to the infecting bacteria. Significant epithelial injury was observed in the kidneys. Infection of all tissues was resolved after 7 days. This first in vivo study of the pathogenicity of F. alocis shows that in the chamber model the organism can establish a proinflammatory, proapoptotic local infection which is rapidly resolved by the host concordant with neutrophil influx. Moreover, F. alocis can spread to, and transiently infect, remote tissues where neutrophils can also be recruited. PMID:24379289

  2. A mouse air pouch model for evaluating the immune response to Taenia crassiceps infection.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Emanuelle B; Sakai, Yuriko I; Gaspari, Elizabeth De

    2014-02-01

    The experimental system of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci infection in BALB/c mice is considered to be the most representative model of cysticercosis. In our work, mice were sacrificed 7 and 30days after infection, and pouch fluid was collected to determine the number of accumulated cells and the concentrations of IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and nitric oxide. The injection of 50 nonbudding cysticerci into normal mouse dorsal air pouches induced a high level of IFNγ and nitric oxide production relative to the parasite load. The air pouch provides a convenient cavity that allows studying the cellular immunological aspects of the T. crassiceps parasite. The nonbudding cysticerci recovered from the air pouches contained cells that can reconstitute complete cysts in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the air pouch model is an alternative tool for the evaluation of the immune characteristics of T. crassiceps infection.

  3. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  4. Development of a Long-Term Ascending Urinary Tract Infection Mouse Model for Antibiotic Treatment Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hvidberg, Hanne; Struve, Carsten; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Christensen, Nils; Rasmussen, Søren N.; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2000-01-01

    A model of ascending unobstructed urinary tract infection (UTI) in mice was developed to study the significance of the antibiotic concentration in urine, serum, and kidney tissue for efficacy of treatment of UTI in general and pyelonephritis in particular. Outbred Ssc-CF1 female mice were used throughout the study, and Escherichia coli was used as the pathogen. The virulence of 11 uropathogenic E. coli isolates and 1 nonpathogenic laboratory E. coli strain was examined. Strain C175-94 achieved the highest counts in the kidneys, and this strain was subsequently used as the infecting organism. The model gave reproducible bladder infections, i.e., bacteria were recovered from 22 of 23 control mice after 3 days, and histological examination of kidney tissue showed that of 14 infected kidneys, 7 (50%) showed major histological changes, whereas 3 of 36 uninfected kidneys showed major histological changes (P = 0.018). Once the model was established, the efficacies of different doses of cefuroxime and gentamicin, corresponding to active concentrations in urine only or in urine, serum, and kidney tissue simultaneously, were examined. All cefuroxime doses resulted in significantly lower counts in urine than control treatments, but the dose which produced concentrations of cefuroxime only in urine and not in serum or kidney tissue had no effect on kidney infection. Even low doses of gentamicin (0.05 mg/mouse) resulted in concentrations in renal tissue for prolonged times due to accumulation. All gentamicin doses had a significant effect (compared to the effect of the control treatment) on bacterial counts in urine and kidneys. The antibiotic effect on bacterial counts in bladders was negligible for unknown reasons. Use of the mouse UTI model is feasible for study of the effect of an antibiotic in the urinary system, although the missing antibacterial effect in the bladder needs further evaluation. PMID:10602738

  5. Chlamydophila abortus infection in the mouse: a useful model of the ovine disease.

    PubMed

    Caro, M R; Buendía, A J; Del Rio, L; Ortega, N; Gallego, M C; Cuello, F; Navarro, J A; Sanchez, J; Salinas, J

    2009-03-16

    Chlamydophila (C.) abortus is an obligate intracellular bacterium able to colonize the placenta of several species of mammals, which may induce abortion in the last third of pregnancy. The infection affects mainly small ruminants resulting in major economic losses in farming industries worldwide. Furthermore, its zoonotic risk has been reported in pregnant farmers or abattoir workers. Mouse models have been widely used to study both the pathology of the disease and the role of immune cells in controlling infection. Moreover, this animal experimental model has been considered a useful tool to evaluate new vaccine candidates and adjuvants that could prevent abortion and reduce fetal death. Future studies using these models will provide and reveal information about the precise mechanisms in the immune response against C. abortus and will increase the knowledge about poorly understood issues such as chlamydial persistence.

  6. Determination of human transferrin concentrations in mouse models of neisserial infection.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; Cobas, Karen; Garrido, Yainelis; Nazabal, Consuelo; Brown, Enma; Pajon, Rolando

    2006-04-20

    Transferrin constitutes the major protein involved in the transport of iron from the sites of absorption to the sites of storage and utilization. Despite the high affinity of transferrin for iron, most bacterial pathogens, such as the human restricted Neisseria meningitidis, have developed iron acquisition mechanisms. Several animal models of bacterial infection that include the exogenous supply of human transferrin have been implemented, and tests using transgenic mouse models are underway. Here we describe an ELISA sandwich procedure based on two monoclonal antibodies with negligible cross-reactivity to murine transferrin, to estimate human transferrin concentrations in mouse sera. The assay can detect as little as 10 ng/ml of human transferrin with coefficients of variation ranging from 1.6% to 4.4% (intra-assay) and 3.8% to 5% (inter-assay). The recovery values range from 90% to 110% in the assay working range (25-400 ng/ml). Human transferrin concentrations estimated in sera from 41 human transferrin transgenic mice ranged from 2 to 14 microg/ml. Further estimations of human transferrin levels in mouse sera of a previously described mouse model of N. meningitidis were also carried out. The intraperitoneal injection of 8 mg of human transferrin achieved a sustained value of human transferrin in mouse sera in the range of 1-2mg/ml over the first 24h, indicating that bacteria reaching the blood stream during this time would be exposed to levels of hTf found in normal human serum.

  7. A mouse model to study infection against porcine circovirus type 2: viral distribution and lesions in mouse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little information is known about viral distribution and transmission of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in species other than swine. It is still a debated topic whether the PCV2 could be infected and caused clinical lesions. Our study is aimed to estimate the susceptibility of Kunming mouse to PCV2. Forty-eight, 6-week-old Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. Group A (C1-C12) was inoculated with PK-15 cell culture as a control group. Group B (sPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml). Group C (mPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml) and a booster inoculation at days 14 and 28 after the first inoculation. Group D (MixPCV1-12) was unvaccinated but released into Group C. Each group was sacrificed at 7, 14, 28, and 42 days post-inoculation, respectively. Necropsy was checked on every mouse. Sera samples were collected for the test of PCV2 specific antibody. Tissues were collected for histopathology study and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The results showed that viral replication, seroconversion, and microscopic lesions were found in inoculated mice. Continuous existence of PCV2 viruses in lymph nodes have been confirmed by PCR, which took at least seven days for the virus to be transferred into other organs from the primary interface, and the diffusion to thymus had been retarded for seven days. Special PCV2 antibody could be found in PCV2 inoculation mice and was significantly higher than that in the control. Further more, microscopic lesions and the main target of PCV2 focused in the lymph nodes with a characteristic depletion and occasional necrosis of lymphocytes in the cortex and paracortex were found in inoculated mice. Conclusions The Kunming mouse could be infected by PCV2 virus and used as a PCV2 infected experimental model. PMID:20630105

  8. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Protects Host against Zika Virus Infection and Its Associated Microcephaly in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunfeng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Shuo; Ma, Feng; Aliyari, Roghiyh; Huang, Xing-Yao; Zhang, Na-Na; Watanabe, Momoko; Dong, Hao-Long; Liu, Ping; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Tian, Min; Hong, Shuai; Fan, Junwan; Zhao, Hui; Li, Lili; Vishlaghi, Neda; Buth, Jessie E; Au, Connie; Liu, Ying; Lu, Ning; Du, Peishuang; Qin, F Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Bo; Gong, Danyang; Dai, Xinghong; Sun, Ren; Novitch, Bennett G; Xu, Zhiheng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Cheng, Genhong

    2017-03-21

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has become a public health threat due to its global transmission and link to severe congenital disorders. The host immune responses to ZIKV infection have not been fully elucidated, and effective therapeutics are not currently available. Herein, we demonstrated that cholesterol-25-hydroxylase (CH25H) was induced in response to ZIKV infection and that its enzymatic product, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), was a critical mediator of host protection against ZIKV. Synthetic 25HC addition inhibited ZIKV infection in vitro by blocking viral entry, and treatment with 25HC reduced viremia and conferred protection against ZIKV in mice and rhesus macaques. 25HC suppressed ZIKV infection and reduced tissue damage in human cortical organoids and the embryonic brain of the ZIKV-induced mouse microcephaly model. Our findings highlight the protective role of CH25H during ZIKV infection and the potential use of 25HC as a natural antiviral agent to combat ZIKV infection and prevent ZIKV-associated outcomes, such as microcephaly.

  9. A severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for infection with Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We used severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice to study resistance to invasive infection with Entamoeba histolytica. Seven of seven SCID mice developed liver abscesses when challenged intrahepatically with virulent HM1:IMSS strain E. histolytica trophozoites. Only one of seven similarly challenged immunocompetent congenic C.B-17 mice developed an abscess. Adoptive transfer of polyclonal rabbit anti-E. histolytica antiserum, but not preimmune rabbit serum, completely protected 7 of 12 SCID mice from intrahepatic challenge with ameba. These results demonstrate that lymphocyte-based immunity is important in protection against amebic liver abscess, and that anti-E. histolytica antibody can protect against amebic infection in this system. The SCID mouse may provide a powerful model for studying the components of protective immunity to invasive amebiasis. PMID:1460420

  10. Protective antiviral antibody responses in a mouse model of influenza virus infection require TACI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amaya I; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Quinn, William J; Metzgar, Michele; Williams, Katie L; Caton, Andrew J; Meffre, Eric; Bram, Richard J; Erickson, Loren D; Allman, David; Cancro, Michael P; Erikson, Jan

    2011-10-01

    Antiviral Abs, for example those produced in response to influenza virus infection, are critical for virus neutralization and defense against secondary infection. While the half-life of Abs is short, Ab titers can last a lifetime due to a subset of the Ab-secreting cells (ASCs) that is long lived. However, the mechanisms governing ASC longevity are poorly understood. Here, we have identified a critical role for extrinsic cytokine signals in the survival of respiratory tract ASCs in a mouse model of influenza infection. Irradiation of mice at various time points after influenza virus infection markedly diminished numbers of lung ASCs, suggesting that they are short-lived and require extrinsic factors in order to persist. Neutralization of the TNF superfamily cytokines B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS; also known as BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) reduced numbers of antiviral ASCs in the lungs and bone marrow, whereas ASCs in the spleen and lung-draining lymph node were surprisingly unaffected. Mice deficient in transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), a receptor for BLyS and APRIL, mounted an initial antiviral B cell response similar to that generated in WT mice but failed to sustain protective Ab titers in the airways and serum, leading to increased susceptibility to secondary viral challenge. These studies highlight the importance of TACI signaling for the maintenance of ASCs and protection against influenza virus infection.

  11. Protective antiviral antibody responses in a mouse model of influenza virus infection require TACI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Amaya I.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; J. Quinn, William; Metzgar, Michele; Williams, Katie L.; Caton, Andrew J.; Meffre, Eric; Bram, Richard J.; Erickson, Loren D.; Allman, David; Cancro, Michael P.; Erikson, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Antiviral Abs, for example those produced in response to influenza virus infection, are critical for virus neutralization and defense against secondary infection. While the half-life of Abs is short, Ab titers can last a lifetime due to a subset of the Ab-secreting cells (ASCs) that is long lived. However, the mechanisms governing ASC longevity are poorly understood. Here, we have identified a critical role for extrinsic cytokine signals in the survival of respiratory tract ASCs in a mouse model of influenza infection. Irradiation of mice at various time points after influenza virus infection markedly diminished numbers of lung ASCs, suggesting that they are short-lived and require extrinsic factors in order to persist. Neutralization of the TNF superfamily cytokines B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS; also known as BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) reduced numbers of antiviral ASCs in the lungs and bone marrow, whereas ASCs in the spleen and lung-draining lymph node were surprisingly unaffected. Mice deficient in transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), a receptor for BLyS and APRIL, mounted an initial antiviral B cell response similar to that generated in WT mice but failed to sustain protective Ab titers in the airways and serum, leading to increased susceptibility to secondary viral challenge. These studies highlight the importance of TACI signaling for the maintenance of ASCs and protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:21881204

  12. A Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection to Study Intervention Strategies to Prevent Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kupz, Andreas; Zedler, Ulrike; Stäber, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+ individuals, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Management of this deadly co-infection is a significant global health challenge that is exacerbated by the lack of efficient vaccines against both Mtb and HIV, as well as the lack of reliable and robust animal models for Mtb/HIV co-infection. Here we describe a tractable and reproducible mouse model to study the reactivation dynamics of latent Mtb infection following the loss of CD4+ T cells as it occurs in HIV-co-infected individuals. Whereas intradermally (i.d.) infected C57BL/6 mice contained Mtb within the local draining lymph nodes, depletion of CD4+ cells led to progressive systemic spread of the bacteria and induction of lung pathology. To interrogate whether reactivation of Mtb after CD4+ T cell depletion can be reversed, we employed interleukin (IL)-2/anti-IL-2 complex-mediated cell boost approaches. Although populations of non-CD4 lymphocytes, such as CD8+ memory T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and double-negative (DN) T cells significantly expanded after IL-2/anti-IL-2 complex treatment, progressive development of bacteremia and pathologic lung alterations could not be prevented. These data suggest that the failure to reverse Mtb reactivation is likely not due to anergy of the expanded cell subsets and rather indicates a limited potential for IL-2-complex-based therapies in the management of Mtb/HIV co-infection. PMID:27391012

  13. Synergy in Polymicrobial Infections in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes†

    PubMed Central

    Mastropaolo, Matthew D.; Evans, Nicholas P.; Byrnes, Meghan K.; Stevens, Ann M.; Robertson, John L.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Human diabetics frequently suffer delayed wound healing, increased susceptibility to localized and systemic infections, and limb amputations as a consequence of the disease. Lower-limb infections in diabetic patients are most often polymicrobial, involving mixtures of aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and anaerobic bacteria. The purpose of this study is to determine if these organisms contribute to synergy in polymicrobial infections by using diabetic mice as an in vivo model. The model was the obese diabetic mouse strain BKS.Cg-m +/+ Leprdb/J, a model of human type 2 diabetes. Young (5- to 6-week-old) prediabetic mice and aged (23- to 24-week-old) diabetic mice were compared. The mice were injected subcutaneously with mixed cultures containing Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens. Progression of the infection (usually abscess formation) was monitored by examining mice for bacterial populations and numbers of white blood cells at 1, 8, and 22 days postinfection. Synergy in the mixed infections was defined as a statistically significant increase in the number of bacteria at the site of injection when coinfected with a second bacterium, compared to when the bacterium was inoculated alone. E. coli provided strong synergy to B. fragilis but not to C. perfringens. C. perfringens and B. fragilis provided moderate synergy to each other but only in young mice. B. fragilis was anergistic (antagonistic) to E. coli in coinfections in young mice at 22 days postinfection. When age-matched nondiabetic mice (C57BLKS/J) were used as controls, the diabetic mice exhibited 5 to 35 times the number of CFU as did the nondiabetic mice, indicating that diabetes was a significant factor in the severity of the polymicrobial infections. PMID:16113326

  14. The utilization of humanized mouse models for the study of human retroviral infections

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Pedati, Caitlin; Guendel, Irene; Carpio, Lawrence; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2009-01-01

    The development of novel techniques and systems to study human infectious diseases in both an in vitro and in vivo settings is always in high demand. Ideally, small animal models are the most efficient method of studying human afflictions. This is especially evident in the study of the human retroviruses, HIV-1 and HTLV-1, in that current simian animal models, though robust, are often expensive and difficult to maintain. Over the past two decades, the construction of humanized animal models through the transplantation and engraftment of human tissues or progenitor cells into immunocompromised mouse strains has allowed for the development of a reconstituted human tissue scaffold in a small animal system. The utilization of small animal models for retroviral studies required expansion of the early CB-17 scid/scid mouse resulting in animals demonstrating improved engraftment efficiency and infectivity. The implantation of uneducated human immune cells and associated tissue provided the basis for the SCID-hu Thy/Liv and hu-PBL-SCID models. Engraftment efficiency of these tissues was further improved through the integration of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mutation leading to the creation of NODSCID, NOD/Shi-scid IL2rγ-/-, and NOD/SCID β2-microglobulinnull animals. Further efforts at minimizing the response of the innate murine immune system produced the Rag2-/-γc-/- model which marked an important advancement in the use of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Together, these animal models have revolutionized the investigation of retroviral infections in vivo. PMID:19674458

  15. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in a mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii burn infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Tianhong; Tegos, George P.; Lu, Zongshun; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Huang, Liyi; Franklin, Michael J.; Baer, David G.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii infections represent a growing problem, especially in traumatic wounds and burns suffered by military personnel injured in Middle Eastern conflicts. Effective treatment using traditional antibiotics can be extremely difficult and new antimicrobial approaches are being investigated. One of these antimicrobial alternatives could be the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) and visible light known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). We report on the establishment of a new mouse model of full thickness thermal burns infected with a bioluminescent derivative of a clinical Iraqi isolate of A. baumannii and its PDT treatment by topical application of a PS produced by covalent conjugation chlorin(e6) to polyethylenimine followed by illumination of the burn surface with red light. Application of 108 A. baumannii cells to the surface of 10-second burns made on the dorsal surface of shaved female BALB/c mice led to chronic infections that lasted on average 22 days characterized by a remarkably stable bacterial bioluminescence. PDT carried out on day 0 soon after applying bacteria gave over three logs of loss of bacterial luminescence in a light exposure dependent manner, while PDT carried out on day 1 and day 2 gave approximately a 1.7-log reduction. Application of PS dissolved in 10% or 20% DMSO without light gave only modest reduction in bacterial luminescence from mouse burns. Some bacterial regrowth in the treated burn was observed but was generally modest. It was also found that PDT did not lead to inhibition of wound healing. The data suggest that PDT may be an effective new treatment for multi-drug resistant localized A. baumannii infections.

  16. Impact of burden on granulocyte clearance of bacteria in a mouse thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Fregeau, Christine; Liu, Weiguo; Brown, D L; Louie, Arnold

    2010-10-01

    We wished to delineate granulocytes' impact on the clearance of different bacterial burdens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in a granulocyte-replete mouse thigh infection model. A mouse thigh model was employed. Bacterial challenges from 10(5) to 3 × 10(7) CFU (S. aureus) and from 3 × 10(4) to 3 × 10(8) CFU (P. aeruginosa) were injected into murine posterior thighs. Organism quantitation was at baseline, 2 h (Pseudomonas only), and 24 h. A Michaelis-Menten population model was fit to the data for each organism. Breakpoints for microbial containment by granulocytes were identified. Bacterial burdens exceeding that breakpoint value resulted in organism multiplication. The Michaelis-Menten model fit the data well. For P. aeruginosa, the observed-predicted plot had a regression equation that explained over 98% of the variance (P ≪ 0.001). For S. aureus, this relationship explained greater than 94% of the variance (P ≪ 0.001). Maximal growth rate constants, maximal population burdens, and the bacterial loads at which granulocytes killed if half-saturated were not different. The kill rate constant for P. aeruginosa was almost 10 times that of S. aureus. Bacterial kill by granulocytes is saturable. No difference between saturation points of different isolates was seen. A higher bacterial burden means an increasing reliance on chemotherapy to drive bacterial clearance.

  17. Combination of Estrogen and Immunosuppressive Agents to Establish a Mouse Model of Candidiasis with Concurrent Oral and Vaginal Mucosal Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Wang, Chong; Mei, Huan; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Guixia; Zeng, Rong; Zhan, Ping; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-02-01

    Mouse model is an appropriate tool for pathogenic determination and study of host defenses during the fungal infection. Here, we established a mouse model of candidiasis with concurrent oral and vaginal mucosal infection. Two C. albicans strains sourced from clinical candidemia (SC5314) and mucosal infection (ATCC62342) were tested in ICR mice. The different combinational panels covering estrogen and immunosuppressive agents, cortisone, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide were used for concurrent oral and vaginal candidiasis establishment. Prednisolone in combination with estrogen proved an optimal mode for concurrent mucosal infection establishment. The model maintained for 1 week with fungal burden reached at least 10(5) cfu/g of tissue. This mouse model was evaluated by in vivo pharmacodynamics of fluconazole and host mucosal immunity of IL-17 and IL-23. Mice infected by SC5314 were cured by fluconazole. An increase in IL-23 in both oral and vaginal homogenates was observed after infection, while IL-17 only had a prominent elevation in oral tissue. This model could properly mimic complicated clinical conditions and provides a valuable means for antifungal assay in vivo and may also provide a useful method for the evaluation of host-fungal interactions.

  18. Avian influenza virus isolates from wild birds replicate and cause disease in a mouse model of infection.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Elizabeth A; Jones, Cheryl A; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Tompkins, S Mark

    2010-04-10

    The direct transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses to humans in Eurasia and subsequent disease has sparked research efforts leading to better understanding of HPAI virus transmission and pathogenicity in mammals. There has been minimal focus on examining the capacity of circulating low pathogenic wild bird avian influenza viruses to infect mammals. We have utilized a mouse model for influenza virus infection to examine 28 North American wild bird avian influenza virus isolates that include the hemagglutinin subtypes H2, H3, H4, H6, H7, and H11. We demonstrate that many wild bird avian influenza viruses of several different hemagglutinin types replicate in this mouse model without adaptation and induce histopathologic lesions similar to other influenza virus infections but cause minimal morbidity. These findings demonstrate the potential of wild avian influenza viruses to directly infect mice without prior adaptation and support their potential role in emergence of pandemic influenza.

  19. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Derek; Moxon, Richard; Purnell, Tom; Richter, Caroline; Williams, Debbie; Azar, Ali; Crompton, Michael; Wells, Sara; Fray, Martin; Brown, Steve D. M.; Cheeseman, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+) bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom) that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90%) of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (104-105 colony-forming units/µl) in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria. PMID:26611891

  20. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Hood, Derek; Moxon, Richard; Purnell, Tom; Richter, Caroline; Williams, Debbie; Azar, Ali; Crompton, Michael; Wells, Sara; Fray, Martin; Brown, Steve D M; Cheeseman, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+) bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom) that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90%) of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (10(4)-10(5) colony-forming units/µl) in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria.

  1. Development and application of an oral challenge mouse model for studying Clostridium perfringens type D infection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Sayeed, Sameera; Fisher, Derek J; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Vicki; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A; Saputo, Julian; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D isolates cause enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and probably cattle. While the major disease signs and lesions of type D animal disease are usually attributed to epsilon toxin, a class B select agent, these bacteria typically produce several lethal toxins. Understanding of disease pathogenesis and development of improved vaccines are hindered by the lack of a small-animal model mimicking natural disease caused by type D isolates. Addressing this need, we developed an oral challenge mouse model of C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia. When BALB/c mice with a sealed anus were inoculated by intragastric gavage with type D isolates, 7 of 10 type D isolates were lethal, as defined by spontaneous death or severe clinical signs necessitating euthanasia. The lethalities of the seven type D isolates varied between 14 and 100%. Clinical signs in the lethally challenged mice included seizures, convulsions, hyperexcitability, and/or depression. Mild intestinal gas distention and brain edema were observed at necropsy in a few mice, while histology showed multifocal acute tubular necrosis of the kidney and edema in the lungs of most challenged mice that developed a clinical response. When the lethality of type D isolates in this model was compared with in vitro toxin production, only a limited correlation was observed. However, mice could be protected against lethality by intravenous passive immunization with an epsilon toxin antibody prior to oral challenge. This study provides an economical new model for studying the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type D infections.

  2. Pathogenesis of Campylobacter fetus infections. Role of surface array proteins in virulence in a mouse model.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Z; Blaser, M J

    1990-01-01

    We developed a mouse model to compare the virulence of Campylobacter fetus strains with (S-plus) and without (S-minus) surface array protein (S-protein) capsules. In adult HA/ICR mice pretreated with ferric chloride, the LD50 for S-plus strain 84-32 was 43.3 times lower than its spontaneous S-minus mutant 84-54. Seven strains of inbred mice were no more susceptible than the outbred strain. In contrast to the findings with Salmonella typhimurium by others, 3 X 10(7) CFU of strain 84-32 caused 90% mortality in C3H/HeN (LPSn) mice and 40% mortality in C3H/HeJ (LPSd) mice. High-grade bacteremia in HA/ICR mice occurred after oral challenge with S-plus C. fetus strains and continued for at least 2 d, but was not present in any mice challenged with S-minus strains. Bacteremia at 30 min after challenge was 51.6-fold lower in mice pretreated with 10 microliters of rabbit antiserum to purified S-protein than after pretreatment with normal rabbit serum. Challenge of mice with a mixture of S-minus strain 84-54 and free S-proteins at a concentration 31.1-fold higher than found in wild-type strain 84-32 caused 30% mortality, compared with 0% with strain 84-54 or S-protein alone. These findings in a mouse model point toward the central role of the S-protein in the pathogenesis of C. fetus infection. The S-protein is not toxic per se, but enhances virulence when present on the bacterial cell surface as a capsule. Images PMID:2318963

  3. A non-mouse-adapted enterovirus 71 (EV71) strain exhibits neurotropism, causing neurological manifestations in a novel mouse model of EV71 infection.

    PubMed

    Khong, Wei Xin; Yan, Benedict; Yeo, Huimin; Tan, Eng Lee; Lee, Jia Jun; Ng, Jowin K W; Chow, Vincent T; Alonso, Sylvie

    2012-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic pathogen that has been consistently associated with the severe neurological forms of hand, foot, and mouth disease. The lack of a relevant animal model has hampered our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis, in particular the route and mode of viral dissemination. It has also hindered the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic approaches, making EV71 one of the most pressing public health concerns in Southeast Asia. Here we report a novel mouse model of EV71 infection. We demonstrate that 2-week-old and younger immunodeficient AG129 mice, which lack type I and II interferon receptors, are susceptible to infection with a non-mouse-adapted EV71 strain via both the intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral routes of inoculation. The infected mice displayed progressive limb paralysis prior to death. The dissemination of the virus was dependent on the route of inoculation but eventually resulted in virus accumulation in the central nervous systems of both animal groups, indicating a clear neurotropism of the virus. Histopathological examination revealed massive damage in the limb muscles, brainstem, and anterior horn areas. However, the minute amount of infectious viral particles in the limbs from orally infected animals argues against a direct viral cytopathic effect in this tissue and suggests that limb paralysis is a consequence of EV71 neuroinvasion. Together, our observations support that young AG129 mice display polio-like neuropathogenesis upon infection with a non-mouse-adapted EV71 strain, making this mouse model relevant for EV71 pathogenesis studies and an attractive platform for EV71 vaccine and drug testing.

  4. In Vivo Examination of Mouse APOBEC3- and Human APOBEC3A- and APOBEC3G-Mediated Restriction of Parvovirus and Herpesvirus Infection in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Yuki; Stavrou, Spyridon; Blouch, Kristin; Tattersall, Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT APOBEC3 knockout and human APOBEC3A and -3G transgenic mice were tested for their ability to be infected by the herpesviruses herpes simplex virus 1 and murine herpesvirus 68 and the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM). Knockout, APOBEC3A and APOBEC3G transgenic, and wild-type mice were equally infected by the herpesviruses, while APOBEC3A but not mouse APOBEC3 conferred resistance to MVM. No viruses showed evidence of cytidine deamination by mouse or human APOBEC3s. These data suggest that in vitro studies implicating APOBEC3 proteins in virus resistance may not reflect their role in vivo. IMPORTANCE It is well established that APOBEC3 proteins in different species are a critical component of the host antiretroviral defense. Whether these proteins also function to inhibit other viruses is not clear. There have been a number of in vitro studies suggesting that different APOBEC3 proteins restrict herpesviruses and parvoviruses, among others, but whether they also work in vivo has not been demonstrated. Our studies looking at the role of mouse and human APOBEC3 proteins in transgenic and knockout mouse models of viral infection suggest that these restriction factors are not broadly antiviral and demonstrate the importance of testing their activity in vivo. PMID:27356895

  5. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model: implications for prophylaxis and treatment of combat-related wound infections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Gupta, Asheesh; Huang, Yingying; Murray, Clinton K; Vrahas, Mark S; Sherwood, Margaret E; Baer, David G; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2014-06-15

    In this study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a mouse burn model. A bioluminescent clinical isolate of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii was obtained. The susceptibility of A. baumannii to blue light (415 nm)-inactivation was compared in vitro to that of human keratinocytes. Repeated cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacterial by blue light were performed to investigate the potential resistance development of A. baumannii to blue light. A mouse model of third degree burn infected with A. baumannii was developed. A single exposure of blue light was initiated 30 minutes after bacterial inoculation to inactivate A. baumannii in mouse burns. It was found that the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strain was significantly more susceptible than keratinocytes to blue light inactivation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed blue light-induced ultrastructural damage in A. baumannii cells. Fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that endogenous porphyrins exist in A. baumannii cells. Blue light at an exposure of 55.8 J/cm(2) significantly reduced the bacterial burden in mouse burns. No resistance development to blue light inactivation was observed in A. baumannii after 10 cycles of sublethal inactivation of bacteria. No significant DNA damage was detected in mouse skin by means of a skin TUNEL assay after a blue light exposure of 195 J/cm(2).

  6. Effects of Murine Norovirus Infection on a Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Jisun; Fierce, Yvette; Drivdahl, Rolf; Treuting, Piper M; Seamons, Audrey; Brabb, Thea; Maggio-Price, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is prevalent in SPF mouse facilities in the United States, and we currently lack sufficient data to determine whether it should be eliminated. It is generally accepted that the virus does not cause clinical symptoms in immunocompetent mice. However, we previously reported that MNV infection alters the phenotype of a mouse model of bacteria-induced inflammatory bowel disease in part through its effects on dendritic cells. The tropism of MNV toward macrophages and dendritic cells makes MNV a potential intercurrent variable in murine models of macrophage-driven inflammatory diseases, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Therefore, we determined whether MNV infection altered obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes in C57BL/6 mice, a widely used model of diet-induced obesity. We found that MNV did not alter weight gain, food intake, and glucose metabolism in this model, but it did induce subtle changes in lymphoid tissue. Further studies using other models of metabolic diseases are needed to provide additional information on the potential role this ‘subclinical’ virus might have on disease progression in mouse models of inflammatory diseases. PMID:20579433

  7. Of men in mice: the success and promise of humanized mouse models for human malaria parasite infections

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A.; Vignali, Marissa; Kappe, Stefan H.I.

    2014-01-01

    Forty percent of people worldwide are at risk of malaria infection, and despite control efforts it remains the most deadly parasitic disease. Unfortunately, rapid discovery and development of new interventions for malaria are hindered by the lack of small animal models that support the complex life cycles of the main parasite species infecting humans. Such tools must accommodate human parasite tropism for human tissue. Mouse models with human tissue developed to date have already enhanced our knowledge of human parasites, and are useful tools for assessing anti-parasitic interventions. Although these systems are imperfect, their continued refinement will likely broaden their utility. Some of the malaria parasite’s interactions with human hepatocytes and human erythrocytes can already be modeled with available humanized mouse systems. However, interactions with other relevant human tissues such as the skin and immune system, as well as most transitions between life cycle stages in vivo will require refinement of existing humanized mouse models. Here, we review the recent successes achieved in modeling human malaria parasite biology in humanized mice, and discuss how these models have potential to become an valuable part of the toolbox used for understanding the biology of, and development of interventions to, malaria. PMID:24506682

  8. Repeated vulvovaginal fungal infections cause persistent pain in a mouse model of vulvodynia.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Melissa A; Taylor, Anna M; Bailey, Andrea L; Tuttle, Alexander H; MacIntyre, Leigh C; Milagrosa, Zarah E; Crissman, Halley P; Bennett, Gary J; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Binik, Yitzchak M; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2011-09-21

    Provoked vestibulodynia, the most common form of vulvodynia (unexplained pain of the vulva), is a prevalent, idiopathic pain disorder associated with a history of recurrent candidiasis (yeast infections). It is characterized by vulvar allodynia (painful hypersensitivity to touch) and hyperinnervation. We tested whether repeated, localized exposure of the vulva to a common fungal pathogen can lead to the development of chronic pain. A subset of female mice subjected to recurrent Candida albicans infection developed mechanical allodynia localized to the vulva. The mice with allodynia also exhibited hyperinnervation with peptidergic nociceptor and sympathetic fibers (as indicated by increased protein gene product 9.5, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 immunoreactivity in the vaginal epithelium). Long-lasting behavioral allodynia in a subset of mice was also observed after a single, extended Candida infection, as well as after repeated vulvar (but not hind paw) inflammation induced with zymosan, a mixture of fungal antigens. The hypersensitivity and hyperinnervation were both present at least 3 weeks after the resolution of infection and inflammation. Our data show that infection can cause persistent pain long after its resolution and that recurrent yeast infection replicates important features of human provoked vulvodynia in the mouse.

  9. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of cultured mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Y.; Naruse, I.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated mouse whole embryos of 7.5 days' gestation were infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and cultured in pure rat serum. Although the MCMV infection had little effect on the survival and development of the embryos during 3 days of cultivation, immunohistochemical analysis of their serial sections using monoclonal antibody showed MCMV-infected cells in various portions of the embryos. This monoclonal antibody, when tested with the use of infected cultured mouse fibroblasts, reacted with nuclear antigen within 2 hours after infection and also reacted with nuclear inclusions in the late phase of infection. The viral antigen-positive cells detected by the monoclonal antibody were present in almost all of the ectoplacental cone and the yolk sac and in about 82% of the embryos. In the embryos, antigen-positive cells were frequently observed in the epithelium of the digestive tracts, endothelial cells of the blood vessels, and the mesodermal cells. In some of the embryos, viral antigen-positive cells were clearly observed in a small percentage of the blood cells. These findings indicate that blood cells, in addition to cell migration during embryogenesis, may play an important role in transmission of infectious virus into the embryos. Mouse whole embryo culture infected with MCMV can provide a model for the study of cellular tropism related to congenital infection by cytomegalovirus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3034066

  10. Characterization and Demonstration of the Value of a Lethal Mouse Model of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xinrong; Garron, Tania; Agrawal, Anurodh Shankar; Algaissi, Abdullah; Peng, Bi-Hung; Wakamiya, Maki; Chan, Teh-Sheng; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Characterized animal models are needed for studying the pathogenesis of and evaluating medical countermeasures for persisting Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections. Here, we further characterized a lethal transgenic mouse model of MERS-CoV infection and disease that globally expresses human CD26 (hCD26)/DPP4. The 50% infectious dose (ID50) and lethal dose (LD50) of virus were estimated to be <1 and 10 TCID50 of MERS-CoV, respectively. Neutralizing antibody developed in the surviving mice from the ID50/LD50 determinations, and all were fully immune to challenge with 100 LD50 of MERS-CoV. The tissue distribution and histopathology in mice challenged with a potential working dose of 10 LD50 of MERS-CoV were subsequently evaluated. In contrast to the overwhelming infection seen in the mice challenged with 105 LD50 of MERS-CoV, we were able to recover infectious virus from these mice only infrequently, although quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) tests indicated early and persistent lung infection and delayed occurrence of brain infection. Persistent inflammatory infiltrates were seen in the lungs and brain stems at day 2 and day 6 after infection, respectively. While focal infiltrates were also noted in the liver, definite pathology was not seen in other tissues. Finally, using a receptor binding domain protein vaccine and a MERS-CoV fusion inhibitor, we demonstrated the value of this model for evaluating vaccines and antivirals against MERS. As outcomes of MERS-CoV infection in patients differ greatly, ranging from asymptomatic to overwhelming disease and death, having available both an infection model and a lethal model makes this transgenic mouse model relevant for advancing MERS research. IMPORTANCE Fully characterized animal models are essential for studying pathogenesis and for preclinical screening of vaccines and drugs against MERS-CoV infection and disease. When given a high dose of MERS-CoV, our transgenic

  11. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas) during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies) in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals.

  12. Early Cytokine Response to Infection with Pathogenic vs Non-Pathogenic Organisms in a Mouse Model of Endodontic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aritsune; Stephens, Danielle; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Rittling, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Using the subcutaneous chamber model of infection, we showed previously that a mixture of four endodontic pathogens (EP: P. intermedia, F. nucleatum, S. intermedius and P. micra) are able to persist without clearance for up to seven days, while a non-pathogenic oral species, S. mitis, was substantially cleared in this time. Here we have compared the cytokine response inside the chambers against these microorganisms. A majority of cytokines tested (17/24) showed different patterns of expression. Several cytokines had a peak of expression at 2 h after infection in response to the EP, while none showed this pattern in S. mitis infections. Chemokines were uniformly present at similar or higher levels in response to S. mitis, with redundant expression of CXCR2 ligands, while several growth/survival factors were present at higher levels in EP infections. Protease activity expressed by EP may be responsible for the lower levels of some chemokines. T-cell associated cytokines were in general expressed at extremely low levels, and did not differ between the two infections. The inflammatory markers IL-6, IL-1α and IL1-β were expressed at similar levels in both infections at early times, while TNFα was preferentially present in S. mitis infections. In EP infected chambers, reciprocal changes in levels of IL-6 and IL-1α were observed at later times suggesting a switch in the inflammatory response. Analysis of the cytokine response to infection with the individual species from the EP mix suggests that P. intermedia drives this inflammatory switch. Together these results show a surprising level of divergence of the host response to pathogenic and non-pathogenic organisms associated with oral infections, and supports a dominant effect of P. intermedia in polymicrobial endodontic infections. PMID:26171605

  13. A novel mouse model of conditional IRAK-M deficiency in myeloid cells: application in lung Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Di; Matsuda, Jennifer; Berman, Reena; Schaefer, Niccolette; Stevenson, Connor; Gross, James; Zhang, Bicheng; Sanchez, Amelia; Li, Liwu; Chu, Hong Wei

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid cells such as macrophages are critical to innate defense against infection. IL-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a negative regulator of TLR signaling during bacterial infection, but the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M in bacterial infection is unclear. Our goal was to generate a novel conditional knockout mouse model to define the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M during bacterial infection. Myeloid cell-specific IRAK-M knockout mice were generated by crossing IRAK-M floxed mice with LysM-Cre knock-in mice. The resulting LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) and control (LysM-Cre(-)/IRAK-M(fl/wt)) mice were intranasally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). IRAK-M deletion, inflammation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and PA load were measured in leukocytes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lungs. PA killing assay with BAL fluid was performed to determine mechanisms of IRAK-M-mediated host defense. IRAK-M mRNA and protein levels in alveolar and lung macrophages were significantly reduced in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice compared with control mice. Following PA infection, LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice have enhanced lung neutrophilic inflammation, including MPO activity, but reduced PA load. The increased lung MPO activity in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mouse BAL fluid reduced PA load. Generation of IRAK-M conditional knockout mice will enable investigators to determine precisely the function of IRAK-M in myeloid cells and other types of cells during infection and inflammation.

  14. Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Pulmonary Delivery of Colistin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Mouse Lung Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Zhou, Qi Tony; Cheah, Soon-Ee; Zhao, Jinxin; Chen, Ke; Wang, Jiping; Chan, Hak-Kim; Li, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Colistin is often administered by inhalation and/or the parenteral route for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa However, limited pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data are available to guide the optimization of dosage regimens of inhaled colistin. In the present study, PK of colistin in epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and plasma was determined following intratracheal delivery of a single dose of colistin solution in neutropenic lung-infected mice. The antimicrobial efficacy of intratracheal delivery of colistin against three P. aeruginosa strains (ATCC 27853, PAO1, and FADDI-PA022; MIC of 1 mg/liter for all strains) was examined in a neutropenic mouse lung infection model. Dose fractionation studies were conducted over 2.64 to 23.8 mg/kg of body weight/day. The inhibitory sigmoid model was employed to determine the PK/PD index that best described the antimicrobial efficacy of pulmonary delivery of colistin. In both ELF and plasma, the ratio of the area under the unbound concentration-time profile to MIC (fAUC/MIC) was the PK/PD index that best described the antimicrobial effect in mouse lung infection (R(2) = 0.60 to 0.84 for ELF and 0.64 to 0.83 for plasma). The fAUC/MIC targets required to achieve stasis against the three strains were 684 to 1,050 in ELF and 2.15 to 3.29 in plasma. The histopathological data showed that pulmonary delivery of colistin reduced infection-caused pulmonary inflammation and preserved the integrity of the lung epithelium, although colistin introduced mild pulmonary inflammation in healthy mice. This study showed pulmonary delivery of colistin provides antimicrobial effects against MDR P. aeruginosa lung infections superior to those of parenteral administrations. For the first time, our results provide important preclinical PK/PD information for optimization of inhaled colistin therapy.

  15. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression.

  16. Development of humanized mouse models to study human malaria parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Ashley M; Kappe, Stefan H I; Ploss, Alexander; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A

    2012-05-01

    Malaria is a disease caused by infection with Plasmodium parasites that are transmitted by mosquito bite. Five different species of Plasmodium infect humans with severe disease, but human malaria is primarily caused by Plasmodium falciparum. The burden of malaria on the developing world is enormous, and a fully protective vaccine is still elusive. One of the biggest challenges in the quest for the development of new antimalarial drugs and vaccines is the lack of accessible animal models to study P. falciparum infection because the parasite is restricted to the great apes and human hosts. Here, we review the current state of research in this field and provide an outlook of the development of humanized small animal models to study P. falciparum infection that will accelerate fundamental research into human parasite biology and could accelerate drug and vaccine design in the future.

  17. Kinetics of Innate Immune Response to Yersinia pestis after Intradermal Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Clayton O.; Gardner, Donald; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of Yersinia pestis infection is a delayed inflammatory response early in infection. In this study, we use an intradermal model of infection to study early innate immune cell recruitment. Mice were injected intradermally in the ear with wild-type (WT) or attenuated Y. pestis lacking the pYV virulence plasmid (pYV−). The inflammatory responses in ear and draining lymph node samples were evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. As measured by flow cytometry, total neutrophil and macrophage recruitment to the ear in WT-infected mice did not differ from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls or mice infected with pYV−, except for a transient increase in macrophages at 6 h compared to the PBS control. Limited inflammation was apparent even in animals with high bacterial loads (105 to 106 CFU). In addition, activation of inflammatory cells was significantly reduced in WT-infected mice as measured by CD11b and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) expression. When mice infected with WT were injected 12 h later at the same intradermal site with purified LPS, Y. pestis did not prevent recruitment of neutrophils. However, significant reduction in neutrophil activation remained compared to that of PBS and pYV− controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed qualitative differences in neutrophil recruitment to the skin and draining lymph node, with WT-infected mice producing a diffuse inflammatory response. In contrast, focal sites of neutrophil recruitment were sustained through 48 h postinfection in pYV−-infected mice. Thus, an important feature of Y. pestis infection is reduced activation and organization of inflammatory cells that is at least partially dependent on the pYV virulence plasmid. PMID:22966041

  18. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S.; Fitzgerald, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection. PMID:26126533

  19. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection.

  20. An Intradermal Inoculation Mouse Model for Immunological Investigations of Acute Scrub Typhus and Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Xu, Guang; Goez-Rivillas, Yenny; Drom, Claire; Shelite, Thomas R.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H.; Bouyer, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a neglected tropical disease, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, a Gram-negative bacterium that is transmitted to mammalian hosts during feeding by Leptotrombidium mites and replicates predominantly within endothelial cells. Most studies of scrub typhus in animal models have utilized either intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation; however, there is limited information on infection by the natural route in murine model skin or its related early host responses. Here, we developed an intradermal (i.d.) inoculation model of scrub typhus and focused on the kinetics of the host responses in the blood and major infected organs. Following ear inoculation with 6 x 104 O. tsutsugamushi, mice developed fever at 11–12 days post-infection (dpi), followed by marked hypothermia and body weight loss at 14–19 dpi. Bacteria in blood and tissues and histopathological changes were detected around 9 dpi and peaked around 14 dpi. Serum cytokine analyses revealed a mixed Th1/Th2 response, with marked elevations of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and IL-10 at 9 dpi, followed by increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, G-CSF, RANTES/CCL5, KC/CCL11, IL-1α/β, IL-2, TNF-α, GM-CSF), as well as modulatory cytokines (IL-9, IL-13). Cytokine levels in lungs had similar elevation patterns, except for a marked reduction of IL-9. The Orientia 47-kDa gene and infectious bacteria were detected in several organs for up to 84 dpi, indicating persistent infection. This is the first comprehensive report of acute scrub typhus and persistent infection in i.d.-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. This is a significant improvement over current murine models for Orientia infection and will permit detailed studies of host immune responses and infection control interventions. PMID:27479584

  1. Cross-Reactive Protection against Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Infection by Enteropathogenic E. coli in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Calderon Toledo, Carla; Arvidsson, Ida; Karpman, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are related attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens. The genes responsible for the A/E pathology are carried on a chromosomal pathogenicity island termed the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Both pathogens share a high degree of homology in the LEE and additional O islands. EHEC prevalence is much lower in areas where EPEC is endemic. This may be due to the development of antibodies against common EPEC and EHEC antigens. This study investigated the hypothesis that EPEC infections may protect against EHEC infections. We used a mouse model to inoculate BALB/c mice intragastrically, first with EPEC and then with EHEC (E. coli O157:H7). Four control groups received either a nonpathogenic E. coli (NPEC) strain followed by EHEC (NPEC/EHEC), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) followed by EHEC (PBS/EHEC), EPEC/PBS, or PBS/PBS. Mice were monitored for weight loss and symptoms. EPEC colonized the intestine after challenge, and mice developed serum antibodies to intimin and E. coli secreted protein B (encoded in the LEE). Prechallenge with an EPEC strain had a protective effect after EHEC infection, as only a few mice developed mild symptoms, from which they recovered. These mice had an increase in body weight similar to that in control animals, and tissue morphology exhibited mild intestinal changes and normal renal histology. All mice that were not prechallenged with the EPEC strain developed mild to severe symptoms after EHEC infection, with weight loss as well as intestinal and renal histopathological changes. These data suggest that EPEC may protect against EHEC infection in this mouse model. PMID:21402761

  2. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models.

    PubMed

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Delarze, Eric; Ischer, Françoise; Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify Candida albicans transcription factors (TFs) involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens (FBs) quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney FB significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in Galleria mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25% of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects), a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching FB phenotypes were observed in 50% of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4% concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the "pool effect." After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adapt.

  3. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models

    PubMed Central

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Delarze, Eric; Ischer, Françoise; Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify Candida albicans transcription factors (TFs) involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens (FBs) quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney FB significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in Galleria mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25% of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects), a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching FB phenotypes were observed in 50% of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4% concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the “pool effect.” After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adapt PMID:25999923

  4. Antimicrobial effect of continuous lidocaine infusion in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced wound infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chiu, Kuan-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Continuous infusion of local anesthetics in surgical wounds has been shown to be an effective technique for postoperative analgesia. To investigate the potential antimicrobial effect of continuous local anesthetic infusion, we adapted a mouse model of surgical wound infection to examine effects on antibacterial response. Forty male BALB/c mice were randomized into 2 groups. An incision wound was made over the dorsal flank and instilled with Staphylococcus aureus. An osmotic pump was then implanted to deliver either 0.9% NaCl or 2% lidocaine continuously. Each wound was cultured postoperatively at 2 days, and the colony count of S. aureus was determined. Results showed that the number of colony-forming units of S. aureus measured in wounds treated with lidocaine displayed a nearly 10-fold reduction compared to the wounds in the saline group (P=0.009). The demonstrated antibacterial activity indicates that local anesthetic infusion may play a role in prophylaxis for surgical wound infections.

  5. Combined effects of social stress and liver fluke infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Avgustinovich, Damira F; Marenina, Mariya K; Zhanaeva, Svetlana Ya; Tenditnik, Mikhail V; Katokhin, Alexey V; Pavlov, Konstantin S; Sivkov, Anton Yu; Vishnivetskaya, Galina B; Lvova, Maria N; Tolstikova, Tatiana G; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of two influences, social stress and acute opisthorchiasis, were investigated in inbred C57BL/6J male mice. In the model of social stress, mice were repeatedly attacked and defeated by aggressive outbred ICR male mice and were in continuous sensory contact with an aggressive conspecific mouse in their home cage for 20 days. Acute opisthorchiasis was provoked by invasion of Opisthorchis felineus (50 larvae per animal) on the fourth day after the social stress was induced. Simultaneous action of both factors caused the hypertrophy of adrenal glands, as well as elevated the activity of cathepsins B and L in the spleen. This effect on the activity of the cysteine proteases in the hippocampus and hypothalamus following O. felineus invasion was the predominant result of simultaneous action with social stress. Acute opisthorchiasis, social stress, and their combination caused an increase in the level of blood IL-6 in approximately 30% of the animals. Social stress induced a more pronounced effect on mouse plus-maze behavior than O. felineus invasion. Our results suggest a more severe negative effect of the simultaneous influence of both factors on most of the parameters that were investigated.

  6. Defining New Therapeutics Using a More Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Amelia K.; Brien, James D.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Johnson, Syd; Chiang, Cindy; Hiscott, John; Sarathy, Vanessa V.; Barrett, Alan D.; Shresta, Sujan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT With over 3.5 billion people at risk and approximately 390 million human infections per year, dengue virus (DENV) disease strains health care resources worldwide. Previously, we and others established models for DENV pathogenesis in mice that completely lack subunits of the receptors (Ifnar and Ifngr) for type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling; however, the utility of these models is limited by the pleotropic effect of these cytokines on innate and adaptive immune system development and function. Here, we demonstrate that the specific deletion of Ifnar expression on subsets of murine myeloid cells (LysM Cre+ Ifnarflox/flox [denoted as Ifnarf/f herein]) resulted in enhanced DENV replication in vivo. The administration of subneutralizing amounts of cross-reactive anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies to LysM Cre+ Ifnarf/f mice prior to infection with DENV serotype 2 or 3 resulted in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection with many of the characteristics associated with severe DENV disease in humans, including plasma leakage, hypercytokinemia, liver injury, hemoconcentration, and thrombocytopenia. Notably, the pathogenesis of severe DENV-2 or DENV-3 infection in LysM Cre+ Ifnarf/f mice was blocked by pre- or postexposure administration of a bispecific dual-affinity retargeting molecule (DART) or an optimized RIG-I receptor agonist that stimulates innate immune responses. Our findings establish a more immunocompetent animal model of ADE of infection with multiple DENV serotypes in which disease is inhibited by treatment with broad-spectrum antibody derivatives or innate immune stimulatory agents. PMID:26374123

  7. Recapitulation of treatment response patterns in a novel humanized mouse model for chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Winer, Benjamin Y; Huang, Tiffany; Low, Benjamin E; Avery, Cindy; Pais, Mihai-Alexandru; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Siu, Evelyn; Chiriboga, Luis; Wiles, Michael V; Ploss, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    There are ~350 million chronic carriers of hepatitis B (HBV). While a prophylactic vaccine and drug regimens to suppress viremia are available, chronic HBV infection is rarely cured. HBV's limited host tropism leads to a scarcity of susceptible small animal models and is a hurdle to developing curative therapies. Mice that support engraftment with human hepatoctyes have traditionally been generated through crosses of murine liver injury models to immunodeficient backgrounds. Here, we describe the disruption of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase directly in the NOD Rag1(-/-) IL2RγNULL (NRG) background using zinc finger nucleases. The resultant human liver chimeric mice sustain persistent HBV viremia for >90 days. When treated with standard of care therapy, HBV DNA levels decrease below detection but rebound when drug suppression is released, mimicking treatment response observed in patients. Our study highlights the utility of directed gene targeting approaches in zygotes to create new humanized mouse models for human diseases.

  8. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  9. Effect of fat content on infection by Listeria monocytogenes in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mytle, N; Anderson, G L; Lambert, S; Doyle, M P; Smith, M A

    2006-03-01

    An estimated 2,500 cases of listeriosis occur annually in the United States. Listeriosis is particularly severe among pregnant women and immunocompromised individuals. Little is known regarding the effect of the food matrix on the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and cause systemic infection. Mice were inoculated with various doses of L. monocytogenes in skim milk, Half & Half, or whipping cream to determine whether differences in milk fat content influence the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive passage through the gut and infect the liver or spleen. The number of fecal samples positive for L. monocytogenes increased with increasing doses of L. monocytogenes for all three vehicles. The number of L. monocytogenes cells isolated from liver or spleen of mice dosed with L. monocytogenes was not significantly different among treatment vehicles. Dose-response models revealed that as the dosage of L. monocytogenes was increased in different milk vehicles, the number of L. monocytogenes cells in liver or spleen also increased. Although fat content of food had no dose-dependent effect on L. monocytogenes infection in the murine gastrointestinal tract, we cannot discount the possibility that it may be a factor in L. monocytogenes infections of humans because of differences in the physiology of gastrointestinal tracts of mice and humans.

  10. Burn Injury Leads to Increased Long-Term Susceptibility to Respiratory Infection in both Mouse Models and Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fear, Vanessa S.; Boyd, James H.; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Burn injury initiates an acute inflammatory response that subsequently drives wound repair. However, acute disruption to the immune response is also common, leading to susceptibility to sepsis and increased morbidity and mortality. Despite increased understanding of the impact of burn injury on the immune system in the acute phase, little is known about long-term consequences of burn injury on immune function. This study was established to determine whether burn injury has long-term clinical impacts on patients’ immune responses. Methods Using a population-based retrospective longitudinal study and linked hospital morbidity and death data from Western Australia, comparative rates of hospitalisation for respiratory infections in burn patients and a non-injured comparator cohort were assessed. In addition, a mouse model of non-severe burn injury was also used in which viral respiratory infection was induced at 4 weeks post-injury using a mouse modified version of the Influenza A virus (H3NN; A/mem/71-a). Results and conclusions The burn injured cohort contained 14893 adult patients from 1980–2012 after removal of those patients with evidence of smoke inhalation or injury to the respiratory tract. During the study follow-up study a total of 2,884 and 2,625 respiratory infection hospital admissions for the burn and uninjured cohorts, respectively, were identified. After adjusting for covariates, the burn cohort experienced significantly elevated admission rates for influenza and viral pneumonia (IRR, 95%CI: 1.73, 1.27–2.36), bacterial pneumonia (IRR, 95%CI: 2.05, 1.85–2.27) and for other types of upper and lower respiratory infections (IRR, 95% CI: 2.38, 2.09–2.71). In the mouse study an increased viral titre was observed after burn injury, accompanied by a reduced CD8 response and increased NK and NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes. This data suggests burn patients are at long-term increased risk of infection due to sustained modulation of the

  11. Trypanosoma vivax Infections: Pushing Ahead with Mouse Models for the Study of Nagana. I. Parasitological, Hematological and Pathological Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chamond, Nathalie; Cosson, Alain; Blom-Potar, Marie Christine; Jouvion, Grégory; D'Archivio, Simon; Medina, Mathieu; Droin-Bergère, Sabrina; Huerre, Michel; Goyard, Sophie; Minoprio, Paola

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a severe parasitic disease that affects both humans and livestock. Several different species may cause animal trypanosomosis and although Trypanosoma vivax (sub-genus Duttonella) is currently responsible for the vast majority of debilitating cases causing great economic hardship in West Africa and South America, little is known about its biology and interaction with its hosts. Relatively speaking, T. vivax has been more than neglected despite an urgent need to develop efficient control strategies. Some pioneering rodent models were developed to circumvent the difficulties of working with livestock, but disappointedly were for the most part discontinued decades ago. To gain more insight into the biology of T. vivax, its interactions with the host and consequently its pathogenesis, we have developed a number of reproducible murine models using a parasite isolate that is infectious for rodents. Firstly, we analyzed the parasitical characteristics of the infection using inbred and outbred mouse strains to compare the impact of host genetic background on the infection and on survival rates. Hematological studies showed that the infection gave rise to severe anemia, and histopathological investigations in various organs showed multifocal inflammatory infiltrates associated with extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver, and cerebral edema. The models developed are consistent with field observations and pave the way for subsequent in-depth studies into the pathogenesis of T. vivax - trypanosomosis. PMID:20706595

  12. In vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Burkholderia mallei Respiratory Infection and Treatment in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Shane; Johnston, Katie; Mott, Tiffany M.; Judy, Barbara M.; Kvitko, Brian H.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Estes, D. Mark; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) technology is a powerful tool for monitoring infectious disease progression and treatment approaches. BLI is particularly useful for tracking fastidious intracellular pathogens that might be difficult to recover from certain organs. Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders, is a facultative intracellular pathogen and has been classified by the CDC as a Category B select agent due to its highly infectious nature and potential use as a biological weapon. Very little is known regarding pathogenesis or treatment of glanders. We investigated the use of bioluminescent reporter constructs to monitor the dynamics of infection as well as the efficacy of therapeutics for B. mallei in real-time. A stable luminescent reporter B. mallei strain was created using the pUTmini-Tn5::luxKm2 plasmid and used to monitor glanders in the BALB/c murine model. Mice were infected via the intranasal route with 5 × 103 bacteria and monitored by BLI at 24, 48, and 72 h. We verified that our reporter construct maintained similar virulence and growth kinetics compared to wild-type B. mallei and confirmed that it maintains luminescent stability in the presence or absence of antibiotic selection. The luminescent signal was initially seen in the lungs, and progressed to the liver and spleen over the course of infection. We demonstrated that antibiotic treatment 24 h post-infection resulted in reduction of bioluminescence that can be attributed to decreased bacterial burden in target organs. These findings suggest that BLI can be used to monitor disease progression and efficacy of therapeutics during glanders infections. Finally, we report an alternative method to mini-Tn5::luxKm2 transposon using mini-Tn7-lux elements that insert site-specifically at known genomic attachment sites and that can also be used to tag bacteria. PMID:21904535

  13. Diverse Secreted Effectors Are Required for Salmonella Persistence in a Mouse Infection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kidwai, Afshan S.; Mushamiri, Ivy T.; Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-08-12

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes typhoid-like disease in mice and is a model of typhoid fever in humans. One of the hallmarks of typhoid is persistence, the ability of the bacteria to survive in the host weeks after infection. Virulence factors called effectors facilitate this process by direct transfer to the cytoplasm of infected cells thereby subverting cellular processes. Secretion of effectors to the cell cytoplasm takes place through multiple routes, including two separate type III secretion (T3SS) apparati as well as outer membrane vesicles. The two T3SS are encoded on separate pathogenicity islands, SPI-1 and -2, with SPI-1 more strongly associated with the intestinal phase of infection, and SPI-2 with the systemic phase. Both T3SS are required for persistence, but the effectors required have not been systematically evaluated. In this study, mutations in 48 described effectors were tested for persistence. We replaced each effector with a specific DNA barcode sequence by allelic exchange and co-infected with a wild-type reference to calculate the ratio of wild-type parent to mutant at different times after infection. The competitive index (CI) was determined by quantitative PCR in which primers that correspond to the barcode were used for amplification. Mutations in all but seven effectors reduced persistence demonstrating that most effectors were required. One exception was CigR, a recently discovered effector that is widely conserved throughout enteric bacteria. Deletion of cigR increased lethality, suggesting that it may be an anti-virulence factor. The fact that almost all Salmonella effectors are required for persistence argues against redundant functions. This is different from effector repertoires in other intracellular pathogens such as Legionella.

  14. Mouse model of congenital infection with a non-virulent Toxoplasma gondii strain: Vertical transmission, "sterile" fetal damage, or both?

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villavicencio, J A; Cedillo-Peláez, C; Rico-Torres, C P; Besné-Mérida, A; García-Vázquez, F; Saldaña, J I; Correa, D

    2016-07-01

    Congenital transmission of Toxoplasma gondii may occur if the mother gets infected for the first time while pregnant. The risk of mother-to-child transmission depends on the gestation trimester at infection, being lowest in the first and highest in the last. Conversely, fetal damage is frequent and more severe at the beginning of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to evaluate congenital transmission and pathological aspects in the placenta and the fetus using a mouse model of congenital infection of the second gestation third. Forty-five female BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 2.5-10.0 × 10(6) tachyzoites of the ME49 strain at middle gestation. Samples of maternal spleen and fetal/placental units were taken 72 h later. We determined parasite load and vertical transmission by qPCR, as well as damage macroscopically and by histopathology. With the lowest dose, 18% of the fetuses were infected. Also, 40% of fetuses/litter were altered, while this value was 10% in the control group (P < 0.05). These results are similar to those described in humans in terms of vertical transmission and fetal damage during the second third of gestation. The maternal spleen had 10-1000 times more tachyzoites than the placenta, and the later retained 90-99% of the parasites that could reach the fetus. Nevertheless, we found resorptions, abortions or fetal tissue damage in the presence but also in the absence of parasites. Our data indicate a strong protective effect of maternal organs and the placenta against fetal infection, but extensive damage of the later may led to resorption or abortion without vertical transmission.

  15. Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin: evaluation as a protective antigen and colonization factor in a mouse respiratory infection model.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, A; Mountzouros, K T; Relman, D A; Falkow, S; Cowell, J L

    1990-01-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a cell surface protein of Bordetella pertussis which functions as an adhesin for this organism. It is a component of many new acellular pertussis vaccines. The proposed role of FHA in immunity to pertussis is based on animal studies which have produced some conflicting results. To clarify this situation, we reexamined the protective activity of FHA in an adult mouse respiratory infection model. Four-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with one or two doses of 4 or 8 micrograms of FHA and then aerosol challenged with B. pertussis Tohama I. In control mice receiving tetanus toxoid, the CFU in the lungs increased from 10(5) immediately following infection to greater than 10(6) by days 5 and 9 after challenge. Mice immunized with FHA by the intraperitoneal or intramuscular route had significantly reduced bacterial colonization in the lungs. A decrease in colonization of the trachea was also observed in FHA-immunized mice. Evaluation of antibody responses in these mice revealed high titers of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM to FHA in sera and of IgG to FHA in lung lavage fluids. No IgA to FHA was detected. BALB/c mice were also passively immunized intravenously with either goat or rat antibodies to FHA and then aerosol challenged 24 h later, when anti-FHA antibodies were detected in the respiratory tract. Lung and tracheal colonization was markedly reduced in mice immunized with FHA-specific antibodies compared with those receiving control antibodies. In additional studies, the role of FHA in the colonization of the mouse respiratory tract was evaluated by using strain BP101, an FHA mutant of B. pertussis. FHA was important in the initial colonization of the mouse trachea, but was not required for colonization of the trachea later in the infection. FHA was not a factor in colonization of the lungs. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate (i) that systemic immunization with FHA can provide significant protection against B. pertussis

  16. Prostatic Inflammation Induces Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Chronic Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R.; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show–for the first time–that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  17. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    PubMed

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010), one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (<1.0 endotoxin unit/106 cells) compared to wild type cells. Immunization with formalin inactivated IB010 produced a robust antibody response consisting of both IgG1 and IgG2c subtypes. Mice immunized with IB010 had significantly lower post-infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  18. Virulence Studies of Different Sequence Types and Geographical Origins of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Jean-Philippe; Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Segura, Mariela; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing previously identified three predominant sequence types (STs) of Streptococcus suis serotype 2: ST1 strains predominate in Eurasia while North American (NA) strains are generally ST25 and ST28. However, ST25/ST28 and ST1 strains have also been isolated in Asia and NA, respectively. Using a well-standardized mouse model of infection, the virulence of strains belonging to different STs and different geographical origins was evaluated. Results demonstrated that although a certain tendency may be observed, S. suis serotype 2 virulence is difficult to predict based on ST and geographical origin alone; strains belonging to the same ST presented important differences of virulence and did not always correlate with origin. The only exception appears to be NA ST28 strains, which were generally less virulent in both systemic and central nervous system (CNS) infection models. Persistent and high levels of bacteremia accompanied by elevated CNS inflammation are required to cause meningitis. Although widely used, in vitro tests such as phagocytosis and killing assays require further standardization in order to be used as predictive tests for evaluating virulence of strains. The use of strains other than archetypal strains has increased our knowledge and understanding of the S. suis serotype 2 population dynamics. PMID:27409640

  19. Yersinia enterocolitica Targets Cells of the Innate and Adaptive Immune System by Injection of Yops in a Mouse Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Köberle, Martin; Klein-Günther, Annegret; Schütz, Monika; Fritz, Michaela; Berchtold, Susanne; Tolosa, Eva; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Bohn, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye) evades the immune system of the host by injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) via a type three secretion system into host cells. In this study, a reporter system comprising a YopE-β-lactamase hybrid protein and a fluorescent staining sensitive to β-lactamase cleavage was used to track Yop injection in cell culture and in an experimental Ye mouse infection model. Experiments with GD25, GD25-β1A, and HeLa cells demonstrated that β1-integrins and RhoGTPases play a role for Yop injection. As demonstrated by infection of splenocyte suspensions in vitro, injection of Yops appears to occur randomly into all types of leukocytes. In contrast, upon infection of mice, Yop injection was detected in 13% of F4/80+, 11% of CD11c+, 7% of CD49b+, 5% of Gr1+ cells, 2.3% of CD19+, and 2.6% of CD3+ cells. Taking the different abundance of these cell types in the spleen into account, the highest total number of Yop-injected cells represents B cells, particularly CD19+CD21+CD23+ follicular B cells, followed by neutrophils, dendritic cells, and macrophages, suggesting a distinct cellular tropism of Ye. Yop-injected B cells displayed a significantly increased expression of CD69 compared to non-Yop-injected B cells, indicating activation of these cells by Ye. Infection of IFN-γR (receptor)- and TNFRp55-deficient mice resulted in increased numbers of Yop-injected spleen cells for yet unknown reasons. The YopE-β-lactamase hybrid protein reporter system provides new insights into the modulation of host cell and immune responses by Ye Yops. PMID:19680448

  20. A Non Mouse-Adapted Dengue Virus Strain as a New Model of Severe Dengue Infection in AG129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Grace K.; Ng, Jowin K. W.; Trasti, Scott L.; Schul, Wouter; Yip, George; Alonso, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The spread of dengue (DEN) worldwide combined with an increased severity of the DEN-associated clinical outcomes have made this mosquito-borne virus of great global public health importance. Progress in understanding DEN pathogenesis and in developing effective treatments has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Most of the DEN clinical isolates and cell culture-passaged DEN virus strains reported so far require either host adaptation, inoculation with a high dose and/or intravenous administration to elicit a virulent phenotype in mice which results, at best, in a productive infection with no, few, or irrelevant disease manifestations, and with mice dying within few days at the peak of viremia. Here we describe a non-mouse-adapted DEN2 virus strain (D2Y98P) that is highly infectious in AG129 mice (lacking interferon-α/β and -γ receptors) upon intraperitoneal administration. Infection with a high dose of D2Y98P induced cytokine storm, massive organ damage, and severe vascular leakage, leading to haemorrhage and rapid death of the animals at the peak of viremia. In contrast, very interestingly and uniquely, infection with a low dose of D2Y98P led to asymptomatic viral dissemination and replication in relevant organs, followed by non-paralytic death of the animals few days after virus clearance, similar to the disease kinetic in humans. Spleen damage, liver dysfunction and increased vascular permeability, but no haemorrhage, were observed in moribund animals, suggesting intact vascular integrity, a cardinal feature in DEN shock syndrome. Infection with D2Y98P thus offers the opportunity to further decipher some of the aspects of dengue pathogenesis and provides a new platform for drug and vaccine testing. PMID:20436920

  1. A non mouse-adapted dengue virus strain as a new model of severe dengue infection in AG129 mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace K; Ng, Jowin K W; Trasti, Scott L; Schul, Wouter; Yip, George; Alonso, Sylvie

    2010-04-27

    The spread of dengue (DEN) worldwide combined with an increased severity of the DEN-associated clinical outcomes have made this mosquito-borne virus of great global public health importance. Progress in understanding DEN pathogenesis and in developing effective treatments has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Most of the DEN clinical isolates and cell culture-passaged DEN virus strains reported so far require either host adaptation, inoculation with a high dose and/or intravenous administration to elicit a virulent phenotype in mice which results, at best, in a productive infection with no, few, or irrelevant disease manifestations, and with mice dying within few days at the peak of viremia. Here we describe a non-mouse-adapted DEN2 virus strain (D2Y98P) that is highly infectious in AG129 mice (lacking interferon-alpha/beta and -gamma receptors) upon intraperitoneal administration. Infection with a high dose of D2Y98P induced cytokine storm, massive organ damage, and severe vascular leakage, leading to haemorrhage and rapid death of the animals at the peak of viremia. In contrast, very interestingly and uniquely, infection with a low dose of D2Y98P led to asymptomatic viral dissemination and replication in relevant organs, followed by non-paralytic death of the animals few days after virus clearance, similar to the disease kinetic in humans. Spleen damage, liver dysfunction and increased vascular permeability, but no haemorrhage, were observed in moribund animals, suggesting intact vascular integrity, a cardinal feature in DEN shock syndrome. Infection with D2Y98P thus offers the opportunity to further decipher some of the aspects of dengue pathogenesis and provides a new platform for drug and vaccine testing.

  2. Histopathological features and distribution of EV71 antigens and SCARB2 in human fatal cases and a mouse model of enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pin; Gao, Zifen; Zong, Yuanyuan; Bao, Linlin; Xu, Lili; Deng, Wei; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gao, Zhancheng; Xu, Yanfeng; Yao, Yanfeng; Qin, Chuan

    2014-08-30

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic pathogen that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease. While infection is usually self-limiting, a minority of patients infected with EV71 develop severe neurological complications. In humans, EV71 has been reported to utilize the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2) as a receptor for infectious cellular entry. In this study, we define the pathological features of EV71-associated disease as well as the distribution of EV71 antigen and SCARB2 in human fatal cases and a mouse model. Histopathologically, human fatal cases showed severe central nervous system (CNS) changes, mainly in the brainstems, spinal cords, and thalamus. These patient further exhibited pulmonary edema and necrotic enteritis. Immunohistochemical analysis of human fatal cases demonstrated that EV71 antigen and SCARB2 were observed mainly in neurons, microglia cells and inflammatory cells in the CNS, and epithelial cells in the intestines. However, skeletal muscle tissue was negative for EV71 antigen. In a mouse model of EV71 infection, we observed massive necrotic myositis, different degrees of viral diseases in CNS, and extensive interstitial pneumonia. In mice, EV71 exhibits strong myotropism compared to the neurotropism seen in humans. EV71 antigen was detected in the spinal cord and brainstem of mice. However, there was no clear correlation between mouse SCARB2 and EV71 antigen distribution in the mouse model, consistent with previous results that SCARB2 functions as a receptor for EV71 in humans but not mice. The EV71-induced lesions seen in the mouse model resembled the pathological changes seen in human samples. These results increase our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis and will inform further work developing a mouse model for EV71 infection.

  3. Pre- and postexposure efficacy of fully human antibodies against Spike protein in a novel humanized mouse model of MERS-CoV infection

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Kristen E.; Coleman, Christopher M.; Mujica, Alejandro O.; Kamat, Vishal; Badithe, Ashok; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Hunt, Charleen; Strein, John; Berrebi, Alexander; Sisk, Jeanne M.; Matthews, Krystal L.; Babb, Robert; Chen, Gang; Lai, Ka-Man V.; Huang, Tammy T.; Olson, William; Yancopoulos, George D.; Stahl, Neil; Frieman, Matthew B.; Kyratsous, Christos A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches to antimicrobial drug development are poorly suited to combatting the emergence of novel pathogens. Additionally, the lack of small animal models for these infections hinders the in vivo testing of potential therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the use of the VelocImmune technology (a mouse that expresses human antibody-variable heavy chains and κ light chains) alongside the VelociGene technology (which allows for rapid engineering of the mouse genome) to quickly develop and evaluate antibodies against an emerging viral disease. Specifically, we show the rapid generation of fully human neutralizing antibodies against the recently emerged Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and development of a humanized mouse model for MERS-CoV infection, which was used to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of the isolated antibodies. The VelocImmune and VelociGene technologies are powerful platforms that can be used to rapidly respond to emerging epidemics. PMID:26124093

  4. Pre- and postexposure efficacy of fully human antibodies against Spike protein in a novel humanized mouse model of MERS-CoV infection.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Kristen E; Coleman, Christopher M; Mujica, Alejandro O; Kamat, Vishal; Badithe, Ashok; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Hunt, Charleen; Strein, John; Berrebi, Alexander; Sisk, Jeanne M; Matthews, Krystal L; Babb, Robert; Chen, Gang; Lai, Ka-Man V; Huang, Tammy T; Olson, William; Yancopoulos, George D; Stahl, Neil; Frieman, Matthew B; Kyratsous, Christos A

    2015-07-14

    Traditional approaches to antimicrobial drug development are poorly suited to combatting the emergence of novel pathogens. Additionally, the lack of small animal models for these infections hinders the in vivo testing of potential therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the use of the VelocImmune technology (a mouse that expresses human antibody-variable heavy chains and κ light chains) alongside the VelociGene technology (which allows for rapid engineering of the mouse genome) to quickly develop and evaluate antibodies against an emerging viral disease. Specifically, we show the rapid generation of fully human neutralizing antibodies against the recently emerged Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and development of a humanized mouse model for MERS-CoV infection, which was used to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of the isolated antibodies. The VelocImmune and VelociGene technologies are powerful platforms that can be used to rapidly respond to emerging epidemics.

  5. Evaluation of Mouse Wound Models for Probiotics-Based Wound Infection Prevention Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    isofluorane and the hair from the dorsal side of the mouse was shaved with a clipper and completely removed using a depilatory cream for 3 minutes. The...completely removed using a depilatory cream for 3 minutes. The mice were placed in individual cages and allowed to acclimate overnight. On the day of

  6. Recombinant Phage Elicits Protective Immune Response against Systemic S. globosa Infection in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Jiang, Rihua; Wang, Yicun; Zhu, Mingji; Zhang, Xu; Dong, Shuai; Shi, Hongxi; Wang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Sporothrix globosa is a type of fungus that typically infects immunocompromised patients. Its prevention continues to pose a challenge. A 70-KDa glycoprotein (Gp70) of Sporothrix has been previously reported to protect host against infection from this fungus. Here, we displayed an epitope peptide (kpvqhalltplgldr) of Gp70 on the major coat protein (pIII), and investigated its efficiency as a vaccine for preventing S. globosa infection. The recombinant phage and the heat-killed S. globosa were used to immunize mice separately. In this study, we evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in the mice and demonstrated that recombinant phage could induce mice to produce a stronger immune response and generate antibodies to inhibit S. globosa infection. Furthermore, immunization with recombinant phage could increase the survival rate of S. globosa infection in mice. All these results together indicated that recombinant phages displaying kpvqhalltplgldr are a potential vaccine candidate against S. globosa infection. PMID:28165018

  7. Different Therapeutic Outcomes of Benznidazole and VNI Treatments in Different Genders in Mouse Experimental Models of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guedes-da-Silva, F. H.; Batista, D. G. J.; da Silva, C. F.; Meuser, M. B.; Simões-Silva, M. R.; de Araújo, J. S.; Ferreira, C. G.; Moreira, O. C.; Britto, C.; Lepesheva, G. I.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of translation between preclinical assays and clinical trials for novel therapies for Chagas disease (CD) indicates a need for more feasible and standardized protocols and experimental models. Here, we investigated the effects of treatment with benznidazole (Bz) and with the potent experimental T. cruzi CYP51 inhibitor VNI in mouse models of Chagas disease by using different animal genders and parasite strains and employing distinct types of therapeutic schemes. Our findings confirm that female mice are less vulnerable to the infection than males, show that male models are less susceptible to treatment with both Bz and VNI, and thus suggest that male models are much more suitable for selection of the most promising antichagasic agents. Additionally, we have found that preventive protocols (compound given at 1 dpi) result in higher treatment success rates, which also should be avoided during advanced steps of in vivo trials of novel anti-T. cruzi drug candidates. Another consideration is the relevance of immunosuppression methods in order to verify the therapeutic profile of novel compounds, besides the usefulness of molecular diagnostic tools (quantitative PCR) to ascertain compound efficacy in experimental animals. Our study aims to contribute to the development of more reliable methods and decision gates for in vivo assays of novel antiparasitic compounds in order to move them from preclinical to clinical trials for CD. PMID:26416857

  8. Modulation of inflammatory bowel disease in a mouse model following infection with Trichinella spiralis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of mice with Trichinella spiralis redirects the mucosal immune system from a Th1 to a protective Th2 response with a reduction in the severity of trinitrobenzesulfonic acid-induced colonic damage. T. spiralis infection induced IL-10 production in a dose-dependent manner in oxazolone (OXZ)-...

  9. Curcumin inhibits gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Santos, António M; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S

    2015-01-06

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  10. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, António M.; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available. PMID:25569625

  11. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rodrigo I.; Hermance, Meghan E.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27529273

  12. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rodrigo I; Hermance, Meghan E; Gelman, Benjamin B; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-08-12

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice.

  13. Phenotypic diversity and selection maintain Leishmania amazonensis infectivity in BALB/c mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Espiau, Benoît; Vilhena, Virginia; Cuvillier, Armelle; Barral, Aldina; Merlin, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Leishmania are protozoan parasites that show remarkable diversity, as revealed by the various clinical forms of leishmaniasis, which can range from mild skin lesions to severe metastatic cutaneous/mucosal lesions. The exact nature and extent of Leishmania phenotypic diversity in establishing infection is not fully understood. In order to try to understand some aspects of this diversity, we subcutaneously infected BALB/c mice with first and second generation subclones of a L. amazonensis strain isolated from a patient (BA125) and examined in vivo lesion growth rate and antimony susceptibility. In vivo fast-, medium- and slow-growing subclones were obtained; moreover, fast-growing subclones could generate slow-growing subclones and inversely, revealing the continuous generation of diversity after passage into mice. No antimony-resistant subclone appeared, probably a rare occurrence. By tagging subclone cells with a L. amazonensis genomic cosmid library, we found that only a very small number of founding cells could produce lesions. Leishmania clones transfected with in vivo selected individual cosmids were also diverse in terms of lesion growth rate, revealing the cosmid-independent intrinsic characteristics of each clone. Our results suggest that only a few of the infecting parasites are able to grow and produce lesions; later, within the cell mixture of each lesion, there coexist several parasite populations with different potentialities to grow lesions during the next infection round. This may reflect a sort of programmed heterogeneity of individual parasites, favoring the survival of some individuals in various environmental conditions. PMID:28076468

  14. Toxoplasma gondii infection induces suppression in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, Ignacio M; Chiurazzi, Romina; Sánchez, Vanesa R; Argenziano, Mariana A; Soto, Ariadna; Picchio, Mariano S; Martin, Valentina; Goldman, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma is an inflammatory disorder characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with inflammatory cells driven mostly by activation of Th2-lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in Western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. We previously showed that both acute and chronic parasite T. gondii infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Based on the high levels of IFN-γ along with the reduction of Th2 phenotype, we hypothesized that the protective effect might be related to the strong Th1 immune response elicited against the parasite. However, other mechanisms could also be implicated. The possibility that regulatory T cells inhibit allergic diseases has received growing support from both animal and human studies. Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in T. gondii induced protection against allergy. Our results show for the first time that thoracic lymph node cells from mice sensitized during chronic T. gondii infection have suppressor activity. Suppression was detected both in vitro, on allergen specific T cell proliferation and in vivo, on allergic lung inflammation after adoptive transference from infected/sensitized mice to previously sensitized animals. This ability was found to be contact-independent and correlated with high levels of TGF-β and CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells.

  15. Toxoplasma gondii Infection Induces Suppression in a Mouse Model of Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fenoy, Ignacio M.; Chiurazzi, Romina; Sánchez, Vanesa R.; Argenziano, Mariana A.; Soto, Ariadna; Picchio, Mariano S.; Martin, Valentina; Goldman, Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma is an inflammatory disorder characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with inflammatory cells driven mostly by activation of Th2-lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in Western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. We previously showed that both acute and chronic parasite T. gondii infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Based on the high levels of IFN-γ along with the reduction of Th2 phenotype, we hypothesized that the protective effect might be related to the strong Th1 immune response elicited against the parasite. However, other mechanisms could also be implicated. The possibility that regulatory T cells inhibit allergic diseases has received growing support from both animal and human studies. Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in T. gondii induced protection against allergy. Our results show for the first time that thoracic lymph node cells from mice sensitized during chronic T. gondii infection have suppressor activity. Suppression was detected both in vitro, on allergen specific T cell proliferation and in vivo, on allergic lung inflammation after adoptive transference from infected/sensitized mice to previously sensitized animals. This ability was found to be contact- independent and correlated with high levels of TGF-β and CD4+FoxP3+ cells. PMID:22952678

  16. Mouse models for graft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lingfeng; Yu, Luyang; Min, Wang

    2013-05-14

    Graft arteriosclerois (GA), also called allograft vasculopathy, is a pathologic lesion that develops over months to years in transplanted organs characterized by diffuse, circumferential stenosis of the entire graft vascular tree. The most critical component of GA pathogenesis is the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells within the intima. When a human coronary artery segment is interposed into the infra-renal aortae of immunodeficient mice, the intimas could be expand in response to adoptively transferred human T cells allogeneic to the artery donor or exogenous human IFN-γ in the absence of human T cells. Interposition of a mouse aorta from one strain into another mouse strain recipient is limited as a model for chronic rejection in humans because the acute cell-mediated rejection response in this mouse model completely eliminates all donor-derived vascular cells from the graft within two-three weeks. We have recently developed two new mouse models to circumvent these problems. The first model involves interposition of a vessel segment from a male mouse into a female recipient of the same inbred strain (C57BL/6J). Graft rejection in this case is directed only against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded by the Y chromosome (present in the male but not the female) and the rejection response that ensues is sufficiently indolent to preserve donor-derived smooth muscle cells for several weeks. The second model involves interposing an artery segment from a wild type C57BL/6J mouse donor into a host mouse of the same strain and gender that lacks the receptor for IFN-γ followed by administration of mouse IFN-γ (delivered via infection of the mouse liver with an adenoviral vector. There is no rejection in this case as both donor and recipient mice are of the same strain and gender but donor smooth muscle cells proliferate in response to the cytokine while host-derived cells, lacking receptor for this cytokine, are unresponsive. By backcrossing additional

  17. Streptococcus suis small RNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating capsule synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation in a mouse infection model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Genhui; Tang, Huanyu; Zhang, Shouming; Ren, Haiyan; Dai, Jiao; Lai, Liying; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun; Fan, Hongjie; Wu, Zongfu

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen for pigs, and it is also considered as a zoonotic agent for humans. Meningitis is one of the most common features of the infection caused by SS, but little is known about the mechanisms of SS meningitis. Recent studies have revealed that small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of the virulence in several bacteria. In the previous study, we reported that SS sRNA rss04 was up-regulated in pig cerebrospinal fluid and contributes to SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Here, we show that rss04 facilitates SS invasion of mouse brain and lung in vivo. Label-free quantitation mass spectrometry analysis revealed that rss04 regulates transcriptional regulator CcpA and several virulence factors including LuxS. Transmission electron microscope and Dot-blot analyses indicated that rss04 represses capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production, which in turn facilitates SS adherence and invasion of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells bEnd.3 in vitro and activates the mRNA expression of TLR2, CCL2, IL-6 and TNF-α in mouse brain in vivo at 12h post-infection. In addition, rss04 positively regulates SS biofilm formation. Survival analysis of infected mice showed that biofilm state in brain contributes to SS virulence by intracranial subarachnoidal route of infection. Together, our data reveal that SS sRNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating the CPS synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation, thereby increasing the virulence in a mouse infection model. To our knowledge, rss04 represents the first bacterial sRNA that plays definitive roles in bacterial meningitis.

  18. Protective Effect of Vaginal Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289 against Urogenital Infection Produced by Staphylococcus aureus in a Mouse Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Zárate, Gabriela; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macias, María Elena

    2007-01-01

    Urogenital infections of bacterial origin have a high incidence among the world female population at reproductive age. Lactobacilli, the predominant microorganisms of the healthy vaginal microbiota, have shown a protective effect against the colonization and overgrowth of urogenital pathogens that increased the interest for including them into probiotics products assigned to restore the urogenital balance. In the present work, we determined in a mouse animal model the capability of Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289, a human vaginal strain with probiotic properties, to prevent the vaginal colonization of a uropathogenic strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Six-week-old female BALB/c mice, synchronized in their estral cycle, were intravaginally inoculated with two doses of 109 lactobacilli before challenging them with a single dose of 105 or 107 CFU of S. aureus. The vaginal colonization of both microorganisms and the effect on the vaginal structure were determined at 2, 5, and 7 days after pathogen inoculation. Control mice and those challenged only with the pathogen showed an insignificant lactobacilli population, whereas 105 lactobacilli/mL of vaginal homogenate were recovered at 2 days after challenge from the L. paracasei CRL 1289 and the probiotic + pathogen groups, decreasing this number on the following days. The treatment with L. paracasei CRL 1289 decreased significantly the number of staphylococci recovered at 2 and 5 days when mice were challenged only with 105 CFU of pathogen. The inoculation of S. aureus produced a remarkable inflammatory response and structural alterations in the vaginal mucosa that decreases in a significant manner when the mice were protected with L. paracasei CRL 1289. The results obtained suggest that this particular Lactobacillus strain could prevent the onset of urogenital infections by interfering with the epithelial colonization by uropathogenic S. aureus. PMID:17485818

  19. Identification of Novel Rosavirus Species That Infects Diverse Rodent Species and Causes Multisystemic Dissemination in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Chan, Brandon C. C.; Lam, Carol S. F.; Yip, Cyril C. Y.; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-01

    While novel picornaviruses are being discovered in rodents, their host range and pathogenicity are largely unknown. We identified two novel picornaviruses, rosavirus B from the street rat, Norway rat, and rosavirus C from five different wild rat species (chestnut spiny rat, greater bandicoot rat, Indochinese forest rat, roof rat and Coxing's white-bellied rat) in China. Analysis of 13 complete genome sequences showed that “Rosavirus B” and “Rosavirus C” represent two potentially novel picornavirus species infecting different rodents. Though being most closely related to rosavirus A, rosavirus B and C possessed distinct protease cleavage sites and variations in Yn-Xm-AUG sequence in 5’UTR and myristylation site in VP4. Anti-rosavirus B VP1 antibodies were detected in Norway rats, whereas anti-rosavirus C VP1 and neutralizing antibodies were detected in Indochinese forest rats and Coxing's white-bellied rats. While the highest prevalence was observed in Coxing's white-bellied rats by RT-PCR, the detection of rosavirus C from different rat species suggests potential interspecies transmission. Rosavirus C isolated from 3T3 cells causes multisystemic diseases in a mouse model, with high viral loads and positive viral antigen expression in organs of infected mice after oral or intracerebral inoculation. Histological examination revealed alveolar fluid exudation, interstitial infiltration, alveolar fluid exudate and wall thickening in lungs, and hepatocyte degeneration and lymphocytic/monocytic inflammatory infiltrates with giant cell formation in liver sections of sacrificed mice. Since rosavirus A2 has been detected in fecal samples of children, further studies should elucidate the pathogenicity and emergence potential of different rosaviruses. PMID:27737017

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunopathogenesis in a Humanized Mouse Model: Induction of Human-Specific Liver Fibrosis and M2-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bility, Moses T.; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology. PMID:24651854

  1. Hepatitis B virus infection and immunopathogenesis in a humanized mouse model: induction of human-specific liver fibrosis and M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology.

  2. Machine Learning Model Analysis and Data Visualization with Small Molecules Tested in a Mouse Model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection (2014–2015)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The renewed urgency to develop new treatments for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection has resulted in large-scale phenotypic screening and thousands of new active compounds in vitro. The next challenge is to identify candidates to pursue in a mouse in vivo efficacy model as a step to predicting clinical efficacy. We previously analyzed over 70 years of this mouse in vivo efficacy data, which we used to generate and validate machine learning models. Curation of 60 additional small molecules with in vivo data published in 2014 and 2015 was undertaken to further test these models. This represents a much larger test set than for the previous models. Several computational approaches have now been applied to analyze these molecules and compare their molecular properties beyond those attempted previously. Our previous machine learning models have been updated, and a novel aspect has been added in the form of mouse liver microsomal half-life (MLM t1/2) and in vitro-based Mtb models incorporating cytotoxicity data that were used to predict in vivo activity for comparison. Our best Mtbin vivo models possess fivefold ROC values > 0.7, sensitivity > 80%, and concordance > 60%, while the best specificity value is >40%. Use of an MLM t1/2 Bayesian model affords comparable results for scoring the 60 compounds tested. Combining MLM stability and in vitroMtb models in a novel consensus workflow in the best cases has a positive predicted value (hit rate) > 77%. Our results indicate that Bayesian models constructed with literature in vivoMtb data generated by different laboratories in various mouse models can have predictive value and may be used alongside MLM t1/2 and in vitro-based Mtb models to assist in selecting antitubercular compounds with desirable in vivo efficacy. We demonstrate for the first time that consensus models of any kind can be used to predict in vivo activity for Mtb. In addition, we describe a new clustering method for data visualization and apply this to

  3. Determination of Therapeutic Equivalence of Generic Products of Gentamicin in the Neutropenic Mouse Thigh Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Andres F.; Agudelo, Maria; Cardeño, John J.; Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Vesga, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug regulatory agencies (DRA) support prescription of generic products of intravenous antibiotics assuming therapeutic equivalence from pharmaceutical equivalence. Recent reports of deaths associated with generic heparin and metoprolol have raised concerns about the efficacy and safety of DRA-approved drugs. Methodology/Principal Findings To challenge the assumption that pharmaceutical equivalence predicts therapeutic equivalence, we determined in vitro and in vivo the efficacy of the innovator product and 20 pharmaceutically equivalent generics of gentamicin. The data showed that, while only 1 generic product failed in vitro (MIC = 45.3 vs. 0.7 mg/L, P<0.05), 10 products (including gentamicin reference powder) failed in vivo against E. coli due to significantly inferior efficacy (Emax = 4.81 to 5.32 vs. 5.99 log10 CFU/g, P≤0.043). Although the design lacked power to detect differences in survival after thigh infection with P. aeruginosa, dissemination to vital organs was significantly higher in animals treated with generic gentamicin despite 4 days of maximally effective treatment. Conclusion Pharmaceutical equivalence does not predict therapeutic equivalence of generic gentamicin. Stricter criteria based on solid experimental evidence should be required before approval for human use. PMID:20505762

  4. Antifungal Activity of Amphotericin B Cochleates against Candida albicans Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zarif, Leila; Graybill, John R.; Perlin, David; Najvar, Laura; Bocanegra, Rosie; Mannino, Raphael J.

    2000-01-01

    Cochleates are lipid-based supramolecular assemblies composed of natural products, negatively charged phospholipid, and a divalent cation. Cochleates can encapsulate amphotericin B (AmB), an important antifungal drug. AmB cochleates (CAMB) have a unique shape and the ability to target AmB to fungi. The minimal inhibitory concentration and the minimum lethal concentration against Candida albicans are similar to that for desoxycholate AmB (DAMB; Fungizone). In vitro, CAMB induced no hemolysis of human red blood cells at concentrations of as high as 500 μg of AmB/ml, and DAMB was highly hemolytic at 10 μg of AmB/ml. CAMB protect ICR mice infected with C. albicans when the agent is administered intraperitoneally at doses of as low as 0.1 mg/kg/day. In a tissue burden study, CAMB, DAMB, and AmBisome (liposomal AmB; LAMB) were effective in the kidneys, but in the spleen CAMB was more potent than DAMB at 1 mg/kg/day and was equivalent to LAMB at 10 mg/kg/day. In summary, CAMB are highly effective in treating murine candidiasis and compare well with AmBisome and AmB. PMID:10817694

  5. Antifungal activity of amphotericin B cochleates against Candida albicans infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zarif, L; Graybill, J R; Perlin, D; Najvar, L; Bocanegra, R; Mannino, R J

    2000-06-01

    Cochleates are lipid-based supramolecular assemblies composed of natural products, negatively charged phospholipid, and a divalent cation. Cochleates can encapsulate amphotericin B (AmB), an important antifungal drug. AmB cochleates (CAMB) have a unique shape and the ability to target AmB to fungi. The minimal inhibitory concentration and the minimum lethal concentration against Candida albicans are similar to that for desoxycholate AmB (DAMB; Fungizone). In vitro, CAMB induced no hemolysis of human red blood cells at concentrations of as high as 500 microg of AmB/ml, and DAMB was highly hemolytic at 10 microg of AmB/ml. CAMB protect ICR mice infected with C. albicans when the agent is administered intraperitoneally at doses of as low as 0.1 mg/kg/day. In a tissue burden study, CAMB, DAMB, and AmBisome (liposomal AmB; LAMB) were effective in the kidneys, but in the spleen CAMB was more potent than DAMB at 1 mg/kg/day and was equivalent to LAMB at 10 mg/kg/day. In summary, CAMB are highly effective in treating murine candidiasis and compare well with AmBisome and AmB.

  6. In Vivo Monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infections and Antimicrobial Therapy by [18F]Fluoro-Deoxyglucose–MicroPET in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Victoria; Collantes, María; Barberán, Montserrat; Peñuelas, Iván; Arbizu, Javier; Amorena, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    A mouse model was developed for in vivo monitoring of infection and the effect of antimicrobial treatment against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, using the [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose–MicroPET ([18F]FDG-MicroPET) image technique. In the model, sealed Vialon catheters were briefly precolonized with S. aureus strains ATCC 15981 or V329, which differ in cytotoxic properties and biofilm matrix composition. After subcutaneous implantation of catheters in mice, the S. aureus strain differences found in bacterial counts and the inflammatory reaction triggered were detected by the regular bacteriological and histological procedures and also by [18F]FDG-MicroPET image signal intensity determinations in the infection area and regional lymph node. Moreover, [18F]FDG-MicroPET imaging allowed the monitoring of the rifampin treatment effect, identifying the periods of controlled infection and those of reactivated infection due to the appearance of bacteria naturally resistant to rifampin. Overall, the mouse model developed may be useful for noninvasive in vivo determinations in studies on S. aureus biofilm infections and assessment of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:25155589

  7. Host Proteome Correlates of Vaccine-Mediated Enhanced Disease in a Mouse Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    van Diepen, Angela; Brand, H. Kim; de Waal, Leon; Bijl, Maarten; Jong, Victor L.; Kuiken, Thijs; van Amerongen, Geert; van den Ham, Henk-Jan; Eijkemans, Marinus J.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants. Despite over 50 years of research, to date no safe and efficacious RSV vaccine has been licensed. Many experimental vaccination strategies failed to induce balanced T-helper (Th) responses and were associated with adverse effects such as hypersensitivity and immunopathology upon challenge. In this study, we explored the well-established recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) RSV-F/RSV-G vaccination-challenge mouse model to study phenotypically distinct vaccine-mediated host immune responses at the proteome level. In this model, rVV-G priming and not rVV-F priming results in the induction of Th2 skewed host responses upon RSV challenge. Mass spectrometry-based spectral count comparisons enabled us to identify seven host proteins for which expression in lung tissue is associated with an aberrant Th2 skewed response characterized by the influx of eosinophils and neutrophils. These proteins are involved in processes related to the direct influx of eosinophils (eosinophil peroxidase [Epx]) and to chemotaxis and extravasation processes (Chil3 [chitinase-like-protein 3]) as well as to eosinophil and neutrophil homing signals to the lung (Itgam). In addition, the increased levels of Arg1 and Chil3 proteins point to a functional and regulatory role for alternatively activated macrophages and type 2 innate lymphoid cells in Th2 cytokine-driven RSV vaccine-mediated enhanced disease. IMPORTANCE RSV alone is responsible for 80% of acute bronchiolitis cases in infants worldwide and causes substantial mortality in developing countries. Clinical trials performed with formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine preparations in the 1960s failed to induce protection upon natural RSV infection and even predisposed patients for enhanced disease. Despite the clinical need, to date no safe and efficacious RSV vaccine has been licensed. Since RSV vaccines have a tendency to prime for

  8. Impacts of allergic airway inflammation on lung pathology in a mouse model of influenza A virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Akira; Ohara, Yuki; Takahashi, Kenta; Sato, Yuko; Ainai, Akira; Nagata, Noriyo; Tashiro, Masato; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A virus is the respiratory pathogen responsible for influenza. Infection by the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus caused severe lower airway inflammation and pneumonia. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that affects the entire brachial tree, and was one of the commonest underlying medical conditions among patients hospitalized with the 2009 pandemic influenza virus infection. Although respiratory virus infections are the major causes of asthma exacerbation, the mechanism by which influenza exacerbates asthma is poorly understood. Animal models of disease comorbidity are crucial to understanding host-pathogen interactions and elucidating complex pathologies. Existing murine models of influenza virus infection in asthmatics show that asthmatic mice are highly resistant to influenza virus infection, which contradicts clinical observations in humans. Here, we developed a murine model of influenza virus/asthma comorbidity using NC/Nga mice, which are highly sensitive to allergic reactions such as atopic dermatitis and allergic airway inflammation. This model was then used to examine the impact of allergic airway inflammation on lung pathology in the 2009 pandemic influenza virus infected mice. The results showed that induction of acute allergic airway inflammation in pre-existing influenza virus infection had additive effects on exacerbation of lung pathology, which mirrors findings in human epidemiological studies. In contrast, pre-existing allergic airway inflammation protected from subsequent influenza virus infection, which was compatible with those of previous murine models of influenza virus infection in asthmatic mice. These variable outcomes of this murine model indicate that the temporal relation between allergic airway inflammation and influenza virus infection might play a critical role in asthma and influenza comorbidity. Thus, this murine model will further our understanding of how influenza virus infection affects an

  9. Prophylactic Use of Ganoderma lucidum Extract May Inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis Replication in a New Mouse Model of Spontaneous Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Lingjun; Tang, Jun; Lin, Shuzhu; Xu, Yanfeng; Xu, Yuhuan; Qin, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    A mouse model of spontaneous latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) that mimics LTBI in humans is valuable for drug/vaccine development and the study of tuberculosis. However, most LTBI mouse models require interventions, and a spontaneous LTBI mouse model with a low bacterial load is difficult to establish. In this study, mice were IV-inoculated with 100 CFU Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and a persistent LTBI was established with low bacterial loads (0.5~1.5log10 CFU in the lung; < 4log10 CFU in the spleen). Histopathological changes in the lung and spleen were mild during the first 20 weeks post-inoculation. The model was used to demonstrate the comparative effects of prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Ganoderma lucidum extract (spores and spores lipid) in preventing H37Rv replication in both lung and spleen. H37Rv was inhibited with prophylactic use of G. lucidum extract relative to that of the untreated control and therapy groups, and observed in the spleen and lung as early as post-inoculation week 3 and week 5 respectively. H37Rv infection in the therapy group was comparable to that of the untreated control mice. No significant mitigation of pathological changes was observed in either the prophylactic or therapeutic group. Our results suggest that this new LTBI mouse model is an efficient tool of testing anti-tuberculosis drug, the use of G. lucidum extract prior to M. tuberculosis infection may protect the host against bacterial replication to some extent. PMID:26779146

  10. Partial protection against enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection in a mouse model immunized with recombinant Newcastle disease virus capsids displaying the EV71 VP1 fragment.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Wei-Choong; Stanbridge, Eric J; Ong, Kien-Chai; Wong, Kum-Thong; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah

    2011-10-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may cause severe neurological complications, particularly in young children. Despite the risks, there are still no commercially available EV71 vaccines. Hence, a candidate vaccine construct, containing recombinant Newcastle disease virus capsids that display an EV71 VP1 fragment (NPt-VP1(1-100) ) protein, was evaluated in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Previously, it was shown that this protein construct provoked a strong immune response in vaccinated adult rabbits. That study, however, did not address the issue of its effectiveness against EV71 infection in young animals. In the present study, EV71 viral challenge in vaccinated newborn mice resulted in more than 40% increase in survival rate. Significantly, half of the surviving mice fully recovered from their paralysis. Histological analysis of all of the surviving mice revealed a complete clearance of EV71 viral antigens from their brains and spinal cords. In hind limb muscles, the amounts of the antigens detected correlated with the degrees of tissue damage and paralysis. Findings from this study provide evidence that immunization with the NPt-VP1(1-100) immunogen in a newborn mouse model confers partial protection against EV71 infection, and also highlights the importance of NPt-VP1(1-100) as a possible candidate vaccine for protection against EV71 infections.

  11. An Optimized Mouse Thigh Infection Model for Enterococci and Its Impact on Antimicrobial Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Agudelo, Maria; Gonzalez, Javier M.; Vesga, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Negligible in vivo growth of enterococci and high-level dispersion of data have led to inaccurate estimations of antibiotic pharmacodynamics (PD). Here we improved an in vivo model apt for PD studies by optimizing the in vitro culture conditions for enterococci. The PD of vancomycin (VAN), ampicillin-sulbactam (SAM), and piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) against enterococci were determined in vivo, comparing the following different conditions of inoculum preparation: aerobiosis, aerobiosis plus mucin, and anaerobiosis plus mucin. Drug exposure was expressed as the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug to the MIC (fAUC/MIC) (VAN) or the time in a 24-h period that the drug concentration for the free, unbound fraction exceeded the MIC under steady-state pharmacokinetic conditions (fT>MIC) (SAM and TZP) and linked to the change in log10 CFU/thigh. Only anaerobiosis plus mucin enhanced the in vivo growth, yielding significant PD parameters with all antibiotics. In conclusion, robust in vivo growth of enterococci was crucial for better determining the PD of tested antibacterial agents, and this was achieved by optimizing the procedure for preparing the inoculum. PMID:25348523

  12. Piscidin is Highly Active against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and NDM-1-Producing Klebsiella pneumonia in a Systemic Septicaemia Infection Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Jian-Chyi; Chen, Te-Li; Wu, Jen-Leih; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial activity of two synthetic antimicrobial peptides from an aquatic organism, tilapia piscidin 3 (TP3) and tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4), in vitro and in a murine sepsis model, as compared with ampicillin, tigecycline, and imipenem. Mice were infected with (NDM-1)-producing K. pneumonia and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, and subsequently treated with TP3, TP4, or antibiotics for different periods of time (up to 168 h). Mouse survival and bacterial colony forming units (CFU) in various organs were measured after each treatment. Toxicity was determined based on observation of behavior and measurement of biochemical parameters. TP3 and TP4 exhibited strong activity against K. pneumonia and A. baumannii in vitro. Administration of TP3 (150 μg/mouse) or TP4 (50 μg/mouse) 30 min after infection with K. pneumonia or A. baumannii significantly increased survival in mice. TP4 was more effective than tigecycline at reducing CFU counts in several organs. TP3 and TP4 were shown to be non-toxic, and did not affect mouse behavior. TP3 and TP4 are able at potentiate anti-Acinetobacter baumannii or anti-Klebsiella pneumonia drug activity, reduce bacterial load, and prevent drug resistance, indicating their potential for use in combating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:25874924

  13. Keratinocyte growth factor-2 inhibits bacterial infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Nana; Wang, Qin; Zhou, Jian; Li, Jing; Wen, Xiaoxing; Chen, Shujing; Zhu, Zhenhua; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin; Li, Huayin

    2016-01-01

    To determine protective effects of concurrent administration of Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2) with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) inoculation on the induced pneumonia. KGF-2 (5 mg/kg) was concurrently administered into the left lobe of 55 mice with P. aeruginosa PAO1 (5 × 10(6) CFU, half-lethal dose); 55 mice in the control group were concurrently administered PBS with the PAO1. We detected and analyzed: body temperature; amount of P. aeruginosa in homogenates; count of total number of nucleated cells and of mononuclear macrophages; protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung wet-to-dry weight ratio; cytokines in BALF and blood; and lung morphology. To study survival rate, concurrent administration of KGF-2 (experimental group) versus PBS (control) with a lethal dose of PAO1 (1 × 10(7) CFU was performed, and survivorship was documented for 7 days post-inoculation. The bacterial CFU in lung homogenates was significantly decreased in the KGF-2 group compared to the control group. There were significantly more mononuclear macrophages in the BALF from the KGF-2 group than from the control group (p < 0.05). KGF-2 increased the surfactant protein and GM-CSF mRNA in lung at 6 h and 72 h after inoculation. Significant reduction of lung injury scores, protein concentrations, lung wet-to-dry weight ratio, and IL-6 and TNF-α levels was noted in the KGF-2 treated rats at 72 h after inoculation (p < 0.05). The 7-day survival rate of the KGF-2 group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.05). Concurrent administration of KGF-2 facilitates the clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs, attenuates P. aeruginosa-induced lung injury, and extends the 7-day survival rate in mice model with P. aeruginosa pneumonia.

  14. Water-filtered infrared A reduces chlamydial infectivity in vitro without causing ex vivo eye damage in pig and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Carolin; Marti, Hanna; Frohns, Antonia; Frohns, Florian; Blenn, Christian; Leonard, Cory Ann; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin; Stein, Elisabeth; Borel, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    Repeated ocular infections with Chlamydia trachomatis trigger the development of trachoma, the most common cause of infectious blindness worldwide. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) has shown positive effects on cultured cells and human skin. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of wIRA as a possible non-chemical treatment for trachoma patients. We both modeled ocular chlamydial infections using C. trachomatis B to infect human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCjE) and studied the effects of wIRA on non-infected ocular structures with two ex vivo eye models. We focused on the temperature development during wIRA irradiation in cell culture and perfused pig eyes to exclude potentially harmful side effects. Furthermore, cell viability of HCjE and cytotoxicity in mouse retina explants was analyzed. We demonstrated a significant wIRA-dependent reduction of chlamydial infectivity in HCjE cells. Moreover, we observed that wIRA treatment of HCjE prior to infection was sufficient to inhibit chlamydial infectivity and that visible light enhances the effect of wIRA. Irradiation did not reduce cell viability and there was no indication of retinal damage post treatment. Additionally, temperatures during wIRA exposure did not markedly exceed physiological eye temperatures, suggesting that hyperthermia-related lesions are unlikely. For clinical applications, further exploration of wIRA as a non-chemical treatment device in an experimental animal model is essential.

  15. Alisporivir inhibits MERS- and SARS-coronavirus replication in cell culture, but not SARS-coronavirus infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Adriaan H; Falzarano, Darryl; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Beugeling, Corrine; Fett, Craig; Martellaro, Cynthia; Posthuma, Clara C; Feldmann, Heinz; Perlman, Stanley; Snijder, Eric J

    2017-01-15

    Currently, there is no registered treatment for infections with emerging zoonotic coronaviruses like SARS- and MERS-coronavirus. We here report that in cultured cells low-micromolar concentrations of alisporivir, a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A-analog, inhibit the replication of four different coronaviruses, including MERS- and SARS-coronavirus. Ribavirin was found to further potentiate the antiviral effect of alisporivir in these cell culture-based infection models, but this combination treatment was unable to improve the outcome of SARS-CoV infection in a mouse model. Nevertheless, our data provide a basis to further explore the potential of Cyp inhibitors as host-directed, broad-spectrum inhibitors of coronavirus replication.

  16. Interleukin-12 and interleukin-2 alone or in combination against the infection in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang-Ran; Lin, Jian-Cong; Xu, Wen-Ming; Li, Ming; Ye, Hui-Shao; Cui, Wei-Ling; Lin, Qing

    2013-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an intracellular opportunistic fungus causing invasive pulmonary mycosis, characterised by hyphal invasion and destruction of pulmonary tissue. Th1 cytokines could enhance fungicidal activity. The effects from the combination of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-2 are rarely known in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis infection. To assess the cleaning of A. fumigatus infection in the pulmonary tissues by IL-12 and IL-2, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was detected in the sera using ELISA, quantification of IFN-γ mRNA using real-time RT-PCR and lung Colony-forming unit was assayed by cultivation. Morphology was analysed by histopathological examination. Our results showed that IL-12 and/or IL-2 could enhance the IFN-γ expression in the pulmonary tissue, reduce the colony load in the pulmonary tissue and increase the survival rate of mouse. The combination of IL-12 and IL-2 could assist in increasing the IFN-γ expression in the pulmonary tissue, but neither reduce colony load in the pulmonary tissue nor increase the survival rate of mouse significantly. It was demonstrated that IL-12 and IL-2 were strong immunomodulatory cytokines as a prerequisite for protecting the host from infectious agents.

  17. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  18. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Methods Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Results Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05) in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain. Conclusion This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of

  19. Stimulation of immature lung macrophages with intranasal interferon gamma in a novel neonatal mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Empey, Kerry M; Orend, Jacob G; Peebles, R Stokes; Egaña, Loreto; Norris, Karen A; Oury, Tim D; Kolls, Jay K

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and viral death in infants. Reduced CD8 T-cells and negligible interferon gamma (IFNγ) in the airway are associated with severe infant RSV disease, yet there is an abundance of alveolar macrophages (AM) and neutrophils. However, it is unclear, based on our current understanding of macrophage functional heterogeneity, if immature AM improve viral clearance or contribute to inflammation and airway obstruction in the IFNγ-deficient neonatal lung environment. The aim of the current study was to define the age-dependent AM phenotype during neonatal RSV infection and investigate their differentiation to classically activated macrophages (CAM) using i.n. IFNγ in the context of improving viral clearance. Neonatal and adult BALB/cJ mice were infected with 1×10(6) plaque forming units (PFU)/gram (g) RSV line 19 and their AM responses compared. Adult mice showed a rapid and robust CAM response, indicated by increases in major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD86, CCR7, and a reduction in mannose receptor (MR). Neonatal mice showed a delayed and reduced CAM response, likely due to undetectable IFNγ production. Intranasal (i.n.) treatment with recombinant mouse IFNγ (rIFNγ) increased the expression of CAM markers on neonatal AM, reduced viral lung titers, and improved weight gain compared to untreated controls with no detectable increase in CD4 or CD8 T-cell infiltration. In vitro infection of J774A.1 macrophages with RSV induced an alternatively activated macrophage (AAM) phenotype however, when macrophages were first primed with IFNγ, a CAM phenotype was induced and RSV spread to adjacent Hep-2 cells was reduced. These studies demonstrate that the neonatal AM response to RSV infection is abundant and immature, but can be exogenously stimulated to express the antimicrobial phenotype, CAM, with i.n. rIFNγ.

  20. Susceptibility of mouse macrophage J774 to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Altamirano, María M B; Sánchez-García, F Javier; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha; Aguilar-Carmona, Israel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the J774 mouse macrophage cell line could be used as an in vitro model for dengue virus infection (DENV). After 3 days, infection in J774 cells was assessed by detecting dengue virus non-structural protein 1 (NSP-1) production either by dot blot or indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) of saponine-permeabilized J774 cells and then confirmed by RT-PCR (171 bp product, corresponding to the DENV-2 core). Based on the presence of NSP-1 in infected but not in non-infected cells by both IFA and dot blot, as well as the amplification of a 171-bp DENV-2-specific RT-PCR product exclusively in the infected cells, the J774 cell line was found to be permissive for dengue virus infection. As far as we know, this is the first report that the J774 mouse macrophage cell line is infected with dengue virus and, thus, that it can be used as an alternative in vitro model for dengue virus infection studies. This finding could help to further elucidate the mechanisms involved in dengue virus infection and pathogenesis.

  1. Prophylactic and therapeutic intranasal administration with an immunomodulator, Hiltonol(®) (Poly IC:LC), in a lethal SARS-CoV-infected BALB/c mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Yohichi; Salazar, Andres M; Wandersee, Miles K; Barnard, Dale L

    2017-03-01

    Hiltonol(®), (Poly IC:LC), a potent immunomodulator, is a synthetic, double-stranded polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly IC) stabilized with Poly-L-lysine and carboxymethyl cellulose (LC). Hiltonol(®) was tested for efficacy in a lethal SARS-CoV-infected BALB/c mouse model. Hiltonol(®) at 5, 1, 0.5 or 0.25 mg/kg/day by intranasal (i.n.) route resulted in significant survival benefit when administered at selected times 24 h prior to challenge with a lethal dose of mouse-adapted severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The infected BALB/c mice receiving the Hiltonol(®) treatments were also significantly effective in protecting mice against weight loss due to infection (p < 0.001). Groups of 20 mice were dosed with Hiltonol(®) at 2.5 or 0.75 mg/kg by intranasal instillation 7, 14, and 21 days before virus exposure and a second dose was given 24 h later, prophylactic Hiltonol(®) treatments (2.5 mg/kg/day) were completely protective in preventing death, and in causing significant reduction in lung hemorrhage scores, lung weights and lung virus titers. Hiltonol(®) was also effective as a therapeutic when give up to 8 h post virus exposure; 100% of the-infected mice were protected against death when Hiltonol(®) was administered at 5 mg/kg/day 8 h after infection. Our data suggest that Hiltonol(®) treatment of SARS-CoV infection in mice leads to substantial prophylactic and therapeutic effects and could be used for treatment of other virus disease such as those caused by MERS-CoV a related coronavirus. These properties might be therapeutically advantageous if Hiltonol(®) is considered for possible clinical use.

  2. Attempts to Image the Early Inflammatory Response during Infection with the Lymphatic Filarial Nematode Brugia pahangi in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Ryan; Goundry, Amy; O’Neill, Kerry; Marchesi, Francesco; Devaney, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Helminth parasites remain a major constraint upon human health and well-being in many parts of the world. Treatment of these infections relies upon a very small number of therapeutics, most of which were originally developed for use in animal health. A lack of high throughput screening systems, together with limitations of available animal models, has restricted the development of novel chemotherapeutics. This is particularly so for filarial nematodes, which are long-lived parasites with a complex cycle of development. In this paper, we describe attempts to visualise the immune response elicited by filarial parasites in infected mice using a non-invasive bioluminescence imaging reagent, luminol, our aim being to determine whether such a model could be developed to discriminate between live and dead worms for in vivo compound screening. We show that while imaging can detect the immune response elicited by early stages of infection with L3, it was unable to detect the presence of adult worms or, indeed, later stages of infection with L3, despite the presence of worms within the lymphatic system of infected animals. In the future, more specific reagents that detect secreted products of adult worms may be required for developing screens based upon live imaging of infected animals. PMID:27992545

  3. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Brady, Rebecca A; Bruno, Vincent M; Burns, Drusilla L

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  4. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rebecca A.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  5. Recombinant adenoviral vector expressing HCV NS4 induces protective immune responses in a mouse model of Vaccinia-HCV virus infection: a dose and route conundrum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Li, Wen; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2014-05-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to chronic infection in the majority of infected patients presumably due to failure or inefficiency of the immune responses generated. Both antibody and cellular immune responses have been suggested to be important in viral clearance. Non-replicative adenoviral vectors expressing antigens of interest are considered as attractive vaccine vectors for a number of pathogens. In this study, we sought to evaluate cellular and humoral immune responses against HCV NS4 protein using recombinant adenovirus as a vaccine vector expressing NS4 antigen. We have also measured the effect of antigen doses and routes of immunization on the quality and extent of the immune responses, especially their role in viral load reduction, in a recombinant Vaccinia-HCV (Vac-HCV) infection mouse model. Our results show that an optimum dose of adenovirus vector (2×10(7)pfu/mouse) administered intramuscularly (i.m.) induces high T cell proliferation, granzyme B-expressing CD8(+) T cells, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-6, and antibody responses that can significantly reduce the Vac-HCV viral load in the ovaries of female C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrate that recombinant adenovirus vector can induce both humoral and cellular protective immunity against HCV-NS4 antigen, and that immunity is intricately controlled by route and dose of immunizing vector.

  6. Impact of fish oils on the outcomes of a mouse model of acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Caron, Emilie; Desseyn, Jean-Luc; Sergent, Luce; Bartke, Nana; Husson, Marie-Odile; Duhamel, Alain; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2015-01-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium that causes pneumonia in immunocompromised humans and severe pulmonary damage in patients with cystic fibrosis. Imbalanced fatty acid incorporation in membranes, including increased arachidonic acid and decreased DHA concentrations, is known to play a critical role in chronic inflammation associated with bacterial infection. Other lipids, such as EPA and alkylglycerols, are also known to play a role in inflammation, particularly by stimulating the immune system, decreasing inflammation and inhibiting bacterial growth. In this context, the goal of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary DHA/EPA, in a 2:1 ratio, and alkylglycerols, as natural compounds extracted from oils of rays and chimeras, respectively, on the inflammatory reaction induced by P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection in mice. To this end, mice were fed with a control diet or isolipidic, isoenergetic diets prepared with oils enriched in DHA/EPA (2:1) or alkylglycerols for 5 weeks before the induction of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection by endotracheal instillation. In our model, DHA/EPA (2:1) significantly improved the survival of mice after infection, which was associated with the acceleration of bacterial clearance and the resolution of inflammation leading to the improvement of pulmonary injuries. By contrast, alkylglycerols did not affect the outcomes of P. aeruginosa infection. Our findings suggest that supplementation with ray oil enriched in DHA/EPA (2:1) can be considered as a preventive treatment for patients at risk for P. aeruginosa infection.

  7. Combinatory antibiotic therapy increases rate of bacterial kill but not final outcome in a novel mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus spinal implant infection

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Johansen, Daniel; Loftin, Amanda H.; Dworsky, Erik; Zoller, Stephen D.; Park, Howard Y.; Hamad, Christopher D.; Nelson, George E.; Francis, Kevin P.; Scaduto, Anthony; Bernthal, Nicholas M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Management of spine implant infections (SII) are challenging. Explantation of infected spinal hardware can destabilize the spine, but retention can lead to cord compromise and biofilm formation, complicating management. While vancomycin monotherapy is commonly used, in vitro studies have shown reduced efficacy against biofilm compared to combination therapy with rifampin. Using an established in vivo mouse model of SII, we aim to evaluate whether combination therapy has increased efficacy compared to both vancomycin alone and infected controls. Methods An L-shaped, Kirschner-wire was transfixed into the L4 spinous process of 12-week-old C57BL/6 mice, and inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus. Mice were randomized into a vancomycin group, a combination group with vancomycin plus rifampin, or a control group receiving saline. Treatment began on post-operative day (POD) 7 and continued through POD 14. In vivo imaging was performed to monitor bioluminescence for 35 days. Colony-forming units (CFUs) were cultured on POD 35. Results Bioluminescence peaked around POD 7 for all groups. The combination group had a 10-fold decrease in signal by POD 10. The vancomycin and control groups reached similar levels on POD 17 and 21, respectively. On POD 25 the combination group dropped below baseline, but rebounded to the same level as the other groups, demonstrating a biofilm-associated infection by POD 35. Quantification of CFUs on POD 35 confirmed an ongoing infection in all three groups. Conclusions Although both therapies were initially effective, they were not able to eliminate implant biofilm bacteria, resulting in a rebound infection after antibiotic cessation. This model shows, for the first time, why histologic-based, static assessments of antimicrobials can be misleading, and the importance of longitudinal tracking of infection. Future studies can use this model to test combinations of antibiotic therapies to see if they are more effective in

  8. Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection of the Junbo Mouse.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Michael T; Hood, Derek W

    2017-03-02

    Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear bulla, is the most common bacterial infection in children. For one of the principal otopathogens, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), animal models allow us to investigate host-microbial interactions relevant to the onset and progression of infection and to study treatment of middle ear disease. We have established a robust model of NTHi middle ear infection in the Junbo mouse. Intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates of bulla infection and high bacterial titers in bulla fluids; bacteria can also spread down the respiratory tract to the mouse lung. An innate immune response is detected in the bulla of Junbo mice following NTHi infection, and bacteria are maintained in some ears at least up to day 56 post-inoculation. The Junbo/NTHi infection model facilitates studies on bacterial pathogenesis and antimicrobial intervention regimens and vaccines for better treatment and prevention of NTHi middle ear infection. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. The Role of CHI3L1 (Chitinase-3-Like-1) in the Pathogenesis of Infections in Burns in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J; Vasko, Radovan; Shen, Keyue; Golberg, Alexander; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    In severe burn injury the unique setting of a depleted, dysfunctional immune system along with a loss of barrier function commonly results in opportunistic infections that eventually proof fatal. Unfortunately, the dynamic sequence of bacterial contamination, colonization and eventually septic invasion with bacteria such as Pseudomonas species is still poorly understood although a limiting factor in clinical decision making. Increasing evidence supports the notion that inhibition of bacterial translocation into the wound site may be an effective alternative to prevent infection. In this context we investigated the role of the mammalian Chitinase-3-Like-1 (CHI3L1) non-enyzmatic protein predominately expressed on epithelial as well as innate immune cells as a potential bacterial-translocation-mediating factor. We show a strong trend that a modulation of chitinase expression is likely to be effective in reducing mortality rates in a mouse model of burn injury with superinfection with the opportunistic PA14 Pseudomonas strain, thus demonstrating possible clinical leverage.

  10. New Mouse Model for Chronic Infections by Gram-Negative Bacteria Enabling the Study of Anti-Infective Efficacy and Host-Microbe Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pletzer, Daniel; Mansour, Sarah C.; Wuerth, Kelli; Rahanjam, Negin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Only a few, relatively cumbersome animal models enable long-term Gram-negative bacterial infections that mimic human situations, where untreated infections can last for weeks. Here, we describe a simple murine cutaneous abscess model that enables chronic or progressive infections, depending on the subcutaneously injected bacterial strain. In this model, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis epidemic isolate LESB58 caused localized high-density skin and soft tissue infections and necrotic skin lesions for up to 10 days but did not disseminate in either CD-1 or C57BL/6 mice. The model was adapted for use with four major Gram-negative nosocomial pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Escherichia coli. This model enabled noninvasive imaging and tracking of lux-tagged bacteria, the influx of activated neutrophils, and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen species at the infection site. Screening antimicrobials against high-density infections showed that local but not intravenous administration of gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem significantly but incompletely reduced bacterial counts and superficial tissue dermonecrosis. Bacterial RNA isolated from the abscess tissue revealed that Pseudomonas genes involved in iron uptake, toxin production, surface lipopolysaccharide regulation, adherence, and lipase production were highly upregulated whereas phenazine production and expression of global activator gacA were downregulated. The model was validated for studying virulence using mutants of more-virulent P. aeruginosa strain PA14. Thus, mutants defective in flagella or motility, type III secretion, or siderophore biosynthesis were noninvasive and suppressed dermal necrosis in mice, while a strain with a mutation in the bfiS gene encoding a sensor kinase showed enhanced invasiveness and mortality in mice compared to controls infected with wild-type P. aeruginosa PA14. PMID:28246361

  11. A Single B-repeat of Staphylococcus epidermidis accumulation-associated protein induces protective immune responses in an experimental biomaterial-associated infection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Hongyan; Chiu, David; Bryers, James D

    2014-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are the fourth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, resulting in 2 million infections and ∼100,000 deaths each year. More than 60% of these infections are associated with some type of biomedical device. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal bacterium of the human skin and is the most common nosocomial pathogen infecting implanted medical devices, especially those in the cardiovasculature. S. epidermidis antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation on inert surfaces make these infections hard to treat. Accumulation-associated protein (Aap), a cell wall-anchored protein of S. epidermidis, is considered one of the most important proteins involved in the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm. A small recombinant protein vaccine comprising a single B-repeat domain (Brpt1.0) of S. epidermidis RP62A Aap was developed, and the vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in vitro with a biofilm inhibition assay and in vivo in a murine model of biomaterial-associated infection. A high IgG antibody response against S. epidermidis RP62A was detected in the sera of the mice after two subcutaneous immunizations with Brpt1.0 coadministered with Freund's adjuvant. Sera from Brpt1.0-immunized mice inhibited in vitro S. epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation in a dose-dependent pattern. After receiving two immunizations, each mouse was surgically implanted with a porous scaffold disk containing 5 × 10(6) CFU of S. epidermidis RP62A. Weight changes, inflammatory markers, and histological assay results after challenge with S. epidermidis indicated that the mice immunized with Brpt1.0 exhibited significantly higher resistance to S. epidermidis RP62A implant infection than the control mice. Day 8 postchallenge, there was a significantly lower number of bacteria in scaffold sections and surrounding tissues and a lower residual inflammatory response to the infected scaffold disks for the Brpt1.0-immunized mice than for of the ovalbumin (Ova

  12. In vivo immunomodulatory effects of Antrodia camphorata polysaccharides in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model for inhibiting infection of Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.-C.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Chen, C.-C.; Lee, K.-M.

    2008-03-01

    Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) is a fungus commonly used for treatment of viral hepatitis and cancer in Chinese folk medicine. Extract of A. camphorate is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, antihepatitis B virus and anticancer activities. In this study, we tested the in vivo effects of polysaccharides derived from A. camphorata (AC-PS) on immune function by detection of cytokine expression and evaluation of the immune phenotype in a T1/T2 doubly transgenic mouse model. The protective effect of AC-PS in mice was tested by infection with Schistosoma mansoni. The induction of large amounts of IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and TNF-a mRNA were detected after 2 and 4 weeks of oral AC-PS administration in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. In transgenic mice, 3 to 6 weeks of oral AC-PS administration increased the proportion of CD4{sup +} T cells and B cells within the spleen. More specifically, there was an increase of Th1 CD4{sup +} T cells and Be1 cells among spleen cells as observed by detection the of Type1/Type2 marker molecules. By using a disease model of parasitic infection, we found that AC-PS treatment inhibited infection with S. mansoni in BALB/C and C57BL/6 mice. AC-PS appears to influence the immune system of mice into developing Th1 responses and have potential for preventing infection with S. mansoni.

  13. Optimizing celgosivir therapy in mouse models of dengue virus infection of serotypes 1 and 2: The search for a window for potential therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoru; Chan, Kitti Wing-Ki; Dow, Geoffrey; Ooi, Eng Eong; Low, Jenny G; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2016-03-01

    Although the antiviral drug celgosivir, an α-glucosidase I inhibitor, is highly protective when given twice daily to AG129 mice infected with dengue virus, a similar regimen of twice daily dosing did not significantly reduce serum viral loads in patients in a recent clinical trial. This failure presumably might reflect the initiation of treatment when patients were already viremic. To better mimic the clinical setting, we used viruses isolated from patients to develop new mouse models of DENV1 and DENV2 infection and employed the models to test the twice daily treatment, begun either on the day of infection or on the third day post-infection, when the mice had peak of viremia. We found that, although the treatment started on day 0 was effective on viral load reduction, it provided no benefit when begun on day 3, indicating that in vivo antiviral efficacy becomes less prominent once viremia reaches the peak level. To determine if the therapeutic regimen in humans could be improved, we tested regimen of four-times daily treatment and found that the treatment significantly reduced viremia, suggesting that a similar regimen may be effective in a human clinical trial. A new clinical trial to investigate an altered dosing regimen has been approved (NCT02569827).

  14. Blockade of Tim-3 Pathway Ameliorates Interferon-γ Production from Hepatic CD8+ T Cells in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying; Hou, Nan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Di; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jinjin; Luan, Fang; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Faliang; Sun, Wensheng; Zhang, Lining; Gao, Chengjiang; Gao, Lifen; Liang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. However, whether Tim-3 is involved in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unknown. Here, we studied the expression and function of Tim-3 in a hydrodynamics-based mouse model of HBV infection. A significant increase of Tim-3 expression on hepatic T lymphocytes, especially on CD8+ T cells, was demonstrated in HBV model mice from day 7 to day 18. After Tim-3 knockdown by specific shRNAs, significantly increased IFN-γ production from hepatic CD8+ T cells in HBV model mice was observed. Very interestingly, we found Tim-3 expression on CD8+ T cells was higher in HBV model mice with higher serum anti-HBs production. Moreover, Tim-3 knockdown influenced anti-HBs production in vivo. Collectively, our data suggested that Tim-3 might act as a potent regulator of antiviral T-cell responses in HBV infection. PMID:19254478

  15. Antibacterial activity and therapeutic efficacy of Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5, a cationic amphiphilic polyproline helix, in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infection.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Nepal, Manish; Chmielewski, Jean; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activities and therapeutic efficacy of the cationic, unnatural proline-rich peptide Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 were evaluated against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse model of skin infection. Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 showed potent activity against all clinical isolates of S. aureus tested, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA, respectively). Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 was also superior in clearing established in vitro biofilms of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, compared with the established antimicrobials mupirocin and vancomycin. Additionally, topical treatment of an MRSA-infected wound with Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 enhanced wound closure and significantly reduced bacterial load. Finally, 0.5% Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 significantly reduced the levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in wounds induced by MRSA skin infection. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest the potential application of Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 in the treatment of staphylococcal skin infections.

  16. 18F-FDG PET imaging for identifying the dynamics of intestinal disease caused by SFTSV infection in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Daisuke; Nishi, Kodai; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Shimada, Satoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging disease that causes fever, enteritis, thrombocytopenia, and leucopenia and can be fatal in up to 30% of cases. However, the mechanism of severe disease is not fully understood. Molecular imaging approaches, such as positron-emission tomography (PET), are functional in vivo imaging techniques that provide real-time dynamics of disease progression, assessments of pharmacokinetics, and diagnoses for disease progression. Molecular imaging also potentially provides useful approaches to explore the pathogenesis of viral infections. Thus, the purpose of this study was to image the pathological features of SFTSV infection in vivo by PET imaging. In a mouse model, we showed that 18F-FDG accumulations clearly identified the intestinal tract site as a pathological site. We also demonstrated that 18F-FDG PET imaging can assess disease progression and response to antiserum therapy within the same individual. This is the first report demonstrating a molecular imaging strategy for SFTSV infection. Our results provide potentially useful information for preclinical studies such as the elucidation of the mechanism of SFTSV infection in vivo and the assessment of drugs for SFTS treatment. PMID:26700962

  17. Antiviral effects of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 and Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205 and SPM1206 on rotavirus-infected Caco-2 cells and a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo Yeon; Lee, Do Kyung; Ha, Nam Joo; Shin, Hea Soon

    2015-11-01

    Rotavirus is worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis including severe diarrhea and fatal dehydration in infants and young children. There is an available vaccination program for preventing rotavirus infection, but it has limits and restrictions. Probiotics therapy could be an alternative method of antiviral prevention and modulation against rotavirus infection. In this study, we screened the antiviral activity of probiotic bacteria such as 3 Lactobacillus spp. and 14 Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from young Korean. Three of the bacteria, Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211, Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205, and SPM1206, inhibited human strain Wa rotavirus infection in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, these bacterial strains inhibited rotavirus replication in a rotavirus-infected neonatal mouse model. To clarify the mechanism of inhibition, we investigated gene expression of Interferon (IFN)-signaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors. All 3 probiotics increased IFN-α and IFN-β levels compared with the control. Gene expression of IFNsignaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors also increased. Overall, these results indicate that L. ruminis SPM0211, B. longum SPM1205 and 1206 efficiently inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro and in vivo. Especially, the antiviral effect of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 is worthy of notice. This is the first report of L. ruminis with antiviral activity. Anti-rotaviral effects of the 3 probiotics are likely due to their modulation of the immune response through promoting type I IFNs, which are key regulators in IFN signaling pathway.

  18. Protection from infection with influenza A H7N9 virus in a mouse model by equine neutralizing F(ab')2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongpeng; Fan, Chuanbo; Duan, Yueqiang; Zhang, Liangyan; Li, Min; Yang, Xiaolan; Li, Ruisheng; Yang, Penghui; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-11-01

    Influenza A H7N9 virus has demonstrated considerable pandemic potential in China ever since early spring 2013. Until now, there have been no specific medicines to treat influenza A H7N9 virus infected patients. Development of a safe and effective H7N9 therapeutic preparation is urgently needed. To this end, we prepared and evaluated the pepsin-digested F(ab')2 fragments of serum IgGs from the horses inoculated with a inactivated influenza A H7N9 whole virus antigens. The protective effects of the F(ab')2 fragments against H7N9 virus infection were determined in cultured MDCK cells by cytopathic effect (CPE) and evaluated in a BALB/c mouse model by observing death, weight loss and viral load. The in vitro results showed that the F(ab')2 fragments had an HI titer of 1:2048 and a neutralization titer of 1: 31,623. The in vivo assays suggested that 600 U of the preparations could efficiently protect BALB/c mice from a lethal dose of A/Anhui/01/2013 (H7N9) infection even when administered two days post infection. Thus, this highly purified preparation should be a potential candidate for treating severe patients suffering from influenza A H7N9.

  19. Protective effect of enterovirus‑71 (EV71) virus‑like particle vaccine against lethal EV71 infection in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Mao, Fengfeng; Pang, Zheng; Yi, Yao; Qiu, Feng; Tian, Ruiguang; Meng, Qingling; Jia, Zhiyuan; Bi, Shengli

    2015-08-01

    Enterovirus-71 (EV71) is a viral pathogen that causes severe cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) among young children, with significant mortality. Effective vaccines against HFMD are urgently required. Several EV71 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine candidates were found to be protective in the neonatal mouse EV71 challenge model. However, to what extent the VLP vaccine protects susceptible organs against EV71 infection in vivo has remained elusive. In the present study, the comprehensive immunogenicity of a potential EV71 vaccine candidate based on VLPs was evaluated in a neonatal mouse model. Despite lower levels of neutralizing antibodies to EV71 in the sera of VLP-immunized mice compared with those in mice vaccinated with inactivated EV71, the VLP-based vaccine was shown to be able to induce immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA memory-associated cellular immune responses to EV71. Of note, the EV71 VLP vaccine candidate was capable of inhibiting viral proliferation in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, lung and intestine of immunized mice and provided effective protection against the pathological damage caused by viral attack. In particular, the VLP vaccine was able to inhibit the transportation of EV71 from the central nervous system to the muscle tissue and greatly protected muscle tissue from infection, along with recovery from the viral infection. This led to nearly 100% immunoprotective efficacy, enabling neonatal mice delivered by VLP-immunized female adult mice to survive and grow with good health. The present study provided valuable additional knowledge of the specific protective efficacy of the EV71 VLP vaccine in vivo, which also indicated that it is a promising potential candidate for being developed into an EV71 vaccine.

  20. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Green, Richard; Sekine, Aimee; Voss, Kathleen M.; Mooney, Michael; Choonoo, Gabrielle; Miller, Darla R.; Pardo Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Gale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013)F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans. PMID:27806117

  1. Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Are Necessary for the Recruitment of CD8+ T Cells in the Liver in a Pregnant Mouse Model of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Oca, Roberto Montes; Buendía, Antonio J.; Del Río, Laura; Sánchez, Joaquín; Salinas, Jesús; Navarro, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the development of the specific immune response against Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection was studied in a pregnant mouse model involving treatment with RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody. PMN depletion significantly affected the immune response in the liver, in which the T-lymphocyte and F4/80+ cell populations decreased, particularly the CD8+ T-cell population. A Th1-like response, characterized by high levels of gamma interferon without detectable levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4) in serum, was observed in both depleted and nondepleted mice, although an increased production of IL-10 was detected in the depleted group. Our results suggest that PMNs play a very important role in the recruitment of other leukocyte populations to the inflammatory foci but have little influence in the polarization of the immune specific response toward a Th1-like response. PMID:10679002

  2. Sustainable antimicrobial effect of silver sulfadiazine-loaded nanosheets on infection in a mouse model of partial-thickness burn injury.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Saito, Akihiro; Fujie, Toshinori; Nishiwaki, Keisuke; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Saitoh, Daizoh; Ohtsubo, Shinya; Takeoka, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Partial-thickness burn injury has the potential for reepithelialization and heals within 3weeks. If the wound is infected by bacteria before reepithelization, however, the depth of disruption increases and the lesion easily progresses to the full-thickness dermal layers. In the treatment of partial-thickness burn injury, it is important to prevent the wound area from bacterial infection with an antimicrobial dressing. Here, we have tested the antimicrobial properties of polymeric ultra-thin films composed of poly(lactic acid) (termed "PLA nanosheets"), which have high flexibility, adhesive strength and transparency, and silver sulfadiazine (AgSD), which exhibits antimicrobial efficacy. The AgSD-loaded nanosheet released Ag(+) for more than 3days, and exerted antimicrobial efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an in vitro Kirby-Bauer test. By contrast, a cell viability assay indicated that the dose of AgSD used in the PLA nanosheets did not show significant cytotoxicity toward fibroblasts. In vivo evaluation using a mouse model of infection in a partial-thickness burn wound demonstrated that the nanosheet significantly reduced the number of MRSA bacteria on the lesion (more than 10(5)-fold) and suppressed the inflammatory reaction, thereby preventing a protracted wound healing process.

  3. Impact of early versus later fluoroquinolone treatment on the clinical; microbiological and resistance outcomes in a mouse-lung model of Pasteurella multocida infection.

    PubMed

    Ferran, Aude A; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2011-03-24

    The early curative uses of antimicrobial drugs such as fluoroquinolones before the onset of symptoms in veterinary medicine may be regarded as irrational antibiotic consumption. However, it should be stressed that in early curative antimicrobial treatment as in metaphylaxis, the bacterial burden at the infection site is often very low, and so the rapid eradication of the bacterial population could result. We investigated the impact of early versus later curative administrations of 1 or 40 mg/kg of marbofloxacin on the survival of mice, the eradication of the targeted pathogen and the selection of resistant bacteria in a mouse lung infection with Pasteurella multocida. In this model, for a given marbofloxacin dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were better, and the selection of resistance less frequent, for the early rather than for the late treatment. Moreover, the early administration of 1mg/kg led to better clinical and similar bacteriological (eradication and selection of resistance) outcomes than the late administration of 40 mg/kg marbofloxacin. Our results suggest that the optimal doses for the animals' cure could be lower when administered early during the time course of the infection than when administered after the disease outbreak. As the main argument against early treatments such as metaphylaxis is the possible enhancement of resistance at the gut level, further studies should assess if lower doses of antibiotic administered to all the animals of a herd could have less impact on the commensal digestive flora than higher doses only administered to animals showing clinical symptoms.

  4. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  5. Gamma interferon controls mouse polyomavirus infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jarad J; Lin, Eugene; Pack, Christopher D; Frost, Elizabeth L; Hadley, Annette; Swimm, Alyson I; Wang, Jun; Dong, Ying; Breeden, Cynthia P; Kalman, Daniel; Newell, Kenneth A; Lukacher, Aron E

    2011-10-01

    Human polyomaviruses are associated with substantial morbidity in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV/AIDS, recipients of bone marrow and kidney transplants, and individuals receiving immunomodulatory agents for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. No effective antipolyomavirus agents are currently available, and no host determinants have been identified to predict susceptibility to polyomavirus-associated diseases. Using the mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) infection model, we recently demonstrated that perforin-granzyme exocytosis, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and Fas did not contribute to control of infection or virus-induced tumors. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was recently shown to inhibit replication by human BK polyomavirus in primary cultures of renal tubular epithelial cells. In this study, we provide evidence that IFN-γ is an important component of the host defense against MPyV infection and tumorigenesis. In immortalized and primary cells, IFN-γ reduces expression of MPyV proteins and impairs viral replication. Mice deficient for the IFN-γ receptor (IFN-γR(-/-)) maintain higher viral loads during MPyV infection and are susceptible to MPyV-induced tumors; this increased viral load is not associated with a defective MPyV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. Using an acute MPyV infection kidney transplant model, we further show that IFN-γR(-/-) donor kidneys harbor higher MPyV levels than donor kidneys from wild-type mice. Finally, administration of IFN-γ to persistently infected mice significantly reduces MPyV levels in multiple organs, including the kidney, a major reservoir for persistent mouse and human polyomavirus infections. These findings demonstrate that IFN-γ is an antiviral effector molecule for MPyV infection.

  6. Mouse models for neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Hafezparast, Majid; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Wood, Nicholas W; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2002-08-01

    The mouse has many advantages over human beings for the study of genetics, including the unique property that genetic manipulation can be routinely carried out in the mouse genome. Most importantly, mice and human beings share the same mammalian genes, have many similar biochemical pathways, and have the same diseases. In the minority of cases where these features do not apply, we can still often gain new insights into mouse and human biology. In addition to existing mouse models, several major programmes have been set up to generate new mouse models of disease. Alongside these efforts are new initiatives for the clinical, behavioural, and physiological testing of mice. Molecular genetics has had a major influence on our understanding of the causes of neurological disorders in human beings, and much of this has come from work in mice.

  7. Impact of calcineurin inhibitors with or without interferon on hepatitis C virus titers in a chimeric mouse model of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kneteman, Norman M; Asthana, Sonal; Lewis, Jamie; Dibben, Chelcey; Douglas, Donna; Nourbakhsh, Mahra; Tyrrell, Lorne J; Lund, Garry

    2012-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CSA) has potent effects against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in vitro, but its clinical efficacy after liver transplantation (LT) is uncertain. We evaluated the impact of CSA and tacrolimus (TAC) with or without concomitant interferon (IFN) therapy on serum HCV titers in a chimeric mouse model of HCV infection. Six groups of HCV-infected mice received only the vehicle, IFN, CSA, CSA and IFN, TAC, or TAC and IFN for 4 weeks. The quantitative HCV polymerase chain reaction levels were determined after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of drug administration. There were no significant differences in the HCV titers after 4 weeks of treatment between the non-IFN-treated groups (log HCV titers: 3.5 ± 0.3 for the vehicle group, 4.4 ± 0.6 for the CSA group, and 4.3 ± 0.4 for the TAC group, P = 0.3). Although IFN had a consistent effect of reducing HCV titers across the groups, there was no significant impact of CSA on HCV levels when it was used alone or in combination with IFN at any time point. The 4-week HCV titers were as follows: 3.2 ± 0.3 for the IFN group, 4.7 ± 0.4 for the CSA/IFN group, and 4.0 ± 0.5 for the TAC/IFN group (P = 0.07). The CSA/IFN and TAC/IFN groups did not differ significantly (P = 0.6). Six of the 7 animals in the IFN group (85.7%) had an HCV titer decline ≥ 1 log, whereas in the test groups (CSA/IFN and TAC/IFN), 6 of 9 animals (66.7%) achieved a 1-log decline in the HCV titer (P = 1). Using this animal model, we could find no evidence supporting the routine use of CSA after LT in HCV-infected patients.

  8. Development of Eczema Vaccinatum in Atopic Mouse Models and Efficacy of MVA Vaccination against Lethal Poxviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knitlova, Jarmila; Hajkova, Vera; Voska, Ludek; Elsterova, Jana; Obrova, Barbora; Melkova, Zora

    2014-01-01

    Smallpox vaccine based on live, replicating vaccinia virus (VACV) is associated with several potentially serious and deadly complications. Consequently, a new generation of vaccine based on non-replicating Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has been under clinical development. MVA seems to induce good immune responses in blood tests, but it is impossible to test its efficacy in vivo in human. One of the serious complications of the replicating vaccine is eczema vaccinatum (EV) occurring in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD), thus excluding them from all preventive vaccination schemes. In this study, we first characterized and compared development of eczema vaccinatum in different mouse strains. Nc/Nga, Balb/c and C57Bl/6J mice were epicutaneously sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline control to induce signs of atopic dermatitis and subsequently trans-dermally (t.d.) immunized with VACV strain Western Reserve (WR). Large primary lesions occurred in both mock- and OVA-sensitized Nc/Nga mice, while they remained small in Balb/c and C57Bl/6J mice. Satellite lesions developed in both mock- and OVA-sensitized Nc/Nga and in OVA-sensitized Balb/c mice with the rate 40–50%. Presence of mastocytes and eosinophils was the highest in Nc/Nga mice. Consequently, we have chosen Nc/Nga mice as a model of AD/EV and tested efficacy of MVA and Dryvax vaccinations against a lethal intra-nasal (i.n.) challenge with WR, the surrogate of smallpox. Inoculation of MVA intra-muscularly (i.m.) or t.d. resulted in no lesions, while inoculation of Dryvax t.d. yielded large primary and many satellite lesions similar to WR. Eighty three and 92% of mice vaccinated with a single dose of MVA i.m. or t.d., respectively, survived a lethal i.n. challenge with WR without any serious illness, while all Dryvax-vaccinated animals survived. This is the first formal prove of protective immunity against a lethal poxvirus challenge induced by vaccination with MVA in an atopic organism. PMID

  9. The Role of CHI3L1 (Chitinase-3-Like-1) in the Pathogenesis of Infections in Burns in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J.; Vasko, Radovan; Shen, Keyue; Golberg, Alexander; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    In severe burn injury the unique setting of a depleted, dysfunctional immune system along with a loss of barrier function commonly results in opportunistic infections that eventually proof fatal. Unfortunately, the dynamic sequence of bacterial contamination, colonization and eventually septic invasion with bacteria such as Pseudomonas species is still poorly understood although a limiting factor in clinical decision making. Increasing evidence supports the notion that inhibition of bacterial translocation into the wound site may be an effective alternative to prevent infection. In this context we investigated the role of the mammalian Chitinase-3-Like-1 (CHI3L1) non-enyzmatic protein predominately expressed on epithelial as well as innate immune cells as a potential bacterial-translocation-mediating factor. We show a strong trend that a modulation of chitinase expression is likely to be effective in reducing mortality rates in a mouse model of burn injury with superinfection with the opportunistic PA14 Pseudomonas strain, thus demonstrating possible clinical leverage. PMID:26528713

  10. Selective Blockade of Interferon-α and -β Reveals Their Non-Redundant Functions in a Mouse Model of West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Kathleen C. F.; Lazear, Helen M.; Diamond, Michael S.; Schreiber, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Although type I interferons (IFNs) were first described almost 60 years ago, the ability to monitor and modulate the functional activities of the individual IFN subtypes that comprise this family has been hindered by a lack of reagents. The major type I IFNs, IFN-β and the multiple subtypes of IFN-α, are expressed widely and induce their effects on cells by interacting with a shared heterodimeric receptor (IFNAR). In the mouse, the physiologic actions of IFN-α and IFN-β have been defined using polyclonal anti-type I IFN sera, by targeting IFNAR using monoclonal antibodies or knockout mice, or using Ifnb-/- mice. However, the corresponding analysis of IFN-α has been difficult because of its polygenic nature. Herein, we describe two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that differentially neutralize murine IFN-β or multiple subtypes of murine IFN-α. Using these mAbs, we distinguish specific contributions of IFN-β versus IFN-α in restricting viral pathogenesis and identify IFN-α as the key mediator of the antiviral response in mice infected with West Nile virus. This study thus suggests the utility of these new reagents in dissecting the antiviral and immunomodulatory roles of IFN-β versus IFN-α in murine models of infection, immunity, and autoimmunity. PMID:26010249

  11. Immuno-pathophysiological responses of mouse model to experimental infection with Brucella melitensis and its lipopolysaccharides via intraperitoneal route.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdinasir Yusuf; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Kadir, Arifah Abdul; Saharee, Abdul Aziz

    2016-11-01

    Brucella melitensis is one of the major zoonotic pathogens with significant economic implications worldwide. The pathogenicity is complex and not always well understood. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) remains the major virulent factor of B. melitensis and responsible for the mechanism by which the pathogen causes its deleterious effects. In this study, 84 mice of 6-8 weeks old of both sexes were divided equally into 3 groups; namely Brucella melitensis infected group, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infected group and control group. The former two groups contained 36 mice each with equal gender distribution. The control group consisted of 12 mice only. Animals in B. melitensis infected group, a single inoculum of 0.4 ml containing 10(9) of B. melitensis were intraperitoneally challenged while animals in LPS group, a single dose of 0.4 ml containing LPS extracted from the B. melitensis were intraperitoneally inoculated. Animals in control group received intraperitoneally, a single dose of 0.4 ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH7. Animals that were infected intraperitoneally with B. melitensis demonstrated significant clinical presentation; gross and histo-pathological evidence than LPS infected group. However, both infected groups showed elevated levels of interleukins (IL-1β and IL6), antibody levels (IgM an IgG) as early as 3 days post-infection with predominance in LPS infected group. In contrast, low levels of sex related hormonal changes in which LPS infected group showed the least concentration were also detected throughout the experimental period. In conclusion, B. melitensis can be transmitted via gastrointestinal, respiratory and reproductive tract. Moreover, LPS stimulated significantly the innate and acquired immune system without significant systemic dysfunction, suggesting potentiality of the protective properties of this component as alternative vaccine for brucellosis infection.

  12. Effect of continuous sub-culturing on infectivity of Clostridium perfringens ATCC13124 in mouse gas gangrene model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi Bhushan; Alam, Syed Imteyaz

    2017-02-17

    Clostridium perfringens is a Validated Biological Agent and a pathogen of medical, veterinary, and military significance. Gas gangrene is the most destructive of all the clostridial diseases and is caused by C. perfringens type A strains wherein the infection spreads quickly (several inches per hour) with production of gas. Influence of repeated in vitro cultivation on the infectivity of C. perfringens was investigated by comparing the surface proteins of laboratory strain and repository strains of the bacterium using 2DE-MS approach. In order to optimize host-pathogen interaction during experimental gas gangrene infection, we also explored the role of particulate matrix on ability of C. perfringens to cause gas gangrene.

  13. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goupil, Brad A.; McNulty, Margaret A.; Martin, Matthew J.; McCracken, Michael K.; Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Mores, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice) to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91%) and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI). Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%), periosteal necrosis (66%), and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%). Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains. PMID:27182740

  14. Inflammation Oxidative Stress and Preneoplasia in a Mouse Model of Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    2003;361:955-64. 31. Hopkins WJ, Gendron-Fitzpatrick A, Balish E, Uehling DT. Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in genetically distinct mouse...strains: Time-course and host responses to infection. Infect Immun. 1998;66:2798-2802. 32. Hopkins WJ. Mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection . Chapter

  15. Post-exposure efficacy of oral T-705 (Favipiravir) against inhalational Ebola virus infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Smither, Sophie J; Eastaugh, Lin S; Steward, Jackie A; Nelson, Michelle; Lenk, Robert P; Lever, Mark S

    2014-04-01

    Filoviruses cause disease with high case fatality rates and are considered biological threat agents. Licensed post-exposure therapies that can be administered by the oral route are desired for safe and rapid distribution and uptake in the event of exposure or outbreaks. Favipiravir or T-705 has broad antiviral activity and has already undergone phase II and is undergoing phase III clinical trials for influenza. Here we report the first use of T-705 against Ebola virus. T-705 gave 100% protection against aerosol Ebola virus E718 infection; protection was shown in immune-deficient mice after 14 days of twice-daily dosing. T-705 was also shown to inhibit Ebola virus infection in cell culture. T-705 is likely to be licensed for use against influenza in the near future and could also be used with a new indication for filovirus infection.

  16. Mouse Models to Study Dengue Virus Immunology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Raphaël M.; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    The development of a compelling murine model of dengue virus (DENV) infection has been challenging, because DENV clinical isolates do not readily replicate or cause pathology in immunocompetent mice. However, research using immunocompromised mice and/or mouse-adapted viruses allows investigation of questions that may be impossible to address in human studies. In this review, we discuss the potential strengths and limitations of existing mouse models of dengue disease. Human studies are descriptive by nature; moreover, the strain, time, and sequence of infection are often unknown. In contrast, in mice, the conditions of infection are well defined and a large number of experimental parameters can be varied at will. Therefore, mouse models offer an opportunity to experimentally test hypotheses that are based on epidemiological observations. In particular, gain-of-function or loss-of-function models can be established to assess how different components of the immune system (either alone or in combination) contribute to protection or pathogenesis during secondary infections or after vaccination. In addition, mouse models have been used for pre-clinical testing of anti-viral drugs or for vaccine development studies. Conclusions based on mouse experiments must be extrapolated to DENV-infection in humans with caution due to the inherent limitations of animal models. However, research in mouse models is a useful complement to in vitro and epidemiological data, and may delineate new areas that deserve attention during future human studies. PMID:24782859

  17. Assessment of Transcriptional Activity of Borrelia burgdorferi and Host Cytokine Genes During Early and Late Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Sunlian; Barthold, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Differential gene expression by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes during mammalian infection facilitates their dissemination as well as immune evasion. Modulation of gene transcription in response to host immunity has been documented with the outer surface protein C, but the influence of transcription of other genes is largely unknown. A low-density array (LDA) was developed to study transcriptional activity of 43 B. burgdorferi genes and 19 host genes that may be involved in various host–agent interactions. Gene transcription in heart, joint, and muscle tissue was compared in immunocompetent C3H and immunodeficient C3H-scid mice during early (3 weeks) and late (2 months) B. burgdorferi infection. Among all tissue types, levels of relative transcription of over 80% of B. burgdorferi genes tested were one- to nine-fold less in C3H mice compared to C3H-scid mice. At the later time point, all genes were transcribed in C3H-scid mice, whereas transcription of 16 genes out of 43 tested was not detected in analyzed tissues of C3H mice. Our data suggest that during infection of immunocompetent mice, a majority of B. burgdorferi genes tested are downregulated in response to acquired host immunity. LDA revealed variable patterns of host gene expression in different tissues and at different intervals in infected mice. Higher levels of relative expression for IL-10 during both early and late infection were detected in heart base, and it was unchanged in the tibiotarsal joint. Comparative analysis of B. burgdorferi and host genes transcriptional activity revealed that increased flaB mRNA during early infection was followed by increases of CCL7, CCL8, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in all assessed tissue types. LDA represents a valuable approach for sensitive and quantitative gene transcription profiling and for understanding Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23930938

  18. Acute respiratory infection with mouse adenovirus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jason B.; Stempfle, Gregory S.; Wilkinson, John E.; Younger, John G.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of adenovirus respiratory disease are limited by the strict species-specificity of the adenoviruses. Following intranasal inoculation of adult C57BL/6 mice with mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1), we detected MAV-1 early region 3 (E3) and hexon gene expression in the lungs at 7 days post-infection (dpi). We detected MAV-1 E3 protein in the respiratory epithelium 7 dpi. We did not detect viral mRNA or protein at 14 dpi, but MAV-1 DNA was detected by PCR at 21 dpi. Chemokine transcript levels increased between 7 and 14 dpi in the lungs of infected mice. MAV-1 infection induced a patchy cellular infiltrate in lungs at 7 and 14 dpi. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of MAV-1 in the respiratory epithelium of infected mice and describing chemokine responses in the lung induced by MAV-1 respiratory infection. MAV-1 infection of mice has the potential to serve as a model for inflammatory changes seen in human adenovirus respiratory disease. PMID:16054189

  19. The gamma interferon knockout mouse model for sarcocystis neurona: comparison of infectivity of sporocysts and merozoites and routes of inoculation.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Lindsay, D S; Kwok, O C; Shen, S K

    2001-10-01

    The dose-related infectivity of Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts and merozoites of 2 recent isolates of S. neurona was compared in gamma interferon knockout (KO) mice. Tenfold dilutions of sporocysts or merozoites were bioassayed in mice, cell culture, or both. All 8 mice, fed 1,000 sporocysts, developed neurological signs with demonstrable S. neurona in their tissues. Of 24 mice fed low numbers of sporocysts (100, 10, 1), 18 became ill by 4 wk postinoculation, and S. neurona was demonstrated in their brains; antibodies (S. neurona agglutination test) to S. neurona and S. neurona parasites were not found in tissues of the 6 mice that were fed sporocysts and survived for >39 days. One thousand culture-derived merozoites of these 2 isolates were pathogenic to all 8 mice inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.). Of the 24 mice inoculated s.c. with merozoites numbering 100, 10, or 1, only 3 mice had demonstrable S. neurona infection; antibodies to S. neurona were not found in the 21 mice that had no demonstrable organisms. As few as 10 merozoites were infective for cell cultures. These results demonstrate that at least 1,000 merozoites are needed to cause disease in KO mice. Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts were infective to mice by the s.c. route.

  20. Interleukin-17 is not required for classical macrophage activation in a pulmonary mouse model of Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Hardison, Sarah E; Wozniak, Karen L; Kolls, Jay K; Wormley, Floyd L

    2010-12-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes disease in individuals with suppressed cell-mediated immunity. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that increases in pulmonary Th1-type and interleukin-17A (IL-17A) cytokine production, classical macrophage activation, and sterilizing immunity are elicited in response to infection with a gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing C. neoformans strain, H99γ. IL-17A-treated macrophages, compared to IL-4-treated macrophages, have been demonstrated to exhibit increased microbicidal activity in vitro, a characteristic consistent with classical macrophage activation. The purpose of these studies is to determine the role of IL-17A in the induction of classically activated macrophages following infection with C. neoformans. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were used to characterize the macrophage activation phenotype in lung tissues of mice treated with isotype control or anti-IL-17A antibodies and given an experimental pulmonary infection with C. neoformans strain H99γ. The pulmonary fungal burden was resolved, albeit more slowly, in mice depleted of IL-17A compared to the fungal burden in isotype control-treated mice. Nonetheless, no difference in classical macrophage activation was observed in IL-17A-depleted mice. Similarly, classical macrophage activation was evident in mice deficient in IL-17A or the IL-17 receptor A, which mediates IL-17A signaling, following pulmonary infection with wild-type C. neoformans strain H99 or H99γ. These studies suggest that IL-17A may play a role in the early immune response to C. neoformans but is not required for classical macrophage activation in mice experimentally infected with C. neoformans.

  1. Immune Activity of BCG Infected Mouse Macrophages Treated with a Novel Recombinant Mouse Lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Kelly M; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin has been investigated for its adjuvant action to boost the BCG vaccine. Previous studies demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF) enhanced efficacy of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to protect mice against the virulent Erdman Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The studies here investigate the hypothesis that a novel CHO-derived recombinant mouse LF can modify cytokine production and antigen presentation molecules on macrophages. The mouse LF (rmLF) was examined for effects on bone marrow derived macrophage (BMM) activities when cultured with BCG. Comparisons were made to CHO-derived recombinant human LF (rhLF). Inflammatory cytokine responses were investigated, as were antigen presentation and associated co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine responses were subsequently measured when these cells were co-cultured with naïve or BCG sensitized CD4+ lymphocytes. While overall responses were similar between mouse, human, and bovine forms, the homologous rmLF treated infected BMMs showed unique activation patterns of cytokine production. These results indicate that species-specific LF can have different effects on mouse macrophages exposed to BCG, thus potentially affecting adjuvant activity when used in models of vaccination in mice.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection does not promote hepatocellular cancer in a transgenic mouse model of hepatitis C virus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexis; Feng, Yan; Parry, Nicola MA; McCabe, Amanda; Mobley, Melissa W; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Whary, Mark T; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect millions of people and can induce cancer. We investigated if H. pylori infection promoted HCV-associated liver cancer. Helicobacter-free C3B6F1 wild-type (WT) and C3B6F1-Tg(Alb1-HCVN)35Sml (HT) male and female mice were orally inoculated with H. pylori SS1 or sterile media. Mice were euthanized at ~12 mo postinoculation and samples were collected for analyses. There were no significant differences in hepatocellular tumor promotion between WT and HT mice; however, HT female mice developed significantly larger livers with more hepatic steatosis than WT female mice. H. pylori did not colonize the liver nor promote hepatocellular tumors in WT or HT mice. In the stomach, H. pylori induced more corpus lesions in WT and HT female mice than in WT and HT male mice, respectively. The increased corpus pathology in WT and HT female mice was associated with decreased gastric H. pylori colonization, increased gastric and hepatic interferon gamma expression, and increased serum Th1 immune responses against H. pylori. HT male mice appeared to be protected from H. pylori-induced corpus lesions. Furthermore, during gastric H. pylori infection, HT male mice were protected from gastric antral lesions and hepatic steatosis relative to WT male mice and these effects were associated with increased serum TNF-α. Our findings indicate that H. pylori is a gastric pathogen that does not promote hepatocellular cancer and suggest that the HCV transgene is associated with amelioration of specific liver and gastric lesions observed during concurrent H. pylori infection in mice. PMID:23929035

  3. Roles of Macrophages and Neutrophils in the Early Host Response to Bacillus anthracis Spores in a Mouse Model of Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    both strains are proficient for the complement component C5 (Hc). However, when the time course experiments were re- peated, nearly identical results...The importance of neutrophils in human anthrax infection is also largely unexplored. In 2001, Grinberg et al. reexamined the human specimens...bloodstream are trapped in the liver and killed by immigrating neutrophils. J. Immunol. 157:2514–2520. 20. Grinberg , L. M., F. A. Abramova, O. V

  4. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  5. Efficacy of liposomal gentamicin against Rhodococcus equi in a mouse infection model and colocalization with R. equi in equine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Burton, Alexandra J; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hondalus, Mary K; Arnold, Robert D

    2015-04-17

    Rhodococcus equi, a facultative intracellular pathogen and an important cause of pneumonia in foals, is highly susceptible to killing by gentamicin in vitro. However, gentamicin is not effective in vivo, due to its poor cellular penetration. Encapsulation of drugs in liposomes enhances cellular uptake. The objectives of this study were to compare liposomal gentamicin and free gentamicin with respect to their uptake by equine macrophages and intracellular colocalization with R. equi and to compare the efficacies of liposomal gentamicin, free gentamicin and clarithromycin with rifampin for the reduction of R. equi CFU in a mouse model of infection. After ex vivo exposure, a significantly higher mean (±SD) percentage of equine alveolar macrophages contained liposomal gentamicin (91.9±7.6%) as opposed to free gentamicin (16.8±12.5%). Intracellular colocalization of drug and R. equi, as assessed by confocal microscopy, occurred in a significantly higher proportion of cells exposed to liposomal gentamicin (81.2±17.8%) compared to those exposed to free gentamicin (10.4±8.7%). The number of R. equi CFU in the spleen was significantly lower in mice treated with liposomal gentamicin compared to that of mice treated with free gentamicin or to untreated control mice. Treatment with liposomal gentamicin also resulted in a significantly greater reduction in the number of R. equi CFU in the liver compared to treatment with clarithromycin in combination with rifampin. These results support further investigation of liposomal gentamicin as a new treatment for infections caused by R. equi.

  6. Myeloid ZFP36L1 Does Not Regulate Inflammation or Host Defense in Mouse Models of Acute Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, Lynnae D.; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Rah, Yoon J.; Matsuura, Kori Y.; Coleman, Fadie T.; Hilliard, Kristie L.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary Ash; Ieong, Michael; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Jones, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 36, C3H type-like 1 (ZFP36L1) is one of several Zinc Finger Protein 36 (Zfp36) family members, which bind AU rich elements within 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) to negatively regulate the post-transcriptional expression of targeted mRNAs. The prototypical member of the family, Tristetraprolin (TTP or ZFP36), has been well-studied in the context of inflammation and plays an important role in repressing pro-inflammatory transcripts such as TNF-α. Much less is known about the other family members, and none have been studied in the context of infection. Using macrophage cell lines and primary alveolar macrophages we demonstrated that, like ZFP36, ZFP36L1 is prominently induced by infection. To test our hypothesis that macrophage production of ZFP36L1 is necessary for regulation of the inflammatory response of the lung during pneumonia, we generated mice with a myeloid-specific deficiency of ZFP36L1. Surprisingly, we found that myeloid deficiency of ZFP36L1 did not result in alteration of lung cytokine production after infection, altered clearance of bacteria, or increased inflammatory lung injury. Although alveolar macrophages are critical components of the innate defense against respiratory pathogens, we concluded that myeloid ZFP36L1 is not essential for appropriate responses to bacteria in the lungs. Based on studies conducted with myeloid-deficient ZFP36 mice, our data indicate that, of the Zfp36 family, ZFP36 is the predominant negative regulator of cytokine expression in macrophages. In conclusion, these results imply that myeloid ZFP36 may fully compensate for loss of ZFP36L1 or that Zfp36l1-dependent mRNA expression does not play an integral role in the host defense against bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25299049

  7. Genomic and immunologic factors associated with viral pathogenesis in a lethal EV71 infected neonatal mouse model

    PubMed Central

    YUE, YINGYING; LI, PENG; SONG, NANNAN; LI, BINGQING; LI, ZHIHUI; GUO, YUQI; ZHANG, WEIDONG; WEI, MING Q.; GAI, ZHONGTAO; MENG, HONG; WANG, JIWEN; QIN, LIZENG

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major health problem in China and worldwide. The present study aimed to understand the virological features of EV71 and host responses resulting from EV71 infection. Six different EV71 strains were isolated from HFMD patients with severe or mild clinical symptoms, and were analyzed for pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the six virus strains exhibited similar cytopathogenic effects on susceptible MA104 cells. However, marked differences in histological and immunopathological changes were observed when mice were inoculated with the different virus strains. Thus, the viruses studied were divided into two groups, highly or weakly pathogenic. Two representative virus strains, JN200804 and JN200803 (highly and weakly pathogenic, respectively) were studied further to investigate pathogenicity-associated factors, including genetic mutations and immunopathogenesis. The present study has demonstrated that highly pathogenic strains have stable genome and amino acid sequences. Notably, the present study demonstrated that a highly pathogenic strain induced a significant increase of the bulk CD4 T cell levels at 3 days post-inoculation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that genomic and immunologic factors may be responsible for the multiple tissue damage caused by highly pathogenic EV71 infection. PMID:27035332

  8. Genomic and immunologic factors associated with viral pathogenesis in a lethal EV71 infected neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yingying; Li, Peng; Song, Nannan; Li, Bingqing; Li, Zhihui; Guo, Yuqi; Zhang, Weidong; Wei, Ming Q; Gai, Zhongtao; Meng, Hong; Wang, Jiwen; Qin, Lizeng

    2016-05-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major health problem in China and worldwide. The present study aimed to understand the virological features of EV71 and host responses resulting from EV71 infection. Six different EV71 strains were isolated from HFMD patients with severe or mild clinical symptoms, and were analyzed for pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the six virus strains exhibited similar cytopathogenic effects on susceptible MA104 cells. However, marked differences in histological and immunopathological changes were observed when mice were inoculated with the different virus strains. Thus, the viruses studied were divided into two groups, highly or weakly pathogenic. Two representative virus strains, JN200804 and JN200803 (highly and weakly pathogenic, respectively) were studied further to investigate pathogenicity-associated factors, including genetic mutations and immunopathogenesis. The present study has demonstrated that highly pathogenic strains have stable genome and amino acid sequences. Notably, the present study demonstrated that a highly pathogenic strain induced a significant increase of the bulk CD4 T cell levels at 3 days post‑inoculation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that genomic and immunologic factors may be responsible for the multiple tissue damage caused by highly pathogenic EV71 infection.

  9. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  10. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Percopo, Caroline M; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ochkur, Sergei I; Luo, Janice L; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-01-30

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine-driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense.

  11. Intranasal Administration of Chitosan Against Influenza A (H7N9) Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mei; Qu, Di; Wang, Haiming; Sun, Zhiping; Liu, Xueying; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Changgui; Li, Xuguang; Chen, Ze

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus evolves constantly in an unpredictable fashion, making it necessary to vaccinate people annually for effective prevention and control of influenza. In general, however, during the first wave of an influenza outbreak caused by a newly emerging virus strain, influenza morbidity and mortality have been observed to rise sharply due to the lack of a matching vaccine. This necessitates the exploration of novel intervention approaches, particularly those prophylactic or therapeutic agents that have a broad range of antiviral activities and are also proven to be non-toxic. Here, we reported that stimulation of the innate immune system by intranasal administration of chitosan as a single agent was sufficient to completely protect BALB/c mice from lethal infection by H7N9 virus, a newly emerged viral strain that is highly pathogenic to humans. Remarkably, animals could still be protected against lethal challenge by H7N9 (10×LD50), even ten days after the intranasal chitosan administration. The significantly enhanced infiltration of leukocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage and elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchia/lung tissues revealed the potent activation of mucosal immune responses by intranasally delivered chitosan. We also observed that chitosan can protect mice from three other virus strains. The marked breadth and magnitude of protection against diverse viral strains makes chitosan an attractive candidate as a universal anti-influenza agent. PMID:27353250

  12. Functional Intestinal Bile Acid 7α-Dehydroxylation by Clostridium scindens Associated with Protection from Clostridium difficile Infection in a Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Nicolas; Desharnais, Lyne; Beutler, Markus; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Terrazos, Miguel A.; Menin, Laure; Schürch, Christian M.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Minton, Nigel P.; Stecher, Bärbel; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, important mediators of lipid absorption, also act as hormone-like regulators and as antimicrobial molecules. In all these functions their potency is modulated by a variety of chemical modifications catalyzed by bacteria of the healthy gut microbiota, generating a complex variety of secondary bile acids. Intestinal commensal organisms are well-adapted to normal concentrations of bile acids in the gut. In contrast, physiological concentrations of the various intestinal bile acid species play an important role in the resistance to intestinal colonization by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. Antibiotic therapy can perturb the gut microbiota and thereby impair the production of protective secondary bile acids. The most important bile acid transformation is 7α-dehydroxylation, producing deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA). The enzymatic pathway carrying out 7α-dehydroxylation is restricted to a narrow phylogenetic group of commensal bacteria, the best-characterized of which is Clostridium scindens. Like many other intestinal commensal species, 7-dehydroxylating bacteria are understudied in vivo. Conventional animals contain variable and uncharacterized indigenous 7α-dehydroxylating organisms that cannot be selectively removed, making controlled colonization with a specific strain in the context of an undisturbed microbiota unfeasible. In the present study, we used a recently established, standardized gnotobiotic mouse model that is stably associated with a simplified murine 12-species “oligo-mouse microbiota” (Oligo-MM12). It is representative of the major murine intestinal bacterial phyla, but is deficient for 7α-dehydroxylation. We find that the Oligo-MM12 consortium carries out bile acid deconjugation, a prerequisite for 7α-dehydroxylation, and confers no resistance to C. difficile infection (CDI). Amendment of Oligo-MM12 with C. scindens normalized the large intestinal bile acid composition by reconstituting 7

  13. T cell-mediated protection against lethal 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hailong; Santiago, Félix; Lambert, Kris; Takimoto, Toru; Topham, David J

    2011-01-01

    Genetic mutation and reassortment of influenza virus gene segments, in particular those of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), that lead to antigenic drift and shift are the major strategies for influenza virus to escape preexisting immunity. The most recent example of such phenomena is the first pandemic of H1N1 influenza of the 21st century, which started in 2009. Cross-reactive antibodies raised against H1N1 viruses circulating before 1930 show protective activity against the 2009 pandemic virus. Cross-reactive T-cell responses can also contribute to protection, but in vivo support of this view is lacking. To explore the protection mechanisms in vivo, we primed mice with H1 and H3 influenza virus isolates and rechallenged them with a virus derived from the 2009 H1N1 A/CA/04/09 virus, named CA/E3/09. We found that priming with influenza viruses of both H1 and H3 homo- and heterosubtypes protected against lethal CA/E3/09 virus challenge. Convalescent-phase sera from these primed mice conferred no neutralization activity in vitro and no protection in vivo. However, T-cell depletion studies suggested that both CD4 and CD8 T cells contributed to the protection. Taken together, these results indicate that cross-reactive T cells established after initial priming with distally related viruses can be a vital component for prevention of disease and control of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection. Our results highlight the importance of establishing cross-reactive T-cell responses for protecting against existing or newly emerging pandemic influenza viruses.

  14. Mouse Models of Human Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A.; McDonald, J. D.; Symula, D.; Dove, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) results from a deficiency in phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although this inborn error of metabolism was among the first in humans to be understood biochemically and genetically, little is known of the mechanism(s) involved in the pathology of PKU. We have combined mouse germline mutagenesis with screens for hyperphenylalaninemia to isolate three mutants deficient in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity and cross-reactive protein. Two of these have reduced PAH mRNA and display characteristics of untreated human PKU patients. A low PHE diet partially reverses these abnormalities. Our success in using high frequency random germline point mutagenesis to obtain appropriate disease models illustrates how such mutagenesis can complement the emergent power of targeted mutagenesis in the mouse. The mutants now can be used as models in studying both maternal PKU and somatic gene therapy. PMID:8375656

  15. [Psoriasis SCID-mouse model].

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J; Kaufmann, R; Boehncke, W-H

    2006-07-01

    Psoriasis is characterized by a complex phenotype and pathogenesis along with polygenic determination. Several psoriasis animal models have only been able to incompletely reproduce the disease. A xenogeneic transplantation approach, grafting skin from psoriatic patients onto mice with a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), was the first to meet the criteria for a psoriasis model. During the last 10 years, this psoriasis SCID-mouse model not only allowed telling experiments focusing on pathogenetic aspects, but also proved being a powerful tool for drug discovery with a good predictive value.

  16. Mouse Models for Methylmalonic Aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Heidi L.; Pitt, James J.; Wood, Leonie R.; Hamilton, Natasha J.; Sarsero, Joseph P.; Buck, Nicole E.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene). Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation. PMID:22792386

  17. Aging Research Using Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Anderson, Laura C; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A; Chesler, Elissa J; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L

    2015-06-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in "health-span," or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, and immune function, as well as physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process.

  18. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  19. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization

    PubMed Central

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 104 C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  20. A STAT-1 knockout mouse model for Machupo virus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Machupo virus (MACV), a member of the Arenaviridae, causes Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, with ~20% lethality in humans. The pathogenesis of MACV infection is poorly understood, and there are no clinically proven treatments for disease. This is due, in part, to a paucity of small animal models for MACV infection in which to discover and explore candidate therapeutics. Methods Mice lacking signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) were infected with MACV. Lethality, viral replication, metabolic changes, hematology, histopathology, and systemic cytokine expression were analyzed throughout the course of infection. Results We report here that STAT-1 knockout mice succumbed to MACV infection within 7-8 days, and presented some relevant clinical and histopathological manifestations of disease. Furthermore, the model was used to validate the efficacy of ribavirin in protection against infection. Conclusions The STAT-1 knockout mouse model can be a useful small animal model for drug testing and preliminary immunological analysis of lethal MACV infection. PMID:21672221

  1. Protection from Secondary Dengue Virus Infection in a Mouse Model Reveals the Role of Serotype Cross-reactive B and T cells1,2

    PubMed Central

    Zompi, Simona; Santich, Brian H.; Beatty, P. Robert; Harris, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes cause dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Although severe disease has been associated with heterotypic secondary DENV infection, most secondary DENV infections are asymptomatic or result in classic DF. The role of cross-reactive immunity in mediating cross-protection against secondary heterotypic DENV infection is not well-understood. DENV infection of interferon-α/β and -γ receptor-deficient (AG129) mice reproduces key features of human disease. We previously demonstrated a role in cross-protection for pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies, maintained by long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs). Here we use a sequential infection model, infecting AG129 mice with DENV-1 followed by DENV-2 6–8 weeks later. We find that increased DENV-specific avidity during acute secondary heterotypic infection is mediated by cross-reactive memory B cells, as evidenced by increased numbers of DENV-1-specific cells by ELISPOT and higher avidity against DENV-1 of supernatants from polyclonally-stimulated splenocytes isolated from mice experiencing secondary DENV-2 infection. However, increased DENV-specific avidity is not associated with increased DENV-specific neutralization, which appears to be mediated by naïve B cells. Adoptive transfer of DENV-1-immune B and T cells into naïve mice prior to secondary DENV-2 infection delayed mortality. Mice depleted of T cells developed signs of disease but recovered after secondary DENV infection. Overall, we found that protective cross-reactive antibodies are secreted by both LLPCs and memory B cells and that both cross-reactive B cells and T cells provide protection against a secondary heterotypic DENV infection. Understanding the protective immunity that develops naturally against DENV infection may help design future vaccines. PMID:22131327

  2. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  3. Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Esquerda-Canals, Gisela; Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra

    2017-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that nowadays affects more than 40 million people worldwide and it is predicted to exponentially increase in the coming decades. Because no curative treatment exists, research on the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as the testing of new drugs, are mandatory. For these purposes, animal models constitute a valuable, although perfectible tool. This review takes a tour through several aspects of mouse models of AD, such as the generation of transgenic models, the relevance of the promoter driving the expression of the transgenes, and the concrete transgenes used to simulate AD pathophysiology. Then, transgenic mouse lines harboring mutated human genes at several loci such as APP, PSEN1, APOEɛ4, and ob (leptin) are reviewed. Therefore, not only the accumulation of the Aβ peptide is emulated but also cholesterol and insulin metabolism. Further novel information about the disease will allow for the development of more accurate animal models, which in turn will undoubtedly be helpful for bringing preclinical research closer to clinical trials in humans.

  4. The mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the species of choice for most immunological studies, ranging from simple vaccine testing to the intricate dissection of fundamental immunopathogenic mechanisms. Although not fully mouse adapted, some strains of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replicate in the murine respiratory tract and induce specific T and B cell responses. Passive transfer of neutralising antibody is protective and assist in viral clearance. In addition, many of RSV's complex behaviours are recapitulated in the mouse (including enhancement of disease by vaccination and delayed effects of neonatal infection). However, human studies remain essential to confirm or refute predictions from animal models.

  5. Mouse models of human thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.F.; Martinell, J.; Whitney, J.B. III; Popp, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The group of diseases called the thalassemias is the largest single-gene health problem in the world according the World Health Organization. The thalassemias are lethal hereditary anemias in which the infants cannot make their own blood. Three mouse mutants are shown to be models of the human disease ..cap alpha..-thalassemia. However, since an additional gene is affected, these mutants represent a particularly severe condition in which death occurs in the homozygous embryo even before globin genes are activated. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics are described. (ACR)

  6. Bioluminescent imaging of bacteria during mouse infection.

    PubMed

    Warawa, Jonathan M; Lawrenz, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging is a powerful tool that has recently been applied towards the study of infectious diseases. Optical imaging of bioluminescently labeled bacteria in infected animals allows for real-time analysis of bacterial proliferation and dissemination during infection without sacrificing the animal. Imaging also allows for tracking of disease progression in an individual subject over time, has the potential to reveal previously overlooked sites of infection, and reduces the number of research animals used in pathogenesis studies. Here, we describe the use of a deep-cooled CCD camera imager to record light emitted from bacteria during infection. We also describe the process of correlating bioluminescence to bacterial numbers by ex vivo imaging of necropsied tissues. Together these techniques can be used to estimate bacterial burdens in host tissues both in vivo and ex vivo using bioluminescent imaging.

  7. Liposome encapsulation of clofazimine reduces toxicity in vitro and in vivo and improves therapeutic efficacy in the beige mouse model of disseminated Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, R T

    1996-01-01

    Disseminated infections caused by the Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex (MAC) are the most frequent opportunistic bacterial infections in patients with AIDS. MAC isolates are resistant to many of the standard antituberculous drugs. Failure to obtain significant activities of certain drugs is due to difficulty in achieving high concentrations at the sites where the infections reside. New and improved agents for the treatment of mycobacterial infections are therefore required. Earlier, the anti-MAC activities of various agents in free or liposomal form were studied; liposomes were used as drug carriers to ultimately target the drugs to macrophages where mycobacterial infections reside. Clofazimine was chosen for further studies because it could be effectively encapsulated and its activity was well maintained in liposomal form. The present studies with both erythrocytes and macrophages as the model systems show that liposomal drug is far less toxic in vitro than the free drug. The in vivo toxicity of clofazimine was also significantly reduced after liposome encapsulation. The therapeutic efficacies of free and liposomal drugs were compared in a beige mouse model of disseminated MAC infection. An equivalent dose of liposomal drug (10 mg/kg of body weight) was more effective in eliminating the bacterial from the various organs studied, particularly from the liver. Moreover, because of the reduced toxicity of liposomal drug, higher doses could be administered, resulting in a significant reduction in the numbers of CFU in the liver, spleen, and kidneys. The data demonstrate that liposomal clofazimine is highly effective in the treatment of MAC infections, even if the treatment is initiated after a disseminated infection has been established. The present studies thus suggest the potential usefulness of liposomal clofazimine for the treatment of disseminated MAC infections. PMID:8843300

  8. Genetic mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Barkus, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of genetically modified mice in investigating the neurobiology of depressive behaviour. First, the behavioural tests commonly used as a model of depressive-like behaviour in rodents are described. These tests include those sensitive to antidepressant treatment such as the forced swim test and the tail suspension test, as well as other tests that encompass the wider symptomatology of a depressive episode. A selection of example mutant mouse lines is then presented to illustrate the use of these tests. As our understanding of depression increases, an expanding list of candidate genes is being investigated using mutant mice. Here, mice relevant to the monoamine and corticotrophin-releasing factor hypotheses of depression are covered as well as those relating to the more recent candidate, brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This selection provides interesting examples of the use of complimentary lines, such as those that have genetic removal or overexpression, and also opposing behavioural changes seen following manipulation of closely related genes. Finally, factors such as the issue of background strain and influence of environmental factors are reflected upon, before considering what can realistically be expected of a mouse model of this complex psychiatric disorder.

  9. Performance of flow cytometric analysis for the micronucleus assay--a reconstruction model using serial dilutions of malaria-infected cells with normal mouse peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Torous, Dorothea; Asano, Norihide; Tometsko, Carol; Sugunan, Siva; Dertinger, Stephen; Morita, Takeshi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    To confirm the performance and statistical power of a flow cytometric method for scoring micronucleated erythrocytes, reconstruction experiments were performed. For these investigations, peripheral blood erythrocytes from untreated mice, with a micronucleated erythrocyte frequency of approximately 0.1% were combined with known quantities of Plasmodium berghei (malaria) infected mouse erythrocytes. These cells had an infected erythrocyte frequency of approximately 0.7%, and mimic the DNA content of micronuclei (MN). For an initial experiment, samples with a range of MN/malaria (Mal) content were constructed and analysed in triplicate by flow cytometry until 2000, 20,000 and 200,000 total erythrocytes were acquired. In a second experiment, each specimen was analysed in triplicate until 2000, 20,000, 200,000 and 1,000,000 erythrocytes were acquired. As expected, the sensitivity of the assay to detect small changes in rare erythrocyte sub-population frequencies was directly related to the number of cells analysed. For example, when 2000 cells were scored, increases in MN/Mal frequencies of 3.9- or 2.7-fold were detected as statistically significant. When 200,000 cells were analysed, a 1.2-fold increase was detected. These data have implications for the experimental design and interpretation of micronucleus assays that are based on automated scoring procedures, since previously unattainable numbers of cells can now be readily scored.

  10. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS VIRULENCE USING AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED MOUSE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An immunocompromised mouse model was used to characterize Aeromonas strains for their ability to cause opportunistic, extraintestinal infections. A total of 34 isolates of Aeromonas (A. hydrophila [n = 12]), A. veronii biotype sobria [n = 7], A. caviae [n = 4], A. enchelia [n = 4...

  12. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Caignard, Grégory; Eva, Megan M.; van Bruggen, Rebekah; Eveleigh, Robert; Bourque, Guillaume; Malo, Danielle; Gros, Philippe; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses. PMID:25268389

  13. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  14. Mouse models of adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Hung, Holly A.; Lerario, Antonio M.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of the organogenesis, homeostasis, and tumorigenesis of the adrenal cortex has been the subject of intense study for many decades. Specifically, characterization of tumor predisposition syndromes with adrenocortical manifestations and molecular profiling of sporadic adrenocortical tumors have led to the discovery of key molecular pathways that promote pathological adrenal growth. However, given the observational nature of such studies, several important questions regarding the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors have remained. This review will summarize naturally occurring and genetically engineered mouse models that have provided novel tools to explore the molecular and cellular underpinnings of adrenocortical tumors. New paradigms of cancer initiation, maintenance, and progression that have emerged from this work will be discussed. PMID:26678830

  15. Treating Viral Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Insights from a Mouse Model of Cigarette Smoke and H1N1 Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Carla M. T.; Zavitz, Caleb C. J.; Botelho, Fernando M.; Lambert, Kristen N.; Brown, Earl G.; Mossman, Karen L.; Taylor, John D.; Stämpfli, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a progressive lung disease that is punctuated by periods of exacerbations (worsening of symptoms) that are attributable to viral infections. While rhinoviruses are most commonly isolated viruses during episodes of exacerbation, influenza viruses have the potential to become even more problematic with the increased likelihood of an epidemic. Methodology and Principal Findings This study examined the impact of current and potential pharmacological targets namely the systemic corticosteroid dexamethasone and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- gamma agonist pioglitazone on the outcome of infection in smoke-exposed mice. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to room air or cigarette smoke for 4 days and subsequently inoculated with an H1N1 influenza A virus. Interventions were delivered daily during the course of infection. We show that smoke-exposed mice have an exacerbated inflammatory response following infection. While smoke exposure did not compromise viral clearance, precision cut lung slices from smoke-exposed mice showed greater expression of CC (MCP-1, -3), and CXC (KC, MIP-2, GCP-2) chemokines compared to controls when stimulated with a viral mimic or influenza A virus. While dexamethasone treatment partially attenuated the inflammatory response in the broncho-alveolar lavage of smoke-exposed, virally-infected animals, viral-induced neutrophilia was steroid insensitive. In contrast to controls, dexamethasone-treated smoke-exposed influenza-infected mice had a worsened health status. Pioglitazone treatment of virally-infected smoke-exposed mice proved more efficacious than the steroid intervention. Further mechanistic evaluation revealed that a deficiency in CCR2 did not improve the inflammatory outcome in smoke-exposed, virally-infected animals. Conclusions and Significance This animal model of cigarette smoke and H1N1 influenza infection demonstrates that smoke-exposed animals are differentially primed to

  16. Delayed control of herpes simplex virus infection and impaired CD4(+) T-cell migration to the skin in mouse models of DOCK8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Inge E A; Randall, Katrina L; Hollett, Natasha A; Di Law, Hsei; Miosge, Lisa A; Sontani, Yovina; Goodnow, Christopher C; Tscharke, David C

    2015-07-01

    DOCK8 deficiency in humans and mice leads to multiple defects in immune cell numbers and function. Patients with this immunodeficiency have a high morbidity and mortality, and are distinguished by chronic cutaneous viral infections, including those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). The underlying mechanism of the specific susceptibility to these chronic cutaneous viral infections is currently unknown, largely because the effect of DOCK8 deficiency has not been studied in suitable models. A better understanding of these mechanisms is required to underpin the development of more specific therapies. Here we show that DOCK8-deficient mice have poor control of primary cutaneous herpes simplex lesions and this is associated with increased virus loads. Furthermore, DOCK8-deficient mice showed a lack of CD4(+) T-cell infiltration into HSV-infected skin.

  17. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection of the Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, John R.; Magliocco, Michael V.

    1971-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of human cornea is rare but serious. The work of previous investigators using experimental infection primarily of rabbit cornea resulted in successful therapy for 10 to 50% of clinical cases. The advantage of using the mouse is demonstrated. The methods we adapted for characterizing the untreated experimental infection included: incising the cornea to enable establishing the infection; corneal examination with a steroscopic microscope; grading corneal pathology; qualitative and quantitative monitoring of the infecting bacteria by culturing and staining sectioned and dissected tissues. The characteristics of the tissue pathology, host response, and infection were similar to those reported for other animals and man. Corneal pathology was frequently nearly maximal 1 day after infection; host response involved a progression of events of long duration; pathology persisted well beyond the period of bacterial infection. The infection was essentially noncommunicable, and invasiveness was limited to the tissues of the incised eye. The results show the possibility of tests for invasiveness of clinical isolates and for screening for therapeutic and prophylactic measures. PMID:16557955

  18. Activation of intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T and CD19+ B cells is associated with viral clearance in a mouse model of acute hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Hu, Ting-Ting; Lei, Yu; Li, Hu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Bin; Chen, Min; Hu, Huai-Dong; Ren, Hong; Hu, Peng

    2016-08-09

    The role of immunity in the pathogenesis of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is poorly understood. The purpose of this research was to define the intrahepatic immune factors responsible for viral clearance during acute HBV infection. The model of acute HBV infection was established by hydrodynamically transfecting mice with pCDNA3.1-HBV1.3 plasmids which contained a supergenomic HBV1.3-length transgene. The frequency of CD4+ CXCR5+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and their surface molecules in livers, spleens and peripheral blood were detected using flow cytometry. The lymphomononuclear cells isolated from the livers of transfected mice were further stimulated by HBc-derived peptides and then the frequency and cytokine secretion of HBV-specific CD4+CXCR5+ T cells were detected. We found that the frequency of CXCR5+ in CD4+ T cells was specifically increased; the expression of PD-1 was decreased while the expression of ICOS was increased on intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T cells. Although the frequency of CD19+ B cells was not affected, the expression of PDL-1, ICOSL and IL-21R on B cells was increased in the livers of mice. The frequency of HBV-specific CD4+CXCR5+ T cells and the production of IL-21 by intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T cells of mice with acute HBV infection were increased after stimulation. Furthermore, the expression of function-related molecules of intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T, including Bcl-6, CXCR5, IL-6, IL-6R, IL-21 and IL-4 in the liver was increased during acute HBV infection. In conclusion, the activation of intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T cells and B cells was associated with the clearance of HBV during acute infection.

  19. Mouse models of alphavirus-induced inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Adam; Herrero, Lara J; Rudd, Penny A; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2015-02-01

    Part of the Togaviridae family, alphaviruses are arthropod-borne viruses that are widely distributed throughout the globe. Alphaviruses are able to infect a variety of vertebrate hosts, but in humans, infection can result in extensive morbidity and mortality. Symptomatic infection can manifest as fever, an erythematous rash and/or significant inflammatory pathologies such as arthritis and encephalitis. Recent overwhelming outbreaks of alphaviral disease have highlighted the void in our understanding of alphavirus pathogenesis and the re-emergence of alphaviruses has given new impetus to anti-alphaviral drug design. In this review, the development of viable mouse models of Old Word and New World alphaviruses is examined. How mouse models that best replicate human disease have been used to elucidate the immunopathology of alphavirus pathogenesis and trial novel therapeutic discoveries is also discussed.

  20. Antibacterial Evaluation of Synthetic Thiazole Compounds In Vitro and In Vivo in a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Skin Infection Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Haroon; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including strains resistant to current antibiotics, has contributed to an increase in the number of skin infections reported in humans in recent years. New therapeutic options are needed to counter this public health challenge. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential of thiazole compounds synthesized by our research group to be used topically to treat MRSA skin and wound infections. The broth microdilution method confirmed that the lead thiazole compound and four analogues are capable of inhibiting MRSA growth at concentrations as low as 1.3 μg/mL. Additionally, three compounds exhibited a synergistic relationship when combined with the topical antibiotic mupirocin against MRSA in vitro via the checkerboard assay. Thus the thiazole compounds have potential to be used alone or in combination with mupirocin against MRSA. When tested against human keratinocytes, four derivatives of the lead compound demonstrated an improved toxicity profile (were found to be non-toxic up to a concentration of 20 μg/mL). Utilizing a murine skin infection model, we confirmed that the lead compound and three analogues exhibited potent antimicrobial activity in vivo, with similar capability as the antibiotic mupirocin, as they reduced the burden of MRSA present in skin wounds by more than 90%. Taken altogether, the present study provides important evidence that these thiazole compounds warrant further investigation for development as novel topical antimicrobials to treat MRSA skin infections. PMID:26536129

  1. Antibacterial Evaluation of Synthetic Thiazole Compounds In Vitro and In Vivo in a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Skin Infection Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Haroon; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including strains resistant to current antibiotics, has contributed to an increase in the number of skin infections reported in humans in recent years. New therapeutic options are needed to counter this public health challenge. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential of thiazole compounds synthesized by our research group to be used topically to treat MRSA skin and wound infections. The broth microdilution method confirmed that the lead thiazole compound and four analogues are capable of inhibiting MRSA growth at concentrations as low as 1.3 μg/mL. Additionally, three compounds exhibited a synergistic relationship when combined with the topical antibiotic mupirocin against MRSA in vitro via the checkerboard assay. Thus the thiazole compounds have potential to be used alone or in combination with mupirocin against MRSA. When tested against human keratinocytes, four derivatives of the lead compound demonstrated an improved toxicity profile (were found to be non-toxic up to a concentration of 20 μg/mL). Utilizing a murine skin infection model, we confirmed that the lead compound and three analogues exhibited potent antimicrobial activity in vivo, with similar capability as the antibiotic mupirocin, as they reduced the burden of MRSA present in skin wounds by more than 90%. Taken altogether, the present study provides important evidence that these thiazole compounds warrant further investigation for development as novel topical antimicrobials to treat MRSA skin infections.

  2. Mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Beuzard, Y

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of a natural animal model for sickle cell disease, transgenic mouse models have been generated to better understand the complex pathophysiology of the disease and to evaluate potential specific therapies. In the early nineties, the simple addition of human globin genes induced the expression of hemoglobin S (HbS) or HbS-related human hemoglobins in mice still expressing mouse hemoglobin. To increase the proportion of human hemoglobin and the severity of the mouse sickle cell syndrome, the proportion of mouse hemoglobin could be decreased by a combination of mouse alpha- and beta-thalassemic defects, leading to complex genotypes and mild disease. Following the discovery of gene targeting in the mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells), it was made possible to knock out all mouse adult globin genes (2alpha and 2beta) and to add the human homologous genes elsewhere in the mouse genome. In addition, the human gamma gene of fetal hemoglobin was protecting the fetus from HbS polymer formation. Accordingly, the resulting adult mouse models obtained in 1997, expressing human HbS-only, had a very severe anemia (Hb=5-6 g/dL). In order to survive, these "HbS-only mice" had to reduce the HbS concentration within the red blood cells. The phenotype could be less severe by adding modified human gamma genes, still expressed in adult mice. In 2006, a last "S-only" model was obtained by homologous knock in, replacing the mouse globin genes by human genes. This array of models contributes to better understand the role of different interacting factors in the complexity of sickle cell events, such as red cell defects, changes in blood flow and vaso-occlusion, hyperhemolysis, vascular tone dysregulation, oxidations, inflammation, activation and adhesion of cells, ischemia, reperfusion... In addition, each model has an appropriate usefulness to evaluate experimental therapies in vivo and to perform preclinical studies.

  3. [Laboratory animal infection in modeling intestinal schistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Zelia, O P

    1984-01-01

    A comparative efficiency of different regimes for infecting laboratory animals has been determined in order to find out optimal conditions under which an experimental model of intestinal schistosomiasis (infection with Schistosoma mansoni) can be maintained. When evaluating the results of laboratory definitive hosts infection we took into account the character of Schistosoma distribution in animals, which with high probability rate was modelled by means of negative binomial distribution. The main parameters of this distribution were used for determination of effective doses and methods of animals infection alongside with generally accepted indices of infection rate and intensiveness. Analysis of the data obtained has shown that the infection of 150 cercarians per mouse and 200 cercarians per golden and striped hairy-footed hamster by their subcutaneous administration creates optimal density of parasites in the host. Results of investigations have shown that striped hairy-footed hamsters can be used as definitive hosts of Schistosoma.

  4. Protection against Chlamydia Promoted by a Subunit Vaccine (CTH1) Compared with a Primary Intranasal Infection in a Mouse Genital Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Theisen, Michael; Christensen, Dennis; Follmann, Frank; Andersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background The chlamydial proteins CT443 (OmcB) and CT521 (rl16) have previously been identified as human B and/or T cell targets during a chlamydial infection in humans. Here we compare the protective effector mechanism promoted by a fusion protein composed of CT521 and CT443 (CTH1) with a primary intranasal Chlamydia muridarum infection known to provide high levels of protection against a genital chlamydial challenge. Methodology/Principal Findings The fusion protein CTH1, adjuvanted with a strong Th1 inducing cationic adjuvant (CAF01), significantly reduced the bacterial shedding compared to a control group in both a C. trachomatis Serovar D and C. muridarum challenge model. The CTH1/CAF01 vaccine was found to induce polyfunctional T cells consisting of TNFα/IL-2 and TNFα/IL-2/IFN-γ positive cells and high titers of CTH1 specific IgG2a and IgG1. By depletion experiments the protection in the C. muridarum challenge model was demonstrated to be mediated solely by CD4+ T cells. In comparison, an intranasal infection with C. muridarum induced a T cell response that consisted predominantly of TNFα/IFN-γ co-expressing effector CD4+ T cells and an antibody response consisting of C. muridarum specific IgG1, IgG2a but also IgA. This response was associated with a high level of protection against challenge—a protection that was only partially dependent on CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, whereas the antibody response induced by intranasal infection was strongly reactive against the native antigens displayed in the chlamydial elementary body, only low levels of antibodies against this preparation were found after CTH1/CAF01 immunization. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that CTH1 vaccination promotes a CD4+ T cell dependent protective response but compared with intranasal C. muridarum infection lacks a CD4 independent protective mechanism for complete protection. PMID:20505822

  5. A High-Affinity Native Human Antibody Disrupts Biofilm from Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria and Potentiates Antibiotic Efficacy in a Mouse Implant Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Estellés, Angeles; Woischnig, Anne-Kathrin; Liu, Keyi; Stephenson, Robert; Lomongsod, Evelene; Nguyen, Da; Zhang, Jianzhong; Heidecker, Manfred; Yang, Yifan; Simon, Reyna J.; Tenorio, Edgar; Ellsworth, Stote; Leighton, Anton; Ryser, Stefan; Gremmelmaier, Nina Khanna

    2016-01-01

    Many serious bacterial infections are difficult to treat due to biofilm formation, which provides physical protection and induces a sessile phenotype refractory to antibiotic treatment compared to the planktonic state. A key structural component of biofilm is extracellular DNA, which is held in place by secreted bacterial proteins from the DNABII family: integration host factor (IHF) and histone-like (HU) proteins. A native human monoclonal antibody, TRL1068, has been discovered using single B-lymphocyte screening technology. It has low-picomolar affinity against DNABII homologs from important Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The disruption of established biofilm was observed in vitro at an antibody concentration of 1.2 μg/ml over 12 h. The effect of TRL1068 in vivo was evaluated in a murine tissue cage infection model in which a biofilm is formed by infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 43300). Treatment of the established biofilm by combination therapy of TRL1068 (15 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneal [i.p.] administration) with daptomycin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced adherent bacterial count compared to that after daptomycin treatment alone, accompanied by significant reduction in planktonic bacterial numbers. The quantification of TRL1068 in sample matrices showed substantial penetration of TRL1068 from serum into the cage interior. TRL1068 is a clinical candidate for combination treatment with standard-of-care antibiotics to overcome the drug-refractory state associated with biofilm formation, with potential utility for a broad spectrum of difficult-to-treat bacterial infections. PMID:26833157

  6. Mechanisms of protective immunity in Hymenolepis nana/mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bortoletti, G; Gabriele, F; Palmas, C

    1992-12-01

    Some immunological and parasitological aspects related to the infection of Hymenolepsis nana in mice are summarized in this review, focusing on the immune effector mechanisms involved in this host/parasite relationship. H. nana is a small cestode tapeworm of man and mice. A primary egg-infection determines within few days a strong immunity. Immunity elicited by low-level primary infection is effective as a high-level infection. The protective role of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity is summarized. The histological findings demonstrate that eosinophils and mast-cells are implicated as effector cells. This review is an attempt to re-examine, at low-level infection, the immune mechanisms in H. nana/mouse model.

  7. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  8. Deficiency of Lymph Node-Resident Dendritic Cells (DCs) and Dysregulation of DC Chemoattractants in a Malnourished Mouse Model of Leishmania donovani Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Marwa K.; Barnes, Jeffrey L.; Osorio, E. Yaneth; Anstead, Gregory M.; Jimenez, Fabio; Osterholzer, John J.; Travi, Bruno L.; Ahuja, Seema S.; White, A. Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is thought to contribute to more than one-third of all childhood deaths via increased susceptibility to infection. Malnutrition is a significant risk factor for the development of visceral leishmaniasis, which results from skin inoculation of the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani. We previously established a murine model of childhood malnutrition and found that malnutrition decreased the lymph node barrier function and increased the early dissemination of L. donovani. In the present study, we found reduced numbers of resident dendritic cells (conventional and monocyte derived) but not migratory dermal dendritic cells in the skin-draining lymph nodes of L. donovani-infected malnourished mice. Expression of chemokines and their receptors involved in trafficking of dendritic cells and their progenitors to the lymph nodes was dysregulated. C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) and its ligands (CCL2 and CCL7) were reduced in the lymph nodes of infected malnourished mice, as were CCR2-bearing monocytes/macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. However, CCR7 and its ligands (CCL19 and CCL21) were increased in the lymph node and CCR7 was increased in lymph node macrophages and dendritic cells. CCR2-deficient mice recapitulated the profound reduction in the number of resident (but not migratory dermal) dendritic cells in the lymph node but showed no alteration in the expression of CCL19 and CCL21. Collectively, these results suggest that the malnutrition-related reduction in the lymph node barrier to dissemination of L. donovani is related to insufficient numbers of lymph node-resident but not migratory dermal dendritic cells. This is likely driven by the altered activity of the CCR2 and CCR7 chemoattractant pathways. PMID:24818662

  9. Deficiency of lymph node-resident dendritic cells (DCs) and dysregulation of DC chemoattractants in a malnourished mouse model of Leishmania donovani infection.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Marwa K; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Osorio, E Yaneth; Anstead, Gregory M; Jimenez, Fabio; Osterholzer, John J; Travi, Bruno L; Ahuja, Seema S; White, A Clinton; Melby, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    Malnutrition is thought to contribute to more than one-third of all childhood deaths via increased susceptibility to infection. Malnutrition is a significant risk factor for the development of visceral leishmaniasis, which results from skin inoculation of the intracellular protozoan Leishmania donovani. We previously established a murine model of childhood malnutrition and found that malnutrition decreased the lymph node barrier function and increased the early dissemination of L. donovani. In the present study, we found reduced numbers of resident dendritic cells (conventional and monocyte derived) but not migratory dermal dendritic cells in the skin-draining lymph nodes of L. donovani-infected malnourished mice. Expression of chemokines and their receptors involved in trafficking of dendritic cells and their progenitors to the lymph nodes was dysregulated. C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) and its ligands (CCL2 and CCL7) were reduced in the lymph nodes of infected malnourished mice, as were CCR2-bearing monocytes/macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells. However, CCR7 and its ligands (CCL19 and CCL21) were increased in the lymph node and CCR7 was increased in lymph node macrophages and dendritic cells. CCR2-deficient mice recapitulated the profound reduction in the number of resident (but not migratory dermal) dendritic cells in the lymph node but showed no alteration in the expression of CCL19 and CCL21. Collectively, these results suggest that the malnutrition-related reduction in the lymph node barrier to dissemination of L. donovani is related to insufficient numbers of lymph node-resident but not migratory dermal dendritic cells. This is likely driven by the altered activity of the CCR2 and CCR7 chemoattractant pathways.

  10. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occur during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological flight experiments on animals was discussed. The mouse model is an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to the one used with rats. It is shown that this murine model yield similar results to the rat model of antiorthostatic suspension for simulating some aspects of weightlessness. It is also shown that mice suspended in this model have decreased interferon-alpha/beta production as compared to control, nonsuspended mice or to orthostatically suspended mice. It is suggested that the conditions occuring during space flight could possibly affect interferon production. The regulatory role of interferon in nonviral diseases is demonstrated including several bacterial and protozoan infections indicating the great significance of interferon in resistance to many types of infectious diseases.

  11. Mouse models in tendon and ligament research.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mouse models are valuable resources for the study of tendon and ligament biology. Many mutant mouse models are used because their manifested phenotypes mimic clinical pathobiology for several heritable disorders, such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Moreover, these models are helpful for discerning roles of specific genes in the development, maturation, and repair of musculoskeletal tissues. There are several categories of genes with essential roles in the synthesis and maintenance of tendon and ligament structures. The form and function of these tissues depend highly upon fibril-forming collagens, the primary extracellular macromolecules of tendons and ligaments. Models for these fibril-forming collagens, as well as for regulatory molecules like FACITs and SLRPs, are important for studying fibril assembly, growth, and maturation. Additionally, mouse models for growth factors and transcription factors are useful for defining regulation of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cues that stimulate matrix synthesis. Models for membrane-bound proteins assess the roles of cell-cell communication and cell-matrix interaction. In some cases, special considerations need to be given to spatio-temporal control of a gene in a model. Thus, conditional and inducible mouse models allow for specific regulation of genes of interest. Advances in mouse models have provided valuable tools for gaining insight into the form and function of tendons and ligaments.

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  14. Varicella infection modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  15. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  16. Neurogenesis in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tsu Tshen

    2010-10-01

    The brains of the adult mouse and human possess neural stem cells (NSCs) that retain the capacity to generate new neurons through the process of neurogenesis. They share the same anatomical locations of stem cell niches in the brain, as well as the prominent feature of rostral migratory stream formed by neuroblasts migrating from the lateral ventricles towards the olfactory bulb. Therefore the mouse possesses some fundamental features that may qualify it as a relevant model for adult human neurogenesis. Adult born young hippocampal neurons in the mouse display the unique property of enhanced plasticity, and can integrate physically and functionally into existing neural circuits in the brain. Such crucial properties of neurogenesis may at least partially underlie the improved learning and memory functions observed in the mouse when hippocampal neurogenesis is augmented, leading to the suggestion that neurogenesis induction may be a novel therapeutic approach for diseases with cognitive impairments such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research towards this goal has benefited significantly from the use of AD mouse models to facilitate the understanding in the impact of AD pathology on neurogenesis. The present article reviews the growing body of controversial data on altered neurogenesis in mouse models of AD and attempts to assess their relative relevance to humans.

  17. Coxsackievirus B3 infection reduces female mouse fertility

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hye Min; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Min; Kim, Yunhwa; Jeong, Daewon; Roh, Jaesook; Choi, Hyeonhae; Hwang, Jung Hye; Park, Hosun

    2015-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection during early gestation as a cause of pregnancy loss. Here, we investigated the impacts of CVB3 infection on female mouse fertility. Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and CVB3 replication in the ovary were evaluated by immunohistochemistry or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). CAR was highly expressed in granulosa cells (GCs) and CVB3 replicated in the ovary. Histological analysis showed a significant increase in the number of atretic follicles in the ovaries of CVB3-infected mice (CVBM). Estrous cycle evaluation demonstrated that a higher number of CVBM were in proestrus compared to mock mice (CVBM vs. mock; 61.5%, 28.5%, respectively). Estradiol concentration in GC culture supernatant and serum were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Baseline and stimulated levels of estradiol in GC were decreased in CVBM, consistent with significantly reduced serum levels in these animals. In addition, aromatase transcript levels in GCs from CVBM were also decreased by 40% relative to the mock. Bone mineral density evaluated by micro-computed tomography was significantly decreased in the CVBM. Moreover, the fertility rate was also significantly decreased for the CVBM compared to the mock (CVBM vs. mock; 20%, 94.7%, respectively). This study suggests that CVB3 infection could interfere with reproduction by disturbing ovarian function and cyclic changes of the uterus. PMID:26062767

  18. Tetracycline-regulated mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Elizabeth S; Vernon-Grey, Ann; Martin, Heather; Chodosh, Lewis A

    2014-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have proven essential to the study of mammalian gene function in both development and disease. However, traditional constitutive transgenic mouse model systems are limited by the temporal and spatial characteristics of the experimental promoter used to drive transgene expression. To address this limitation, considerable effort has been dedicated to developing conditional and inducible mouse model systems. Although a number of approaches to generating inducible GEMMs have been pursued, several have been restricted by toxic or undesired physiological side effects of the compounds used to activate gene expression. The development of tetracycline (tet)-dependent regulatory systems has allowed for circumvention of these issues resulting in the widespread adoption of these systems as an invaluable tool for modeling the complex nature of cancer progression.

  19. Mouse papillomavirus MmuPV1 infects oral mucosa and preferentially targets the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R; Balogh, Karla K.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Hu, Jiafen; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, a new mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, was discovered in a colony of NMRI- Foxn1nu /Foxn1nu athymic mice in India. This finding was significant because it was the first papillomavirus to be found in a laboratory mouse. In this paper we report successful infections of both dorsal and ventral surfaces of the rostral tongues of outbred athymic nude mice. We also report the observation that the base of the tongue, the area of the tongue often targeted by cancer-associated high-risk papillomavirus infections in humans, is especially susceptible to infection. A suitable animal model for the study of oral papillomavirus infections, co-infections, and cancers has long been sought. The work presented here suggests that such a model is now at hand. PMID:26609937

  20. The Type IV Secretion System Effector Protein CirA Stimulates the GTPase Activity of RhoA and Is Required for Virulence in a Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Mary M.; Faris, Robert; van Schaik, Erin J.; McLachlan, Juanita Thrasher; Wright, William U.; Tellez, Andres; Roman, Victor A.; Rowin, Kristina; Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiological agent of Q fever in humans, is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in an acidified parasitophorous vacuole derived from host lysosomes. Generation of this replicative compartment requires effectors delivered into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type IVb secretion system. Several effectors crucial for C. burnetii intracellular replication have been identified, but the host pathways coopted by these essential effectors are poorly defined, and very little is known about how spacious vacuoles are formed and maintained. Here we demonstrate that the essential type IVb effector, CirA, stimulates GTPase activity of RhoA. Overexpression of CirA in mammalian cells results in cell rounding and stress fiber disruption, a phenotype that is rescued by overexpression of wild-type or constitutively active RhoA. Unlike other effector proteins that subvert Rho GTPases to modulate uptake, CirA is the first effector identified that is dispensable for uptake and instead recruits Rho GTPase to promote biogenesis of the bacterial vacuole. Collectively our results highlight the importance of CirA in coopting host Rho GTPases for establishment of Coxiella burnetii infection and virulence in mammalian cell culture and mouse models of infection. PMID:27324482

  1. The Type IV Secretion System Effector Protein CirA Stimulates the GTPase Activity of RhoA and Is Required for Virulence in a Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Infection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mary M; Faris, Robert; van Schaik, Erin J; McLachlan, Juanita Thrasher; Wright, William U; Tellez, Andres; Roman, Victor A; Rowin, Kristina; Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Samuel, James E

    2016-09-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiological agent of Q fever in humans, is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in an acidified parasitophorous vacuole derived from host lysosomes. Generation of this replicative compartment requires effectors delivered into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type IVb secretion system. Several effectors crucial for C. burnetii intracellular replication have been identified, but the host pathways coopted by these essential effectors are poorly defined, and very little is known about how spacious vacuoles are formed and maintained. Here we demonstrate that the essential type IVb effector, CirA, stimulates GTPase activity of RhoA. Overexpression of CirA in mammalian cells results in cell rounding and stress fiber disruption, a phenotype that is rescued by overexpression of wild-type or constitutively active RhoA. Unlike other effector proteins that subvert Rho GTPases to modulate uptake, CirA is the first effector identified that is dispensable for uptake and instead recruits Rho GTPase to promote biogenesis of the bacterial vacuole. Collectively our results highlight the importance of CirA in coopting host Rho GTPases for establishment of Coxiella burnetii infection and virulence in mammalian cell culture and mouse models of infection.

  2. A mouse model for too much TV?

    PubMed

    Bilimoria, Parizad M; Hensch, Takao K; Bavelier, Daphne

    2012-11-01

    In a new study published in Scientific Reports, Christakis and colleagues investigate a mouse model for technology-induced overstimulation. We review their findings, discuss the challenges of defining overstimulation, and consider the resemblance of the phenotypes observed in Christakis et al. to those noted in genetic models of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  3. Mouse models of the laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Colin L. . E-mail: stewartc@ncifcrf.gov; Kozlov, Serguei; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G. . E-mail: sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-06-10

    The A and B type lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins that comprise the bulk of the nuclear lamina, a thin proteinaceous structure underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The A type lamins are encoded by the lamin A gene (LMNA). Mutations in this gene have been linked to at least nine diseases, including the progeroid diseases Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner's syndromes, striated muscle diseases including muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies affecting adipose tissue deposition, diseases affecting skeletal development, and a peripheral neuropathy. To understand how different diseases arise from different mutations in the same gene, mouse lines carrying some of the same mutations found in the human diseases have been established. We, and others have generated mice with different mutations that result in progeria, muscular dystrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. To further our understanding of the functions of the lamins, we also created mice lacking lamin B1, as well as mice expressing only one of the A type lamins. These mouse lines are providing insights into the functions of the lamina and how changes to the lamina affect the mechanical integrity of the nucleus as well as signaling pathways that, when disrupted, may contribute to the disease.

  4. Caspase-1 Dependent IL-1β Secretion Is Critical for Host Defense in a Mouse Model of Chlamydia pneumoniae Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Chiba, Norika; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Vergnes, Laurent; Ojcius, David M.; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is an important human pathogen that causes atypical pneumonia and is associated with various chronic inflammatory disorders. Caspase-1 is a key component of the ‘inflammasome’, and is required to cleave pro-IL-1β to bioactive IL-1β. Here we demonstrate for the first time a critical requirement for IL-1β in response to CP infection. Caspase-1−/− mice exhibit delayed cytokine production, defective clearance of pulmonary bacteria and higher mortality in response to CP infection. Alveolar macrophages harbored increased bacterial numbers due to reduced iNOS levels in Caspase-1−/− mice. Pharmacological blockade of the IL-1 receptor in CP infected wild-type mice phenocopies Caspase-1-deficient mice, and administration of recombinant IL-1β rescues CP infected Caspase-1−/− mice from mortality, indicating that IL-1β secretion is crucial for host immune defense against CP lung infection. In vitro investigation reveals that CP-induced IL-1β secretion by macrophages requires TLR2/MyD88 and NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 signaling. Entry into the cell by CP and new protein synthesis by CP are required for inflammasome activation. Neither ROS nor cathepsin was required for CP infection induced inflammasome activation. Interestingly, Caspase-1 activation during CP infection occurs with mitochondrial dysfunction indicating a possible mechanism involving the mitochondria for CP-induced inflammasome activation. PMID:21731762

  5. Caspase-1 dependent IL-1β secretion is critical for host defense in a mouse model of Chlamydia pneumoniae lung infection.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Chiba, Norika; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Vergnes, Laurent; Ojcius, David M; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is an important human pathogen that causes atypical pneumonia and is associated with various chronic inflammatory disorders. Caspase-1 is a key component of the 'inflammasome', and is required to cleave pro-IL-1β to bioactive IL-1β. Here we demonstrate for the first time a critical requirement for IL-1β in response to CP infection. Caspase-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit delayed cytokine production, defective clearance of pulmonary bacteria and higher mortality in response to CP infection. Alveolar macrophages harbored increased bacterial numbers due to reduced iNOS levels in Caspase-1⁻/⁻ mice. Pharmacological blockade of the IL-1 receptor in CP infected wild-type mice phenocopies Caspase-1-deficient mice, and administration of recombinant IL-1β rescues CP infected Caspase-1⁻/⁻ mice from mortality, indicating that IL-1β secretion is crucial for host immune defense against CP lung infection. In vitro investigation reveals that CP-induced IL-1β secretion by macrophages requires TLR2/MyD88 and NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 signaling. Entry into the cell by CP and new protein synthesis by CP are required for inflammasome activation. Neither ROS nor cathepsin was required for CP infection induced inflammasome activation. Interestingly, Caspase-1 activation during CP infection occurs with mitochondrial dysfunction indicating a possible mechanism involving the mitochondria for CP-induced inflammasome activation.

  6. Pathogenicity of Conidiobolus coronatus and Fusarium solani in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadi; Fang, Xiangang; Zhou, Xiaoqian; Geng, Suying; Wang, Yuxin; Yang, Xiumin

    2017-02-27

    To study the pathogenicity of Conidiobolus coronatus (C. coronatus) and Fusarium solani (F. solani) in animal models. Immunocompromised mice were treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone via intraperitoneal injection before and after inoculation. According to pathogenic characteristics of different fungi, C. coronatus was used to infect mice via intravenous inoculation, intraperitoneal inoculation, gastrointestinal infusion and intradermal inoculation methods. And F. solani was used to infect mice by inoculation via the abraded or normal skin. In the group of immunocompromised mice, C. coronatus was isolated from the lung tissues of one mouse on day 7 and another on day 10 respectively. The corresponding histopathology revealed infiltration of local inflammatory cells in the lung tissue. Pathogenic lesions were observed in all normal and immunocompromised mice infected with F. solani via abraded skin. The lesions in the immunocompromised mice were more severe and persisted longer than those in the normal mice. Moreover, hyphae were mostly observed in the histopathological examination and fungal culture from the immunocompromised mouse. The pathogenicity of C. coronatus was relatively weak as it did not induce local infections and did not disseminate the disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice. Therefore, F. solani is a type of opportunistic pathogenic fungus, and abraded skin is one of the causative routes of infection.

  7. A New Model for Hendra Virus Encephalitis in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dups, Johanna; Middleton, Deborah; Yamada, Manabu; Monaghan, Paul; Long, Fenella; Robinson, Rachel; Marsh, Glenn A.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) infection in humans is characterized by an influenza like illness, which may progress to pneumonia or encephalitis and lead to death. The pathogenesis of HeV infection is poorly understood, and the lack of a mouse model has limited the opportunities for pathogenetic research. In this project we reassessed the role of mice as an animal model for HeV infection and found that mice are susceptible to HeV infection after intranasal exposure, with aged mice reliably developing encephalitic disease. We propose an anterograde route of neuroinvasion to the brain, possibly along olfactory nerves. This is supported by evidence for the development of encephalitis in the absence of viremia and the sequential distribution of viral antigen along pathways of olfaction in the brain of intranasally challenged animals. In our studies mice developed transient lower respiratory tract infection without progressing to viremia and systemic vasculitis that is common to other animal models. These studies report a new animal model of HeV encephalitis that will allow more detailed studies of the neuropathogenesis of HeV infection, particularly the mode of viral spread and possible sequestration within the central nervous system; investigation of mechanisms that moderate the development of viremia and systemic disease; and inform the development of improved treatment options for human patients. PMID:22808132

  8. The Effect of Oseltamivir on the Disease Progression of Lethal Influenza A Virus Infection: Plasma Cytokine and miRNA Responses in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Ashok K.; Hamed, Salaheldin; Goodwin, David G.; Rosenzweig, Barry A.; Pang, Eric; Boyne II, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Lethal influenza A virus infection leads to acute lung injury and possibly lethal complications. There has been a continuous effort to identify the possible predictors of disease severity. Unlike earlier studies, where biomarkers were analyzed on certain time points or days after infection, in this study biomarkers were evaluated over the entire course of infection. Circulating proinflammatory cytokines and/or miRNAs that track with the onset and progression of lethal A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) influenza A virus infection and their response to oseltamivir treatment were investigated up to 10 days after infection. Changes in plasma cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-6, KC, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) and several candidate miRNAs were profiled. Among the cytokines analyzed, IL-6 and KC/GRO cytokines appeared to correlate with peak viral titer. Over the selected 48 miRNAs profiled, certain miRNAs were up- or downregulated in a manner that was dependent on the oseltamivir treatment and disease severity. Our findings suggest that IL-6 and KC/GRO cytokines can be a potential disease severity biomarker and/or marker for the progression/remission of infection. Further studies to explore other cytokines, miRNAs, and lung injury proteins in serum with different subtypes of influenza A viruses with varying disease severity may provide new insight into other unique biomarkers. PMID:27110056

  9. Anaerobic arginine metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by arginine deiminase (arcA), but is not essential for chronic persistence in an aerogenic mouse model of infection.

    PubMed

    Sürken, Michael; Keller, Christine; Röhker, Claudia; Ehlers, Stefan; Bange, Franz-Christoph

    2008-10-01

    In many pathogens, degradation of arginine via the arginine deiminase pathway supports anaerobic metabolism. Here we show by deletion of Rv1001 (arcA) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis that this gene functions as an arginine deiminase. Arginine metabolism in the presence of oxygen was not affected by the mutation, indicating a separate pathway for arginine degradation under aerobic conditions. Following aerosol infection in mice, the DeltaarcA mutant and wild-type strain of M. tuberculosis multiplied and persisted in infected organs in a similar fashion.

  10. Effects of verbenalin on prostatitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mingsan; Guo, Lin; Yan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tan; Li, Zuming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the treatment characteristics of verbenalin on a prostatitis mouse model. Give Xiaozhiling injection in the prostate locally to make a prostatitis mouse model. High, medium and low doses of verbenalin were each given to different mouse groups. The amount of water was determined in 14th, 28th. The number of white cells and lecithin corpuscle density in prostatic fluid were determined. Morphological changes in the prostate, testis, epididymis and kidney were detected. Compared with the model control group, the mice treated with high, medium and low doses of verbenalin had significantly increased amounts of water, and prostate white blood cell count and prostate volume density (Vv) were decreased significantly, the density of lecithin corpuscle score increased, and pathologic prostatitis changes were significantly reduced. Pathological change in the testis was significantly reduced and the change in the epididymis was obviously reduced. The thymic cortex thickness and the number of lymphocytes increased significantly and could reduce the renal pathological changes in potential. Verbenalin has a good therapeutic effect on the prostatitis mouse model. PMID:26858560

  11. Mouse Mammary Cancer Models - Mechanisms and Markers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    Wipl knockout mouse model and have shown defects in cell cycle control in cells derived from Wipl null animals. We are crossing these mice to mammary...compartment of the testes (13,14). Mice lacking Wipl are viable, but males show a reduced longevity and frequent runting (14). Wipl null males also show...predominates and thus the other TG/p53 mouse . Wnt-1 TG mice contain several copies nontumor components should not obscure any strong of a germline Wnt-1

  12. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  13. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  14. Mouse intestinal innate immune responses altered by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Zhu, Xiaoping; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Wang, Shengping; Tang, Yulong; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of human and porcine morbidity and mortality. The current study was conducted to identify intestinal immunity that is altered in a mouse model of ETEC infection. Innate immune responses and inflammation were analyzed. The activation of signal transduction pathways, including toll like receptor 4 (TLR-4)-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), was analyzed using immunoblotting and PCR array analyses. We found that ETEC infection promoted the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the activation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Meanwhile, ETEC infection affected sIgA transportation and Paneth cell function. These data improve our understanding of how ETEC causes disease in animals.

  15. Lethal dissemination of H5N1 influenza virus is associated with dysregulation of inflammation and lipoxin signaling in a mouse model of infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lessons learned from the Spanish influenza pandemic, the periodic outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses, and the current H1N1 ("swine flu") pandemic highlight the need for a more detailed understanding of influenza virus pathogenesis and the host response to infection. To inve...

  16. Lessons Learned from Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Jaquelin P.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.; Ross, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), which was discovered as a milk-transmitted, infectious, cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used as an animal model for the study of retroviral infection and transmission, antiviral immune responses, and breast cancer and lymphoma biology. The main target cells for MMTV infection in vivo are cells of the immune system and mammary epithelial cells. Although the host mounts an immune response to the virus, MMTV has evolved multiple means of evading this response. MMTV causes mammary tumors when the provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial and lymphoid cell genome during viral replication and thereby activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer. PMID:27034391

  17. Study of the Ability of Bifidobacteria of Human Origin to Prevent and Treat Rotavirus Infection Using Colonic Cell and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Darveau, André; Fliss, Ismaïl

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children worldwide. Despite effective vaccines, inexpensive alternatives such as probiotics are needed. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of probiotic candidate Bifidobacterium thermophilum RBL67 to inhibit rotavirus infection. Bacterial adhesion to intestinal cells and interference with viral attachment were evaluated in vitro. B. thermophilum RBL67 displayed adhesion indexes of 625 ± 84 and 1958 ± 318 on Caco-2 and HT-29 cells respectively and was comparable or superior to four other bifidobacteria, including B. longum ATCC 15707 and B. pseudolongum ATCC 25526 strains. Incubation of B. thermophilum RBL67 for 30 min before (exclusion) and simultaneously (competition) with human rotavirus strain Wa decreased virus attachment by 2.0 ± 0.1 and 1.5 ± 0.1 log10 (by 99.0% and 96.8% respectively). Displacement of virus already present was negligible. In CD-1 suckling mice fed B. thermophilum RBL67 challenged with simian rotavirus SA-11, pre-infection feeding with RBL 67 was more effective than post-infection feeding, reducing the duration of diarrhea, limiting epithelial lesions, reducing viral replication in the intestine, accelerating recovery, and stimulating the humoral specific IgG and IgM response, without inducing any adverse effect. B. thermophilum RBL67 had little effect on intestinal IgA titer. These results suggest that humoral immunoglobulin might provide protection against the virus and that B. thermophilum RBL67 has potential as a probiotic able to inhibit rotavirus infection and ultimately reduce its spread. PMID:27727323

  18. Study of the Ability of Bifidobacteria of Human Origin to Prevent and Treat Rotavirus Infection Using Colonic Cell and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Mélanie; Vimont, Allison; Darveau, André; Fliss, Ismaïl; Jean, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children worldwide. Despite effective vaccines, inexpensive alternatives such as probiotics are needed. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of probiotic candidate Bifidobacterium thermophilum RBL67 to inhibit rotavirus infection. Bacterial adhesion to intestinal cells and interference with viral attachment were evaluated in vitro. B. thermophilum RBL67 displayed adhesion indexes of 625 ± 84 and 1958 ± 318 on Caco-2 and HT-29 cells respectively and was comparable or superior to four other bifidobacteria, including B. longum ATCC 15707 and B. pseudolongum ATCC 25526 strains. Incubation of B. thermophilum RBL67 for 30 min before (exclusion) and simultaneously (competition) with human rotavirus strain Wa decreased virus attachment by 2.0 ± 0.1 and 1.5 ± 0.1 log10 (by 99.0% and 96.8% respectively). Displacement of virus already present was negligible. In CD-1 suckling mice fed B. thermophilum RBL67 challenged with simian rotavirus SA-11, pre-infection feeding with RBL 67 was more effective than post-infection feeding, reducing the duration of diarrhea, limiting epithelial lesions, reducing viral replication in the intestine, accelerating recovery, and stimulating the humoral specific IgG and IgM response, without inducing any adverse effect. B. thermophilum RBL67 had little effect on intestinal IgA titer. These results suggest that humoral immunoglobulin might provide protection against the virus and that B. thermophilum RBL67 has potential as a probiotic able to inhibit rotavirus infection and ultimately reduce its spread.

  19. Junín Virus Infects Mouse Cells and Induces Innate Immune Responses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Christian D.; Lavanya, Madakasira; Wang, Enxiu; Ross, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Junín virus is the causative agent for Argentine hemorrhagic fever, and its natural host is the New World rodent Calomys musculinus. The virus is transmitted to humans by aerosolization, and it is believed that many of the clinical symptoms are caused by cytokines produced by sentinel cells of the immune system. Here we used the Junín virus vaccine strain Candid 1 to determine whether mouse cells could be used to study virus entry and antiviral innate immune responses. We show that Candid 1 can infect and propagate in different mouse-derived cell lines through a low-pH-dependent, transferrin receptor 1-independent mechanism, suggesting that there is a second entry receptor. In addition, Candid 1 induced expression of the antiviral cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and beta interferon in macrophages, and this induction was independent of viral replication. Using Candid 1, as well as virus-like particles bearing the viral glycoprotein, to infect different primary cells and established macrophage cell lines with deletions in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, we show that TLR2 is a cellular sensor of both the Parodi and Candid 1 viral glycoproteins. Because Junín virus is highly lethal in humans, the use of an experimentally tractable model system, such as the mouse, could provide a better understanding of the antiviral innate cellular responses to Junín virus and the role of these responses in pathogenesis. PMID:21880772

  20. The mouse gut microbiome revisited: From complex diversity to model ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Blaut, Michael; Stecher, Bärbel

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory mice are the most commonly used animal model in translational medical research. In recent years, the impact of the gut microbiota (i.e. communities of microorganisms in the intestine) on host physiology and the onset of diseases, including metabolic and neuronal disorders, cancers, gastrointestinal infections and chronic inflammation, became a focal point of interest. There is abundant evidence that mouse phenotypes in disease models vary greatly between animal facilities or commercial providers, and that this variation is associated with differences in the microbiota. Hence, there is a clear discrepancy between the widespread use of mouse models in research and the patchwork knowledge on the mouse gut microbiome. In the present manuscript, we summarize data pertaining to the diversity and functions of the mouse gut microbiota, review existing work on gnotobiotic mouse models, and discuss challenges and opportunities for current and future research in the field.

  1. Debridement increases survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Zachary P; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Cardani, Amber N; Barr, John R; Glomski, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming gram-positive bacterium. A major virulence factor for B. anthracis is an immunomodulatory tripartite exotoxin that has been reported to alter immune cell chemotaxis and activation. It has been proposed that B. anthracis infections initiate through entry of spores into the regional draining lymph nodes where they germinate, grow, and disseminate systemically via the efferent lymphatics. If this model holds true, it would be predicted that surgical removal of infected tissues, debridement, would have little effect on the systemic dissemination of bacteria. This model was tested through the development of a mouse debridement model. It was found that removal of the site of subcutaneous infection in the ear increased the likelihood of survival and reduced the quantity of spores in the draining cervical lymph nodes (cLN). At the time of debridement 12 hours post-injection measurable levels of exotoxins were present in the ear, cLN, and serum, yet leukocytes within the cLN were activated; countering the concept that exotoxins inhibit the early inflammatory response to promote bacterial growth. We conclude that the initial entry of spores into the draining lymph node of cutaneous infections alone is not sufficient to cause systemic disease and that debridement should be considered as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

  2. The Core Mouse Response to Infection by Neospora Caninum Defined by Gene Set Enrichment Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, John; Goodswen, Stephen; Kennedy, Paul J; Bush, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the BALB/c and Qs mouse responses to infection by the parasite Neospora caninum were investigated in order to identify host response mechanisms. Investigation was done using gene set (enrichment) analyses of microarray data. GSEA, MANOVA, Romer, subGSE and SAM-GS were used to study the contrasts Neospora strain type, Mouse type (BALB/c and Qs) and time post infection (6 hours post infection and 10 days post infection). The analyses show that the major signal in the core mouse response to infection is from time post infection and can be defined by gene ontology terms Protein Kinase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Transcription Initiation. Several terms linked to signaling, morphogenesis, response and fat metabolism were also identified. At 10 days post infection, genes associated with fatty acid metabolism were identified as up regulated in expression. The value of gene set (enrichment) analyses in the analysis of microarray data is discussed. PMID:23012496

  3. Novel robust hepatitis C virus mouse efficacy model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Oei, Yoko; Mendel, Dirk B; Garrett, Evelyn N; Patawaran, Montesa B; Hollenbach, Paul W; Aukerman, Sharon L; Weiner, Amy J

    2006-10-01

    The lack of a robust small-animal model for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has hindered the discovery and development of novel drug treatments for HCV infections. We developed a reproducible and easily accessible xenograft mouse efficacy model in which HCV RNA replication is accurately monitored in vivo by real-time, noninvasive whole-body imaging of gamma-irradiated SCID mice implanted with a mouse-adapted luciferase replicon-containing Huh-7 cell line (T7-11). The model was validated by demonstrating that both a small-molecule NS3/4A protease inhibitor (BILN 2061) and human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) decreased HCV RNA replication and that treatment withdrawal resulted in a rebound in replication, which paralleled clinical outcomes in humans. We further showed that protease inhibitor and IFN-alpha combination therapy was more effective in reducing HCV RNA replication than treatment with each compound alone and supports testing in humans. This robust mouse efficacy model provides a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of potential anti-HCV compounds in vivo as part of aggressive drug discovery efforts.

  4. Novel Robust Hepatitis C Virus Mouse Efficacy Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Oei, Yoko; Mendel, Dirk B.; Garrett, Evelyn N.; Patawaran, Montesa B.; Hollenbach, Paul W.; Aukerman, Sharon L.; Weiner, Amy J.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of a robust small-animal model for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has hindered the discovery and development of novel drug treatments for HCV infections. We developed a reproducible and easily accessible xenograft mouse efficacy model in which HCV RNA replication is accurately monitored in vivo by real-time, noninvasive whole-body imaging of gamma-irradiated SCID mice implanted with a mouse-adapted luciferase replicon-containing Huh-7 cell line (T7-11). The model was validated by demonstrating that both a small-molecule NS3/4A protease inhibitor (BILN 2061) and human alpha interferon (IFN-α) decreased HCV RNA replication and that treatment withdrawal resulted in a rebound in replication, which paralleled clinical outcomes in humans. We further showed that protease inhibitor and IFN-α combination therapy was more effective in reducing HCV RNA replication than treatment with each compound alone and supports testing in humans. This robust mouse efficacy model provides a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of potential anti-HCV compounds in vivo as part of aggressive drug discovery efforts. PMID:17005803

  5. The invA gene of Brucella melitensis is involved in intracellular invasion and is required to establish infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alva-Pérez, Jorge; Arellano-Reynoso, Beatriz; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco

    2014-05-15

    Some of the mechanisms underlying the invasion and intracellular survival of B. melitensis are still unknown, including the role of a subfamily of NUDIX enzymes, which have been described in other bacterial species as invasins and are present in Brucella spp. We have generated a mutation in the coding gene of one of these proteins, the invA gene (BMEI0215) of B. melitensis strain 133, to understand its role in virulence. HeLa cell invasion results showed that mutant strain survival was decreased 5-fold compared with that of the parental strain at 2 h pi (P<0.001). In a goat macrophage infection assay, mutant strain replication was 8-fold less than in the parental strain at 24 h pi (P<0.001); yet, at 48 h pi, no significant differences in intracellular replication were observed. Additionally, colocalization of the invA mutant with calregulin was significantly lower at 24 h pi compared with that of the parental strain. Furthermore, the mutant strain exhibited a low level of colocalization with cathepsin D, which was similar to the parental strain colocalization at 24 h pi. In vivo infection results demonstrated that spleen colonization was significantly lower with the mutant than with the parental strain. The immune response, measured in terms of antibody switching and IFN-γ transcription, was similar for Rev1 and infection with the mutant, although it was lower than the immune response elicited by the parental strain. Consequently, these results indicate that the invA gene is important during invasion but not for intracellular replication. Additionally, mutation of the invA gene results in in vivo attenuation.

  6. Characteristics of IL-17 induction by Schistosoma japonicum infection in C57BL/6 mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dianhui; Luo, Xueping; Xie, Hongyan; Gao, Zhiyan; Fang, Huilong; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a severe tropical disease caused by the parasitic worm Schistosoma japonicum. Among the most serious pathological effects of S. japonicum infection are hepatic lesions (cirrhosis and fibrosis) and portal hypertension. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory and infectious conditions, including schistosomiasis. We infected C57BL/6 mice with S. japonicum and isolated lymphocytes from the liver to identify cell subsets with high IL-17 expression and release using flow cytometry and ELISA. Expression and release of IL-17 was significantly higher in hepatic lymphocytes from infected mice compared with control mice in response to both non-specific stimulation with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody plus/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody and PMA plus ionomycin. We then compared IL-17 expression in three hepatic T-cell subsets, T helper, natural killer T and γδT cells, to determine the major source of IL-17 during infection. Interleukin-17 was induced in all three subsets by PMA + ionomycin, but γδT lymphocytes exhibited the largest increase in expression. We then established a mouse model to further investigate the role of IL-17 in granulomatous and fibrosing inflammation against parasite eggs. Reducing IL-17 activity using anti-IL-17A antibodies decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells and collagen deposition in the livers of infected C57BL/6 mice. The serum levels of soluble egg antigen (IL) -specific IgGs were enhanced by anti-IL-17A monoclonal antibody blockade, suggesting that IL-17 normally serves to suppress this humoral response. These findings suggest that γδT cells are the most IL-17-producing cells and that IL-17 contributes to granulomatous inflammatory and fibrosing reactions in S. japonicum-infected C57BL/6 mouse liver. PMID:23551262

  7. Toll-like receptor 7 suppresses virus replication in neurons but does not affect viral pathogenesis in a mouse model of Langat virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David G.; Woods, Tyson A.; Butchi, Niranjan B.; Morgan, Timothy M.; Taylor, R. Travis; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Mukherjee, Piyali; Lubick, Kirk J.; Best, Sonja M.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) recognizes guanidine-rich viral ssRNA and is an important mediator of peripheral immune responses to several ssRNA viruses. However, the role that TLR7 plays in regulating the innate immune response to ssRNA virus infections in specific organs such as the central nervous system (CNS) is not as clear. This study examined the influence of TLR7 on the neurovirulence of Langat virus (LGTV), a ssRNA tick-borne flavivirus. TLR7 deficiency did not substantially alter the onset or incidence of LGTV-induced clinical disease; however, it did significantly affect virus levels in the CNS with a log10 increase in virus titres in brain tissue from TLR7-deficient mice. This difference in virus load was also observed following intracranial inoculation, indicating a direct effect of TLR7 deficiency on regulating virus replication in the brain. LGTV-induced type I interferon responses in the CNS were not dependent on TLR7, being higher in TLR7-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. In contrast, induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumour necrosis factor, CCL3, CCL4 and CXCL13 were dependent on TLR7. Thus, although TLR7 is not essential in controlling LGTV pathogenesis, it is important in controlling virus infection in neurons in the CNS, possibly by regulating neuroinflammatory responses. PMID:23136362

  8. Toll-like receptor 7 suppresses virus replication in neurons but does not affect viral pathogenesis in a mouse model of Langat virus infection.

    PubMed

    Baker, David G; Woods, Tyson A; Butchi, Niranjan B; Morgan, Timothy M; Taylor, R Travis; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Mukherjee, Piyali; Lubick, Kirk J; Best, Sonja M; Peterson, Karin E

    2013-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) recognizes guanidine-rich viral ssRNA and is an important mediator of peripheral immune responses to several ssRNA viruses. However, the role that TLR7 plays in regulating the innate immune response to ssRNA virus infections in specific organs such as the central nervous system (CNS) is not as clear. This study examined the influence of TLR7 on the neurovirulence of Langat virus (LGTV), a ssRNA tick-borne flavivirus. TLR7 deficiency did not substantially alter the onset or incidence of LGTV-induced clinical disease; however, it did significantly affect virus levels in the CNS with a log(10) increase in virus titres in brain tissue from TLR7-deficient mice. This difference in virus load was also observed following intracranial inoculation, indicating a direct effect of TLR7 deficiency on regulating virus replication in the brain. LGTV-induced type I interferon responses in the CNS were not dependent on TLR7, being higher in TLR7-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. In contrast, induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumour necrosis factor, CCL3, CCL4 and CXCL13 were dependent on TLR7. Thus, although TLR7 is not essential in controlling LGTV pathogenesis, it is important in controlling virus infection in neurons in the CNS, possibly by regulating neuroinflammatory responses.

  9. Chicken egg yolk antibodies (IgY) modulate the intestinal mucosal immune response in a mouse model of Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Yao, Ying; Wang, Xitao; Zhen, Yuhong; Thacker, Philip A; Wang, Lili; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Junjun; Zong, Ying; Wang, Ni; Xu, Yongping

    2016-07-01

    This study determined the effects of chicken egg yolk antibodies (IgY) on immune responses in the intestinal mucosal of mice infected with Salmonella typhimurium. Sixty, 28-day-old mice were divided into 4 groups and treated with streptomycin or sterile water for 2days followed by 1day without treatment. The control group was unchallenged whereas the mice in the other three groups were treated twice with 10(9)CFUmL(-1)S. typhimurium. For the next 3days, control mice continued to receive no treatment whereas the mice in the remaining three groups were orally administered with 20mgmL(-1) of specific IgY, 20mgmL(-1) of nonspecific IgY or PBS. S. typhimurium activated gut-associated lymphoid tissue, increasing the release of IFN-γ and TNF-α in the mucosa and increased the number of activated T-lymphocytes and cytotoxic T-γδ. Specific IgY attenuated the increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α and the decrease in IL-10. S. typhimurium induced mobilization of CD8(+) and CD8(+) TCRγδ T cells in the epithelium and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the lamina propria reflecting an inflammatory process that was attenuated by IgY. These results suggest that specific IgY modulates intestinal mucosal immune responses during a S. typhimurium infection.

  10. Mouse models of multiple sclerosis: lost in translation?

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) leading to progressive accumulation of neurological deficits arising from recurrent episodes of inflammation, demyelination and neuronal degeneration. While the aetiology of the disease is unknown MS is widely considered to be the result of aberrant T cell and antibody responses to CNS antigens giving rise to the common concept that MS is an autoimmune disease or that there is an autoimmune component in the pathogenesis. This idea has lead to the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse models of MS in which immunisation with CNS antigens induces neurological and pathological signs of disease in mice. In addition to EAE models, injection with neurotropic viruses has been used to examine how infections are implicated in the disease process and how they may generate autoimmune responses in the CNS. Viral models are also crucial to investigate the impact of blocking trafficking of immune responses into the CNS since an emerging side-effect of current immunotherapeutic approaches in MS is the reactivation of viruses within the CNS. To investigate myelin damage and repair in the absence of the adaptive immune response, toxin-induced demyelination using cuprizone, ethidium bromide and lysolecithin, which rapidly leads to remyelination when the toxins are withdrawn, is also reviewed. Mice also lend themselves to the vast array of transgenic technologies to probe specific pathways as well as the use of humanised transgenic mice to examine the impact of human molecules. Despite the vast array of mouse models EAE is the most frequently exploited paradigm used to develop therapeutic approaches. However, despite over one thousand compounds used in the treatment of EAE few have become licenced for treatment of MS so far. Thus, this review also debates the reasons for these failures in mouse models as well as discusses how mouse models can be better utilised

  11. On Models and Mickey Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petherbridge, Deanna

    2005-01-01

    The re-issue of a nineteenth-century French "Drawing Course" is the occasion for an examination of issues of "models of good practice" in current art teaching. These are listed as an expanded set of student-centred pedagogical paradigms, which embrace the forceful popular imagery of electronic games and comic strips. The formalist adaptations of…

  12. Mitochondrial dynamics in the mouse liver infected by Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tina Tu-Wen; Wu, Lawrence Shih Hsin; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Lee, Kin-Mu; Cheng, Po-Ching; Peng, Shih-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for regulation of cell homeostasis. Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most common parasites known to cause liver disease. Mice infected by S. mansoni show acute symptoms of schistosomiasis after 8 weeks. Hence, in this study, we attempted to assess the direct effects of S. mansoni infection on mice liver, and to explore the expression of mitochondrial morphology, dynamics, and function. Our recent findings show that S. mansoni infection changes mitochondrial morphology and affects mitochondrial functions, which attenuates mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation. S. mansoni-infected mice increases mitochondrial numbers by upregulating of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor c co-activator 1α (PGC1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). This may promote mitochondria generation for accelerating the recovery of mitochondrial functions. Moreover, S. mansoni would disrupt mitochondrial dynamics including induced mitochondrial fission and promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in mice liver. More importantly, S. mansoni further stimulated upregulation both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathway in infected mice liver. The intrinsic pathway was triggered by cytochrome c release. Additionally, NFκB (nuclear factor-kappa B, p65) could play a protective role to inhibit apoptosis through reducing active caspase-3 expression. Therefore, our results confirmed the liver damage mechanism of experimental schistosomiasis in mice model.

  13. Mouse models of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The use of mice as model organisms to study human biology is predicated on the genetic and physiological similarities between the species. Nonetheless, mice and humans have evolved in and become adapted to different environments and so, despite their phylogenetic relatedness, they have become very different organisms. Mice often respond to experimental interventions in ways that differ strikingly from humans. Mice are invaluable for studying biological processes that have been conserved during the evolution of the rodent and primate lineages and for investigating the developmental mechanisms by which the conserved mammalian genome gives rise to a variety of different species. Mice are less reliable as models of human disease, however, because the networks linking genes to disease are likely to differ between the two species. The use of mice in biomedical research needs to take account of the evolved differences as well as the similarities between mice and humans. PMID:27121451

  14. Mouse models for neural tube closure defects.

    PubMed

    Juriloff, D M; Harris, M J

    2000-04-12

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs), in particular anencephaly and spina bifida, are common human birth defects (1 in 1000), their genetics is complex and their risk is reduced by periconceptional maternal folic acid supplementation. There are > 60 mouse mutants and strains with NTDs, many reported within the past 2 years. Not only are NTD mutations at loci widely heterogeneous in function, but also most of the mutants demonstrate variable low penetrance and some show complex inheritance patterns (e.g. SELH/Bc, Abl / Arg, Mena / Profilin1 ). In most of these mouse models, the NTDs are exencephaly (equivalent to anencephaly) or spina bifida or both, reflecting failure of neural fold elevation in well defined, mechanistically distinct elevation zones. NTD risk is reduced in various models by different maternal nutrient supplements, including folic acid ( Pax3, Cart1, Cd mutants), inositol ( ct ) and methionine ( Axd ). Lack of de novo methylation in embryos ( Dnmt3b -null) leads to NTD risk, and we suggest a potential link between methylation and the observed female excess among cranial NTDs in several models. Some surprising NTD mutants ( Gadd45a, Terc, Trp53 ) suggest that genes with a basic mitotic function also have a function specific to neural fold elevation. The genes mutated in several mouse NTD models involve actin regulation ( Abl/Arg, Macs, Mena/Profilin1, Mlp, Shrm, Vcl ), support the postulated key role of actin in neural fold elevation, and may be a good candidate pathway to search for human NTD genes.

  15. Testing of Four Leishmania Vaccine Candidates in a Mouse Model of Infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the Main Causative Agent of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the New World▿

    PubMed Central

    Salay, G.; Dorta, M. L.; Santos, N. M.; Mortara, R. A.; Brodskyn, C.; Oliveira, C. I.; Barbiéri, C. L.; Rodrigues, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated whether four recombinant antigens previously used for vaccination against experimental infection with Leishmania (Leishmania) major could also induce protective immunity against a challenge with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the species responsible for 90% of the 28,712 annual cases of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis recorded in Brazil during the year of 2004. Initially, we isolated the homolog genes encoding four L. (V.) braziliensis antigens: (i) homologue of receptor for activated C kinase, (ii) thiol-specific antioxidant, (iii) Leishmania elongation and initiation factor, and (iv) L. (L.) major stress-inducible protein 1. At the deduced amino acid level, all four open reading frames had a high degree of identity with the previously described genes of L. (L.) major being expressed on promastigotes and amastigotes of L. (V.) braziliensis. These genes were inserted into the vector pcDNA3 or expressed as bacterial recombinant proteins. After immunization with recombinant plasmids or proteins, BALB/c mice generated specific antibody or cell-mediated immune responses (gamma interferon production). After an intradermal challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis infective promastigotes, no significant reduction on the lesions was detected. We conclude that the protective immunity afforded by these four vaccine candidates against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. (L.) major could not be reproduced against a challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis. Although negative, we consider our results important since they suggest that studies aimed at the development of an effective vaccine against L. (V.) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World, should be redirected toward distinct antigens or different vaccination strategies. PMID:17626159

  16. Testing of four Leishmania vaccine candidates in a mouse model of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World.

    PubMed

    Salay, G; Dorta, M L; Santos, N M; Mortara, R A; Brodskyn, C; Oliveira, C I; Barbiéri, C L; Rodrigues, M M

    2007-09-01

    We evaluated whether four recombinant antigens previously used for vaccination against experimental infection with Leishmania (Leishmania) major could also induce protective immunity against a challenge with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the species responsible for 90% of the 28,712 annual cases of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis recorded in Brazil during the year of 2004. Initially, we isolated the homolog genes encoding four L. (V.) braziliensis antigens: (i) homologue of receptor for activated C kinase, (ii) thiol-specific antioxidant, (iii) Leishmania elongation and initiation factor, and (iv) L. (L.) major stress-inducible protein 1. At the deduced amino acid level, all four open reading frames had a high degree of identity with the previously described genes of L. (L.) major being expressed on promastigotes and amastigotes of L. (V.) braziliensis. These genes were inserted into the vector pcDNA3 or expressed as bacterial recombinant proteins. After immunization with recombinant plasmids or proteins, BALB/c mice generated specific antibody or cell-mediated immune responses (gamma interferon production). After an intradermal challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis infective promastigotes, no significant reduction on the lesions was detected. We conclude that the protective immunity afforded by these four vaccine candidates against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. (L.) major could not be reproduced against a challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis. Although negative, we consider our results important since they suggest that studies aimed at the development of an effective vaccine against L. (V.) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World, should be redirected toward distinct antigens or different vaccination strategies.

  17. Genetically engineered mucin mouse models for inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Suhasini; Kumar, Sushil; Bafna, Sangeeta; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Jain, Maneesh

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins primarily produced by glandular and ductal epithelial cells, either in membrane-tethered or secretory forms, for providing lubrication and protection from various exogenous and endogenous insults. However, recent studies have linked their aberrant overexpression with infection, inflammation, and cancer that underscores their importance in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we present current status of the existing mouse models that have been developed to gain insights into the functional role(s) of mucins under physiological and pathological conditions. Knockout mouse models for membrane-associated (Muc1 and Muc16) and secretory mucins (Muc2) have helped us to elucidate the role of mucins in providing effective and protective barrier functions against pathological threats, participation in disease progression, and improved our understanding of mucin interaction with biotic and abiotic environmental components. Emphasis is also given to available transgenic mouse models (MUC1 and MUC7), which has been exploited to understand the context-dependent regulation and therapeutic potential of human mucins during inflammation and cancer. PMID:25634251

  18. Outer membrane vesicles derived from Salmonella Typhimurium mutants with truncated LPS induce cross-protective immune responses against infection of Salmonella enterica serovars in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Liu, Tian; Roland, Kenneth L; Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella enterica cause diarrheal and systemic diseases and are of considerable concern worldwide. Vaccines that are cross-protective against multiple serovars could provide effective control of Salmonella-mediated diseases. Bacteria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are highly immunogenic and are capable of eliciting protective immune responses. Alterations in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) length can result in outer membrane remodeling and composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) changing. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncated LPS on both the production and immunogenicity of Salmonella OMVs, including the ability of OMVs to elicit cross-protection against challenge by heterologous Salmonella strains. We found that mutations in waaJ and rfbP enhanced vesiculation, while mutations in waaC, waaF and waaG inhibited this process. Animal experiments indicated that OMVs from waaC, rfaH and rfbP mutants induced stronger serum immune responses compared to OMVs from the parent strain, while all elicited protective responses against the wild-type S. Typhimurium challenge. Furthermore, intranasal or intraperitoneal immunization with OMVs derived from the waaC and rfbP mutants elicited significantly higher cross-reactive IgG responses and provided enhanced cross-protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis challenge than the wild-type OMVs. These results indicate that truncated-LPS OMVs are capable of conferring cross protection against multiple serotypes of Salmonella infection.

  19. Criteria for Validating Mouse Models of Psychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chadman, Kathryn K.; Yang, Mu; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are in widespread use for biomedical research. Mouse models with a mutation in a single gene or multiple genes are excellent research tools for understanding the role of a specific gene in the etiology of a human genetic disease. Ideally, the mouse phenotypes will recapitulate the human phenotypes exactly. However, exact matches are rare, particularly in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. This article summarizes the current strategies for optimizing the validity of a mouse model of a human brain dysfunction. We address the common question raised by molecular geneticists and clinical researchers in psychiatry, “what is a ‘good enough’ mouse model”? PMID:18484083

  20. Crawling with Virus: Translational Insights from a Neonatal Mouse Model on the Pathogenesis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Infants.

    PubMed

    You, Dahui; Saravia, Jordy; Siefker, David; Shrestha, Bishwas; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-10-07

    The infant immune response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains incompletely understood. Here we review the use of a neonatal mouse model of RSV infection to mimic severe infection in human infants. We describe numerous age-specific responses, organized by cell type, observed in RSV-infected neonatal mice and draw comparisons (when possible) to human infants.

  1. Mouse models of acute exacerbations of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh K; Herbert, Cristan; Foster, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Most of the healthcare costs associated with asthma relate to emergency department visits and hospitalizations because of acute exacerbations of underlying chronic disease. Development of appropriate animal models of acute exacerbations of asthma is a necessary prerequisite for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms and assessing potential novel therapeutic approaches. Most such models have been developed using mice. Relatively few mouse models attempt to simulate the acute-on-chronic disease that characterizes human asthma exacerbations. Instead, many reported models involve relatively short-term challenge with an antigen to which animals are sensitized, followed closely by an unrelated triggering agent, so are better described as models of potentiation of acute allergic inflammation. Triggers for experimental models of asthma exacerbations include (i) challenge with high levels of the sensitizing allergen (ii) infection by viruses or fungi, or challenge with components of these microorganisms (iii) exposure to environmental pollutants. In this review, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of published mouse models, their application for investigation of novel treatments and potential future developments.

  2. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-09-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model.

  3. A Mouse Model for Osseous Heteroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Michael T.; Vowell, Kate; Hough, Tertius A.; Jones, Lynn; Pathak, Paras; Tyrer, Hayley E.; Kelly, Michelle; Cox, Roger; Warren, Madhuri V.; Peters, Jo

    2012-01-01

    GNAS/Gnas encodes Gsα that is mainly biallelically expressed but shows imprinted expression in some tissues. In Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) heterozygous loss of function mutations of GNAS can result in ectopic ossification that tends to be superficial and attributable to haploinsufficiency of biallelically expressed Gsα. Oed-Sml is a point missense mutation in exon 6 of the orthologous mouse locus Gnas. We report here both the late onset ossification and occurrence of benign cutaneous fibroepithelial polyps in Oed-Sml. These phenotypes are seen on both maternal and paternal inheritance of the mutant allele and are therefore due to an effect on biallelically expressed Gsα. The ossification is confined to subcutaneous tissues and so resembles the ossification observed with AHO. Our mouse model is the first with both subcutaneous ossification and fibroepithelial polyps related to Gsα deficiency. It is also the first mouse model described with a clinically relevant phenotype associated with a point mutation in Gsα and may be useful in investigations of the mechanisms of heterotopic bone formation. Together with earlier results, our findings indicate that Gsα signalling pathways play a vital role in repressing ectopic bone formation. PMID:23284784

  4. Efficacy of Pyrvinium Pamoate against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection In Vitro and in a Neonatal Mouse Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Autumn S.; Chong, Curtis R.; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Sullivan, David J.

    2008-01-01

    No effective approved drug therapy exists for Cryptosporidium infection of immunocompromised patients. Here we investigated the nonabsorbed anthelmintic drug pyrvinium pamoate for inhibition of the growth of the intestinal protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. The concentration of pyrvinium that effected 50% growth inhibition in human enterocytic HCT-8 cells by a quantitative alkaline phosphatase immunoassay was 354 nM. For comparison, in the same assay, 50% growth inhibition was obtained with 711 μM paromomycin or 27 μM chloroquine. We used a neonatal mouse model to measure the anti-Cryptosporidium activity of pyrvinium pamoate in vivo. Beginning 3 days after infection, pyrvinium at 5 or 12.5 mg/kg of body weight/day was administered to the treatment group mice for 4 or 6 consecutive days. Nine days after infection, the mice were sacrificed, and drug efficacy was determined by comparing the numbers of oocysts in the fecal smears of treated versus untreated mice. The intensities of trophozoite infection in the ileocecal intestinal regions were also compared using hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained histological slides. We observed a >90% reduction in infection intensity in pyrvinium-treated mice relative to that in untreated controls, along with a substantial reduction in tissue pathology. Based on these results, pyrvinium pamoate is a potential drug candidate for the treatment of cryptosporidiosis in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. PMID:18591280

  5. Unstressing intemperate models: how cold stress undermines mouse modeling.

    PubMed

    Karp, Christopher L

    2012-06-04

    Mus musculus enjoys pride of place at the center of contemporary biomedical research. Despite being the current model system of choice for in vivo mechanistic analysis, mice have clear limitations. The literature is littered with examples of therapeutic approaches that showed promise in mouse models but failed in clinical trials. More generally, mice often provide poor mimics of the human diseases being modeled. Available data suggest that the cold stress to which laboratory mice are ubiquitously subjected profoundly affects mouse physiology in ways that impair the modeling of human homeostasis and disease. Experimental attention to this key, albeit largely ignored, environmental variable is likely to have a broad transformative effect on biomedical research.

  6. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  7. Early specific host response associated with starting effective tuberculosis treatment in an infection controlled placebo controlled mouse study.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Alice L; de Vos, Alex F; Klatser, Paul R; Anthony, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Recently we proposed exploring the potential of treatment stimulated testing as diagnostic method for tuberculosis (TB). An infection controlled placebo controlled mouse study was performed to investigate whether serum cytokine levels changed measurably during the early phase of TB chemotherapy. Serum was collected prior to and during the first 3 weeks of isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF) chemotherapy, and levels of 23 selected cytokines/chemokines were measured using a liquid bead array. The serum levels of IFNγ, IP-10, MIG, MCP-1, IL-17 and IL-6 were elevated in the TB infected mice compared to non-infected mice at least at 1 time point measured. In infected mice, IFNγ, IP-10, MIG and MCP-1 levels decreased within 7 days of treatment with RIF+INH compared to placebo. Treatment of non-infected mice in the absence of tuberculosis infection had no effect on these cytokines. IL-17 and IL-6 had decreased to baseline in all infected mice prior to the initiation of treatment. This study demonstrates that systemic levels of some cytokines, more specifically IFNγ, IP-10, MIG and MCP-1, rapidly and specifically change upon starting TB chemotherapy only in the presence of infection in a mouse model. Thus, IFNγ, IP-10, MIG and MCP-1 are promising 'Treat-to-Test' targets for the diagnosis of TB and deserve further investigation in a study on human TB suspects.

  8. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  9. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  10. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-27

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  11. A Mouse Model of Endocardial Fibroelastosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth S.; Pepper, Victoria K.; Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Cianciolo, Rachel; Baker, Peter; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocardial Fibroelastosis (EFE) is a pathologic condition of abnormal deposition of collagen and elastin within the endocardium of the heart. It is seen in conjunction with a variety of diseases including hypoplastic left heart syndrome and viral endocarditis. While an experimental model using heterotopic heart transplant in rats has been described, we sought to fully describe a mouse model that can be used to further elucidate the potential mechanisms of and treatments for EFE. Materials and Methods The hearts of 2-day-old C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into the abdomen of 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice. At 2 weeks, the hearts were harvested and histologic analysis performed using hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s Trichrome, Russell-Movat’s Pentachrome, Picrosirius Red, Hart’s, Verhoeff-Van Gieson, and Weigert’s Resorcin-Fuschin stains. Additionally, one heart was analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results Specimens demonstrated abnormal accumulation of both collagen and elastin within the endocardium with occasional expansion in to the myocardium. Heterogeneity in extracellular matrix deposition was noted in the histologic specimens. In addition, TEM demonstrated the presence of excess collagen within the endocardium. Conclusions The heterotopic transplantation of an immature heart into a mouse results in changes consistent with EFE. This model is appropriate to investigate the etiology and treatment of endocardial fibroelastosis. PMID:26363814

  12. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  13. Mouse models of otitis media: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mahmood Fazal

    2012-10-01

    There has been a rapid rise in the use of the mouse to investigate pathobiology of otitis media. This is for good reason, including easy husbandry, but also capacity for genetic manipulation of the mouse. Insights into human disease have been gleaned from mouse models, but there are limitations of the mouse-to-man approach. First, important differences exist between mouse and man, particularly in immune function. Second, functional equivalence of genes in the 2 species is not ensured. Third, laboratory mice of a uniform genetic background and environment are an inadequate model of the plethora of factors affecting complex disease in humans. Finally, gene function in mouse models is often obliterated using gene knockout technology, but this is a poor mimic of normal gene variation in man. These drawbacks of the mouse may in the future limit its usefulness in otitis media research.

  14. Zika virus infects cells lining the blood-retinal barrier and causes chorioretinal atrophy in mouse eyes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Guest, John-Michael; Kanwar, Mamta; Boss, Joseph; Gao, Nan; Juzych, Mark S; Abrams, Gary W; Yu, Fu-Shin; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-02-23

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an important pathogen that causes not only neurologic, but also ocular, abnormalities. Thus, it is imperative that models to study ZIKV pathogenesis in the eye are developed to identify potential targets for interventions. Here, we studied ZIKV interactions with human retinal cells and evaluated ZIKV's pathobiology in mouse eyes. We showed that cells lining the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), the retinal endothelium, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were highly permissive and susceptible to ZIKV-induced cell death. Direct inoculation of ZIKV in eyes of adult C57BL/6 and IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) KO mice caused chorioretinal atrophy with RPE mottling, a common ocular manifestation of congenital ZIKV infection in humans. This response was associated with induced expression of multiple inflammatory and antiviral (IFNs) response genes in the infected mouse retina. Interestingly, ISG15 KO eyes exhibited severe chorioretinitis, which coincided with increased retinal cell death and higher ZIKV replication. Collectively, our study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that ZIKV causes retinal lesions and infects the cells lining the BRB and that ISG15 plays a role in retinal innate defense against ZIKV infection. Our mouse model can be used to study mechanisms underlying ZIKV-induced chorioretinitis and to gauge ocular antiviral therapies.

  15. Zika virus infects cells lining the blood-retinal barrier and causes chorioretinal atrophy in mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Guest, John-Michael; Kanwar, Mamta; Gao, Nan; Juzych, Mark S.; Abrams, Gary W.; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an important pathogen that causes not only neurologic, but also ocular, abnormalities. Thus, it is imperative that models to study ZIKV pathogenesis in the eye are developed to identify potential targets for interventions. Here, we studied ZIKV interactions with human retinal cells and evaluated ZIKV’s pathobiology in mouse eyes. We showed that cells lining the blood-retinal barrier (BRB), the retinal endothelium, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were highly permissive and susceptible to ZIKV-induced cell death. Direct inoculation of ZIKV in eyes of adult C57BL/6 and IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) KO mice caused chorioretinal atrophy with RPE mottling, a common ocular manifestation of congenital ZIKV infection in humans. This response was associated with induced expression of multiple inflammatory and antiviral (IFNs) response genes in the infected mouse retina. Interestingly, ISG15 KO eyes exhibited severe chorioretinitis, which coincided with increased retinal cell death and higher ZIKV replication. Collectively, our study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that ZIKV causes retinal lesions and infects the cells lining the BRB and that ISG15 plays a role in retinal innate defense against ZIKV infection. Our mouse model can be used to study mechanisms underlying ZIKV-induced chorioretinitis and to gauge ocular antiviral therapies. PMID:28239662

  16. A humanoid mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Toru

    2010-10-01

    Even now fruit of the human genome project is available, we have difficulties to approach neuropsychiatric disorders at the molecular level. Autism is a complex psychiatric illness but has received considerable attention as a developmental brain disorder not only from basic researchers but also from society. Substantial evidence suggests that chromosomal abnormalities contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism. We succeeded to generate mice with a 6.3-Mb-wide interstitial duplication in mouse chromosome 7c that is highly syntenic to human 15q11-13 by using a Cre-loxP-based chromosome-engineering technique. The only paternally duplicated mice display autistic behavioral features such as poor social interaction and stereotypical behavior, and exhibit a developmental abnormality in ultrasonic vocalizations as well as anxiety. The detailed analysis focusing on a non-coding small nucleolar RNA, MBII52, within the duplicated region, revealed that the paternally duplicated mice alter the editing ratio of serotonin (5-HT) 2c receptor pre-mRNA and intracellular calcium responses by a 5-HT2c receptor specific agonist are changed in neurons. This result may explain one of molecular mechanisms of abnormal behaviors in the paternal duplicated mice. The first chromosome-engineered mouse model for human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication fulfills not only face validity of human autistic phenotypes but also construct validity based on human chromosome abnormality. This model will be a founder mouse for forward genetics of autistic disease and an invaluable tool for its therapeutic development.

  17. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  18. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  19. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community.

  20. Mouse intragastric infusion (iG) model

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Akiko; Lazaro, Raul; Wang, Ping-Yen; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Machida, Keigo; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Direct intragastric delivery of a diet, nutrient or test substance can be achieved in rodents (mice and rats) on a long-term (2–3 months) basis using a chronically implanted gastrostomy catheter and a flow-through swivel system. This rodent intragastric infusion (iG) model has broad applications in research on food intake, gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, GI neuroendocrinology, drug metabolism and toxicity, obesity and liver disease. It achieves maximal control over the rate and pattern of delivery and it can be combined with normal ad libitum feeding of solid diet if so desired. It may be adopted to achieve infusion at other sites of the GI system to test the role of a bypassed GI segment in neuroendocrine physiology, and its use in genetic mouse models facilitates the genetic analysis of a central question under investigation. PMID:22461066

  1. Prion Infection of Mouse Brain Reveals Multiple New Upregulated Genes Involved in Neuroinflammation or Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, James F.; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gliosis is often a preclinical pathological finding in neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases, but the mechanisms facilitating gliosis and neuronal damage in these diseases are not understood. To expand our knowledge of the neuroinflammatory response in prion diseases, we assessed the expression of key genes and proteins involved in the inflammatory response and signal transduction in mouse brain at various times after scrapie infection. In brains of scrapie-infected mice at pre- and postclinical stages, we identified 15 previously unreported differentially expressed genes related to inflammation or activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Levels for the majority of differentially expressed genes increased with time postinfection. In quantitative immunoblotting experiments of STAT proteins, STAT1α, phosphorylated-STAT1α (pSTAT1α), and pSTAT3 were increased between 94 and 131 days postinfection (p.i.) in brains of mice infected with strain 22L. Furthermore, a select group of STAT-associated genes was increased preclinically during scrapie infection, suggesting early activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Comparison of inflammatory markers between mice infected with scrapie strains 22L and RML indicated that the inflammatory responses and gene expression profiles in the brains were strikingly similar, even though these scrapie strains infect different brain regions. The endogenous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an inflammatory marker, was newly identified as increasing preclinically in our model and therefore might influence scrapie pathogenesis in vivo. However, in IL-1Ra-deficient or overexpressor transgenic mice inoculated with scrapie, neither loss nor overexpression of IL-1Ra demonstrated any observable effect on gliosis, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) formation, disease tempo, pathology, or expression of the inflammatory genes analyzed. IMPORTANCE Prion infection leads to Pr

  2. Comparative studies evaluating mouse models used for efficacy testing of experimental drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Mary A; Gilliland, Janet C; Wells, Colby L; Brooks, Elizabeth J; Woolhiser, Lisa K; Gruppo, Veronica; Peloquin, Charles A; Orme, Ian M; Lenaerts, Anne J

    2011-03-01

    Methodologies for preclinical animal model testing of drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary from laboratory to laboratory; however, it is unknown if these variations result in different outcomes. Thus, a series of head-to-head comparisons of drug regimens in three commonly used mouse models (intravenous, a low-dose aerosol, and a high-dose aerosol infection model) and in two strains of mice are reported here. Treatment with standard tuberculosis (TB) drugs resulted in similar efficacies in two mouse species after a low-dose aerosol infection. When comparing the three different infection models, the efficacies in mice of rifampin and pyrazinamide were similar when administered with either isoniazid or moxifloxacin. Relapse studies revealed that the standard drug regimen showed a significantly higher relapse rate than the moxifloxacin-containing regimen. In fact, 4 months of the moxifloxacin-containing combination regimen showed similar relapse rates as 6 months of the standard regimen. The intravenous model showed slower bactericidal killing kinetics with the combination regimens tested and a higher relapse of infection than either aerosol infection models. All three models showed similar outcomes for in vivo efficacy and relapse of infection for the drug combinations tested, regardless of the mouse infection model used. Efficacy data for the drug combinations used also showed similar results, regardless of the formulation used for rifampin or timing of the drugs administered in combination. In all three infection models, the dual combination of rifampin and pyrazinamide was less sterilizing than the standard three-drug regimen, and therefore the results do not support the previously reported antagonism between standard TB agents.

  3. A mouse model of mandibular osteotomy healing.

    PubMed

    Paccione, M F; Warren, S M; Spector, J A; Greenwald, J A; Bouletreau, P J; Longaker, M T

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing. By applying this model to transgenic mice or using in situ hybridization techniques, we can subsequently investigate candidate genes that are believed to be important in membranous osteotomy healing. In the current study, 20 adult male CD-1 mice underwent a full-thickness osteotomy between the second and third molars of the right hemimandible using a 3-mm diamond disc and copious irrigation. Compo-Post pins were secured into the mandible, 2 mm anterior and posterior to the osteotomy. After the soft tissues were reapproximated and the skin was closed, an acrylic external fixator was attached to the exposed posts for stabilization. The animals were killed on postoperative day number 7, 10, 14, and 28 (n=5 animals per time point). The right hemimandibles were decalcified and embedded in paraffin for histologic evaluation or immunohistochemistry localizing osteocalcin. At 7 days after the osteotomy, early intramembranous bone formation could be seen extending from either edge of the osteotomized bone. By 10 days, an increasing number of small blood vessels could be seen within and around the osteotomy. At 14 days, the bone edges were in close approximation, and by 28 days the callus had been replaced by actively remodeling woven bone in all specimens examined. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that osteocalcin expression correlated temporally with the transition from a soft to a hard callus. Furthermore, osteocalcin was spatially confined to osteoblasts actively laying down new osteoid or remodeling bone. This study describes a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing that can be used as a paradigm for future osteotomy healing studies investigating candidate genes critical for osteogenesis and successful bone repair.

  4. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Infection Remodels Connexin43-Mediated Gap Junction Intercellular Communication In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Rahul; Banerjee, Kaveri; Bose, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gap junctions (GJs) form intercellular channels which directly connect the cytoplasm between neighboring cells to facilitate the transfer of ions and small molecules. GJs play a major role in the pathogenesis of infection-associated inflammation. Mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins (Cxs), cause dysmyelination and leukoencephalopathy. In multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), Cx43 was shown to be modulated in the central nervous system (CNS). The mechanism behind Cx43 alteration and its role in MS remains unexplored. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infection-induced demyelination is one of the best-studied experimental animal models for MS. Our studies demonstrated that MHV infection downregulated Cx43 expression at protein and mRNA levels in vitro in primary astrocytes obtained from neonatal mouse brains. After infection, a significant amount of Cx43 was retained in endoplasmic reticulum/endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate complex (ER/ERGIC) and GJ plaque formation was impaired at the cell surface, as evidenced by a reduction of the Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of Cx43. Altered trafficking and impairment of GJ plaque formation may cause the loss of functional channel formation in MHV-infected primary astrocytes, as demonstrated by a reduced number of dye-coupled cells after a scrape-loading Lucifer yellow dye transfer assay. Upon MHV infection, a significant downregulation of Cx43 was observed in the virus-infected mouse brain. This study demonstrates that astrocytic Cx43 expression and function can be modulated due to virus stress and can be an appropriate model to understand the basis of cellular mechanisms involved in the alteration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in CNS neuroinflammation. IMPORTANCE We found that MHV infection leads to the downregulation of Cx43 in vivo in the CNS. In addition, results show that MHV infection impairs Cx43 expression in addition

  5. A novel mouse xenotransplantation model of EBV-T/NK-LPD and the application of the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Imadome, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection (CAEBV), characterized by proliferation of EBV-infected T or NK cells, is a disease of unknown pathogenesis and requires hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for curative treatment. Here we show that intravenous injection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients with CAEBV to NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2R γ(null) (NOG) mice leads to engraftment of EBV-infected T or NK cells. Analysis of TCR repertoire identified an identical predominant EBV-infected T-cell clone both in a patient and a mouse transplanted with his PBMCs. EBV-infected T or NK cells infiltrated to most major organs including the liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, adrenal glands, and intestine, showing histological characteristics of CAEBV. Expression of EBNA1, LMP1, and LMP2A, but not EBNA2, in these cells indicated the latency II program of EBV gene characteristic to CAEBV. High levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and RANTES were detected in the peripheral blood of these mice. EBV-containing fractions of either CD8(+), γδT, or NK cell lineages failed to engraft, once they were isolated from PBMCs ; they could engraft only when CD4(+) cell fraction was transplanted in parallel. Isolated EBV-containing CD4(+) T cells, in contrast, did engraft on their own. This is the first report of an animal model of CAEBV and suggest that EBV-infected T or NK cells in CAEBV are not truly neoplastic but are dependent on CD4(+) T cells for their proliferation in vivo.

  6. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of mouse macrophages stimulates early expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and SOCS3

    PubMed Central

    Alston, Christine I.; Dix, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a species-specific β-herpesvirus that infects for life up to 80% of the world’s population and causes severe morbidity in at-risk immunocompromised populations. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and SOCS3 are host proteins that act as inducible negative feedback regulators of cytokine signaling and have been implicated in several ocular diseases and viral infections. We recently found in our mouse model of experimental cytomegalovirus retinitis that subretinally-injected murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) stimulates ocular SOCS1 and SOCS3 during retrovirus-induced immune suppression of murine AIDS (MAIDS), and that infiltrating macrophages are prominent cellular sources of retinal SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression. Herein we investigate possible virologic mechanisms whereby MCMV infection may stimulate SOCS1 and/or SOCS3 expression in cell culture. We report that infection of IC-21 mouse macrophages with MCMV propagated through the salivary glands of BALB/c mice, but not from tissue culture in C57BL/6 fibroblasts, transiently stimulates SOCS1 and SOCS3 mRNA transcripts, but not SOCS5 mRNA. Viral tegument proteins are insufficient for this stimulation, as replication-deficient UV-inactivated MCMV fails to stimulate SOCS1 or SOCS3 in IC-21 macrophages. By contrast, infection of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with either productive MCMV or UV-inactivated MCMV significantly stimulates SOCS1 and SOCS3 mRNA expression early after infection. Treatment of MCMV-infected IC-21 mouse macrophages with the antiviral drug ganciclovir significantly decreases MCMV-stimulated SOCS3 expression at 3 days post-infection. These data suggest cell type-specific, different roles for viral immediate early or early gene expression and/or viral tegument proteins in the early stimulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3 during MCMV infection. Furthermore, putative biphasic stimulation of SOCS3 during late MCMV infection of IC-21 mouse macrophages may occur by divergent

  7. The characteristics of NK cells in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mouse spleens.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Cha, Hefei; Yu, Xiuxue; Xie, Hongyan; Wu, Changyou; Dong, Nuo; Huang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are classic innate immune cells that play roles in many types of infectious disease. Recently, some new characteristics of NK cells were discovered. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum for 5-6 weeks and lymphocytes were isolated from the spleen to detect some of the NK cell characteristics by multiparametric flow cytometry. The results revealed that the S. japonicum infection induced a large amount of NK cells, although the percentage of NK cells was not increased significantly. At the same time, the results showed that infected mouse splenic NK cells expressed increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and produced more IL-2, IL-4, and IL-17 and less IFN-γ after stimulation with PMA and ionomycin. This meant that NK cells played a role in S. japonicum infection. Moreover, decreased NKG2A/C/E (CD94) expression levels were detected on the surface of NK cells from infected mouse spleens, which might serve as a NK cell activation mechanism. Additionally, high levels of IL-10, but not PD-1, were expressed on the infected mouse NK cells, which implied that functional exhaustion might exist in the splenic NK cells from S. japonicum-infected mice. Collectively, our results suggest that NK cells play important roles in the course of S. japonicum infection.

  8. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  9. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  10. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  11. A Murine Model for Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Hunstad, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections of humans. The mouse provides an excellent and tractable model system for cystitis and pyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli and other uropathogens. Using a well-established model of experimental cystitis in which the bladders of female mice are infected via transurethral catheterization, the molecular details of the pathogenesis of bacterial cystitis have been substantially illuminated in the last decade. Uropathogenic E. coli attach to bladder epithelium (both in human and mouse) via adhesive type 1 pili, establish a replicative niche within epithelial cell cytoplasm, and form intracellular bacterial communities that are protected from antibiotic effects and immune clearance. The use of different inbred and mutant mouse strains offers the opportunity to study outcomes of infection, including resolution, formation of quiescent intracellular bacterial reservoirs, chronic bacterial cystitis, and recurrent infections. Urine, bladder, and kidney tissues can be analyzed by bacterial culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent and confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, and flow cytometry, while a broad array of soluble markers (e.g., cytokines) can also be profiled in serum, urine, and tissue homogenates by ELISA, Western blotting, multiplex bead array, and other approaches. This model promises to afford continued opportunity for discovery of pathogenic mechanisms and evaluation of therapeutic and preventive strategies for acute, chronic, and recurrent UTI. PMID:26468108

  12. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse–human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human–Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene–phenotype–disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25348401

  13. Efficacy of Enrofloxacin in a Mouse Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Francis, Kevin P; Papich, Mark G; Karolewski, Brian; Hod, Eldad A; Prestia, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of enrofloxacin administered by 2 different routes in a mouse model of sepsis. Male CD1 mice were infected with a bioluminescent strain of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and treated with enrofloxacin either by injection or in drinking water. Peak serum levels were evaluated by using HPLC. Mice were monitored for signs of clinical disease, and infections were monitored by using bioluminescence imaging. Serum levels of enrofloxacin and the active metabolite ciprofloxacin were greater in the group treated by injection than in controls or the groups treated by administration in drinking water. Survival of the group treated with enrofloxacin injection was greater than that of controls and groups treated with enrofloxacin in the drinking water. Bioluminescence in the group treated with enrofloxacin injection was less than that in the groups treated with oral administration at 12 h and in the groups treated orally and the control group at 16 h. According to these findings, we recommend the use of injectable enrofloxacin at 5 mg/kg SC for mice with systemic infections. PMID:25199094

  14. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest.

  15. Evaluation of Listeria Monocytogenes Based Vaccines for HER-2/neu in Mouse Transgenic Models of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    surrounding vessels in commonly studied mouse tumors. We have identified two autochthonous mouse mammary tumor models, MMTV-infected and MMTV-neu mice , with...Generate mammary specific inducible Tie2Ex mice a. Cross MMTV-rtTA mice with TRE-Tie2Ex mice (FVB and C3H strain). The Transgenic Mouse Facility...at Penn generated C3H/HeN TRE-Tie2Ex and FVB TRE-Tie2Ex transgenic mice using a TRE-Tie2Ex plasmid. Mouse lines that stably transmitted the

  16. Mouse models of colorectal cancer as preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Buczacki, Simon J.A.; Arends, Mark J.; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the application of mouse models to the identification and pre‐clinical validation of novel therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer, and to the search for early disease biomarkers. Large‐scale genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic profiling of colorectal carcinomas has led to the identification of many candidate genes whose direct contribution to tumourigenesis is yet to be defined; we discuss the utility of cross‐species comparative ‘omics‐based approaches to this problem. We highlight recent progress in modelling late‐stage disease using mice, and discuss ways in which mouse models could better recapitulate the complexity of human cancers to tackle the problem of therapeutic resistance and recurrence after surgical resection. PMID:26115037

  17. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  18. A non-transgenic mouse model (icv-STZ mouse) of Alzheimer's disease: similarities to and differences from the transgenic model (3xTg-AD mouse).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Sun, Shenggang; Lee, Moon H; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations in the presenilins or amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) genes. A commonly used animal model for AD is the 3xTg-AD transgenic mouse model, which harbors mutated presenilin 1, APP, and tau genes and thus represents a model of FAD. There is an unmet need in the field to characterize animal models representing different AD mechanisms, so that potential drugs for SAD can be evaluated preclinically in these animal models. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), the icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. In this study, we compared the non-cognitive and cognitive behaviors as well as biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse. We found that both mouse models showed increased exploratory activity as well as impaired learning and spatial memory. Both models also demonstrated neuroinflammation, altered synaptic proteins and insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling, and increased hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. The most prominent brain abnormality in the icv-STZ mouse was neuroinflammation, and in the 3xTg-AD mouse it was elevation of hyperphosphorylated tau. These observations demonstrate the behavioral and neuropathological similarities and differences between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs.

  19. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  20. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  1. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  2. Ultrastructural study of Rift Valley fever virus in the mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Christopher; Steele, Keith E.; Honko, Anna; Shamblin, Joshua; Hensley, Lisa E.; Smith, Darci R.

    2012-09-15

    Detailed ultrastructural studies of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in the mouse model are needed to develop and characterize a small animal model of RVF for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, the ultrastructural features of RVFV infection in the mouse model were analyzed. The main changes in the liver included the presence of viral particles in hepatocytes and hepatic stem cells accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. However, viral particles were observed rarely in the liver; in contrast, particles were extremely abundant in the CNS. Despite extensive lymphocytolysis, direct evidence of viral replication was not observed in the lymphoid tissue. These results correlate with the acute-onset hepatitis and delayed-onset encephalitis that are dominant features of severe human RVF, but suggest that host immune-mediated mechanisms contribute significantly to pathology. The results of this study expand our knowledge of RVFV-host interactions and further characterize the mouse model of RVF.

  3. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer‐related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late‐stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new‐targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre‐clinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:26809278

  4. Biofilm models of polymicrobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between microbes are complex and play an important role in the pathogenesis of infections. These interactions can range from fierce competition for nutrients and niches to highly evolved cooperative mechanisms between different species that support their mutual growth. An increasing appreciation for these interactions, and desire to uncover the mechanisms that govern them, has resulted in a shift from monomicrobial to polymicrobial biofilm studies in different disease models. Here we provide an overview of biofilm models used to study select polymicrobial infections and highlight the impact that the interactions between microbes within these biofilms have on disease progression. Notable recent advances in the development of polymicrobial biofilm-associated infection models and challenges facing the study of polymicrobial biofilms are addressed. PMID:26592098

  5. Dopamine and serotonin levels following prenatal viral infection in mouse--implications for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christine; Reutiman, Teri J; Folsom, Timothy D; Sohr, Reinhard; Wolf, Rainer J; Juckel, Georg; Fatemi, S Hossein

    2008-10-01

    Prenatal viral infection has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. It has previously been demonstrated that viral infection causes deleterious effects on brain structure and function in mouse offspring following late first trimester (E9) and middle-late second trimester (E18) administration of influenza virus. Neurochemical analysis following infection on E18 using this model has revealed significantly altered levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and taurine, but not dopamine. In order to monitor these different patterns of monoamine expression in exposed offspring in more detail and to see if there are changes in the dopamine system at another time point, pregnant C57BL6J mice were infected with a sublethal dose of human influenza virus or sham-infected using vehicle solution on E16. Male offspring of the infected mice were collected at P0, P14, and P56, their brains removed and cerebellum dissected and flash frozen. Dopamine and serotonin levels were then measured using HPLC-ED technique. When compared to controls, there was a significant decrease in serotonin levels in the cerebella of offspring of virally exposed mice at P14. No differences in levels of dopamine were observed in exposed and control mice, although there was a significant decrease in dopamine at P14 and P56 when compared to P0. The present study shows that the serotonergic system is disrupted following prenatal viral infection, potentially modelling disruptions that occur in patients with schizophrenia and autism.

  6. Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses (Mtv): New Roles for an Old Virus in Cancer, Infection, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Michael P.; Shevach, Ethan M.; Punkosdy, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses are beta-retroviruses that exist in both exogenous (MMTV) and endogenous (Mtv) forms. Exogenous MMTV is transmitted via the milk of lactating animals and is capable of inducing mammary gland tumors later in life. MMTV has provided a number of critical models for studying both viral infection as well as human breast cancer. In addition to the horizontally transmitted MMTV, most inbred mouse strains contain permanently integrated Mtv proviruses within their genome that are remnants of MMTV infection and vertically transmitted. Historically, Mtv have been appreciated for their role in shaping the T cell repertoire during thymic development via negative selection. In addition, more recent work has demonstrated a larger role for Mtv in modulating host immune responses due to its peripheral expression. The influence of Mtv on host response has been observed during experimental murine models of Polyomavirus- and ESb-induced lymphoma as well as Leishmania major and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. Decreased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and virus-induced tumors has been observed among mice lacking all Mtv. We have also demonstrated a role for Mtv Sag in the expansion of regulatory T cells following chronic viral infection. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest research in the field regarding peripheral expression of Mtv with a particular focus on their role and influence on the immune system, infectious disease outcome, and potential involvement in tumor formation. PMID:24324930

  7. Mouse Model of Halogenated Platinum Salt Hypersensitivity ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Occupational exposure to halogenated platinum salts can trigger the development of asthma. Concern for increased asthma risk exists for the general population due to the use of platinum (Pt) in catalytic converters and its emerging use as a diesel fuel additive. To investigate airway responses to Pt, we developed a mouse model of Pt hypersensitivity. Previously, we confirmed the dermal sensitizing potency of ammonium hexachloroplatinate (AHCP) using an ex vivo [3H]methyl thymidine labeling version of the local lymph node assay in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the ability of AHCP to induce airway responses in mice sensitized by the dermal route. Mice were sensitized through application of 100 µL 1% AHCP in DMSO to the shaved back on days 0, 5 and 19, and 25 µl to each ear on days 10, 11 and 12. Unsensitized mice received vehicle. On day 24, mice were challenged by oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) with 0 or 100 µg AHCP in saline. Before and immediately after challenge, airway responses were assessed using whole body plethysmography (WBP). On day 26, changes in ventilatory responses to methacholine (Mch) aerosol were assessed by WBP; dose-dependent increases in Mch responsiveness occurred in sensitized mice. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid harvested from sensitized mice contained an average of 7.5% eosinophils compared to less than 0.5% in control mice (p < 0.05). This model will be useful for assessing both relative sensitizing potency and cross-reacti

  8. Mouse models for human hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Michel; Safieddine, Saaid; Petit, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a frequent condition in humans. Identification of the causative genes for the early onset forms of isolated deafness began 15 years ago and has been very fruitful. To date, approximately 50 causative genes have been identified. Yet, limited information regarding the underlying pathogenic mechanisms can be derived from hearing tests in deaf patients. This chapter describes the success of mouse models in the elucidation of some pathophysiological processes in the auditory sensory organ, the cochlea. These models have revealed a variety of defective structures and functions at the origin of deafness genetic forms. This is illustrated by three different examples: (1) the DFNB9 deafness form, a synaptopathy of the cochlear sensory cells where otoferlin is defective; (2) the Usher syndrome, in which deafness is related to abnormal development of the hair bundle, the mechanoreceptive structure of the sensory cells to sound; (3) the DFNB1 deafness form, which is the most common form of inherited deafness in Caucasian populations, mainly caused by connexin-26 defects that alter gap junction communication between nonsensory cochlear cells.

  9. Mouse Models in Bone Marrow Transplantation and Adoptive Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arber, Caroline; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Reddy, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of transplantation have been indispensable to the development of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Their role in the generation of basic science knowledge is invaluable and is subject to discussion below. However, this article focuses on the direct role and relevance of mouse models towards the clinical development and advances in BMT and adoptive T-cell therapy for human diseases. The authors aim to present a thoughtful perspective on the pros and cons of mouse models while noting that despite imperfections these models are obligatory for the development of science-based medicine. PMID:24216170

  10. Mouse infection and pathogenesis by Trypanosoma brucei motility mutants.

    PubMed

    Kisalu, Neville K; Langousis, Gerasimos; Bentolila, Laurent A; Ralston, Katherine S; Hill, Kent L

    2014-06-01

    The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei is an essential and multifunctional organelle that drives parasite motility and is receiving increased attention as a potential drug target. In the mammalian host, parasite motility is suspected to contribute to infection and disease pathogenesis. However, it has not been possible to test this hypothesis owing to lack of motility mutants that are viable in the bloodstream life cycle stage that infects the mammalian host. We recently identified a bloodstream-form motility mutant in 427-derived T. brucei in which point mutations in the LC1 dynein subunit disrupt propulsive motility but do not affect viability. These mutants have an actively beating flagellum, but cannot translocate. Here we demonstrate that the LC1 point mutant fails to show enhanced cell motility upon increasing viscosity of the surrounding medium, which is a hallmark of wild type T. brucei, thus indicating that motility of the mutant is fundamentally altered compared with wild type cells. We next used the LC1 point mutant to assess the influence of trypanosome motility on infection in mice. Wesurprisingly found that disrupting parasite motility has no discernible effect on T. brucei bloodstream infection. Infection time-course, maximum parasitaemia, number of waves of parasitaemia, clinical features and disease outcome are indistinguishable between motility mutant and control parasites. Our studies provide an important step toward understanding the contribution of parasite motility to infection and a foundation for future investigations of T. brucei interaction with the mammalian host.

  11. The Viral Polymerase Inhibitor 7-Deaza-2’-C-Methyladenosine Is a Potent Inhibitor of In Vitro Zika Virus Replication and Delays Disease Progression in a Robust Mouse Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Zmurko, Joanna; Marques, Rafael E.; Schols, Dominique; Verbeken, Erik; Kaptein, Suzanne J.F.; Neyts, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging flavivirus typically causing a dengue-like febrile illness, but neurological complications, such as microcephaly in newborns, have potentially been linked to this viral infection. We established a panel of in vitro assays to allow the identification of ZIKV inhibitors and demonstrate that the viral polymerase inhibitor 7-deaza-2’-C-methyladenosine (7DMA) efficiently inhibits replication. Infection of AG129 (IFN-α/β and IFN-γ receptor knock-out) mice with ZIKV resulted in acute neutrophilic encephalitis with viral antigens accumulating in neurons of the brain and spinal cord. Additionally, high levels of viral RNA were detected in the spleen, liver and kidney, and levels of IFN-γ and IL-18 were systematically increased in serum of ZIKV-infected mice. Interestingly, the virus was also detected in testicles of infected mice. In line with its in vitro anti-ZIKV activity, 7DMA reduced viremia and delayed virus-induced morbidity and mortality in infected mice, which also validates this small animal model to assess the in vivo efficacy of novel ZIKV inhibitors. Since AG129 mice can generate an antibody response, and have been used in dengue vaccine studies, the model can also be used to assess the efficacy of ZIKV vaccines.   PMID:27163257

  12. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells with classical swine fever virus C-strain promotes cells maturation and lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fu-Ying; Qiu, Chang-Qing; Jia, Huai-Jie; Chen, Guo-Hua; Zeng, Shuang; He, Xiao-Bing; Fang, Yong-Xiang; Lin, Guo-Zhen; Jing, Zhi-Zhong

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the interactions of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) C-strain and the virulent GSLZ strain with mouse bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells (BM-imDCs) were investigated for the first time. Both the C-strain and the virulent GSLZ strain could effectively infect and replicate in mouse BM-imDCs. C-strain-infected BM-imDCs showed a greatly enhanced degree of maturation, and could effectively promote the expansion and proliferation of allogeneic naive T cells. The C-strain induced a stronger Th1 response. Infection with the virulent GSLZ strain had no obvious influence on cell maturation or lymphocyte proliferation, and failed to induce any obvious immune response. The results of this study provided initial information for research of the immunologic mechanisms of CSFV using mouse DCs as the model cells.

  13. Development of a novel mouse constipation model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Wang, Kai-Yue; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a novel mouse constipation model. METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into three groups, and intragastrically administered 0-4 °C saline (ice-cold group) or 15-20 °C saline (saline control group) daily for 14 d, or were left untreated (blank control group). Stools were collected 3-24 h after treatment to record the wet and dry weights and the stool form. Intestinal propulsion experiments were carried out and defecation time was measured for six days continuously after suspending treatments. The expressions of PGP9.5 were detected by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Based on the percentage of stool weight changes compared with baseline (before irritation) in 9-14 d, stool weight changes were classified into three levels. Each level shows a different body state, which is state I (no change: plus or minus 5%), state II (slightly decreased: 5%-15%) and state III (decreased: 15%-25%). In state III, between day 9-14, the stool weights decreased by 15%-25% compared with the baseline, and changed at a rate > 10% compared with blank control values, and the stools became small and dry. Additionally, intestinal functions degenerated in these animals, and PGP9.5-positive expression markedly decreased in jejunum, ileum and proximal colon myenteric plexus. CONCLUSION: Irritation with ice-cold saline is a stable, repeatable method in building constipation model in mice for exploring the pathogenesis and treatment options of constipation, and the change of stool weight and size may serve as a useful tool to judge a constipation model success or not. PMID:26973418

  14. A Mouse Model of Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Katerina; Szabolcs, Matthias; Fisher, Peter; Kljuic, Ana; Ludwig, Thomas; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2004-01-01

    We are using an approach that is based on the cre/loxP recombination process and involves a binary system of Cre-producing and Cre-responding transgenic mice to achieve ubiquitous or tissue-specific expression of oncoproteins. To develop mouse models of tumorigenesis, Cre-producers are mated with responder animals carrying a dormant oncogene targeted into the 3′ untranslated region of the locus encoding cytoplasmic β-actin (actin cassette). Production of oncoprotein from a bicistronic message is accomplished in bitransgenic progeny by Cre-mediated excision of a segment flanked by loxP sites that is located upstream from the oncogenic sequence. Widespread Cre-dependent activation and expression of an actin-cassette transgene encoding the T antigens of the SV40 early region (SVER) commencing in embryos was compatible with normal development and did not impair viability. However, at ∼3 months of age, all female animals developed massive uterine leiomyosarcomas, whereas practically all males exhibited enormously enlarged seminal vesicles because of pronounced hyperplasia of the smooth muscle layers. In addition, because of smooth muscle hyperproliferation, marked dilation of the gallbladder was observed in mice of both sexes. To begin exploring aberrant signaling events in the SVER-triggered tumorigenic pathways, we analyzed the expression profile of leiomyosarcomas by DNA microarray analysis. PMID:14695345

  15. Mouse Models for Studying the Formation and Propagation of Prions*

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Joel C.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2014-01-01

    Prions are self-propagating protein conformers that cause a variety of neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. Mouse models have played key roles in deciphering the biology of prions and in assessing candidate therapeutics. The development of transgenic mice that form prions spontaneously in the brain has advanced our understanding of sporadic and genetic prion diseases. Furthermore, the realization that many proteins can become prions has necessitated the development of mouse models for assessing the potential transmissibility of common neurodegenerative diseases. As the universe of prion diseases continues to expand, mouse models will remain crucial for interrogating these devastating illnesses. PMID:24860095

  16. In Vitro Infection with Dengue Virus Induces Changes in the Structure and Function of the Mouse Brain Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Jaime E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The neurological manifestations of dengue disease are occurring with greater frequency, and currently, no information is available regarding the reasons for this phenomenon. Some viruses infect and/or alter the function of endothelial organs, which results in changes in cellular function, including permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which allows the entry of infected cells or free viral particles into the nervous system. Methods In the present study, we standardized two in vitro models, a polarized monolayer of mouse brain endothelial cells (MBECs) and an organized co-culture containing MBECs and astrocytes. Using these cell models, we assessed whether DENV-4 or the neuro-adapted dengue virus (D4MB-6) variant infects cells or induces changes in the structure or function of the endothelial barrier. Results The results showed that MBECs, but not astrocytes, were susceptible to infection with both viruses, although the percentage of infected cells was higher when the neuro-adapted virus variant was used. In both culture systems, DENV infection changed the localization of the tight junction proteins Zonula occludens (ZO-1) and Claudin-1 (Cln1), and this process was associated with a decrease in transendothelial resistance, an increase in macromolecule permeability and an increase in the paracellular passing of free virus particles. MBEC infection led to transcriptional up-regulation of adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and PECAM) and immune mediators (MCP-1 and TNF- α) that are associated with immune cell transmigration, mainly in D4MB-6-infected cells. Conclusion These results indicate that DENV infection in MBECs altered the structure and function of the BBB and activated the endothelium, affecting its transcellular and paracellular permeability and favoring the passage of viruses and the transmigration of immune cells. This phenomenon can be harnessed for neurotropic and neurovirulent strains to infect and induce alterations in the CNS. PMID

  17. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    cause hereditary pancreatitis in humans. Previous attempts to introduce these mutant forms of human trypsinogen into mice have failed to produce...mutations in mouse trypsinogen isoform T7. Under this aim, we had two major tasks in our SOW: Major Task 1 was the design and construction of mutant forms...of the T7 mouse trypsinogen gene and expression and purification of these mutant enzymes. Major Task 2 was to analyze autoactivation of the T7

  18. Effect of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Gideon W; Parsa, Arya; Park, Anthony K; McDowell, Beverly L P; Arroyo-Mendoza, Melissa; Girguis, Marie; Adler-Moore, Jill P; Olson, Jon; Buckley, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, is known to suppress the immune responses to bacterial, viral and protozoan infections, but its effects on fungal infections have not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on mouse resistance to systemic Candida albicans (C. albicans) infection. To determine the outcome of chronic Δ9-THC treatment on primary, acute systemic candidiasis, c57BL/6 mice were given vehicle or Δ9-THC (16 mg/kg) in vehicle on days 1-4, 8-11 and 15-18. On day 19, mice were infected with 5×10(5) C. albicans. We also determined the effect of chronic Δ9-THC (4-64 mg/kg) treatment on mice infected with a non-lethal dose of 7.5×10(4) C. albicans on day 2, followed by a higher challenge with 5×10(5) C. albicans on day 19. Mouse resistance to the infection was assessed by survival and tissue fungal load. Serum cytokine levels were determine to evaluate the immune responses. In the acute infection, chronic Δ9-THC treatment had no effect on mouse survival or tissue fungal load when compared to vehicle treated mice. However, Δ9-THC significantly suppressed IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 as well as marginally suppressed IL-17 versus vehicle treated mice. In comparison, when mice were given a secondary yeast infection, Δ9-THC significantly decreased survival, increased tissue fungal burden and suppressed serum IFN-γ and IL-12p40 levels compared to vehicle treated mice. The data showed that chronic Δ9-THC treatment decreased the efficacy of the memory immune response to candida infection, which correlated with a decrease in IFN-γ that was only observed after the secondary candida challenge.

  19. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Sundberg, John P; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers.

  20. Differential susceptibility of equine and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells to equine herpesvirus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, R; Kimura, T; Nakamura, K; Ochiai, K; Okazaki, K; Wada, R; Umemura, T

    2006-04-01

    Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) shows endotheliotropism in the central nervous system (CNS) of infected horses. However, infection of endothelial cells has not been observed in the CNS of infected mice. To explore the basis for this difference in endotheliotropism, we compared the susceptibility of equine brain microvascular endothelial cells (EBMECs) and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) to EHV-1 infection. The kinetics of viral growth in EBMECs was typical of a fully productive infection whereas viral infection in MBMECs seemed to be nonproductive. Immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-EHV-1 polyclonal antibody demonstrated viral antigen in infected EBMECs, but not infected MBMECs. EHV-1 immediate early (IE), early (ICP0), and late (gB, gD and gK) transcripts were expressed in infected EBMECs. However, none of these genes was detected in infected MBMECs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Electron microscopic examination at the stage of viral entry showed that viral particles were present within uncoated vesicles in the cytoplasm of EBMECs, but absent from those of MBMECs. These results suggest that viral entry is an important determinant of the susceptibility of EBMECs and MBMECs to EHV-1 infection.

  1. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)—the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality—is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  2. Eravacycline (TP-434) Is Efficacious in Animal Models of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy M.; Slee, Andrew M.; Lofland, Denene; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.

    2015-01-01

    Eravacycline is a novel broad-spectrum fluorocycline antibiotic being developed for a wide range of serious infections. Eravacycline was efficacious in mouse septicemia models, demonstrating 50% protective dose (PD50) values of ≤1 mg/kg of body weight once a day (q.d.) against Staphylococcus aureus, including tetracycline-resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pyogenes. The PD50 values against Escherichia coli isolates were 1.2 to 4.4 mg/kg q.d. In neutropenic mouse thigh infection models with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and S. pyogenes, eravacycline produced 2 log10 reductions in CFU at single intravenous (i.v.) doses ranging from 0.2 to 9.5 mg/kg. In a neutropenic mouse lung infection model, eravacycline administered i.v. at 10 mg/kg twice a day (b.i.d.) reduced the level of tetracycline-resistant MRSA in the lung equivalent to that of linezolid given orally (p.o.) at 30 mg/kg b.i.d. At i.v. doses of 3 to 12 mg/kg b.i.d., eravacycline was more efficacious against tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in a neutropenic lung infection model than linezolid p.o. at 30 mg/kg b.i.d. Eravacycline showed good efficacy at 2 to 10 mg/kg i.v. b.i.d., producing up to a 4.6 log10 CFU reduction in kidney bacterial burden in a model challenged with a uropathogenic E. coli isolate. Eravacycline was active in multiple murine models of infection against clinically important Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:25691636

  3. Invertebrate models of fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Marios; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2013-09-01

    The morbidity, mortality and economic burden associated with fungal infections, together with the emergence of fungal strains resistant to current antimicrobial agents, necessitate broadening our understanding of fungal pathogenesis and discovering new agents to treat these infections. Using invertebrate hosts, especially the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the model insects Drosophila melanogaster and Galleria mellonella, could help achieve these goals. The evolutionary conservation of several aspects of the innate immune response between invertebrates and mammals makes the use of these simple hosts an effective and fast screening method for identifying fungal virulence factors and testing potential antifungal compounds. The purpose of this review is to compare several model hosts that have been used in experimental mycology to-date and to describe their different characteristics and contribution to the study of fungal virulence and the detection of compounds with antifungal properties. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  4. In vitro propagation of the scrapie agent. I. Transformation of mouse glia and neuroblastoma cells after infection with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain c-506.

    PubMed

    Markovits, P; Dautheville, C; Dormont, D; Dianoux, L; Latarjet, R

    1983-01-01

    Seven cell lines including glia cells from mouse brains and mouse neuroblastoma cells were infected with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain c-506. During the early in vitro passages, a stimulation of growth was already observed but cellular morphology and differentiation did not alter. Later on, after 12-16 passages, six of the seven infected lines displayed cell proliferation and morphological alterations, suggesting an in vitro morphological transformation. At this stage, differentiation was no longer observed in the scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells and all the scrapie-infected cells formed two to four times more colonies in liquid medium than the controls, and developed large tridimensional colonies in agar. The part played by the scrapie agent in these changes is discussed.

  5. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. genesis 53:458–473, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26150326

  6. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  7. Chronic Toxoplasmosis Modulates the Induction of Contact Hypersensitivity by TNCB in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Nam, Ho-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Mouse models of chronic toxoplasmosis and atopic dermatitis (AD) were combined to clarify the effect of opportunistic Toxoplasma gondii infection on the development of AD. AD was induced as a chronic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) with repeated challenge of 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB) on the dorsal skin of mice. TNCB induced skin thickness increases in both normal and toxoplasmic mice. The changing patterns were different from the sigmoidal which saturated at 20 days in normal mice to the convex saturated at 12 days in toxoplasmic mice with the crossing at 18 days. Compared to normal mice, toxoplasmic mice presented CHS more severely in earlier times and then moderately in later times. These data suggest that host immune modification by T. gondii infection enhances CHS in early times of atopic stimulation but soothes the reaction of CHS in later times in mouse model.

  8. Noninvasive Imaging of Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Apoptosis in a Mouse Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thoudam Debraj; Lee, Jaetae; Jeon, Yong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that induce apoptosis in cancer cells infected with viruses and bacteria through a caspase-3-dependent pathway. Effective NK cell-based immunotherapy requires highly sensitive imaging tools for in vivo monitoring of the dynamic events involved in apoptosis. Here, we describe a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging approach to determine the antitumor effects of NK cell-based therapy by serial imaging of caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in a mouse model of human glioma.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells are enriched in mouse lungs and liver.

    PubMed

    Unno, Akihiro; Kachi, Seira; Batanova, Tatiana A; Ohno, Tamio; Elhawary, Nagwa; Kitoh, Katsuya; Takashima, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is thought to disseminate throughout the host by circulation of tachyzoite-infected leukocytes in the blood, and adherence and migration of such leukocytes into solid tissues. However, it is unclear whether T. gondii-infected leukocytes can migrate to solid organs via the general circulation. In this study, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method to determine the rate of infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) flowing into and remaining within solid organs in mice. A transgenic T. gondii parasite line derived from the PLK strain that expresses DsRed Express, and transgenic green fluorescent protein-positive PBMCs, were used for these experiments. Tachyzoite-infected PBMCs were injected into mouse tail veins and qRT-PCR was used to measure the infection rates of the PBMCs remaining in the lungs, liver, spleen and brain. We found that the PBMCs in the lungs and liver had statistically higher infection rates than that of the original inoculum; this difference was statistically significant. However, the PBMC infection rate in the spleen showed no such enhancement. These results show that tachyzoite-infected PBMCs in the general circulation remain in the lungs and liver more effectively than non-infected PBMCs.

  10. Murine models susceptibility to distinct Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes infection.

    PubMed

    León, Cielo M; Montilla, Marleny; Vanegas, Ricardo; Castillo, Maria; Parra, Edgar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonosis that affects around 8 million people worldwide. This pathology is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a kinetoplastid parasite that shows tremendous genetic diversity evinced in six distinct Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI) including a recent genotype named as TcBat and associated with anthropogenic bats. TcI presents a broad geographical distribution and has been associated with chronic cardiomyopathy. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest the existence of two genotypes (Domestic (TcIDom) and sylvatic TcI) within TcI. The understanding of the course of the infection in different mouse models by these two genotypes is not yet known. Therefore, we infected 126 animals (ICR-CD1, National Institute of Health (NIH) and Balb/c) with two TcIDom strains and one sylvatic strain for a follow-up period of 60 days. We quantified the parasitaemia, immune response and histopathology observing that the maximum day of parasitaemia was achieved at day 21 post-infection. Domestic strains showed higher parasitaemia than the sylvatic strain in the three mouse models; however in the survival curves Balb/c mice were less susceptible to infection compared with NIH and ICR-CD1. Our results suggest that the genetic background plays a fundamental role in the natural history of the infection and the sympatric TcI genotypes have relevant implications in disease pathogenesis.

  11. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus infections in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, K W; Chueh, L L; Wang, M H; Huang, Y T; Fang, B H; Chang, C Y; Fang, M C; Chou, J Y; Hsieh, S C; Wan, C H

    2013-04-01

    Mouse parvoviruses are among the most prevalent infectious pathogens in contemporary mouse colonies. To improve the efficiency of routine screening for mouse parvovirus infections, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the VP gene was developed. The assay detected minute virus of mice (MVM), mouse parvovirus (MPV) and a mouse housekeeping gene (α-actin) and was able to specifically detect MVM and MPV at levels as low as 50 copies. Co-infection with the two viruses with up to 200-fold differences in viral concentrations can easily be detected. The multiplex PCR assay developed here could be a useful tool for monitoring mouse health and the viral contamination of biological materials.

  12. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  13. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, T. M.; Leach, P. T.; Crawley, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. PMID:26403076

  14. Immunobiology of congenital cytomegalovirus infection of the central nervous system—the murine cytomegalovirus model.

    PubMed

    Slavuljica, Irena; Kveštak, Daria; Huszthy, Peter Csaba; Kosmac, Kate; Britt, William J; Jonjić, Stipan

    2015-03-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus infection is a leading infectious cause of long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, including mental retardation and hearing defects. Strict species specificity of cytomegaloviruses has restricted the scope of studies of cytomegalovirus infection in animal models. To investigate the pathogenesis of congenital human cytomegalovirus infection, we developed a mouse cytomegalovirus model that recapitulates the major characteristics of central nervous system infection in human infants, including the route of neuroinvasion and neuropathological findings. Following intraperitoneal inoculation of newborn animals with mouse cytomegalovirus, the virus disseminates to the central nervous system during high-level viremia and replicates in the brain parenchyma, resulting in a focal but widespread, non-necrotizing encephalitis. Central nervous system infection is coupled with the recruitment of resident and peripheral immune cells as well as the expression of a large number of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Although infiltration of cellular constituents of the innate immune response characterizes the early immune response in the central nervous system, resolution of productive infection requires virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. Perinatal mouse cytomegalovirus infection results in profoundly altered postnatal development of the mouse central nervous system and long-term motor and sensory disabilities. Based on an enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis of this infection, prospects for novel intervention strategies aimed to improve the outcome of congenital human cytomegalovirus infection are proposed.

  15. Isolation of a Polyoma-Nucleoprotein Complex from Infected Mouse-Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melvin H.; Miller, Henry I.; Hendler, Sheldon

    1971-01-01

    A complex containing polyoma (py) DNA and protein (py complex) was isolated from polyoma-infected mouse-cell cultures. The complex sedimented unimodally at about 55 S. When labeled for long periods (2-3 hr) between 20 and 40 hr after infection, most of the [3H]DNA in the py complex was in the form of covalently closed, circular polyoma DNA (component I). When labeled for 5 min, the [3H]DNA in the py complex was nicked in one or both of the strands, as shown by alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. Under all conditions studied, no free py DNA was extracted from mouse cells by the two methods described. PMID:4324998

  16. Experimental Infection of Mice with Hamster Parvovirus: Evidence for Interspecies Transmission of Mouse Parvovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-01-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster. PMID:20412687

  17. Experimental infection of mice with hamster parvovirus: evidence for interspecies transmission of mouse parvovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-04-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster.

  18. A Mouse Model of Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Broekema, Nicole M.; Larsen, Inna V.; Naruzawa, Erika S.; Filutowicz, Marcin; Kolb, Aaron W.; Teixeira, Leandro B. C.; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infection of the cornea is a significant threat to vision. The percentage of bacterial isolates resistant to antibiotics is increasing as is the percentage of infections caused by methicillin resistant isolates. There is a critical need for additional therapeutic approaches and their development will require the use of animal models to test efficacy. Two mouse models of S. aureus keratitis have been described but only quantified stromal keratitis (corneal clouding and perforation). We have extended these models using the methicillin resistant S. aureus USA300 LAC strain and show that eyelid inflammation and swelling (blepharitis) and corneal neovascularization can be quantified. This expanded model should prove useful in assessing additional effects of antibacterial therapies and additional pathological mechanisms involved in bacterial ocular infection. PMID:27896297

  19. High-Throughput Humanized Mouse Models for Evaluation of HIV-1 Therapeutics and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tynisha; Seay, Kieran; Zheng, Jian Hua; Zhang, Cong; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Goldstein, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Mice cannot be used as a model to evaluate HIV-1 therapeutics because they do not become infected by HIV-1 due to structural differences between several human and mouse proteins required for HIV-1 replication. This has limited their use for in vivo assessment of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics and the mechanism by which cofactors, such as illicit drug use accelerate HIV-1 replication and disease course in substance abusers. Here, we describe the development and application of two in vivo humanized mouse models that are highly sensitive and useful models for the in vivo evaluation of candidate anti-HIV therapeutics. The first model, hu-spl-PBMC-NSG mice, uses NOD-SCID IL2rγ(-/-) (NSG) mice intrasplenically injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) which develop productive splenic HIV-1 infection after intrasplenic inoculation with a replication-competent HIV-1 expressing Renilla reniformis luciferase (HIV-LucR) and enables investigators to use bioluminescence to visualize and quantitate the temporal effects of therapeutics on HIV-1 infection. The second model, hCD4/R5/cT1 mice, consists of transgenic mice carrying human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 genes, which enables murine CD4-expressing cells to support HIV-1 entry, Tat-mediated LTR transcription and consequently develop productive infection. The hCD4/R5/cT1 mice develop disseminated infection of tissues including the spleen, small intestine, lymph nodes and lungs after intravenous injection with HIV-1-LucR. Because these mice can be infected with HIV-LucR expressing transmitted/founder and clade A/E and C Envs, these mouse models can also be used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of broadly neutralizing antibodies and antibodies induced by candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Furthermore, because hCD4/R5/cT1 mice can be infected by vaginal inoculation with replication-competent HIV-1 expressing NanoLuc (HIV-nLucR)-, this mouse model can be used to evaluate the mechanisms by which substance abuse and other factors

  20. Glucosylceramide Administration as a Vaccination Strategy in Mouse Models of Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Visesato; Farnoud, Amir M.; Singh, Ashutosh; Rella, Antonella; Tanno, Hiromasa; Ishii, Keiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Toshiya; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the causative agent of the disease cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis is initiated as a pulmonary infection and in conditions of immune deficiency disseminates to the blood stream and central nervous system, resulting in life-threatening meningoencephalitis. A number of studies have focused on the development of a vaccine against Cryptococcus, primarily utilizing protein-conjugated components of the Cryptococcus polysaccharide capsule as antigen. However, there is currently no vaccine against Cryptococcus in the clinic. Previous studies have shown that the glycosphingolipid, glucosylceramide (GlcCer), is a virulence factor in C. neoformans and antibodies against this lipid inhibit fungal growth and cell division. In the present study, we have investigated the possibility of using GlcCer as a therapeutic agent against C. neoformans infections in mouse models of cryptococcosis. GlcCer purified from a non-pathogenic fungus, Candida utilis, was administered intraperitoneally, prior to infecting mice with a lethal dose of C. neoformans. GlcCer administration prevented the dissemination of C. neoformans from the lungs to the brain and led to 60% mouse survival. GlcCer administration did not cause hepatic injury and elicited an anti-GlcCer antibody response, which was observed independent of the route of administration and the strains of mouse. Taken together, our results suggest that fungal GlcCer can protect mice against lethal doses of C. neoformans infection and can provide a viable vaccination strategy against Cryptococcus. PMID:27082428

  1. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  2. Morphological and Cytochemical Characterization of Cells Infiltrating Mouse Lungs After Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wyde, Philip R.; Peavy, Duane L.; Cate, Thomas R.

    1978-01-01

    To initiate evaluation of the cell-mediated immunological response to influenza virus in a major site of disease, lung cells were obtained by transpleural lavage from lungs of uninfected mice and from those infected 3 or 6 days previously with 5 50% mouse infectious doses (MID50) of avirulent (P3) or virulent (P9) influenza A Hong Kong (H3N2) virus. The number of cells recovered by lavage was dependent on the dose, time after inoculation, and the type of virus used for inoculation. Although lavage pools were shown to contain peripheral blood leukocytes, this contamination was shown to be consistently less than 5% of the total leukocytes harvested. Among the ca. 0.75 × 106 lavage cells obtained from each uninfected mouse, about 90% were macrophages or lymphocytes in approximately equal proportion. T, B, and null (lyphocytes lacking theta or surface immunoglobulin markers) lymphocytes averaged 23, 9, and 7% of cells in these suspensions, respectively. After infection with either P3 or P9 virus, increased numbers of activated macrophages and lymphoblasts were observed. The major change during P3 infection was an increase in absolute numbers of null lymphocytes. In contrast, during P9 infection, T and B lymphocytes and macrophages progressively increased in absolute numbers while null cells decreased. These data suggest that cell-mediated immunological responses to influenza virus occur in the lung during infection, but that the responses to virulent and avirulent variants may differ both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:711312

  3. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  4. Uterine disorders and pregnancy complications: insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunjung Jade; Wang, Haibin

    2010-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of human uterine physiology and pathology has been extrapolated from the study of diverse animal models, as there is no ideal system for studying human uterine biology in vitro. Although it remains debatable whether mouse models are the most suitable system for investigating human uterine function(s), gene-manipulated mice are considered by many the most useful tool for mechanistic analysis, and numerous studies have identified many similarities in female reproduction between the two species. This Review brings together information from studies using animal models, in particular mouse models, that shed light on normal and pathologic aspects of uterine biology and pregnancy complications. PMID:20364098

  5. Generation Of A Mouse Model For Schwannomatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    tumor virus (MMTV)-Cre, the whey acidic protein (WAP)-Cre, and the β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-Cre lines. We showed that merlin plays an important role...Cre lines, the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Cre, the whey acidic protein (WAP)-Cre, and the β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-Cre lines. We showed that the...cycles, consequently leading to decreased milk production and malnourishment of the offspring by the second lactation. Immunostaining analysis revealed

  6. Vesicoureteric reflux and reflux nephropathy: from mouse models to childhood disease.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Marie-Lyne; Watt, Christine L; Gupta, Indra R

    2014-04-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a common congenital urinary tract defect that predisposes children to recurrent kidney infections. Kidney infections can result in renal scarring or reflux nephropathy defined by the presence of chronic tubulo-interstitial inflammation and fibrosis that is a frequent cause of end-stage renal failure. The discovery of mouse models with VUR and with reflux nephropathy has provided new opportunities to understand the pathogenesis of these conditions and may provide insight on the genes and the associated phenotypes that need to be examined in human studies.

  7. Finding Mouse Models of Human Lymphomas and Leukemia’s using The Jackson Laboratory Mouse Tumor Biology Database

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Dale A.; Sundberg, John P.; Krupke, Debra M.; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  8. An in vitro mouse model of congenital cytomegalovirus-induced pathogenesis of the inner ear cochlea.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Michael; Jaskoll, Tina

    2013-02-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading nongenetic etiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) at birth and prelingual SNHL not expressed at birth. The paucity of temporal bone autopsy specimens from infants with congenital CMV infection has hindered the critical correlation of histopathology with pathogenesis. Here, we present an in vitro embryonic mouse model of CMV-infected cochleas that mimics the human sites of viral infection and associated pathology. There is a striking dysplasia/hyperplasia in mouse CMV-infected cochlear epithelium and mesenchyme, including organ of Corti hair and supporting cells and stria vascularis. This is concomitant with significant dysregulation of p19, p21, p27, and Pcna gene expression, as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression. Other pathologies similar to those arising from known deafness gene mutations include downregulation of KCNQ1 protein expression in the stria vascularis, as well as hypoplastic and dysmorphic melanocytes. Thus, this model provides a relevant and reliable platform within which the detailed cell and molecular biology of CMV-induced deafness may be studied.

  9. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  10. Myxomavirus-Derived Serpin Prolongs Survival and Reduces Inflammation and Hemorrhage in an Unrelated Lethal Mouse Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Abbott, Jeff; Liu, Liying; Bartee, Mee Y.; Long, Maureen; Davids, Jennifer; Williams, Jennifer; Feldmann, Heinz; Strong, James; Grau, Katrina R.; Tibbetts, Scott; Macaulay, Colin; McFadden, Grant; Thoburn, Robert; Lomas, David A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2013-01-01

    Lethal viral infections produce widespread inflammation with vascular leak, clotting, and bleeding (disseminated intravascular coagulation [DIC]), organ failure, and high mortality. Serine proteases in clot-forming (thrombotic) and clot-dissolving (thrombolytic) cascades are activated by an inflammatory cytokine storm and also can induce systemic inflammation with loss of normal serine protease inhibitor (serpin) regulation. Myxomavirus secretes a potent anti-inflammatory serpin, Serp-1, that inhibits clotting factor X (fX) and thrombolytic tissue- and urokinase-type plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA) with anti-inflammatory activity in multiple animal models. Purified serpin significantly improved survival in a murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection in gamma interferon receptor (IFN-γR) knockout mice, a model for lethal inflammatory vasculitis. Treatment of MHV68-infected mice with neuroserpin, a mammalian serpin that inhibits only tPA and uPA, was ineffective. Serp-1 reduced virus load, lung hemorrhage, and aortic, lung, and colon inflammation in MHV68-infected mice and also reduced virus load. Neuroserpin suppressed a wide range of immune spleen cell responses after MHV68 infection, while Serp-1 selectively increased CD11c+ splenocytes (macrophage and dendritic cells) and reduced CD11b+ tissue macrophages. Serp-1 altered gene expression for coagulation and inflammatory responses, whereas neuroserpin did not. Serp-1 treatment was assessed in a second viral infection, mouse-adapted Zaire ebolavirus in wild-type BALB/c mice, with improved survival and reduced tissue necrosis. In summary, treatment with this unique myxomavirus-derived serpin suppresses systemic serine protease and innate immune responses caused by unrelated lethal viral infections (both RNA and DNA viruses), providing a potential new therapeutic approach for treatment of lethal viral sepsis. PMID:23774438

  11. In vivo evaluation of antiviral efficacy against genital herpes using mouse and guinea pig models.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Frances; Veselenak, Ronald L; Bourne, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Both the guinea pig and mouse are important animal models for the study of genital herpes. The murine model has been used extensively to evaluate vaccines and antiviral agents by measuring the incidence of infection and the magnitude of viral replication; however, this model is limited with regard to distinguishing between candidate vaccines or treatments. In contrast, the guinea pig closely mimics human infection and provides an excellent model of both primary and recurrent genital herpes disease. This animal model is especially important in the study of viral transmission through the evaluation of latent viral reactivation and virus shedding into the genital tract. Here, we describe methodologies to determine viral infection, severity of primary disease, and quantification of primary viral replication in the genital tract for both the guinea pig and murine models of genital herpes. Additionally, we detail the evaluation of the onset of primary disease and progression to the day of death in the mouse model. Further, we summarize methods to assess the frequency of recurrences, frequency and magnitude of virus shedding, and latent viral load in the sensory nerve ganglia of the guinea pig.

  12. A mouse model for MERS coronavirus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cockrell, Adam S; Yount, Boyd L; Scobey, Trevor; Jensen, Kara; Douglas, Madeline; Beall, Anne; Tang, Xian-Chun; Marasco, Wayne A; Heise, Mark T; Baric, Ralph S

    2016-11-28

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel virus that emerged in 2012, causing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), severe pneumonia-like symptoms and multi-organ failure, with a case fatality rate of ∼36%. Limited clinical studies indicate that humans infected with MERS-CoV exhibit pathology consistent with the late stages of ARDS, which is reminiscent of the disease observed in patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Models of MERS-CoV-induced severe respiratory disease have been difficult to achieve, and small-animal models traditionally used to investigate viral pathogenesis (mouse, hamster, guinea-pig and ferret) are naturally resistant to MERS-CoV. Therefore, we used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to modify the mouse genome to encode two amino acids (positions 288 and 330) that match the human sequence in the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 receptor, making mice susceptible to MERS-CoV infection and replication. Serial MERS-CoV passage in these engineered mice was then used to generate a mouse-adapted virus that replicated efficiently within the lungs and evoked symptoms indicative of severe ARDS, including decreased survival, extreme weight loss, decreased pulmonary function, pulmonary haemorrhage and pathological signs indicative of end-stage lung disease. Importantly, therapeutic countermeasures comprising MERS-CoV neutralizing antibody treatment or a MERS-CoV spike protein vaccine protected the engineered mice against MERS-CoV-induced ARDS.

  13. The value of incomplete mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Cecilia; Goedert, Michel; Jucker, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    To study Alzheimer's disease (AD), a variety of mouse models has been generated through the overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein and/or the presenilins harboring one or several mutations found in familial AD. With aging, these mice develop several lesions similar to those of AD, including diffuse and neuritic amyloid deposits, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, dystrophic neurites and synapses, and amyloid-associated neuroinflammation. Other characteristics of AD, such as neurofibrillary tangles and nerve cell loss, are not satisfactorily reproduced in these models. Mouse models that recapitulate only specific aspects of AD pathogenesis are of great advantage when deciphering the complexity of the disease and can contribute substantially to diagnostic and therapeutic innovations. Incomplete mouse models have been key to the development of Abeta42-targeted therapies, as well as to the current understanding of the interrelationship between cerebral beta-amyloidosis and tau neurofibrillary lesions, and are currently being used to develop novel diagnostic agents for in vivo imaging.

  14. Animal Models of Zika Virus Infection, Pathogenesis, and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Thomas E; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-04-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-transmitted flavivirus that now causes epidemics affecting millions of people on multiple continents. The virus has received global attention because of some of its unusual epidemiological and clinical features, including persistent infection in the male reproductive tract and sexual transmission, an ability to cross the placenta during pregnancy and infect the developing fetus to cause congenital malformations, and its association with Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. This past year has witnessed an intensive effort by the global scientific community to understand the biology of ZIKV and to develop pathogenesis models for the rapid testing of possible countermeasures. Here, we review the recent advances in and utility and limitations of newly developed mouse and nonhuman primate models of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis.

  15. Counting mycobacteria in infected human cells and mouse tissue: a comparison between qPCR and CFU.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sharad; Awuh, Jane A; Leversen, Nils Anders; Flo, Trude H; Asjø, Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    Due to the slow growth rate and pathogenicity of mycobacteria, enumeration by traditional reference methods like colony counting is notoriously time-consuming, inconvenient and biohazardous. Thus, novel methods that rapidly and reliably quantify mycobacteria are warranted in experimental models to facilitate basic research, development of vaccines and anti-mycobacterial drugs. In this study we have developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for simultaneous quantification of mycobacterial and host DNA in infected human macrophage cultures and in mouse tissues. The qPCR method cannot discriminate live from dead bacteria and found a 10- to 100-fold excess of mycobacterial genomes, relative to colony formation. However, good linear correlations were observed between viable colony counts and qPCR results from infected macrophage cultures (Pearson correlation coefficient [r] for M. tuberculosis = 0.82; M. a. avium = 0.95; M. a. paratuberculosis = 0.91). Regression models that predict colony counts from qPCR data in infected macrophages were validated empirically and showed a high degree of agreement with observed counts. Similar correlation results were also obtained in liver and spleen homogenates of M. a. avium infected mice, although the correlations were distinct for the early phase (< day 9 post-infection) and later phase (≥ day 20 post-infection) liver r = 0.94 and r = 0.91; spleen r = 0.91 and r = 0.87, respectively. Interestingly, in the mouse model the number of live bacteria as determined by colony counts constituted a much higher proportion of the total genomic qPCR count in the early phase (geometric mean ratio of 0.37 and 0.34 in spleen and liver, respectively), as compared to later phase of infection (geometric mean ratio of 0.01 in both spleen and liver). Overall, qPCR methods offer advantages in biosafety, time-saving, assay range and reproducibility compared to colony counting. Additionally, the duplex format allows enumeration of

  16. Metabolic Profiling of an Echinostoma caproni Infection in the Mouse for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Saric, Jasmina; Li, Jia V.; Wang, Yulan; Keiser, Jennifer; Bundy, Jake G.; Holmes, Elaine; Utzinger, Jürg

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic profiling holds promise with regard to deepening our understanding of infection biology and disease states. The objectives of our study were to assess the global metabolic responses to an Echinostoma caproni infection in the mouse, and to compare the biomarkers extracted from different biofluids (plasma, stool, and urine) in terms of characterizing acute and chronic stages of this intestinal fluke infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Twelve female NMRI mice were infected with 30 E. caproni metacercariae each. Plasma, stool, and urine samples were collected at 7 time points up to day 33 post-infection. Samples were also obtained from non-infected control mice at the same time points and measured using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Spectral data were subjected to multivariate statistical analyses. In plasma and urine, an altered metabolic profile was already evident 1 day post-infection, characterized by reduced levels of plasma choline, acetate, formate, and lactate, coupled with increased levels of plasma glucose, and relatively lower concentrations of urinary creatine. The main changes in the urine metabolic profile started at day 8 post-infection, characterized by increased relative concentrations of trimethylamine and phenylacetylglycine and lower levels of 2-ketoisocaproate and showed differentiation over the course of the infection. Conclusion/Significance The current investigation is part of a broader NMR-based metabonomics profiling strategy and confirms the utility of this approach for biomarker discovery. In the case of E. caproni, a diagnosis based on all three biofluids would deliver the most comprehensive fingerprint of an infection. For practical purposes, however, future diagnosis might aim at a single biofluid, in which case urine would be chosen for further investigation, based on quantity of biomarkers, ease of sampling, and the degree of differentiation from the non-infected control group. PMID

  17. Combination chemotherapy with a substance P receptor antagonist (aprepitant) and melarsoprol in a mouse model of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jean; Bradley, Barbara; Kennedy, Peter G E

    2007-12-01

    Drug therapy for late-stage (encephalitic) human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is currently very unsatisfactory with the most commonly used drug, melarsoprol, having a 5% overall mortality. There is evidence in a mouse model of HAT that Substance P (SP) receptor antagonism reduces the neuroinflammatory reaction to CNS trypanosome infection. In this study we investigated the effects of combination chemotherapy with melarsoprol and a humanised SP receptor antagonist aprepitant (EMEND) in this mouse model. The melarsoprol/aprepitant drug combination did not produce any clinical signs of illness in mice with CNS trypanosome infection. This lack of any additional or unexpected CNS toxicity in the mouse model of CNS HAT provides valuable safety data for the future possible use of this drug combination in patients with late-stage HAT.

  18. Mouse models for understanding human developmental anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The mouse experimental system presents an opportunity for studying the nature of the underlying mutagenic damage and the molecular pathogenesis of this class of anomalies by virtue of the accessibility of the zygote and its descendant blastomeres. Such studies could contribute to the understanding of the etiology of certain sporadic but common human malformations. The vulnerability of the zygotes to mutagens as demonstrated in the studies described in this report should be a major consideration in chemical safety evaluation. It raises questions regarding the danger to human zygotes when the mother is exposed to drugs and environmental chemicals.

  19. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    trypsinogen cause hereditary pancreatitis in humans. Previous attempts to introduce these mutant forms of human trypsinogen into mice have failed to...cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several new mutant strains. These newly created mouse strains will be characterized with respect to spontaneous...10 8. Special Reporting Requirements……………………………………11 9. Appendices……………………………………………………………11 4  Figure 1. Mutant forms of T7 trypsinogen

  20. Fingerprinting of Galectins in Normal, P. aeruginosa–Infected, and Chemically Burned Mouse Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Cao, Zhiyi; Truong, Laetitia; Sugaya, Satoshi; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we aimed to assess whether the expression pattern of galectins is altered in Pseudomonas aeruginosa–infected and chemically burned mouse corneas. Methods. Galectin (Gal) fingerprinting of normal, P. aeruginosa–infected, and silver nitrate–cauterized corneas was performed by Western blotting, immunofluorescence staining, and qRT-PCR. Results. In normal corneas, Gal-1 was distributed mainly in the stroma, Gal-3 was localized mainly in epithelium, and Gal-7, -8, and -9 were detected in both corneal epithelium and stroma. Expression levels of the five galectins were drastically altered under pathological conditions. In both infected and cauterized corneas, overall Gal-3 expression was downregulated, whereas overall Gal-8 and -9 were upregulated. Changes in the expression level of Gal-7, -8, and -9 were distinct in the epithelium of infected and cauterized corneas. Expression of these three galectins was upregulated in corneal epithelium of infected corneas but not in cauterized corneas. Consistent with the changes in protein expression: (1) Gal-7, -8, and -9 mRNA expression was upregulated in cauterized corneas, and (2) Gal-3 mRNA was downregulated and Gal-9 mRNA expression was upregulated in infected corneas. Conclusions. Our data demonstrate differential regulation of various members of the galectin family in the course of corneal infection and neovascularization. The emerging functionality of the sugar code of cell surface receptors via endogenous galectins reflect to the pertinent roles of the five tested galectins in the diseases of cornea. PMID:25564452

  1. Mouse models of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Cha, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by immune cell infiltration and progressive injury to the salivary and lacrimal glands. As a consequence, patients with SjS develop xerostomia (dry mouth) and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eyes). SjS is the third most common rheumatic autoimmune disorder, affecting 4 million Americans with over 90% of patients being female. Current diagnostic criteria for SjS frequently utilize histological examinations of minor salivary glands for immune cell foci, serology for autoantibodies, and dry eye evaluation by corneal or conjunctival staining. SjS can be classified as primary or secondary SjS, depending on whether it occurs alone or in association with other systemic rheumatic conditions, respectively. Clinical manifestations typically become apparent when the disease is relatively advanced in SjS patients, which poses a challenge for early diagnosis and treatment of SjS. Therefore, SjS mouse models, because of their close resemblance to the human SjS, have been extremely valuable to identify early disease markers and to investigate underlying biological and immunological dysregulations. However, it is important to bear in mind that no single mouse model has duplicated all aspects of SjS pathogenesis and clinical features, mainly due to the multifactorial etiology of SjS that includes numerous susceptibility genes and environmental factors. As such, various mouse models have been developed in the field to try to recapitulate SjS. In this review, we focus on recent mouse models of primary SjS and describe them under three categories of spontaneous, genetically engineered, and experimentally induced development of SjS-like disease. In addition, we discuss future perspectives of SjS mouse models highlighting pros and cons of utilizing mouse models and demands for improved models. PMID:25777752

  2. Susceptible-infected-recovered model with recurrent infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruziska, Flávia M.; Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze a stochastic lattice model describing the spreading of a disease among a community composed by susceptible, infected and removed individuals. A susceptible individual becomes infected catalytically. An infected individual may, spontaneously, either become recovered, that is, acquire a permanent immunization, or become again susceptible. The critical properties including the phase diagram is obtained by means of mean-field theories as well as numerical simulations. The model is found to belong to the universality class of dynamic percolation except when the recovering rate vanishes in which case the model belongs to the directed percolation universality class.

  3. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  4. History and milestones of mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinhua; Huang, Qiaoniang; Petersen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders mediated by self-reactive T cells and/or autoantibodies. Mice, as the most widely used animal for modeling autoimmune disorders, have been extensively used in the investigation of disease pathogenesis as well as in the search for novel therapeutics. Since the first mouse model of multiple sclerosis was established more than 60 years ago, hundreds of mouse models have been established for tens of autoimmune diseases. These mouse models can be divided into three categories based on the approaches used for disease induction. The first one represents the induced models in which autoimmunity is initiated in mice by immunization, adoptive transfer or environmental factors. The second group is formed by the spontaneous models where mice develop autoimmune disorders without further induction. The third group refers to the humanized models in which mice bearing humanized cells, tissues, or genes, develop autoimmune diseases either spontaneously or by induction. This article reviews the history and highlights the milestones of the mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  5. A stochastic model for head lice infections.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patricia; Wilkinson-Herbots, Hilde; Isham, Valerie

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of head lice infections in schools, by considering a model for endemic infection based on a stochastic SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) epidemic model, with the addition of an external source of infection. We deduce a range of properties of our model, including the length of a single outbreak of infection. We use the stationary distribution of the number of infected individuals, in conjunction with data from a recent study carried out in Welsh schools on the prevalence of head lice infections, and employ maximum likelihood methods to obtain estimates of the model parameters. A complication is that, for each school, only a sample of the pupils was checked for infection. Our likelihood function takes account of the missing data by incorporating a hypergeometric sampling element. We arrive at estimates of the ratios of the "within school" and "external source" transmission rates to the recovery rate and use these to obtain estimates for various quantities of interest.

  6. Mouse Models of Thyroid Cancer: A 2015 Update

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Lawrence S.; Qamri, Zahida; Kari, Suresh; Ashtekar, Amruta

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine neoplasm, and its rate is rising at an alarming pace. Thus, there is a compelling need to develop in vivo models which will not only enable the confirmation of the oncogenic potential of driver genes, but also point the way towards the development of new therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, techniques for the generation of mouse models of human diseases have progressed substantially, accompanied by parallel advances in the genetics and genomics of human tumors. This convergence has enabled the development of mouse lines carrying mutations in the genes that cause thyroid cancers of all subtypes, including differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancers, poorly differentiated/anaplastic cancers, and medullary thyroid cancers. In this review, we will discuss the state of the art of mouse modeling of thyroid cancer, with the eventual goal of providing insight into tumor biology and treatment. PMID:26123589

  7. A mouse model of orthotopic vascularized aerated lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Krupnick, A S; Kornfeld, C G; Lai, J M; Ritter, J H; Richardson, S B; Huang, H J; Das, N A; Patterson, G A; Gelman, A E; Kreisel, D

    2007-06-01

    Outcomes after lung transplantation are markedly inferior to those after other solid organ transplants. A better understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms contributing to lung graft injury will be critical to improve outcomes. Advances in this field have been hampered by the lack of a mouse model of lung transplantation. Here, we report a mouse model of vascularized aerated single lung transplantation utilizing cuff techniques. We show that syngeneic grafts have normal histological appearance with minimal infiltration of T lymphocytes. Allogeneic grafts show acute cellular rejection with infiltration of T lymphocytes and recipient-type antigen presenting cells. Our data show that we have developed a physiological model of lung transplantation in the mouse, which provides ample opportunity for the study of nonimmune and immune mechanisms that contribute to lung allograft injury.

  8. Of mice, flies--and men? Comparing fungal infection models for large-scale screening efforts.

    PubMed

    Brunke, Sascha; Quintin, Jessica; Kasper, Lydia; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Richter, Martin E; Hiller, Ekkehard; Schwarzmüller, Tobias; d'Enfert, Christophe; Kuchler, Karl; Rupp, Steffen; Hube, Bernhard; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2015-05-01

    Studying infectious diseases requires suitable hosts for experimental in vivo infections. Recent years have seen the advent of many alternatives to murine infection models. However, the use of non-mammalian models is still controversial because it is often unclear how well findings from these systems predict virulence potential in humans or other mammals. Here, we compare the commonly used models, fruit fly and mouse (representing invertebrate and mammalian hosts), for their similarities and degree of correlation upon infection with a library of mutants of an important fungal pathogen, the yeast Candida glabrata. Using two indices, for fly survival time and for mouse fungal burden in specific organs, we show a good agreement between the models. We provide a suitable predictive model for estimating the virulence potential of C. glabrata mutants in the mouse from fly survival data. As examples, we found cell wall integrity mutants attenuated in flies, and mutants of a MAP kinase pathway had defective virulence in flies and reduced relative pathogen fitness in mice. In addition, mutants with strongly reduced in vitro growth generally, but not always, had reduced virulence in flies. Overall, we demonstrate that surveying Drosophila survival after infection is a suitable model to predict the outcome of murine infections, especially for severely attenuated C. glabrata mutants. Pre-screening of mutants in an invertebrate Drosophila model can, thus, provide a good estimate of the probability of finding a strain with reduced microbial burden in the mouse host.

  9. A mouse-adapted enterovirus 71 strain causes neurological disease in mice after oral infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Chou, Chun-Ting; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Shih-Min; Yan, Jing-Jou; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Jen-Reng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Chen, Shun-Hua; Yu, Chun-Keung

    2004-08-01

    A mouse-adapted enterovirus 71 (EV71) strain with increased virulence in mice, MP4, was generated after four serial passages of the parental EV71 strain 4643 in mice. Strain MP4 exhibited a larger plaque size, grew more rapidly, and was more cytotoxic in vitro than strain 4643. Although strains 4643 and MP4 both induced apoptosis of SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells, MP4 was more virulent than 4643 in 1-day-old mice (50% lethal doses, 10(2) and 10(4) PFU/mouse, respectively). Strain MP4 (5 x 10(6) PFU/mouse), but not 4643, could orally infect 7-day-old mice, resulting in rear-limb paralysis followed by death 5 to 9 days after inoculation with the virus. Histopathologically, neuronal loss and apoptosis were evident in the spinal cords as well as the brain stems of the infected mice. The limb muscles displayed massive necrosis. There was early and transient virus replication in the intestines, whereas the spinal cord, brain, and muscle became the sites of viral replication during the late phase of the infection. Virus transmission occurred among infected and noninfected cagemates, as demonstrated by the occurrence of seroconversion and the presence of viable viruses in the stool samples of the latter. Protection against EV71 challenge was demonstrated following administration of hyperimmune serum 1 day after inoculation with the virus. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the genome of EV71 strain MP4 revealed four nucleotide changes on the 5' untranslated region, three on the VP2 region, and eight on the 2C region, resulting in one and four amino acid substitutions in the VP2 and 2C proteins, respectively.

  10. Animal Models of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Randy E.; Durbin, Russell K.; Durbin, Joan E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and immunity has been hampered by its exquisite host specificity, and the difficulties encountered in adapting this virus to a murine host. The reasons for this obstacle are not well understood, but appear to reflect, at least in part, the inability of the virus to block the interferon response in any but the human host. This review addresses some of the issues encountered in mouse models of respiratory syncytial virus infection, and describes the advantages and disadvantages of alternative model systems. PMID:26176495

  11. Animal models of respiratory syncytial virus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Randy E; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E

    2015-08-01

    The study of human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and immunity has been hampered by its exquisite host specificity, and the difficulties encountered in adapting this virus to a murine host. The reasons for this obstacle are not well understood, but appear to reflect, at least in part, the inability of the virus to block the interferon response in any but the human host. This review addresses some of the issues encountered in mouse models of respiratory syncytial virus infection, and describes the advantages and disadvantages of alternative model systems.

  12. Enhanced levels of scrapie responsive gene mRNA in BSE-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dandoy-Dron, F; Benboudjema, L; Guillo, F; Jaegly, A; Jasmin, C; Dormont, D; Tovey, M G; Dron, M

    2000-03-10

    The expression of the mRNA of nine scrapie responsive genes was analyzed in the brains of FVB/N mice infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The RNA transcripts of eight genes were overexpressed to a comparable extent in both BSE-infected and scrapie-infected mice, indicating a common series of pathogenic events in the two transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In contrast, the serine proteinase inhibitor spi 2, an analogue of the human alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene, was overexpressed to a greater extent in the brains of scrapie-infected animals than in animals infected with BSE, reflecting either an agent specific or a mouse strain specific response. The levels of spi 2 mRNA were increased during the course of scrapie prior to the onset of clinical signs of the disease and the increase reached 11 to 45 fold relative to uninfected controls in terminally ill mice. Spi 2, in common with four of the other scrapie responsive genes studied, is known to be associated with pro-inflammatory processes. These observations underline the importance of cell reactivity in TSE. In addition, scrg2 mRNA the level of which is enhanced in TSE-infected mouse brain, was identified as a previously unrecognized long transcript of the murine aldolase C gene. However, the level of the principal aldolase C mRNA is unaffected in TSE. The increased representation of the longer transcript in the late stage of the disease may reflect changes in mRNA processing and/or stability in reactive astrocytes or in damaged Purkinje cells.

  13. A Mouse Model for Laser-induced Choroidal Neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ronil S; Soetikno, Brian T; Lajko, Michelle; Fawzi, Amani A

    2015-12-27

    The mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) model has been a crucial mainstay model for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) research. By administering targeted laser injury to the RPE and Bruch's membrane, the procedure induces angiogenesis, modeling the hallmark pathology observed in neovascular AMD. First developed in non-human primates, the laser-induced CNV model has come to be implemented into many other species, the most recent of which being the mouse. Mouse experiments are advantageously more cost-effective, experiments can be executed on a much faster timeline, and they allow the use of various transgenic models. The miniature size of the mouse eye, however, poses a particular challenge when performing the procedure. Manipulation of the eye to visualize the retina requires practice of fine dexterity skills as well as simultaneous hand-eye-foot coordination to operate the laser. However, once mastered, the model can be applied to study many aspects of neovascular AMD such as molecular mechanisms, the effect of genetic manipulations, and drug treatment effects. The laser-induced CNV model, though useful, is not a perfect model of the disease. The wild-type mouse eye is otherwise healthy, and the chorio-retinal environment does not mimic the pathologic changes in human AMD. Furthermore, injury-induced angiogenesis does not reflect the same pathways as angiogenesis occurring in an age-related and chronic disease state as in AMD. Despite its shortcomings, the laser-induced CNV model is one of the best methods currently available to study the debilitating pathology of neovascular AMD. Its implementation has led to a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AMD, as well as contributing to the development of many of the AMD therapies currently available.

  14. Towards multiscale modeling of influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Lisa N.; Murillo, Michael S.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Aided by recent advances in computational power, algorithms, and higher fidelity data, increasingly detailed theoretical models of infection with influenza A virus are being developed. We review single scale models as they describe influenza infection from intracellular to global scales, and, in particular, we consider those models that capture details specific to influenza and can be used to link different scales. We discuss the few multiscale models of influenza infection that have been developed in this emerging field. In addition to discussing modeling approaches, we also survey biological data on influenza infection and transmission that is relevant for constructing influenza infection models. We envision that, in the future, multiscale models that capitalize on technical advances in experimental biology and high performance computing could be used to describe the large spatial scale epidemiology of influenza infection, evolution of the virus, and transmission between hosts more accurately. PMID:23608630

  15. A fractional-order infectivity SIR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Henry, B. I.; McGann, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Fractional-order SIR models have become increasingly popular in the literature in recent years, however unlike the standard SIR model, they often lack a derivation from an underlying stochastic process. Here we derive a fractional-order infectivity SIR model from a stochastic process that incorporates a time-since-infection dependence on the infectivity of individuals. The fractional derivative appears in the generalised master equations of a continuous time random walk through SIR compartments, with a power-law function in the infectivity. We show that this model can also be formulated as an infection-age structured Kermack-McKendrick integro-differential SIR model. Under the appropriate limit the fractional infectivity model reduces to the standard ordinary differential equation SIR model.

  16. [Genetically engineered mice: mouse models for cancer research].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Hanna

    2007-10-26

    Genetically engineered mice (GEM) have been extensively used to model human cancer. Mouse models mimic the morphology, histopathology, phenotype, and genotype of the corresponding cancer in humans. GEM mice are created by random integration of a transgene into the genome, which results in gene overexpression (transgenic mice); gene deletion (knock-out mice); or targeted insertion of the transgene in a selected locus (knock-in mice). Knock-out may be constitutive, i.e. total inactivation of the gene of interest in any cell, or conditional, i.e. tissue-specific inactivation of the gene. Gene knock-down (RNAi) and humanization of the mouse are more sophisticated models of GEM mice. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism in which double-stranded RNAs inhibits the respective gene expression by inducing degradation of its mRNA. Humanization is based on replacing a mouse gene by its human counterpart. The alterations in genes in GEM have to be heritable. The opportunities provided by employing GEM cancer models are: analysis of the role of specific cancer genes and modifier genes, evaluation of conventional cancer therapies and new drugs, identification of cancer markers of tumor growth, analysis of the influence of the tumor's microenvironment on tumor formation, and the definition of the pre-clinical, discrete steps of tumorigenesis. The validation of mouse models of human cancer is the task of the MMHCC (Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortium). The GEM models of breast, pancreatic, intestinal and colon, and prostate cancer are the most actively explored. In contrast, the models of brain tumors and ovary, cervical, and skin cancer are in the early stage of investigation.

  17. Modeling rotavirus infection and antiviral therapy using primary intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuebang; Bijvelds, Marcel; Dang, Wen; Xu, Lei; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Knipping, Karen; Tuysuz, Nesrin; Dekkers, Johanna F; Wang, Yijin; de Jonge, Jeroen; Sprengers, Dave; van der Laan, Luc J W; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Ten Berge, Derk; Metselaar, Herold J; de Jonge, Hugo; Koopmans, Marion P G; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-11-01

    Despite the introduction of oral vaccines, rotavirus still kills over 450,000 children under five years of age annually. The absence of specific treatment prompts research aiming at further understanding of pathogenesis and the development of effective antiviral therapy, which in turn requires advanced experimental models. Given the intrinsic limitations of the classical rotavirus models using immortalized cell lines infected with laboratory-adapted strains in two dimensional cultures, our study aimed to model infection and antiviral therapy of both experimental and patient-derived rotavirus strains using three dimensional cultures of primary intestinal organoids. Intestinal epithelial organoids were successfully cultured from mouse or human gut tissues. These organoids recapitulate essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture, and are susceptible to rotavirus. Human organoids are more permissive to rotavirus infection, displaying an over 10,000-fold increase in genomic RNA following 24h of viral replication. Furthermore, infected organoids are capable of producing infectious rotavirus particles. Treatment of interferon-alpha or ribavirin inhibited viral replication in organoids of both species. Importantly, human organoids efficiently support the infection of patient-derived rotavirus strains and can be potentially harnessed for personalized evaluation of the efficacy of antiviral medications. Therefore, organoids provide a robust model system for studying rotavirus-host interactions and assessing antiviral medications.

  18. The clinical implications of mouse models of enhanced anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Simone B; Landgraf, Rainer; Singewald, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Mice are increasingly overtaking the rat model organism in important aspects of anxiety research, including drug development. However, translating the results obtained in mouse studies into information that can be applied in clinics remains challenging. One reason may be that most of the studies so far have used animals displaying ‘normal’ anxiety rather than ‘psychopathological’ animal models with abnormal (elevated) anxiety, which more closely reflect core features and sensitivities to therapeutic interventions of human anxiety disorders, and which would, thus, narrow the translational gap. Here, we discuss manipulations aimed at persistently enhancing anxiety-related behavior in the laboratory mouse using phenotypic selection, genetic techniques and/or environmental manipulations. It is hoped that such models with enhanced construct validity will provide improved ways of studying the neurobiology and treatment of pathological anxiety. Examples of findings from mouse models of enhanced anxiety-related behavior will be discussed, as well as their relation to findings in anxiety disorder patients regarding neuroanatomy, neurobiology, genetic involvement and epigenetic modifications. Finally, we highlight novel targets for potential anxiolytic pharmacotherapeutics that have been established with the help of research involving mice. Since the use of psychopathological mouse models is only just beginning to increase, it is still unclear as to the extent to which such approaches will enhance the success rate of drug development in translating identified therapeutic targets into clinical trials and, thus, helping to introduce the next anxiolytic class of drugs. PMID:21901080

  19. Inducible Mouse Models for Cancer Drug Target Validation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joseph H.

    2016-01-01

    Genetically-engineered mouse (GEM) models have provided significant contributions to our understanding of cancer biology and developing anticancer therapeutic strategies. The development of GEM models that faithfully recapitulate histopathological and clinical features of human cancers is one of the most pressing needs to successfully conquer cancer. In particular, doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse models allow us to regulate (induce or suppress) the expression of a specific gene of interest within a specific tissue in a temporal manner. Leveraging this mouse model system, we can determine whether the transgene expression is required for tumor maintenance, thereby validating the transgene product as a target for anticancer drug development (target validation study). In addition, there is always a risk of tumor recurrence with cancer therapy. By analyzing recurrent tumors derived from fully regressed tumors after turning off transgene expression in tumor-bearing mice, we can gain an insight into the molecular basis of how tumor cells escape from their dependence on the transgene (tumor recurrence study). Results from such studies will ultimately allow us to predict therapeutic responses in clinical settings and develop new therapeutic strategies against recurrent tumors. The aim of this review is to highlight the significance of doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse models in studying target validation and tumor recurrence. PMID:28053958

  20. Construction of a flagellum-negative mutant of Proteus mirabilis: effect on internalization by human renal epithelial cells and virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, H L; Belas, R; Lockatell, V; Chippendale, G; Trifillis, A L; Johnson, D E; Warren, J W

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of flagella in pathogenesis of urinary tract infection caused by Proteus mirabilis, we constructed a nonmotile, nonswarming flagellum mutant of strain WPM111 (an hpmA hemolysin mutant of strain BA6163, chosen because of its lack of in vitro cytotoxicity in renal epithelial cell internalization studies). A nonpolar mutation was introduced into the flaD gene, which encodes the flagellar cap protein. This mutation does not affect the synthesis of flagellin but rather prevents the assembly of an intact flagellar filament. In in vitro assays, the genetically characterized nonmotile mutant was found to be internalized by cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells in numbers less than 1% of those of the flagellated parent strain. Internalization of the nonmotile mutant was increased significantly (14- to 21-fold) by centrifugation onto the monolayer. To assess virulence in vivo, CBA mice were challenged transurethrally with 10(7) CFU of P. mirabilis BA6163 (wild type) (n = 16), WPM111 (hpmA mutant) (n = 46), or BB2401 (hmpA flaD mutant) (n = 46). Differences in quantitative cultures between the parent strain and the hemolysin-negative mutant were not significant. However, the hpmA flaD mutant was recovered in numbers approximately 100-fold lower than those of the hmpA mutant or the wild-type parent strain and thus was clearly attenuated. We conclude that while hemolysin does not significantly influence virulence, flagella contribute significantly to the ability of P. mirabilis to colonize the urinary tract and cause acute pyelonephritis in an experimental model of ascending urinary tract infection. PMID:8945585

  1. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Inhibit Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection through a Multi-Step Process

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Hideya; Kosugi, Isao; Arai, Yoshifumi; Iwashita, Toshihide; Tsutsui, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    In humans, cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most significant infectious cause of intrauterine infections that cause congenital anomalies of the central nervous system. Currently, it is not known how this process is affected by the timing of infection and the susceptibility of early-gestational-period cells. Embryonic stem (ES) cells are more resistant to CMV than most other cell types, although the mechanism responsible for this resistance is not well understood. Using a plaque assay and evaluation of immediate-early 1 mRNA and protein expression, we found that mouse ES cells were resistant to murine CMV (MCMV) at the point of transcription. In ES cells infected with MCMV, treatment with forskolin and trichostatin A did not confer full permissiveness to MCMV. In ES cultures infected with elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) promoter-green fluorescent protein (GFP) recombinant MCMV at a multiplicity of infection of 10, less than 5% of cells were GFP-positive, despite the fact that ES cells have relatively high EF-1α promoter activity. Quantitative PCR analysis of the MCMV genome showed that ES cells allow approximately 20-fold less MCMV DNA to enter the nucleus than mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) do, and that this inhibition occurs in a multi-step manner. In situ hybridization revealed that ES cell nuclei have significantly less MCMV DNA than MEF nuclei. This appears to be facilitated by the fact that ES cells express less heparan sulfate, β1 integrin, and vimentin, and have fewer nuclear pores, than MEF. This may reduce the ability of MCMV to attach to and enter through the cellular membrane, translocate to the nucleus, and cross the nuclear membrane in pluripotent stem cells (ES/induced pluripotent stem cells). The results presented here provide perspective on the relationship between CMV susceptibility and cell differentiation. PMID:21407806

  2. Genetically Engineered Humanized Mouse Models for Preclinical Antibody Studies

    PubMed Central

    Proetzel, Gabriele; Wiles, Michael V.; Roopenian, Derry C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of genetic engineering has vastly improved our capabilities to create animal models relevant in preclinical research. With the recent advances in gene-editing technologies, it is now possible to very rapidly create highly tunable mouse models as needs arise. Here, we provide an overview of genetic engineering methods, as well as the development of humanized neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) models and their use for monoclonal antibody in vivo studies. PMID:24150980

  3. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells.

  4. Two-Pore Channels: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Margarida; Galione, Antony; Parrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in two-pore channels (TPCs) has resulted in a variety of studies dealing with the functional role and mechanism of action of these endo-lysosomal proteins in diverse physiological processes. With the availability of mouse lines harbouring mutant alleles for Tpcnl and/or Tpcn2 genes, several studies have made use of them to validate, consolidate and discover new roles for these channels not only at the cellular level but, importantly, also at the level of the whole organism. The different mutant mouse lines that have been used were derived from distinct genetic manipulation strategies, with the aim of knocking out expression of TPC proteins. However, the expression of different residual TPC sequences predicted to occur in these mutant mouse lines, together with the varied degree to which the effects on Tpcn expression have been studied, makes it important to assess the true knockout status of some of the lines. In this review we summarize these Tpcn mutant mouse lines with regard to their predicted effect on Tpcn expression and the extent to which they have been characterized. Additionally, we discuss how results derived from studies using these Tpcn mutant mouse lines have consolidated previously proposed roles for TPCs, such as mediators of NAADP signalling, endo-lysosomal functions, and pancreatic β cell physiology. We will also review how they have been instrumental in the assignment of new physiological roles for these cation channels in processes such as membrane electrical excitability, neoangiogenesis, viral infection and brown adipose tissue and heart function, revealing, in some cases, a specific contribution of a particular TPC isoform. PMID:27330869

  5. Establishing the colitis-associated cancer progression mouse models.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiming; Lu, Zhanjun; Wang, Ruhua; Chen, Niwei; Zheng, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been reported as an important inducer of colorectal cancer (CRC). The most malignant IBD-associated CRC type has been highlighted as colitis-associated cancer (CAC). However, lack of CAC cases and difficulties of the long follow-up research have challenged researchers in molecular mechanism probing. Here, we established pre-CAC mouse models (dextran sulfate sodium [DSS] group and azoxymethane [AOM] group) and CAC mouse model (DSS/AOM group) to mimic human CAC development through singly or combinational treatment with DSS and AOM followed by disease activity index analysis. We found that these CAC mice showed much more severe disease phenotype, including serious diarrhea, body weight loss, rectal prolapse and bleeding, bloody stool, tumor burden, and bad survival. By detecting expression patterns of several therapeutic targets-Apc, p53, Kras, and TNF-α-in these mouse models through western blot, histology analysis, qRT-PCR, and ELISA methods, we found that the oncogene Kras expression remained unchanged, while the tumor suppressors-Apc and p53 expression were both significantly downregulated with malignancy progression from pre-CAC to CAC, and TNF-α level was elevated the most in CAC mice blood which is of potential clinical use. These data indicated the successful establishment of CAC development mouse models, which mimics human CAC well both in disease phenotype and molecular level, and highlighted the promoting role of inflammation in CAC progression. This useful tool will facilitate the further study in CAC molecular mechanism.

  6. A mouse model for testing the pathogenicity of equine herpes virus-1 strains.

    PubMed

    van Woensel, P A; Goovaerts, D; Markx, D; Visser, N

    1995-07-01

    A mouse model was developed for testing the pathogenicity of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1) strains. The model was validated with EHV-1 strains that are known to be of a low or high pathogenicity in horses. From all parameters tested, the safety index, which was calculated from the body weights of the mice after infection, proved to be the best predictive parameter. When this parameter was used, good and reliable correlations were found with the pathogenicity of the EHV-1 strains in horses. This method enabled the differentiation between the two experimental EHV-1 strains whose genetic backgrounds were supposedly equal.

  7. Retinal fundus imaging in mouse models of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anne F; Heiduschka, Peter; Eter, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The development of in vivo retinal fundus imaging in mice has opened a new research horizon, not only in ophthalmic research. The ability to monitor the dynamics of vascular and cellular changes in pathological conditions, such as neovascularization or degeneration, longitudinally without the need to sacrifice the mouse, permits longer observation periods in the same animal. With the application of the high-resolution confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in experimental mouse models, access to a large spectrum of imaging modalities in vivo is provided.

  8. Analysis of Rifapentine for Preventive Therapy in the Cornell Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Eishi; Chaisson, Richard E.; Bishai, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Rifapentine is a long-acting rifamycin which may be useful for intermittent drug therapy against tuberculosis. In this study we measured the efficacies of rifapentine-containing intermittent drug regimens for preventive therapy using the Cornell mouse model of latent tuberculosis. We infected groups of mice intravenously with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then treated them with isoniazid and pyrazinamide for 12 weeks according to the Cornell latency development protocol. After a 4-week interval of no treatment, experimental preventive therapy was administered by esophageal gavage for 12 or 18 weeks. After equilibration and dexamethasone amplification treatment, mouse organs were analyzed by quantitative colony counts to measure the effectiveness of therapy. Our results showed that once-weekly isoniazid plus rifapentine combination therapy for 18 weeks was an effective preventive regimen with sterilizing potency and bacillary load reduction comparable to those of daily isoniazid therapy for 18 weeks. Monotherapy with rifapentine weekly or fortnightly or with rifampin twice weekly for up to 18 weeks did not offer advantages in reducing bacillary load or in sterilizing organs compared to the effects of a placebo. These results with the Cornell mouse model indicate that once-weekly, short-course preventive therapy with isoniazid plus rifapentine is effective and may warrant investigation in humans with latent tuberculosis infection. PMID:10471552

  9. Inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage DNA synthesis by infection with the Arenavirus Pichinde. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, A.M.; Jahrling, P.B.; Merrill, P.; Tobery, S.

    1983-01-19

    Macrophage DNA synthesis and proliferation occur during the development of cell-mediated immunity and in the early non-specific reaction to infection. Arenaviruses have a predilection for infection of cells of the reticuloendothelial system and in this study we have examined the effect of the arenavirus Pichinde on macrophage DNA synthesis. We have found that infection of mouse peritoneal macrophages with Pichinde caused a profound dose dependent inhibition of the DNA synthesis induced by macrophage growth factor/colony stimulating factor. At a multiplicity of inoculum of five there is a 75-95% inhibition of DNA synthesis. Viable virus is necessary for inhibition since Pichinde inactivated by heat or cobalt irradiation had no effect. Similarly, virus pre-treated with an antiserum to Pichinde was without inhibitory effect. Inhibition was demonstrated by measuring DNA synthesis spectrofluorometrically as well as by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The inhibition of DNA synthesis was not associated with any cytopathology. There was no evidence that the inhibition was due to soluble factors, such as prostaglandins or interferon, released by infected cells. These studies demonstrate, for the first time in vitro, a significant alteration in macrophage function caused by infection with an arenavirus. It is possible that inhibition of macrophage proliferation represents a mechanism by which some microorganisms interfere with host resistance.

  10. Neuroinvasion of prions: insights from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Brandner, S; Klein, M A; Frigg, R; Pekarik, V; Parizek, P; Raeber, A; Glatzel, M; Schwarz, P; Rülicke, T; Weissmann, C; Aguzzi, A

    2000-11-01

    The prion was defined by Stanley B. Prusiner as the infectious agent that causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. A pathological protein accumulating in the brain of scrapie-infected hamsters was isolated in 1982 and termed prion protein (PrPSc). Its cognate gene Prnp was identified more than a decade ago by Charles Weissmann, and shown to encode the host protein PrP(C). Since the latter discovery, transgenic mice have contributed many important insights into the field of prion biology, including the understanding of the molecular basis of the species barrier for prions. By disrupting the Prnp gene, it was shown that an organism that lacks PrP(C) is resistant to infection by prions. Introduction of mutant PrP genes into PrP-deficient mice was used to investigate the structure-activity relationship of the PrP gene with regard to scrapie susceptibility. Ectopic expression of PrP in PrP knockout mice proved a useful tool for the identification of host cells competent for prion replication. Finally, the availability of PrP knockout mice and transgenic mice overexpressing PrP allows selective reconstitution experiments aimed at expressing PrP in neurografts or in specific populations of haemato- and lymphopoietic cells. The latter studies have allowed us to clarify some of the mechanisms of prion spread and disease pathogenesis.

  11. Acute metabolic decompensation due to influenza in a mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Peter J; Tarasenko, Tatiana N; Wang, Tony; Levy, Ezra; Zerfas, Patricia M; Moran, Thomas; Lee, Hye Seung; Bequette, Brian J; Diaz, George A

    2014-02-01

    The urea cycle functions to incorporate ammonia, generated by normal metabolism, into urea. Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are caused by loss of function in any of the enzymes responsible for ureagenesis, and are characterized by life-threatening episodes of acute metabolic decompensation with hyperammonemia (HA). A prospective analysis of interim HA events in a cohort of individuals with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, the most common UCD, revealed that intercurrent infection was the most common precipitant of acute HA and was associated with markers of increased morbidity when compared with other precipitants. To further understand these clinical observations, we developed a model system of metabolic decompensation with HA triggered by viral infection (PR8 influenza) using spf-ash mice, a model of OTC deficiency. Both wild-type (WT) and spf-ash mice displayed similar cytokine profiles and lung viral titers in response to PR8 influenza infection. During infection, spf-ash mice displayed an increase in liver transaminases, suggesting a hepatic sensitivity to the inflammatory response and an altered hepatic immune response. Despite having no visible pathological changes by histology, WT and spf-ash mice had reduced CPS1 and OTC enzyme activities, and, unlike WT, spf-ash mice failed to increase ureagenesis. Depression of urea cycle function was seen in liver amino acid analysis, with reductions seen in aspartate, ornithine and arginine during infection. In conclusion, we developed a model system of acute metabolic decompensation due to infection in a mouse model of a UCD. In addition, we have identified metabolic perturbations during infection in the spf-ash mice, including a reduction of urea cycle intermediates. This model of acute metabolic decompensation with HA due to infection in UCD serves as a platform for exploring biochemical perturbations and the efficacy of treatments, and could be adapted to explore acute decompensation in other types of inborn

  12. Traditional Chinese Medicine QPYF as Preventive Treatment for Clostridium difficile Associated Diarrhea in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ya-Nan, Guo; Hao-Jun, Zhang; Hong-Bing, Jia; Ping, Li; Xin-Zhu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine QPYF has a good effect for treating antibiotic-associated diarrhea in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to test its efficacy to prevent Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Clostridium difficile VPI 10463 after exposure to antimicrobial mixture. QPYF was administered from 7 days prior to Clostridium difficile infection to 20 days after infection, and its effect was compared with no treatment and receiving placebo. The mice were monitored for 20 days and the percent survival, disease activity index, weight loss, colon histopathology, and the levels of toxins in the feces were measured. The expressions of TNF α, MCP-1, NF-κB p65, and phospho-NF-κB p65 in the colon were presented by immunohistochemistry. The survival rate of QPYF group (93.75%) was higher than that of model control group (65%). The mice treated with QPYF had a lower weight loss and disease activity index, compared to the mice with placebo. A significantly lower level of histopathology scores, toxins in the feces, and TNF α, MCP-1, NF-κB p65, and phospho-NF-κB p65 were detected for QPYF-treated mice. Traditional Chinese medicine QPYF showed a good preventive effect for CDAD in a mouse model. PMID:27999606

  13. Modeling fragile X syndrome in the Fmr1 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Leach, Prescott T; Silverman, Jill L; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2014-11-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and one of the leading genetic causes for autism spectrum disorder. Clinical symptoms of FXS can include impaired cognition, anxiety, hyperactivity, social phobia, and repetitive behaviors. FXS is caused by a CGG repeat mutation which expands a region on the X chromosome containing the FMR1 gene. In FXS, a full mutation (> 200 repeats) leads to hypermethylation of FMR1, an epigenetic mechanism that effectively silences FMR1 gene expression and reduces levels of the FMR1 gene product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is important for the regulation of protein expression. In an effort to further understand how loss of FMR1 and FMRP contribute to FXS symptomology, several FXS animal models have been created. The most well characterized rodent model is the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse, which lacks FMRP protein due to a disruption in its Fmr1 gene. Here, we review the behavioral phenotyping of the Fmr1 KO mouse to date, and discuss the clinical relevance of this mouse model to the human FXS condition. While much remains to be learned about FXS, the Fmr1 KO mouse is a valuable tool for understanding the repercussions of functional loss of FMRP and assessing the efficacy of pharmacological compounds in ameliorating the molecular and behavioral phenotypes relevant to FXS.

  14. Animal Models for Studying Female Genital Tract Infection with Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Kalmar, Isabelle; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen. It is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the world, with more than 100 million new cases of genital tract infections with C. trachomatis occurring each year. Animal models are indispensable for the study of C. trachomatis infections and the development and evaluation of candidate vaccines. In this paper, the most commonly used animal models to study female genital tract infections with C. trachomatis will be reviewed, namely, the mouse, guinea pig, and nonhuman primate models. Additionally, we will focus on the more recently developed pig model. PMID:23836817

  15. Mouse mammary tumor virus uses mouse but not human transferrin receptor 1 to reach a low pH compartment and infect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Enxiu; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ying Qihua; Davey, Robert A.; Ross, Susan R.

    2008-11-25

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a pH-dependent virus that uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry into cells. Previous studies demonstrated that MMTV could induce pH 5-dependent fusion-from-with of mouse cells. Here we show that the MMTV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion requires both the entry receptor and low pH (pH 5). Although expression of the MMTV envelope and TfR1 was sufficient to mediate low pH-dependent syncytia formation, virus infection required trafficking to a low pH compartment; infection was independent of cathepsin-mediated proteolysis. Human TfR1 did not support virus infection, although envelope-mediated syncytia formation occurred with human cells after pH 5 treatment and this fusion depended on TfR1 expression. However, although the MMTV envelope bound human TfR1, virus was only internalized and trafficked to a low pH compartment in cells expressing mouse TfR1. Thus, while human TfR1 supported cell-cell fusion, because it was not internalized when bound to MMTV, it did not function as an entry receptor. Our data suggest that MMTV uses TfR1 for all steps of entry: cell attachment, induction of the conformational changes in Env required for membrane fusion and internalization to an appropriate acidic compartment.

  16. Animal models of external traumatic wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Bil de Arce, Vida J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in traumatic wound care and management, infections remain a leading cause of mortality, morbidity and economic disruption in millions of wound patients around the world. Animal models have become standard tools for studying a wide array of external traumatic wound infections and testing new antimicrobial strategies. Results: Animal models of external traumatic wound infections reported by different investigators vary in animal species used, microorganism strains, the number of microorganisms applied, the size of the wounds and for burn infections, the length of time the heated object or liquid is in contact with the skin. Methods: This review covers experimental infections in animal models of surgical wounds, skin abrasions, burns, lacerations, excisional wounds and open fractures. Conclusions: As antibiotic resistance continues to increase, more new antimicrobial approaches are urgently needed. These should be tested using standard protocols for infections in external traumatic wounds in animal models. PMID:21701256

  17. Current State of Animal (Mouse) Modeling in Melanoma Research

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Omer F.; Nguyen, Felix D.; Noory, Mohammad A.; Sharma, Arati

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress in understanding the biology of human cancer and technological advancement in drug discovery, treatment failure remains an inevitable outcome for most cancer patients with advanced diseases, including melanoma. Despite FDA-approved BRAF-targeted therapies for advanced stage melanoma showed a great deal of promise, development of rapid resistance limits the success. Hence, the overall success rate of melanoma therapy still remains to be one of the worst compared to other malignancies. Advancement of next-generation sequencing technology allowed better identification of alterations that trigger melanoma development. As development of successful therapies strongly depends on clinically relevant preclinical models, together with the new findings, more advanced melanoma models have been generated. In this article, besides traditional mouse models of melanoma, we will discuss recent ones, such as patient-derived tumor xenografts, topically inducible BRAF mouse model and RCAS/TVA-based model, and their advantages as well as limitations. Although mouse models of melanoma are often criticized as poor predictors of whether an experimental drug would be an effective treatment, development of new and more relevant models could circumvent this problem in the near future. PMID:26483610

  18. Comprehensive Neurocognitive Endophenotyping Strategies for Mouse Models of Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for refinement of the current behavioral phenotyping methods for mouse models of genetic disorders. The current approach is to perform a behavioral screen using standardized tasks to define a broad phenotype of the model. This phenotype is then compared to what is known concerning the disorder being modeled. The weakness inherent in this approach is twofold: First, the tasks that make up these standard behavioral screens do not model specific behaviors associated with a given genetic mutation but rather phenotypes affected in various genetic disorders; secondly, these behavioral tasks are insufficiently sensitive to identify subtle phenotypes. An alternate phenotyping strategy is to determine the core behavioral phenotypes of the genetic disorder being studied and develop behavioral tasks to evaluate specific hypotheses concerning the behavioral consequences of the genetic mutation. This approach emphasizes direct comparisons between the mouse and human that facilitate the development of neurobehavioral biomarkers or quantitative outcome measures for studies of genetic disorders across species. PMID:22266125

  19. Murine Mycobacterium marinum Infection as a Model for Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Julia; Carlsson, Fredric

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are a major human health problem globally. Regarding tuberculosis the situation is worsened by the poor efficacy of current vaccine regimens and by emergence of drug-resistant strains (Manjelievskaia J et al, Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 110: 110, 2016; Pereira et al., Lancet Infect Dis 12:300-306, 2012; http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/) undermining both disease-prevention and available treatments. Thus, increased basic understanding of mycobacterial-and particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis-virulence strategies and pathogenesis is of great importance. To this end several in vivo infection models are available (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013; Leung et al., Eur J Immunol 43:2246-2254, 2013; Patel et al., J Lab Physicians 3:75-79, 2011; van Leeuwen et al., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 5:a018580, 2015). While these models all have their merits they also exhibit limitations, and none perfectly mimics all aspects of human tuberculosis. Thus, there is a need for multiple models that may complement each other, ultimately allowing us to gain true insight into the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections.Here, we describe a recently developed mouse model of Mycobacterium marinum infection that allows kinetic and quantitative studies of disease progression in live animals [8]. Notably, this model exhibits features of human tuberculosis not replicated in M. tuberculosis infected mice, and may provide an important complement to the field. For example, granulomas in the M. marinum model develop central caseating necrosis (Carlsson et al., PLoS Pathog 6:e1000895, 2010), a hallmark of granulomas in human tuberculosis normally not replicated in murine M. tuberculosis infection. Moreover, while tuberculosis is heterogeneous and presents with a continuum of active and latent disease, M. tuberculosis infected mice essentially lack this dynamic range and do not replicate latency (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013

  20. Mouse models for studying prostate cancer bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinlu; Hensel, Janine; Wang, Ning; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna; Shiozawa, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Once tumor cells metastasize to the bone, the prognosis for prostate cancer patients is generally very poor. The mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, however, remain elusive, because of lack of relevant animal models. In this manuscript, we describe step-by-step protocols for the xenograft mouse models that are currently used for studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. The different routes of tumor inoculation (intraosseous, intracardiac, intravenous and orthotopic) presented are useful for exploring the biology of bone metastasis. PMID:26916039

  1. Surgically-induced mouse models in the study of bone regeneration: Current models and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Bin; Zhao, Yunpeng; Buza, John A.; Li, Wei; Wang, Wenzhao; Jia, Tanghong

    2017-01-01

    Bone regeneration has been extensively studied over the past several decades. The surgically-induced mouse model is the key animal model for studying bone regeneration, of the various research strategies used. These mouse models mimic the trauma and recovery processes in vivo and serve as carriers for tissue engineering and gene modification to test various therapies or associated genes in bone regeneration. The present review introduces a classification of surgically induced mouse models in bone regeneration, evaluates the application and value of these models and discusses the potential development of further innovations in this field in the future. PMID:28138711

  2. A mouse model for pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, George; Kramer, Carolyn D; Slocum, Connie S; Weinberg, Ellen O; Hua, Ning; Gudino, Cynthia V; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2014-08-08

    Chronic inflammation is a major driver of pathological tissue damage and a unifying characteristic of many chronic diseases in humans including neoplastic, autoimmune, and chronic inflammatory diseases. Emerging evidence implicates pathogen-induced chronic inflammation in the development and progression of chronic diseases with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Due to the complex and multifactorial etiology of chronic disease, designing experiments for proof of causality and the establishment of mechanistic links is nearly impossible in humans. An advantage of using animal models is that both genetic and environmental factors that may influence the course of a particular disease can be controlled. Thus, designing relevant animal models of infection represents a key step in identifying host and pathogen specific mechanisms that contribute to chronic inflammation. Here we describe a mouse model of pathogen-induced chronic inflammation at local and systemic sites following infection with the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium closely associated with human periodontal disease. Oral infection of specific-pathogen free mice induces a local inflammatory response resulting in destruction of tooth supporting alveolar bone, a hallmark of periodontal disease. In an established mouse model of atherosclerosis, infection with P. gingivalis accelerates inflammatory plaque deposition within the aortic sinus and innominate artery, accompanied by activation of the vascular endothelium, an increased immune cell infiltrate, and elevated expression of inflammatory mediators within lesions. We detail methodologies for the assessment of inflammation at local and systemic sites. The use of transgenic mice and defined bacterial mutants makes this model particularly suitable for identifying both host and microbial factors involved in the initiation, progression, and outcome of disease. Additionally, the model can be used to screen for novel therapeutic strategies

  3. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  4. Spallanzani's mouse: a model of restoration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heber-Katz, E; Leferovich, J M; Bedelbaeva, K; Gourevitch, D

    2004-01-01

    The ability to regenerate is thought to be a lost phenotype in mammals, though there are certainly sporadic examples of mammalian regeneration. Our laboratory has identified a strain of mouse, the MRL mouse, which has a unique capacity to heal complex tissue in an epimorphic fashion, i.e., to restore a damaged limb or organ to its normal structure and function. Initial studies using through-and-through ear punches showed rapid full closure of the ear holes with cartilage growth, new hair follicles, and normal tissue architecture reminiscent of regeneration seen in amphibians as opposed to the scarring usually seen in mammals. Since the ear hole closure phenotype is a quantitative trait, this has been used to show-through extensive breeding and backcrossing--that the trait is heritable. Such analysis reveals that there is a complex genetic basis for this trait with multiple loci. One of the major phenotypes of the MRL mouse is a potent remodeling response with the absence or a reduced level of scarring. MRL healing is associated with the upregulation of the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and the downregulation of their inhibitors TIMP-2 and TIMP-3, both present in inflammatory cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. This model has more recently been extended to the heart. In this case, a cryoinjury to the right ventricle leads to near complete scarless healing in the MRL mouse whereas scarring is seen in the control mouse. In the MRL heart, bromodeoxyuridine uptake by cardiomyocytes filling the wound site can be seen 60 days after injury. This does not occur in the control mouse. Function in the MRL heart, as measured by echocardiography, returns to normal.

  5. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Hyperglycemia and Retinal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Rahman, Ireni S. Ali; Binz, Nicolette; Li, Cai-Rui; Vagaja, Nermina N.; de Pinho, Marisa; Lai, Chooi-May

    2010-01-01

    One of the limitations of research into diabetic retinopathy is the lack of suitable animal models. To study how the two important factors—hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor—interact in diabetic retinopathy, the Akimba mouse (Ins2AkitaVEGF+/−) was generated by crossing the Akita mouse (Ins2Akita) with the Kimba mouse (VEGF+/+). C57Bl/6 and the parental and Akimba mouse lines were characterized by biometric measurements, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Spectralis Heidelberg retinal angiography and optical coherence tomography. The Akimba line not only retained the characteristics of the parental strains, such as developing hyperglycemia and retinal neovascularization, but developed higher blood glucose levels at a younger age and had worse kidney-body weight ratios than the Akita line. With aging, the Akimba line demonstrated enhanced photoreceptor cell loss, thinning of the retina, and more severe retinal vascular pathology, including more severe capillary nonperfusion, vessel constriction, beading, neovascularization, fibroses, and edema, compared with the Kimba line. The vascular changes were associated with major histocompatibility complex class II+ cellular staining throughout the retina. Together, these observations suggest that hyperglycemia resulted in higher prevalences of edema and exacerbated the vascular endothelial growth factor-driven neovascular and retinal changes in the Akimba line. Thus, the Akimba line could become a useful model for studying the interplay between hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial growth factor and for testing treatment strategies for potentially blinding complications, such as edema. PMID:20829433

  6. A guide to histomorphological evaluation of intestinal inflammation in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Erben, Ulrike; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Doerfel, Katja; Spieckermann, Simone; Haller, Dirk; Heimesaat, Markus M; Zeitz, Martin; Siegmund, Britta; Kühl, Anja A

    2014-01-01

    Histomorphology remains a powerful routine evaluating intestinal inflammation in animal models. Emphasizing the focus of a given animal study, histopathology can overstate differences between established models. We aimed to systematize histopathological evaluation of intestinal inflammation in mouse models facilitating inter-study comparisons. Samples of all parts of the intestinal tract from well-established mouse models of intestinal inflammation were evaluated from hematoxylin/eosin-stained sections and specific observations confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemistry. Three main categories sufficiently reflected the severity of histopathology independent of the localization and the overall extent of an inflammation: (i) quality and dimension of inflammatory cell infiltrates, (ii) epithelial changes and (iii) overall mucosal architecture. Scoring schemata were defined along specified criteria for each of the three categories. The direction of the initial hit proved crucial for the comparability of histological changes. Chemical noxes, infection with intestinal parasites or other models where the barrier was disturbed from outside, the luminal side, showed high levels of similarity and distinct differences to changes in the intestinal balance resulting from inside events like altered cytokine responses or disruption of the immune cell homeostasis. With a high degree of generalisation and maximum scores from 4-8 suitable scoring schemata accounted specific histopathological hallmarks. Truly integrating demands and experiences of gastroenterologists, mouse researchers, microbiologists and pathologists we provide an easy-to-use guideline evaluating histomorphology in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Standard criteria and definitions facilitate classification and rating of new relevant models, allow comparison in animal studies and transfer of functional findings to comparable histopathologies in human disease. PMID:25197329

  7. A guide to histomorphological evaluation of intestinal inflammation in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Erben, Ulrike; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Doerfel, Katja; Spieckermann, Simone; Haller, Dirk; Heimesaat, Markus M; Zeitz, Martin; Siegmund, Britta; Kühl, Anja A

    2014-01-01

    Histomorphology remains a powerful routine evaluating intestinal inflammation in animal models. Emphasizing the focus of a given animal study, histopathology can overstate differences between established models. We aimed to systematize histopathological evaluation of intestinal inflammation in mouse models facilitating inter-study comparisons. Samples of all parts of the intestinal tract from well-established mouse models of intestinal inflammation were evaluated from hematoxylin/eosin-stained sections and specific observations confirmed by subsequent immunohistochemistry. Three main categories sufficiently reflected the severity of histopathology independent of the localization and the overall extent of an inflammation: (i) quality and dimension of inflammatory cell infiltrates, (ii) epithelial changes and (iii) overall mucosal architecture. Scoring schemata were defined along specified criteria for each of the three categories. The direction of the initial hit proved crucial for the comparability of histological changes. Chemical noxes, infection with intestinal parasites or other models where the barrier was disturbed from outside, the luminal side, showed high levels of similarity and distinct differences to changes in the intestinal balance resulting from inside events like altered cytokine responses or disruption of the immune cell homeostasis. With a high degree of generalisation and maximum scores from 4-8 suitable scoring schemata accounted specific histopathological hallmarks. Truly integrating demands and experiences of gastroenterologists, mouse researchers, microbiologists and pathologists we provide an easy-to-use guideline evaluating histomorphology in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Standard criteria and definitions facilitate classification and rating of new relevant models, allow comparison in animal studies and transfer of functional findings to comparable histopathologies in human disease.

  8. Genetic Architecture of Group A Streptococcal Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Alagarsamy, Jeyashree; Hur, Junguk; Siemens, Nikolai; Svensson, Mattias; Hyldegaard, Ole; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Kotb, Malak

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variations play an important role in several pathogenic diseases, and we have previously provided strong evidences that these genetic variations contribute significantly to differences in susceptibility and clinical outcomes of invasive Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections, including sepsis and necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs). Our initial studies with conventional mouse strains revealed that host genetic variations and sex differences play an important role in orchestrating the severity, susceptibility and outcomes of NSTIs. To understand the complex genetic architecture of NSTIs, we utilized an unbiased, forward systems genetics approach in an advanced recombinant inbred (ARI) panel of mouse strains (BXD). Through this approach, we uncovered interactions between host genetics, and other non-genetic cofactors including sex, age and body weight in determining susceptibility to NSTIs. We mapped three NSTIs-associated phenotypic traits (i.e., survival, percent weight change, and lesion size) to underlying host genetic variations by using the WebQTL tool, and identified four NSTIs-associated quantitative genetic loci (QTL) for survival on mouse chromosome (Chr) 2, for weight change on Chr 7, and for lesion size on Chr 6 and 18 respectively. These QTL harbor several polymorphic genes. Identification of multiple QTL highlighted the complexity of the host-pathogen interactions involved in NSTI pathogenesis. We then analyzed and rank-ordered host candidate genes in these QTL by using the QTLminer tool and then developed a list of 375 candidate genes on the basis of annotation data and biological relevance to NSTIs. Further differential expression analyses revealed 125 genes to be significantly differentially regulated in susceptible strains compared to their uninfected controls. Several of these genes are involved in innate immunity, inflammatory response, cell growth, development and proliferation, and apoptosis. Additional network analyses using

  9. Towards a Humanized Mouse Model of Liver Stage Malaria Using Ectopic Artificial Livers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Stevens, Kelly R.; Mota, Maria M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    The malaria liver stage is an attractive target for antimalarial development, and preclinical malaria models are essential for testing such candidates. Given ethical concerns and costs associated with non‐human primate models, humanized mouse models containing chimeric human livers offer a valuable alternative as small animal models of liver stage human malaria. The best available human liver chimeric mice rely on cellular transplantation into mice with genetically engineered liver injury, but these systems involve a long and variable humanization process, are expensive, and require the use of breeding-challenged mouse strains which are not widely accessible. We previously incorporated primary human hepatocytes into engineered polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoporous human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs), implanted them in mice without liver injury, and rapidly generated human liver chimeric mice in a reproducible and scalable fashion. By re-designing the PEG scaffold to be macroporous, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of implantable porous HEALs that support liver stage human malaria (P. falciparum) infection in vitro, and also after implantation in mice with normal liver function, 60% of the time. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a tissue engineering strategy towards the development of scalable preclinical models of liver stage malaria infection for future applications. PMID:28361899

  10. The abnormal isoform of the prion protein accumulates in late-endosome-like organelles in scrapie-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J E; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Hope, J; Landon, M; Mayer, R J

    1995-08-01

    The prion encephalopathies are characterized by accumulation in the brain of the abnormal form PrPsc of a normal host gene product PrPc. The mechanism and site of formation of PrPsc from PrPc are currently unknown. In this study, ME7 scrapie-infected mouse brain was used to show, both biochemically and by double-labelled immunogold electron microscopy, that proteinase K-resistant PrPsc is enriched in subcellular structures which contain the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, ubiquitin-protein conjugates, beta-glucuronidase, and cathepsin B, termed late endosome-like organelles. The glycosylinositol phospholipid membrane-anchored PrPc will enter such compartment for normal degradation and the organelles may therefore act as chambers for the conversion of PrPc into infectious PrPsc in this murine model of scrapie.

  11. Interferon gamma regulates platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 expression and neutrophil infiltration into herpes simplex virus- infected mouse corneas

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In a mouse model of herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 corneal infection, tissue destruction results from a CD4+ T cell-mediated chronic inflammation, in which interleukin 2 and interferon (IFN) gamma are requisite inflammatory mediators and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are the predominant infiltrating cells. In vivo neutralization of IFN- gamma relieved inflammation at least in part through a specific block of PMN extravasation into HSV-1-infected corneas. Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) 1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) 1 were upregulated on the vascular endothelium of inflamed corneas. Reduced PMN extravasation in anti-IFN-gamma-treated mice was associated with a dramatic reduction of PECAM-1 but not ICAM-1 expression on vascular endothelium. PMN accumulated in the lumen of corneal vessels after in vivo IFN-gamma neutralization. PECAM-1 was readily detectable on PMN inside the vessels but was not detectable on PMN that extravasated into the infected cornea. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis revealed reduced PECAM-1 expression but elevated major histocompatibility complex class I expression on PMN that recently extravasated into the peritoneal cavity when compared with PMN in the peripheral blood. We conclude that IFN-gamma contributes to HSV- 1-induced corneal inflammation by facilitating PMN infiltration; this appears to be accomplished through upregulation of PECAM-1 expression on the vascular endothelium; and PMN downregulate PECAM-1 expression during the process of extravasation. PMID:8879215

  12. Psidium guajava leaf extract prevents intestinal colonization of Citrobacter rodentium in the mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja; Birdi, Tannaz

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are the second highest cause of mortality of children under 5 years worldwide. There is a continuous search for developing a cost-effective treatment for diarrhea as the present ones are facing challenges. Medicinal plants can be explored further as an alternative treatment for diarrhea. Psidium guajava leaves have been used as an antidiarrheal globally. Citrobacter rodentium, a common mouse pathogen, is known to mimic the pathogenecity of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. It can thus present an effective model to study infectious diarrhea. In the present study, the P. guajava leaf extract was tested for its efficacy in treating infectious diarrhea using a C. rodentium mouse model. The mice in the test group (treated with P. guajava leaf extract) showed quicker clearance of infection as compared with the control group. The bacterial load in the fecal sample of the mice in the test group was high on Day 4 as compared with that in the control group, suggesting a flush out of the bacteria. In the test group, 6/7 (85.71%) mice showed clearance of infection by Day 19. The control group continued to show infection till Day 29. P. guajava leaf extract thus has the potential for use in the treatment of infectious diarrhea. PMID:25878465

  13. Ebola Virus Makona Shows Reduced Lethality in an Immune-deficient Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Smither, Sophie J; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn; Phelps, Amanda; Steward, Jackie; Lever, Mark Stephen

    2016-10-15

    Ebola virus Makona (EBOV-Makona; from the 2013-2016 West Africa outbreak) shows decreased virulence in an immune-deficient mouse model, compared with a strain from 1976. Unlike other filoviruses tested, EBOV-Makona may be slightly more virulent by the aerosol route than by the injected route, as 2 mice died following aerosol exposure, compared with no mortality among mice that received intraperitoneal injection of equivalent or higher doses. Although most mice did not succumb to infection, the detection of an immunoglobulin G antibody response along with observed clinical signs suggest that the mice were infected but able to clear the infection and recover. We hypothesize that this may be due to the growth rates and kinetics of the virus, which appear slower than that for other filoviruses and consequently give more time for an immune response that results in clearance of the virus. In this instance, the immune-deficient mouse model is unlikely to be appropriate for testing medical countermeasures against this EBOV-Makona stock but may provide insight into pathogenesis and the immune response to virus.

  14. Quantitative In Vivo Detection of Chlamydia muridarum Associated Inflammation in a Mouse Model Using Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manishkumar; Boddicker, Melissa A.; DeMaula, Christopher; Connolly, Brett; Bednar, Bohumil; Heinrichs, Jon H.; Smith, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted disease with over 1.3 million cases reported to the CDC in 2010. While Chlamydia infection is easily treated with antibiotics, up to 70% of infections are asymptomatic and go untreated. The current mouse model relies on invasive upper genital tract gross pathology readouts at ~60–80 days postinfection. High throughput optical imaging through the use of biomarkers has been successfully used to quickly evaluate several disease processes. Here we evaluate Neutrophil Elastase 680 (Elastase680) for its ability to measure Chlamydia muridarum associated inflammation in live mice using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS). Optical imaging was able to distinguish with statistical significance between vaccinated and nonvaccinated mice as well as mock-challenged and challenged mice 2 weeks after challenge which was 9 weeks sooner than typical gross pathological assessment. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of neutrophils and correlated well with both in vivo and ex vivo imaging. In this report we demonstrate that Elastase680 can be used as a molecular imaging biomarker for inflammation associated with chlamydial infection in a mouse model and that these biomarkers can significantly decrease the time for pathology evaluation and thus increase the rate of therapeutics discovery. PMID:26663988

  15. Mouse Norovirus infection promotes autophagy induction to facilitate replication but prevents final autophagosome maturation

    SciTech Connect

    O’Donnell, Tanya B.; Hyde, Jennifer L.; Mintern, Justine D.; Mackenzie, Jason M.

    2016-05-15

    Autophagy is a cellular process used to eliminate intracellular pathogens. Many viruses however are able to manipulate this cellular process for their own advantage. Here we demonstrate that Mouse Norovirus (MNV) infection induces autophagy but does not appear to utilise the autophagosomal membrane for establishment and formation of the viral replication complex. We have observed that MNV infection results in lipidation and recruitment of LC3 to the autophagosome membrane but prevents subsequent fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, as SQSTM1 (an autophagy receptor) accumulates and Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein1 is sequestered to the MNV replication complex (RC) rather than to autophagosomes. We have additionally observed that chemical modulation of autophagy differentially affects MNV replication. From this study we can conclude that MNV infection induces autophagy, however suppresses the final maturation step of this response, indicating that autophagy induction contributes to MNV replication independently of RC biogenesis. - Highlights: • MNV induces autophagy in infected murine macrophages. • MNV does not utilise autophagosomal membranes for replication. • The MNV-induced autophagosomes do not fuse with lysosomes. • MNV sequesters SQSTM1 to prevent autophagy degradation and turnover. • Chemical modulation of autophagy enhances MNV replication.

  16. Animal models of orthopedic implant infection.

    PubMed

    An, Y H; Friedman, R J

    1998-01-01

    Prosthetic infection following total joint replacement can have catastrophic results both physically and psychologically for patients, leading to complete failure of the arthroplasty, possible amputation, prolonged hospitalization, and even death. Although with the use of prophylactic antibiotics and greatly improved operating room techniques the infection rate has decreased markedly during the years, challenges still remain for better preventive and therapeutic measures. In this review the in vivo experimental methods for studies of prosthetic infection are discussed, concentrating on (1) the animal models that have been established and the use of these animal models for studies of pathogenesis of bacteria, behavior of biofilm, effect of biomaterials on prosthetic infection rate, and the effect of infection on biomaterial surfaces, and (2) how to design and conduct an animal model of orthopedic prosthetic infection including animal selection, implant fabrication, bacterial inoculation, surgical technique, and the methods for evaluating the results.

  17. [THE USE OF THE MODEL MOUSE ICR--VARIOLA VIRUS FOR EVALUATION OF ANTIVIRAL DRUG EFFICACY].

    PubMed

    Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Shishkina, L N; Zamedyanskaya, A S; Nesterov, A E; Glotov, A G; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Mice of the ICR outbred population were infected intranasally (i/n) with the variola virus (VARV, strain Ind-3a). Clinical signs of the disease did not appear even at the maximum possible dose of the virus 5.2 lg PFU/head (plaque-forming units per head). In this case, 50% infective dose (ID50) of VARV estimated by the presence or absence of the virus in the lungs three days after infection (p.i.) was equal to 2.7 ± 0.4 lg PFU/head. Taking into account the 10% application of the virus in the lungs during the intranasal infection of the mice, it was adequate to 1.7 lg PFU/lungs. This indicates a high infectivity of the VARV for mice comparable to its infectivity for humans. After the i/n infection of mice with the VARV at a dose 30 ID50/ head the highest concentration of the virus detected in the lungs (4.9 ± 0.0 lg PFU/ml of homogenate) and in nasal cavity tissues (4.8 ± 0.0 lg PFU/ml) were observed. The pathomorphological changes in the respiratory organs of the mice infected with the VARV appeared at 3-5 days p.i., and the VARV reproduction noted in the epithelial cells and macrophages were noticed. When the preparations ST-246 and NIOCH-14 were administered orally at a dose of 60 μg/g of mouse weight up to one day before infection, after 2 hours, 1 and 2 days p.i., the VARV reproduction in the lungs after 3 days p.i. decreased by an order of magnitude. Thus, outbred ICR mice infected with the VARV can be used as a laboratory model of the smallpox when evaluating the therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of the antismallpox drugs.

  18. Humanized mouse as an appropriate model for accelerated global HIV research and vaccine development: current trend.

    PubMed

    Ibeh, Bartholomew Okechukwu; Furuta, Yasuhide; Habu, Josiah Bitrus; Ogbadu, Lucy

    2016-09-23

    Humanized mouse models currently have seen improved development and have received wide applications. Its usefulness is observed in cell and tissue transplant involving basic and applied human disease research. In this article, the development of a new generation of humanized mice was discussed as well as their relevant application in HIV disease. Furthermore, current techniques employed to overcome the initial limitations of mouse model were reviewed. Highly immunodeficient mice which support cell and tissue differentiation and do not reject xenografts are indispensable for generating additional appropriate models useful in disease study, this phenomenom deserves emphases, scientific highlight and a definitive research focus. Since the early 2000s, a series of immunodeficient mice appropriate for generating humanized mice has been successively developed by introducing the IL-2Rγ(null) gene (e.g. NOD/SCID/γc(null) and Rag2(null)γc(null) mice) through various genomic approaches. These mice were generated by genetically introducing human cytokine genes into NOD/SCID/γc(null) and Rag2(null)γc(null) mouse backgrounds. The application of these techniques serves as a quick and appropriate mechanistic model for basic and therapeutic investigations of known and emerging infections.

  19. Visualization of a neurotropic flavivirus infection in mouse reveals unique viscerotropism controlled by host type I interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Dan; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Dong, Hao-Long; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Ye, Qing; Ye, Han-Qing; Huang, Xing-Yao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Flavivirus includes a large group of human pathogens with medical importance. Especially, neurotropic flaviviruses capable of invading central and peripheral nervous system, e.g. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Zika virus (ZIKV), are highly pathogenic to human and constitute major global health problems. However, the dynamic dissemination and pathogenesis of neurotropic flavivirus infections remain largely unknown. Here, using JEV as a model, we rationally designed and constructed a recombinant reporter virus that stably expressed Renilla luciferase (Rluc). The resulting JEV reporter virus (named Rluc-JEV) and parental JEV exhibited similar replication and infection characteristics, and the magnitude of Rluc activity correlated well with progeny viral production in vitro and in vivo. By using in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) technology, we dissected the replication and dissemination dynamics of JEV infection in mice upon different inoculation routes. Interestingly, besides replicating in mouse brain, Rluc-JEV predominantly invaded the abdominal organs in mice with typical viscerotropism. Further tests in mice deficient in type I interferon (IFN) receptors demonstrated robust and prolonged viral replication in the intestine, spleen, liver, kidney and other abdominal organs. Combined with histopathological and immunohistochemical results, the host type I IFN signaling was evidenced as the major barrier to the viscerotropism and pathogenicity of this neurotropic flavivirus. Additionally, the Rluc-JEV platform was readily adapted for efficacy assay of known antiviral compounds and a live JE vaccine. Collectively, our study revealed abdominal organs as important targets of JEV infection in mice and profiled the unique viscerotropism trait controlled by the host type I IFN signaling. This in vivo visualization technology described here provides a powerful tool for testing antiviral agents and vaccine candidates for flaviviral infection. PMID:28382163

  20. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  1. Dissecting Alzheimer disease in Down syndrome using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Xun Yu; Tosh, Justin L.; Pulford, Laura J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a common genetic condition caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). This greatly increases the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but although virtually all people with DS have AD neuropathology by 40 years of age, not all develop dementia. To dissect the genetic contribution of trisomy 21 to DS phenotypes including those relevant to AD, a range of DS mouse models has been generated which are trisomic for chromosome segments syntenic to human chromosome 21. Here, we consider key characteristics of human AD in DS (AD-DS), and our current state of knowledge on related phenotypes in AD and DS mouse models. We go on to review important features needed in future models of AD-DS, to understand this type of dementia and so highlight pathogenic mechanisms relevant to all populations at risk of AD. PMID:26528151

  2. Mouse models of ciliopathies: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Norris, Dominic P; Grimes, Daniel T

    2012-05-01

    The ciliopathies are an apparently disparate group of human diseases that all result from defects in the formation and/or function of cilia. They include disorders such as Meckel-Grüber syndrome (MKS), Joubert syndrome (JBTS), Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Alström syndrome (ALS). Reflecting the manifold requirements for cilia in signalling, sensation and motility, different ciliopathies exhibit common elements. The mouse has been used widely as a model organism for the study of ciliopathies. Although many mutant alleles have proved lethal, continued investigations have led to the development of better models. Here, we review current mouse models of a core set of ciliopathies, their utility and future prospects.

  3. Psoriasis: what we have learned from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Erwin F; Schonthaler, Helia B; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Tschachler, Erwin

    2010-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology, for which there is no cure. This heterogeneous, cutaneous, inflammatory disorder is clinically characterized by prominent epidermal hyperplasia and a distinct inflammatory infiltrate. Crosstalk between immunocytes and keratinocytes, which results in the production of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, is thought to mediate the disease. Given that psoriasis is only observed in humans, numerous genetic approaches to model the disease in mice have been undertaken. In this Review, we describe and critically assess the mouse models and transplantation experiments that have contributed to the discovery of novel disease-relevant pathways in psoriasis. Research performed using improved mouse models, combined with studies employing human cells, xenografts and patient material, will be key to our understanding of why such distinctive patterns of inflammation develop in patients with psoriasis. Indeed, a combination of genetic and immunological investigations will be necessary to develop both improved drugs for the treatment of psoriasis and novel curative strategies.

  4. The Aspergillus fumigatus pkcA G579R Mutant Is Defective in the Activation of the Cell Wall Integrity Pathway but Is Dispensable for Virulence in a Neutropenic Mouse Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Marina Campos; Godoy, Krissia Franco de; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Hori, Juliana Issa; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Brown, Neil Andrew; Cunha, Anderson Ferreira da; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Malavazi, Iran

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which causes the life-threatening disease, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. In fungi, cell wall homeostasis is controlled by the conserved Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) pathway. In A. fumigatus this signaling cascade is partially characterized, but the mechanisms by which it is activated are not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PkcA) in this signaling cascade. Our results suggest that pkcA is an essential gene and is activated in response to cell wall stress. Subsequently, we constructed and analyzed a non-essential A. fumigatus pkcAG579R mutant, carrying a Gly579Arg substitution in the PkcA C1B regulatory domain. The pkcAG579R mutation has a reduced activation of the downstream Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, MpkA, resulting in the altered expression of genes encoding cell wall-related proteins, markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, PkcAG579R is involved in the formation of proper conidial architecture and protection to oxidative damage. The pkcAG579R mutant elicits increased production of TNF-α and phagocytosis but it has no impact on virulence in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results highlight the importance of PkcA to the CWI pathway but also indicated that additional regulatory circuits may be involved in the biosynthesis and/or reinforcement of the A. fumigatus cell wall during infection.

  5. The Aspergillus fumigatus pkcAG579R Mutant Is Defective in the Activation of the Cell Wall Integrity Pathway but Is Dispensable for Virulence in a Neutropenic Mouse Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marina Campos; de Godoy, Krissia Franco; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Hori, Juliana Issa; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Brown, Neil Andrew; da Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Malavazi, Iran

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which causes the life-threatening disease, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. In fungi, cell wall homeostasis is controlled by the conserved Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) pathway. In A. fumigatus this signaling cascade is partially characterized, but the mechanisms by which it is activated are not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PkcA) in this signaling cascade. Our results suggest that pkcA is an essential gene and is activated in response to cell wall stress. Subsequently, we constructed and analyzed a non-essential A. fumigatus pkcAG579R mutant, carrying a Gly579Arg substitution in the PkcA C1B regulatory domain. The pkcAG579R mutation has a reduced activation of the downstream Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, MpkA, resulting in the altered expression of genes encoding cell wall-related proteins, markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, PkcAG579R is involved in the formation of proper conidial architecture and protection to oxidative damage. The pkcAG579R mutant elicits increased production of TNF-α and phagocytosis but it has no impact on virulence in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results highlight the importance of PkcA to the CWI pathway but also indicated that additional regulatory circuits may be involved in the biosynthesis and/or reinforcement of the A. fumigatus cell wall during infection. PMID:26295576

  6. The Aspergillus fumigatus transcriptional regulator AfYap1 represents the major regulator for defense against reactive oxygen intermediates but is dispensable for pathogenicity in an intranasal mouse infection model.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Franziska; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Wozniok, Iwona; Loeffler, Juergen; Kurzai, Oliver; Haertl, Albert; Brakhage, Axel A

    2007-12-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils kill the airborne fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. The dependency of this killing process on reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) has been strongly suggested. Therefore, we investigated the enzymatic ROI detoxifying system by proteome analysis of A. fumigatus challenged by H(2)O(2). Since many of the identified proteins and genes are apparently regulated by a putative Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yap1 homolog, the corresponding gene of A. fumigatus was identified and designated Afyap1. Nuclear localization of a functional AfYap1-eGFP fusion was stress dependent. Deletion of the Afyap1 gene led to drastically increased sensitivity of the deletion mutant against H(2)O(2) and menadione, but not against diamide and NO radicals. Proteome analysis of the DeltaAfyap1 mutant strain challenged with 2 mM H(2)O(2) indicated that 29 proteins are controlled directly or indirectly by AfYap1, including catalase 2. Despite its importance for defense against reactive agents, the Afyap1 deletion mutant did not show attenuated virulence in a murine model of Aspergillus infection. These data challenge the hypothesis that ROI such as superoxide anions and peroxides play a direct role in killing of A. fumigatus in an immunocompromised host. This conclusion was further supported by the finding that killing of A. fumigatus wild-type and DeltaAfyap1 mutant germlings by human neutrophilic granulocytes worked equally well irrespective of whether the ROI scavenger glutathione or an NADPH-oxidase inhibitor was added to the cells.

  7. Limited susceptibility of three different mouse (Mus musculus) lines to Porcine circovirus-2 infection and associated lesions

    PubMed Central

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Patterson, Abby R.; Jones, Douglas E.; Juhan, Nicole M.; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Halbur, Patrick G.

    2009-01-01

    Porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD), a major global problem for pork producers, is characterized microscopically by depletion and histiocytic replacement of follicles in the lymphoid tissues. The objectives of this study were to determine 1) if Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV-2) inoculated mice (Mus musculus) can develop PCV-2 associated lymphoid lesions and serve as a model for PCVAD, and 2) if differences in PCV-2 host susceptibility exist among mice lines. Three groups (n = 48/group) of 4-wk-old male mice were used: BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H/HeJ. A 2 × 2 factorial analysis was designed for each group using PCV-2 inoculation and keyhole limpet hemocyanin in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant injections on day 0 and 7 as factors. Necropsies were performed on days 12, 17, 22, 27, 32, and 37. Serum samples collected at each necropsy tested negative for anti-IgG PCV-2 antibodies in all mice at all time points by 2 different PCV-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The PCV-2 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 93% (100/108) of tissues and 42.6% (46/108) of serum samples from PCV-2-inoculated mice from days 12 to 37. Microscopic lesions consistent with PCV-2 infection were not observed in any mice and PCV-2 DNA and PCV-2 antigen were not detected in tissues by in-situ-hybridization or immunohistochemistry assays, respectively. Based on incidence of PCV-2 DNA in serum samples, the C57BL/6 mouse line was more resistant to PCV-2 infection than the other lines. The results indicate the mouse model likely has limited utility to advance understanding of the pathogenesis of PCV-2 associated lesions, but mice could potentially be important in the epidemiology of PCV-2. PMID:19436587

  8. Chemically induced mouse models of intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Weigmann, Benno; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Animal models of intestinal inflammation are indispensable for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease in humans. Here, we provide protocols for establishing murine 2,4,6-trinitro benzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-, oxazolone- and both acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis, the most widely used chemically induced models of intestinal inflammation. In the former two models, colitis is induced by intrarectal administration of the covalently reactive reagents TNBS/oxazolone, which are believed to induce a T-cell-mediated response against hapten-modified autologous proteins/luminal antigens. In the DSS model, mice are subjected several days to drinking water supplemented with DSS, which seems to be directly toxic to colonic epithelial cells of the basal crypts. The procedures for the hapten models of colitis and acute DSS colitis can be accomplished in about 2 weeks but the protocol for chronic DSS colitis takes about 2 months.

  9. Behavioral phenotyping of mouse models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tonya N.; Greene, James G.; Miller, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative movement disorder afflicting millions of people in the United States. The advent of transgenic technologies has contributed to the development of several new mouse models, many of which recapitulate some aspects of the disease; however, no model has been demonstrated to faithfully reproduce the full constellation of symptoms seen in human PD. This may be due in part to the narrow focus on the dopamine-mediated motor deficits. As current research continues to unmask PD as a multi-system disorder, animal models should similarly evolve to include the non-motor features of the disease. This requires that typically cited behavioral test batteries be expanded. The major non-motor symptoms observed in PD patients include hyposmia, sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal dysfunction, autonomic dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and cognitive decline. Mouse behavioral tests exist for all of these symptoms and while some models have begun to be reassessed for the prevalence of this broader behavioral phenotype, the majority has not. Moreover, all behavioral paradigms should be tested for their responsiveness to L-DOPA so these data can be compared to patient response and help elucidate which symptoms are likely not dopamine-mediated. Here, we suggest an extensive, yet feasible, battery of behavioral tests for mouse models of PD aimed to better assess both non-motor and motor deficits associated with the disease. PMID:20211655

  10. Mouse models and aging: longevity and progeria.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Yu; Kennedy, Brian K

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex, multifactorial process that is likely influenced by the activities of a range of biological pathways. Genetic approaches to identify genes modulating longevity have been highly successful and recent efforts have extended these studies to mammalian aging. A variety of genetic models have been reported to have enhanced lifespan and, similarly, many genetic interventions lead to progeroid phenotypes. Here, we detail and evaluate both sets of models, focusing on the insights they provide about the molecular processes modulating aging and the extent to which mutations conferring progeroid pathologies really phenocopy accelerated aging.

  11. Phage Therapy Is Effective in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Equine Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Takaaki; Hiyashimizu, Yutaro; Matsubara, Kazuki; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Nagahata, Hajime; Niwa, Hidekazu; Katayama, Yoshinari; Kinoshita, Yuta; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Tanji, Yasunori; Yokota, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial keratitis of the horse is mainly caused by staphylococci, streptococci, and pseudomonads. Of these bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa sometimes causes rapid corneal corruption and, in some cases, blindness. Antimicrobial resistance can make treatment very difficult. Therefore, new strategies to control bacterial infection are required. A bacteriophage (phage) is a virus that specifically infects and kills bacteria. Since phage often can lyse antibiotic-resistant bacteria because the killing mechanism is different, we examined the use of phage to treat horse bacterial keratitis. We isolated Myoviridae or Podoviridae phages, which together have a broad host range. They adsorb efficiently to host bacteria; more than 80% of the ΦR18 phage were adsorbed to host cells after 30 s. In our keratitis mouse model, the administration of phage within 3 h also could kill bacteria and suppress keratitis. A phage multiplicity of infection of 100 times the host bacterial number could kill host bacteria effectively. A cocktail of two phages suppressed bacteria in the keratitis model mouse. These data demonstrated that the phages in this study could completely prevent the keratitis caused by P. aeruginosa in a keratitis mouse model. Furthermore, these results suggest that phage may be a more effective prophylaxis for horse keratitis than the current preventive use of antibiotics. Such treatment may reduce the use of antibiotics and therefore antibiotic resistance. Further studies are required to assess phage therapy as a candidate for treatment of horse keratitis. IMPORTANCE Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging all over the world. Bacteriophages have great potential for resolution of this problem. A bacteriophage, or phage, is a virus that infects bacteria specifically. As a novel therapeutic strategy against racehorse keratitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we propose the application of phages for treatment. Phages isolated in this work had in vitro

  12. VSVΔG/EBOV GP-induced innate protection enhances natural killer cell activity to increase survival in a lethal mouse adapted Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kinola J N; Qiu, Xiangguo; Fernando, Lisa; Jones, Steven M; Alimonti, Judie B

    2015-02-01

    Members of the species Zaire ebolavirus cause severe hemorrhagic fever with up to a 90% mortality rate in humans. The VSVΔG/EBOV GP vaccine has provided 100% protection in the mouse, guinea pig, and nonhuman primate (NHP) models, and has also been utilized as a post-exposure therapeutic to protect mice, guinea pigs, and NHPs from a lethal challenge of Ebola virus (EBOV). EBOV infection causes rapid mortality in human and animal models, with death occurring as early as 6 days after infection, suggesting a vital role for the innate immune system to control the infection before cells of the adaptive immune system can assume control. Natural killer (NK) cells are the predominant cell of the innate immune response, which has been shown to expand with VSVΔG/EBOV GP treatment. In the current study, an in vivo mouse model of the VSVΔG/EBOV GP post-exposure treatment was used for a mouse adapted (MA)-EBOV infection, to determine the putative VSVΔG/EBOV GP-induced protective mechanism of NK cells. NK depletion studies demonstrated that mice with NK cells survive longer in a MA-EBOV infection, which is further enhanced with VSVΔG/EBOV GP treatment. NK cell mediated cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion was significantly higher with VSVΔG/EBOV GP treatment. Cell mediated cytotoxicity assays and perforin knockout mice experiments suggest that there are perforin-dependent and -independent mechanisms involved. Together, these data suggest that NK cells play an important role in VSVΔG/EBOV GP-induced protection of EBOV by increasing NK cytotoxicity, and IFN-γ secretion.

  13. Insights into mast cell functions in asthma using mouse models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ying; Gregory, Joshua A; Nilsson, Gunnar P; Adner, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    Therapeutics targeting specific mechanisms of asthma have shown promising results in mouse models of asthma. However, these successes have not transferred well to the clinic or to the treatment of asthma sufferers. We suggest a reason for this incongruity is that mast cell-dependent responses, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of both atopic and non-atopic asthma, are not a key component in most of the current asthma mouse models. Two reasons for this are that wild type mice have, in contrast to humans, a negligible number of mast cells localized in the smaller airways and in the parenchyma, and that only specific protocols show mast cell-dependent reactions. The development of mast cell-deficient mice and the reconstitution of mast cells within these mice have opened up the possibility to generate mouse models of asthma with a marked role of mast cells. In addition, mast cell-deficient mice engrafted with mast cells have a distribution of mast cells more similar to humans. In this article we review and highlight the mast cell-dependent and -independent responses with respect to airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in asthma models using mast cell-deficient and mast cell-engrafted mice.

  14. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  15. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation