Science.gov

Sample records for mouse liver tumors

  1. Mechanistic Investigation of Toxaphene Induced Mouse Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zemin; Neal, Barbara H; Lamb, James C; Klaunig, James E

    2015-10-01

    Chronic exposure to toxaphene resulted in an increase in liver tumors in B6C3F1 mice. This study was performed to investigate the mode of action of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors. Following an initial 14 day dietary dose range-finding study in male mice, a mechanistic study (0, 3, 32, and 320 ppm toxaphene in diet for 7, 14, and 28 days of treatment) was performed to examine the potential mechanisms of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors. Toxaphene induced a significant increase in expression of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) target genes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11) at 32 and 320 ppm toxaphene. aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) target genes (Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2) were slightly increased in expression at the highest toxaphene dose (320 ppm). No increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activity or related genes was seen following toxaphene treatment. Lipid peroxidation was seen following treatment with 320 ppm toxaphene. These changes correlated with increases in hepatic DNA synthesis. To confirm the role of CAR in this mode of action, CAR knockout mice (CAR(-/-)) treated with toxaphene confirmed that the induction of CAR responsive genes seen in wild-type mice was abolished following treatment with toxaphene for 14 days. These findings, taken together with previously reported studies, support the mode of action of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors is through a nongenotoxic mechanism involving primarily a CAR-mediated processes that results in an increase in cell proliferation in the liver, promotes the clonal expansion of preneoplastic lesions leading to adenoma formation.

  2. Nuclear receptor CAR-regulated expression of the FAM84A gene during the development of mouse liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Saito, Kosuke; Takizawa, Daichi; Kakizaki, Satoru; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2011-06-01

    The nuclear xenobiotic receptor CAR is a phenobarbital (PB)-activated transcription factor. Using a mouse model of two-step liver tumorigenesis, in which tumor growth was initiated by diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) and promoted by chronic treatment with PB, we previously demonstrated that tumors developed only in the presence of CAR. Here, we have identified the FAM84A (family with sequence similarity 84, member A) gene as a CAR-regulated gene that is over-expressed during development of phenobarbital-promoted mouse liver tumors. FAM84A mRNA was induced in the liver of DEN/PB-treated mice prior to the development of liver tumors and this induction continued in the non-tumor as well as tumor tissues of a tumor-bearing liver. Western blotting demonstated that FAM84A protein expression increased in mouse liver after PB treatment; however, the FAM84A protein in liver and liver tumors was not phosphorylated at the serine 38 residue, which has been reported to correlate with morphological changes in cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed the cytoplasmic localization of FAM84A protein and its expression during tumor development in normal tissues (especially in hepatocytes around the central vein), eosinophilic foci, adenomas and carcinomas. HepG2 cell-based reporter assays indicated that CAR activated the FAM84A promoter. Exogenous over-expression of FAM84A in HepG2 cells resulted in increased cell migration. The physiological function of FAM84A remains unknown, but our results suggest that FAM84A is up-regulated by CAR during the development of liver tumors, and may play an important role in the progression of liver cancer by increasing cell migration.

  3. Thiamethoxam induced mouse liver tumors and their relevance to humans. Part 2: species differences in response.

    PubMed

    Green, Trevor; Toghill, Alison; Lee, Robert; Waechter, Felix; Weber, Edgar; Peffer, Richard; Noakes, James; Robinson, Mervyn

    2005-07-01

    Thiamethoxam is a neonicotinoid insecticide that is not a mutagen, but it did cause a significant increase in liver cancer in mice, but not rats, in chronic dietary feeding studies. Previous studies in mice have characterized a carcinogenicity mode of action that involved depletion of plasma cholesterol, cell death, both as single cell necrosis and as apoptosis, and sustained increases in cell replication rates. In a study reported in this article, female rats have been exposed to thiamethoxam in their diet at concentrations of 0, 1000, and 3000 ppm for 50 weeks, a study design directly comparable to the mouse study in which the mode of action changes were characterized. In rats, thiamethoxam had no adverse effects on either the biochemistry or histopathology of the liver at any time point during the study. Cell replication rates were not increased, in fact they were significantly decreased at several time points. The lack of effect on the rat liver is entirely consistent with the lack of liver tumor formation in the two-year cancer bioassay. Comparisons of the metabolism of thiamethoxam in rats and mice have shown that concentrations of the parent chemical were either similar or higher in rat blood than in mouse blood in both single dose and the dietary studies strongly indicating that thiamethoxam itself is unlikely to play a role in the development of liver tumors. In contrast, the concentrations of the two metabolites, CGA265307 and CGA330050, shown to play a role in the development of liver damage in the mouse, were 140- (CGA265307) and 15- (CGA330050) fold lower in rats than in mice following either a single oral dose, or dietary administration of thiamethoxam for up to 50 weeks. Comparisons of the major metabolic pathways of thiamethoxam in vitro using mouse, rat, and human liver fractions have shown that metabolic rates in humans are lower than those in the rat suggesting that thiamethoxam is unlikely to pose a hazard to humans exposed to this chemical at

  4. Case study: weight of evidence evaluation of the human health relevance of thiamethoxam-related mouse liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Pastoor, Timothy; Rose, Patrick; Lloyd, Sara; Peffer, Richard; Green, Trevor

    2005-07-01

    Thiamethoxam (CGA293343; 3-(2-chloro-thiazol-5-ylmethyl)-5-methyl-[1,3,5]oxadiazinan-4-ylidene-N-nitroamine) was shown to increase the incidence of mouse liver tumors in an 18-month study; however, thiamethoxam was not hepatocarcinogenic in rats. Thiamethoxam is not genotoxic, and, given the late life generation of mouse liver tumors, suggests a time-related progression of key hepatic events that leads to the tumors. These key events were identified in a series of studies of up to 50 weeks that showed the time-dependent evolution of relatively mild liver dysfunction within 10 weeks of dosing, followed by frank signs of hepatotoxicity after 20 weeks, leading to cellular attrition and regenerative hyperplasia. A metabolite, CGA330050, was identified as generating the mild hepatic toxicity, and another metabolite, CGA265307, exacerbated the initial toxicity by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. This combination of metabolite-generated hepatotoxicity and increase in cell replication rates is postulated as the mode of action for thiamethoxam-related mouse liver tumors. The relevance of these mouse-specific tumors to human health was assessed by using the framework and decision logic developed by ILSI-RSI. The postulated mode of action was tested against the Hill criteria and found to fulfill the comprehensive requirements of strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, dose-response, and the collective criteria of being a plausible mode of action that fits with known and similar modes of action. Whereas the postulated mode of action could theoretically operate in human liver, quantitation of the key metabolites in vivo and in vitro showed that mice, but not rats or humans, generate sufficient amounts of these metabolites to initiate the hepatic toxicity and consequent tumors. Indeed, rats fed 3000 ppm thiamethoxam for a lifetime did not develop hepatotoxicity or tumors. In conclusion, the coherence and extent of the database clearly demonstrates the mode of

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-10-13

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis.

  6. Involvement of Mouse Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Acifluorfen-Induced Liver Injury and Subsequent Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Kazunori; Inoue, Kaoru; Ichimura, Ryohei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Shibutani, Makoto; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-06-01

    Acifluorfen (ACI), a protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PROTOX) inhibitor herbicide, promotes the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), and induces tumors in the rodent liver. Porphyria is a risk factor for liver tumors in humans; however, the specific mechanisms through which ACI induces hepatocarcinogenesis in rodents are unclear. Here, we investigated the mode of action of ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, focusing on constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), which is essential for the development of rodent liver tumors in response to certain cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B inducers. Dietary treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for up to 13 weeks increased Cyp2b10 expression in the livers of wild-type (WT) mice, but not in CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice. Microscopically, ACI treatment-induced cytotoxic changes, including hepatocellular necrosis and inflammation, and caused regenerative changes accompanied by prolonged increases in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive hepatocytes in WT mice. In contrast, these cytotoxic and regenerative changes in hepatocytes were significantly attenuated, but still observed, in CARKO mice. ACI treatment also increased liver PPIX levels similarly in both genotypes; however, no morphological evidence of porphyrin deposition was found in hepatocytes from either genotype. Treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for 26 weeks after initiation with diethylnitrosamine increased the incidence and multiplicities of altered foci and adenomas in hepatocytes from WT mice; these effects were significantly reduced in CARKO mice. These results indicated that prolonged cytotoxicity in the liver was a key factor for ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and that CAR played an important role in ACI-induced liver injury and tumor development in mice.

  7. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is dispensable for virus-mediated liver and skin tumor development in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tung; Xu, Jianliang; Chikuma, Shunsuke; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Pfister, Herbert; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-07-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) not only promotes immune diversity by initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes but also provokes genomic instability by introducing translocations and mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes. To test whether AID is essential for virus-induced tumor development, we used two transgenic tumor models: mice expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) core proteins (HCV-Tg), driven by the hepatitis B virus promoter, and mice expressing human papillomavirus type 8 proteins (HPV8-Tg), driven by the Keratin 14 promoter. Both strains were analyzed in the absence and presence of AID by crossing each with AID (-/-) mice. There was no difference in the liver tumor frequency between the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) and HCV-Tg/AID (-/-) mice at 20 months of age although the AID (+/+) mice showed more severe histological findings and increased cytokine expression. Furthermore, a low level of AID transcript was detected in the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) liver tissue that was not derived from hepatocytes themselves but from intra-hepatic immune cells. Although AID may not be the direct cause of HCV-induced oncogenesis, AID expressed in B cells, not in hepatocytes, may prolong steatosis and cause increased lymphocyte infiltration into HCV core protein-induced liver lesions. Similarly, there was no difference in the time course of skin tumor development between the HPV8-Tg/AID (-/-) and HPV8-Tg/AID (+/+) groups. In conclusion, AID does not appear to be required for tumor development in the two virus-induced tumor mouse models tested although AID expressed in infiltrating B cells may promote inflammatory reactions in HCV core protein-induced liver pathogenesis.

  8. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Liver Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Liver Tumors Print A A A What's in this ... Malignant (Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  9. Thiamethoxam induced mouse liver tumors and their relevance to humans. Part 1: mode of action studies in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Green, Trevor; Toghill, Alison; Lee, Robert; Waechter, Felix; Weber, Edgar; Noakes, James

    2005-07-01

    Thiamethoxam, a neonicotinoid insecticide, which is not mutagenic either in vitro or in vivo, caused an increased incidence of liver tumors in mice when fed in the diet for 18 months at concentrations in the range 500 to 2500 ppm. A number of dietary studies of up to 50 weeks duration have been conducted in order to identify the mode of action for the development of the liver tumors seen at the end of the cancer bioassay. Both thiamethoxam and its major metabolites have been tested in these studies. Over the duration of a 50-week thiamethoxam dietary feeding study in mice, the earliest change, within one week, is a marked reduction (by up to 40%) in plasma cholesterol. This was followed 10 weeks later by evidence of liver toxicity including single cell necrosis and an increase in apoptosis. After 20 weeks there was a significant increase in hepatic cell replication rates. All of these changes persisted from the time they were first observed until the end of the study at 50 weeks. They occurred in a dose-dependent manner and were only observed at doses (500, 1250, 2500 ppm) where liver tumors were increased in the cancer bioassay. There was a clear no-effect level of 200 ppm. The changes seen in this study are consistent with the development of liver cancer in mice and form the basis of the mode of action. When the major metabolites of thiamethoxam, CGA322704, CGA265307, and CGA330050 were tested in dietary feeding studies of up to 20 weeks duration, only metabolite CGA330050 induced the same changes as those seen in the liver in the thiamethoxam feeding study. It was concluded that thiamethoxam is hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic as a result of its metabolism to CGA330050. Metabolite CGA265307 was also shown to be an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase and to increase the hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride. It is proposed that CGA265307, through its effects on nitric oxide synthase, exacerbates the toxicity of CGA330050 in thiamethoxam treated mice.

  10. Different Efficiency of Liposomal Forms with Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Antitumor Agents in Relation to Solid Transplants of Mouse Tumor and Its Metastases in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Popova, N A; Kaledin, V I; Nikolin, V P; Bogdanova, L A; Morozkova, T S; Tornuev, Yu V

    2016-10-01

    Experiments were performed on the model of transplanted mouse tumor with high incidence of liver metastases. Hydrophilic drug cycloplatam (injected intravenously in liposomes) was more potent than "free cycloplatam" (injected intravenously or intraperitoneally in physiological saline) in inhibiting the growth of natural and experimental metastases in the liver. By contrast, liposomal cycloplatam had lower efficiency than free cycloplatam in suppressing the growth of solid tumor. Liposomal and free cortifen (hydrophobic hormonal cytostatic) produced nearly the same effects on solid tumor growth. Our results suggest that liposomal forms of hydrophobic compounds producing nonselective effect on tumor cells (e.g., actinomycin D or Cosmegen), should not have advantages over free forms.

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  12. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS INDUCED BY DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) - EXPLORATION OF THE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based mathematical model for the induction of liver tumors in mice by dichloroacetic acid (DCA) has been developed from histopathologic analysis of the livers of exposed mice. This analysis suggests that following chronic exposure to DCA, carcinomas can arise dire...

  13. Development of Short-term Molecular Thresholds to Predict Long-term Mouse Liver Tumor Outcomes: Phthalate Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short-term molecular profiles are a central component of strategies to model health effects of environmental chemicals. In this study, a 7 day mouse assay was used to evaluate transcriptomic and proliferative responses in the liver for a hepatocarcinogenic phthalate, di (2-ethylh...

  14. Evaluation of the Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in Mouse Liver Tumor Induction by Trichloroethylene and Metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent and a widespread environmental contaminant. Induction of liver cancer in mice by TCE is thought to be mediated by two metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA), both of which are themselves mouse liver carcinoge...

  15. Activation of H-ras oncogenes in male B6C3F1 mouse liver tumors induced by vinthionine or 2-chloroethyl-methyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Y W; Lee, G H; Liem, A; Miller, J A

    1996-06-01

    Vinthionine (S-vinyl-DL-homocysteine) is hepatocarcinogenic in rats and mice. [Vinyl-14C]vinthionine binds covalently to rat liver DNA, RNA and protein in vivo, but not in vitro. This amino acid is directly mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and TA1535; the mechanism of its metabolic activation in vivo in bacteria and liver is under study. In the present study liver tumors were induced in 12-day-old male B6C3F1 mice by single i.p. injections of vinthionine or the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS). At 10 months the gross tumors were examined for the presence of activated H-ras oncogenes. DNA was isolated from single tumors per mouse from 37 mice treated with vinthionine and from 31 mice treated with CEMS. These DNAs were screened for codon 61 mutations by restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified H-ras gene fragments. Thirty seven of 37 vinthionine-induced hepatomas had H-ras mutations in this codon, which consisted of seven C-->A transversions in the first base, with 29 A-->T transversions and one A-->G transition in the second base. Twenty five of 31 CEMS-induced hepatomas had mutations in the same codon, which consisted of seven C-->A transversions in the first base, with eight A-->T transversions and 10 A-->G transitions in the second base. These mutation spectra are quite different to that noted by others in spontaneous hepatomas in untreated B6C3F1 mice. These data appear to result from the covalent binding of these carcinogens to the liver DNA.

  16. Uncommon liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Hung; Chiu, Nai-Chi; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Kuo, Yu; Yu, Sz-Shian; Weng, Ching-Yao; Liu, Chien-An; Chou, Yi-Hong; Chiou, Yi-You

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Beside hepatocellular carcinoma, metastasis, and cholangiocarcinoma, the imaging findings of other relatively uncommon hepatic lesions are less discussed in the literature. Imaging diagnosis of these lesions is a daily challenge. In this article, we review the imaging characteristics of these neoplasms. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2014, 4746 patients underwent liver biopsy or hepatic surgical resection in our hospital. We reviewed the pathological database retrospectively. Imaging of these lesions was reviewed. Results: Imaging findings of uncommon hepatic lesions vary. We discuss the typical imaging characteristics with literature review. Clinical and pathological correlations are also described. Primary hepatic lymphoma consists only of 1% of the extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and is defined as the one involving only the liver and perihepatic lymph nodes within 6 months after diagnosis. Combined hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinoma (cHCC-CC) shares some overlapping imaging characteristics with both HCC and cholangiocarcinoma because of being an admixture of them. Angiosarcoma is the most common hepatic mesenchymal tumor and is hypervascular in nature. Inflammatory pseudotumor is often heterogeneous on ultrasonography and with enhanced septations and rims in the portovenous phase after contrast medium. Angiomyolipoma (AML) typically presents with macroscopic fat components with low signal on fat-saturated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and presence of drainage vessels. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is thought of as a counterpart to the pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Most of the IPNBs secrete mucin and cause disproportional dilatation of the bile ducts. Mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) contains proteinaceous and colloidal components without ductal communication and characterizes with hyperintensity on T1-weighted imaging. Other extremely rare lesions, including epithelioid

  17. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... producing bile (which helps break down food during digestion), and storing energy in the form of a ... complete blood count , liver function panel , and blood chemistries can show how well the liver and other ...

  18. Benign Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month Personal Story - David Roncori Liver Disease - The Big Picture 13 Ways to a Healthy Liver In the Field Call to Action - Change Tomorrow, Give Today Liver Lowdown Sept 2013 Recovery Month Path to Wellness 5 Facts About Recovery Patient Story In the Field ...

  19. Mesenchymal tumors of the liver.

    PubMed

    Mani, H; Van Thiel, D H

    2001-02-01

    Primary angiosarcoma of the liver accounts for up to 2% of all primary liver tumors and is the second most common primary malignant neoplasm of the liver. Approximately 10 to 20 new cases are diagnosed every year in the United States and the prevalence varies from 0.14 to 0.25 per million. In an autopsy series from Chicago, one hepatic angiosarcoma was noted for every 30 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Effects of Anti-repulsive Guidance Molecule C (RGMc/Hemojuvelin) Antibody on Hepcidin and Iron in Mouse Liver and Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Torti, SV; Lemler, E; Mueller, BK; Popp, A; Torti, FM

    2017-01-01

    Objective Hepcidin is a peptide hormone produced by the liver that regulates systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin is also synthesized by tumors, where it contributes to tumor growth by increasing the tumoral retention of iron. Targeted reduction of hepcidin may therefore be useful in reducing tumor growth. H5F9-AM8 is an antibody in preclinical development for the anemia of chronic disease that reduces hepcidin synthesis by binding to RGMc, a co-receptor involved in the transcriptional induction of hepcidin by BMP6. We explored the ability of H5F9-AM8 to act as an anti-tumor agent. Methods Effects of anti-hemojuvelin antibody on hepcidin synthesis were assessed by qRTPCR in tissue culture and in tumor xenografts and livers of mice treated with H5F9-AM8 or saline. Tumor growth was assessed using caliper measurements. Serum iron was measured colorimetrically and tissue iron was measured using western blotting and inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Results In tissue culture, the anti-hemojuvelin antibody H5F9-AM8 significantly reduced BMP6-stimulated hepcidin synthesis in HepG2 and other cancer cells. In mice, H5F9-AM8 reduced hepcidin in the liver and increased serum iron, total liver iron, and liver ferritin. Although hepcidin in tumors was also significantly decreased, H5F9-AM8 did not reduce tumor iron content, ferritin, or tumor growth. Conclusion Anti-hemojuvelin antibody successfully reduces hepcidin in both tumors and livers but has different effects in these target organs: it reduces iron content and ferritin in the liver, but does not reduce iron content or ferritin in tumors, and does not inhibit tumor growth. These results suggest that despite their ability to induce hepcidin in tumors, the anti-tumor efficacy of systemic, non-targeted hepcidin antagonists may be limited by their ability to simultaneously elevate plasma iron. Tumor-specific hepcidin inhibitors may be required to overcome the limitations of drugs that target the synthesis of both

  1. Primary tumors of the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B. B.; Ukah, F.; Tette, A.; Villaflor, S. G.; Koh, D.; Seton, P.

    1992-01-01

    Primary tumors of the liver that are of clinical significance are rare. Ninety-five percent of such lesions when encountered will be malignant and only 5% will be benign. Malignant primary hepatic lesions represent 2% to 3% of primary cancers encountered in the United States. Hepatocellular carcinoma constitutes 90% of malignant liver primaries in the adult. Seventy-five percent of cases are associated with cirrhosis of the liver and patients with hepatitis B infection have a 33- to 200-fold excess risk for this malignancy. Cholangiocarcinoma represents 5% to 10% of hepatic primary malignancies while hepatoblastoma is distinctly uncommon in adults. Treatment is primarily surgical, and resectability is limited by the presence of cirrhosis and spread of the tumor within and outside of the liver. Of the benign liver tumors, the liver cell adenoma seem to be associated with oral contraception and have a proclivity for intraperitoneal hemorrhage, especially during pregnancy. Focal nodular hyperplasia is a tumor-like condition that also may be associated with oral contraception. This article describes five cases, two of which had quite unique presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:1602511

  2. Electronic State of Sodium trans-[Tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339) in Tumor, Liver and Kidney Tissue of a SW480-bearing Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevic, Amir; Hummer, Alfred A.; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Filipits, Martin; Cibin, Giannantonio; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Rompel, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium complexes are promising candidates for anticancer agents, especially NKP-1339 (sodium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)]), which is on the edge to clinical applications. The anticancer mechanism seems to be tightly linked to the redox chemistry but despite progress in human clinical trials the in vivo Ru oxidation state and the coordination of Ru remains unclear. The Ru-based anticancer drug NKP-1339 was studied applying XANES (Cl K- and Ru L2,3-edges) in tumor, kidney and liver tissue of a SW480 bearing mouse. Based on coordination charge and 3D XANES plots containing a series of model compounds as well as pre-edge analysis of the ligand Cl K-edge it is suggested that NKP-1339 remains in its +III oxidation state after 24 hours and at least one of the four chlorido ligands remain covalently bound to the Ru ion showing a biotransformation from RuIIIN2Cl4 to RuIIIClx(N/O)6‑x (X = 1 or 2).

  3. Electronic State of Sodium trans-[Tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339) in Tumor, Liver and Kidney Tissue of a SW480-bearing Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blazevic, Amir; Hummer, Alfred A.; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Filipits, Martin; Cibin, Giannantonio; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Rompel, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Ruthenium complexes are promising candidates for anticancer agents, especially NKP-1339 (sodium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)]), which is on the edge to clinical applications. The anticancer mechanism seems to be tightly linked to the redox chemistry but despite progress in human clinical trials the in vivo Ru oxidation state and the coordination of Ru remains unclear. The Ru-based anticancer drug NKP-1339 was studied applying XANES (Cl K- and Ru L2,3-edges) in tumor, kidney and liver tissue of a SW480 bearing mouse. Based on coordination charge and 3D XANES plots containing a series of model compounds as well as pre-edge analysis of the ligand Cl K-edge it is suggested that NKP-1339 remains in its +III oxidation state after 24 hours and at least one of the four chlorido ligands remain covalently bound to the Ru ion showing a biotransformation from RuIIIN2Cl4 to RuIIIClx(N/O)6−x (X = 1 or 2). PMID:28112202

  4. Adjuvant treatment with tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R reduces recurrence and increases survival after liver metastasis resection in an orthotopic nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-12-08

    Colon cancer liver metastasis is often the lethal aspect of this disease. Well-isolated metastases are candidates for surgical resection, but recurrence is common. Better adjuvant treatment is therefore needed to reduce or prevent recurrence. In the present study, HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used to establish liver metastases in nude mice. Mice with a single liver metastasis were randomized into bright-light surgery (BLS) or the combination of BLS and adjuvant treatment with tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R. Residual tumor fluorescence after BLS was clearly visualized at high magnification by fluorescence imaging. Adjuvant treatment with S. typhimurium A1-R was highly effective to increase survival and disease-free survival after BLS of liver metastasis. The results suggest the future clinical potential of adjuvant S. typhimurium A1-R treatment after liver metastasis resection.

  5. Mouse models of adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Hung, Holly A.; Lerario, Antonio M.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of the organogenesis, homeostasis, and tumorigenesis of the adrenal cortex has been the subject of intense study for many decades. Specifically, characterization of tumor predisposition syndromes with adrenocortical manifestations and molecular profiling of sporadic adrenocortical tumors have led to the discovery of key molecular pathways that promote pathological adrenal growth. However, given the observational nature of such studies, several important questions regarding the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors have remained. This review will summarize naturally occurring and genetically engineered mouse models that have provided novel tools to explore the molecular and cellular underpinnings of adrenocortical tumors. New paradigms of cancer initiation, maintenance, and progression that have emerged from this work will be discussed. PMID:26678830

  6. Liver tumor ablation: percutaneous and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Padma, Srikanth; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2009-12-15

    The global incidence of liver cancer is greater than a million cases a year. Surgical resection where applicable is still the standard of care for these patients. Various liver-directed regional therapies have been developed in an effort to treat the vast majority of unresectable liver tumors. This article reviews the principles behind various ablation therapies currently available for malignant liver tumors and their outcomes.

  7. A potential microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants of conazole tumor...

  8. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  9. Biological and tumor-promoting effects of dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in mouse liver after single or combined treatment.

    PubMed

    Rignall, Benjamin; Grote, Konstanze; Gavrilov, Alina; Weimer, Marc; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Krause, Eberhard; Appel, Klaus E; Buchmann, Albrecht; Robertson, Larry W; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Chahoud, Ibrahim; Schwarz, Michael

    2013-05-01

    To assess the impact of a mixture containing dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), male mice were initiated with N-nitroso-diethylamine and subsequently treated with PCB126, an Ah-Receptor agonist, and PCB153, acting via activation of the constitutive androstane receptor. The two congeners were given at two dose levels: the low dose was adjusted to induce ~150-fold increases in cytochrome P450 (Cyp)1a1 (PCB126) and Cyp2b10 mRNAs (PCB153), and the high dose was chosen as twice the low dose. To keep the liver PCB levels constant, mice were given initial loading doses followed by weekly maintenance doses calculated on the basis of the PCBs' half-lives. Mice were treated with the individual congeners (low and high dose) or with a mixture consisting of the low doses of the 2 PCBs. The following results were obtained: (1) the 2 PCBs produced dose-dependent increases in Cyp1a1 and Cyp2b10 mRNA, protein, and activity when given individually; (2) combined treatment caused more than additive effects on Cyp1a1 mRNA expression, protein level, and ethoxyresurofin activity; (3) changes in the levels of several proteins were detected by proteome analysis in livers of PCB-treated mice; (4) besides these biological responses, the individual PCBs caused no significant increase in the number of glucose-6-phospatase (G6Pase)-deficient neoplastic lesions in liver, whereas a moderate significant effect occurred in the combination group. These results suggest weak but significant response-additive effects of the 2 PCBs when given in combination. They also suggest that the Cyp biomarkers tend to overestimate the carcinogenic response produced by the PCBs in mouse liver.

  10. Combination therapy with doxorubicin-loaded galactosylated poly(ethyleneglycol)-lithocholic acid to suppress the tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijay; Jang, Yoonjeong; Maharjan, Sushila; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Ah Young; Kim, Sanghwa; Gankhuyag, Nomundelger; Yang, Myeon-Sik; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Myung-Haing; Cho, Chong-Su

    2017-02-01

    Despite advances in technology, neither conventional anti-cancer drugs nor current nanoparticle (NP) drugs have gained substantial success in cancer treatment. While conventional chemotherapy drugs have several limitations such as low potency, poor in vivo stability and limited bioavailability, non-specific targeting of NP drugs diminishes their potency at actual target sites. In addition, the development of drug resistance to anti-cancer drugs is another challenging problem. To overcome these limitations, we aimed to develop a polymer-drug conjugate, which functions as an active NP drug and drug carrier both, to deliver a chemotherapeutic drug for combination therapy. Accordingly, we made targeting NP carrier of lithocholic acid-poly(ethylene glycol)-lactobionic acid (LPL) loading doxorubicin (Dox) to produce Dox/LPL NPs. The cellular uptake of Dox/LPL NPs was relatively higher in human liver cancer cell line (SK-HEP-1) due to galactose ligand-asialoglycoprotein receptor interaction. Consequently, the cellular uptake of Dox/LPL NPs led to massive cell death of SK-HEP-1 cells by two different mechanisms, particularly apoptotic activity by LPL and mitotic catastrophe by Dox. Most importantly, Dox/LPL NPs, when administered to orthotopic xenograft model of liver cancer, greatly reduced proliferation, invasion, migration, and angiogenesis of liver tumor in vivo. Thus, this study exemplifies the superiority of combination therapy over individual NP drug or conventional small molecule drug for cancer therapy. Overall, we present a promising approach of combinatorial therapy to inhibit the hepatic tumor growth and metastasis in the orthotopic xenograft model mice, thus representing an effective weapon for cancer treatment.

  11. Liver transplantation for metastatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, H; Oldhafer, K J; Weimann, A; Schlitt, H J; Scheumann, G F; Flemming, P; Ringe, B; Pichlmayr, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes the experience with liver transplantation in patients with irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Liver transplantation has become an established therapy in primary liver cancer. On contrast, there is little experience with liver transplantation in secondary hepatic tumors. So far, in the majority of patients being transplanted for irresectable liver metastases, long-term results have been disappointing because of early tumor recurrence. Because of their biologically less aggressive nature, the metastases of neuroendocrine tumors could represent a justified indication for liver grafting. METHODS: In a retrospective study, the data of 12 patients who underwent liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases were analyzed regarding survival, tumor recurrence, and symptomatic relief. RESULTS: Nine of 12 patients currently are alive with a median survival of 55 months (range, 11.0 days to 103.5 months). The operative mortality was 1 of 12, 2 patients died because of septic complications or tumor recurrences or both 6.5 months and 68.0 months after transplantation. all patients had good symptomatic relief after hepatectomy and transplantation. Four of the nine patients who are alive have no evidence of tumor with a follow-up of 2.0, 57.0, 58.0, and 103.5 months after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients, liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases may provide not only long-term palliation but even cure. Regarding the shortage of donor organs, liver grafting for neuroendocrine metastases should be considered solely in patients without evidence of extrahepatic tumor manifestation and in whom all other treatment methods are no longer effective. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:9114792

  12. ASSESSING MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF THREE TOXICOLOGICALLY DIFFERENT CONAZOLES BASED ON PATHWAY ANALYSIS OF MOUSE LIVER TRANSCRIPTOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was designed to identify the underlying molecular mechanism for the induction of mouse liver tumors by structurally-related conazoles. CD-1 mice were treated with the tumor producing conazoles, triadimefon (1800, 500, or 100 ppm), or propiconazole (2500, 500, or...

  13. Tumor regulation of the tissue environment in the liver.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Tobias; Greten, Tim F

    2017-02-04

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) in the liver plays an important role in primary and metastatic liver tumor formation and tumor growth promotion. Cellular and non-cellular components of the TME significantly influence tumor development, growth, metastatic spread, anti-tumor immunity and response to tumor therapy. The cellular components of the TME in the liver not only consist of infiltrating immune cells, but also of liver-resident cells such as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which promote tumor growth by negatively regulating tumor-associated immune responses. In this review, we characterize cells of the TME with pro- and anti-tumor function in primary and metastatic liver tumors. Furthermore, we summarize mechanisms that permit growth of hepatic tumors despite the occurrence of spontaneous anti-tumor immune responses and how novel therapeutic approaches targeting the TME could unleash tumor-specific immune responses to improve survival of liver cancer patients.

  14. [Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: an uncommon liver tumor].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Rayon, Miguel; Moya, Angel; Mir, Jose

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient who was referred to our unit because of a solid liver tumor, suggestive of metastasis. After biopsy, the patient was diagnosed with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the liver. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma is a rare entity with an unpredictable, potentially fatal, clinical course and outcome. Due to its rarity, this entity should be considered when a solitary hepatic lesion is detected and should be included in the differential diagnosis with liver metastases. We highlight the infrequency of this tumor, its presentation as a solitary hepatic lesion and the indication of surgical treatment. We describe the clinical and pathological characteristics of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the liver and report a new case of this entity. The distinct therapeutic options are discussed.

  15. [Radiofrequency for the treatment of liver tumors].

    PubMed

    Elias, D; De Baere, T

    2001-04-01

    Radiofrequency is performed with thin electrodes that are placed in the center of a tumor under ultrasonographic guidance. Radiofrequency waves induce ionic agitation which destroys neighboring tissues by heat. The most recent equipment can produce necrosis of 4-cm diameter areas. Efficacy is enhanced by blocking intrahepatic blood flow which naturally refreshes the liver parenchyma. The technique has the advantage of minimal invasion and of sparing liver parenchymal tissue. radiofrequency can be performed percutaneously or by laparoscopi or laparotomy. results in most reported series have been good with low morbidity. rapid improvment of material and of new associated procedures (vascular clamping, cooling infusion of the bile ducts, transplaeurodiaphragmatic approach, combination with other new approaches in liver surgery) are continuously modifying performance levels and potential indications curently under validation. radiofrequency, like other tools for local tumor destruction, will greatly change our therapeutic strategies in the neat future.

  16. Development of Short-term Molecular Thresholds to Predict Long-term Mouse Liver Tumor Outcomes: Phthalate Case StudyTo be

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular Thresholds for Early Key Events in Liver Tumorgensis: PhthalateCase StudyTriangleShort-term changes in molecular profiles are a central component of strategies to model health effects of environmental chemicals such as phthalates, for which there is widespread human exp...

  17. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  18. An orthotopic mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma with underlying liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Reiberger, Thomas; Chen, Yunching; Ramjiawan, Rakesh R; Hato, Tai; Fan, Christopher; Samuel, Rekha; Roberge, Sylvie; Huang, Peigen; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Zhu, Andrew X; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Jain, Rakesh K; Duda, Dan G

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous xenografts have been used for decades to study hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These models do not reproduce the specific pathophysiological features of HCCs, which occur in cirrhotic livers that show pronounced necroinflammation, abnormal angiogenesis and extensive fibrosis. As these features are crucial for studying the role of the pathologic host microenvironment in tumor initiation, progression and treatment response, alternative HCC models are desirable. Here we describe a syngeneic orthotopic HCC model in immunocompetent mice with liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) that recapitulates key features of human HCC. Induction of substantial hepatic fibrosis requires 12 weeks of CCl4 administration. Intrahepatic implantation of mouse HCC cell lines requires 30 min per mouse. Tumor growth varies by tumor cell line and mouse strain used. Alternatively, tumors can be induced in a genetically engineered mouse model. In this setting, CCl4 is administered for 12 weeks after tail-vein injection of Cre-expressing adenovirus (adeno-Cre) in Stk4−/−Stk3F/− (also known as Mst1−/−Mst2F/−; F indicates a floxed allele) mice, and it results in the development of HCC tumors (hepatocarcinogenesis) concomitantly with liver cirrhosis. PMID:26203823

  19. Segmentation of liver and liver tumor for the Liver-Workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiayin; Ding, Feng; Xiong, Wei; Huang, Weimin; Tian, Qi; Wang, Zhimin; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Leow, Wee Kheng

    2011-03-01

    Robust and efficient segmentation tools are important for the quantification of 3D liver and liver tumor volumes which can greatly help clinicians in clinical decision-making and treatment planning. A two-module image analysis procedure which integrates two novel semi-automatic algorithms has been developed to segment 3D liver and liver tumors from multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) images. The first module is to segment the liver volume using a flippingfree mesh deformation model. In each iteration, before mesh deformation, the algorithm detects and avoids possible flippings which will cause the self-intersection of the mesh and then the undesired segmentation results. After flipping avoidance, Laplacian mesh deformation is performed with various constraints in geometry and shape smoothness. In the second module, the segmented liver volume is used as the ROI and liver tumors are segmented by using support vector machines (SVMs)-based voxel classification and propagational learning. First a SVM classifier was trained to extract tumor region from one single 2D slice in the intermediate part of a tumor by voxel classification. Then the extracted tumor contour, after some morphological operations, was projected to its neighboring slices for automated sampling, learning and further voxel classification in neighboring slices. This propagation procedure continued till all tumorcontaining slices were processed. The performance of the whole procedure was tested using 20 MDCT data sets and the results were promising: Nineteen liver volumes were successfully segmented out, with the mean relative absolute volume difference (RAVD), volume overlap error (VOE) and average symmetric surface distance (ASSD) to reference segmentation of 7.1%, 12.3% and 2.5 mm, respectively. For live tumors segmentation, the median RAVD, VOE and ASSD were 7.3%, 18.4%, 1.7 mm, respectively.

  20. Methylation of tRNA by normal mouse liver and Erhlich ascites cell extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.D.; Sitz, T.O.

    1986-05-01

    When Erhlich ascites tumor and normal mouse liver extracts were incubated with (/sup 3/H-CH/sub 3/)-S-adenosylmethionine and E. coli tRNA, the tumor extracts had a ten-fold higher methyltransferase activity than mouse liver extracts. However, only a two-fold higher methyltransferase activity was observed when methyl deficient mouse liver tRNA was used as a substrate. DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of alkaline hydrolysates of methyl deficient mouse liver tRNA (tRNA isolated from mice treated with ethionine) showed 70% of the /sup 3/H-methyl groups in the mononucleotide peak and 30% in alkaline stable di-, tri- and oligonucleotide peaks demonstrating methylation of both the base and ribose moieties. Perchloric acid digest of material isolated from the di-, tri- and oligonucleotide peaks confirm that the /sup 3/H-methyl groups are on the ribose moieties. In hydrolysates of E. coli tRNA /sup 3/H-methyl groups appeared in only the mononucleotide peak, i.e. only base methylation. These data, from Erhlich ascites cells, suggest that ribose methyltransferases may have greater RNA substrate specificity than the base methyltransferases and may act processively to produce alkaline stable oligonucleotides.

  1. Liver transplantation in the mouse: Insights into liver immunobiology, tissue injury, and allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Ono, Yoshihiro; Geller, David A; Thomson, Angus W

    2016-04-01

    The surgically demanding mouse orthotopic liver transplant model was first described in 1991. It has proved to be a powerful research tool for the investigation of liver biology, tissue injury, the regulation of alloimmunity and tolerance induction, and the pathogenesis of specific liver diseases. Liver transplantation in mice has unique advantages over transplantation of the liver in larger species, such as the rat or pig, because the mouse genome is well characterized and there is much greater availability of both genetically modified animals and research reagents. Liver transplant experiments using various transgenic or gene knockout mice have provided valuable mechanistic insights into the immunobiology and pathobiology of the liver and the regulation of graft rejection and tolerance over the past 25 years. The molecular pathways identified in the regulation of tissue injury and promotion of liver transplant tolerance provide new potential targets for therapeutic intervention to control adverse inflammatory responses/immune-mediated events in the hepatic environment and systemically. In conclusion, orthotopic liver transplantation in the mouse is a valuable model for gaining improved insights into liver biology, immunopathology, and allograft tolerance that may result in therapeutic innovation in the liver and in the treatment of other diseases.

  2. Impact of myeloid-derived suppressor cell on Kupffer cells from mouse livers with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A.; Meyer, Jeremy; Oldani, Graziano; Gonelle-Gispert, Carmen; Morel, Philippe; Toso, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kupffer cells represent the first line of defense against tumor cells in the liver. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have recently been observed in the liver parenchyma of tumor-bearing animals. The present study investigates the function of the MDSC subsets, and their impact on Kupffer cell phenotype and function. RIL-175 mouse hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells were injected into the median liver lobe of C57BL/6 mice. Three weeks later, the median lobe hosting the tumor nodule was removed, and Kupffer cells and MDSCs were sorted from the remaining liver. Mouse livers devoid of HCC served as control. Kupffer cells expressed less co-stimulatory CD86 and MHCII and more co-inhibitory CD274 molecules in HCC-bearing livers than in control livers. Corresponding to this phenotype, Kupffer cells from HCC-bearing mice were less efficient in their function as antigen-presenting cells. Three CD11b+ cell populations were identified and sorted from HCC-bearing mice. These cells had various phenotypes with different levels of MDSC-specific surface markers (Ly6Ghigh cells, Gr1high cells, and Ly6Clow cells), and may be considered as bonafide MDSCs given their suppression of antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Primary isolated Kupffer cells in co-culture with the three MDSC subsets showed a decrease in CCL2 and IL-18 secretion, and an increase in IL-10 and IL-1β secretion, and an increased expression of CD86, CD274, and MHCII. In conclusion, these data demonstrated the existence of three MDSC subsets in HCC-bearing animals. These cells altered Kupffer cell function and may decrease the migration and activation of anticancer effector cells in the liver. PMID:27999748

  3. Limitation of liver function tests in metastatic carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moinuddin, M.; Dean, P.; Vander Zwaag, R.; Dragutsky, M.

    1987-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of liver function tests (LFT) as indicators of metastatic carcinoid tumors, a retrospective study was performed. The LFT results of 17 patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were compared with 17 patients with other malignant tumors. In the noncarcinoid group, 82.4% of the patients had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), whereas only 28.6% of carcinoid patients had abnormal enzymes. The medians of all LFT values were significantly higher in noncarcinoid patients than in the carcinoid group, except for glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Our data indicate that LFT are helpful in screening for liver metastases in patients with noncarcinoid tumors, but are unreliable in carcinoid tumors. Imaging tests should be used to rule out liver metastases in carcinoid tumors, irrespective of LFT results.

  4. Increased Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 Stimulates Hepatocyte Proliferation during Mouse Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yongjun; Yoshida, Yuichi; Hughes, Douglas E.; Costa, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aims The Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6 (HNF6 or ONECUT-1) protein is a cell-type specific transcription factor that regulates expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Using hepatocytes for Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, the HNF6 protein was shown to associate with cell cycle regulatory promoters. Here, we examined whether increased levels of HNF6 stimulate hepatocyte proliferation during mouse liver regeneration. Methods Tail vein injection of adenovirus expressing the HNF6 cDNA (AdHNF6) was used to increase hepatic HNF6 levels during mouse liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, and DNA replication was determined by Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Cotransfection and ChIP assays were used to determine transcriptional target promoters. Results Elevated expression of HNF6 during mouse liver regeneration causes a significant increase in the number of hepatocytes entering DNA replication (S-phase) and mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells diminished for HNF6 levels by siRNA transfection exhibit a 50% reduction in S-phase following serum stimulation. This stimulation in hepatocyte S-phase progression was associated with increased expression of the hepatocyte mitogen Tumor Growth Factor α (TGFα) and the cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1 and Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1) transcription factor. Cotransfection and ChIP assays show that TGFα, Cyclin D1, and HNF6 promoter regions are direct transcriptional targets of the HNF6 protein. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with regenerating mouse liver extracts reveal association between HNF6 and Foxm1 proteins and cotransfection assays show that HNF6 stimulates Foxm1 transcriptional activity. Conclusion These mouse liver regeneration studies show that increased HNF6 levels stimulate hepatocyte proliferation through transcriptional induction of cell cycle regulatory genes. PMID:16618419

  5. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  6. Towards a Humanized Mouse Model of Liver Stage Malaria Using Ectopic Artificial Livers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Stevens, Kelly R.; Mota, Maria M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    The malaria liver stage is an attractive target for antimalarial development, and preclinical malaria models are essential for testing such candidates. Given ethical concerns and costs associated with non‐human primate models, humanized mouse models containing chimeric human livers offer a valuable alternative as small animal models of liver stage human malaria. The best available human liver chimeric mice rely on cellular transplantation into mice with genetically engineered liver injury, but these systems involve a long and variable humanization process, are expensive, and require the use of breeding-challenged mouse strains which are not widely accessible. We previously incorporated primary human hepatocytes into engineered polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoporous human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs), implanted them in mice without liver injury, and rapidly generated human liver chimeric mice in a reproducible and scalable fashion. By re-designing the PEG scaffold to be macroporous, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of implantable porous HEALs that support liver stage human malaria (P. falciparum) infection in vitro, and also after implantation in mice with normal liver function, 60% of the time. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a tissue engineering strategy towards the development of scalable preclinical models of liver stage malaria infection for future applications. PMID:28361899

  7. Spaceflight Activates Lipotoxic Pathways in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Jonscher, Karen R.; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Suhalim, Jeffrey L.; Orlicky, David J.; Potma, Eric O.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Levi, Moshe; Friedman, Jacob E.; Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight affects numerous organ systems in the body, leading to metabolic dysfunction that may have long-term consequences. Microgravity-induced alterations in liver metabolism, particularly with respect to lipids, remain largely unexplored. Here we utilize a novel systems biology approach, combining metabolomics and transcriptomics with advanced Raman microscopy, to investigate altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice following short duration spaceflight. Mice flown aboard Space Transportation System -135, the last Shuttle mission, lose weight but redistribute lipids, particularly to the liver. Intriguingly, spaceflight mice lose retinol from lipid droplets. Both mRNA and metabolite changes suggest the retinol loss is linked to activation of PPARα-mediated pathways and potentially to hepatic stellate cell activation, both of which may be coincident with increased bile acids and early signs of liver injury. Although the 13-day flight duration is too short for frank fibrosis to develop, the retinol loss plus changes in markers of extracellular matrix remodeling raise the concern that longer duration exposure to the space environment may result in progressive liver damage, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27097220

  8. Dietary sugar intake increases liver tumor incidence in female mice.

    PubMed

    Healy, Marin E; Lahiri, Sujoy; Hargett, Stefan R; Chow, Jenny D Y; Byrne, Frances L; Breen, David S; Kenwood, Brandon M; Taddeo, Evan P; Lackner, Carolin; Caldwell, Stephen H; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2016-02-29

    Overnutrition can promote liver cancer in mice and humans that have liver damage caused by alcohol, viruses, or carcinogens. However, the mechanism linking diet to increased liver tumorigenesis remains unclear in the context of whether tumorigenesis is secondary to obesity, or whether nutrients like sugar or fat drive tumorigenesis independent of obesity. In male mice, liver tumor burden was recently found to correlate with sugar intake, independent of dietary fat intake and obesity. However, females are less susceptible to developing liver cancer than males, and it remains unclear how nutrition affects tumorigenesis in females. Herein, female mice were exposed to the liver carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and fed diets with well-defined sugar and fat content. Mice fed diets with high sugar content had the greatest liver tumor incidence while dietary fat intake was not associated with tumorigenesis. Diet-induced postprandial hyperglycemia and fasting hyperinsulinemia significantly correlated with tumor incidence, while tumor incidence was not associated with obesity and obesity-related disorders including liver steatosis, glucose intolerance, or elevated serum levels of estrogen, ALT, and lipids. These results simplify the pathophysiology of diet-induced liver tumorigenesis by focusing attention on the role of sugar metabolism and reducing emphasis on the complex milieu associated with obesity.

  9. Dietary sugar intake increases liver tumor incidence in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Marin E.; Lahiri, Sujoy; Hargett, Stefan R.; Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Byrne, Frances L.; Breen, David S.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Taddeo, Evan P.; Lackner, Carolin; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2016-01-01

    Overnutrition can promote liver cancer in mice and humans that have liver damage caused by alcohol, viruses, or carcinogens. However, the mechanism linking diet to increased liver tumorigenesis remains unclear in the context of whether tumorigenesis is secondary to obesity, or whether nutrients like sugar or fat drive tumorigenesis independent of obesity. In male mice, liver tumor burden was recently found to correlate with sugar intake, independent of dietary fat intake and obesity. However, females are less susceptible to developing liver cancer than males, and it remains unclear how nutrition affects tumorigenesis in females. Herein, female mice were exposed to the liver carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and fed diets with well-defined sugar and fat content. Mice fed diets with high sugar content had the greatest liver tumor incidence while dietary fat intake was not associated with tumorigenesis. Diet-induced postprandial hyperglycemia and fasting hyperinsulinemia significantly correlated with tumor incidence, while tumor incidence was not associated with obesity and obesity-related disorders including liver steatosis, glucose intolerance, or elevated serum levels of estrogen, ALT, and lipids. These results simplify the pathophysiology of diet-induced liver tumorigenesis by focusing attention on the role of sugar metabolism and reducing emphasis on the complex milieu associated with obesity. PMID:26924712

  10. ‘Obligate’ anaerobic Salmonella strain YB1 suppresses liver tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Xian; Yu, Bin; Shi, Lei; Geng, Wei; Lin, Qiu-Bin; Ling, Chang-Chun; Yang, Mei; Ng, Kevin T. P.; Huang, Jian-Dong; Man, Kwan

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor properties of bacteria have been demonstrated over the past decades. However, the efficacy is limited and unclear. Furthermore, systemic infection remains a serious concern in bacteria treatment. In this study, the effect of YB1, a rationally designed ‘obligate’ anaerobic Salmonella typhimurium strain, on liver tumor growth and metastasis in a nude mouse orthotopic liver tumor model was investigated. The orthotopic liver tumor model was established in nude mice using the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line MHCC-97L. Two weeks after orthotopic liver tumor implantation, YB1, SL7207 and saline were respectively administered through the tail vein of the mice. Longitudinal monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis was performed using Xenogen IVIS, and direct measurements of tumor volume were taken 3 weeks after treatment. In vitro, MHCC-97L and PLC cells were incubated with YB1 or SL7207 under anaerobic conditions. YB1 was observed to invade tumor cells and induce tumor cell apoptosis and death. The results revealed that all mice in the YB1 group were alive 3 weeks after YB1 injection while all mice in the SL7207 group died within 11 days of the SL7207 injection. The body weight decreased by ~9% on day 1 after YB1 injection and but subsequently recovered. Liver tumor growth and metastases were significantly inhibited following YB1 treatment. By contrast to the control group, a large number of Gr1-positive cells were detected on days 1 to 21 following YB1 treatment. Furthermore, YB1 also effectively invaded tumor cells and induced tumor cell apoptosis and death. In conclusion, YB1 suppressed liver tumor growth and metastasis in a nude mice liver tumor model. The potential mechanism may be through enhancing innate immune response and inducing tumor cell apoptosis and cell death. PMID:28123538

  11. Autophagy-deficient mice develop multiple liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Akito; Komatsu, Masaaki; Hara, Taichi; Sakamoto, Ayako; Kishi, Chieko; Waguri, Satoshi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Hino, Okio; Tanaka, Keiji; Mizushima, Noboru

    2011-04-15

    Autophagy is a major pathway for degradation of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles, and has been implicated in tumor suppression. Here, we report that mice with systemic mosaic deletion of Atg5 and liver-specific Atg7⁻/⁻ mice develop benign liver adenomas. These tumor cells originate autophagy-deficient hepatocytes and show mitochondrial swelling, p62 accumulation, and oxidative stress and genomic damage responses. The size of the Atg7⁻/⁻ liver tumors is reduced by simultaneous deletion of p62. These results suggest that autophagy is important for the suppression of spontaneous tumorigenesis through a cell-intrinsic mechanism, particularly in the liver, and that p62 accumulation contributes to tumor progression.

  12. Identification of Tumor Rejection Antigens for Breast Cancer Using a Mouse Tumor Rejection Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    of the mouse antigens. This comprehensive evaluation will only be performed to the antigens that show tumor protection effect in mice ; 3) test the...from the same mouse . The expression profile of these antigens were examined using real time RT-PCR. RNA was extracted from 3 normal...than tumor bearing mice is more likely to yield therapeutically relevant targets. We recognize that tumor implant model is not optimal in testing

  13. Cytokeratin 8/18 as a new marker of mouse liver preneoplastic lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Kakehashi, Anna; Kato, Ayumi; Inoue, Masayo; Ishii, Naomi; Okazaki, Etsuko; Wei, Min; Tachibana, Taro; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    To search for a reliable biomarker of preneoplastic lesions arising early in mouse hepatocarcinogenesis the proteomes of microdissected basophilic foci, hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs), carcinomas (HCCs) and normal-appearing liver of B6C3F1 mice initiated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) were analysed on anionic (Q10) surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) ProteinChip arrays. Significant overexpression of cytokeratin 8 (CK8; m/z 54, 565), cytokeratin 18 (CK18; m/z 47,538) proteins was found in basophilic foci as well as in HCAs and HCCs. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry demonstrated profound overexpression of CK8 and CK18 proteins (CK8/18) in all basophilic foci, mixed cell type foci, HCAs and HCCs in B6C3F1 and C57BL/6J mice initiated with DEN. A strong correlation between CK8/18-positive foci development and multiplicity of liver tumors in B6C3F1 and C57Bl/6J mice was further observed. Moreover, formation of CK8 and CK18 complexes due to CK8 phosphorylation at Ser73 and Ser431 was found to be strongly associated with neoplastic transformation of mice liver basophilic foci. Elevation of CK8/18 was strongly correlated with induction of cell proliferation in basophilic foci and tumors. In conclusion, our data imply that CK8/18 is a novel reliable marker of preneoplastic lesions arising during mouse hepatocarcinogenesis which might be used for prediction of tumor development and evaluation of environmental agents as well as drugs and food additives using mouse liver tests.

  14. Toxaphene-induced mouse liver tumorigenesis is mediated by the constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zemin; Li, Xilin; Wu, Qiangen; Lamb, James C; Klaunig, James E

    2017-02-20

    Toxaphene was shown to increase liver tumor incidence in B6C3F1 mice following chronic dietary exposure. Preliminary evidence supported a role for the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in the mode of action of toxaphene-induced mouse liver tumors. However, these results could not rule out a role for the pregnane X receptor (PXR) in liver tumor formation. To define further the nuclear receptors involved in this study, we utilized CAR, PXR and PXR/CAR knockout mice (CAR(-/-) , PXR(-/-) and PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) ) along with the wild-type C57BL/6. In this study CAR-responsive genes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 were induced in the liver of C57BL/6 (wild-type) mice by toxaphene (30-570-fold) (at the carcinogenic dose 320 ppm) and phenobarbital (positive control) (16-420-fold) following 14 days' dietary treatment. In contrast, in CAR(-/-) mice, no induction of these genes was seen following treatment with either chemical. Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 were also induced in PXR(-/-) mice with toxaphene and phenobarbital but were not changed in treated PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) mice. Similarly, induction of liver pentoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (CAR activation) activity by toxaphene and phenobarbital was absent in CAR(-/-) and PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) mice treated with phenobarbital or toxaphene. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD, represents aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation) activity in CAR(-/-) mice treated with toxaphene or phenobarbital was increased compared with untreated control, but lower overall in activity in comparison to the wild-type mouse. Liver EROD activity was also induced by both phenobarbital and toxaphene in the PXR(-/-) mice but not in the PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) mice. Toxaphene treatment increased 7-benzyloxyquinoline activity (a marker for PXR activation) in a similar pattern to that seen with pentoxyresorufin-O-deethylase. These observations indicate that EROD and PXR activation are evidence, as expected, of secondary overlap to primary CAR receptor activation. Together, these

  15. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the liver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mani, Siddhartha; Dutta, Deep; De, Binay K

    2010-03-01

    Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor is a rare tumor of soft tissues of thoraco-pulmonary regions, pelvis and lower extremities. Involvement of visceral organs by primitive neuroectodermal tumor is even rarer, with the kidney being the most commonly involved organ. Involvement of the liver has been reported in the form of metastasis from other primary sources presenting as liver abscess. We report a 20-year-old lady presenting with massive hepatomegaly, with computed tomography scan evidence of diffuse hepatomegaly and a normal porta and intrahepatic biliary radicles. She subsequently underwent ultrasonography-guided true-cut needle biopsy of the liver. Histopathology of the liver revealed nests of small round blue tumor cells in the background of hepatocytes infiltrating the liver, which expressed Mic-2 and Fli-1, and were negative for cytokeratin, desmin, hepatocyte-specific antigen (OCHIE5), synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD-20. Immunohistochemistry revealed CD-99-positive. Extensive search regarding any possible different site of involvement by the tumor was negative. The patient responded to a combination therapy of vincristine, adriamycin and cyclophosphamide alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide 3 weekly over 43 weeks and has been doing well even after 1 year of diagnosis. The clinical presentation, the macroscopic aspect, together with the histological pattern, the cytological characteristic and the cellular immunophenotype lead to the diagnosis of primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the liver which responded well to combination chemotherapy.

  16. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  17. Induction of rat liver tumor using the Sleeping Beauty transposon and electroporation.

    PubMed

    Park, June-Shine; Kim, Bae-Hwan; Park, Sung Goo; Jung, Sun Young; Lee, Do Hee; Son, Woo-Chan

    2013-05-10

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been receiving much attention as a gene transfer method of choice since it allows permanent gene expression after insertion into the host chromosome. However, low transposition frequency in higher eukaryotes limits its use in commonly-used mammalian species. Researchers have therefore attempted to modify gene delivery and expression to overcome this limitation. In mouse liver, tumor induction using SB introduced by the hydrodynamic method has been successfully accomplished. Liver tumor in rat models using SB could also be of great use; however, dose of DNA, injection volume, rate of injection and achieving back pressure limit the use of the hydrodynamics-based gene delivery. In the present study, we combined the electroporation, a relatively simple and easy gene delivery method, with the SB transposon system and as a result successfully induced tumor in rat liver by directly injecting the c-Myc, HRAS and shp53 genes. The tumor phenotype was determined as a sarcomatoid carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of induction of tumor in the rat liver using the electroporation-enhanced SB transposon system.

  18. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the analysis due to the commonality of mouse lung tumors in all three chemicals. The goals of the workshop were to: identify the evidence, from multiple scientific disciplines, regarding formation of chemically-induced lung tumors in mice; discuss analysis and interpretation of the evidence; discuss how such evidence informs human health assessments; and identify commonalities, linkages, or differences between the evidence from various disciplines and across the chemicals. Evidence informing the association between occupational exposure to styrene, ethylbenzene, or naphthalene and lung cancer; comparative biology of mouse lung tumors, associated pathologic effects, issues related to tissue and species concordance; mode of action analysis and biological mechanisms including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and evidence from cellular, genetic and molecular toxicity was discussed. In summary, although consensus was not sought, the panelists agreed that available mouse lung tumor data should be considered for human health risk evaluation on an individual chemical basis. Key data gaps were identified that would assist in further understanding the mechanism and relevan

  19. Development and Characterization of a Reliable Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Davis, Celestia; Ryan, James; Janney, Cory; Peña, Maria Marjorette O.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer and the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States [1]. The major cause of death is metastasis and frequently, the target organ is the liver. Successful metastasis depends on acquired properties in cancer cells that promote invasion and migration, and on multiple interactions between tumors and host-derived cells in the microenvironment. These processes, however, occur asymptomatically, thus, metastasis remains poorly understood and often diagnosed only at the final stage. To facilitate the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these processes and to identify the molecular regulators, particularly at the early stages, we developed a mouse model of hepatic metastasis of CRC by cecal implantation of a mouse adenocarcinoma cell line in an immune competent host that reliably recapitulates all steps of tumor growth and metastasis within a defined period. By in vivo selection, we isolated cells of varying metastatic potential. The most highly metastatic CT26-FL3 cells produced liver metastasis as early as ten days after implantation in 90% of host mice. These cells expressed elevated levels of genes whose products promote invasion, migration, and mobilization of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs). Mice bearing tumors from CT26-FL3 had elevated serum levels of OPN, MMP9, S100A8, S100A9, SAA3, and VEGFA that promote invasion and BMDC mobilization, and showed enhanced BMDC recruitment to the liver where they established a pre-metastatic niche. This model provides an important platform to characterize metastatic cells and elucidate tumor-host interactions and mechanisms that drive liver metastasis of CRC. PMID:23748471

  20. [Effect of combined administration of Angelica polysaccharide and cytarabine on liver of human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Hong; Xu, Chun-Yan; Mu, Xin-Yi; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Meng-Si; Jia, Dao-Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Huang, Guo-Ning; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia is a type of malignant tumors of hematopoietic system with the abnormal increased immature leukemia cells showing metastasis and invasion ability. Liver is one of the main targets of the leukemia cells spread to, where they may continue to proliferate and differentiate and cause liver function damage, even liver failure. Our previous studies showed that Angelica polysscharides (APS), the main effective components in Angelica sinensis of Chinese traditional medicine, was able to inhibit the proliferation and induced differentiation of the leukemia cells, however, its effect on the liver during the treatment remains elucidated. In the present study, the human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model were established by implantation human leukemia K562 cells line, then the leukemia mouse were treated with APS, Ara-c or APS + Ara-c respectively by peritoneal injection for 14 days, to explore the effect and mechanism of the chemicals on the mouse liver. Compared to the human leukemia NOD/SCID mouse model group with the treatments of APS, Ara-c and APS + Ara-c, We found that severe liver damage and pathological changes of the liver were able to alleviate: First, the number of white blood cells in the peripheral blood was significantly lower and with less transplanted K562 leukemia cells; Second, liver function damage was alleviated as liver function tests showed that alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBiL) were significantly reduced, while the albumin (Alb) was notably increased; Third, liver antioxidant ability was improved as the activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly increased, and the contents of GSH and malonaldehyde (MDA) were decreased significantly in the liver; Fourth, the inflammation of the liver was relieved as the level of IL-1beta and IL-6, the inflammatory cytokines, were decreased significantly in the liver. Fifth, liver index

  1. Immunotherapeutic modulation of the suppressive liver and tumor microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tim; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Weiss, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    The liver is an immunologically unique organ, consisting of resident hematopoietic and parenchymal cells which often contribute to a relatively tolerant microenvironment. It is also becoming increasingly clear that tumor-induced immunosuppression occurs via many of the same cellular mechanisms which contribute to the tolerogenic liver microenvironment. Myeloid cells, consisting of dendritic cells (DC), macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), have been implicated in providing a tolerogenic liver environment and immune dysfunction within the tumor microenvironment which can favor tumor progression. As we increase our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved for each phenotypic and/or functionally distinct leukocyte subset, immunotherapeutic strategies can be developed to overcome the inherent barriers to the development of improved strategies for the treatment of liver disease and tumors. In this review, we discuss the principal myeloid cell-based contributions to immunosuppression that are shared between the liver and tumor microenvironments. We further highlight immune-based strategies shown to modulate immunoregulatory cells within each microenvironment and enhance anti-tumor responses. PMID:21241810

  2. Expression of liver alpha-amylase in obese mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Afsartala, Zohreh; Savabkar, Sanaz; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Assadollahi, Vahideh; Tanha, Shima; Bijangi, Khosro; Gholami, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to demonstrate the relation between the expression of liver alpha-amylase and obesity. Background: Alpha-amylase catalyses the hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-glucosidic linkages in polysaccharides and has three main subtypes, including: salivary, pancreatic, and hepatic. Hepatic alpha-amylase is involved in glycogen metabolism, and has a role in obesity and its management. In this study, we aimed to analyze the expression of liver alpha-amylase in overweight and obese mouse. Material and methods: In this study, NMRI male mice were randomly divided into two groups. The sample group (obese) took a high-fat and carbohydrate diet, while the control group (normal) took a laboratory pellet chow for eight weeks. During this period, their weight was measured. After eight weeks, liver hepatocytes were isolated using an enzymatic digestion method. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and flow cytometry analysis were performed to measure alpha amylase protein expression in mouse liver hepatocyte cells. Results: A significant difference in the body weight was observed between the two groups (p<0.05). The qualitative protein expression of liver alpha-amylase was found to be higher in the obese group in both tests (immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry). Animals from the test group presented higher alpha-amylase expression, which suggests that this hepatic protein may constitute a potential indicator of susceptibility for fat tissue accumulation and obesity. The present data demonstrates an increased expression of liver amylase in obese mice. Conclusion: These results suggest that liver amylase secretion might be useful for predicting susceptibility to obesity induced by consumption of a high-fat and carbohydrate diet. PMID:27895853

  3. The commonly used antimicrobial additive triclosan is a liver tumor promoter

    PubMed Central

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Taniguchi, Koji; Chen, Shujuan; Evans, Ronald M.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Karin, Michael; Tukey, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan [5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol; TCS] is a synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial chemical used in a wide range of consumer products including soaps, cosmetics, therapeutics, and plastics. The general population is exposed to TCS because of its prevalence in a variety of daily care products as well as through waterborne contamination. TCS is linked to a multitude of health and environmental effects, ranging from endocrine disruption and impaired muscle contraction to effects on aquatic ecosystems. We discovered that TCS was capable of stimulating liver cell proliferation and fibrotic responses, accompanied by signs of oxidative stress. Through a reporter screening assay with an array of nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs), we found that TCS activates the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and, contrary to previous reports, has no significant effect on mouse peroxisome proliferation activating receptor α (PPARα). Using the procarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) to initiate tumorigenesis in mice, we discovered that TCS substantially accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development, acting as a liver tumor promoter. TCS-treated mice exhibited a large increase in tumor multiplicity, size, and incidence compared with control mice. TCS-mediated liver regeneration and fibrosis preceded HCC development and may constitute the primary tumor-promoting mechanism through which TCS acts. These findings strongly suggest there are adverse health effects in mice with long-term TCS exposure, especially on enhancing liver fibrogenesis and tumorigenesis, and the relevance of TCS liver toxicity to humans should be evaluated. PMID:25404284

  4. Liver Progenitors Isolated from Adult Healthy Mouse Liver Efficiently Differentiate to Functional Hepatocytes In Vitro and Repopulate Liver Tissue.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed that tissue stem cells supply multiple epithelial cells in mature tissues and organs. However, it is unclear whether tissue stem cells generally contribute to cellular turnover in normal healthy organs. Here, we show that liver progenitors distinct from bipotent liver stem/progenitor cells (LPCs) persistently exist in mouse livers and potentially contribute to tissue maintenance. We found that, in addition to LPCs isolated as EpCAM(+) cells, liver progenitors were enriched in CD45(-) TER119(-) CD31(-) EpCAM(-) ICAM-1(+) fraction isolated from late-fetal and postnatal livers. ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors were abundant by 4 weeks (4W) after birth. Although their number decreased with age, ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors existed in livers beyond that stage. We established liver progenitor clones derived from ICAM-1(+) cells between 1 and 20W and found that those clones efficiently differentiated into mature hepatocytes (MHs), which secreted albumin, eliminated ammonium ion, stored glycogen, and showed cytochrome P450 activity. Even after long-term culture, those clones kept potential to differentiate to MHs. When ICAM-1(+) clones were transplanted into nude mice after retrorsine treatment and 70% partial hepatectomy, donor cells were incorporated into liver plates and expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, and carbamoylphosphate synthetase I. Moreover, after short-term treatment with oncostatin M, ICAM-1(+) clones could efficiently repopulate the recipient liver tissues. Our results indicate that liver progenitors that can efficiently differentiate to MHs exist in normal adult livers. Those liver progenitors could be an important source of new MHs for tissue maintenance and repair in vivo, and for regenerative medicine ex vivo. Stem Cells 2016;34:2889-2901.

  5. Protein profiling of mouse livers with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ruiyin; Lim, Hanjo; Brumfield, Laura; Liu, Hong; Herring, Chris; Ulintz, Peter; Reddy, Janardan K; Davison, Matthew

    2004-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is important in the induction of cell-specific pleiotropic responses, including the development of liver tumors, when it is chronically activated by structurally diverse synthetic ligands such as Wy-14,643 or by unmetabolized endogenous ligands resulting from the disruption of the gene encoding acyl coenzyme A (CoA) oxidase (AOX). Alterations in gene expression patterns in livers with PPARalpha activation were delineated by using a proteomic approach to analyze liver proteins of Wy-14,643-treated and AOX(-/-) mice. We identified 46 differentially expressed proteins in mouse livers with PPARalpha activation. Up-regulated proteins, including acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, and carnitine O-octanoyltransferase, are involved in fatty acid metabolism, whereas down-regulated proteins, including ketohexokinase, formiminotransferase-cyclodeaminase, fructose-bisphosphatase aldolase B, sarcosine dehydrogenase, and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase, are involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Among stress response and xenobiotic metabolism proteins, selenium-binding protein 2 and catalase showed a dramatic approximately 18-fold decrease in expression and a modest approximately 6-fold increase in expression, respectively. In addition, glycine N-methyltransferase, pyrophosphate phosphohydrolase, and protein phosphatase 1D were down-regulated with PPARalpha activation. These observations establish proteomic profiles reflecting a common and predictable pattern of differential protein expression in livers with PPARalpha activation. We conclude that livers with PPARalpha activation are transcriptionally geared towards fatty acid combustion.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, R; Stark, D D

    1989-02-01

    Careful optimization of scanning techniques, particularly motion artifact suppression, has been essential to achieve reproducible results in abdominal MRI. The investigators experience indicates that MRI can be more accurate than other imaging methods for the detection of focal liver lesions. Furthermore, MRI is able to solve the major clinical problems in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant liver lesions: cancer v cavernous hemangioma or focal fat. MRI has reduced the dependence on liver biopsy and angiography to diagnose and stage focal liver lesions. Unfortunately, both imaging techniques, especially motion artifact suppression methods, vary widely among machines operating at different field strengths. Therefore, as hardware and software evolve, it is necessary to retrace the steps of pulse sequence optimization and clinical testing. Hopefully, in the future, standardized imaging techniques will become available for body MRI.

  7. [Multiple primary malignant tumors involving the liver].

    PubMed

    Tiszlavicz, L

    1991-11-17

    In the autopsy material of the Department of Pathology of Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University 167 primary liver cancers were observed in 30 years, from which 13 patients (7.8%) had also other primary malignancies. The tumour-associations were mainly synchronously, there was strong male predominance. In 9 cases the hepatocellular carcinoma originated in cirrhotic liver. The most frequent extrahepatic tumours were found in the lungs (5 cases), smoking was among the anamnestic data.

  8. Efficacy of cabazitaxel in mouse models of pediatric brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Emily; Ditzler, Sally; Lee, Donghoon; Richards, Andrew; Yagle, Kevin; Park, Joshua; Eslamy, Hedieh; Bobilev, Dmitri; Vrignaud, Patricia; Olson, James

    2015-01-01

    Background There is an unmet need in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors for chemotherapy that is efficacious, avoids damage to the developing brain, and crosses the blood-brain barrier. These experiments evaluated the efficacy of cabazitaxel in mouse models of pediatric brain tumors. Methods The antitumor activity of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were compared in flank and orthotopic xenograft models of patient-derived atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT), medulloblastoma, and central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET). Efficacy of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were also assessed in the Smo/Smo spontaneous mouse medulloblastoma tumor model. Results This study observed significant tumor growth inhibition in pediatric patient-derived flank xenograft tumor models of ATRT, medulloblastoma, and CNS-PNET after treatment with either cabazitaxel or docetaxel. Cabazitaxel, but not docetaxel, treatment resulted in sustained tumor growth inhibition in the ATRT and medulloblastoma flank xenograft models. Patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models of ATRT, medulloblastoma, and CNS-PNET showed significantly improved survival with treatment of cabazitaxel. Conclusion These data support further testing of cabazitaxel as a therapy for treating human pediatric brain tumors. PMID:25140037

  9. Liver BCATm transgenic mouse model reveals the important role of the liver in maintaining BCAA homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ananieva, Elitsa A; Van Horn, Cynthia G; Jones, Meghan R; Hutson, Susan M

    2017-02-01

    Unlike other amino acids, the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) largely bypass first-pass liver degradation due to a lack of hepatocyte expression of the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm). This sets up interorgan shuttling of BCAAs and liver-skeletal muscle cooperation in BCAA catabolism. To explore whether complete liver catabolism of BCAAs may impact BCAA shuttling in peripheral tissues, the BCATm gene was stably introduced into mouse liver. Two transgenic mouse lines with low and high hepatocyte expression of the BCATm transgene (LivTg-LE and LivTg-HE) were created and used to measure liver and plasma amino acid concentrations and determine whether the first two BCAA enzymatic steps in liver, skeletal muscle, heart and kidney were impacted. Expression of the hepatic BCATm transgene lowered the concentrations of hepatic BCAAs while enhancing the concentrations of some nonessential amino acids. Extrahepatic BCAA metabolic enzymes and plasma amino acids were largely unaffected, and no growth rate or body composition differences were observed in the transgenic animals as compared to wild-type mice. Feeding the transgenic animals a high-fat diet did not reverse the effect of the BCATm transgene on the hepatic BCAA catabolism, nor did the high-fat diet cause elevation in plasma BCAAs. However, the high-fat-diet-fed BCATm transgenic animals experienced attenuation in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the liver and had impaired blood glucose tolerance. These results suggest that complete liver BCAA metabolism influences the regulation of glucose utilization during diet-induced obesity.

  10. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Li; Liu, Dan; Yang, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Min-Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the liver. A 17-year-old man with a solid mass in the anterior segment of the right liver was asymptomatic with negative laboratory examinations with the exception of positive HBV. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) revealed a hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase and hypoechoic features during the portal and late phases. However, enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) showed hypoattenuation in all three phases. Following biopsy, immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated positive CD117. Different imaging features of primary GISTs of the liver are due to pathological properties and different working systems between CEUS and enhanced spiral CT. PMID:19653356

  11. Immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of Nigella glandulifera freyn and sint seeds on ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Aikemu, Ainiwaer; Xiaerfuding, Xiadiya; Shiwenhui, Chengyufeng; Abudureyimu, Meiliwan; Maimaitiyiming, Dilinuer

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of Nigella glandulifera Freyn and Sint seeds (NGS) on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in a mouse model. Materials and Methods: Kunming mice with transplanted Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAC) were treated with NGS by oral administration. On the 11th day after the EAC implant, mouse thymus, liver, spleen and kidney tumors were removed for histopathological analysis. Blood samples were taken for hematological and biochemical analyses. Results: The results indicate that NGS treatment leads to an increase in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-2 blood serum levels. Absence of viable EAC and presence of necrotic cells were observed in the tumor tissue of the NGS-treated animals. Conclusions: The study results indicated that a water extract of NGS had the highest anti-tumor effect. Moreover, NGS treatment also showed an increase in the immune system activity. PMID:23929999

  12. Discrimination of tumorigenic triazole conazoles from phenobarbital by transcriptional analyses of mouse liver gene expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used to control fungal growth in environmental settings and to treat humans with fungal infections. Mouse hepatotumorigenic conazoles display many of the same hepatic toxicologic responses as the mouse liver carcinogen phenobarbital (PB): constitutive and...

  13. CT Imaging Findings after Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Olga R.; Thornton, Eavan; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Mahadevan, Anand; Raptopoulos, Vassilious; Brook, Alexander; Najarian, Robert; Sheiman, Robert; Siewert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study radiological response to stereotactic radiotherapy for focal liver tumors. Materials and Methods. In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study CTs of 68 consecutive patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy for liver tumors between 01/2006 and 01/2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Two independent reviewers evaluated lesion volume and enhancement pattern of the lesion and of juxtaposed liver parenchyma. Results. 36 subjects with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 25 with liver metastases, and seven with cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) were included in study. Mean follow-up time was 5.6 ± 7.1 months for HCC, 6.4 ± 5.1 months for metastases, and 10.1 ± 4.8 months for the CCC. Complete response was seen in 4/36 (11.1%) HCCs and 1/25 (4%) metastases. Partial response (>30% decrease in long diameter) was seen in 25/36 (69%) HCCs, 14/25 (58%) metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Partial response followed by local recurrence (>20% increase in long diameter from nadir) occurred in 2/36 (6%) HCCs and 4/25 (17%) metastases. Liver parenchyma adjacent to the lesion demonstrated a prominent halo of delayed enhancement in 27/36 (78%) of HCCs, 19/21 (91%) of metastases, and 7/7 (100%) of CCCs. Conclusion. Sustainable radiological partial response to stereotactic radiotherapy is most frequent outcome seen in liver lesions. Prominent halo of delayed enhancement of the adjacent liver is frequent finding. PMID:26221135

  14. Potent anti-tumor effects of EGFR-targeted hybrid peptide on mice bearing liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Gaowa, Arong; Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide for the treatment of liver metastasis from colon carcinoma. The cytotoxic activity of the hybrid peptide against luciferase-expressing human colon cancer (HCT-116-luc) cells was determined by the WST-8 assay. The experimental mouse model of liver metastases was generated by splenic injection of HCT-116-luc cells. The hybrid peptide was intravenously injected into mice the day after cell implantation at a dose of 5 mg/kg and this was repeated on alternate days for a total of 7 doses. Saline-treated mice were used as controls. Tumor growth and therapeutic responses were monitored by an IVIS imaging system. It was shown that the hybrid peptide exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against HCT-116-luc cells and the liver metastases were significantly reduced after intravenous injections of hybrid peptide compared with controls. Furthermore, Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that hybrid peptide-treated mice had significantly longer survival than controls. In addition, bright-field and ex vivo imaging of liver tissue revealed that mice treated with the hybrid peptide had significantly fewer tumors compared with controls. These results demonstrated that the EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide is a potential treatment option for patients with colorectal cancer metastases in the liver.

  15. Mouse genotypes drive the liver and adrenal gland clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košir, Rok; Prosenc Zmrzljak, Uršula; Korenčič, Anja; Juvan, Peter; Ačimovič, Jure; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate a plethora of physiological processes. Perturbations of the rhythm can result in pathologies which are frequently studied in inbred mouse strains. We show that the genotype of mouse lines defines the circadian gene expression patterns. Expression of majority of core clock and output metabolic genes are phase delayed in the C56BL/6J line compared to 129S2 in the adrenal glands and the liver. Circadian amplitudes are generally higher in the 129S2 line. Experiments in dark – dark (DD) and light – dark conditions (LD), exome sequencing and data mining proposed that mouse lines differ in single nucleotide variants in the binding regions of clock related transcription factors in open chromatin regions. A possible mechanisms of differential circadian expression could be the entrainment and transmission of the light signal to peripheral organs. This is supported by the genotype effect in adrenal glands that is largest under LD, and by the high number of single nucleotide variants in the Receptor, Kinase and G-protein coupled receptor Panther molecular function categories. Different phenotypes of the two mouse lines and changed amino acid sequence of the Period 2 protein possibly contribute further to the observed differences in circadian gene expression.

  16. Mouse genotypes drive the liver and adrenal gland clocks

    PubMed Central

    Košir, Rok; Prosenc Zmrzljak, Uršula; Korenčič, Anja; Juvan, Peter; Ačimovič, Jure; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate a plethora of physiological processes. Perturbations of the rhythm can result in pathologies which are frequently studied in inbred mouse strains. We show that the genotype of mouse lines defines the circadian gene expression patterns. Expression of majority of core clock and output metabolic genes are phase delayed in the C56BL/6J line compared to 129S2 in the adrenal glands and the liver. Circadian amplitudes are generally higher in the 129S2 line. Experiments in dark – dark (DD) and light – dark conditions (LD), exome sequencing and data mining proposed that mouse lines differ in single nucleotide variants in the binding regions of clock related transcription factors in open chromatin regions. A possible mechanisms of differential circadian expression could be the entrainment and transmission of the light signal to peripheral organs. This is supported by the genotype effect in adrenal glands that is largest under LD, and by the high number of single nucleotide variants in the Receptor, Kinase and G-protein coupled receptor Panther molecular function categories. Different phenotypes of the two mouse lines and changed amino acid sequence of the Period 2 protein possibly contribute further to the observed differences in circadian gene expression. PMID:27535584

  17. Quantitative analysis of tumor burden in mouse lung via MRI.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Vanessa K; Garbow, Joel R; Krupnick, Alexander S; Engelbach, John A; Nehorai, Arye

    2012-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Despite recent advances in screening protocols, the majority of patients still present with advanced or disseminated disease. Preclinical rodent models provide a unique opportunity to test novel therapeutic drugs for targeting lung cancer. Respiratory-gated MRI is a key tool for quantitatively measuring lung-tumor burden and monitoring the time-course progression of individual tumors in mouse models of primary and metastatic lung cancer. However, quantitative analysis of lung-tumor burden in mice by MRI presents significant challenges. Herein, a method for measuring tumor burden based upon average lung-image intensity is described and validated. The method requires accurate lung segmentation; its efficiency and throughput would be greatly aided by the ability to automatically segment the lungs. A technique for automated lung segmentation in the presence of varying tumor burden levels is presented. The method includes development of a new, two-dimensional parametric model of the mouse lungs and a multi-faceted cost function to optimally fit the model parameters to each image. Results demonstrate a strong correlation (0.93), comparable with that of fully manual expert segmentation, between the automated method's tumor-burden metric and the tumor burden measured by lung weight.

  18. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    SciTech Connect

    Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-04-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with olycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site.

  19. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  20. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  1. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  2. Sex-specific gene expression in the BXD mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Daniel M; Zhao, Ni; Chesler, Elissa J; Bradford, Blair U; Shabalin, Andrey A; Yordanova, Roumyana; Lu, Lu; Rusyn, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    Differences in clinical phenotypes between the sexes are well documented and have their roots in differential gene expression. While sex has a major effect on gene expression, transcription is also influenced by complex interactions between individual genetic variation and environmental stimuli. In this study, we sought to understand how genetic variation affects sex-related differences in liver gene expression by performing genetic mapping of genomewide liver mRNA expression data in a genetically defined population of naive male and female mice from C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, B6D2F1, and 37 C57BL/6J x DBA/2J (BXD) recombinant inbred strains. As expected, we found that many genes important to xenobiotic metabolism and other important pathways exhibit sexually dimorphic expression. We also performed gene expression quantitative trait locus mapping in this panel and report that the most significant loci that appear to regulate a larger number of genes than expected by chance are largely sex independent. Importantly, we found that the degree of correlation within gene expression networks differs substantially between the sexes. Finally, we compare our results to a recently released human liver gene expression data set and report on important similarities in sexually dimorphic liver gene expression between mouse and human. This study enhances our understanding of sex differences at the genome level and between species, as well as increasing our knowledge of the molecular underpinnings of sex differences in responses to xenobiotics.

  3. Jute batching oil: a tumor promoter on mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, N.K.; Kumar, S.; Agarwal, R.; Antony, M.

    1987-02-01

    A mineral oil essentially used in the jute industry for the batching of jute fibers, and earlier reported to be nontumorigenic on mouse skin, has been found to be a tumor promoter following a two-stage mouse-skin bioassay protocol. The types of tumors developed after initiation with a single dose of urethane or 3-methylcholanthrene (subcutaneously), followed by repeated skin painting with jute batching oil (JBO) included benign papillomas, keratoacanthomas, and fibrosarcomas. Chemical analysis of this oil indicated the total aromatic content was 11.71% and the amount of fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and triphenylene was in the range of 192.54 to 227.79 mg/kg in the test sample. The underlying biochemical mechanism for the tumor-promoting effect of JBO seemed to operate through a different pathway rather than involving the induction of cytochrome-dependent monoxygenase and N-demethylase activities in the tissue.

  4. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  5. [Treatment of liver metastasis of endocrine tumors of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Orozco Zepeda, H

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to analyze the diagnostic approach, presentation and therapeutic modalities in patients with liver metastasis from endocrine tumors. The paper shows the "state of the art" of therapeutic approaches with emphasis on the roll of different surgery, radio and chemotherapy, arterial embolization and other palliative procedures. The overall results of each of this modalities are also shown.

  6. A simple technique for hemostasis control after enucleation of deep located liver tumors or after liver trauma

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Marcel A.; Surjan, Rodrigo C.; Basseres, Tiago; Makdissi, Fábio F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern liver techniques allowed the development of segment-based anatomical liver resections. Nevertheless, there is still a place for nonanatomical liver resections. However, in some cases, there is a need for enucleation of deep located liver tumors. The main problem with enucleation of a liver tumor deeply located in the middle of the liver is the control of bleeding resulting from the rupture of small or medium vessels. The authors describe a simple way to control the bleeding without the use of any special instrument or material. This technique can also be used to control bleeding from penetrating liver injury. PMID:26846270

  7. Adult Embryonal Sarcoma of the Liver: Management of a Massive Liver Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Roudenko, Alexandra; El Hussein, Siba; Rizer, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcomas of the liver are extremely rare cases in adults. We report the case of a 30-year-old male who presented with early satiety and abdominal pain due to a massive tumor originating from the left liver and occupying the entire epigastrium. The patient underwent bland embolization in an attempt to decrease the size of the tumor. He then underwent a formal left hepatectomy with resection of liver segments 2, 3, and 4. Extrahepatic inflow control of the portal vein and hepatic artery was performed prior to parenchymal transection. No Pringle maneuver was required. Pathology analysis showed a 45 cm tumor consistent with an undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma and negative microscopic margins. The epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of this unusual cancer presentation are reviewed. PMID:27895954

  8. Immunotherapy for liver tumors: present status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Pablo; Alaniz, Laura; Rozados, Viviana; Aquino, Jorge B; Malvicini, Mariana; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Gidekel, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo; Scharovsky, O Graciela; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that immune responses are involved in the control of cancer and that the immune system can be manipulated in different ways to recognize and attack tumors. Progress in immune-based strategies has opened new therapeutic avenues using a number of techniques destined to eliminate malignant cells. In the present review, we overview current knowledge on the importance, successes and difficulties of immunotherapy in liver tumors, including preclinical data available in animal models and information from clinical trials carried out during the lasts years. This review shows that new options for the treatment of advanced liver tumors are urgently needed and that there is a ground for future advances in the field. PMID:19272130

  9. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  10. [Multiple primary malignant tumors involving the liver].

    PubMed

    Tiszlavicz, L; Tasnádi, T

    1993-01-31

    In the Department of Pathology of the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University in Szeged during the last 30 years 1770 (19.4% of the cancers) primary malignant lung tumours were observed in autopsy material, from which 86 patients (4.9%) had other malignancies as well. In 81 cases other extrapulmonary and in 5 cases other primary lung tumours were observed. The male predominance in these cases was significant. All of the patients were heavy smokers. Amongst these synchronous tumour-associations the most frequent extrapulmonary tumours arose in the urogenital tract, in the head and neck, relatively frequently also in the breast, liver, stomach, intestine and thyroid. These cases caused diagnostic dilemmas both for the clinician and even for the pathologist. Several signs help to distinguish a new primary tumour from a metastasis. Multiplicity itself does not mean poorer prognosis. Each cancer should possibly receive adequate treatment.

  11. Inflammatory angiomyolipoma of the liver: a rare hepatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm of the tumor, composed of a varying heterogeneous mixture of three tissue components: blood vessels, smooth muscle and adipose cells. Hepatic AML may demonstrate a marked histological diversity. We herein present one case of hepatic AML exhibiting prominent inflammatory cells in the background, which happened in a 61-year-old Chinese female patient, without signs of tuberous sclerosis. Histologically, the striking feature was the infiltration of numerous inflammatory cells in the background, including small lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosnophils. The tumor cells were spindled and histiocytoid in shape, with slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm, and arranged along the vessels or scattered among the inflammatory background. Sinusoid structure was obviously seen in the tumor. Mature adipocytes and thick-walled blood vessels were focally observed at the boundaries between the tumor and surrounding liver tissues. The tumor cells were positive immunostaining for HMB-45, Melan-A, and smooth muscle actin. The inflammatory AML should be distinguished from other tumors with inflammatory background such as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and follicular dendritic cell tumor and deserves wider recognition for its occurrence as a primary hepatic tumor. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1828633072762370 PMID:22978636

  12. Liver transplantation surgical techniques for extensive retroperitoneal tumor with major blood vessel involvement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miura, K; Sato, Y; Kokai, H; Hara, Y; Kobayashi, T; Oya, H; Yamamoto, S; Hatakeyama, K

    2012-03-01

    A case of a 71-year-old man with a huge retroperitoneal tumor situated behind the liver, which strongly compressed the liver inferior vena cava (IVC), and gastrointestinal tract is described. With the techniques of whole liver extraction and autologous orthotopic liver transplantation, we successfully removed the tumor. We have the surgical techniques, essential elements, and indications for this procedure.

  13. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Sundberg, John P; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers.

  14. Microdistribution of specific rat monoclonal antibodies to mouse tissues and human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Falcioni, R; Wesley, J W

    1991-03-01

    Detailed evaluations of the microdistribution of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to normal tissue antigens were conducted in BALB/c mice. MoAb 273-34A, which binds to a target molecule on the lumenal surface of lung endothelial cells, localizes quickly and efficiently throughout the lung vasculature. MoAb 133-13A, which binds to an antigen on macrophage-like cells expressed in nearly equal amounts in lung, liver, and spleen, localizes most efficiently to spleen and less well to liver and lung. The microdistribution of MoAb 133-13A in liver and spleen is consistent with the antigen distribution in these organs, but in the lung a more diffuse microdistribution is observed, indicating poor access of MoAb to the antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tight endothelium (lung) represents a significant barrier to extravasation of MoAb into tissue while fenestrated (spleen) and sinusoidal (liver) endothelium are more easily penetrated. In human tumor bearing nu/nu mice, the microdistribution of MoAb to the beta 4 and alpha 6 subunits of integrin was studied. These MoAbs do not cross-react with murine integrins and thus are tumor-specific in the nu/nu mouse model. Localization of 125I-labeled MoAb 450-11A, which reacts with an intercellular domain of beta 4 integrin, is very weak and diffuse. All MoAbs to extracellular domains (mouse 450-9D, 450-30A1, and rat 439-9B) localize well to the tumor. Microdistribution of these MoAbs in the 3 different tumors is nonuniform with heavy distribution near the blood vessels, whereas antigen distribution as determined by immunoperoxidase shows a much more uniform pattern throughout the tumors. In experiments with 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B F(ab')2, the nonuniform pattern of distribution was not changed. Gross and microdistribution of different doses of 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B were studied. The percent of injected dose per g of MoAb in the tumor at 48 h did not vary

  15. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  16. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.**

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  17. Quantifying levels of p53 mutation in mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Verkler, Tracie L; Couch, Letha H; Howard, Paul C; Parsons, Barbara L

    2005-06-01

    Allele-specific competitive blocker PCR (ACB-PCR) amplification and quantification was developed for mouse p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT base substitution and codon 244/245 AAC/CGC-->AAT/TGC tandem mutation. PCR products corresponding to p53 mutant and wild-type DNA sequences were generated. These DNAs were mixed in known proportions to construct samples with defined mutant fractions and the allele-specific detection of each mutation was systematically optimized. Each assay was used to analyze eight simulated solar light (SSL)-induced tumors. By analyzing mutant fraction (MF) standards in parallel with PCR products generated from tumor samples, p53 mutants could be quantified as subpopulations within the tumors. All eight tumors contained detectable levels of p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT mutation. Three tumors had p53 MFs between 10(-4) and 10(-3). Five tumors had p53 MFs between 10(-3) and 10(-2). None of the eight mouse skin tumors had measurable levels of p53 codon 244/245 tandem mutation. Frequent detection of p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT mutation provides additional evidence that a pyrimidine dinucleotide overlapping a methylated CpG site (Pyr(me)CG) is a susceptible target for SSL-induced mutagenesis. The absence of p53 codon 244/245 mutation in tumors may be explained by its mutant p53 phenotype and/or indicate that this site is not methylated. These initial results indicate that p53 codon 270 CGT-->TGT mutation may be a sensitive biomarker for SSL- or UV-induced mutagenesis. This mutational endpoint may be useful for evaluating the co-carcinogenicity of compounds administered in combination with UV or SSL.

  18. Use of Semiflexible Applicators for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffke, G. Gebauer, B.; Knollmann, F.D.; Helmberger, T.; Ricke, J.; Oettle, H.; Felix, R.; Stroszczynski, C.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using new MRI-compatible semiflexible applicators in a closed-bore high-field MRI scanner. Methods. We treated 8 patients with 12 malignant liver tumors of different origin (5 colorectal carcinoma, 2 cholangiocellular carcinoma, 1 breast cancer) under MRI guidance. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed using 5 cm Rita Starburst Semi-Flex applicators (Rita Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) which are suitable for MR- and CT-guided interventions and a 150 W RF generator. All interventions were performed in a closed-bore 1.5 T high-field MRI scanner for MRI-guided RFA using fast T1-weighted gradient echo sequences and T2-weighted ultra-turbo spin echo sequences. Control and follow-up MRI examinations were performed on the next day, at 6 weeks, and every 3 months after RFA. Control MRI were performed as double-contrast MRI examinations (enhancement with iron oxide and gadopentetate dimeglumine). All interventions were performed with the patient under local anesthesia and analgo-sedation. Results. The mean diameter of the treated hepatic tumors was 2.4 cm ({+-}0.6 cm, range 1.0-3.2 cm). The mean diameter of induced necrosis was 3.1 cm ({+-}0.4 cm). We achieved complete ablation in all patients. Follow-up examinations over a duration of 7 months ({+-}1.3 months, range 4-9 month) showed a local control rate of 100% in this group of patients. All interventions were performed without major complications; only 2 subcapsular hematomas were documented. Conclusion. RFA of liver tumors using semiflexible applicators in closed-bore 1.5 T scanner systems is feasible. These applicators might simplify the RFA of liver tumors under MRI control. The stiff distal part of the applicator facilitates its repositioning.

  19. Is Diaphragm Motion a Good Surrogate for Liver Tumor Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongjun; Chang, Zheng; Czito, Brian G.; Bashir, Mustafa R.; Palta, Manisha; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between liver tumor motion and diaphragm motion. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (10 of 14) or liver metastases (4 of 14) undergoing radiation therapy were included in this study. All patients underwent single-slice cine–magnetic resonance imaging simulations across the center of the tumor in 3 orthogonal planes. Tumor and diaphragm motion trajectories in the superior–inferior (SI), anterior–posterior (AP), and medial–lateral (ML) directions were obtained using an in-house-developed normalized cross-correlation–based tracking technique. Agreement between the tumor and diaphragm motion was assessed by calculating phase difference percentage, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman analysis (Diff). The distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was analyzed to understand its impact on the correlation between the 2 motions. Results: Of all patients, the mean (±standard deviation) phase difference percentage values were 7.1% ± 1.1%, 4.5% ± 0.5%, and 17.5% ± 4.5% in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.98 ± 0.02, 0.97 ± 0.02, and 0.08 ± 0.06 in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. The mean Diff values were 2.8 ± 1.4 mm, 2.4 ± 1.1 mm, and 2.2 ± 0.5 mm in the SI, AP, and ML directions, respectively. Tumor and diaphragm motions had high concordance when the distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm area was small. Conclusions: This study showed that liver tumor motion had good correlation with diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions, indicating diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions could potentially be used as a reliable surrogate for liver tumor motion.

  20. Radiotherapeutic Parameters Predictive of Liver Complications Induced by Liver Tumor Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Seong, Jinsil Shim, Su Jung; Han, Kwang Hyub

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify radiotherapeutic parameters for predicting the occurrence of liver complications induced by radiotherapy of a liver tumor. Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2003, a total of 131 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The total dose was determined by the fraction of nontumor liver receiving 50% of the isocenter dose (V{sub 50%}). We evaluated three sets of published radiation dose guidelines using nontumor liver volume or a combination of nontumor liver volume and hepatic functional reserve. The V{sub 50%} was divided into three intervals (<33%, 33-66%, and >66%) and four categories (<25%, 25-49%, 50-75%, and >75%) according to guidelines by University of Michigan and the Yonsei University, respectively. According to the guideline of Cheng et al., the radiation dose was determined by the indocyanin green retention rate at 15 min (ICG-R15) and the nontumor liver volume. Results: Of the 131 patients, 13 patients (9.9%) presented with liver complications. The incidence was 11.1%, 10.3%, and 18.2%, respectively, for a V{sub 50%} of less than 33%, 33% to 66%, and more than 66%. The observed hepatic toxicity incidence was 10%, 12.1%, and 10.4% respectively for a V{sub 50%} of less than 25%, 25% to 49%, and 50% to 75%, respectively. Nontumor liver volume and ICG-R15 were not predictors of liver complications. The incidence of liver complications was significantly increased in patients with Child-Pugh Class B (p = 0.044). Conclusions: The parameter, V{sub 50%}, can be divided into 4 categories and used to predict acceptable toxicity. Furthermore, indicators of liver functional status like the Child-Pugh class may be more important and useful parameters than ICG-R15 for predicting radiation-related liver disease.

  1. Totally laparoscopic anatomical liver resection for centrally located tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Joon; Kim, Ki-Hun; Shin, Min-Ho; Yoon, Young-In; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic major hepatectomy is a common procedure that has been reported frequently; however, laparoscopic resection of centrally located tumors involving segments 4, 5, and 8 remains a technically difficult procedure because it requires 2 transection planes and dissection of numerous branches of the hepatic vein and glissonean capsule compared to hemi-hepatectomy. Here, we present 7 cases of totally laparoscopic right anterior sectionectomy (Lap-RAS) and 3 cases of totally laparoscopic central bisectionectomy (Lap-CBS). Between May 2013 and January 2015, 10 totally laparoscopic anatomical resections of centrally located tumors were performed in our institution. The median age of the patients was 54.2 (38–72) years and the median ICG-R15 was 10.4 (3.9–17.4). There were 8 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 2 with metastatic colorectal cancer. All the HCC patients has the liver function impairment on the degree of Child-Pugh score A. The mean operation time was 330 ± 92.7 minutes with an estimated blood loss of 325 ± 234.5 mL. Only 1 patient required transfusion during surgery. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 9.5 ± 3.4 day and postop complication was reported only 1 case that has the fluid collection at the resection margin of the liver. Mean resection margin was 8.5 ± 6.1 mm and tumor size was 2.9 ± 1.9 cm. Totally lap-RAS and lap-CBS are feasible operative procedures in patients with centrally located tumor of the liver and particularly in patients with limited liver function such as those with cirrhosis. PMID:28121916

  2. The fetal mouse is a sensitive genotoxicity model that exposes lentiviral-associated mutagenesis resulting in liver oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-02-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis.

  3. The Fetal Mouse Is a Sensitive Genotoxicity Model That Exposes Lentiviral-associated Mutagenesis Resulting in Liver Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne MK; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis. PMID:23299800

  4. Proton Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors: Dosimetric Advantages Over Photon Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun Krishnan, Sunil; Zhang Xiaodong; Dong Lei; Briere, Tina; Crane, Christopher H.; Martel, Mary; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to dosimetrically investigate the advantages of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy for liver tumors. The proton plan and the photon plan were designed using commercial treatment planning systems. The treatment target dose conformity and heterogeneity and dose-volume analyses of normal structures were compared between proton and photon radiotherapy for 9 patients with liver tumors. Proton radiotherapy delivered a more conformal target dose with slightly less homogeneity when compared with photon radiotherapy. Protons significantly reduced the fractional volume of liver receiving dose greater or equal to 30 Gy (V{sub 30}) and the mean liver dose. The stomach and duodenal V{sub 45} were significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. The V{sub 40} and V{sub 50} of the heart and the maximum spinal cord dose were also significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. Protons were better able to spare one kidney completely and deliver less dose to one (generally the left) kidney than photons. The mean dose to the total body and most critical structures was significantly decreased using protons when compared to corresponding photon plans. In conclusion, our study suggests the dosimetric benefits of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy. These dosimetric advantages of proton plans may permit further dose escalation with lower risk of complications.

  5. Chondroma of the diaphragm mimicking a giant liver tumor with calcification: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Yoh; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Yokoo, Hideki; Tahara, Munenori; Usui, Akihiro; Funakoshi, Tohru; Sato, Masanori; Sasaki, Ayami; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Taketomi, Akinobu; Todo, Satoru

    2014-12-01

    Extraskeletal chondroma is an unusual benign tumor, which rarely arises in the diaphragm. We report a case of chondroma of the diaphragm in a 31-year-old woman. Initially, a benign liver tumor with calcification was suspected, based on pre and intraoperative examination findings. Although parts of the tumor were contiguous with the diaphragm, its connections with the diaphragm were much narrower than its connection with the liver, which suggested a liver tumor. Pathological examination subsequently revealed that the chondroma was contiguous with the diaphragm and that there was a distinct border between the tumor and the liver; thus, the tumor was diagnosed as a chondroma of the diaphragm.

  6. Endpoints for Mouse Abdominal Tumor Models: Refinement of Current Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eden V; Villines, Kimberly A; Hickman, Debra L

    2009-01-01

    Accurate, rapid, and noninvasive health assessments are required to establish more appropriate endpoints in mouse cancer models where tumor size is not easily measured. We evaluated potential endpoints in mice with experimentally induced peritoneal lymphoma, an abdominal tumor model, by comparing body weight, body condition, and behavior with those of a control group of mice not developing lymphoma. Our hypothesis was that body weight would increase or plateau, whereas body condition and behavioral scores would decrease, as disease progressed. Results indicated that body weight did not differ significantly between the control and experimental groups, but the experimental group experienced significant decreases in both body condition and behavioral scores. Our results support the use of body condition and behavioral scoring as adjunctive assessment methods for mice involved in abdominal lymphoma tumor studies in which health may decline despite an increase or plateau in body weight. PMID:19619413

  7. Lessons Learned from Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Jaquelin P.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.; Ross, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), which was discovered as a milk-transmitted, infectious, cancer-inducing agent in the 1930s, has been used as an animal model for the study of retroviral infection and transmission, antiviral immune responses, and breast cancer and lymphoma biology. The main target cells for MMTV infection in vivo are cells of the immune system and mammary epithelial cells. Although the host mounts an immune response to the virus, MMTV has evolved multiple means of evading this response. MMTV causes mammary tumors when the provirus integrates into the mammary epithelial and lymphoid cell genome during viral replication and thereby activates cellular oncogene expression. Thus, tumor induction is a by-product of the infection cycle. A number of important oncogenes have been discovered by carrying out MMTV integration site analysis, some of which may play a role in human breast cancer. PMID:27034391

  8. Radioembolization of liver tumors with yttrium-90 microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Ezziddin, Samer

    2010-03-01

    Radioembolization (RE), also termed selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT), has been gradually introduced to the clinical arsenal of cytoreductive modalities in recent years. There is growing evidence for efficiency in liver tumors of various entities, with the most prominent ones being hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and neuroendocrine tumors. Hepatic metastases of numerous other tumor entities including breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and pancreatic cancer are treatment-sensitive, even when being refractory to other treatment modalities such as bland-embolization, regional, or systemic chemotherapy. The antitumor effect of SIRT is related to radiation rather than embolization, with extraordinary high local radiation doses obtained selectively at the site of viable tumor and little affection of the surrounding normal liver tissue. Morphologic changes after RE may pose difficulties for interpretation in conventional restaging with regard to tumor viability and true response to treatment. Therefore, functional imaging, that is, metabolic imaging with (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (computed tomography) in the majority of treated tumors, is regarded the gold standard in this respect and should be included for pre- and post-SIRT assessment. To prevent serious toxicity to be associated with the potent antitumor efficacy, meticulous pretreatment evaluation is of particular importance. Improvements in predicting dosimetry will help optimize treatment and patient selection. Nuclear medicine procedures are essential for planning, performing, and monitoring of RE. However, the interdisciplinary aspect of patient management has to be emphasized for this particular treatment form. As SIRT is moving forward from the salvage setting indication to the use in earlier stages of hepatic tumor disease and with the advent of new treatment protocols and targeted therapies, embedding SIRT into a multidisciplinary approach will become even

  9. Sulfurtransferases and cyanide detoxification in mouse liver, kidney, and brain.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, M; Jurkowska, H; Sliwa, L; Srebro, Z

    2004-01-01

    The activity of rhodanese, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST) and cystathionase in mouse liver, kidney, and four brain regions: tele-, meso-, di- and rhombencephalon was studied 30 min and 2 h following a sublethal dose of cyanide (4 mg/ kg body weight) intraperitoneal injection. Simultaneously, sulfane sulfur levels and total sulfur content, a direct or indirect source of sulfur for CN(-) conversion to SCN(-), were also investigated in these tissues. In the liver this dose of cyanide seemed to impair the process of cyanide detoxification by MPST, as well as rhodanese inhibition. The effects of cyanide administration to mice proved to be totally different in the liver and kidney. In the kidney, a significant increase in the rhodanese activity was observed as early as 30 min following cyanide intoxication, and an elevated cystathionase activity after 2 h was detected. This suggests the involvement of cystathionase in cyanide detoxification in the kidney. The activity of MPST remained at the same level as in the control group. In the rhombencephalon, similarly as in the kidney, L-cysteine desulfuration pathways, which generate sulfane sulfur and sulfurtransferases that transfer sulfane sulfur atoms to CN(-), seemed to play an important role as a defense system against cyanide. The stable level of sulfane sulfur and total sulfur content was accompanied in the rhombencephalon by an increased activity of MPST, cystathionase and rhodanese. In other brain regions the role of these three sulfurtransferases was not so clear and it seemed that in the telencephalon, where the total sulfur content, but not the sulfane sulfur level, was significantly increased, some sulfur-containing compounds, such as GSH and/or cysteine, appeared in response to cyanide.

  10. A novel non-mouse mammary tumor virus activation of the Int-3 gene in a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kordon, E C; Smith, G H; Callahan, R; Gallahan, D

    1995-01-01

    In a mouse mammary tumor model system in which carcinogenic progression can be investigated, we have found a unique mutation of Int-3 associated with progression from premalignant lobular hyperplasia to tumor. Sequence analysis of the rearranged fragment revealed an insertion of an intracisternal type A particle (IAP) within the Int-3 gene. Int-3 is mutated frequently in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors by insertion of MMTV proviral DNA into this intragenic region. In these mutations, the insertion produces a chimeric Int-3 transcript encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the Int-3 protein driven by the MMTV long terminal repeat promoter. In this case, the IAP DNA was inserted in the opposite transcriptional orientation relative to Int-3; nevertheless, a similar chimeric RNA transcript driven by a cryptic promoter in the oppositely oriented 5' IAP long terminal repeat was generated. This is the first demonstration that an insertional mutation unrelated to MMTV activates an Int gene commonly associated with mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:7494323

  11. Human liver tumors in relation to steroidal usage.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, G H; Christopherson, W M

    1983-01-01

    Since 1973 a number of investigators have reported an association between liver neoplasia and steroid usage. Through referral material we have examined the histology of over 250 cases of hepatic neoplasia, most in patients receiving steroid medications. The majority have been benign, predominantly focal nodular hyperplasia (55%) and hepatocellular adenoma (39%). The average age was 31.4 years; 83% had significant steroid exposure with an average duration of 71 months for focal nodular hyperplasia and 79.6 months for hepatocellular adenoma. The type of estrogenic agent was predominantly mestranol; however, during the period mestranol was the most frequently used synthetic steroid. A distinct clinical entity of life threatening hemorrhage from the lesion occurred in 31% of patients with hepatocellular adenoma and 9% of patients with focal nodular hyperplasia. Recurrence of benign tumors has occurred in some patients who continued using steroids and regression has been observed in patients who had incomplete tumor removal but discontinued steroid medication. Medial and intimal vascular changes have been present in a large number of the benign tumors. The relationship of these vascular changes to oncogenesis is unclear, but similar lesions have been described in the peripheral vasculature associated with steroid administration. A number of hepatocellular carcinomas have also been seen. Of significance is the young age of these patients and lack of abnormal histology in adjacent nonneoplastic liver. A striking number of the malignant hepatocellular tumors have been of the uncommon type described as "eosinophilic hepatocellular carcinoma with lamellar fibrosis." The epidemiology of liver lesions within this series is difficult to assess, since the material has been referred from very diverse locations. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:6307679

  12. Host pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) prevents progression of liver metastasis in a mouse model of uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lattier, John M; Yang, Hua; Crawford, Susan; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2013-12-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) has a 30 % 5-year mortality rate, primarily due to liver metastasis. Both angiogenesis and stromagenesis are important mechanisms for the progression of liver metastasis. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), an anti-angiogenic and anti-stromagenic protein, is produced by hepatocytes. Exogenous PEDF suppresses metastasis progression; however, the effects of host-produced PEDF on metastasis progression are unknown. We hypothesize that host PEDF inhibits liver metastasis progression through a mechanism involving angiogenesis and stromagenesis. Mouse melanoma cells were injected into the posterior ocular compartment of PEDF-null mice and control mice. After 1 month, the number, size, and mean vascular density (MVD) of liver metastases were determined. The stromal component of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the type III collagen they produce was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Host PEDF inhibited the total area of liver metastasis and the frequency of macrometastases (diameter >200 μm) but did not affect the total number of metastases. Mice expressing PEDF exhibited significantly lower MVD and less type III collagen production in metastases. An increase in activated HSCs was seen in the absence of PEDF, but this result was not statistically significant. In conclusion, host PEDF inhibits the progression of hepatic metastases in a mouse model of UM, and loss of PEDF is accompanied by an increase in tumor blood vessel density and type III collagen.

  13. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats.

  14. Finding Mouse Models of Human Lymphomas and Leukemia’s using The Jackson Laboratory Mouse Tumor Biology Database

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Dale A.; Sundberg, John P.; Krupke, Debra M.; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  15. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  16. Bromopropylate: induction of hepatic cytochromes P450 and absence of covalent binding to DNA in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Thomas, H; Sagelsdorff, P; Molitor, E; Skripsky, T; Waechter, F

    1994-11-01

    Oral administration of benzilic acid ester-based acaricide bromopropylate at daily doses of 3, 15, 100, and 300 mg/kg body wt to young adult male Tif:MAGf mice for 14 days caused slightly increased liver weights in the high-dose group. A dose-dependent increase of the microsomal cytochrome P450 content was accompanied by elevated ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, pentoxyresorufin O-depentylase, and total testosterone hydroxylase activities. When compared with mice treated in parallel with the model compounds for hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme induction, phenobarbitone, and 3-methylcholanthrene, the enzyme activity changes observed with bromopropylate largely equalled those expressed in phenobarbitone-treated mice. Immunochemical studies with monoclonal antibodies against rat liver cytochrome P450 isoenzymes of the gene families 1A, 2B, 3A, and 4A confirmed that bromopropylate is a phenobarbitone-type inducer in the mouse liver. Titration of liver microsomal suspensions with bromopropylate yielded Type I substrate binding spectra. The specific amplitude was increased 1.5-fold when microsomes from bromopropylate-treated mice (300 mg/kg body wt) were used instead of control microsomes, indicating the induction of cytochromes P450 catalyzing the oxidative metabolism of the test compound. Single oral administration of 300 mg/kg body wt [14C]bromopropylate to male mice, without or following pretreatment for 14 days with 300 mg/kg body wt unlabeled bromopropylate, gave no indication for DNA binding of the test compound in the liver. This excludes a genotoxic potential via covalent DNA modification. The results suggest that, in analogy to phenobarbitone, bromopropylate acts as a tumor promotor rather than a tumor initiator in the mouse liver.

  17. Transplacental arsenic plus postnatal 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate exposures associated with hepatocarcinogenesis induce similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Merrick, B. Alex; Shen Jun; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Collins, Jennifer; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Logsdon, Daniel; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-06-15

    Our prior work shows that in utero arsenic exposure alone is a complete transplacental carcinogen, producing hepatocellular carcinoma in adult male offspring but not in females. In a follow-up study to potentially promote arsenic-initiated tumors, mice were exposed to arsenic (85 ppm) from gestation day 8 to 18 and then exposed to 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a well-known tumor promoter after weaning. The dermal application of TPA (2 {mu}g/0.1 ml acetone, twice/week for 21 weeks) after transplacental arsenic did not further increase arsenic-induced liver tumor formation in adult males but significantly increased liver tumor formation in adult females. Thus, for comparison, liver tumors and normal liver samples taken from adult male and female mice at necropsy were analyzed for aberrant gene/protein expression by microarray, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Arsenic/TPA treatment resulted in increased expression of {alpha}-fetoprotein, k-ras, c-myc, estrogen receptor-{alpha}, cyclin D1, cdk2na, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, cytokeratin-8, cytokeratin-18, glutathione S-transferases and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in liver and liver tumors from both male and female mice. Arsenic/TPA also decreased the expression of BRCA1, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, CYP7B1, CYP2F2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 in normal and cancerous livers. Alterations in these gene products were associated with arsenic/TPA-induced liver tumors, regardless of sex. Thus, transplacental arsenic plus postnatal TPA exposure induced similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver, which are persistent and potentially important to the mechanism of arsenic initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  18. Registration of serial sections of mouse liver cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Baheerathan, S; Albregtsen, F; Danielsen, H E

    1998-10-01

    Image registration of biological tissue is essential for 3D reconstruction, which is important for visualizing and quantifying the 3D relationships between internal structures of an object. The biological role of DNA organization, which is an extremely complex 3D architecture within the cell nucleus, has come into focus since it has become clear that the chromatin structure in itself functions as a regulator of DNA. Thus, 3D reconstruction of cell nuclei based on consecutive series of high-resolution ultrathin slices may provide new information about the chromatin structure and its organizational changes during carcinogenesis. This work focuses mainly on the problem of registering successive serial transmission electron micrographs of ultrathin sections of mouse liver cell nuclei to analyse the 3D chromatin structure. A five-step semiautomatic interactive registration method is proposed. The first two steps of the procedure correct the rotation and translation components by using the phase correlation. The third, fourth and fifth steps correct the global distortion, employing a point mapping method based on different ways of selecting the control points. In step three, the control points were automatically computed by phase correlating corresponding subimages of the reference and sensed image. A semiautomatic method is used in the fourth step to select the control points, i.e. an automated method for computing the centre of mass of manually identified anatomical structures in neighbouring slices. For the sections which could not be properly corrected by the four steps, a final step is introduced, where control points are manually selected in the reference and sensed images. An algorithm is proposed to examine the spatial distribution of selected control points. Four sets of serial sections of mouse liver cell nuclei, each with approximately 100 sections, are registered by the proposed method and also registered manually for the comparison of registration accuracy

  19. Transgenic mouse model expressing P53R172H, luciferase, EGFP, and KRASG12D in a single open reading frame for live imaging of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Calvisi, Diego F.; Moon, Hyuk; Baek, Sinhwa; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Cho, Kyung Joo; Chung, Sook In; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse cancer models allow tumors to be imaged in vivo via co-expression of a reporter gene with a tumor-initiating gene. However, differential transcriptional and translational regulation between the tumor-initiating gene and the reporter gene can result in inconsistency between the actual tumor size and the size indicated by the imaging assay. To overcome this limitation, we developed a transgenic mouse in which two oncogenes, encoding P53R172H and KRASG12D, are expressed together with two reporter genes, encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and firefly luciferase, in a single open reading frame following Cre-mediated DNA excision. Systemic administration of adenovirus encoding Cre to these mice induced specific transgene expression in the liver. Repeated bioluminescence imaging of the mice revealed a continuous increase in the bioluminescent signal over time. A strong correlation was found between the bioluminescent signal and actual tumor size. Interestingly, all liver tumors induced by P53R172H and KRASG12D in the model were hepatocellular adenomas. The mouse model was also used to trace cell proliferation in the epidermis via live fluorescence imaging. We anticipate that the transgenic mouse model will be useful for imaging tumor development in vivo and for investigating the oncogenic collaboration between P53R172H and KRASG12D. PMID:25623590

  20. GRP78 as a regulator of liver steatosis and cancer progression mediated by loss of the tumor suppressor PTEN.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-T; Zhu, G; Pfaffenbach, K; Kanel, G; Stiles, B; Lee, A S

    2014-10-16

    Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a molecular chaperone widely elevated in human cancers, is critical for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein folding, stress signaling and PI3K/AKT activation. Genetic knockout models of GRP78 revealed that GRP78 maintains homeostasis of metabolic organs, including liver, pancreas and adipose tissues. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are the most common liver cancers. There is a lack of effective therapeutics for HCC and CC, highlighting the need to further understand liver tumorigenic mechanisms. PTEN (phosphatase and tenson homolog deleted on chromosome 10), a tumor suppressor that antagonizes the PI3K/AKT pathway, is inactivated in a wide range of tumors, including 40-50% of human liver cancers. To elucidate the role of GRP78 in liver cancer, we created a mouse model with biallelic liver-specific deletion of Pten and Grp78 mediated by Albumin-Cre-recombinase (cP(f/f)78(f/f)). Interestingly, in contrast to PTEN, deletion of GRP78 was progressive but incomplete. At 3 months, cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers showed hepatomegaly, activation of lipogenic genes, exacerbated steatosis and liver injury, implying that GRP78 protects the liver against PTEN-null-mediated pathogenesis. Furthermore, in response to liver injury, we observed increased proliferation and expansion of bile duct and liver progenitor cells in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers. Strikingly, bile duct cells in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers maintained wild-type (WT) GRP78 level, whereas adjacent areas showed GRP78 reduction. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed selective JNK activation, β-catenin downregulation, along with PDGFRα upregulation, which was unique to cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers at 6 months. Development of both HCC and CC was accelerated and was evident in cP(f/f)78(f/f) livers at 8-9 months, coinciding with intense GRP78 expression in the cancer lesions, and GRP78 expression in adjacent normal areas reverted back to the WT level. In contrast, c78(f/f) livers

  1. Molecular dynamics in mouse atrial tumor sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Voss, J C; Mahaney, J E; Jones, L R; Thomas, D D

    1995-01-01

    We have determined directly the effects of the inhibitory peptide phospholamban (PLB) on the rotational dynamics of the calcium pump (Ca-ATPase) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). This was accomplished by comparing mouse ventricular SR, which has PLB levels similar to those found in other mammals, with mouse atrial SR, which is effectively devoid of PLB and thus has much higher (unregulated) calcium pump activity. To obtain sufficient quantities of atrial SR, we isolated the membranes from atrial tumor cells. We used time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy of an erythrosin isothiocyanate label attached selectively and rigidly to the Ca-ATPase, to detect the microsecond rotational motion of the Ca-ATPase in the two preparations. The time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy decays of both preparations at 25 degrees C were multi-exponential, because of the presence of different oligomeric species. The rotational correlation times for the different oligomers were similar for the two preparations, but the total decay amplitude was substantially greater for atrial tumor SR, indicating that a smaller fraction of the Ca-ATPase molecules exists as large aggregates. Phosphorylation of PLB in ventricular SR decreased the population of large-scale Ca-ATPase aggregates to a level similar to that of atrial tumor SR. Lipid chain mobility (fluidity), detected by electron paramagnetic resonance of stearic acid spin labels, was very similar in the two preparations, indicating that the higher protein mobility in atrial tumor SR is not due to higher lipid fluidity. We conclude that PLB inhibits by inducing Ca-ATPase lateral aggregation, which can be relieved either by phosphorylating or removing PLB. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:7612820

  2. Regulation by vascular endothelial growth factor of human colon cancer tumorigenesis in a mouse model of experimental liver metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R S; Yuan, H; Matli, M R; Gillett, N A; Ferrara, N

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between angiogenesis and hepatic tumorigenesis, we examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 8 human colon carcinoma cell lines and in 30 human colorectal cancer liver metastases. Abundant message for VEGF was found in all tumors, localized to the malignant cells within each neoplasm. Two receptors for VEGF, KDR and flt1, were also demonstrated in most of the tumors examined. KDR and flt1 mRNA were limited to tumor endothelial cells and were more strongly expressed in the hepatic metastases than in the sinusoidal endothelium of the surrounding liver parenchyma. VEGF monoclonal antibody administration in tumor-bearing athymic mice led to a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth of subcutaneous xenografts and to a marked reduction in the number and size of experimental liver metastases. In hepatic metastases of VEGF antibody-treated mice, neither blood vessels nor expression of the mouse KDR homologue flk-1 could be demonstrated. These data indicate that VEGF is a commonly expressed angiogenic factor in human colorectal cancer metastases, that VEGF receptors are up-regulated as a concomitant of hepatic tumorigenesis, and that modulation of VEGF gene expression or activity may represent a potentially effective antineoplastic therapy in colorectal cancer. Images PMID:7535799

  3. Enhanced radiation lethality in partially synchronized solid mouse tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Todoroki, T.; Koike, S.; Tsunemoto, H.; Watanabe, I.

    1982-12-01

    We studied the combined effects of local irradiation on in vivo partially synchronized solid mouse tumors. Syngeneic fibrosarcoma cells were transplanted s.c. into the thighs of C3H/He mice. When the tumors grew to 179 cu mm in volume, 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) was repeatedly injected i.p. followed by a single injection of vinblastine sulfate at 5 hr after the end of the ara-C treatment. The mitotic indexes increased from 4% in control to 22 to 23% at 5 hr after the ara-C treatment, and the level continued for another 5 hr. Further treatment with vinblastine sulfate after the ara-C injections resulted in more effective accumulation of mitotic cells, i.e., 30% at the sixth hr. The tumor was locally irradiated with a single dose of 3000 rads of gamma-rays at the maximum level of mitotic index. The results indicated a synergistic inhibition of tumor growth and an 84% prolongation of the 50% survival day beyond that of the nontreated control mice.

  4. Liver Metastases of Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumors: Ki67 heterogeneity and WHO grade discordance with primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chanjuan; Gonzalez, Raul S.; Zhao, Zhiguo; Koyama, Tatsuki; Cornish, Toby C; Hande, Kenneth R; Walker, Ronald; Sandler, Martin; Berlin, Jordan; Liu, Eric H

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined Ki67 heterogeneity within single and between synchronous liver metastases of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors. Methods There were 27 patients (10 males and 17 females) with ≥2 liver metastases. Ki67 index was used to classify the tumors into WHO grade 1, 2, or 3. Association between Ki67 heterogeneity and tumor size of liver metastases were analyzed. Correlation of tumor grade with patient survival was also evaluated. Results Primary tumors from 20 patients were graded, including 17 grade 1 and 3 grade 2. A total of 188 liver metastases were resected, including 122 (65%) grade 1, 47 (25%) grade 2, and 19 (10%) grade 3. The highest tumor grade was grade 1 in10 (37%), grade 2 in 9 (33%), and grade 3 in 8 (30%) patients. Patients with ≥1 grade 3 liver lesions were associated with a shorter progression-free survival compared to those with grade 1/2 tumors (p<0.001). A positive association was found between tumor size and Ki67 index (p=0.04) as well as between tumor size and intratumoral Ki67 heterogeneity (p<0.001). Conclusions Intratumoral and intertumoral Ki67 heterogeneity is common and is positively correlated with tumor size. The presence of ≥1 grade 3 liver lesions predicts a worse prognosis. PMID:25696798

  5. A microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants o...

  6. Altered microRNA expression induced by tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants ...

  7. A novel acute lethal liver injury mouse model with visualization of NF-κB activity for treatment of severe acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Huanjin; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Lifang; Peng, Yanxia; Wu, Ping; Xie, Tong; Pan, Qingjun

    2017-01-01

    Acute lethal inflammation, especially that related to liver injury, is an important clinical issue. To date, however, there is no model that can be used to assess this serious condition. This study was designed to establish a novel lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced acute lethal liver injury model in nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transgenic mice. The results show that a high dose of LPS (500 μg/kg) plus D-GalN (800 mg/kg) successfully established a novel mouse model of acute lethal liver injury with a lifespan of 8-10 h. Significantly increased NF-κB activity, detected with an in vivo imaging system (IVIS), peaked at approximately 4 h post-LPS/D-GalN challenge in NF-κB transgenic mice. Moreover, the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 were significantly increased and peaked at approximately 4 h post-i.p. injection of LPS/D-GalN. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) also sharply increased. Correlation analyses showed that NF-κB activity was significantly correlated with serum levels of ALT and AST. The mouse model livers showed marked congestion and hemorrhage, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining confirmed the destruction of the lobular structure and severe hepatocyte necrosis and hemorrhage. None of these changes were observed in the control mice. In summary, a novel LPS/D-GalN-induced acute lethal liver injury model with visualization of NF-κB activity was established in NF-κB transgenic mice. This model will provide the technology for developing new therapeutic strategies for treatment of severe acute liver injury complicated by endotoxemia or septicemia. PMID:28386325

  8. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  9. Metabolic conversion of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in adult and newborn mouse skin and mouse liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Berry, D L; Bracken, W M; Fischer, S M; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1978-08-01

    Tritiated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was applied to adult mouse skin; at specified time intervals the mice were killed, and the labeled phorbol was extracted and subjected to separation and quantitation by high-pressure liquid chromatography. After 24 hr, TPA comprised greater than 96% of the recovered label from the skin, and its apparent half-life was 17.8 hr. Pretreatment of adult skin with TPA for 4 weeks before treatment with labeled TPA resulted in an increase in the clearance rate of TPA from the skin. Skin from newborn mice was capable of converting TPA into monoesters and phorbol, but the clearance rate in the adult was about 12 times more rapid than it was in the newborn. Epidermal homogenates converted TPA into 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol, phorbol-13-acetate, and phorbol. Hepatic homogenates were able to convert TPA to monoesters and phorbol at rates 14 to 15 times faster than were epidermal homogenates. Attempts to isolate any previously undescribed metabolites of TPA by use of liver homogenates were unsuccessful, and mixed-function oxidation did not contribute to the metabolism of TPA. From inhibitor studies it was judged that esterases were implicated in the conversion of TPA to monoesters and phorbol. The results support the hypothesis that the tumor-promoting activity of TPA is directly related to its concentration in a specific tissue and that conversion of TPA to an active metabolite probably does not occur.

  10. Detection of mouse liver cancer via a parallel iterative shrinkage method in hybrid optical/microcomputed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Zhenwen; Li, Yongbao; Ning, Nannan; Yang, Xin; Li, Xingde; Tian, Jie

    2012-12-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. In order to enable the noninvasive detection of small liver tumors in mice, we present a parallel iterative shrinkage (PIS) algorithm for dual-modality tomography. It takes advantage of microcomputed tomography and multiview bioluminescence imaging, providing anatomical structure and bioluminescence intensity information to reconstruct the size and location of tumors. By incorporating prior knowledge of signal sparsity, we associate some mathematical strategies including specific smooth convex approximation, an iterative shrinkage operator, and affine subspace with the PIS method, which guarantees the accuracy, efficiency, and reliability for three-dimensional reconstruction. Then an in vivo experiment on the bead-implanted mouse has been performed to validate the feasibility of this method. The findings indicate that a tiny lesion less than 3 mm in diameter can be localized with a position bias no more than 1 mm the computational efficiency is one to three orders of magnitude faster than the existing algorithms; this approach is robust to the different regularization parameters and the lp norms. Finally, we have applied this algorithm to another in vivo experiment on an HCCLM3 orthotopic xenograft mouse model, which suggests the PIS method holds the promise for practical applications of whole-body cancer detection.

  11. PD-L1 Blockade Attenuated Sepsis-Induced Liver Injury in a Mouse Cecal Ligation and Puncture Model

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rui; Zhu, Jiali; Wang, Jiafeng; Li, Jinbao

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a major role in hypermetabolism and produces acute phase proteins during systemic inflammatory response syndrome and it is of vital importance in host defense and bacteria clearance. Our previous studies indicated that programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) are crucial modulators of host immune responses during sepsis. Our current study was designed to investigate the role of PD-L1 in sepsis-induced liver injury by a mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. Our results indicated that there was a significant increase of PD-L1 expression in liver after CLP challenge compared to sham-operated controls, in terms of levels of mRNA transcription and immunohistochemistry. Anti-PD-L1 antibody significantly alleviated the morphology of liver injury in CLP mice. Anti-PD-L1 antibody administration decreased ALT and AST release in CLP mice, decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 mRNA in liver after sepsis challenge. Thus, anti-PD-L1 antibody might have a therapeutic potential in attenuating liver injury in sepsis. PMID:24324295

  12. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  13. Glomus tumor of the liver in a cow

    PubMed Central

    HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; KOMAGATA, Makoto; SHITAMURA, Keiichi; CHIBA, Shiori; MATSUMOTO, Kotaro; INOKUMA, Hisashi; MATSUI, Takane; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old Holstein-Friesian cow exhibited anorexia and jaundice. A large mass was found in the liver during necropsy. Macroscopically, the mass was composed of dark red multilobular tissue and a centrally located abscess, which was connected to the hepatic duct. Histologically, the mass consisted of proliferation of small neoplastic cells and was demarcated from the hepatic parenchyma by a thick region of granulation tissue. The neoplastic cells were predominantly arranged in solid sheets, but they also formed blood-filled cancellous structures, and proliferating foci were seen around blood vessels. Periodic acid-Schiff reaction demonstrated that a fine basement membrane-like structure surrounded the neoplastic cells. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin and alpha smooth muscle actin and negative for cytokeratin, factor VIII-related antigen, chromogranin and desmin. Based on its histopathological features, the hepatic neoplasm was diagnosed as a primary glomus tumor. This is the first report about a primary glomus tumor of the liver in a cow. PMID:25715802

  14. PPARÁ-DEPENDENT GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE MOUSE LIVER AFTER EXPOSURE TO PEROXISOME PROLIFERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferators (PP) are a large class of structurally diverse chemicals that mediate their effects in the liver mainly through the PP-activated receptor ¿ (PPARα). Development of PP induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mouse liver is known to be dependent on PPAR&#...

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Propiconazole Responses in Mouse Liver-Comparison of Genomic and Proteomic Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this commonly used fungicide. Utilizing t...

  16. Proteomic analysis of propiconazole responses in mouse liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this fungicide. Utilizing twodimensional...

  17. Notch1 functions as a tumor suppressor in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Michael; Wolfer, Anita; Raj, Kenneth; Kummer, J Alain; Mill, Pleasantine; van Noort, Mascha; Hui, Chi-chung; Clevers, Hans; Dotto, G Paolo; Radtke, Freddy

    2003-03-01

    Notch proteins are important in binary cell-fate decisions and inhibiting differentiation in many developmental systems, and aberrant Notch signaling is associated with tumorigenesis. The role of Notch signaling in mammalian skin is less well characterized and is mainly based on in vitro studies, which suggest that Notch signaling induces differentiation in mammalian skin. Conventional gene targeting is not applicable to establishing the role of Notch receptors or ligands in the skin because Notch1-/- embryos die during gestation. Therefore, we used a tissue-specific inducible gene-targeting approach to study the physiological role of the Notch1 receptor in the mouse epidermis and the corneal epithelium of adult mice. Unexpectedly, ablation of Notch1 results in epidermal and corneal hyperplasia followed by the development of skin tumors and facilitated chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. Notch1 deficiency in skin and in primary keratinocytes results in increased and sustained expression of Gli2, causing the development of basal-cell carcinoma-like tumors. Furthermore, Notch1 inactivation in the epidermis results in derepressed beta-catenin signaling in cells that should normally undergo differentiation. Enhanced beta-catenin signaling can be reversed by re-introduction of a dominant active form of the Notch1 receptor. This leads to a reduction in the signaling-competent pool of beta-catenin, indicating that Notch1 can inhibit beta-catenin-mediated signaling. Our results indicate that Notch1 functions as a tumor-suppressor gene in mammalian skin.

  18. Immunosuppression in the livers of mice with obstructive jaundice participates in their susceptibility to bacterial infection and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kawarabayashi, Nobuaki; Seki, Shuhji; Hatsuse, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Manabu; Takigawa, Toshimichi; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Kawabata, Toshinobu; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Shono, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Hidetaka

    2010-05-01

    Although patients with obstructive jaundice are susceptible to bacterial infections and cancers, the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) of bile duct-ligated (BDL) mice were immunologically assessed. Liver natural killer T cells were greatly decreased within 24 h after BDL. Upon injection of Escherichia coli (E. coli; 10 colony-forming units) at 7 days after the procedure, all BDL mice had died, but no sham mice died. Consistently, an overgrowth of E. coli was seen in the livers of BDL mice. Although the serum IL-12 and IL-18 levels after E. coli challenge in BDL mice were higher than those in sham mice, the IFN-gamma level was greatly suppressed. However, exogenous IFN-gamma injection significantly increased BDL mouse survival after E. coli challenge. Furthermore, liver MNC of BDL mice exhibited a lower cytotoxic activity against tumors, and BDL mice intravenously injected with liver metastatic EL-4 cells showed markedly increased EL-4 metastases. The total bile acids, as well as the bile acid fractions, increased in the sera and liver. IFN-gamma production by liver MNC from normal mice stimulated with LPS in vitro was inhibited by the addition of bile acids, whereas, conversely, the production of IL-12 and IL-18 increased. In conclusion, liver natural killer T cells were diminished in BDL mice, and the function of liver MNC (IFN-gamma production) was also impaired presumably due to increased bile acids. This may partly explain the increased susceptibility of BDL mice to bacterial infections and tumor metastasis.

  19. Insights into granulosa cell tumors using spontaneous or genetically engineered mouse models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that have been studied for decades. However, their infrequency has delayed efforts to research their etiology. Recently, mutations in human GCTs have been discovered, which has led to further research aimed at determining the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Mouse models have been important tools for studying GCTs, and have provided means to develop and improve diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus far, several genetically modified mouse models, along with one spontaneous mouse model, have been reported. This review summarizes the phenotypes of these mouse models and their applicability in elucidating the mechanisms of granulosa cell tumor development. PMID:27104151

  20. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiaomin; Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Meiling; Zhou, Lei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  1. Keratin 18-deficiency results in steatohepatitis and liver tumors in old mice: A model of steatohepatitis-associated liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Eva M.; Wohlrab, Christina; Golob-Schwarzl, Nicole; Svendova, Vendula; Schimek, Michael G.; Stumptner, Cornelia; Thüringer, Andrea; Speicher, Michael R.; Lackner, Carolin; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Backround Steatohepatitis (SH)-associated liver carcinogenesis is an increasingly important issue in clinical medicine. SH is morphologically characterized by steatosis, hepatocyte injury, ballooning, hepatocytic cytoplasmic inclusions termed Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs), inflammation and fibrosis. Results 17-20-months-old Krt18−/− and Krt18+/− mice in contrast to wt mice spontaneously developed liver lesions closely resembling the morphological spectrum of human SH as well as liver tumors. The pathologic alterations were more pronounced in Krt18−/− than in Krt18+/− mice. The frequency of liver tumors with male predominance was significantly higher in Krt18−/− compared to age-matched Krt18+/− and wt mice. Krt18-deficient tumors in contrast to wt animals displayed SH features and often pleomorphic morphology. aCGH analysis of tumors revealed chromosomal aberrations in Krt18−/− liver tumors, affecting loci of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Materials and Methods Livers of 3-, 6-, 12- and 17-20-months-old aged wild type (wt), Krt18+/− and Krt18−/− (129P2/OlaHsd background) mice were analyzed by light and immunofluorescence microscopy as well as immunohistochemistry. Liver tumors arising in aged mice were analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Conclusions Our findings show that K18 deficiency of hepatocytes leads to steatosis, increasing with age, and finally to SH. K18 deficiency and age promote liver tumor development in mice, frequently on the basis of chromosomal instability, resembling human HCC with stemness features. PMID:27689336

  2. Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Tumors in the Left Lateral Liver Section

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung-Yip; Lee, Ser-Yee; Lee, Victor T. W.; Cheow, Peng-Chung; Chow, Pierce K. H.; Ooi, London L. P. J.; Chung, Alexander Y. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The laparoscopic approach is increasingly adopted for liver resections today especially for lesions located in the left lateral liver section. This study was conducted to determine the impact of the introduction of laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) as a surgical option for suspected small- to medium-sized (<8 cm) tumors located in the left lateral section (LLS). Methods: This is a retrospective review of 156 consecutive patients who underwent LLR or open liver resection (OLR) of tumors located in the LLS. The study was divided into 2 consecutive periods (period 1, January 2003 through September 2006, and period 2, October 2006 through April 2014); LLR was available as a surgical option only in the latter period. Comparisons made were LLR versus OLR, LLR versus OLR (in period 2 only), and resections performed in period 1 versus period 2. Results: Forty-two patients underwent LLR with 4 conversions. LLR was significantly associated with a longer median operative time [167.5 minutes (range, 60–525) vs 105 minutes (range, 40–235); P < .001], decreased need for the Pringle maneuver [n = 1 (2%) vs 22 (19%); P = .008], and shorter postoperative stay [n = 4 (range, 1–10) days vs 5 days (range, 2–47); P < .001] compared with open resection. Comparison of the 42 patients who underwent LLR with the 64 contemporaneous patients who underwent OLR demonstrated similar outcomes. Again, LLR was associated with a significantly longer operation, decreased need for the Pringle maneuver, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: LLR can be safely adopted to treat lesions in the LLS. The procedure is associated with a shorter postoperative stay and a decreased need for the Pringle maneuver, but longer operative time compared with that required for OLR. PMID:26877627

  3. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, N. A.; Muggenburg, B. A.; Mewhinney, J. A.; Hahn, F. F.; Seiler, F. A.; Boecker, B. B.; McClellan, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of 238PuO2. Initial deposition of 238PuO2 in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the 238Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to 238PuO2, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after 238Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that 238Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of 238Pu. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3142267

  4. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  5. Orthotopic mouse models of tumor metastasis expressing fluorescent reporters produce imageable circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are of high importance, since they are potential metastatic precursors and are readily available for prognostic analysis and treatment testing. In this review, we demonstrate the great power that green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeling and orthotopic mouse models of cancer confer to the study of CTCs for isolation and characterization, including metastatic testing in mice and the chick embryo as well as drug response testing in vitro. We also describe a facile method to label patient CTCs ex vivo using a telomerase-expressing GFP-containing adenovirus that will allow the CTC studies described in this review to be translated clinically.

  6. Fulminant liver failure model with hepatic encephalopathy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Chen, Feng; Baine, Ann-Marie T.; Gardner, Lindsay B.; Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To develop a reliable murine model for fulminant liver failure (FLF). Material and Methods We treated three groups of male C57BL/6 mice:as controls, with azoxymethane (AOM), and with galactosamine (Gal) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). Effects of body temperature (BT) control on survival, in all three groups were investigated. Using BT control, survival, histopathological findings and biochemical/coagulation profiles were compared between the experimental groups. Effects of hydration on international normalized ratios of prothrombin time (PT-INR) were also checked. Dose-dependent survival curves were made for both experimental groups. Neurological behaviors were assessed using a coma scale. Results No unexpected BT effects were seen in the control group. The AOM group, but not the Gal+TNFα group, showed significant differences in survival curves between those with and without BT care. Histopathological assessment showed consistent FLF findings in both experimental groups with BT care. Between the experimental groups, there were significant differences in aspartate aminotransferase levels and PT-INR; and significant differences in PT-INRs between sufficiently- and insufficiently-hydrated groups. There were significant differences between FLF models, in the duration of each coma stage, with significant differences in stages 1 and 3 as percentages of the diseased state (stages 1-4). The two FLF models with BT care showed different survival curves in the dose-dependent survival study. Conclusion Azoxymethane can provide a good FLF model, but requires a specialized environment and careful BT control. Other FLF models may also be useful, depending on research purpose. Thoughtful attention to caregiving and close observation are indispensable for successful FLF models. PMID:24713795

  7. Primary Hepatic Osteosarcoma: A Rare Cause of Primary Liver Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Tsering Gyalpo Lama; Shuster, Marina; Chandra, Abhinav B.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Extraosseous osteosarcomas are rare, accounting for approximately 4% of all osteosarcomas. A literature review yields very few cases of osteosarcoma primarily arising from the hepatic parenchyma. CASE REPORT This report describes a case of a man in his 50s with a history of hepatitis C and cirrhosis who presented with 5 days of progressive right upper quadrant pain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a 4.4 cm × 4.8 cm × 4.8 cm right hepatic lobe mass with a large area of necrosis and peripheral enhancement. The subsequent liver biopsy showed few cores of tumor composed of fibroblastic malignant cells producing lace-like osteoid matrix. Osteosarcomatous foci in other parts of the body were excluded by performing extensive physical examination, radiologic imaging, and biopsy. Hence, a primary osteosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient underwent portal vein embolization in preparation for a surgical resection of the right liver lobe. He was admitted six weeks after the embolization for dyspnea and abdominal distension and expired due to abdominal hematoma and pulmonary embolism. CONCLUSION Based on the rarity, lack of consensus in treatment, and dismal prognosis, extraosseous osteosarcoma should be considered a separate entity from osseous osteosarcoma. More data and research are needed in this rare and understudied malignancy. PMID:27081321

  8. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  9. Effect of cyanobacteria extract on some associated enzymes in mouse liver in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Liu, Zhili; Zhou, Guoqing; Han, Zhiping; Zhang, Haiyang; Zhang, Yixiang

    2010-11-01

    Blooms of toxin-producing cyanobacteria have become increasingly common in the surface water of the world. In this study, we studied the dose- and time-dependent effects of a microcystin (MC) extract of cyanobacteria from Dianchi Lake in China on liver weight/body weight ratio and superoxide dismutase (SOD), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in mouse liver. We found that exposure to the cyanobacterial extract (CE) resulted in increase in liver weight/body weight ratio in a dose-dependent manner, and the mouse liver reached the maximum size at 1 h post-exposure (pe). SOD activity in mouse liver decreased in a dose-dependent manner, and time course study indicated that it decreased significantly at 1 and 2 h pe, and resumed at 3 h pe as compared to control. CE caused LDH activity in the livers of mice to decrease in a dose- and time-dependent manner except a small increase in 30 min pe mice. GSH-Px activity increased in a dose-dependent manner, and was higher than that in the control over the 3 h observation period. The present findings suggest that oxidative damage may be involved in the toxicity of microcystins on mouse.

  10. Sexual dimorphism of liver metastasis by murine pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is affected by expression of complement C5.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Kobayashi, Shinta; da Silva, Edaise; Clausen, Richard; Chan, Chang; Vosburgh, Evan; Tang, Laura H; Levine, Arnold J; Harris, Chris R

    2016-05-24

    In a mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (PanNETs), liver metastasis occurred at a higher frequency in males. Male mice also had higher serum and intratumoral levels of the innate immunity protein complement C5. In mice that lost the ability to express complement C5, there was a lower frequency of metastasis, and males no longer had a higher frequency of metastasis than females. Treatment with PMX53, a small molecule antagonist of C5aR1/CD88, the receptor for complement C5a, also reduced metastasis. Mice lacking a functional gene for complement C5 had smaller primary tumors, which were less invasive and lacked the CD68+ macrophages that have previously been associated with metastasis in this type of tumor. This is the first report of a gene that causes sexual dimorphism of metastasis in a mouse model. In the human disease, which also shows sexual dimorphism for metastasis, clinically advanced tumors expressed more complement C5 than less advanced tumors.

  11. A Transcriptomic Signature of Mouse Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Low, Jasmine; Miyajima, Atsushi; Tanaka, Minoru; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Ochsner, Scott; Zhu, Cornelia; Whelan, James; Callus, Bernard A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) can proliferate extensively, are able to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and contribute to liver regeneration. The presence of LPCs, however, often accompanies liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), indicating that they may be a cancer stem cell. Understanding LPC biology and establishing a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method to detect their presence in the liver will assist diagnosis and facilitate monitoring of treatment outcomes in patients with liver pathologies. A transcriptomic meta-analysis of over 400 microarrays was undertaken to compare LPC lines against datasets of muscle and embryonic stem cell lines, embryonic and developed liver (DL), and HCC. Three gene clusters distinguishing LPCs from other liver cell types were identified. Pathways overrepresented in these clusters denote the proliferative nature of LPCs and their association with HCC. Our analysis also revealed 26 novel markers, LPC markers, including Mcm2 and Ltbp3, and eight known LPC markers, including M2pk and Ncam. These markers specified the presence of LPCs in pathological liver tissue by qPCR and correlated with LPC abundance determined using immunohistochemistry. These results showcase the value of global transcript profiling to identify pathways and markers that may be used to detect LPCs in injured or diseased liver. PMID:27777588

  12. Automatic liver tumor segmentation on computed tomography for patient treatment planning and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Moghbel, Mehrdad; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Saripan, M Iqbal Bin

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of liver tumors from Computed Tomography (CT) and tumor burden analysis play an important role in the choice of therapeutic strategies for liver diseases and treatment monitoring. In this paper, a new segmentation method for liver tumors from contrast-enhanced CT imaging is proposed. As manual segmentation of tumors for liver treatment planning is both labor intensive and time-consuming, a highly accurate automatic tumor segmentation is desired. The proposed framework is fully automatic requiring no user interaction. The proposed segmentation evaluated on real-world clinical data from patients is based on a hybrid method integrating cuckoo optimization and fuzzy c-means algorithm with random walkers algorithm. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated using a clinical liver dataset containing one of the highest numbers of tumors utilized for liver tumor segmentation containing 127 tumors in total with further validation of the results by a consultant radiologist. The proposed method was able to achieve one of the highest accuracies reported in the literature for liver tumor segmentation compared to other segmentation methods with a mean overlap error of 22.78 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.75 in 3Dircadb dataset and a mean overlap error of 15.61 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.81 in MIDAS dataset. The proposed method was able to outperform most other tumor segmentation methods reported in the literature while representing an overlap error improvement of 6 % compared to one of the best performing automatic methods in the literature. The proposed framework was able to provide consistently accurate results considering the number of tumors and the variations in tumor contrast enhancements and tumor appearances while the tumor burden was estimated with a mean error of 0.84 % in 3Dircadb dataset.

  13. Automatic liver tumor segmentation on computed tomography for patient treatment planning and monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moghbel, Mehrdad; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Saripan, M. Iqbal Bin

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of liver tumors from Computed Tomography (CT) and tumor burden analysis play an important role in the choice of therapeutic strategies for liver diseases and treatment monitoring. In this paper, a new segmentation method for liver tumors from contrast-enhanced CT imaging is proposed. As manual segmentation of tumors for liver treatment planning is both labor intensive and time-consuming, a highly accurate automatic tumor segmentation is desired. The proposed framework is fully automatic requiring no user interaction. The proposed segmentation evaluated on real-world clinical data from patients is based on a hybrid method integrating cuckoo optimization and fuzzy c-means algorithm with random walkers algorithm. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated using a clinical liver dataset containing one of the highest numbers of tumors utilized for liver tumor segmentation containing 127 tumors in total with further validation of the results by a consultant radiologist. The proposed method was able to achieve one of the highest accuracies reported in the literature for liver tumor segmentation compared to other segmentation methods with a mean overlap error of 22.78 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.75 in 3Dircadb dataset and a mean overlap error of 15.61 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.81 in MIDAS dataset. The proposed method was able to outperform most other tumor segmentation methods reported in the literature while representing an overlap error improvement of 6 % compared to one of the best performing automatic methods in the literature. The proposed framework was able to provide consistently accurate results considering the number of tumors and the variations in tumor contrast enhancements and tumor appearances while the tumor burden was estimated with a mean error of 0.84 % in 3Dircadb dataset. PMID:27540353

  14. Mouse liver dispersion for the diagnosis of early-stage Fatty liver disease: a 70-sample study.

    PubMed

    Barry, Christopher T; Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Mooney, Robert A; Chuang, Kuang-Hsiang; Augustine, Alicia; Almudevar, Anthony; Cao, Wenqing; Rubens, Deborah J; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-04-01

    The accumulation of fat droplets within the liver is an important marker of liver disease. This study assesses gradations of steatosis in mouse livers using crawling waves, which are interfering patterns of shear waves introduced into the liver by external sources. The crawling waves are detected by Doppler ultrasound imaging techniques, and these are analyzed to estimate the shear wave speed as a function of frequency between 200 and 360 Hz. In a study of 70 mice with progressive increases in steatosis from 0% to >60%, increases in steatosis are found to increase the dispersion, or frequency dependence, of shear wave speed. This finding confirms an earlier, smaller study and points to the potential of a scoring system for steatosis based on shear wave dispersion.

  15. Trichloroethylene: Metabolism and Other Biological Determinants of Mouse Liver Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    finally) the cysteine conjugate. The cysteine conjugate then may be metabolized via cysteine beta-lyase or N- acetyl transferase to yield DCVC or the...considered. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 1,2-dichlorovinyl cysteine Cell Proliferation Trichloroethylene Modeling 77 Chloral Hydrate...J.F. and P.J. Boogaard. 1991. Nephrotoxicity of halogenated alkenyl cysteine -S- conjugates. Life Sci. 49(24):1769-1776. Paget, G.E. 1963

  16. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  17. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  18. Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein is required for normal mouse liver development

    PubMed Central

    Szunyogova, Eva; Zhou, Haiyan; Maxwell, Gillian K.; Powis, Rachael A.; Francesco, Muntoni; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Parson, Simon H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Decreased levels of, cell-ubiquitous, SMN protein is associated with a range of systemic pathologies reported in severe patients. Despite high levels of SMN protein in normal liver, there is no comprehensive study of liver pathology in SMA. We describe failed liver development in response to reduced SMN levels, in a mouse model of severe SMA. The SMA liver is dark red, small and has: iron deposition; immature sinusoids congested with blood; persistent erythropoietic elements and increased immature red blood cells; increased and persistent megakaryocytes which release high levels of platelets found as clot-like accumulations in the heart. Myelopoiesis in contrast, was unaffected. Further analysis revealed significant molecular changes in SMA liver, consistent with the morphological findings. Antisense treatment from birth with PMO25, increased lifespan and ameliorated all morphological defects in liver by postnatal day 21. Defects in the liver are evident at birth, prior to motor system pathology, and impair essential liver function in SMA. Liver is a key recipient of SMA therapies, and systemically delivered antisense treatment, completely rescued liver pathology. Liver therefore, represents an important therapeutic target in SMA. PMID:27698380

  19. Phytoestrogens regulate vitamin D metabolism in the mouse colon: relevance for colon tumor prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kállay, Enikö; Adlercreutz, Herman; Farhan, Hesso; Lechner, Daniel; Bajna, Erika; Gerdenitsch, Waltraud; Campbell, Moray; Cross, Heide S

    2002-11-01

    Soybean products are highly represented in the traditional Asian diet. Major components of soy proteins are phytoestrogens, such as isoflavones. They may be responsible for the extremely low incidence of prostate and mammary tumors and possibly also of colon cancer in countries such as China and Japan. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 level is inversely related to incidence of some cancers. Levels are determined by skin exposure to ultraviolet light or, to a minor extent, nutritional uptake and by subsequent conversion of the precursor vitamin D to the active hormone by the cytochrome P450 hydroxylases CYP27A1, CYP27B1 (responsible for synthesis) and CYP24 (responsible for catabolism) in liver and kidney. However, vitamin D synthesis is also found in colonocytes and is enhanced during incipient malignancy. This may indicate an autocrine/paracrine role for this differentiation-inducing hormone in defense against progression. We were able to demonstrate that either a single large oral dose of genistein or feeding soy protein for 4 mo elevated CYP27B1 and decreased CYP24 expression in the mouse colon. Our data therefore suggest that an inverse correlation of soy product consumption with colon tumor incidence may be consequent to enhanced colonic synthesis of the antimitotic hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

  20. [Baseline and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the liver in tumor patients].

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, A; Albrecht, T

    2008-10-01

    In patients with known malignancy, correct detection and characterization of liver lesions has important therapeutic consequences. Conventional sonography is the most commonly used modality for liver imaging in tumor patients. However, it has a lower sensitivity for the detection of liver metastases compared to contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The majority of liver metastases are hypoechoic and well defined in baseline ultrasound (US), while detection of isoechoic or small liver metastases <1 cm is difficult and the differentiation of liver metastases from benign liver lesions and other malignant liver tumors can be impossible with baseline US. The use of microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents and contrast-specific imaging techniques advanced the accuracy of ultrasound in liver imaging. Levovist and SonoVue are the US contrast agents approved for liver imaging in Europe. Compared to Levovist, SonoVue allows continuous imaging of the liver in real-time over a period of up to 5 minutes. As a result, SonoVue became the preferred contrast agent for liver imaging in the recent years, while Levovist became less important. Important for the detection of liver metastases are the portal venous and late phases in which metastases show a wash-out and can be detected as hypoechoic lesions in homogeneous enhanced liver parenchyma. The detection of hepatic metastases is substantially improved by CEUS compared to conventional B-mode sonography. Several studies showed sensitivity in detecting liver metastases comparable to that of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI. Furthermore, the typical enhancement patterns of the different benign and malignant liver lesions allow reliable characterization and differentiation from liver metastases in the majority of cases. This paper provides information about the advantages and expedient application of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in tumor patients.

  1. Alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yannan; Zhong, Yaogang; Ma, Tianran; Wu, Fei; Wu, Haoxiang; Yu, Hanjie; Huang, Chen; Li, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is closely correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cirrhosis. Structural changes in the glycans of serum and tissue proteins are reliable indicators of liver damage. However, little is known about the alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV infection. This study compared the differential expression of liver glycopatterns in 7 sets of normal pericarcinomatous tissues (PCTs), cirrhotic, and tumor tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC induced by HBV using lectin microarrays. Fluorescence-based lectin histochemistry and lectin blotting were further utilized to validate and assess the expression and distribution of certain glycans in 9 sets of corresponding liver tissue sections. Eight lectins (e.g., Jacalin and AAL) revealed significant difference in cirrhotic tissues versus PCTs. Eleven lectins (e.g., EEL and SJA) showed significant alteration during cirrhotic and tumor progression. The expression of Galα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal (EEL) and fucosyltransferase 1 was mainly increasing in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during PCTs-cirrhotic-tumor tissues progression, while the expression of T antigen (ACA and PNA) was decreased sharply in cytoplasm of tumor hepatocytes. Understanding the precision alteration of liver glycopatterns related to the development of hepatitis, cirrhosis, and tumor induced by HBV infection may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of chronic liver diseases and develop new antineoplastic therapeutic strategies.

  2. Histological changes in mouse liver and spleen caused by different Coxiella burnetii antigenic preparations.

    PubMed

    Kokorin, I N; Pushkareva, V I; Kazár, J; Schramek, S

    1985-09-01

    The effect was examined on mouse liver and spleen (inbred line A) of intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation of phase I Coxiella burnetii (C.b.) cells either untreated or treated with chloroform-methanol (CM) mixture in comparison to the trichloracetic acid extract (TCAE) from phase I C.b.) cells. The phase I C.b. cells were highly toxic as manifested by marked hepatosplenomegaly accompanied with hyperplastic, degenerative and necrotic changes in the liver. By contrast, phase I CM--treated C.b. cells and TCAE were nontoxic as evidenced by the absence of any distinct pathological changes in mouse viscera.

  3. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  4. Metabolism, Genomics, and DNA Repair in the Mouse Aging Liver

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Michel; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2011-01-01

    The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products, thereby maintaining body homeostasis. The liver undergoes substantial changes in structure and function within old age. Such changes are associated with significant impairment of many hepatic metabolic and detoxification activities, with implications for systemic aging and age-related disease. It has become clear, using rodent models as biological tools, that genetic instability in the form of gross DNA rearrangements or point mutations accumulate in the liver with age. DNA lesions, such as oxidized bases or persistent breaks, increase with age and correlate well with the presence of senescent hepatocytes. The level of DNA damage and/or mutation can be affected by changes in carcinogen activation, decreased ability to repair DNA, or a combination of these factors. This paper covers some of the DNA repair pathways affecting liver homeostasis with age using rodents as model systems. PMID:21559242

  5. Human Glucocorticoid Receptor β Regulates Gluconeogenesis and Inflammation in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Oakley, Robert H; Xiao, Xiao; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-12-28

    While in vitro studies have demonstrated that a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) splice isoform, β-isoform of human GR (hGRβ), acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of the classic hGRα and confers glucocorticoid resistance, the in vivo function of hGRβ is poorly understood. To this end, we created an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express hGRβ in the mouse liver under the control of the hepatocyte-specific promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of mouse livers showed that hGRβ significantly increased the expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved in endocrine system disorders and the inflammatory response. Physiologically, hGRβ antagonized GRα's function and attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis through downregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in wild-type (WT) mouse liver. Interestingly, however, hGRβ did not repress PEPCK in GR liver knockout (GRLKO) mice. In contrast, hGRβ regulates the expression of STAT1 in the livers of both WT and GRLKO mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that hGRβ binds to the intergenic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) of the STAT1 gene. Furthermore, treatment with RU486 inhibited the upregulation of STAT1 mediated by hGRβ. Finally, our array data demonstrate that hGRβ regulates unique components of liver gene expression in vivo by both GRα-dependent and GRα-independent mechanisms.

  6. Mouse Liver Protein Sulfhydryl Depletion after Acetaminophen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Shi, Qiang; Roberts, Dean W.; Hinson, Jack A.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Davis, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is the leading cause of acute liver failure in many countries. This study determined the extent of liver protein sulfhydryl depletion not only in whole liver homogenate but also in the zonal pattern of sulfhydryl depletion within the liver lobule. A single oral gavage dose of 150 or 300 mg/kg APAP in B6C3F1 mice produced increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, and glutathione depletion in a dose-dependent manner. Free protein sulfhydryls were measured in liver protein homogenates by labeling with maleimide linked to a near infrared fluorescent dye followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Global protein sulfhydryl levels were decreased significantly (48.4%) starting at 1 hour after the APAP dose and maintained at this reduced level through 24 hours. To visualize the specific hepatocytes that had reduced protein sulfhydryl levels, frozen liver sections were labeled with maleimide linked to horseradish peroxidase. The centrilobular areas exhibited dramatic decreases in free protein sulfhydryls while the periportal regions were essentially spared. These protein sulfhydryl-depleted regions correlated with areas exhibiting histopathologic injury and APAP binding to protein. The majority of protein sulfhydryl depletion was due to reversible oxidation since the global- and lobule-specific effects were essentially reversed when the samples were reduced with tris(2-carboxyethy)phosphine before maleimide labeling. These temporal and zonal pattern changes in protein sulfhydryl oxidation shed new light on the importance that changes in protein redox status might play in the pathogenesis of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:23093024

  7. Premetastatic niche formation in the liver: emerging mechanisms and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Achim

    2015-11-01

    The liver is recognized as the target organ of metastases of almost all prominent malignancies. Its unique biology renders this organ particularly susceptible to circulating disseminated tumour cells (DTCs), and it can be assumed that very early metastasis occurs in the liver. The premetastatic niche concept may explain very early metastasis, as it defines priming of a future target organ of metastasis by factors that may already be secreted from premalignant lesions. This review shows that comprehensive knowledge on mechanisms of premetastatic niche formation in the liver is based on pre-clinical models only and still rather rare, mostly due to the scarcity of mouse liver metastasis models displaying a tumour cell-free period in the liver or lack of liver-tropic syngeneic tumour cells to probe for the niche. Attentive re-assessment of previous studies and reviews was undertaken revealing only two clearly identified tumour-derived secreted factors (TDSFs), both inducing infiltration of the liver by bone marrow-derived cells and increased liver metastasis, namely tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) and macrophage-inducing factor (MIF). Future directions of this research area will comprise elucidation of the impact of TDSFs on regulation and activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and/or the specific architecture and homeostasis of the liver, as well as development of prognostic TDSF detection in patients at risk of liver metastasis.

  8. Cellular Organization of Normal Mouse Liver: A Histological, Quantitative Immunocytochemical, and Fine Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Janie L.; Ngo, Anthony; Lopez, Bryan; Kasabwalla, Natasha; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Robertson, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular organization of normal mouse liver was studied using light and electron microscopy and quantitative immunocytochemical techniques. The general histological organization of the mouse liver is similar to livers of other mammalian species, with a lobular organization based on the distributions of portal areas and central venules. The parenchymal hepatocytes were detected with immunocytochemical techniques to recognize albumin or biotin containing cells. The macrophage Kupffer cells were identified with F4-80 immunocytochemistry, Ito stellate cells were identified with GFAP immunocytochemistry, and endothelial cells were labeled with the CD-34 antibody. Kupffer cells were labeled with intravascularly administered fluorescently labeled latex microspheres of both large (0.5 μm) and small (0.03 μm) diameters, while endothelial cells were labeled only with small diameter microspheres. Neither hepatocytes nor Ito stellate cells were labeled by intravascularly administered latex microspheres. The principal fine structural features of hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells of mouse liver are similar to those reported for rat. Counts of immunocytochemically labeled cells with stained nuclei indicated that hepatocytes constituted approximately 52% of all labeled cells, Kupffer cells about 18%, Ito cells about 8%, and endothelial cells about 22% of all labeled cells. Approximately 35% of the hepatocytes contained two nuclei; none of the Kupffer or Ito cells were double nucleated. The presence of canaliculi and a bile duct system appear similar to that reported for other mammalian species. The cellular organization of the mouse liver is quite similar to that of other mammalian species, confirming that the mouse presents a useful animal model for studies of liver structure and function. PMID:19255771

  9. Factors associated with long-term survival in dogs undergoing liver lobectomy as treatment for liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Jessica R; Gilson, Stephen D; Hauptman, Joe; Mehler, Steve J; May, Lauren R

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe clinicopathologic findings in dogs that underwent surgical treatment of liver tumors and to define outcome-associated variables in this canine population. Medical records of 118 dogs that underwent liver lobectomy were reviewed. Variables were assessed via univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Hazard ratios, median survival times (MSTs), and Kaplan-Meier Survival curves (KMSCs) were created for significant variables. Of the dogs with surgically addressed hepatic tumors, 93% survived to discharge. The MST was not reached. Lethargic dogs had a mortality risk 10.2 times that of non-lethargic dogs. Non-tachypneic dogs had a mortality risk 4.3 times that of tachypneic dogs. Dogs that experienced anesthetic complications had a mortality risk 100 times that of dogs that did not. We conclude that the prognosis associated with liver tumors is good. Lethargy, respiratory rate, and anesthetic complications were associated with outcome.

  10. In liver metastases from small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors, SSTR2A expression is heterogeneous.

    PubMed

    Charoenpitakchai, Mongkon; Liu, Eric; Zhao, Zhiguo; Koyama, Tatsuki; Huh, Won Jae; Berlin, Jordan; Hande, Kenneth; Walker, Ronald; Shi, Chanjuan

    2017-02-17

    We examined somatostatin receptor type 2A (SSTR2A) expression in primary and metastatic small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs). We retrieved 156 liver metastases from 26 patients (10 males, 16 females) who had two or more liver lesions resected. A representative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded section of tumor tissue from each liver metastasis and from the primary tumor, when available, were immunohistochemically stained for SSTR2A. SSTR2A expression was evaluated by the Her2/neu-scoring system and the scoring system proposed by Volante et al. Based on the Her2/neu-scoring system, moderate to strong SSTR2A expression was observed in 121 of 156 (78%) liver metastases. In 15 (58%) subjects, all liver metastases showed moderate to strong SSTR2A expression, whereas in 11 (42%) one or more liver tumors had weak or no expression. Of the 16 stained primaries, 11 (69%) showed heterogeneous SSTR2A expression. The corresponding liver metastases showed only weak to no expression in one, moderate to strong in five, and both weak to no and moderate to strong expression in five of the 11 cases. Using the Volante scoring system, no tumor was scored 0 (0%), two were scored 1 (1%), 38 were scored 2 (24%), and 116 were scored 3 (74%). No statistically significant association was observed between SSTR2A expression and Ki67 index (p = 0.56). Fifteen of 18 (83%) metastatic tumors with a Ki67 index >20% showed moderate to strong SSTR2A. Most liver tumors with weak SSTR2A expression or an IHC score of 2 were detected by OctreoScan. SSTR2A expression in liver metastases of SI-NETs can be variable, even between lesions in the same patient. Expression in metastatic lesions is not always similar to that in the primary tumor. SSTR2A expression is not associated with the Ki67 index.

  11. Morphological and biochemical characterization of a human liver in a uPA-SCID mouse chimera.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, Philip; Libbrecht, Louis; De Vos, Rita; de Hemptinne, Bernard; Gevaert, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Roskams, Tania; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2005-04-01

    A small animal model harboring a functional human liver cell xenograft would be a useful tool to study human liver cell biology, drug metabolism, and infections with hepatotropic viruses. Here we describe the repopulation, organization, and function of human hepatocytes in a mouse recipient and the infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the transplanted cells. Homozygous urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-SCID mice underwent transplantation with primary human hepatocytes, and at different times animals were bled and sacrificed to analyze plasma and liver tissue, respectively. The plasma of mice that were successfully transplanted contained albumin and an additional 21 human proteins. Liver histology showed progressive and massive replacement of diseased mouse tissue by human hepatocytes. These cells were accumulating glycogen but appeared otherwise normal and showed no signs of damage or death. They formed functional bile canaliculi that connected to mouse canaliculi. Besides mature hepatocytes, human hepatic progenitor cells that were differentiating into mature hepatocytes could be identified within liver parenchyma. Infection of chimeric mice with HBV or HCV resulted in an active infection that did not alter the liver function and architecture. Electron microscopy showed the presence of viral and subviral structures in HBV infected hepatocytes. In conclusion, human hepatocytes repopulate the uPA(+/+)-SCID mouse liver in a very organized fashion with preservation of normal cell function. The presence of human hepatic progenitor cells in these chimeric animals necessitates a critical review of the observations and conclusions made in experiments with isolated "mature" hepatocytes. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0270-9139/suppmat/index.html).

  12. Mitochondrial dynamics in the mouse liver infected by Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tina Tu-Wen; Wu, Lawrence Shih Hsin; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Lee, Kin-Mu; Cheng, Po-Ching; Peng, Shih-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for regulation of cell homeostasis. Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most common parasites known to cause liver disease. Mice infected by S. mansoni show acute symptoms of schistosomiasis after 8 weeks. Hence, in this study, we attempted to assess the direct effects of S. mansoni infection on mice liver, and to explore the expression of mitochondrial morphology, dynamics, and function. Our recent findings show that S. mansoni infection changes mitochondrial morphology and affects mitochondrial functions, which attenuates mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation. S. mansoni-infected mice increases mitochondrial numbers by upregulating of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor c co-activator 1α (PGC1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). This may promote mitochondria generation for accelerating the recovery of mitochondrial functions. Moreover, S. mansoni would disrupt mitochondrial dynamics including induced mitochondrial fission and promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in mice liver. More importantly, S. mansoni further stimulated upregulation both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathway in infected mice liver. The intrinsic pathway was triggered by cytochrome c release. Additionally, NFκB (nuclear factor-kappa B, p65) could play a protective role to inhibit apoptosis through reducing active caspase-3 expression. Therefore, our results confirmed the liver damage mechanism of experimental schistosomiasis in mice model.

  13. An Oral Salmonella-Based Vaccine Inhibits Liver Metastases by Promoting Tumor-Specific T-Cell-Mediated Immunity in Celiac and Portal Lymph Nodes: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, Alejandrina; Mongini, Claudia; Gravisaco, María José; Canellada, Andrea; Tesone, Agustina Inés; Goin, Juan Carlos; Waldner, Claudia Inés

    2016-01-01

    Primary tumor excision is one of the most widely used therapies of cancer. However, the risk of metastases development still exists following tumor resection. The liver is a common site of metastatic disease for numerous cancers. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent sources of metastases to the liver. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the orally administered Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 915 on the development of liver metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer. To this end, one group of BALB/c mice was orogastrically immunized with CVD 915, while another received PBS as a control. After 24 h, mice were injected with LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cells into the spleen and subjected to splenectomy. This oral Salmonella-based vaccine produced an antitumor effect, leading to a decrease in the number and volume of liver metastases. Immunization with Salmonella induced an early cellular immune response in mice. This innate stimulation rendered a large production of IFN-γ by intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC) detected within 24 h. An antitumor adaptive immunity was found in the liver and celiac and portal lymph nodes (LDLN) 21 days after oral bacterial inoculation. The antitumor immune response inside the liver was associated with increased CD4+ and dendritic cell populations as well as with an inflammatory infiltrate located around liver metastatic nodules. Enlarged levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF) were also detected in IHIC. Furthermore, a tumor-specific production of IFN-γ and TNF as well as tumor-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+) were found in the celiac and portal lymph nodes of Salmonella-treated mice. This study provides first evidence for the involvement of LDLN in the development of an efficient cellular immune response against hepatic tumors, which resulted in the elimination of liver metastases after oral Salmonella-based vaccination. PMID:26973649

  14. Structural and metabolic characterization of RNAs from rats with experimental Guerin tumor - I. Nucleotide composition of RNAs from the liver and tumor tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, A; Galasinski, W

    1976-01-01

    The characteristics of the ribonucleic acids of Guerin tumor was the subject of this work. The effect of tumor development on the structure of the ribonucleic acids in the liver of tumor bearing rats was studied. Some differences of nucleotide compositions in RNAs isolated from subcellular fractions of liver of control and tumor bearing rats and of cancer tissue were observed. The nucleotide compositions of cancer nuclear RNA is distinctly different from liver RNA. The changes in primary structure of liver RNAs due by development of tumor in rats may be result of metabolic peculiarities of these RNAs.

  15. Folate supplementation differently affects uracil content in DNA in the mouse colon and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High folate intake may increase the risk of cancer, especially in the elderly. The present study examined the effects of ageing and dietary folate on uracil misincorporation into DNA, which has a mutagenic effect, in the mouse colon and liver. Old (18 months; n 42) and young (4 months; n 42) male C5...

  16. The Role of Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Liver Injury and Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatics and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) possess multiple immunological functions besides affecting immune cell migration, such as inhibiting T cell proliferation and antigen presentation by dendritic cells. Moreover, they control the trans-endothelial transport of multiple molecules and antigens. Emerging evidence suggest their active involvements in immunregulation, tumor, and metastases formation. In the liver, increased lymphangiogenesis, specifically at the portal area has been associated with multiple liver diseases in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, and liver malignancies. Nevertheless, the exact role and contribution of LECs to liver diseases are poorly understood. The review summarizes the current understanding of LECs in liver diseases. PMID:27965673

  17. Carcinogenicity of by-products of disinfection in mouse and rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Herren-Freund, S.L.; Pereira, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    By-products of disinfection were tested for initiating and/or promoting activity in rat liver by using the rat liver foci bioassay. The assay uses an increased incidence of ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase-positive foci (GGT foci) as an indicator of carcinogenicity. The by-products of disinfection, including chloramine, halogenated humic acids, halogenated ethanes, halogenated acetonitriles, halogenated methanes, halogenated ethylene, and N-Cl piperidine, did not initiate GGT foci, which would indicate that they are not capable of initiating carcinogenesis. Chloroform and halogenated benzenes were tested in this assay for their ability to promote the occurrence of GGT foci and tumors initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DENA). Chloroform either had no effect or inhibited the occurrence of GGT foci when administered subsequent to a single dose of DENA. However, when the chloroform was administered in drinking water concurrently with weekly doses of DENA, it enhanced the formation of liver tumors. Of 20 halogenated benzenes tested, only 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene promoted the occurrence of DENA-initiated GGT foci. Thus in rat liver, the tested by-products of drinking water disinfection did not demonstrate tumor-initiating activity, although a few appeared to possess tumor-promoting activity. Chloroform was also tested for tumor-promoting activity in 15-days-old Swiss mice initiated with ethylnitrosourea (ENU). ENU at 5 and 20 ..mu..g/g caused a dose-dependent increase in liver tumors. In male mice, chloroform inhibited both spontaneous and ENU-induced liver tumors. When administered in the drinking water, chloroform inhibited, whereas phenobarbital promoted, hepatocarcinogenesis in mice.

  18. The Treatment of Liver Metastases in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Teresa; Fernandes, Isabel; Sousa, Ana Rita; Costa, Ana Lúcia; Távora, Isabel; Quintela, António; Cortes, Paulo; Costa, Luís

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of tumors that form a distinct entity. Approximately 75–80% of patients present with liver metastases at the time of their diagnosis, and 20%–25% will develop these lesions in the course of their disease. The presence of secondary deposits in the liver significantly increases the morbidity and mortality in these patients. The only potentially curative treatment is the surgical resection of the primary tumor and hepatic lesions. However, only 10% of patients presents under ideal conditions for that approach. Several techniques aimed at localized liver lesions have been applied also with interesting results in terms of survival and symptom control. The same has been demonstrated with new systemic therapies (target therapies). However, these are still under study, in order to define their true role in the management of these patients. This paper intends to address, in a general way, the various treatment options in patients with liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:27335831

  19. Hepatocyte Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Mediates the Development of Liver Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mesarwi, Omar A.; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Schlesinger, Christina; Shaw, Janet; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. This progression correlates with the severity of OSA-associated hypoxia. In mice with diet induced obesity, hepatic steatosis leads to liver tissue hypoxia, which worsens with exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Emerging data has implicated hepatocyte cell signaling as an important factor in hepatic fibrogenesis. We hypothesized that hepatocyte specific knockout of the oxygen sensing α subunit of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of the global response to hypoxia, may be protective against the development of liver fibrosis. Methods Wild-type mice and mice with hepatocyte-specific HIF-1α knockout (Hif1a-/-hep) were fed a high trans-fat diet for six months, as a model of NAFLD. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by Sirius red stain and hydroxyproline assay. Liver enzymes, fasting insulin, and hepatic triglyceride content were also assessed. Hepatocytes were isolated from Hif1a-/-hep mice and wild-type controls and were exposed to sustained hypoxia (1% O2) or normoxia (16% O2) for 24 hours. The culture media was used to reconstitute type I collagen and the resulting matrices were examined for collagen cross-linking. Results Wild-type mice on a high trans-fat diet had 80% more hepatic collagen than Hif1a-/-hep mice (2.21 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, versus 1.23 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, p = 0.03), which was confirmed by Sirius red staining. Body weight, liver weight, mean hepatic triglyceride content, and fasting insulin were similar between groups. Culture media from wild-type mouse hepatocytes exposed to hypoxia allowed for avid collagen cross-linking, but very little cross-linking was seen when hepatocytes were exposed to normoxia, or when hepatocytes from Hif1a-/-hep mice were used in hypoxia or normoxia. Conclusions Hepatocyte HIF-1 mediates an increase in liver fibrosis in a mouse model of

  20. [Effect of pravastatin on transportation of scutellarin in mouse liver and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Ming; Xiong, Yu-Qing

    2011-03-01

    This study is to investigate the transportation of scutellarin in cell and live models and study on mechanism of absorption and transport of scutellarin in mouse liver. The concentration of scutellarin in plasma and liver from control and pretreated groups was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The uptake of scutellarin was examined in control hepatocytes group, induced hepatocytes group and induced hepatocytes plus pravastatin group. Pravastatin can affect the pharmacokinetics of scutellarin in mouse: CL is decreased while AUC is increased. The scutellarin absorption of hepatocyte induced group was higher than that of control group, but was decreased in the group with pravastatin added. The research showed that there was potential drug interaction between pravastatin and scutellarin. The drugs may compete for oatp2 mediated transport pathway consisted in the uptake of scutellarin in liver.

  1. Unusual liver locations of growing teratoma syndrome in ovarian malignant germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Domenica; Malaguti, Paola; Trivellizzi, Ilaria Nausica; Scambia, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    ► Growing teratoma syndrome (GTS) with unusual liver locations are described after fertility preserving surgery and chemotherapy treatment for mixed malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (MGCT). ► It's a rare syndrome of mixed malignant ovarian germ cell tumors and in both cases enlarged and growing liver masses appeared during cisplatin-etoposide-bleomicin (BEP) chemotherapy. ► Radiological exams (CT scan and MRI) were suggestive for secondary metastasis and serum markers became negative during chemotherapy.

  2. Epiplakin attenuates experimental mouse liver injury by chaperoning keratin reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Sandra; Wögenstein, Karl L.; Österreicher, Christoph H.; Guldiken, Nurdan; Chen, Yu; Doler, Carina; Wiche, Gerhard; Boor, Peter; Haybaeck, Johannes; Strnad, Pavel; Fuchs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Epiplakin is a member of the plakin protein family and exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues where it binds to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (Eppk1−/−) mice displayed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, but their keratinocytes showed a faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in the stressed liver remained to be elucidated. Methods Wild-type (WT) and Eppk1−/− mice were subjected to common bile duct ligation (CBDL) or fed with a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-containing diet. The importance of epiplakin during keratin reorganization was assessed in primary hepatocytes. Results Our experiments revealed that epiplakin is expressed in hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and binds to keratin 8 (K8) and K18 via multiple domains. In several liver stress models epiplakin and K8 genes displayed identical expression patterns and transgenic K8 overexpression resulted in elevated hepatic epiplakin levels. After CBDL and DDC treatment, Eppk1−/− mice developed a more pronounced liver injury and their livers contained larger amounts of hepatocellular keratin granules, indicating impaired disease-induced keratin network reorganization. In line with these findings, primary Eppk1−/− hepatocytes showed increased formation of keratin aggregates after treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, a phenotype which was rescued by the chemical chaperone trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). Finally, transfection experiments revealed that Eppk1−/− primary hepatocytes were less able to tolerate forced K8 overexpression and that TMAO treatment rescued this phenotype. Conclusion Our data indicate that epiplakin plays a protective role during experimental liver injuries by chaperoning disease-induced keratin reorganization. PMID:25617501

  3. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  4. [Metabolism inhibition stimulates, metabolism activation inhibits cancerogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene in mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Il'nitskaia, S I

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol, an inhibitor of metabolic activation of aminoazo dyes was administered to suckling mice prior to o-aminoazotoluene (OAT). It was followed by formation of numerous preneoplastic nodules and tumors in the lungs and liver. At the same time, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine treatment decreased their number in the liver while slightly increasing them in the lung. A possible mechanism of aminoazo dye carcinogenicity is suggested.

  5. Snai1 and Snai2 collaborate on tumor growth and metastasis properties of mouse skin carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Olmeda, D; Montes, A; Moreno-Bueno, G; Flores, J M; Portillo, F; Cano, A

    2008-08-07

    Snai1 (Snail) and Snai2 (Slug), the two main members of Snail family factors, are important mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and involved in tumor progression. We recently reported that Snai1 plays a major role in tumor growth, invasion and metastasis, but the contribution of Snai2 to tumorigenesis is not yet well understood. To approach this question we have silenced Snai2 and/or Snai1 by stable RNA interference in two independent mouse skin carcinoma (HaCa4 and CarB) cell lines. We demonstrate that Snai2 knockdown has a milder effect, but collaborates with Snai1 silencing in reduction of tumor growth potential of either carcinoma cell line when injected into nude mice. Importantly, Snai1 or Snai2 silencing dramatically influences the metastatic ability of squamous carcinoma HaCa4 cells, inducing a strong reduction in liver and lung distant metastasis. However, only Snai1 knockdown has an effective action on invasiveness and fully abolishes tumor cell dissemination into the spleen. These results demonstrate that Snai1 and Snai2 collaborate on primary tumor growth and specifically contribute to site-specific metastasis of HaCa4 cells. These data also indicate that Snai1 is the major regulator of local invasion, supporting a hierarchical participation of both factors in the metastatic process.

  6. Zonal induction of mixed lineage kinase ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression in regenerating mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Douziech, M; Grondin, G; Loranger, A; Marceau, N; Blouin, R

    1998-08-28

    ZPK/DLK/MUK is a serine/theronine kinase believed to be involved in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. To further explore the suggested participation of ZPK/DLK/MUK in this process, we examined the expression and cellular localization of ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNA in regenerating mouse liver following partial hepatectomy by ribonuclease protection assay and in situ hybridization. The steady-state level of APK/DLKMUK mRNA was very low in normal and sham-operated mouse livers, whereas a marked and transient increase was observed in the regenerating liver. While ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNAs were rarely detected in hepatocytes from all zones of the normal liver, hepatocytes of regenerating liver exhibit a gradient of expression ranging from low in the periportal zone, to intermediate in the mid-zone, to high in the pericentral zone. These findings demonstrate a transient stimulation of ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression that correlates with the growth response of hepatocyte subpopulations in regenerating liver.

  7. Rectal carcinoma with metachronous metastasis to the extrahepatic bile duct without liver tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Kobayashi, Ryu; Kato, Shingo; Watanabe, Seitaro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Shimamura, Takeshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Endo, Itaru

    2011-08-01

    In July 2003, a 63-year-old man received a low anterior resection for rectal cancer. In February 2006, he underwent a right hepatectomy for a solitary metastatic liver tumor; the liver tumor had not invaded the bile duct, and a curative resection was performed. In August 2008, an enhanced computed tomography examination revealed a massive focal lesion at the point of the common bile duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography clearly revealed a hyperechoic polypoid lesion that had spread laterally on the surface of the slightly dilated bile duct and had a smooth outer hyperechoic layer. No lymph nodes were present in this region. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed an irregular stricture, and a biopsy was performed through the scope. Microscopic examination revealed a tumor characterized as a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma resembling the liver tumor. We diagnosed the intrabiliary tumor as a metachronous metastatic bile duct tumor from rectal cancer without involvement of the liver parenchyma. This is a very rare case, with recurrence only in an extrahepatic bile duct after the complete resection of a metastatic liver tumor. This is the first clinical, pathological, and radiological description of this rare condition.

  8. Deciphering the Developmental Dynamics of the Mouse Liver Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Gunewardena, Sumedha S.; Yoo, Byunggil; Peng, Lai; Lu, Hong; Zhong, Xiaobo; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-01-01

    During development, liver undergoes a rapid transition from a hematopoietic organ to a major organ for drug metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. However, little is known on a transcriptome level of the genes and RNA-splicing variants that are differentially regulated with age, and which up-stream regulators orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver. We used RNA-Seq to interrogate the developmental dynamics of the liver transcriptome in mice at 12 ages from late embryonic stage (2-days before birth) to maturity (60-days after birth). Among 21,889 unique NCBI RefSeq-annotated genes, 9,641 were significantly expressed in at least one age, 7,289 were differently regulated with age, and 859 had multiple (> = 2) RNA splicing-variants. Factor analysis showed that the dynamics of hepatic genes fall into six distinct groups based on their temporal expression. The average expression of cytokines, ion channels, kinases, phosphatases, transcription regulators and translation regulators decreased with age, whereas the average expression of peptidases, enzymes and transmembrane receptors increased with age. The average expression of growth factors peak between Day-3 and Day-10, and decrease thereafter. We identified critical biological functions, upstream regulators, and putative transcription modules that seem to govern age-specific gene expression. We also observed differential ontogenic expression of known splicing variants of certain genes, and 1,455 novel splicing isoform candidates. In conclusion, the hepatic ontogeny of the transcriptome ontogeny has unveiled critical networks and up-stream regulators that orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver, and suggest that age contributes to the complexity of the alternative splicing landscape of the hepatic transcriptome. PMID:26496202

  9. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  10. Cyanine 5.5 Conjugated Nanobubbles as a Tumor Selective Contrast Agent for Dual Ultrasound-Fluorescence Imaging in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wei, Qiong; Yuchi, Ming; He, Xiaoling; Ding, Mingyue; Zhou, Qibing

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles and microbubbles are non-invasive ultrasound imaging contrast agents that may potentially enhance diagnosis of tumors. However, to date, both nanobubbles and microbubbles display poor in vivo tumor-selectivity over non-targeted organs such as liver. We report here cyanine 5.5 conjugated nanobubbles (cy5.5-nanobubbles) of a biocompatible chitosan–vitamin C lipid system as a dual ultrasound-fluorescence contrast agent that achieved tumor-selective imaging in a mouse tumor model. Cy5.5-nanobubble suspension contained single bubble spheres and clusters of bubble spheres with the size ranging between 400–800 nm. In the in vivo mouse study, enhancement of ultrasound signals at tumor site was found to persist over 2 h while tumor-selective fluorescence emission was persistently observed over 24 h with intravenous injection of cy5.5-nanobubbles. In vitro cell study indicated that cy5.5-flurescence dye was able to accumulate in cancer cells due to the unique conjugated nanobubble structure. Further in vivo fluorescence study suggested that cy5.5-nanobubbles were mainly located at tumor site and in the bladder of mice. Subsequent analysis confirmed that accumulation of high fluorescence was present at the intact subcutaneous tumor site and in isolated tumor tissue but not in liver tissue post intravenous injection of cy5.5-nanobubbles. All these results led to the conclusion that cy5.5-nanobubbles with unique crosslinked chitosan–vitamin C lipid system have achieved tumor-selective imaging in vivo. PMID:23637799

  11. Suppression of breast tumor growth by DNA vaccination against phosphatase of regenerating liver 3.

    PubMed

    Lv, J; Liu, C; Huang, H; Meng, L; Jiang, B; Cao, Y; Zhou, Z; She, T; Qu, L; Wei Song, S; Shou, C

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL)-3 is highly expressed in multiple cancers and has important roles in cancer development. Some small-molecule inhibitors and antibodies targeting PRL-3 have been recently reported to inhibit tumor growth effectively. To determine whether PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccination can induce immune response to prevent or inhibit the tumor growth, we established mouse D2F2 breast cancer cells expressing PRL-3 (D2F2/PRL-3) and control cells (D2F2/NC) with lentivirus, and constructed pVAX1-Igκ-PRL-3 plasmid (named as K-P3) as DNA vaccine to immunize BALB/c mice. We found that the K-P3 vaccine delivered by gene gun significantly prevented the growth of D2F2/PRL-3 compared with pVAX1-vector (P<0.01), but not of D2F2/NC, and improved the survival of D2F2/PRL-3-innoculated mice. Both PRL-3-targeted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and T-helper type 1 cell immune response (production of high levels of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α) were found to be involved in the preventive effect. Furthermore, PRL-3-targeted DNA immunization inhibited tumor growth of D2F2/PRL-3 cells in mice. We also evaluated the potential of immunization with PRL-3 protein, but no significant therapeutic or preventive effect was obtained on tumor growth. To enhance the immunity of PRL-3, we incorporated different molecular adjuvants, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat-shock protein, CTL antigen 4 and M. tuberculosis T-cell stimulatory epitope (MT), into K-P3 vaccine for expressing the fusion proteins. We found that these adjuvant molecules did not significantly improve the antitumor activity of PRL-3 vaccine, but enhanced the production of PRL-3 antibodies in immunized mice. Summarily, our findings demonstrate that PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccine can generate significantly preventive and therapeutic effects on the growth of breast cancer expressing PRL-3 through the induction of cellular immune responses to PRL-3.

  12. Resection of postoperative liver metastasis from pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: report of one case

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Ren, Hu; Chi, Yihebali; He, Shun; Huang, Zhen; Hu, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) is a rare type of pancreatic tumors. The incidence of pNET shows a gradually increasing trend in recent years. Except insulinoma, majority of pNET are metastatic when diagnosis. And liver is the most common organ of distant metastases. Liver metastases are the main determinant for long-term survival and quality of life of patients with pNET. A case of liver metastases of pNET of a 44-year-old female patient is presented in this study. Then we have a brief discussion of the diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of advanced pNET. PMID:28138614

  13. Adult mouse model of early hepatocellular carcinoma promoted by alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mouse model of alcohol-driven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that develops in livers with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: Adult C57BL/6 male mice received multiple doses of chemical carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 7 wk of 4% Lieber-DeCarli diet. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and liver Cyp2e1 were assessed. Expression of F4/80, CD68 for macrophages and Ly6G, MPO, E-selectin for neutrophils was measured. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-1β/iNOS (M1) and Arg-1/IL-10/CD163/CD206 (M2) expression. Liver steatosis and fibrosis were measured by oil-red-O and Sirius red staining respectively. HCC development was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by histology. Cellular proliferation was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). RESULTS: Alcohol-DEN mice showed higher ALTs than pair fed-DEN mice throughout the alcohol feeding without weight gain. Alcohol feeding resulted in increased ALT, liver steatosis and inflammation compared to pair-fed controls. Alcohol-DEN mice had reduced steatosis and increased fibrosis indicating advanced liver disease. Molecular characterization showed highest levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers in alcohol-DEN livers. Importantly, M2 macrophages were predominantly higher in alcohol-DEN livers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased numbers of intrahepatic cysts and liver histology confirmed the presence of early HCC in alcohol-DEN mice compared to all other groups. This correlated with increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, a marker of HCC, in alcohol-DEN mice. PCNA immunostaining revealed significantly increased hepatocyte proliferation in livers from alcohol-DEN compared to pair fed-DEN or alcohol-fed mice. CONCLUSION: We describe a new 12-wk HCC model in adult mice that develops in livers with alcoholic hepatitis and defines ALD as co-factor in HCC. PMID:27122661

  14. Mouse models in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis research

    PubMed Central

    Anstee, Quentin M; Goldin, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a histological spectrum of liver disease associated with obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. As well as being a potential cause of progressive liver disease in its own right, steatosis has been shown to be an important cofactor in the pathogenesis of many other liver diseases. Animal models of NAFLD may be divided into two broad categories: those caused by genetic mutation and those with an acquired phenotype produced by dietary or pharmacological manipulation. The literature contains numerous different mouse models that exhibit histological evidence of hepatic steatosis or, more variably, steatohepatitis; however, few replicate the entire human phenotype. The genetic leptin-deficient (ob/ob) or leptin-resistant (db/db) mouse and the dietary methionine/choline-deficient model are used in the majority of published research. More recently, targeted gene disruption and the use of supra-nutritional diets to induce NAFLD have gained greater prominence as researchers have attempted to bridge the phenotype gap between the available models and the human disease. Using the physiological processes that underlie the pathogenesis and progression of NAFLD as a framework, we review the literature describing currently available mouse models of NAFLD, highlight the strengths and weaknesses of established models and describe the key findings that have furthered the understanding of disease pathogenesis. PMID:16436109

  15. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  16. Investigating the effects of Panadol on mouse liver by in vivo multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng Chieh; Liang, Huei, Jr.; Yang, Shu-Mei; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Conventional hepatic research relies heavily on histological images for obtaining morphological information of the liver. However, static histological images can not provide real-time dynamic information of in vivo physiological processes such as cellular motion or damage. For a long time, panadol has been used in pain relief. However, Panadol may have unwanted side effects and detailed information of the effects of Panadol on hepatic metabolism is unknown. In this work, we developed a high resolution intravital hepatic imaging chamber to study the effects of Panadol on liver. We expect this methodology to be useful in revealing the detailed metabolism of liver after using Panadol and this approach allows us to achieve a better understanding of hepatic processes. In our approach, we use multiphoton fluorescence (MPF) microscopy to observe the side effect of liver on using Panadol inside the in vivo mouse animal model.

  17. Bioinformatic analysis of microRNA networks following the activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ruixin; Su, Shengzhong; Wan, Yinan; Shen, Frank; Niu, Ben; Coslo, Denise M; Albert, Istvan; Han, Xing; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that functions as a xenosensor, serving to regulate xenobiotic detoxification, lipid homeostasis and energy metabolism. CAR activation is also a key contributor to the development of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. The underlying pathways affected by CAR in these processes are complex and not fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical modulators of gene expression and appear to impact many cellular pathways, including those involved in chemical detoxification and liver tumor development. In this study, we used deep sequencing approaches with an Illumina HiSeq platform to differentially profile microRNA expression patterns in livers from wild type C57BL/6J mice following CAR activation with the mouse CAR-specific ligand activator, 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5,-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP). Bioinformatic analyses and pathway evaluations were performed leading to the identification of 51 miRNAs whose expression levels were significantly altered by TCPOBOP treatment, including mmu-miR-802-5p and miR-485-3p. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of the differentially expressed microRNAs revealed altered effector pathways, including those involved in liver cell growth and proliferation. A functional network among CAR targeted genes and the affected microRNAs was constructed to illustrate how CAR modulation of microRNA expression may potentially mediate its biological role in mouse hepatocyte proliferation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  18. Changes in Mouse Liver Protein Glutathionylation after Acetaminophen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Ali, Akhtar; Shi, Qiang; Roberts, Dean W.; Hinson, Jack A.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Beger, Richard; Pence, Lisa M.; Ando, Yosuke; Sun, Jinchun; Davis, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The role of protein glutathionylation in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury was investigated in this study. A single oral gavage dose of 150 or 300 mg/kg APAP in B6C3F1 mice produced increased serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels and liver necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ratio of GSH to GSSG was decreased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that APAP produced a more oxidizing environment within the liver. Despite the increased oxidation state, the level of global protein glutathionylation was decreased at 1 h and continued to decline through 24 h. Immunohistochemical localization of glutathionylated proteins showed a complex dynamic change in the lobule zonation of glutathionylated proteins. At 1 h after APAP exposure, the level of glutathionylation decreased in the single layer of hepatocytes around the central veins but increased mildly in the remaining centrilobular hepatocytes. This increase correlated with the immunohistochemical localization of APAP covalently bound to protein. Thereafter, the level of glutathionylation decreased dramatically over time in the centrilobular regions with major decreases observed at 6 and 24 h. Despite the overall decreased glutathionylation, a layer of cells lying between the undamaged periportal region and the damaged centrilobular hepatocytes exhibited high levels of glutathionylation at 3 and 6 h in all samples and in some 24-h samples that had milder injury. These temporal and zonal pattern changes in protein glutathionylation after APAP exposure indicate that protein glutathionylation may play a role in protein homeostasis during APAP-induced hepatocellular injury. PMID:22045778

  19. Molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells resemble the liver metastasis more closely than the primary tumor in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Mostert, Bianca; Lalmahomed, Zarina; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B.; van Galen, Anne; Smid, Marcel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; de Weerd, Vanja; Ramírez-Moreno, Raquel; Biermann, Katharina; Verhoef, Cornelis; Grünhagen, Dirk J.; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Gratama, Jan W.; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background CTCs are a promising alternative for metastatic tissue biopsies for use in precision medicine approaches. We investigated to what extent the molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) resemble the liver metastasis and/or the primary tumor from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Results The CTC profiles were concordant with the liver metastasis in 17/23 patients (74%) and with the primary tumor in 13 patients (57%). The CTCs better resembled the liver metastasis in 13 patients (57%), and the primary tumor in five patients (22%). The strength of the correlations was not associated with clinical parameters. Nine genes (CDH1, CDH17, CDX1, CEACAM5, FABP1, FCGBP, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, and MAPT) displayed significant differential expressions, all of which were downregulated, in CTCs compared to the tissues in the 23 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were retrospectively selected from a prospective study. Using the CellSearch System, CTCs were enumerated and isolated just prior to liver metastasectomy. A panel of 25 CTC-specific genes was measured by RT-qPCR in matching CTCs, primary tumors, and liver metastases. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and considered as continuous variables with r=1 representing absolute concordance and r= -1 representing absolute discordance. A cut-off of r>0.1 was applied in order to consider profiles to be concordant. Conclusions In the majority of the patients, CTCs reflected the molecular characteristics of metastatic cells better than the primary tumors. Genes involved in cell adhesion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were downregulated in the CTCs. Our results support the use of CTC characterization as a liquid biopsy for precision medicine. PMID:27340863

  20. Hepatocyte Tissue Factor Contributes to the Hypercoagulable State in a Mouse Model of Chronic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tatsumi, Kohei; Antoniak, Silvio; Owens, A. Phillip; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Holle, Lori A.; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Kopec, Anna K.; Pawlinski, Rafal; Luyendyk, James P.; Mackman, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background & Aims Patients with chronic liver disease and cirrhosis have a dysregulated coagulation system and are prone to thrombosis. The basis for this hypercoagulable state is not completely understood. Tissue factor (TF) is the primary initiator of coagulation in vivo. Patients with cirrhosis have increased TF activity in white blood cells and circulating microparticles. The aim of our study was to determine the contribution of TF to the hypercoagulable state in a mouse model of chronic liver injury. Methods We measured levels of TF activity in the liver, white blood cells and circulating microparticles, and a marker of activation of coagulation [thrombinantithrombin complexes (TATc)] in the plasma of mice subjected to bile duct ligation for 12 days. We used wild-type mice, mice with a global TF deficiency (low TF mice), and mice deficient for TF in either myeloid cells (TFflox/flox, LysMCre mice) or in hepatocytes (TFflox/flox, AlbCre). Results Wild-type mice with liver injury had increased levels of white blood cell, microparticle TF activity and TATc compared to sham mice. Low TF mice and mice lacking TF in hepatocytes had reduced levels of TF in the liver and in microparticles and exhibited reduced activation of coagulation without a change in liver fibrosis. In contrast, mice lacking TF in myeloid cells had reduced white blood cell TF but no change in microparticle TF activity or TATc. Conclusions Hepatocyte TF activates coagulation in a mouse model of chronic liver injury. TF may contribute to the hypercoagulable state associated with chronic liver diseases in patients. PMID:26325534

  1. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer.

  2. Ozone-related fluorescent compounds in mouse liver and lung

    SciTech Connect

    Csallany, A.S.; Manwaring, J.D.; Menken, B.Z.

    1985-08-01

    Groups of ten female, weanling mice were fed a basal, vitamin E-deficient diet or a basal diet supplemented with RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate for 14 months. During the last month one group from each dietary regimen was exposed for 30-60 min/day to 1.5 ppm ozone (25 hr total ozone exposure) and the remaining groups to control ambient air. The liver and lung tissues were homogenized and extracted with 2:1 chloroform:methanol and water. Excitation and emission wavelengths for the eluting fractions were determined by continuous emission scans from 250 to 600 nm for each excitation wavelength between 250 and 500 nm. Ozone exposure did not effect the concentration of any of the fluorescent materials examined in the lung, but it resulted in a significant increase in two of four water-soluble compounds in the liver with excitation wavelength maxima/emission wavelength maxima of 270 nm/310 nm and 275 nm/350 nm (smaller molecular weight material) suggesting in vivo lipid oxidation.

  3. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence. PMID:27446562

  4. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence.

  5. Luminol-based bioluminescence imaging of mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Alshetaiwi, Hamad S; Balivada, Sivasai; Shrestha, Tej B; Pyle, Marla; Basel, Matthew T; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2013-10-05

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant circulating blood leukocytes. They are part of the innate immune system and provide a first line of defense by migrating toward areas of inflammation in response to chemical signals released from the site. Some solid tumors, such as breast cancer, also cause recruitment and activation of PMNs and release of myeloperoxidase. In this study, we demonstrate that administration of luminol to mice that have been transplanted with 4T1 mammary tumor cells permits the detection of myeloperoxidase activity, and consequently, the location of the tumor. Luminol allowed detection of activated PMNs only two days after cancer cell transplantation, even though tumors were not yet palpable. In conclusion, luminol-bioluminescence imaging (BLI) can provide a pathway towards detection of solid tumors at an early stage in preclinical tumor models.

  6. Mutagenic activation reduces carcinogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene for mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, L P; Bogdanova, L A; Kaledin, V I

    2013-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (aromatic amine and azo stain metabolic stimulation inhibitor) reduced the hepatocarcinogenic activity of 4-aminoazobenzene and reduced that of ortho-aminoazotoluene in suckling mice. Both 4-aminoazobenzene and ortho-aminoazotoluene exhibited mutagenic activity in Ames' test in vitro on S. typhimurium TA 98 strain with activation with liver enzymes; this mutagenic activity was similarly suppressed by adding pentachlorophenol into activation medium. Induction of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, stimulating the mutagenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene, suppressed its carcinogenic effect on mouse liver. Hence, ortho-aminotoluene (the initial compound), but not its mutagenic metabolites, was the direct active hepatocarcinogen for mice.

  7. Enalapril and ASS inhibit tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fendrich, V; Lopez, C L; Manoharan, J; Maschuw, K; Wichmann, S; Baier, A; Holler, J P; Ramaswamy, A; Bartsch, D K; Waldmann, J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for angiotensin-converting enzymes involving the angiotensin II-receptor 1 (AT1-R) and the cyclooxygenase pathway in carcinogenesis. The effects of ASS and enalapril were assessed in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs). The effects of enalapril and ASS on proliferation and expression of the AGTR1A and its target gene vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) were assessed in the neuroendocrine cell line BON1. Rip1-Tag2 mice were treated daily with either 0.6 mg/kg bodyweight of enalapril i.p., 20 mg/kg bodyweight of ASS i.p., or a vehicle in a prevention (weeks 5-12) and a survival group (week 5 till death). Tumor surface, weight of pancreatic glands, immunostaining for AT1-R and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB), and mice survival were analyzed. In addition, sections from human specimens of 20 insulinomas, ten gastrinomas, and 12 non-functional pNENs were evaluated for AT1-R and NFKB (NFKB1) expression and grouped according to the current WHO classification. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in BON1 cells, with the combination being the most effective. Treatment with enalapril and ASS led to significant downregulation of known target genes Vegf and Rela at RNA level. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in the prevention group displayed by a reduction of tumor size (84%/67%) and number (30%/45%). Furthermore, daily treatment with enalapril and ASS prolonged the overall median survival compared with vehicle-treated Rip1-Tag2 (107 days) mice by 9 and 17 days (P=0.016 and P=0.013). The AT1-R and the inflammatory transcription factor NFKB were abolished completely upon enalapril and ASS treatment. AT1-R and NFKB expressions were observed in 80% of human pNENs. Enalapril and ASS may provide an approach for chemoprevention and treatment of pNENs.

  8. CAR and PXR-dependent transcriptional changes in the mouse liver after exposure to propiconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the conazoles propiconazole and triadimefon but not myclobutanilled to tumors in mice after 2 years. Transcript profiling studies in the livers ofwild-type mice after short-term exposure to the conazoles revealed signatures indicating the involvement ofthe nuclear rec...

  9. Liver tissue engineering utilizing hepatocytes propagated in mouse livers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Tateno, Chise; Kataoka, Miho; Utoh, Rie; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Okano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in tissue engineering technologies have highlighted the ability to create functional liver systems using isolated hepatocytes in vivo. Considering the serious shortage of donor livers that can be used for hepatocyte isolation, it has remained imperative to establish a hepatocyte propagation protocol to provide highly efficient cell recovery allowing for subsequent tissue engineering procedures. Donor primary hepatocytes were isolated from human α-1 antitrypsin (hA1AT) transgenic mice and were transplanted into the recipient liver of urokinase-type plasminogen activator-severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) mice. Transplanted donor hepatocytes actively proliferated within the recipient liver of the uPA/SCID mice. At week 8 or later, full repopulation of the uPA/SCID livers with the transplanted hA1AT hepatocytes were confirmed by blood examination and histological assessment. Proliferated hA1AT hepatocytes were recovered from the recipient uPA/SCID mice, and we generated hepatocyte sheets using these recovered hepatocytes for subsequent transplantation into the subcutaneous space of mice. Stable persistency of the subcutaneously engineered liver tissues was confirmed for up to 90 days, which was the length of our present study. These new data demonstrate the feasibility in propagating murine hepatocytes prior to the development of hepatic cells and bioengineered liver systems. The ability to regenerate and expand hepatocytes has potential clinical value whereby procurement of small amounts of tissue could be expanded to sufficient quantities prior to their use in hepatocyte transplantation or other hepatocyte-based therapies.

  10. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Ullrich, M; Schally, A V; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, S R

    2013-05-22

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPCs) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing.

  11. [Histopathology of strobilocercosis found in the livers of white mouse.].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nasuhi Engin; Miman, Ozlem; Gül, Mehmet; Daldal, Nilgün

    2010-01-01

    The adult form of Taenia taeniaeformis is found in the intestine of the cat and cheetah. The larva form is called Strobilocercus fasciolaris and is found in rodents such as mice and rats. Our objective was to draw attention to that rare zoonosis, since it has already been reported in the literature as strobilocercosis in humans. During an experimental animal study conducted at Inonu University, some unexpected cystic formations were found in the livers of nine 6-8-month-old healthy white mice, which affected the conducted study negatively. These cystic formations were examined histopathologically. Prepared sections were stained with haemotoxylin eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and Masson trichrome stains, and examined by light microscopy. Strobilocercus fasciolaris larvae that curled towards cyst cavity and their hooks were seen. Plasma cells, macrophage, focus of eosinophilic infiltration and fibroblastic connective tissue were simultaneous found. In this paper, histopathological changes in intermediate hosts caused by Strobilocercus fasciolaris and other cestod larvae have been discussed.

  12. [The antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria after nanosecond pulsed periodic X-ray exposure].

    PubMed

    Kniazeva, I R; Ivanov, V V; Bol'shakov, M A; Zharkova, L P; Kereia, A V; Kutenkov, O P; Rostov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The effect of repetitive pulsed X-ray (4 ns pulse duration, 300 kV accelerating voltage; 2.5 kA electron beam current) on the antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria has been investigated. The mitochondrial suspension was exposed to single 4000 pulse X-ray radiation with repetition rates ranging between 10 and 22 pps (pulsed dose was 0.3-1.8 x 10(-6) Gy/pulse, the total absorbed dose following a single exposure was 7.2 x 10(-3) Gy). It was shown that a short-time exposure to X-ray radiation changes the antioxidant enzyme activity in mouse liver mitochondria. The greatest effect was observed in the changes of the activity of the metal-containing enzymes: superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The effect depends on the pulse repetition frequency and radiation dose.

  13. Application Value of Mass Spectrometry in the Differentiation of Benign and Malignant Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Li, Boan; Guo, Tongsheng; Sun, Zhiqiang; Li, Xiaohan; Li, Xiaoxi; Wang, Han; Chen, Weijiao; Chen, Peng; Qiao, Mengran; Xia, Lifang; Mao, Yuanli

    2017-01-01

    Background Differentiation of malignant from benign liver tumors remains a challenging problem. In recent years, mass spectrometry (MS) technique has emerged as a promising strategy to diagnose a wide range of malignant tumors. The purpose of this study was to establish classification models to distinguish benign and malignant liver tumors and identify the liver cancer-specific peptides by mass spectrometry. Material/Methods In our study, serum samples from 43 patients with malignant liver tumors and 52 patients with benign liver tumors were treated with weak cation-exchange chromatography Magnetic Beads (MB-WCX) kits and analyzed by the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Then we established genetic algorithm (GA), supervised neural networks (SNN), and quick classifier (QC) models to distinguish malignant from benign liver tumors. To confirm the clinical applicability of the established models, the blinded validation test was performed in 50 clinical serum samples. Discriminatory peaks associated with malignant liver tumors were subsequently identified by a qTOF Synapt G2-S system. Results A total of 27 discriminant peaks (p<0.05) in mass spectra of serum samples were found by ClinPro Tools software. Recognition capabilities of the established models were 100% (GA), 89.38% (SNN), and 80.84% (QC); cross-validation rates were 81.67% (GA), 81.11% (SNN), and 86.11% (QC). The accuracy rates of the blinded validation test were 78% (GA), 84% (SNN), and 84% (QC). From the 27 discriminatory peptide peaks analyzed, 3 peaks of m/z 2860.34, 2881.54, and 3155.67 were identified as a fragment of fibrinogen alpha chain, fibrinogen beta chain, and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), respectively. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that MS technique can be helpful in differentiation of benign and malignant liver tumors. Fibrinogen and ITIH4 might be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis of malignant liver tumors

  14. Cumene hydroperoxide-supported denitrification of 2-nitropropane in uninduced mouse liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Marker, E K; Kulkarni, A P

    1986-01-01

    Cumene hydroperoxide supported oxidative denitrification of 2-nitropropane was investigated in uninduced mouse liver microsomes. The cytochrome P-450 peroxygenase catalyzed reaction resulted in the production of nitrite and acetone. Several lines of evidence suggested the involvement of multiple forms of cytochrome P-450. Acetone production was at least two times greater than nitrite release possibly due to sequestration of nitrite in the reaction mixtures.

  15. Specific molecular signatures of non-tumor liver tissue may predict a risk of hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Tohru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Morine, Yuji; Tajima, Atsushi; Imoto, Issei

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common human cancers and a major cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The bleak outcomes of HCC patients even after curative treatment have been, at least partially, attributed to its multicentric origin. Therefore, it is necessary to examine not only tumor tissue but also non-tumor liver tissue to investigate the molecular mechanisms operating during hepatocarcinogenesis based on the concept of “field cancerization”. Several studies previously investigated the association of molecular alterations in non-tumor liver tissue with clinical features and prognosis in HCC patients on a genome-wide scale. In particular, specific alterations of DNA methylation profiles have been confirmed in non-tumor liver tissue. This review focuses on the possible clinical value of array-based comprehensive analyses of molecular alterations, especially aberrant DNA methylation, in non-tumor liver tissue to clarify the risk of hepatocarcinogenesis. Carcinogenetic risk estimation based on specific methylation signatures may be advantageous for close follow-up of patients who are at high risk of HCC development. Furthermore, epigenetic therapies for patients with chronic liver diseases may be helpful to reduce the risk of HCC development because epigenetic alterations are potentially reversible, and thus provide promising molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24766251

  16. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of the development of individual colon cancer tumors in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Mook, Olaf R F; Jonker, Ard; Strang, Aart C; Veltien, Andor; Gambarota, Giulio; Frederiks, Wilma M; Heerschap, Arend; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2008-04-01

    Monitoring tumor development is essential for the understanding of mechanisms involved in tumor progression and to determine efficacy of therapy. One of the evolving approaches is longitudinal noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumors in experimental models. We applied high-resolution MRI at 7 Tesla to study the development of colon cancer tumors in rat liver. MRI acquisition was triggered to the respiratory cycle to minimize motion artifacts. A special radio frequency (RF) coil was designed to acquire detailed T1-weighted and T2-weighted images of the liver. T2-weighted images identified hyperintense lesions representing tumors with a minimum diameter of 2 mm, enabling the determination of growth rates and morphological aspects of individual tumors. It is concluded that high-resolution MRI using a dedicated RF coil and triggering to the respiratory cycle is an excellent tool for quantitative and morphological analysis of individual diffusely distributed tumors throughout the liver. However, at present, MRI requires expensive equipment and expertise and is a time-consuming methodology. Therefore, it should preferably be used for dedicated applications rather than for high-throughput assessment of total tumor load in animals.

  17. Study of in vivo exposure of single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Lyndon L.

    Currently, few studies are available that have explored the role of carbon nanoparticles in liver toxicity. The susceptibility of the liver to nanoparticles rises from the inhalation exposure route often encountered during manufacturing and occupational exposure. Persons occupying these types of environmental setting are exposed to airborne nanoparticles less than 100nm, which have unobstructed access to most area of the lungs due to their size. Several reports have shown that single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce oxidative stress and pose the greatest cytotoxicity potential do to their size. Also, studies in mice indicate nanoparticles tend to accumulate in organs such as the spleen, kidney and liver, which is a major concern due to a lack of knowledge as to their fate. Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT's) are able to more easily penetrate through the cell membrane and display higher cell toxicity than Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs), opening the possibility for crossing various biological barriers within the body. Therefore effective occupational and environmental health risk assessments are significant in controlling the manufacture process of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The present study was undertaken to determine the toxicity exhibited by SWCNT in mouse liver tissue as a model system. Mouse exposure during inhalation with and without SWCNT and reactive oxygen species (ROS) products were measured by change in fluorescence using dichloro fluorescein (DCF). The result showed no increase ROS on exposure of SWCNT in a dose and time dependent manner. Also, there is no reduction levels of glutathione (GSH) and super oxide dismutase (SOD), the antioxidant protective mechanism present in mouse liver cells upon SWCNT exposure. Lipid Peroxidation (LPO) and Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assays indicated no tissue or protein damage. Additionally, Caspases --8 and --3 assays were conducted in order to understand the apoptotic signaling pathways initiated by

  18. The role of focal liver ablation in the treatment of unresectable primary and secondary malignant liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Christopher J; Curley, Steven A

    2005-10-01

    Surgical resection is often the first-line treatment option for primary and select metastatic hepatic malignancies. A minority of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergo potentially curative resection. Similarly, patients with liver-only metastasis are candidates for resection less than 15% of the time because of bilobar disease in which resection would sacrifice too great a volume of hepatic parenchyma, tumor proximity to major vascular or biliary structures thus preventing adequate margins, or unfavorable tumor biology. Ablative techniques directed at tumor elimination while minimizing injury to the surrounding functional hepatic parenchyma may be offered to select patients with unresectable cancers. Radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, transarterial chemoembolization, cryoablation, microwave coagulation, and laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy all offer potential local tumor control and occasionally achieve long-term disease-free survival. This review focuses on the indications, anticipated benefits, and limitations of these ablative techniques.

  19. Serotonin transporter antagonists target tumor-initiating cells in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Gwynne, William D.; Giacomelli, Andrew O.; Bisson, Jennifer N.P.; Jensen, Jeremy E.; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Hassell, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggests that the initiation and progression of human breast tumors is fueled by a rare subpopulation of tumor cells, termed breast tumor-initiating cells (BTIC), which resist radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Consequently, therapies that abrogate BTIC activity are needed to achieve durable cures for breast cancer patients. To identify such therapies we used a sensitive assay to complete a high-throughput screen of small molecules, including approved drugs, with BTIC-rich mouse mammary tumor cell populations. We found that inhibitors of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and serotonin receptors, which include approved drugs used to treat mood disorders, were potent inhibitors of mouse BTIC activity as determined by functional sphere-forming assays and the initiation of tumor formation by transplant of drug-exposed tumor cells into syngeneic mice. Moreover, sertraline (Zoloft), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), synergized with docetaxel (Taxotere) to shrink mouse breast tumors in vivo. Hence drugs targeting the serotonergic system might be repurposed to treat breast cancer patients to afford more durable breast cancer remissions. PMID:27447971

  20. Benign liver tumors in pediatric patients - Review with emphasis on imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Cui, Xin-Wu; Tannapfel, Andrea; Franke, Doris; Stenzel, Martin; Kosiak, Wojciech; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jüngert, Jörg; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Benign hepatic tumors are commonly observed in adults, but rarely reported in children. The reasons for this remain speculative and the exact data concerning the incidence of these lesions are lacking. Benign hepatic tumors represent a diverse group of epithelial and mesenchymal tumors. In pediatric patients, most benign focal liver lesions are inborn and may grow like the rest of the body. Knowledge of pediatric liver diseases and their imaging appearances is essential in order to make an appropriate differential diagnosis. Selection of the appropriate imaging test is challenging, since it depends on a number of age-related factors. This paper will discuss the most frequently encountered benign liver tumors in children (infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and hepatocellular adenoma), as well as a comparison to the current knowledge regarding such tumors in adult patients. The current emphasis is on imaging features, which are helpful not only for the initial diagnosis, but also for pre- and post-treatment evaluation and follow-up. In addition, future perspectives of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in pediatric patients are highlighted, with descriptions of enhancement patterns for each lesion being discussed. The role of advanced imaging tests such as CEUS and magnetic resonance imaging, which allow for non-invasive assessment of liver tumors, is of utmost importance in pediatric patients, especially when repeated imaging tests are needed and radiation exposure should be avoided. PMID:26229397

  1. A D-D/D-T fusion reaction based neutron generator system for liver tumor BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, H.; Lou, T.P.; Leung, K. N.; Reijonen, J.

    2003-04-02

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiation treatment modality used for highly malignant tumor treatments. Prior to irradiation with low energetic neutrons, a 10B compound is located selectively in the tumor cells. The effect of the treatment is based on the high LET radiation released in the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction with thermal neutrons. BNCT has been used experimentally for brain tumor and melanoma treatments. Lately applications of other severe tumor type treatments have been introduced. Results have shown that liver tumors can also be treated by BNCT. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, various compact neutron generators based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions are being developed. The earlier theoretical studies of the D-D or D-T fusion reaction based neutron generators have shown that the optimal moderator and reflector configuration for brain tumor BNCT can be created. In this work, the applicability of 2.5 MeV neutrons for liver tumor BNCT application was studied. The optimal neutron energy for external liver treatments is not known. Neutron beams of different energies (1eV < E < 100 keV) were simulated and the dose distribution in the liver was calculated with the MCNP simulation code. In order to obtain the optimal neutron energy spectrum with the D-D neutrons, various moderator designs were performed using MCNP simulations. In this article the neutron spectrum and the optimized beam shaping assembly for liver tumor treatments is presented.

  2. Application value of computer assisted surgery system in precision surgeries for pediatric complex liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin; Zhou, Xian-Jun; Dong, Qian; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Feng; Chen, Yong-Jian; Hao, Xi-Wei; Li, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    We discussed the diagnostic and treatment value and clinical significance of computer assisted surgery system (Higemi) in precision surgeries for pediatric complex liver tumors. A total of 21 pediatric cases receiving hepatectomy for tumors in the portal vein and giant liver tumors from June 2012 to January 2015 were analyzed. Higemi was used for 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of thin-slice CT images and surgical planning. Tumors were precisely located and blood vessel neighborhood was determined so as to evaluate surgical feasibility. In addition, pathological classification, surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, transfusion rate and complications were predicted. After 3D reconstruction using Higemi, the neighboring relationship of tumors with blood vessels and the running direction of the blood vessels were clearly visualized. Of 21 cases, 10 cases had tumors located in the left lobe, 5 cases in the right lobe, 3 cases showing involvement of right trilobes, and 3 cases in the middle lobe. Lobes exceeding one third of the total liver volume were resected in 18 cases. Postoperative pathological examination indicated 10 cases of hepatoblastoma, 3 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 cases of hamartoma, 3 cases of infantile hemangioendothelioma, 1 case of teratoma and 1 case of undifferentiated malignant mesenchymoma. The surgical time was 90-240 min with an average of 130 min; the medium intraoperative blood loss was 60 ml and the minimum blood loss was 3 ml; the transfusion rate was 42.9% (9/21). Surgeries were successful in 20 cases, who were discharged after recovery. However, one case had giant liver tumor combined with severe obstructive jaundice and hepatic insufficiency and died of postoperative liver failure and DIC. 3D reconstruction of CT data using Higemi can clearly visualize the running direction of blood vessels and the neighboring relationship with tumors. Higemi can improve the precision and safety of complex hepatectomy. PMID:26770445

  3. Dietary effects on liver tumor burden in mice treated with the hepatocellular carcinogen diethylnitrosamine

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Marin E.; Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Byrne, Frances L.; Breen, David S.; Leitinger, Norbert; Li, Chien; Lackner, Carolin; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Mice exposed to the hepatocellular carcinogen diethylnitrosamine at 2 weeks of age have a high risk of developing primary liver tumors later in life. Previous studies have demonstrated that diethylnitrosamine-treated mice have increased tumor burden when fed an obesigenic “Western” diet rich in lard fat and sugar. However, the role of dietary fats versus sugars in the promotion of liver cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine how altering dietary fats versus sugars affects tumor burden in the diethylnitrosamine model. Methods C57BL/6N mice were treated with diethylnitrosamine at 2 weeks of age and, from 6 to 32 weeks of age, fed one of five diets that differed in fat and sugar content including normal chow, ketogenic, and Western diets. Results Mice fed sugar-rich diets had the greatest tumor burden irrespective of dietary fat content. In contrast, mice fed a high-fat low-sugar diet had the least tumor burden despite obesity and glucose intolerance. When evaluated as independent variables, tumor burden was positively correlated with hepatic fat accumulation, postprandial insulin, and liver IL-6, and inversely correlated with serum adiponectin. In contrast, tumor burden did not correlate with adiposity, fasting insulin, or glucose intolerance. Furthermore, mice fed high sugar diets had lower liver expression of p21 and cleaved caspase-3 compared to mice fed low sugar diets. Conclusions These data indicate that dietary sugar intake contributes to liver tumor burden independent of excess adiposity or insulin resistance in mice treated with diethylnitrosamine. PMID:25450719

  4. Comparison of Liver Tumor Motion With and Without Abdominal Compression Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Patel, Ritesh; Simeonov, Anna K.; Lockwood, Gina; Haider, Masoom; Dawson, Laura A.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients undergoing liver stereotactic body radiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to measure the changes in three-dimensional liver tumor motion with and without compression using cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients treated as a part of an institutional research ethics board-approved liver stereotactic body radiotherapy protocol underwent cine T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging through the tumor centroid in the coronal and sagittal planes. A total of 240 cine-magnetic resonance imaging sequences acquired at one to three images each second for 30-60 s were evaluated using an in-house-developed template matching tool (based on the coefficient correlation) to measure the magnitude of the tumor motion. The average tumor edge displacements were used to determine the magnitude of changes in the caudal-cranial (CC) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, with and without AC. Results: The mean tumor motion without AC of 11.7 mm (range, 4.8-23.3) in the CC direction was reduced to 9.4 mm (range, 1.6-23.4) with AC. The tumor motion was reduced in both directions (CC and AP) in 52% of the patients and in a single direction (CC or AP) in 90% of the patients. The mean decrease in tumor motion with AC was 2.3 and 0.6 mm in the CC and AP direction, respectively. Increased motion occurred in one or more directions in 28% of patients. Clinically significant (>3 mm) decreases were observed in 40% and increases in <2% of patients in the CC direction. Conclusion: AC can significantly reduce three-dimensional liver tumor motion in most patients, although the magnitude of the reduction was smaller than previously reported.

  5. Comparison of clenbuterol and salbutamol accumulation in the liver of two different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Vulić, Ana; Pleadin, Jelka; Durgo, Ksenija; Scortichini, Giampiero; Stojković, Ranko

    2014-06-01

    In the European Union, β(2)-adrenergic agonists like clenbuterol and salbutamol are banned from use as growth promoters. Although clenbuterol and salbutamol both accumulate in the liver, differences in the accumulation rate can be seen among animal species due to different β(2)-adrenoreceptor distributions. The aim of this study was to compare the accumulation of the two in the liver tissue of two different mouse strains. The study included 200 8-week-old BALB/c and C57/BL/6 mice. One group of BALB/c (40) and one group of C57/BL/6 (40) mice were treated with 2.5 mg/kg body mass clenbuterol per os for 28 days. The remaining two animal groups were treated with salbutamol in the same manner. The animals were then randomly sacrificed on day 1, 15 and 30 post treatments. Despite of the same treatment dose, the results revealed clenbuterol to persist in the liver tissue longer than salbutamol. On post treatment day 30, the concentration of clenbuterol residue in C57/BL/6 and BALB/c mice liver tissue were 0.23 ± 0.02 and 0.21 ± 0.03 ng/g, respectively, while residues of salbutamol were not detected. When comparing the accumulation of both compounds between the two mouse strains, it becomes apparent that no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the accumulation rate can be found.

  6. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Ko, Eun Hee; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. - Highlights: • Refeeding increases the RXRγ expression level in mouse liver. • RXRγ expression is induced by high glucose condition in primary hepatocytes. • RXRγ and LXRα have synergistic effect on SREBP-1c promoter activity. • RXRγ binds to LXRE(-299/-280) located within SREBP-1c promoter region and interacts with LXRα.

  7. N-hydroxylation of 4-aminobiphenyl by CYP2E1 produces oxidative stress in a mouse model of chemically induced liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Sugamori, Kim S; Tung, Aveline; McPherson, J Peter; Grant, Denis M

    2015-04-01

    4-Aminobiphenyl (ABP) is a trace component of cigarette smoke and hair dyes, a suspected human carcinogen and a potent rodent liver carcinogen. Postnatal exposure of mice to ABP results in a higher incidence of liver tumors in males than in females, paralleling the sex difference in human liver cancer incidence. A traditional model of ABP tumorigenesis involves initial CYP1A2-mediated N-hydroxylation, which eventually leads to production of mutagenic ABP-DNA adducts that initiate tumor growth. However, several studies have found no correlation between sex or CYP1A2 function and the DNA-damaging, mutagenic, or tumorigenic effects of ABP. Oxidative stress may be an important etiological factor for liver cancer, and it has also been linked to ABP exposure. The goals of this study were to identify novel enzyme(s) that contribute to ABP N-oxidation, and to investigate a potential role for oxidative stress in ABP liver tumorigenicity. Isozyme-selective inhibition experiments using liver microsomes from wild-type and genetically modified mice identified CYP2E1 as a major ABP N-hydroxylating enzyme. The N-hydroxylation of ABP by transiently expressed CYP2E1 produced oxidative stress in cultured mouse hepatoma cells. In vivo postnatal exposure of mice to a tumorigenic dose of ABP also produced oxidative stress in male wild-type mice, but not in male Cyp2e1(-/-) mice or in female mice. However, a stronger NRF2-associated antioxidant response was observed in females. Our results identify CYP2E1 as a novel ABP-N-oxidizing enzyme, and suggest that sex differences in CYP2E1-dependent oxidative stress and antioxidant responses to ABP may contribute to the observed sex difference in tumor incidence.

  8. Propiconazole increases reactive oxygen species levels in mouse hepatic cells in culture and in mouse liver by a cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole induces hepatocarcinomas and hepatoadenomas in mice and is a rat liver tumor promoter. Transcriptional, proteomic, metabolomic and biochemical studies of hepatic tissues from mice treated with propiconazole under the conditions of the chronic bioassay indicate that ...

  9. Undifferentiated sarcoma of the liver: a case study of an erythropoietin-secreting tumor.

    PubMed

    Lin, JoAnn M; Heath, Jonathon E; Twaddell, William S; Castellani, Rudy J

    2014-09-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver (UESL) is an uncommon hepatic tumor usually found in children, with rare cases reported in adults. We present a case of a 53-year-old woman with an undifferentiated sarcoma of the liver (USL), which resembles UESL, who initially presented with a markedly elevated hematocrit (61.2%). Cytogenetic studies for polycythemia vera were negative, but the patient's erythropoietin (EPO) was elevated. A computed tomography scan and subsequent partial hepatectomy revealed a well-circumscribed, partially cystic mass in the right lobe of the liver measuring 34 cm. Following surgery, the patient's EPO level and hematocrit dropped to within normal range and remained so for 1 year, at which point it rose again. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a liver mass at the previous resection margin, consistent with a recurrence. In this case study, we describe the first reported USL resembling an UESL that secretes EPO, which was a useful marker of tumor recurrence.

  10. Common Fragile Site Tumor Suppressor Genes and Corresponding Mouse Models of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drusco, Alessandra; Pekarsky, Yuri; Costinean, Stefan; Antenucci, Anna; Conti, Laura; Volinia, Stefano; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Huebner, Kay; Zanesi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal common fragile sites (CFSs) are specific mammalian genomic regions that show an increased frequency of gaps and breaks when cells are exposed to replication stress in vitro. CFSs are also consistently involved in chromosomal abnormalities in vivo related to cancer. Interestingly, several CFSs contain one or more tumor suppressor genes whose structure and function are often affected by chromosomal fragility. The two most active fragile sites in the human genome are FRA3B and FRA16D where the tumor suppressor genes FHIT and WWOX are located, respectively. The best approach to study tumorigenic effects of altered tumor suppressors located at CFSs in vivo is to generate mouse models in which these genes are inactivated. This paper summarizes our present knowledge on mouse models of cancer generated by knocking out tumor suppressors of CFS. PMID:21318118

  11. Common fragile site tumor suppressor genes and corresponding mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Drusco, Alessandra; Pekarsky, Yuri; Costinean, Stefan; Antenucci, Anna; Conti, Laura; Volinia, Stefano; Aqeilan, Rami I; Huebner, Kay; Zanesi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal common fragile sites (CFSs) are specific mammalian genomic regions that show an increased frequency of gaps and breaks when cells are exposed to replication stress in vitro. CFSs are also consistently involved in chromosomal abnormalities in vivo related to cancer. Interestingly, several CFSs contain one or more tumor suppressor genes whose structure and function are often affected by chromosomal fragility. The two most active fragile sites in the human genome are FRA3B and FRA16D where the tumor suppressor genes FHIT and WWOX are located, respectively. The best approach to study tumorigenic effects of altered tumor suppressors located at CFSs in vivo is to generate mouse models in which these genes are inactivated. This paper summarizes our present knowledge on mouse models of cancer generated by knocking out tumor suppressors of CFS.

  12. MRI visible drug eluting magnetic microspheres for transcatheter intra-arterial delivery to liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chen, Jeane; Omary, Reed A; Larson, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible amonafide-eluting alginate microspheres were developed for targeted arterial-infusion chemotherapy. These alginate microspheres were synthesized using a highly efficient microfluidic gelation process. The microspheres included magnetic clusters formed by USPIO nanoparticles to permit MRI and a sustained drug-release profile. The biocompatibility, MR imaging properties and amonafide release kinetics of these microspheres were investigated during in vitro studies. A xenograft rodent model was used to demonstrate the feasibility to deliver these microspheres to liver tumors using hepatic transcatheter intra-arterial infusions and potential to visualize the intra-hepatic delivery of these microspheres to both liver tumor and normal tissues with MRI immediately after infusion. This approach offer the potential for catheter-directed drug delivery to liver tumors for reduced systemic toxicity and superior therapeutic outcomes.

  13. MRI Visible Drug Eluting Magnetic Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Delivery to Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chen, Jeane; Omary, Reed A.; Larson, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible amonafide-eluting alginate microspheres were developed for targeted arterial-infusion chemotherapy. These alginate microspheres were synthesized using a highly efficient microfluidic gelation process. The microspheres included magnetic clusters formed by USPIO nanoparticles to permit MRI and a sustained drug-release profile. The biocompatibility, MR imaging properties and amonafide release kinetics of these microspheres were investigated during in vitro studies. A xenograft rodent model was used to demonstrate the feasibility to deliver these microspheres to liver tumors using hepatic transcatheter intra-arterial infusions and potential to visualize the intra-hepatic delivery of these microspheres to both liver tumor and normal tissues with MRI immediately after infusion. This approach offer the potential for catheter-directed drug delivery to liver tumors for reduced systemic toxicity and superior therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25767615

  14. Toxicity monitoring with primary cultured hepatocytes underestimates the acetaminophen-induced inflammatory responses of the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Shinjiro; Shimomura, Akiko; Inadera, Hidekuni

    2011-01-01

    In vitro gene expression profiling with isolated hepatocytes has been used to assess the hepatotoxicity of certain chemicals because of animal welfare issues. However, whether an in vitro system can completely replace the in vivo system has yet to be elucidated in detail. Using a focused microarray established in our laboratory, we examined gene expression profiles in the mouse liver and primary cultured hepatocytes after treatment with different doses of acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic that frequently causes liver injury. The acute hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen was confirmed by showing the induction of an oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1, elevated levels of serum transaminase, and histopathological findings. In vivo microarray and network analysis showed that acetaminophen treatment provoked alterations in relation to the inflammatory response, and that tumor necrosis factor-α plays a central role in related pathway alterations. By contrast, pathway analyses in in vitro isolated hepatocytes did not find such prominent changes in the inflammation-related networks compared with the in vivo situation. Thus, although in vitro gene expression profiles are useful for evaluating the direct toxicity of chemicals, indirect toxicities including inflammatory responses mediated by cell-cell interactions or secondary toxicity due to pathophysiological changes in the whole body may be overlooked. Our results indicate that the in vitro hepatotoxicity prediction system using isolated hepatocytes does not fully reflect the in vivo cellular response. An in vitro system may be appropriate, therefore, for high throughput screening to detect the direct hepatotoxicity of a test compound.

  15. Effect of a polysaccharide (TAP) from the fruiting bodies of Tremella aurantia on glucose metabolism in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kiho, T; Morimoto, H; Kobayashi, T; Usui, S; Ukai, S; Aizawa, K; Inakuma, T

    2000-02-01

    An acidic polysaccharide (TAP) obtained from the fruiting bodies of Tremella aurantia significantly increased the activities of glucokinase, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and decreased the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase in normal and diabetic mouse liver after intraperitoneal administration, while the glycogen content in the liver was reduced. Furthermore, TAP lowered the plasma cholesterol level in normal and diabetic mice.

  16. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  17. Mode of action of liver tumor induction by trichloroethylene and its metabolites, trichloroacetate and dichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, R J

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) induces liver cancer in mice but not in rats. Three metabolites of TCE may contribute--chloral hydrate (CH), dichloroacetate (DCA), and trichloroacetate (TCA). CH and TCA appear capable of only inducing liver tumors in mice, but DCA is active in rats as well. The concentrations of TCA in blood required to induce liver cancer approach the mM range. Concentrations of DCA in blood associated with carcinogenesis are in the sub-microM range. The carcinogenic activity of CH is largely dependent on its conversion to TCA and/or DCA. TCA is a peroxisome proliferator in the same dose range that induces liver cancer. Mice with targeted disruptions of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha) are insensitive to the liver cancer-inducing properties of other peroxisome proliferators. Human cells do not display the responses associated with PPAR-alpha that are observed in rodents. This may be attributed to lower levels of expressed PPAR-alpha in human liver. DCA treatment produces liver tumors with a different phenotype than TCA. Its tumorigenic effects are closely associated with differential effects on cell replication rates in tumors, normal hepatocytes, and suppression of apoptosis. Growth of DCA-induced tumors has been shown to arrest after cessation of treatment. The DCA and TCA adequately account for the hepatocarcinogenic responses to TCE. Low-level exposure to TCE is not likely to induce liver cancer in humans. Higher exposures to TCE could affect sensitive populations. Sensitivity could be based on different metabolic capacities for TCE or its metabolites or result from certain chronic diseases that have a genetic basis. PMID:10807555

  18. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  19. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D.; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M. S.; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  20. Lung tumor promotion by chromium-containing welding particulate matter in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiology suggests that occupational exposure to welding particulate matter (PM) may increase lung cancer risk. However, animal studies are lacking to conclusively link welding with an increased risk. PM derived from stainless steel (SS) welding contains carcinogenic metals such as hexavalent chromium and nickel. We hypothesized that welding PM may act as a tumor promoter and increase lung tumor multiplicity in vivo. Therefore, the capacity of chromium-containing gas metal arc (GMA)-SS welding PM to promote lung tumors was evaluated using a two-stage (initiation-promotion) model in lung tumor susceptible A/J mice. Methods Male mice (n = 28-30/group) were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA;10 μg/g; IP) or vehicle (corn oil) followed by 5 weekly pharyngeal aspirations of GMA-SS (340 or 680 μg/exposure) or PBS. Lung tumors were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. Results MCA initiation followed by GMA-SS welding PM exposure promoted tumor multiplicity in both the low (12.1 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse) and high (14.0 ± 1.8 tumors/mouse) exposure groups significantly above MCA/sham (4.77 ± 0.7 tumors/mouse; p = 0.0001). Multiplicity was also highly significant (p < 0.004) across all individual lung regions of GMA-SS-exposed mice. No exposure effects were found in the corn oil groups at 30 weeks. Histopathology confirmed the gross findings and revealed increased inflammation and a greater number of malignant lesions in the MCA/welding PM-exposed groups. Conclusions GMA-SS welding PM acts as a lung tumor promoter in vivo. Thus, this study provides animal evidence to support the epidemiological data that show welders have an increased lung cancer risk. PMID:24107379

  1. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Okushin, Kazuya; Enooku, Kenichiro; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Moriya, Kyoji; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Aizaki, Hideki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity. PMID:28107512

  2. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Ryuta; Carlson, Bradley A.; Tsuji, Petra A.; Lee, Byeong Jae; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2015-01-01

    A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system. PMID:26569310

  3. Random feature subspace ensemble based Extreme Learning Machine for liver tumor detection and segmentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weimin; Yang, Yongzhong; Lin, Zhiping; Huang, Guang-Bin; Zhou, Jiayin; Duan, Yuping; Xiong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to detect and segment liver tumors. The detection and segmentation of liver tumors can be formulized as novelty detection or two-class classification problem. Each voxel is characterized by a rich feature vector, and a classifier using random feature subspace ensemble is trained to classify the voxels. Since Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) has advantages of very fast learning speed and good generalization ability, it is chosen to be the base classifier in the ensemble. Besides, majority voting is incorporated for fusion of classification results from the ensemble of base classifiers. In order to further increase testing accuracy, ELM autoencoder is implemented as a pre-training step. In automatic liver tumor detection, ELM is trained as a one-class classifier with only healthy liver samples, and the performance is compared with two-class ELM. In liver tumor segmentation, a semi-automatic approach is adopted by selecting samples in 3D space to train the classifier. The proposed method is tested and evaluated on a group of patients' CT data and experiment show promising results.

  4. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  5. Laparoscopic liver resection for posterosuperior tumors using caudal approach and postural changes: A new technical approach

    PubMed Central

    Morise, Zenichi

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) for tumors in the posterosuperior liver [segment (S) 7 and deep S6] is a challenging clinical procedure. This area is located in the bottom of the small subphrenic space (rib cage), with the large and heavy right liver on it when the patient is in the supine position. Thus, LLR of this area is technically demanding because of the handling of the right liver which is necessary to obtain a fine surgical view, secure hemostasis and conduct the resection so as to achieve an appropriate surgical margin in the cage. Handling of the right liver may be performed by the hand-assisted approach, robotic liver resection or by using spacers, such as a sterile glove pouch. In addition, the operative field of posterosuperior resection is in the deep bottom area of the subphrenic cage, with the liver S6 obstructing the laparoscopic caudal view of lesions. The use of intercostal ports facilitates the direct lateral approach into the cage and to the target area, with the combination of mobilization of the liver. Postural changes during the LLR procedure have also been reported to facilitate the LLR for this area, such as left lateral positioning for posterior sectionectomy and semi-prone positioning for tumors in the posterosuperior segments. In our hospital, LLR procedures for posterosuperior tumors are performed via the caudal approach with postural changes. The left lateral position is used for posterior sectionectomy and the semi-prone position is used for S7 segmentectomy and partial resections of S7 and deep S6 without combined intercostal ports insertion. Although the movement of instruments is restricted in the caudal approach, compared to the lateral approach, port placement in the para-vertebra area makes the manipulation feasible and stable, with minimum damage to the environment around the liver. PMID:28058008

  6. Laparoscopic liver resection for posterosuperior tumors using caudal approach and postural changes: A new technical approach.

    PubMed

    Morise, Zenichi

    2016-12-21

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) for tumors in the posterosuperior liver [segment (S) 7 and deep S6] is a challenging clinical procedure. This area is located in the bottom of the small subphrenic space (rib cage), with the large and heavy right liver on it when the patient is in the supine position. Thus, LLR of this area is technically demanding because of the handling of the right liver which is necessary to obtain a fine surgical view, secure hemostasis and conduct the resection so as to achieve an appropriate surgical margin in the cage. Handling of the right liver may be performed by the hand-assisted approach, robotic liver resection or by using spacers, such as a sterile glove pouch. In addition, the operative field of posterosuperior resection is in the deep bottom area of the subphrenic cage, with the liver S6 obstructing the laparoscopic caudal view of lesions. The use of intercostal ports facilitates the direct lateral approach into the cage and to the target area, with the combination of mobilization of the liver. Postural changes during the LLR procedure have also been reported to facilitate the LLR for this area, such as left lateral positioning for posterior sectionectomy and semi-prone positioning for tumors in the posterosuperior segments. In our hospital, LLR procedures for posterosuperior tumors are performed via the caudal approach with postural changes. The left lateral position is used for posterior sectionectomy and the semi-prone position is used for S7 segmentectomy and partial resections of S7 and deep S6 without combined intercostal ports insertion. Although the movement of instruments is restricted in the caudal approach, compared to the lateral approach, port placement in the para-vertebra area makes the manipulation feasible and stable, with minimum damage to the environment around the liver.

  7. Quantification of Liver Tumors Using Statistical Characteristics of Ultrasonic RF Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chono, Tomoaki; Ito, Masayasu

    We propose a method for quantification of liver tumors using statistical characteristics of ultrasonic RF signals. Parameters of K distribution show the characteristics of a soft tissue. The proposed method of chi-square test(CST) can estimate the most appropriate parameters of K distribution, which are fitted to an observed amplitude distribution. Method of moment(MOM), method combining maximum likelihood and MOM(ML/MOM), and CST are compared on simulated RF signals. The CST is applied to RF signals of liver tumors including 38 hepatocellular carcinomas(malignancy) and 12 hepatic hemangiomas(benignancy). The accuracy of discriminant analysis are 78% and 50% for malignancy and benignancy, respectively.

  8. [Effect of lipiodol emulsion and local hyperthermia on hepatic tissue blood flow in rabbits with VX-2 liver tumor].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Tada, I; Okada, K; Kim, Y I; Kobayashi, M

    1988-08-01

    The effect of intra-arterial infusion of lipiodol-emulsion and local hyperthermia on tissue blood flow was examined in experimental hepatic tumor and normal liver of rabbits. VX-2 tumor was implanted in liver of rabbit. The tissue blood flow was estimated by hydrogen gas clearance method when the tumor grew to about 2 cm. Tissue blood flow in tumor (64.5 ml/min/100 g) was significantly less than in normal liver (90.8 ml/min/100 g) (p less than 0.005). The intra-arterial infusion of lipiodol-emulsion did not alter the flow in either tissue. However, the addition of hyperthermia induced a substantial rise of tissue blood flow in normal liver (35% increase, from 93.8 to 127 ml/min/100 g) when compared with in VX-2 tumor (8.9% increase, from 65.1 to 71.8 ml/min/100 g). These were accompanied by a selective heating of liver tumor; the tumor temperature rose to 43 degrees C, although that of normal liver remained at 38 degrees C. Our results suggested that a specific temperature rise of liver tumor after infusion of lipiodol-emulsion and local heating might be related to a different response of microcirculation in tumor and normal liver to the hyperthermia.

  9. Inactivation of Sirt1 in mouse livers protects against endotoxemic liver injury by acetylating and activating NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaolan; Chen, Qian; Dong, Zhen; Xu, Longmei; Lu, Tianfei; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Jiangjun; Zhang, Ming; Xia, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is a deacetylase that regulates many cellular processes in the liver, and so far its role in endotoxemic liver injury is elusive. So we conditionally inactivate Sirt1 in murine hepatocytes to determine its role in d-galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver damage, which is a well-established experimental model mimicking septic liver injury and fulminant hepatitis. Ablation of Sirt1 shows remarkable protection against GalN/LPS-induced liver injury, which is a result of enhanced NF-κB response because knockdown of RelA/p65 negates the protective effect of Sirt1 knockout. Mechanistically, NF-κB p65 is maintained in a hyperacetylated, DNA-binding competent state in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-challenged albumin-Cre+ (AlbCre+) hepatocytes. Transfection of hepatocytes with a recombinant acetylated p65 expression construct replicates the protection afforded by Sirt1 knockout. Transfection of AlbCre+ hepatocytes with a recombinant wild-type Sirt1 construct, rather than a deacetylase-defective one, compromises NF-κB activation and resensitizes hepatocytes to TNF-α-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Sirt1 deacetylates p65 and compromises NF-κB activity in hepatocytes when confronted with LPS/TNF-α stimulation, leading to increased susceptibility to endotoxemic injury. These findings identify a possible protein effector to maneuver the hepatic NF-κB signaling pathway under inflammatory circumstances and a feasible way to increase hepatocellular resistance to endotoxin/TNF-α toxicity. PMID:27711079

  10. US-Cut: interactive algorithm for rapid detection and segmentation of liver tumors in ultrasound acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Chen, Xiaojun; Zoller, Wolfram G.; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Hann, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (US) is the most commonly used liver imaging modality worldwide. It plays an important role in follow-up of cancer patients with liver metastases. We present an interactive segmentation approach for liver tumors in US acquisitions. Due to the low image quality and the low contrast between the tumors and the surrounding tissue in US images, the segmentation is very challenging. Thus, the clinical practice still relies on manual measurement and outlining of the tumors in the US images. We target this problem by applying an interactive segmentation algorithm to the US data, allowing the user to get real-time feedback of the segmentation results. The algorithm has been developed and tested hand-in-hand by physicians and computer scientists to make sure a future practical usage in a clinical setting is feasible. To cover typical acquisitions from the clinical routine, the approach has been evaluated with dozens of datasets where the tumors are hyperechoic (brighter), hypoechoic (darker) or isoechoic (similar) in comparison to the surrounding liver tissue. Due to the interactive real-time behavior of the approach, it was possible even in difficult cases to find satisfying segmentations of the tumors within seconds and without parameter settings, and the average tumor deviation was only 1.4mm compared with manual measurements. However, the long term goal is to ease the volumetric acquisition of liver tumors in order to evaluate for treatment response. Additional aim is the registration of intraoperative US images via the interactive segmentations to the patient's pre-interventional CT acquisitions.

  11. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  12. Predisposing Factors of Liver Necrosis after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization in Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Joskin, Julien Baere, Thierry de; Auperin, Anne; Tselikas, Lambros Guiu, Boris Farouil, Geoffroy; Boige, Valérie Malka, David; Leboulleux, Sophie; Ducreux, Michel; Baudin, Eric; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo investigate predictive factors for liver necrosis after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) of neuroendocrine liver metastases.MethodsA total of 164 patients receiving 374 TACE were reviewed retrospectively to analyze predictive factors of liver necrosis. We analyzed patient age and sex; metastasis number and location; percentage of liver involvement; baseline liver function test; and pretreatment imaging abnormalities such as bile duct dilatation (BDD), portal vein narrowing (PVN), and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We analyzed TACE technique such as Lipiodol or drug-eluting beads (DEB) as the drug’s vector; dose of chemotherapy; diameter of DEB; and number, frequency, and selectivity of TACE.ResultsLiver necrosis developed after 23 (6.1 %) of 374 TACE. In multivariate analysis, DEB > 300 μm in size induced more liver necrosis compared to Lipiodol (odds ratio [OR] 35.20; p < 0.0001) or with DEB < 300 μm in size (OR 19.95; p < 0.010). Pretreatment BDD (OR 119.64; p < 0.0001) and PVT (OR 9.83; p = 0.030) were predictive of liver necrosis. BDD or PVT responsible for liver necrosis were present before TACE in 59 % (13 of 22) and were induced by a previous TACE in 41 % (9 of 22) of cases.ConclusionDEB > 300 μm in size, BDD, and PVT are responsible for increased rate of liver necrosis after TACE. Careful analysis of BDD or PVT on pretreatment images as well as images taken between two courses can help avoid TACE complications.

  13. Metabolism of 17alpha-ethynylestradiol by intact liver parenchymal cells isolated from mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Helton, E D; Casciano, D A; Althaus, Z R; Plant, H D

    1977-12-01

    Liver parenchymal cells isolated by perfusion from female C3H/HeN-MTV+Nctr mice and Sprague-Dawley rats were incubated with [6,7-3H] 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2). The incubates were individually fractionated into free steroid (organic phase), steroid conjugates (aqueous), and bound steroids (macromolecular pellet). The rat had significantly less total free radioactive steroid but significantly more total conjugated and irreversibly bound radioactivity than the mouse. However, when the metabolic conversion of EE2 was compared in the rat and the mouse on a cellular basis (metabolic clearance per 10(6) cells), the rat was found to be less efficient than the mouse. The two species were essentially equivalent in their covalent binding when expressed on a per 10(6) cell basis. Purification of the free radiolabeled steriods on LH-20 demonstrated the mouse to have the parent compound and on identifiable 2-OH-EE2 fraction. The rat had EE2 and an identifiable 2-methoxy-EE2 fraction. A major metabolite fraction for both species was very nonpolar and, although not identified, was found to be ethynylated as demonstrated by silver-sulfoethylcellulose chromatography. The conjugate fractions of the mouse were indicative of glucuronide conjugation, whereas the rat had additional conjugate fractions suggestive of sulfoconjugation.

  14. A compendium of the mouse mammary tumor biologist: from the initial observations in the house mouse to the development of genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration in 1984. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skill sets to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this compendium is to extend an "olive branch" while simultaneously deepen the knowledge of the novice mouse mammary tumor biologist as they journey into a field rich in pathology and genetics spanning several centuries.

  15. Computer-assisted liver tumor surgery using a novel semiautomatic and a hybrid semiautomatic segmentation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zygomalas, Apollon; Karavias, Dionissios; Koutsouris, Dimitrios; Maroulis, Ioannis; Karavias, Dimitrios D; Giokas, Konstantinos; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2016-05-01

    We developed a medical image segmentation and preoperative planning application which implements a semiautomatic and a hybrid semiautomatic liver segmentation algorithm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of computer-assisted liver tumor surgery using these algorithms which are based on thresholding by pixel intensity value from initial seed points. A random sample of 12 patients undergoing elective high-risk hepatectomies at our institution was prospectively selected to undergo computer-assisted surgery using our algorithms (June 2013-July 2014). Quantitative and qualitative evaluation was performed. The average computer analysis time (segmentation, resection planning, volumetry, visualization) was 45 min/dataset. The runtime for the semiautomatic algorithm was <0.2 s/slice. Liver volumetric segmentation using the hybrid method was achieved in 12.9 s/dataset (SD ± 6.14). Mean similarity index was 96.2 % (SD ± 1.6). The future liver remnant volume calculated by the application showed a correlation of 0.99 to that calculated using manual boundary tracing. The 3D liver models and the virtual liver resections had an acceptable coincidence with the real intraoperative findings. The patient-specific 3D models produced using our semiautomatic and hybrid semiautomatic segmentation algorithms proved to be accurate for the preoperative planning in liver tumor surgery and effectively enhanced the intraoperative medical image guidance.

  16. Ca2+ transport by mitochondria from L1210 mouse ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1973-06-01

    Mitochondria isolated from the ascites form of L1210 mouse leukemia cells readily accumulate Ca(2+) from the suspending medium and eject H(+) during oxidation of succinate in the presence of phosphate and Mg(2+), with normal stoichiometry between Ca(2+) uptake and electron transport. Ca(2+) loads up to 1600 ng-atoms per mg of protein are attained. As is the case in mitochondria from normal tissues, Ca(2+) uptake takes precedence over oxidative phosphorylation. However, Ca(2+) transport by the L-1210 mitochondria is unusual in other respects, which may possibly have general significance in tumor cells. The apparent affinity of the L1210 mitochondria for Ca(2+) in stimulation of oxygen uptake is about 3-fold greater than in normal liver mitochondria; moreover, the maximal rate of Ca(2+) transport is also considerably higher. Furthermore, when Ca(2+) pulses are added to L1210 mitochondria in the absence of phosphate or other permeant anions, much larger amounts of Ca(2+) are bound and H(+) ejected per atom of oxygen consumed than in the presence of phosphate; up to 7 Ca(2+) ions are bound per pair of electrons passing each energy-conserving site of the electron-transport chain. Such "superstoichiometry" of Ca(2+) uptake can be accounted for by two distinct types of respiration-dependent interaction of Ca(2+) with the L1210 mitochondria. One is the stimulation of oxygen consumption, which is achieved by relatively low concentrations of Ca(2+) (K(m) congruent with 8 muM) and is accompanied by binding of Ca(2+) up to 40 ng-atoms per mg of protein. The second process, also dependent on electron transport, is the binding of further Ca(2+) from the medium in exchange with previously stored membrane-bound protons, in which the affinity for Ca(2+) is much lower (K(m) congruent with 120 muM).

  17. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  18. Gene therapy with IL-12 induced enhanced anti-tumor activity in fibrosarcoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Razi Soofiyani, Saiedeh; Kazemi, Tohid; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Mohammad Hosseini, Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Hallaj-Nezhadi, Somayeh; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-12-01

    Context Immunotherapy is among the most promising modalities for treatment of cancer. Recently, interleukin 12 (IL-12) has been used as an immunotherapeutic agent in cancer gene therapy. IL-12 can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and boost anti-tumor immune responses. Objective In the current study, we have investigated if IL-12 gene therapy can lead to the regression of tumor mass in a mouse model of fibrosarcoma. Material and methods To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of IL-12, WEHI-164 tumor cells were transfected with murine-IL12 plasmids using Lipofectamine. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to confirm IL-12 expression in transfected cells. The fibrosarcoma mouse model was established by subcutaneous injection of transfected cells to Balb/C mice. Mice were sacrificed and the tumors were extracted. Tumor sizes were measured by caliper. The expression of IL-12 and IFN-γ was studied with real-time PCR and western blotting. The expression of Ki-67(a tumor proliferation marker) in tumor mass was studied by immunohistochemistry staining. Results and discussion The group treated with IL-12 showed a significant decrease in tumor mass volume (P: 0.000). The results of real-time PCR and western blotting showed that IL-12 and IFN-γ expression increased in the group treated with IL-12 (relative expression of IL-12: 1.9 and relative expression of IFN-γ: 1.766). Immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ki-67 expression was reduced in the group treated with IL-12. Conclusion IL-12 gene therapy successfully led to regress of tumor mass in the fibrosarcoma mouse model. This may serve as a candidate therapeutic approach for treatment of cancer.

  19. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Hansjoerg Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2012-12-15

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  20. Troxerutin protects the mouse liver against oxidative stress-mediated injury induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-feng; Fan, Shao-hua; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2009-09-09

    Troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of rutin, has been well-demonstrated to exert hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we attempted to explore whether the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms were involved in troxerutin-mediated protection from D-gal-induced liver injury. The effects of troxerutin on liver lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and the expression of inflammatory mediator were investigated in D-gal-treated mice. The results showed that troxerutin largely attenuated the D-gal-induced TBARS content increase and also markedly renewed the activities of Cu, Zn-SOD, CAT, and GPx in the livers of D-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, troxerutin inhibited the upregulation of the expression of NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, and COX-2 induced by D-gal. D-Gal-induced tissue architecture changes and serum ALT and AST increases were effectively suppressed by troxerutin. In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse liver from D-gal-induced injury by attenuating lipid peroxidation, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and suppressing inflammatory response. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of troxerutin in the protection of the liver.

  1. Esterase 22 and beta-glucuronidase hydrolyze retinoids in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Renate; Taschler, Ulrike; Wolinski, Heimo; Seper, Andrea; Tamegger, Stefanie N; Graf, Maria; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Lass, Achim

    2009-12-01

    Excess dietary vitamin A is esterified with fatty acids and stored in the form of retinyl ester (RE) predominantly in the liver. According to the requirements of the body, liver RE stores are hydrolyzed and retinol is delivered to peripheral tissues. The controlled mobilization of retinol ensures a constant supply of the body with the vitamin. Currently, the enzymes catalyzing liver RE hydrolysis are unknown. In this study, we identified mouse esterase 22 (Es22) as potent RE hydrolase highly expressed in the liver, particularly in hepatocytes. The enzyme is located exclusively at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), implying that it is not involved in the mobilization of RE present in cytosolic lipid droplets. Nevertheless, cell culture experiments revealed that overexpression of Es22 attenuated the formation of cellular RE stores, presumably by counteracting retinol esterification at the ER. Es22 was previously shown to form a complex with beta-glucuronidase (Gus). Our studies revealed that Gus colocalizes with Es22 at the ER but does not affect its RE hydrolase activity. Interestingly, however, Gus was capable of hydrolyzing the naturally occurring vitamin A metabolite retinoyl beta-glucuronide. In conclusion, our observations implicate that both Es22 and Gus play a role in liver retinoid metabolism.

  2. Alcoholic Liver Disease: A Mouse Model Reveals Protection by Lactobacillus fermentum

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Rosario; Rappa, Francesca; Macaluso, Filippo; Caruso Bavisotto, Celeste; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Di Paola, Gaia; Tomasello, Giovanni; Di Felice, Valentina; Marcianò, Vito; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly; J.L. Macario, Alberto; Cocchi, Massimo; Cappello, MD, Francesco; Marino Gammazza, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Alcoholism is one of the most devastating diseases with high incidence, but knowledge of its pathology and treatment is still plagued with gaps mostly because of the inherent limitations of research with patients. We developed an animal model for studying liver histopathology, Hsp (heat-shock protein)-chaperones involvement, and response to treatment. Methods: The system was standardized using mice to which ethanol was orally administered alone or in combination with Lactobacillus fermentum following a precise schedule over time and applying, at predetermined intervals, a battery of techniques (histology, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, 3-nitrotyrosine labeling) to assess liver pathology (e.g., steatosis, fibrosis), and Hsp60 and iNOS (inducible form of nitric oxide synthase) gene expression and protein levels, and post-translational modifications. Results: Typical ethanol-induced liver pathology occurred and the effect of the probiotic could be reliably monitored. Steatosis score, iNOS levels, and nitrated proteins (e.g., Hsp60) decreased after probiotic intake. Conclusions: We describe a mouse model useful for studying liver disease induced by chronic ethanol intake and for testing pertinent therapeutic agents, e.g., probiotics. We tested L. fermentum, which reduced considerably ethanol-induced tissue damage and deleterious post-translational modifications of the chaperone Hsp60. The model is available to test other agents and probiotics with therapeutic potential in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26795070

  3. Signaling through hepatocyte vasopressin receptor 1 protects mouse liver from ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingbo; Ma, Tonghui; Lin, Xiaozhu; Jiang, Liping; Cheng, Jilin; Tao, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin has been used extensively in the management of certain complications associated with end-stage liver diseases (ESLDs). In our pilot study, terlipressin treatment showed beneficial effects on liver function in patients with decompensated cirrhosis, however whether it plays a role in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remains unknown. Using a mouse nonlethal hepatic IR model, we found terlipressin administration significantly ameliorated IR-induced liver apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. Furthermore, despite its known effect on visceral vasoconstriction, hemodynamic evaluation of murine hepatic tissue after IR revealed no change of overall hepatic blood flow after terlipressin treatment. Further studies identified the upregulation of vasopressin receptor 1 (V1R) expression on hepatocytes upon IR. In isolated hepatocyte hypoxia/reoxygenation model, the active component of terlipressin, lysine vasopressin, conferred hepatocytes resistant to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed the V1R engagement activated the Wnt/β-catenin/FoxO3a/AKT pathway, which subsequently circumvented the proapoptotic events, thus ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, genetic knockdown of V1R expression in hepatocyte cell lines or blockade of this signaling pathway abrogated such protective effect. Conclusion: These data highlight the functional importance of the hepatocyte V1R/Wnt/β-catenin/FoxO3a/AKT pathway in protecting liver from oxidative stress-induced injury. PMID:27713143

  4. Hepcidin protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in a mouse model of obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yang, Ya-Ling; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Li-Tung; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive jaundice (OJ) increases the risk of liver injury and sepsis, leading to increased mortality. Cholestatic liver injury is associated with a downregulation of hepcidin expression levels. In fact, hepcidin has an important antimicrobial effect, especially against Escherichia coli. It is unknown whether supplementing recombinant hepcidin is effective in alleviating cholestasis-induced liver injury and mortality in mice with superimposed sepsis. A mouse model of cholestasis was developed using extrahepatic bile duct ligation for 3 days. In addition, sepsis due to E. coli 0111:B4 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was induced in the model. The serum levels of total bilirubin, AST, ALT, and LDH and the mRNA levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and MCP-1 in the liver were significantly higher in the OJ mice receiving LPS than in the sham-operated mice receiving LPS. Compared to the OJ mice receiving LPS, the hepcidin-pretreated OJ mice receiving LPS showed a significant decrease in the above mentioned parameters, as well as a reversal in the downregulation of LC3B-II and upregulation of cleaved caspase-3; this, in turn, led to significantly decreased lethality in 24h. In conclusion, these results indicate that hepcidin pretreatment significantly reduced hepatic proinflammatory cytokine expression and liver injury, leading to reduced early lethality in OJ mice receiving LPS. Enhanced autophagy and reduced apoptosis may account for the protective effects of hepcidin.

  5. Scintillation Studies of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with ^125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Amir; Blue, Eric; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; Mohammed, Shira; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, Margaret; Schworer, Stephen; Sutton, Jonathan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Welsh, Robert

    2007-10-01

    We have applied the techniques of scintillation imaging to studies of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). In these studies, Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) transfers the radioactive ^125I to the mammary glands of lactating mice and in particular to those mammaries with visible tumors. These studies have principally been carried out using pixellated scintillators coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). More recently, we have initiated such studies with a monolithic slab of LaBr3 scintillator coupled to an array of PSPMTs. Several techniques of mapping and measuring the development of such tumors have been employed. These will be discussed in detail and preliminary results will be reported.

  6. Expression of phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 is associated with prognosis of Wilms’ tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fengyin; Li, Wenyi; Wang, Lie; Jiao, Changfeng

    2017-01-01

    Objective The current study was undertaken to explore the clinical and prognostic value of phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) expression in Wilms’ tumor. Methods Seventy-six patients with Wilms’ tumor in Qilu Hospital from January 2003 to July 2009 were enrolled in the study. Protein expression level of PRL-3 was examined by immunohistochemical staining, and the correlation between PRL-3 expression and histopathological parameters, clinical variables, and outcome of patients with Wilms’ tumor were analyzed. Results We found that 19% of patients with unfavorable histology had tumor recurrence and 16% of patients died following the operation. PRL-3 was expressed in 15 out of 76 tumors (19%) and expressed highly in unfavorable histology Wilms’ tumor (P=0.04). PRL-3 protein expression level was correlated to 2.5-fold increase in recurrence rate of Wilms’ tumor (P=0.06) without any statistically significant difference. However, in favorable histology Wilms’ tumor, PRL-3 expression was correlated to an increase of 3.4-fold in recurrence rate (P=0.03). Conclusion The expression of PRL-3 protein was correlated with an increased recurrence rate of favorable histology Wilms’ tumor. PRL-3 may serve as a promising biomarker for predicting patients with high risk of Wilms’ tumor. Further investigations are warranted to investigate the clinical function of PRL-3 in Wilms’ tumor. PMID:28138254

  7. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Pamela K.; Woods, Courtney G.; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-03-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

  8. Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ju; Isern, Nancy G.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-31

    NMR metabolomics, consisting of solid state high resolution (hr) magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR (1H hr-MAS), liquid state high resolution 1H-NMR, and principal components analysis (PCA) has been used to study secondary metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse liver . The melanoma group can be differentiated from its control group by PCA analysis of the absolute concentrations or by the absolute peak intensities of metabolites from either 1H hr-MAS NMR data on intact liver tissues or liquid state 1H-NMR spectra on liver tissue extracts. In particular, we found that the absolute concentrations of alanine, glutamate, creatine, creatinine, fumarate and cholesterol are elevated in the melanoma group as compared to controls, while the absolute concentrations of succinate, glycine, glucose, and the family of linear lipids including long chain fatty acids, total choline and acylglycerol are decreased. The ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine is increased by about 1.5 fold in the melanoma group, while the absolute concentration of total choline is actually lower in melanoma mice. These results suggest the following picture in secondary melanoma metastasis: Linear lipid levels are decreased by beta oxidation in the melanoma group, which contributes to an increase in the synthesis of cholesterol, and also provides an energy source input for TCA cycle. These findings suggest a link between lipid oxidation, the TCA cycle and the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) signal pathway in tumor metastases. Thus this study indicates that the metabolic profile derived from NMR analysis can provide a valuable bio-signature of malignancy and cell hypoxia in metastatic melanoma.

  9. Comparison Analysis of Dysregulated LncRNA Profile in Mouse Plasma and Liver after Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Luo, Yanjin; Yang, Weili; Ding, Liwei; Wang, Junpei; Tu, Jian; Geng, Bin; Cui, Qinghua; Yang, Jichun

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) have been believed to be the major transcripts in various tissues and organs, and may play important roles in regulation of many biological processes. The current study determined the LncRNA profile in mouse plasma after liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) using microarray technology. Microarray assays revealed that 64 LncRNAs were upregulated, and 244 LncRNAs were downregulated in the plasma of liver IRI mouse. Among these dysregulated plasma LncRNAs, 59-61% were intergenic, 22-25% were antisense overlap, 8-12% were sense overlap and 6-7% were bidirectional. Ten dysregulated plasma LncRNAs were validated by quantitative PCR assays, confirming the accuracy of microarray analysis result. Comparison analysis between dysregulated plasma and liver LncRNA profile after liver IRI revealed that among the 308 dysregulated plasma LncRNAs, 245 LncRNAs were present in the liver, but remained unchanged. In contrast, among the 98 dysregulated liver LncRNAs after IRI, only 19 were present in the plasma, but remained unchanged. LncRNA AK139328 had been previously reported to be upregulated in the liver after IRI, and silencing of hepatic AK139328 ameliorated liver IRI. Both microarray and RT-PCR analyses failed to detect the presence of AK139328 in mouse plasma. In summary, the current study compared the difference between dysregulated LncRNA profile in mouse plasma and liver after liver IRI, and suggested that a group of dysregulated plasma LncRNAs have the potential of becoming novel biomarkers for evaluation of ischemic liver injury.

  10. Spatio-temporal Model of Xenobiotic Distribution and Metabolism in an in Silico Mouse Liver Lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Sluka, James; Clendenon, Sherry; Glazier, James; Ryan, Jennifer; Dunn, Kenneth; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James

    Our study aims to construct a structurally plausible in silico model of a mouse liver lobule to simulate the transport of xenobiotics and the production of their metabolites. We use a physiologically-based model to calculate blood-flow rates in a network of mouse liver sinusoids and simulate transport, uptake and biotransformation of xenobiotics within the in silico lobule. Using our base model, we then explore the effects of variations of compound-specific (diffusion, transport and metabolism) and compound-independent (temporal alteration of blood flow pattern) parameters, and examine their influence on the distribution of xenobiotics and metabolites. Our simulations show that the transport mechanism (diffusive and transporter-mediated) of xenobiotics and blood flow both impact the regional distribution of xenobiotics in a mouse hepatic lobule. Furthermore, differential expression of metabolic enzymes along each sinusoid's portal to central axis, together with differential cellular availability of xenobiotics, induce non-uniform production of metabolites. Thus, the heterogeneity of the biochemical and biophysical properties of xenobiotics, along with the complexity of blood flow, result in different exposures to xenobiotics for hepatocytes at different lobular locations. We acknowledge support from National Institute of Health GM 077138 and GM 111243.

  11. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies. PMID:27501019

  12. Combination Therapy of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization and Arterial Administration of Antiangiogenesis on VX2 Liver Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Gang; Zhao DenglLing; Li Guangchao; Yu Hui; Teng Gaojun

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the antitumorigenic efficiency of Endostar (an antiangiogenic agent) arterially administrated combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) on liver tumor, and validation of perfusion CT for quantitative measurements of the results.Experimental DesignThirty rabbits bearing VX2 liver tumors were randomly and equally distributed into three groups. One of the following treatment protocols was performed in each group: 1) group 1 was treated with TACE and simultaneously arterially administrated Endostar; 2) group 2 with TACE alone, and 3) a control group that had saline injected through hepatic artery. Routine CT scan was performed before treatment, and perfusion CT imaging was performed 2 weeks after treatment. Immunohistochemical biomarkers of microvascular density (MVD) and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured for assessments of angiogenesis. Results: We observed a statistically significant reduction from the control in the volume, growth rate, and size of the tumor 2 weeks after treatment with both TACE plus Endostar and with TACE alone (P < 0.01). Although there was no statistically significant difference in tumor size between the group with TACE plus Endostar and the group with TACE alone (P > 0.05), MVD and VEGF were significantly less expressed in the TACE plus Endostar group than both groups with TACE alone and the control group (P < 0.01). Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area products (PS) in the group with TACE plus Endostar on perfusion CT were significantly higher than other two groups (P < 0.05), which were positively correlated with the MVD and VEGF values (P < 0.05). Conclusions: TACE with arterial administration of Endostar simultaneously significantly inhibited the angiogenesis biomarkers associated with TACE in a rabbit model bearing VX2 liver tumor, which indicates that the combined treatment protocol may have potential

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Inoperable Liver Tumors: Results of a Single Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Hussam; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Roberge, David; Donath, David; Lapointe, Real; Vandenbroucke-Menu, Franck; Taussky, Daniel; Boudam, Karim; Chan, Gabriel; Bujold, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for liver tumors unsuitable for ablation or surgery. We report our experience with SBRT in the treatment of liver tumors. Materials and methods Patients with primary or secondary liver cancer were identified in our local SBRT database. Patients were included irrespective of prior liver-directed therapies. The primary endpoint of our review was in-field local control (LC). Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results From 2009 to 2015, a total of 71 liver lesions in 68 patients were treated with SBRT (three patients had two liver lesions treated). The median age was 71 years (27–89 years). Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was the diagnosis in 23 patients (34%), with the grade of Child–Pugh A (52%), B (39%), or C (nine percent) cirrhosis. Six patients (nine percent) had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHC). The remaining 39 patients (57%) had metastatic liver lesions. Colorectal adenocarcinoma was the most common primary tumor type (81%). The median size for HCC, IHC, and metastatic lesions was 5 cm (2–9 cm), 3.6 cm (2–4.9 cm), and 4 cm (1–8 cm), respectively. The median prescribed dose was 45 Gy (16–50 Gy). Median follow-up was 11.5 months (1–45 months). Actuarial one-year in-field LC for HCC and metastatic lesions was 85% and 64% respectively (p= 0.66). At one year, the actuarial rate of new liver lesions was 40% and 26%, respectively, (p=0.58) for HCC and metastases. Only six patients with IHC were treated with SBRT in this study – in these patients, one-year LC was 78% with new liver lesions in 53%. The SBRT treatments were well tolerated. The side effects included common criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v4 grade 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity in three patients, grade 3 nausea in one patient, and grade 3 acute dermatitis in another patient. Two patients had grade 5 toxicity. Radiation pneumonitis was

  14. A fine structural analysis of intercellular junctions in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A; Revel, J P

    1970-05-01

    Zonulae occludentes and gap junctions were examined both in the intact mouse liver and in a junction-rich membrane fraction from homogenized mouse liver. These preparations were visualized with the techniques of uranyl acetate staining en bloc, staining with colloidal lanthanum, negative staining with phosphotungstate, and freeze-cleaving. The zonula occludens is arranged as a meshwork of branching and anastomosing threadlike contacts sealing the lumen of the bile canaliculus from the liver intercellular space. The gap junction is characterized in section by a 20 A gap between the apposed junctional membrane outer leaflets, and permeation of this space with lanthanum or phosphotungstate reveals a polygonal lattice of subunits with a center-to-center spacing of 90-100 A. Freeze-cleaved gap junctions show a similar lattice. Extraction of junction-rich fractions with 60% aqueous acetone results in a disappearance of the 20 A gap in sectioned pellets and an inability to demonstrate the polygonal lattice with either the freeze-cleave or negative staining techniques. Extraction of the membranes with 50% acetone does not produce this effect. Thin-layer chromatography of the acetone extracts reveals a group of phospholipids in the 60% extract that are not detectable in the 50% extract. Acetone does not cause any detectable change in the structure of the zonula occludens, but the occluding junction becomes leaky to lanthanum following acetone treatment. The effects of other reagents on the junctions are reported.

  15. Promiscuous activity of the LXR antagonist GSK2033 in a mouse model of fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffett, Kristine; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The liver X receptor (LXR) functions as a receptor for oxysterols and plays a critical role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. We recently described a synthetic LXR inverse agonist that displayed efficacy in treatment of hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This compound, SR9238, was designed to display liver specificity so as to avoid potential detrimental effects on reverse cholesterol transport in peripheral tissues. Here, we examined the effects of a LXR antagonist/inverse agonist, GSK2033, which displays systemic exposure. Although GSK2033 performed as expected in cell-based models as a LXR inverse agonist, it displayed unexpected activity in the mouse NAFLD model. The expression of lipogenic enzyme genes such as fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory binding protein 1c were induced rather than suppressed and no effect on hepatic steatosis was found. Further characterization of the specificity of GSK2033 revealed that it displayed a significant degree of promiscuity, targeting a number of other nuclear receptors that could clearly alter hepatic gene expression. PMID:27680310

  16. A model of spontaneous mouse mammary tumor for human estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, LIXIANG; ZHOU, BUGAO; MENG, XIANMING; ZHU, WEIFENG; ZUO, AIREN; WANG, XIAOMIN; JIANG, RUNDE; YU, SHIPING

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequently malignancy in women. Therefore, establishment of an animal model for the development of preventative measures and effective treatment for tumors is required. A novel heterogeneous spontaneous mammary tumor animal model of Kunming mice was generated. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spontaneous mammary tumor model. Histopathologically, invasive nodular masses of pleomorphic tubular neoplastic epithelial cells invaded fibro-vascular stroma, adjacent dermis and muscle tissue. Metastatic spread through blood vessel into liver and lungs was observed by hematoxylin eosin staining. No estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) immunoreactivity was detected in their associated malignant tumors, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) protein weak expression was found by immunohistochemistry. High expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), moderate or high expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 were observed in tumor sections at different stages (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after cancer being found) when compared with that of the normal mammary glands. The result showed that the model is of an invasive ductal carcinoma. Remarkably in the mouse model, ER and PR-negative and HER2 weak positivity are observed. The high or moderate expressions of breast cancer markers (VEGF, c-Myc and cyclin D1) in mammary cancer tissue change at different stages. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a spontaneous mammary model displaying colony-strain, outbred mice. This model will be an attractive tool to understand the biology of anti-hormonal breast cancer in women. PMID:25230850

  17. Salmonella Bacterial Monotherapy Reduces Autochthonous Prostate Tumor Burden in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Robert A.; Gentry, Bettina; Mumm, Tyler; Schatten, Heide; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium injected in the circulatory system of mammals selectively targets tumors. Using weekly intraperitoneal injections of attenuated Salmonella strain CRC2631, we tested for regression and/or inhibition of tumor development in the TRAMP prostate tumor mouse model, which utilizes SV40 early region expression for autochthonous formation of prostate tumors that progress into metastatic, poorly differentiated prostatic carcinomas in an immunocompetent murine model. Thirteen weekly intraperitoneal administrations of 105–107 CFU CRC2631 into 10 week old mice were well tolerated by the TRAMP model. Sacrifice and histological analysis of TRAMP prostates at 22 weeks indicated that Salmonella monotherapy at administrated levels decrease visible tumor size (>29%) but did not significantly inhibit previously described SV40 expression-driven TRAMP tumor progression to undifferentiated carcinomas when histologically examined. In conclusion, this work demonstrates baseline results for CRC2631 Salmonella monotherapy using the immunocompetent TRAMP prostate tumor model in preparation for study of combination therapies that resolve autochthonously generated TRAMP prostate tumors, further reduce tumor size, or inhibit prostate tumor progression. PMID:27504973

  18. Liver Injury and Tumor-Inhibiting Effect of Sequential Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization and Portal Venous Embolization on Rabbit VX2 Liver Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongda; Hu, Minggen; Guo, Weichang

    2017-03-27

    BACKGROUND The concepts of sequential transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and portal venous embolization (PVE) were proposed to prevent the detrimental tumor growth-inducing effect of PVE and to facilitate growth of further future liver remnant (FLR). This study aimed to investigate the effect of sequential TACE and PVE on liver damage and the therapeutic effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. MATERIAL AND METHODS Rabbits bearing VX2 liver tumors were randomly divided into TACE+PVE, TACE, PVE, and Sham groups. Plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (TBIL), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at 6 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were measured by ELISA assay. Tumor diameter on day 7 was measured and the tumor sections with cleaved caspase-3 was stained and observed. RESULTS Plasma ALT, AST, and ALP levels were significantly increased at the first hours after the interventions. The TACE group had higher increases than the TACE+PVE and PVE alone groups. ALT, AST, and ALP levels decreased on day 7 and presented a trend to return to the baseline level. The TACE+PVE group showed stronger tumor-inhibiting effect than the TACE and PVE alone groups and also induced the highest level of tumor cell apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS The liver damage caused by TACE+PVE is mild and recoverable. TACE+PVE showed stronger tumor-inhibiting effect than in the TACE and PVE group and also induced the highest level of tumor cell apoptosis.

  19. Liver Injury and Tumor-Inhibiting Effect of Sequential Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization and Portal Venous Embolization on Rabbit VX2 Liver Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dongda; Hu, Minggen; Guo, Weichang

    2017-01-01

    Background The concepts of sequential transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and portal venous embolization (PVE) were proposed to prevent the detrimental tumor growth-inducing effect of PVE and to facilitate growth of further future liver remnant (FLR). This study aimed to investigate the effect of sequential TACE and PVE on liver damage and the therapeutic effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Material/Methods Rabbits bearing VX2 liver tumors were randomly divided into TACE+PVE, TACE, PVE, and Sham groups. Plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (TBIL), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at 6 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were measured by ELISA assay. Tumor diameter on day 7 was measured and the tumor sections with cleaved caspase-3 was stained and observed. Results Plasma ALT, AST, and ALP levels were significantly increased at the first hours after the interventions. The TACE group had higher increases than the TACE+PVE and PVE alone groups. ALT, AST, and ALP levels decreased on day 7 and presented a trend to return to the baseline level. The TACE+PVE group showed stronger tumor-inhibiting effect than the TACE and PVE alone groups and also induced the highest level of tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions The liver damage caused by TACE+PVE is mild and recoverable. TACE+PVE showed stronger tumor-inhibiting effect than in the TACE and PVE group and also induced the highest level of tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:28344313

  20. Epithelialization of mouse ovarian tumor cells originating in the fallopian tube stroma

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yuanyuan; Choi, Pui-Wah; Trachtenberg, Alexander J.; Ng, Allen C.; Kuo, Winston P.; Ng, Shu-Kay; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma accounts for 90% of all ovarian cancer and is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. Recent studies have suggested that fallopian tube fimbriae can be the origin of cells for high-grade serous subtype of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). A mouse HGSOC model with conditional Dicer-Pten double knockout (Dicer-Pten DKO) developed primary tumors, intriguingly, from the fallopian tube stroma. We examined the growth and epithelial phenotypes of the Dicer-Pten DKO mouse tumor cells contributable by each gene knockout. Unlike human ovarian epithelial cancer cells that expressed full-length E-cadherin, the Dicer-Pten DKO stromal tumor cells expressed cleaved E-cadherin fragments and metalloproteinase 2, a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Although the Dicer-Pten DKO tumor cells lost the expression of mature microRNAs as expected, they showed high levels of tRNA fragment expression and enhanced AKT activation due to the loss of PTEN function. Introduction of a Dicer1-expressing construct into the DKO mouse tumor cells significantly reduced DNA synthesis and the cell growth rate, with concurrent diminished adhesion and ZO1 epithelial staining. Hence, it is likely that the loss of Dicer promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition in fallopian tube stromal cells, and in conjunction with Pten loss, further promoted cell proliferation and epithelial-like tumorigenesis. PMID:27602775

  1. Embryonic mouse STO cell-derived xenografts express hepatocytic functions in the livers of nonimmunosuppressed adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Joseph, Brigid; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guest, I; Xu, Meng; Sell, Stewart; Son, Kyung-Hwa; Koch, Katherine S; Leffert, Hyam L

    2005-02-01

    Cells derived from embryonic mouse STO cell lines differentiate into hepatocytes when transplanted into the livers of nonimmunosuppressed dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV)-negative F344 rats. Within 1 day after intrasplenic injection, donor cells moved rapidly into the liver and were found in intravascular and perivascular sites; by 1 month, they were intrasinusoidal and also integrated into hepatic plates with approximately 2% efficiency and formed conjoint bile canaliculi. Neither donor cell proliferation nor host inflammatory responses were observed during this time. Detection of intrahepatic mouse COX1 mitochondrial DNA and mouse albumin mRNA in recipient rats indicated survival and differentiation of donor cells for at least 3 months. Mouse COX1 targets were also detected intrahepatically 4-9 weeks after STO cell injection into nonimmunosuppressed wild-type rats. In contrast to STO-transplanted rats, mouse DNA or RNA was not detectable in untreated or mock-transplanted rats or in rats injected with donor cell DNA. In cultured STO donor cells, DPPIV and glucose-6-phosphatase activities were observed in small clusters; in contrast, mouse major histocompatibility complex class I H-2Kq, H-2Dq, and H-2Lq and class II I-Aq markers were undetectable in vitro before or after interferon gamma treatment. Together with H-2K allele typing, which confirmed the Swiss mouse origin of the donor cells, these observations indicate that mouse-derived STO cell lines can differentiate along hepatocytic lineage and engraft into rat liver across major histocompatibility barriers.

  2. Chemo-immunotherapy induces tumor regression in a mouse model of spontaneous mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carpinelli, Giulia; Canese, Rossella; Cecchetti, Serena; Schiavoni, Giovanna; D'Urso, Maria Teresa; Belardelli, Filippo; Proietti, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-specific immune tolerance represents an obstacle for the development of effective anti-tumor immune responses through cancer vaccines. We here evaluated the efficacy of chemo-immunotherapy in breaking tumor-specific immune tolerance in an almost incurable mouse model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Transgenic HER-2/neu mice bearing large mammary tumors received the adoptive transfer of splenocytes and serum isolated from immune donors, with or without pre-conditioning with cyclophosphamide. Treatment efficacy was assessed by monitoring tumor growth by manual inspection and by magnetic resonance imaging. The same chemo-immunotherapy protocol was tested on tumor-free HER-2/neu mice, to evaluate the effects on tumor emergence. Our data show that chemo-immunotherapy hampered carcinogenesis and caused the regression of large mammary tumor lesions in tumor-bearing HER-2/neu mice. The complete eradication of a significant number of tumor lesions occurred only in mice receiving cyclophosphamide shortly before immunotherapy, and was associated with increased serum anti HER-2/p185 antibodies and tumor leukocyte infiltration. The same protocol significantly delayed the appearance of mammary tumors when administered to tumor-free HER-2/neu mice, indicating that this chemo-immunotherapy approach acted through the elicitation of an effective anti-tumor immune response. Overall, our data support the immune-modulatory role of chemotherapy in overcoming cancer immune tolerance when administered at lymphodepleting non-myeloablative doses shortly before transfer of antigen-specific immune cells and immunoglobulins. These findings open new perspectives on combining immune-modulatory chemotherapy and immunotherapy to overcome immune tolerance in cancer patients. PMID:27486759

  3. Transgenic mouse models generated by hydrodynamic transfection for genetic studies of liver cancer and preclinical testing of anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Lee, Jong Doo; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide; however, the genetic mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are incompletely understood. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of HCC have been developed to elucidate the role of individual cancer-related genes in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the expensive and time-consuming processes related to generating a GEM model discourage the development of diverse genotype models. Recently, a simple and inexpensive liver-specific transgenic approach was developed, in which a hydrodynamics-based transfection (HT) method was coupled with the Sleeping Beauty transposase system. Various HT models in which different oncogenic pathways are activated and/or tumor-suppressing pathways inactivated have been developed in recent years. The applicability of HT models in liver cancer research is expected to broaden and ultimately elucidate the cooperation between oncogenic signaling pathways and aid in designing molecular therapy to target altered pathways.

  4. Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Infused 3 Days Postsurgery Improve Liver Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Extended Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Astrid; Prigent, Julie; Lombard, Catherine; Rosseels, Valérie; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Breckpot, Karine; Najimi, Mustapha; Deblandre, Gisèle; Sokal, Etienne M

    2017-02-16

    There is growing evidence that cell therapy constitutes a promising strategy for liver regenerative medicine. In the setting of hepatic cancer treatments, cell therapy could prove a useful therapeutic approach for managing the acute liver failure that occurs following extended hepatectomy. In this study, we examined the influence of delivering adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSCs) at two different early time points in an immunodeficient mouse model (Rag2-/-IL2Rγ-/-) that had undergone a 70% hepatectomy procedure. The hepatic mesenchymal cells were intrasplenically infused either immediately after surgery (n = 26) or following a critical 3-day period (n = 26). We evaluated the cells' capacity to engraft at day 1 and day 7 following transplantation by means of human Alu qPCR quantification, along with histological assessment of human albumin and α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, cell proliferation (anti-mouse and human Ki-67 staining) and murine liver weight were measured in order to evaluate liver regeneration. At day 1 posttransplantation, the ratio of human to mouse cells was similar in both groups, whereas 1 week posttransplantation this ratio was significantly improved (p < 0.016) in mice receiving ADHLSC injection at day 3 posthepatectomy (1.7%), compared to those injected at the time of surgery (1%). On the basis of liver weight, mouse liver regeneration was more extensive 1 week posttransplantation in mice transplanted with ADHLSCs (+65.3%) compared to that of mice from the sham vehicle group (+42.7%). In conclusion, infusing ADHLSCs 3 days after extensive hepatectomy improves the cell engraftment and murine hepatic tissue regeneration, thereby confirming that ADHLSCs could be a promising cell source for liver cell therapy and hepatic tissue repair.

  5. A crucial role of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in liver tumor development by imazalil in mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Matsuo, Saori; Kodama, Yukio; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the major pathway of liver tumor development induced by imazalil (IMA), an imidazole fungicide, male constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)-knockout (CARKO) and wild-type (WT) mice were treated with IMA at 500 ppm in the diet up to 27 weeks after initiation by diethylnitrosamine. After 27 weeks of treatment, neither altered foci nor adenomas were significantly increased in CARKO mice, whereas both eosinophilic altered foci and adenomas were increased in WT mice. After 4 or 13 weeks of IMA treatment, liver hypertrophy was observed at the tumor-inducible dose without differences among genotypes or durations. Analysis of hepatic drug metabolite enzymes, performed after administration of multiple doses during a 1-week period, indicated that pregnane X receptor might be involved in liver hypertrophy because IMA markedly elevated Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 expression levels in a dose-dependent manner in both genotypes. Our results demonstrated that the CAR pathway was the main mechanism of liver tumor development induced by IMA. The carcinogenic pathway was different from that of liver hypertrophy.

  6. New mouse tumor model system (RIF-1) for comparison of end-point studies

    SciTech Connect

    Twentyman, P.R.; Brown, J.M.; Gray, J.W.; Franko, A.J.; Scoles, M.A.; Kallman, R.F.

    1980-03-01

    A new tumor model system (RIF-1) was developed that is very suitable for studies in which clonogenic survival is compared with growth delay and control probability following various forms of treatment. The tumor was a radiation-induced sarcoma in the inbred female C3H/Km mouse. It had a low median tumor dose, had a satisfactory plating efficiency direct from in vivo to in vitro, was nonimmunogenic or minimally immunogenic, and metastasized only at a relatively advanced stage of growth. The cell line grew either as a monolayer on plastic dishes, as tumor spheroids in spinner culture, as lung nodules following injection of a single-cell suspension into the tall veins of syngeneic mice, or as a solid tumor. Both diploid and tetraploid clonogenic cells were found in monolayer cultures of the RIF-1 line.

  7. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaobin; Chen, Dong; Chen, Wenbin; Sheng, Qinsong

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors located in the alimentary tract. A small portion of GISTs are observed in extra-gastrointestinal regions, primarily in the omentum, mesentery and retroperioneum, and these types of GISTs are referred to as extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The present study reports of a patient with unique primary liver GIST. The patient underwent en bloc resection and post-operative administration of imatinib, and subsequently experienced a good prognosis. The present case is followed by a brief review of reported cases of liver GISTs identified in the literature. The literature revealed that primary liver GISTs are usually large in size and possess a high mitotic index, which contributes to malignant characterization, thus classifying these tumors as high-risk. En bloc resection remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary liver GISTs. However, the prognosis of these patients is not favorable. Perioperative administration of imatinib may be useful to a certain extent, and interventional therapy, including radiofrequency ablation, should be considered. PMID:27698856

  8. Effect of intermittent fasting on prostate cancer tumor growth in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Antonelli, J A; Lloyd, J C; Masko, E M; Poulton, S H; Phillips, T E; Pollak, M; Freedland, S J

    2010-12-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. However, CR may be difficult to apply in humans secondary to compliance and potentially deleterious effects. An alternative is intermittent CR, or in the extreme case intermittent fasting (IF). In a previous small pilot study, we found 2 days per week of IF with ad libitum feeding on the other days resulted in trends toward prolonged survival of mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts. We sought to confirm these findings in a larger study. A total of 100 (7- to 8-week-old) male severe combined immunodeficiency mice were injected subcutaneously with 1 × 10(5) LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. Mice were randomized to either ad libitum Western Diet (44% carbohydrates, 40% fat and 16% protein) or ad libitum Western Diet with twice-weekly 24 h fasts (IF). Tumor volumes and mouse bodyweights were measured twice weekly. Mice were killed when tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3). Serum and tumor were collected for analysis of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) hormonal axis. Overall, there was no difference in mouse survival (P=0.37) or tumor volumes (P ≥ 0.10) between groups. Mouse body weights were similar between arms (P=0.84). IF mice had significantly higher serum IGF-1 levels and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratios at killing (P<0.001). However, no difference was observed in serum insulin, IGFBP-3 or tumor phospho-Akt levels (P ≥ 0.39). IF did not improve mouse survival nor did it delay prostate tumor growth. This may be secondary to metabolic adaptations to the 24 h fasting periods. Future studies are required to optimize CR for application in humans.

  9. Role of Interleukin-6 in the Radiation Response of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in biological sequelae and tumor regrowth after irradiation for hepatic malignancy, which are critical for the clinical radiation response of liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The Hepa 1-6 murine hepatocellular cancer cell line was used to examine the radiation response by clonogenic assays and tumor growth delay in vivo. After irradiation in a single dose of 6 Gy in vitro or 15 Gy in vivo, biological changes including cell death and tumor regrowth were examined by experimental manipulation of IL-6 signaling. The effects of blocking IL-6 were assessed by cells preincubated in the presence of IL-6-neutralizing antibody for 24 hours or stably transfected with IL-6-silencing vectors. The correlations among tumor responses, IL-6 levels, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) recruitment were examined using animal experiments. Results: Interleukin-6 expression was positively linked to irradiation and radiation resistance, as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Interleukin-6-silencing vectors induced more tumor inhibition and DNA damage after irradiation. When subjects were irradiated with a sublethal dose, the regrowth of irradiated tumors significantly correlated with IL-6 levels and MDSC recruitment in vivo. Furthermore, blocking of IL-6 could overcome irradiation-induced MDSC recruitment and tumor regrowth after treatment. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that IL-6 is important in determining the radiation response of liver tumor cells. Irradiation-induced IL-6 and the subsequent recruitment of MDSC could be responsible for tumor regrowth. Therefore, treatment with concurrent IL-6 inhibition could be a potential therapeutic strategy for increasing the radiation response of tumors.

  10. Primary liver tumors in pediatric patients: proper imaging technique for diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Rozell, Joseph M; Catanzano, Tara; Polansky, Stanley M; Rakita, Dmitry; Fox, Lindsay

    2014-08-01

    Liver tumors in children are rare and comprise a diverse set of both benign and malignant lesions, most of which are not clinically detected until they are large and often difficult to resect. Technological advances in diagnostic imaging have greatly influenced the surgical planning of these lesions and ultimately the clinical outcome. The intent of this article is to present an imaging algorithm for the effective and efficient workup of liver tumors in pediatric patients. This includes the appropriate timing and use of various imaging modalities, such as conventional radiographs, ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. This article also addresses the use of sedation, intravenous contrast agents, and the benefits and limitations of specific imaging modalities. An overview of the radiologic and pathologic findings in common liver lesions in pediatric patients, as well as individual case examples demonstrating the use of the proposed workup algorithm, is provided.

  11. Claudin-2 promotes breast cancer liver metastasis by facilitating tumor cell interactions with hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Siegel, Peter M

    2012-08-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes.

  12. A case of liver hemangioma with markedly reduced tumor size after metformin treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ono, Minoru; Sawada, Koji; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-02-01

    A 52-year-old man with a 9-year history of hepatic hemangioma was treated with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, resulting in complete remission of the tumor. In 2006, a hemangioma with diameter of 20 × 25 mm was detected incidentally in the liver. The results of imaging studies including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were all compatible with that of hepatic hemangioma. The patient consequently underwent imaging annually from 2006 to 2015. The tumor size increased slightly, to 30 × 35 mm in 2012; however, the general tumor characteristics in imaging were not changed. Beginning May 2012, metformin (750 mg/day) was administered because of an increase in blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c levels. After the start of metformin treatment, the tumor size on US gradually decreased. Finally, in October 2015, the tumor was no longer detected. Dynamic CT study also demonstrated markedly reduced tumor size, with a decrease of 2-3 mm in diameter. These results indicate that metformin treatment strongly suppressed cell proliferation in liver hemangioma. The anti-angiogenic effect of metformin was indicated as a possible cause of the reduction in tumor size.

  13. An inducible mouse model of colon carcinogenesis for the analysis of sporadic and inflammation-driven tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a life-threatening disease that can develop spontaneously or as a complication of inflammatory bowel diseases. Mouse models are essential tools for the preclinical testing of novel therapeutic options in vivo. Here, we provide a highly reliable protocol for an experimental mouse model to study the development of colon cancers. It is based on the mutagenic agent azoxymethane (AOM), which exerts colonotropic carcinogenicity. Repeated intraperitoneal administration of AOM results in the development of spontaneous tumors within 30 weeks. As an alternative option, inflammation-dependent tumor growth can be investigated by combining the administration of AOM with the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water, which causes rapid growth of multiple colon tumors per mouse within 10 weeks. Different scoring systems including number of tumors and tumor size identify factors promoting or inhibiting tumor initiation and/or tumor progression, respectively.

  14. Small heterodimer partner overexpression partially protects against liver tumor development in farnesoid X receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guodong; Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Le; Williams, Jessica A.; Tawfik, Ossama; Kassel, Karen M.; Luyendyk, James P.; Wang, Li; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-10-15

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, Nr1h4) and small heterodimer partner (SHP, Nr0b2) are nuclear receptors that are critical to liver homeostasis. Induction of SHP serves as a major mechanism of FXR in suppressing gene expression. Both FXR{sup −/−} and SHP{sup −/−} mice develop spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SHP is one of the most strongly induced genes by FXR in the liver and is a tumor suppressor, therefore, we hypothesized that deficiency of SHP contributes to HCC development in the livers of FXR{sup −/−} mice and therefore, increased SHP expression in FXR{sup −/−} mice reduces liver tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, we generated FXR{sup −/−} mice with overexpression of SHP in hepatocytes (FXR{sup −/−}/SHP{sup Tg}) and determined the contribution of SHP in HCC development in FXR{sup −/−} mice. Hepatocyte-specific SHP overexpression did not affect liver tumor incidence or size in FXR{sup −/−} mice. However, SHP overexpression led to a lower grade of dysplasia, reduced indicator cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. All tumor-bearing mice had increased serum bile acid levels and IL-6 levels, which was associated with activation of hepatic STAT3. In conclusion, SHP partially protects FXR{sup −/−} mice from HCC formation by reducing tumor malignancy. However, disrupted bile acid homeostasis by FXR deficiency leads to inflammation and injury, which ultimately results in uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the liver. - Highlights: • SHP does not prevent HCC incidence nor size in FXR KO mice but reduces malignancy. • Increased SHP promotes apoptosis. • Bile acids and inflammation maybe critical for HCC formation with FXR deficiency.

  15. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  16. Structural and metabolic characterization of RNAs from rats with experimental Guerin tumor - II. metabolic peculiarities of RNAs from the liver and tumor tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, A; Galasinski, W

    1976-01-01

    Metabolic peculiarities of RNAs in the liver of the tumor bearing and in the tumor tissue were found. The synthesis of nuclear RNA in liver of tumor bearing rats is distinctly disordered in comparison to that of control rats. The level of 14C-orotic acid incorporation into RNA of cancer tissue is manifold lower than that into the liver RNA. The studies on turnover rate showed the metabolic heterogeneity of the nuclear RNAs. The part of them showed a short turnover, the other RNAs were degraded much slower.

  17. Effects of Yttrium-90 selective internal radiation therapy on non-conventional liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuei, Andrew; Saab, Sammy; Cho, Sung-Ki; Kee, Stephen T; Lee, Edward Wolfgang

    2015-07-21

    The liver is a common site of metastasis, with essentially all metastatic malignancies having been known to spread to the liver. Nearly half of all patients with extrahepatic primary cancer have hepatic metastases. The severe prognostic implications of hepatic metastases have made surgical resection an important first line treatment in management. However, limitations such as the presence of extrahepatic spread or poor functional hepatic reserve exclude the majority of patients as surgical candidates, leaving chemotherapy and locoregional therapies as next best options. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a form of catheter-based locoregional cancer treatment modality for unresectable tumors, involving trans-arterial injection of microspheres embedded with a radio-isotope Yttrium-90. The therapeutic radiation dose is selectively delivered as the microspheres permanently embed themselves within the tumor vascular bed. Use of SIRT has been conventionally aimed at treating primary hepatic tumors (hepatocellular carcinoma) or colorectal and neuroendocrine metastases. Numerous reviews are available for these tumor types. However, little is known or reviewed on non-colorectal or non-neuroendocrine primaries. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to systematically review the current literature to evaluate the effects of Yttrium-90 radioembolization on non-conventional liver tumors including those secondary to breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ocular and percutaneous melanoma, pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and lung cancer.

  18. In vivo and in vitro binding of alpha- and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane to mouse liver macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Iverson, F; Ryan, J J; Lizotte, R; Hierlihy, S L

    1984-03-01

    alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH) but not gamma-HCH, produces a strong neoplastic response in HPB strain mouse liver. In vivo and in vitro binding studies with 14C-labelled HCH isomers showed no preferential binding of the alpha-HCH isomer to protein or DNA. Moreover, the binding of both isomers to DNA in vivo or in vitro occurred only at very low levels, a result consistent with the lack of mutagenic activity associated with these compounds. The results suggest that the neoplastic response observed with alpha-HCH results from a non-genotoxic mechanism.

  19. Baicalin Attenuates IL-17-Mediated Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chia-Chih; Day, Yuan-Ji; Lee, Hung-Chen; Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Chou, An-Hsun; Liu, Fu-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background IL-17 has been shown to be involved in liver inflammatory disorders in both mice and humans. Baicalin (BA), a major compound extracted from traditional herb medicine (Scutellariae radix), has potent hepatoprotective properties. Previous study showed that BA inhibits IL-17-mediated lymphocyte adhesion and downregulates joint inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of IL-17 in the hepatoprotective effects of BA in an acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury mouse model. Methods Eight weeks male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were used for this study. Mice received intraperitoneal hepatotoxic injection of APAP (300 mg/kg) and after 30 min of injection, the mice were treated with BA at a concentration of 30 mg/kg. After 16 h of treatment, mice were killed. Blood samples and liver tissues were harvested for analysis of liver injury parameters. Results APAP overdose significantly increased the serum alanine transferase (ALT) levels, hepatic activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO), expression of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-17), and malondialdehyde (MDA) activity when compared with the control animals. BA treatment after APAP administration significantly attenuated the elevation of these parameters in APAP-induced liver injury mice. Furthermore, BA treatment could also decrease hepatic IL-17-producing γδT cells recruitment, which was induced after APAP overdose. Conclusion Our data suggested that baicalin treatment could effectively decrease APAP-induced liver injury in part through attenuation of hepatic IL-17 expression. These results indicate that baicalin is a potential hepatoprotective agent. PMID:27855209

  20. IDH1 deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis in mouse liver by impairing amino acid utilization

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing; Gu, Yu; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Yuanlin; Yuan, Yuan; Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Li, Wanda Y.; Wakeham, Andrew; Cairns, Rob A.; Mak, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Although the enzymatic activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) was defined decades ago, its functions in vivo are not yet fully understood. Cytosolic IDH1 converts isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), a key metabolite regulating nitrogen homeostasis in catabolic pathways. It was thought that IDH1 might enhance lipid biosynthesis in liver or adipose tissue by generating NADPH, but we show here that lipid contents are relatively unchanged in both IDH1-null mouse liver and IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells generated using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Instead, we found that IDH1 is critical for liver amino acid (AA) utilization. Body weights of IDH1-null mice fed a high-protein diet (HPD) were abnormally low. After prolonged fasting, IDH1-null mice exhibited decreased blood glucose but elevated blood alanine and glycine compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Similarly, in IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells, glucose consumption was increased, but alanine utilization and levels of intracellular α-KG and glutamate were reduced. In IDH1-deficient primary hepatocytes, gluconeogenesis as well as production of ammonia and urea were decreased. In IDH1-deficient whole livers, expression levels of genes involved in AA metabolism were reduced, whereas those involved in gluconeogenesis were up-regulated. Thus, IDH1 is critical for AA utilization in vivo and its deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis primarily by impairing α-KG–dependent transamination of glucogenic AAs such as alanine. PMID:28011762

  1. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  2. Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling in the mouse liver following exposure to ultraviolet B radiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Shon, Jong Cheol; Lee, Mee Youn; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Kim, Jeong Kee; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have been performed on the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the skin, only a limited number of reports have investigated these effects on non-skin tissue. This study aimed to describe the metabolite changes in the liver of hairless mice following chronic exposure to UVB radiation. We did not observe significant macroscopic changes or alterations in hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the liver of UVB-irradiated mice, compared with those for normal mice. In this study, we detected hepatic metabolite changes by UVB exposure and identified several amino acids, fatty acids, nucleosides, carbohydrates, phospholipids, lysophospholipids, and taurine-conjugated cholic acids as candidate biomarkers in response to UVB radiation in the mouse liver by using various mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolite profiling including ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight (TOF)-MS, gas chromatography-TOF-MS and nanomate LTQ-MS. Glutamine exhibited the most dramatic change with a 5-fold increase in quantity. The results from altering several types of metabolites suggest that chronic UVB irradiation may impact significantly on major hepatic metabolism processes, despite the fact that the liver is not directly exposed to UVB radiation. MS-based metabolomic approach for determining regulatory hepatic metabolites following UV irradiation will provide a better understanding of the relationship between internal organs and UV light.

  3. Gene expression profiling in the lung and liver of PFOA-exposed mouse fetuses.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Mitchell B; Thibodeaux, Julie R; Wood, Carmen R; Zehr, Robert D; Schmid, Judith E; Lau, Christopher

    2007-09-24

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a stable perfluoroalkyl acid used to synthesize fluoropolymers during the manufacture of a wide variety of products. Concerns have been raised over the potential health effects of PFOA because it is persistent in the environment and can be detected in blood and other tissues of many animal species, including humans. PFOA has also been shown to induce growth deficits and mortality in murine neonates. To better understand the mechanism of PFOA induced developmental toxicity, lung and liver gene expression profiling was conducted in PFOA-exposed full-term mouse fetuses. Thirty timed-pregnant CD-1 mice were orally dosed from gestation days 1-17 with either 0, 1, 3, 5, or 10mg/(kgday) PFOA in water. At term, fetal lung and liver were collected, total RNA prepared, and samples pooled from three fetuses per litter. Five biological replicates consisting of individual litter samples were then evaluated for each treatment group using Affymetrix mouse 430_2 microarrays. The expression of genes related to fatty acid catabolism was altered in both the fetal liver and lung. In the fetal liver, the effects of PFOA were robust and also included genes associated with lipid transport, ketogenesis, glucose metabolism, lipoprotein metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, steroid metabolism, bile acid biosynthesis, phospholipid metabolism, retinol metabolism, proteosome activation, and inflammation. These changes are consistent with transactivation of PPARalpha, although, with regard to bile acid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism, non-PPARalpha related effects were suggested as well. Additional studies will be needed to more thoroughly address the role of PPARalpha, and other nuclear receptors, in PFOA mediated developmental toxicity.

  4. Correlation of tissue-plasma partition coefficients between normal tissues and subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines in mouse as a prediction tool of drug penetration in tumors.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Salphati, Laurent; Liederer, Bianca M

    2013-04-01

    Understanding drug distribution and accumulation in tumors would be informative in the assessment of efficacy in targeted therapy; however, existing methods for predicting tissue drug distribution focus on normal tissues and do not incorporate tumors. The main objective of this study was to describe the relationships between tissue-plasma concentration ratios (Kp ) of normal tissues and those of subcutaneous xenograft tumors under nonsteady-state conditions, and establish regression equations that could potentially be used for the prediction of drug levels in several human tumor xenografts in mouse, based solely on a Kp value determined in a normal tissue (e.g., muscle). A dataset of 17 compounds was collected from the literature and from Genentech. Tissue and plasma concentration data in mouse were obtained following oral gavage or intraperitoneal administration. Linear regression analyses were performed between Kp values in several normal tissues (muscle, lung, liver, or brain) and those in human tumor xenografts (CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, PC3, U-87, MCF-7-neo-Her2, or BT474M1.1). The tissue-plasma ratios in normal tissues reasonably correlated with the tumor-plasma ratios in CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, U-87, BT474M1.1, and MCF-7-neo-Her2 xenografts (r(2) in the range 0.62-1) but not with the PC3 xenograft. In general, muscle and lung exhibited the strongest correlation with tumor xenografts, followed by liver. Regression coefficients from brain were low, except between brain and the glioblastoma U-87 xenograft (r(2) in the range 0.62-0.94). Furthermore, reasonably strong correlations were observed between muscle and lung and between muscle and liver (r(2) in the range 0.67-0.96). The slopes of the regressions differed depending on the class of drug (strong vs. weak base) and type of tissue (brain vs. other tissues and tumors). Overall, this study will contribute to our understanding of tissue-plasma partition coefficients for tumors and facilitate the use of physiologically

  5. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. PMID:20881168

  6. Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors: Ready for Inclusion in Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the historically limited role of radiotherapy in the management of primary hepatic malignancies, modern advances in treatment design and delivery have renewed enthusiasm for radiation as a potentially curative treatment modality. Surgical resection and/or liver transplantation are traditionally regarded as the most effective forms of therapy, although the majority of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma present with locally advanced or unresectable disease on the basis of local vascular invasion or inadequate baseline hepatobiliary function. In this context, many efforts have focused on nonoperative treatment approaches including novel systemic therapies, transarterial chemoembolization, ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This review aims to summarize modern advances in radiotherapy, particularly SBRT, in the treatment of primary hepatic malignancies. PMID:25001265

  7. [Utilization of Werner syndrome mouse model in studying premature aging and tumor].

    PubMed

    Jia, Shu-Ting; Yang, Shi-Hua; Luo, Ying

    2009-08-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease in human. It is considered as a good model disease in studying human premature syndrome. Werner protein (WRN) is a nuclear protein mutated in WS. Recent biochemical and genetic studies indicated that WRN plays important roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reviewed the molecular genetics of WS and the importance of telomere and WRN in the development of WS. Knocking out both telomerase and Wrn genes in mouse faithfully manifests human WS. The mouse model provides a unique genetic platform to explore the crosstalk of premature aging and tumor.

  8. Hepatic NK cell-mediated hypersensitivity to ConA-induced liver injury in mouse liver expressing hepatitis C virus polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuxia; Yan, Shaoduo; Wang, Licui; Duan, Xiangguo; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yue; Wu, Tao; Wang, Xiaohui; An, Jie; Zhang, Yulong; Zhou, Qianqian; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-08-04

    The role of hepatic NK cells in the pathogenesis of HCV-associated hepatic failure is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of HCV on ConA-induced immunological hepatic injury and the influence of HCV on hepatic NK cell activation in the liver after ConA administration. An immunocompetent HCV mouse model that encodes the entire viral polyprotein in a liver-specific manner based on hydrodynamic injection and φC31o integrase was used to study the role of hepatic NK cells. Interestingly, the frequency of hepatic NK cells was reduced in HCV mice, whereas the levels of other intrahepatic lymphocytes remained unaltered. Next, we investigated whether the reduction in NK cells within HCV mouse livers might elicit an effect on immune-mediated liver injury. HCV mice were subjected to acute liver injury models upon ConA administration. We observed that HCV mice developed more severe ConA-induced immune-mediated hepatitis, which was dependent on the accumulated intrahepatic NK cells. Our results indicated that after the administration of ConA, NK cells not only mediated liver injury through the production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and perforin) with direct antiviral activity, but they also killed target cells directly through the TRAIL/DR5 and NKG2D/NKG2D ligand signaling pathway in HCV mice. Our findings suggest a critical role for NK cells in oversensitive liver injury during chronic HCV infection.

  9. Connexin expression in epidermal cell lines from SENCAR mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Budunova, I V; Carbajal, S; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1996-03-01

    Alteration of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has long been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis. Previously, we reported that the level of gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse skin carcinoma cell lines is significantly lower than in papilloma cell lines and normal mouse keratinocytes Klann et al., Cancer Res 49:699-705, 1989). Here, we present data on expression of the gap-junctional protein connexins (Cx) 26, Cx31.1, and Cx43 in a comprehensive panel of keratinocyte cell lines representing different stages of mouse skin carcinogenesis and the effect of different conditions of propagation on Cx phenotype. Northern and western blot analyses and immunostaining showed that all cell lines studied in vitro expressed Cx43 but most did not express Cx31.1 or Cx26. The abundance of Cx43 expression on plasma membranes correlated well with the level of GJIC. In vivo expression of Cx43 and Cx26 was strongly increased. Whereas none of tumorigenic cell lines expressed Cx26 gap junctions in culture, those growing as tumors in nude mice began to express Cx26 protein. The comparison of Cx expression on the keratinocyte membranes in three different groups of tumors (papillomas and squamous cell and spindle cell carcinomas) clearly revealed that the abundance of Cx43 and Cx26 expression directly correlated with the level of tumor differentiation. All studied tumors were Cx31.1 negative. These results suggest that both Cx expression and gap-junction permeability are gradually reduced during the tumor progression stage of mouse skin carcinogenesis.

  10. Gene Expression Profile Change and Associated Physiological and Pathological Effects in Mouse Liver Induced by Fasting and Refeeding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2011-01-01

    Food availability regulates basal metabolism and progression of many diseases, and liver plays an important role in these processes. The effects of food availability on digital gene expression profile, physiological and pathological functions in liver are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect digital gene expression profile of mouse liver in fed, fasted and refed states. Totally 12162 genes were detected, and 2305 genes were significantly regulated by food availability. Biological process and pathway analysis showed that fasting mainly affected lipid and carboxylic acid metabolic processes in liver. Moreover, the genes regulated by fasting and refeeding in liver were mainly enriched in lipid metabolic process or fatty acid metabolism. Network analysis demonstrated that fasting mainly regulated Drug Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Endocrine System Development and Function, and the networks including Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Gene Expression were affected by refeeding. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and diabetes mellitus were most likely to be affected by food availability. This study provides the digital gene expression profile of mouse liver regulated by food availability, and demonstrates the main biological processes, pathways, gene networks and potential hepatic diseases regulated by fasting and refeeding. These results show that food availability mainly regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and is highly correlated with liver-related diseases including liver cancer and diabetes. PMID:22096593

  11. Tumor Blood Flow Differs between Mouse Strains: Consequences for Vasoresponse to Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; Han, Sung Wan; Miller, Joann; Schenkel, Steven S.; Pole, Andrew; Esipova, Tatiana V.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Putt, Mary E.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in tumor blood flow are common and attributed to factors such as vasomotion or local vascular structure, yet, because vessel structure and physiology are host-derived, animal strain of tumor propagation may further determine blood flow characteristics. In the present report, baseline and stress-altered tumor hemodynamics as a function of murine strain were studied using radiation-induced fibrosacomas (RIF) grown in C3H or nude mice. Fluctuations in tumor blood flow during one hour of baseline monitoring or during vascular stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT) were measured by diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Baseline monitoring revealed fluctuating tumor blood flow highly correlated with heart rate and with similar median periods (i.e., ∼9 and 14 min in C3H and nudes, respectively). However, tumor blood flow in C3H animals was more sensitive to physiologic or stress-induced perturbations. Specifically, PDT-induced vascular insults produced greater decreases in blood flow in the tumors of C3H versus nude mice; similarly, during baseline monitoring, fluctuations in blood flow were more regular and more prevalent within the tumors of C3H mice versus nude mice; finally, the vasoconstrictor L-NNA reduced tumor blood flow in C3H mice but did not affect tumor blood flow in nudes. Underlying differences in vascular structure, such as smaller tumor blood vessels in C3H versus nude animals, may contribute to strain-dependent variation in vascular function. These data thus identify clear effects of mouse strain on tumor hemodynamics with consequences to PDT and potentially other vascular-mediated therapies. PMID:22624014

  12. Tumor blood flow differs between mouse strains: consequences for vasoresponse to photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Rickson C; Han, Sung Wan; Miller, Joann; Schenkel, Steven S; Pole, Andrew; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Putt, Mary E; Yodh, Arjun G; Busch, Theresa M

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in tumor blood flow are common and attributed to factors such as vasomotion or local vascular structure, yet, because vessel structure and physiology are host-derived, animal strain of tumor propagation may further determine blood flow characteristics. In the present report, baseline and stress-altered tumor hemodynamics as a function of murine strain were studied using radiation-induced fibrosacomas (RIF) grown in C3H or nude mice. Fluctuations in tumor blood flow during one hour of baseline monitoring or during vascular stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT) were measured by diffuse correlation spectroscopy. Baseline monitoring revealed fluctuating tumor blood flow highly correlated with heart rate and with similar median periods (i.e., ∼9 and 14 min in C3H and nudes, respectively). However, tumor blood flow in C3H animals was more sensitive to physiologic or stress-induced perturbations. Specifically, PDT-induced vascular insults produced greater decreases in blood flow in the tumors of C3H versus nude mice; similarly, during baseline monitoring, fluctuations in blood flow were more regular and more prevalent within the tumors of C3H mice versus nude mice; finally, the vasoconstrictor L-NNA reduced tumor blood flow in C3H mice but did not affect tumor blood flow in nudes. Underlying differences in vascular structure, such as smaller tumor blood vessels in C3H versus nude animals, may contribute to strain-dependent variation in vascular function. These data thus identify clear effects of mouse strain on tumor hemodynamics with consequences to PDT and potentially other vascular-mediated therapies.

  13. Rectal Carcinoid Tumor With Liver Metastases Treated by Local Excision and Orthotopic Liver Transplant With Long-term Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascianà, Gianluca; de Werra, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Nicola; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Coluzzi, Mariagrazia; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-03-28

    In patients affected by unresectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor, liver transplant represents currently the only realistic chance for cure. The first attempt to establish selection criteria for liver transplant in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumor liver metastases was made by Mazzaferro and associates in 2007. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who came to our institution in 2006 with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Diagnosis of rectal neuroendocrine tumor with bilobar liver nodules was made; the patient underwent transanal local resection. A liver biopsy confirmed the metastatic nature of the hepatic lesion, showing a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor (G1, proliferation index Ki-67 <2%). The patient underwent 2 sessions of transarterial chemoembolization that resulted in stable disease. Afterward, the patient underwent a liver transplant, using the piggyback technique without a venous-venous bypass. His postoperative course was uneventful. The patient has been disease-free for 3 years. Posttransplant treatment has played a key role in increasing the overall survival of the patient and assuring him a good quality of life. He died 9 years (102 mo) after liver transplant.

  14. WE-G-18C-06: Is Diaphragm Motion a Good Surrogate for Liver Tumor Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J; Cai, J; Zheng, C; Czito, B; Palta, M; Yin, F; Wang, H; Bashir, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether diaphragm motion is a good surrogate for liver tumor motion by comparing their motion trajectories obtained from cine-MRI. Methods: Fourteen patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (10/14) or liver metastases (4/14) undergoing radiation therapy were included in this study. All patients underwent single-slice 2D cine-MRI simulations across the center of the tumor in three orthogonal planes. Tumor and diaphragm motion trajectories in the superior-inferior (SI), anteriorposterior (AP), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were obtained using the normalized cross-correlation based tracking technique. Agreement between tumor and diaphragm motions was assessed by calculating the phase difference percentage (PDP), intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman analysis (Diffs) and paired t-test. The distance (D) between tumor and tracked diaphragm area was analyzed to understand its impact on the correlation between tumor and diaphragm motions. Results: Of all patients, the means (±standard deviations) of PDP were 7.1 (±1.1)%, 4.5 (±0.5)% and 17.5 (±4.5)% in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The means of ICC were 0.98 (±0.02), 0.97 (±0.02), and 0.08 (±0.06) in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The Diffs were 2.8 (±1.4) mm, 2.4 (±1.1) mm, and 2.2 (±0.5) mm in the SI, AP and ML directions, respectively. The p-values derived from the paired t-test were < 0.02 in SI and AP directions, whereas were > 0.58 in ML direction primarily due to the small motion in ML direction. Tumor and diaphragmatic motion had high concordance when the distance between the tumor and tracked diaphragm areas was small. Conclusion: Preliminary results showed that liver tumor motion had good correlations with diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions, indicating diaphragm motion in the SI and AP directions could potentially be a reliable surrogate for liver tumor motion. NIH (1R21CA165384-01A1), Golfers Against Cancer (GAC

  15. Feasibility of Respiratory Triggering for MR-Guided Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Shigehiro Inubushi, Toshiro; Kurumi, Yoshimasa; Naka, Shigeyuki; Sato, Koichiro; Demura, Koichi; Tani, Tohru; Haque, Hasnine A

    2004-08-15

    We obtained clear and reproducible MR fluoroscopic images and temperature maps for MR image-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory information was directly obtained from air-way pressure without a sensor on the chest wall. The trigger signal started scanning of one whole image with a spoiled gradient echo sequence. The delay time before the start of scanning was adjusted to acquire the data corresponding to the k-space center at the maximal expiratory phase. The triggered images were apparently clearer than the nontriggered ones and the location of the liver was consistent, which made targeting of the tumor easy. MR temperature images, which were highly susceptible to the movement of the liver, during microwave ablation using a proton resonance frequency method, could be obtained without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory triggering technique was found to be useful for MR fluoroscopic images and MR temperature monitoring in MR-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia.

  16. Functional liver tissue engineering by an adult mouse liver-derived neuro-glia antigen 2-expressing stem/progenitor population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T; Li, Jing; Lai, Jiejuan; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Xiangdong; Zhang, Yujun; Jiang, Yan; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-09-17

    Deaths due to end-stage liver diseases (ESLD) are increasingly registered annually in the world. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for ESLD to date, which has been hampered by a critical shortage of organs. The potential of decellularized liver scaffolds (DLS) derived from solid organs as a three dimensional (3D) platform has been evolved as a promising approach in liver tissue engineering for translating functional liver organ replacements, but questions still exist regarding the optimal cell population for seeding in DLS and the preparation of the DLS themselves. The aim of our study was to utilize a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) decellularization procedure in combination with a low concentration of trypsin (0.005%)-EDTA (0.002%) process to manufacture DLS from whole mouse livers and recellularized with hepatic stem/progenitors for use in liver tissue engineering and injured liver treatment. Results showed that the DLS generated with all the necessary microstructure and the extracellular components to support seeded hepatic stem/progenitor cell attachment, functional hepatic cell differentiation. Hepatic differentiation from stem/progenitor cells loaded by DLS was more efficient than that of the stem/progenitor cells in the 2D cell culture model. In summary, the method of DLS loaded by hepatic stem/progenitor cells provided by this study was effective in maintaining DLS extracellular matrix (ECM) to introduce seeded stem/progenitor cell differentiation, hepatic-like tissue formation and functional hepatic protein production in vitro that promoted functional recovery and survival in a mouse model of dimethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced liver cirrhosis after auxiliary heterotopic liver transplantation.

  17. In Vivo Imaging of Mouse Tumors by a Lipidated Cathepsin S Substrate**

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Yu; Vats, Divya; Vizovisek, Matej; Kramer, Lovro; Germanier, Catherine; Wendt, K Ulrich; Rudin, Markus; Turk, Boris; Plettenburg, Oliver; Schultz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and evaluation of two cathepsin S-specific probes is described. For long-term retention of the probe at the target site and a high signal-to-noise ratio, we introduced a lipidation approach via the simple attachment of palmitoic acid to the reporter. After cathepsin S-specific cleavage in cultured cells and in a grafted tumor mouse model, fluorescence increased owing to dequenching and we observed an intracellular accumulation of the fluorescence in the target tissue. The lipidated probe provided a prolonged and strongly fluorescent signal in tumors when compared to the very similar non-lipidated probe, demonstrating that non-invasive tumor identification is feasable. The homing principle by probe lipidation might also work for selective administration of cytotoxic compounds to specifically reduce tumor mass. PMID:24888522

  18. Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) expression decreases with aging, acute liver injuries and tumors in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Terai, Shuji; Hirose, Yoshikazu; Takami, Taro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging. {yields} Decreased expression was observed in liver tumors as compared to the surrounding area. {yields} SMP30/RGN is important for liver proliferation and tumorigenesis. -- Abstract: Senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30)/regucalcin (RGN) is known to be related to aging, hepatocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, expression and function of non-mammalian SMP30/RGN is poorly understood. We found that zebrafish SMP30/RGN mRNA expression decreases with aging, partial hepatectomy and thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury. SMP30/RGN expression was also greatly decreased in a zebrafish liver cell line. In addition, we induced liver tumors in adult zebrafish by administering diethylnitrosamine. Decreased expression was observed in foci, hepatocellular carcinomas, cholangiocellular carcinomas and mixed tumors as compared to the surrounding area. We thus showed the importance of SMP30/RGN in liver proliferation and tumorigenesis.

  19. Advantages of Whole-liver Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Children With Wilms Tumor and Liver Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Pokhrel, Damodar; Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh; Zhang, Yunkai

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the dosimetric advantages of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in children with Wilms tumor (WT) undergoing whole-liver (WL) RT. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography simulation scans of 10 children, either 3 (3D) or 4-dimensional (4D), were used for this study. The WL PTV was determined by the 3D or 4D liver volumes, with a margin of 1 cm. A total of 40 WL RT plans were performed: 10 each for left- and right-sided WT with IMRT and anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) techniques. The radiation dose-volume coverage of the WL planning target volume (PTV), remaining kidney, and other organs were analyzed and compared. Results: The 95% dose coverage to WL PTV for left and right WT were as follows: 97% ± 4% (IMRT), 83% ± 8% (AP-PA) (P<.01) and 99% ± 1% (IMRT), 94% ± 5% (AP-PA) (P<.01), respectively. When 3D WL PTV was used for RT planning, the AP-PA technique delivered 95% of dose to only 78% ± 13% and 88% ± 8% of 4D liver volume. For left WT, the right kidney V15 and V10 for IMRT were 29% ± 7% and 55% ± 8%, compared with 61% ± 29% (P<.01) and 78% ± 25% (P<.01) with AP-PA. For right WT, the left kidney V15 and V10 were 0 ± 0 and 2% ± 3% for IMRT, compared with 25% ± 19% (P<.01) and 40% ± 31% (P<.01) for AP-PA. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and 4D treatment planning resulted in the delivery of a higher RT dose to the liver compared with the standard AP-PA technique. Whole-liver IMRT also delivered a significantly lower dose to the remaining kidney.

  20. [Analysis of mouse liver membrane proteins using multidimensional ion exchange chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuowei; Peng, Fuli; Wang, Yuan; Tong, Wei; Ren, Yan; Xu, Ningzhi; Liu, Siqi

    2010-02-01

    The analysis of membrane proteins is still a technical obstacle in proteomic investigation. A fundamental question is how to allow the hydrophobic proteins fully solubilizing in a proper solvent environment. We propose that the denatured membrane proteins in high denaturant solution are fully ionized and separated through ion exchange chromatography. The membrane proteins prepared from a mouse liver were dissolved in 4 mol/L urea, 20 mmol/L Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0), and loaded onto a tandem chromatography coupled with Q-Sepharose FF and Sephacryl S-200HR. With a linear NaCl gradient elution, the bound proteins were eluted and collected followed by sodium-dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to further separate the eluted proteins. The protein bound on SDS-PAGE were excised and in-gel digested by trypsin, while the digested peptides were delivered to reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion-trap mass spectrometry for the peptide identifications. Of a total of 392 proteins identified, 306 were membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins reported by literature. Based on the calculation of hydrophobicity, the GRAVY (grand average of hydropathicity) scores of 83 proteins are over or equal to 0.00. Taking all the evidence, we have established an effective approach which is feasible in the investigation towards mouse liver membrane proteomics.

  1. Gene expression accurately distinguishes liver metastases of small bowel and pancreas neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Scott K; Maxwell, Jessica E; Carr, Jennifer C; Wang, Donghong; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Sue O'Dorisio, M; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Howe, James R

    2014-12-01

    Small bowel (SBNETs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) often present with liver metastases. Although liver biopsy establishes a neuroendocrine diagnosis, the primary tumor site is frequently unknown without exploratory surgery. Gene expression differences in metastases may distinguish primary SBNETs and PNETs. This study sought to determine expression differences of four genes in neuroendocrine metastases and to create a gene expression algorithm to distinguish the primary site. Nodal and liver metastases from SBNETs and PNETs (n = 136) were collected at surgery under an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol. Quantitative PCR measured expression of bombesin-like receptor-3, opioid receptor kappa-1, oxytocin receptor, and secretin receptor in metastases. Logistic regression models defined an algorithm predicting the primary tumor site. Models were developed on a training set of 21 nodal metastases and performance was validated on an independent set of nodal and liver metastases. Expression of all four genes was significantly different in SBNET compared to PNET metastases. The optimal model employed expression of bombesin-like receptor-3 and opioid receptor kappa-1. When these genes did not amplify, the algorithm used oxytocin receptor and secretin receptor expression, which allowed classification of all 136 metastases with 94.1 % accuracy. In the independent liver metastasis validation set, 52/56 (92.9 %) were correctly classified. Positive predictive values were 92.5 % for SBNETs and 93.8 % for PNETs. This validated algorithm accurately distinguishes SBNET and PNET metastases based on their expression of four genes. High accuracy in liver metastases demonstrates applicability to the clinical setting. Studies assessing this algorithm's utility in prospective clinical decision-making are warranted.

  2. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  3. Development of a circulating miRNA assay to monitor tumor burden: From mouse to man.

    PubMed

    Greystoke, Alastair; Ayub, Mahmood; Rothwell, Dominic G; Morris, Dan; Burt, Deborah; Hodgkinson, Cassandra L; Morrow, Christopher J; Smith, Nigel; Aung, Kyaw; Valle, Juan; Carter, Louise; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-02-01

    Circulating miRNA stability suggests potential utility of miRNA based biomarkers to monitor tumor burden and/or progression, particularly in cancer types where serial biopsy is impractical. Assessment of miRNA specificity and sensitivity is challenging within the clinical setting. To address this, circulating miRNAs were examined in mice bearing human SCLC tumor xenografts and SCLC patient derived circulating tumor cell explant models (CDX). We identified 49 miRNAs using human TaqMan Low Density Arrays readily detectable in 10 μl tail vein plasma from mice carrying H526 SCLC xenografts that were low or undetectable in non-tumor bearing controls. Circulating miR-95 measured serially in mice bearing CDX was detected with tumor volumes as low as 10 mm(3) and faithfully reported subsequent tumor growth. Having established assay sensitivity in mouse models, we identified 26 miRNAs that were elevated in a stage dependent manner in a pilot study of plasma from SCLC patients (n = 16) compared to healthy controls (n = 11) that were also elevated in the mouse models. We selected a smaller panel of 10 previously reported miRNAs (miRs 95, 141, 200a, 200b, 200c, 210, 335#, 375, 429) that were consistently elevated in SCLC, some of which are reported to be elevated in other cancer types. Using a multiplex qPCR assay, elevated levels of miRNAs across the panel were also observed in a further 66 patients with non-small cell lung, colorectal or pancreatic cancers. The utility of this circulating miRNA panel as an early warning of tumor progression across several tumor types merits further evaluation in larger studies.

  4. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery. PMID:27405824

  5. Interacting network of Hippo, Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling represses liver tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wantae; Khan, Sanjoy Kumar; Yang, Yingzi

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring a selective growth advantage by breaking the proliferation barrier established by gatekeeper genes is a centrally important event in tumor formation. Removal of the mammalian Hippo kinase Mst1 and Mst2 in hepatocytes leads to rapid hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) formation, indicating that the Hippo signaling pathway is a critical gatekeeper that restrains abnormal growth in hepatocytes. By rigorous genetic approaches, we identified an interacting network of the Hippo, Wnt/β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways that control organ size and HCC development. We found that in hepatocytes, the loss of Mst1/2 leads to the activation of Notch signaling, which forms a positive feedback loop with Yap/Taz (transcription factors controlled by Mst1/2). This positive feedback loop results in severe liver enlargement and rapid HCC formation. Blocking the Yap/Taz-Notch positive feedback loop by Notch inhibition in vivo significantly reduced the Yap/Taz activities, hepatocyte proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, we uncovered a surprising inhibitory role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling to Yap/Taz activities, which are important in tumor initiation. Genetic removal of β-catenin in the liver of the Mst1/2 mutants significantly accelerates tumoriogenesis. Therefore, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, known for its oncogenic property, exerts an unexpected function in restricting Yap/Taz and Notch activities in HCC initiation. The molecular interplay between the three signaling pathways identified in our study provides new insights in developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat liver tumors. PMID:27881216

  6. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-07-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery.

  7. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C

    2016-07-13

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery.

  8. Contribution and Mobilization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Xue; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Shanshan; Zong, Chen; Jiang, Jinghua; Sun, Kai; Li, Rong; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Xue; Wu, Dong; Shi, Yufang; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is associated with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). In this study, we aimed to determine what role MSCs play in the process and how they mobilize from bone marrow (BM). We employed a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis. Frozen section was used to detect MSCs recruited to mice and human fibrotic liver. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was detected to assess liver function. It was found that MSCs of both exogenous and endogenous origin could aggravate liver fibrosis and attenuate liver damage as indicated by lower serum ALT and AST levels. Stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1α)/ CXCR4 was the most important chemotactic axis regulating MSCs migration from BM to fibrotic liver. Frozen section results showed that the migration did not start from the beginning of liver injury but occured when the expression balance of SDF-1α between liver and BM was disrupted, where SDF-1α expression in liver was higher than that in BM. Our findings provide further evidence to show the role of BM-MSCs in liver fibrosis and to elucidate the mechanism underlying MSCs mobilization in our early liver fibrosis mice model induced by CCl4. PMID:26643997

  9. Contribution and Mobilization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Xue; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Shanshan; Zong, Chen; Jiang, Jinghua; Sun, Kai; Li, Rong; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Xue; Wu, Dong; Shi, Yufang; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin

    2015-12-08

    Hepatic fibrosis is associated with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). In this study, we aimed to determine what role MSCs play in the process and how they mobilize from bone marrow (BM). We employed a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis. Frozen section was used to detect MSCs recruited to mice and human fibrotic liver. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was detected to assess liver function. It was found that MSCs of both exogenous and endogenous origin could aggravate liver fibrosis and attenuate liver damage as indicated by lower serum ALT and AST levels. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α)/ CXCR4 was the most important chemotactic axis regulating MSCs migration from BM to fibrotic liver. Frozen section results showed that the migration did not start from the beginning of liver injury but occurred when the expression balance of SDF-1α between liver and BM was disrupted, where SDF-1α expression in liver was higher than that in BM. Our findings provide further evidence to show the role of BM-MSCs in liver fibrosis and to elucidate the mechanism underlying MSCs mobilization in our early liver fibrosis mice model induced by CCl4.

  10. Gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of malignant liver tumors of vascular origin

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Nora; Soudah, Bisharah; Gebel, Michael; Manns, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Malignant vascular tumors of the liver are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in patients with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) of the liver and hepatic angiosarcoma (HA) and to describe the clinical presentation. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all patients with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma or hemangiosarcoma of the liver from 1998 to 2011, who underwent ultrasound investigation. We describe the findings in gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasound and the clinical course of the disease of seven patients with EHE and five patients with HA. Results Ultrasound investigation in EHE showed mostly multiple hypoechoic irregular lesions close to the liver capsule and with a halo in some cases. Contrast enhancement revealed inhomogeneously and through all contrast phases vascularized tumors with a rim enhancement in 50%, with or without early wash out. All tumors had avascular parts. HA presented as multiple and irregular hypo-, iso- or hyperechoic lesions. After contrast enhancement, hypervascularization with individual patterns was evident in all patients. Of five, three had liquid parts. Patients with HA were significantly older (58 vs. 37 years, p = 0.014) and presented with lower thrombocyte counts (84 vs. 264, p = 0.0025) and with higher CEA levels (4.6 vs. 1.5, p = 0.03). Conclusion EHE and HA are inhomogeneous tumors, explaining the high inter-individual variability and heterogeneity in ultrasound examination. The presence of multifocal lesions, heterogeneity and undefined margins may differentiate EHE or HA from hemangioma. A biopsy is essential in the diagnosis of vascular tumors. PMID:25653860

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Liver Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of inter-individual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. We tested a hypothesis that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with liver-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various liver toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, inter-strain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and liver levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In sub-chronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Liver protein levels of Cyp2e1, Adh and Aldh2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE. PMID:25424544

  12. Therapeutic Efficacy of Human Hepatocyte Transplantation in a SCID/uPA Mouse Model with Inducible Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Donna N.; Kawahara, Toshiyasu; Sis, Banu; Bond, David; Fischer, Karl P.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Lewis, Jamie T.; Kneteman, Norman M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe Combined Immune Deficient (SCID)/Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) mice undergo liver failure and are useful hosts for the propagation of transplanted human hepatocytes (HH) which must compete with recipient-derived hepatocytes for replacement of the diseased liver parenchyma. While partial replacement by HH has proven useful for studies with Hepatitis C virus, complete replacement of SCID/uPA mouse liver by HH has never been achieved and limits the broader application of these mice for other areas of biomedical research. The herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system is a powerful tool for cell-specific ablation in transgenic animals. The aim of this study was to selectively eliminate murine-derived parenchymal liver cells from humanized SCID/uPA mouse liver in order to achieve mice with completely humanized liver parenchyma. Thus, we reproduced the HSVtk (vTK)/GCV system of hepatic failure in SCID/uPA mice. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro experiments demonstrated efficient killing of vTK expressing hepatoma cells after GCV treatment. For in vivo experiments, expression of vTK was targeted to the livers of FVB/N and SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic sensitivity to GCV was first established in FVB/N mice since these mice do not undergo liver failure inherent to SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic vTK expression was found to be an integral component of GCV-induced pathologic and biochemical alterations and caused death due to liver dysfunction in vTK transgenic FVB/N and non-transplanted SCID/uPA mice. In SCID/uPA mice with humanized liver, vTK/GCV caused death despite extensive replacement of the mouse liver parenchyma with HH (ranging from 32–87%). Surprisingly, vTK/GCV-dependent apoptosis and mitochondrial aberrations were also localized to bystander vTK-negative HH. Conclusions/Significance Extensive replacement of mouse liver parenchyma by HH does not provide a secure therapeutic advantage against v

  13. Prediction of Liver Injury Induced by Chemicals in Human With a Multiparametric Assay on Isolated Mouse Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is difficult to predict using classical in vitro cytotoxicity screening and regulatory animal studies. This explains why numerous compounds are stopped during clinical trials or withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity. Thus, it is important to improve early prediction of DILI in human. In this study, we hypothesized that this goal could be achieved by investigating drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction as this toxic effect is a major mechanism of DILI. To this end, we developed a high-throughput screening platform using isolated mouse liver mitochondria. Our broad spectrum multiparametric assay was designed to detect the global mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (swelling), inner membrane permeabilization (transmembrane potential), outer membrane permeabilization (cytochrome c release), and alteration of mitochondrial respiration driven by succinate or malate/glutamate. A pool of 124 chemicals (mainly drugs) was selected, including 87 with documented DILI and 37 without reported clinical hepatotoxicity. Our screening assay revealed an excellent sensitivity for clinical outcome of DILI (94 or 92% depending on cutoff) and a high positive predictive value (89 or 82%). A highly significant relationship between drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity and DILI occurrence in patients was calculated (p < 0.001). Moreover, this multiparametric assay allowed identifying several compounds for which mitochondrial toxicity had never been described before and even helped to clarify mechanisms with some drugs already known to be mitochondriotoxic. Investigation of drug-induced loss of mitochondrial integrity and function with this multiparametric assay should be considered for integration into basic screening processes at early stage to select drug candidates with lower risk of DILI in human. This assay is also a valuable tool for assessing the mitochondrial toxicity profile and investigating the mechanism of action of new

  14. Tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic site increase the tumor initiation potential of putative mouse mammary cancer stem cells derived from MMTV-PyMT mice.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Denise Grant; Ma, Jun; Guest, Ian; Uk-Lim, Chang; Glinskii, Anna; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    The ability to transplant mammary cancer stem cells, identified by the phenotype CD24(+)CD29(+)CD49f(+)Sca-1(low), is dependent on the microenvironment in which the cells are placed. Using the MMTV-PyMT mouse model of mammary cancer, we now report two methods of tumor growth enhancement: contributions of tumor stroma in the form of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic vs. heterotopic transplantation sites. To support evidence of stem cell function, tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into adipocyte- and osteocyte-like cells after culture in specific medium. Co-injection of tumor-initiating cells with tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased tumor initiation compared to subcutaneous injection of TICs alone; co-injection also allowed tumor initiation with a single TIC. Interestingly, we observed the formation of sarcomas after co-injections of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts with TICs; sarcomas are not observed in spontaneous MMTV-PyMT tumors and rarely observed in injections of TICs alone. Tumor initiation was also significantly increased in the orthotopic injection site compared to heterotopic injections. We conclude that tumor stroma and orthotopic sites both enhance tumor initiation by mammary cancer stem cells.

  15. Characteristics of IL-17 induction by Schistosoma japonicum infection in C57BL/6 mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dianhui; Luo, Xueping; Xie, Hongyan; Gao, Zhiyan; Fang, Huilong; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a severe tropical disease caused by the parasitic worm Schistosoma japonicum. Among the most serious pathological effects of S. japonicum infection are hepatic lesions (cirrhosis and fibrosis) and portal hypertension. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory and infectious conditions, including schistosomiasis. We infected C57BL/6 mice with S. japonicum and isolated lymphocytes from the liver to identify cell subsets with high IL-17 expression and release using flow cytometry and ELISA. Expression and release of IL-17 was significantly higher in hepatic lymphocytes from infected mice compared with control mice in response to both non-specific stimulation with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody plus/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody and PMA plus ionomycin. We then compared IL-17 expression in three hepatic T-cell subsets, T helper, natural killer T and γδT cells, to determine the major source of IL-17 during infection. Interleukin-17 was induced in all three subsets by PMA + ionomycin, but γδT lymphocytes exhibited the largest increase in expression. We then established a mouse model to further investigate the role of IL-17 in granulomatous and fibrosing inflammation against parasite eggs. Reducing IL-17 activity using anti-IL-17A antibodies decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells and collagen deposition in the livers of infected C57BL/6 mice. The serum levels of soluble egg antigen (IL) -specific IgGs were enhanced by anti-IL-17A monoclonal antibody blockade, suggesting that IL-17 normally serves to suppress this humoral response. These findings suggest that γδT cells are the most IL-17-producing cells and that IL-17 contributes to granulomatous inflammatory and fibrosing reactions in S. japonicum-infected C57BL/6 mouse liver. PMID:23551262

  16. Mouse liver selenium-binding protein decreased in aboundance by peroxisome proliferators.

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C. S.; Liang, X.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Wall, D. B.; Lubman, D. M.; Subbarao, V.; Sambasiva Rao, M.

    2000-06-01

    Several studies with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) have shown that the abundance of numerous mouse liver proteins is altered in response to treatment with chemicals known to cause peroxisome proliferation. The peptide masses from tryptic digests of two liver proteins showing dramatic decreases in abundance in response to numerous peroxisome proliferators were used to search sequence databases. The selenium-binding protein 2 (SBP2 formerly 56 kDa acetaminophen-binding protein, AP 56) and selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1 formerly 56 kDa selenium-binding protein, SP 56) in mouse liver, proteins with a high degree of sequence similarity, were the highest ranked identities obtained. Identity with SBP2 was subsequently confirmed by immunodetection with specific antiserum. Treatment of mice with 0.025% ciprofibrate resulted in the more basic of this pair of proteins being decreased to 30% of control abundance while the acidic protein was decreased to 7% of the control amount. Dexamethasone treatment, in contrast, caused increases of 80% and 20% in the abundance of the acidic and basic forms, respectively. Administration of dexamethasone to mice in combination with ciprofibrate produced expression of the acidic SBP2 at 23% of the control level and the basic SBP2 at 36%, a slightly moderated reduction compared with the decrease that occurred with ciprofibrate alone. These data suggest that peroxisome proliferators such as ciprofibrate cause a decrease in the abundance of the SBP2, which leads to increased cell proliferation, even in the presence of an inhibitor such as dexamethasone. Such a decrease in SBP, thought to serve as cell growth regulation factors, could be central to the nongenotoxic carcinogenicity of the peroxisome proliferators observed in rodents.

  17. Comparison of Percutaneous Ablation Technologies in the Treatment of Malignant Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyeon; Burke, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to deliver chemical, thermal, electrical, or ultrasonic damage to a specific focal tumor in an attempt to achieve substantial tumor destruction or complete eradication. As the technology continues to advance, several image-guided tumor ablations have emerged to effectively manage primary and secondary malignancies in the liver. Percutaneous chemical ablation is one of the oldest and most established techniques for treating small hepatocellular carcinomas. However, this technique has been largely replaced by newer modalities including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, cryoablation, high-intensity–focused ultrasound ablation, and irreversible electroporation. Because there exist significant differences in underlying technological bases, understanding each mechanism of action is essential for achieving desirable outcomes. In this article, the authors review the current state of each ablation method including technological and clinical considerations. PMID:25071303

  18. Comparison of percutaneous ablation technologies in the treatment of malignant liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyeon; Burke, Charles T

    2014-06-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to deliver chemical, thermal, electrical, or ultrasonic damage to a specific focal tumor in an attempt to achieve substantial tumor destruction or complete eradication. As the technology continues to advance, several image-guided tumor ablations have emerged to effectively manage primary and secondary malignancies in the liver. Percutaneous chemical ablation is one of the oldest and most established techniques for treating small hepatocellular carcinomas. However, this technique has been largely replaced by newer modalities including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, cryoablation, high-intensity-focused ultrasound ablation, and irreversible electroporation. Because there exist significant differences in underlying technological bases, understanding each mechanism of action is essential for achieving desirable outcomes. In this article, the authors review the current state of each ablation method including technological and clinical considerations.

  19. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    PubMed

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  20. The Interplay of cis-Regulatory Elements Rules Circadian Rhythms in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Korenčič, Anja; Bordyugov, Grigory; Košir, Rok; Rozman, Damjana; Goličnik, Marko; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock is driven by cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops that involve E-boxes, D-boxes, and ROR-elements. In peripheral organs, circadian rhythms are additionally affected by systemic factors. We show that intrinsic combinatorial gene regulation governs the liver clock. With a temporal resolution of 2 h, we measured the expression of 21 clock genes in mouse liver under constant darkness and equinoctial light-dark cycles. Based on these data and known transcription factor binding sites, we develop a six-variable gene regulatory network. The transcriptional feedback loops are represented by equations with time-delayed variables, which substantially simplifies modelling of intermediate protein dynamics. Our model accurately reproduces measured phases, amplitudes, and waveforms of clock genes. Analysis of the network reveals properties of the clock: overcritical delays generate oscillations; synergy of inhibition and activation enhances amplitudes; and combinatorial modulation of transcription controls the phases. The agreement of measurements and simulations suggests that the intrinsic gene regulatory network primarily determines the circadian clock in liver, whereas systemic cues such as light-dark cycles serve to fine-tune the rhythms. PMID:23144788

  1. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Ko, Eun Hee; Kim, Jae-Woo

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting-feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting-feeding cycle.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells are enriched in mouse lungs and liver.

    PubMed

    Unno, Akihiro; Kachi, Seira; Batanova, Tatiana A; Ohno, Tamio; Elhawary, Nagwa; Kitoh, Katsuya; Takashima, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is thought to disseminate throughout the host by circulation of tachyzoite-infected leukocytes in the blood, and adherence and migration of such leukocytes into solid tissues. However, it is unclear whether T. gondii-infected leukocytes can migrate to solid organs via the general circulation. In this study, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method to determine the rate of infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) flowing into and remaining within solid organs in mice. A transgenic T. gondii parasite line derived from the PLK strain that expresses DsRed Express, and transgenic green fluorescent protein-positive PBMCs, were used for these experiments. Tachyzoite-infected PBMCs were injected into mouse tail veins and qRT-PCR was used to measure the infection rates of the PBMCs remaining in the lungs, liver, spleen and brain. We found that the PBMCs in the lungs and liver had statistically higher infection rates than that of the original inoculum; this difference was statistically significant. However, the PBMC infection rate in the spleen showed no such enhancement. These results show that tachyzoite-infected PBMCs in the general circulation remain in the lungs and liver more effectively than non-infected PBMCs.

  3. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kengo Shimohira, Masashi; Sasaki, Shigeru Iwata, Hiromitsu Nishikawa, Hiroko Ogino, Hiroyuki Hara, Masaki; Hashizume, Takuya Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  4. Dosimetry study of PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Haixia; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that there is a large variability between PDT light dose and therapeutic outcomes. An explicit dosimetry model using apparent reacted 1O2 concentration [1O2]rx has been developed as a PDT dosimetric quantity to improve the accuracy of the predicted ability of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, this explicit macroscopic singlet oxygen model was adopted to establish the correlation between calculated reacted [1O2]rx and the tumor growth using Photofrin-mediated PDT in a mouse tumor model. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were injected with Photofrin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. PDT was performed 24h later with different fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) and different fluences (50 and 135 J/cm2) using a collimated light applicator coupled to a 630nm laser. The tumor volume was monitored daily after PDT and correlated with the total light fluence and [1O2]rx. Photophysical parameters as well as the singlet oxygen threshold dose for this sensitizer and the RIF tumor model were determined previously. The result showed that tumor growth rate varied greatly with light fluence for different fluence rates while [1O2]rx had a good correlation with the PDT-induced tumor growth rate. This preliminary study indicated that [1O2]rx could serve as a better dosimetric predictor for predicting PDT outcome than PDT light dose.

  5. Impact of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after liver transplantation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiang-Qian; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Teng, Da-Hong; Sun, Ji-San; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary neoplasm of the liver and is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Liver transplantation (LT) has become one of the best curative therapeutic options for patients with HCC, although tumor recurrence after LT is a major and unaddressed cause of mortality. Furthermore, the factors that are associated with recurrence are not fully understood, and most previous studies have focused on the biological properties of HCC, such as the number and size of the HCC nodules, the degree of differentiation, the presence of hepatic vascular invasion, elevated serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, and the tumor stage outside of the Milan criteria. Thus, little attention has been given to factors that are not directly related to HCC (i.e., “non-oncological factors”), which have emerged as predictors of tumor recurrence. This review was performed to assess the effects of non-oncological factors on tumor recurrence after LT. The identification of these factors may provide new research directions and clinical strategies for the prophylaxis and surveillance of tumor recurrence after LT, which can help reduce recurrence and improve patient survival. PMID:26973413

  6. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects.

  7. Polymorphic expression of a human superficial bladder tumor antigen defined by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Y; Islam, N; Boucher, L; Parent-Vaugeois, C; Tardif, M

    1987-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up. Images PMID:3313389

  8. Acute inflammation induces immunomodulatory effects on myeloid cells associated with anti-tumor responses in a tumor mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed L.; Attia, Zeinab I.; Galal, Sohaila M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the self nature of cancer, anti-tumor immune response is weak. As such, acute inflammation induced by microbial products can induce signals that result in initiation of an inflammatory cascade that helps activation of immune cells. We aimed to compare the nature and magnitude of acute inflammation induced by toll-like receptor ligands (TLRLs) on the tumor growth and the associated inflammatory immune responses. To induce acute inflammation in tumor-bearing host, CD1 mice were inoculated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) (5 × 105 cells/mouse), and then treated with i.p. injection on day 1, day 7 or days 1 + 7 with: (1) polyinosinic:polycytidylic (poly(I:C)) (TLR3L); (2) Poly-ICLC (clinical grade of TLR3L); (3) Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) (coding for TLR9L); (4) Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) (coding for TLR9L); and (5) Incomplete Freund’s Adjuvant (IFA). Treatment with poly(I:C), Poly-ICLC, BCG, CFA, or IFA induced anti-tumor activities as measured by 79.1%, 75.94%, 73.94%, 71.88% and 47.75% decreases, respectively in the total number of tumor cells collected 7 days after tumor challenge. Among the tested TLRLs, both poly(I:C) (TLR3L) and BCG (contain TLR9L) showed the highest anti-tumor effects as reflected by the decrease in the number of EAc cells. These effects were associated with a 2-fold increase in the numbers of inflammatory cells expressing the myeloid markers CD11b+Ly6G+, CD11b+Ly6G−, and CD11b+Ly6G−. We concluded that Provision of the proper inflammatory signal with optimally defined magnitude and duration during tumor growth can induce inflammatory immune cells with potent anti-tumor responses without vaccination. PMID:26966565

  9. Primary solitary fibrous tumors of liver: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 42-year-old male presented right upper abdomen pain for more than 6 days, which misdiagnose calculus of intrahepatic duct and acute cholecystitis. An approximately 1.5 cm x 1.0 cm x 1.0 cm nodule was found and resected in left lateral lobe of hepatic. Pathological examination showed spindle cell and fibroblast -like cells within the collagenous stroma. Immunohistochemically, these spindle tumor cells showed diffuse Vim and Bcl-2 positive reactivity, but S-100 protein and HMB45 were negative. The post-operative course was uneventful. Solitary fibrous tumors of the liver, although rare, should be differentiated from mesenchymal lesions of the liver. Virtual slide The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4214341041091088. PMID:24294990

  10. Mechanistic study on liver tumor promoting effects of flutamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Tawfeeq, Mohammad Monir; Hayashi, Hitomi; Shimamoto, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Shibutani, Makoto; Inokuma, Hisashi; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2012-03-01

    Flutamide (FLU), a nonsteroidal anti-androgen, is used for the treatment of prostate cancer but is also a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A inducer. Some CYP1A inducers are known to exert hepatocellular tumor-promoting activities in rodents, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by CYP1A1 induction via a metabolism of FLU is probably involved in the liver tumor promotion. In the present study, to clarify the possible liver tumor promoting effect of FLU, a two-stage liver carcinogenesis assay was performed using male F344 rats. Rats received an intraperitoneal (ip) injection of 200 mg/kg body weight of N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and fed a diet containing 0, 0.1 or 0.2% FLU for 6 weeks. After 2 weeks of DEN treatment, all rats were subjected to two-thirds partial hepatectomy. Animals were killed 8 weeks after ip injection of DEN. Immunohistochemically, the number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive foci significantly increased in the liver of rats given 0.2% FLU as compared with the control. Ki-67-positive cell ratio also increased in rats given FLU at both concentrations. ROS generation in the microsomal fraction and production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance [TBARS] and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content in the liver did not increase in any of the FLU-treated groups. The results of microarray and real-time RT-PCR revealed that phase 1 drug-metabolizing enzymes such as CYP1A1, Ugt1a61 and Nqo1 and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes such as Yc2, Akr1b7, Akr1b8, Akr1b10, Aldh1a1, Gpx2 and Me1 were up-regulated in rats treated with FLU. In addition, the MAPK pathway family-related genes such as Prkcα, Mek1, Rafb, Myc, Mek2, Raf1 and Egfr were also up-regulated in FLU-treated groups. The results of the present study indicate that FLU is a CYP1A inducer but does not cause any production of microsomal ROS in the liver and suggest that microsomal ROS is not involved in the liver tumor promoting effect of FLU.

  11. Identification of Tumor Rejection Antigens for Breast Cancer Using a Mouse Tumor Rejection Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Days after Tumor Implantation Tu m or S iz e (m m 3 ) 0 10 20 30 40 0 1000 2000 3000 PBS MMC Swap70...or Gsn, or irradiated whole tumor cells at day -42, -28, and -14. Live MMC cells were given subcutaneously on day 0. 0 10 20 30 40...hICD Mtv1 Mtv1 + FxyD3 Mtv1 + FxyD3 + hICD Days after MMC chalange Tu m or s iz e( m m 3) Figure 4. Multi-antigen vaccines

  12. E2f8 mediates tumor suppression in postnatal liver development

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Lindsey N.; Rakijas, Jessica B.; Pandit, Shusil K.; Westendorp, Bart; Chen, Hui-Zi; Huntington, Justin T.; Tang, Xing; Bae, Sooin; Srivastava, Arunima; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Martin, Chelsea K.; Cuitino, Maria C.; Perez, Miguel; Clouse, Julian M.; Chokshi, Veda; Shinde, Neelam; Kladney, Raleigh; Sun, Daokun; Perez-Castro, Antonio; Matondo, Ramadhan B.; Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Mokry, Michal; Machiraju, Raghu; Fernandez, Soledad; Rosol, Thomas J.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Pipas, James M.; Schmidt, Carl R.; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    E2F-mediated transcriptional repression of cell cycle–dependent gene expression is critical for the control of cellular proliferation, survival, and development. E2F signaling also interacts with transcriptional programs that are downstream of genetic predictors for cancer development, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we evaluated the function of the atypical repressor genes E2f7 and E2f8 in adult liver physiology. Using several loss-of-function alleles in mice, we determined that combined deletion of E2f7 and E2f8 in hepatocytes leads to HCC. Temporal-specific ablation strategies revealed that E2f8’s tumor suppressor role is critical during the first 2 weeks of life, which correspond to a highly proliferative stage of postnatal liver development. Disruption of E2F8’s DNA binding activity phenocopied the effects of an E2f8 null allele and led to HCC. Finally, a profile of chromatin occupancy and gene expression in young and tumor-bearing mice identified a set of shared targets for E2F7 and E2F8 whose increased expression during early postnatal liver development is associated with HCC progression in mice. Increased expression of E2F8-specific target genes was also observed in human liver biopsies from HCC patients compared to healthy patients. In summary, these studies suggest that E2F8-mediated transcriptional repression is a critical tumor suppressor mechanism during postnatal liver development. PMID:27454291

  13. Human relevance framework for rodent liver tumors induced by the insecticide sulfoxaflor.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard; Rasoulpour, Reza J

    2014-05-01

    Sulfoxaflor, a novel active substance that targets sap-feeding insects, induced rodent hepatotoxicity when administered at high dietary doses. Specifically, hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas increased after 18 months in male and female CD-1 mice at 750 and 1250 ppm, respectively, and hepatocellular adenomas increased after 2 years in male F344 rats at 500 ppm. Studies to determine the mode of action (MoA) for these liver tumors were performed in an integrated and prospective manner as part of the standard battery of toxicology studies such that the MoA data were available prior to, or by the time of, the completion of the carcinogenicity studies. Sulfoxaflor is not genotoxic and the MoA data support the following key events in the etiology of the rodent liver tumors: (1) CAR nuclear receptor activation and (2) hepatocellular proliferation. The MoA data were evaluated in a weight of evidence approach using the Bradford Hill criteria for causation and were found to align with dose and temporal concordance, biological plausibility, coherence, strength, consistency, and specificity for a CAR-mediated MoA while excluding other alternate MoAs. The available data include: activation of CAR, Cyp2b induction, hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, absence of liver effects in KO mice, absence of proliferation in humanized mice, and exclusion of other possible mechanisms (e.g., genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, AhR, or PPAR activation), and indicate that the identified rodent liver tumor MoA for sulfoxaflor would not occur in humans. In this case, sulfoxaflor is considered not to be a potential human liver carcinogen.

  14. Inflammatory pseudo-tumor of the liver: a rare pathological entity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudo-tumor (IPT) of the liver is a rare benign neoplasm and is often mistaken as a malignant entity. Few cases have been reported in the literature and the precise etiology of inflammatory pseudotumor remains unknown. Patients usually present with fever, abdominal pain and jaundice. The proliferation of spindled myofibroblast cells mixed with variable amounts of reactive inflammatory cells is characteristics of IPT. We reviewed the literature regarding possible etiology for IPT with a possible suggested etiology. PMID:21255461

  15. Hepatic Arterial Chemoembolization Using Drug-Eluting Beads in Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Shantanu K.; Friese, Jeremy L.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Ayyagari, Rajasekhara; Binkert, Christoph A.; Schenker, Matthew P.; Kulke, Matthew; Baum, Richard

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate short (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) follow-up in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver who underwent hepatic arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads at a single institution. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective review. All patients who were treated with 100-300 or 300-500 {mu}m drug-eluting LC Beads (Biocompatibles, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (range, 50-100 mg) for GI neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver from June 2004 to June 2009 were included. CT and MRI were evaluated for progression using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Short-term (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) imaging response was determined and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. Results: Thirty-eight drug-eluting bead chemoembolization procedures were performed on 32 hepatic lobes, comprising 21 treatment cycles in 18 patients. All procedures were technically successful with two major complications (biliary injuries). At short-term follow-up (<3 months), 22 of 38 (58%) procedures and 10 of 21 (48%) treatment cycles produced an objective response (OR) with the remainder having stable disease (SD). At intermediate-term follow-up (mean, 445 days; range, 163-1247), 17 of 26 (65%) procedures and 8 of 14 (57%) treatment cycles produced an OR. Probability of progressing was approximately 52% at 1 year with a median time to progression of 419 days. Conclusions: Drug-eluting bead chemoembolization is a reasonable alternative to hepatic arterial embolization and chemoembolization for the treatment of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver.

  16. Totally laparoscopic anatomical liver resection for centrally located tumors: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan-Joon; Kim, Ki-Hun; Shin, Min-Ho; Yoon, Young-In; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic major hepatectomy is a common procedure that has been reported frequently; however, laparoscopic resection of centrally located tumors involving segments 4, 5, and 8 remains a technically difficult procedure because it requires 2 transection planes and dissection of numerous branches of the hepatic vein and glissonean capsule compared to hemi-hepatectomy. Here, we present 7 cases of totally laparoscopic right anterior sectionectomy (Lap-RAS) and 3 cases of totally laparoscopic central bisectionectomy (Lap-CBS).Between May 2013 and January 2015, 10 totally laparoscopic anatomical resections of centrally located tumors were performed in our institution. The median age of the patients was 54.2 (38-72) years and the median ICG-R15 was 10.4 (3.9-17.4). There were 8 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 2 with metastatic colorectal cancer. All the HCC patients has the liver function impairment on the degree of Child-Pugh score A.The mean operation time was 330 ± 92.7 minutes with an estimated blood loss of 325 ± 234.5 mL. Only 1 patient required transfusion during surgery. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 9.5 ± 3.4 day and postop complication was reported only 1 case that has the fluid collection at the resection margin of the liver. Mean resection margin was 8.5 ± 6.1 mm and tumor size was 2.9 ± 1.9 cm.Totally lap-RAS and lap-CBS are feasible operative procedures in patients with centrally located tumor of the liver and particularly in patients with limited liver function such as those with cirrhosis.

  17. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho |; Kim, Mingoo |; Lee, Byung-Hoon |; Kim, Ju-Han |; Kang, Kyung-Sun |; Kim, Hyung-Lae |; Yoon, Byung-Il |; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu |; Lee, Mi-Ock ||

    2008-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) and fold change (> 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity.

  18. Negative CD4+TIM-3 Signaling Confers Resistance Against Cold Preservation Damage in Mouse Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiu-da; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Terry T.; Shang, Xuanming; Lee, Nayun; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), an innate immunity-driven local inflammation, remains the major problem in clinical organ transplantation. T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM-3) – Galectin-9 (Gal-9) signaling regulates CD4+ Th1 immune responses. Here, we explored TIM-3 – Gal-9 function in a clinically relevant murine model of hepatic cold storage and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). C57BL/6 livers, preserved for 20h at 4°C in UW solution, were transplanted to syngeneic mouse recipients. Up-regulation of TIM-3 on OLT-infiltrating activated CD4+ T cells was observed in the early IRI phase (1h). By 6h of reperfusion, OLTs in recipients treated with a blocking anti-TIM-3 Ab were characterized by: 1/ enhanced hepatocellular damage (sALT levels, liver Suzuki's histological score); 2/ polarized cell infiltrate towards Th1/Th17-type phenotype; 3/ depressed T cell exhaustion markers (PD-1, LAG3); and 4/ elevated neutrophil and macrophage infiltration/activation. In parallel studies, adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells from naïve WT, but not from TIM-3 Tg donors, readily recreated OLT damage in otherwise IR-resistant RAG−/− test recipients. Furthermore, pre-treatment of mice with rGal-9 promoted hepatoprotection against preservation-association liver damage, accompanied by enhanced TIM-3 expression in OLTs. Thus, CD4+ T cell-dependent “negative” TIM-3 costimulation is essential for hepatic homeostasis and resistance against IR stress in OLTs. PMID:25676534

  19. Oncogenic Kit signaling and therapeutic intervention in a mouse model of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ferdinand; Ehlers, Imke; Agosti, Valter; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Sommer, Gunhild; Yozgat, Yasemin; Manova, Katia; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Besmer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Kit receptor-activating mutations are critical in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). We investigated mechanisms of oncogenic Kit signaling and the consequences of therapeutic intervention in a mouse model of human GIST. Treatment of GIST mice with imatinib decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the tumor. Analysis of tumor tissue from imatinib-treated mice showed diminished phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling suggesting that oncogenic Kit signaling critically contributes to the translational response in GIST. Treatment with RAD001 (everolimus), an mTOR inhibitor, diminished the translational response and cell proliferation in tumor lesions, pointing to mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic approach for imatinib-resistant GIST. Analysis of RNA expression profiles in GIST lesions with and without imatinib treatment showed changes in expression of IFN-inducible genes and cell cycle regulators. These results convincingly show that KitV558Δ/+ mice represent a unique faithful mouse model of human familial GIST, and they demonstrate the utility of these mice for preclinical investigations and to elucidate oncogenic signaling mechanisms by using genetic approaches and targeted pharmacological intervention. PMID:16908864

  20. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qiang; Li, Dongyue; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors.

  1. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

    PubMed

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Toussaint, Mathilda J M; Youssef, Sameh A; Tooten, Peter C J; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC). DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.

  2. Laser ablation of liver tumors: An ancillary technique, or an alternative to radiofrequency and microwave?

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Sergio; Di Vece, Francesca; Ermili, Francesca; Tombesi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently the most popular and used ablation modality for the treatment of non surgical patients with primary and secondary liver tumors, but in the last years microwave ablation (MWA) is being technically improved and widely rediscovered for clinical use. Laser thermal ablation (LTA) is by far less investigated and used than RFA and MWA, but the available data on its effectiveness and safety are quite good and comparable to those of RFA and MWA. All the three hyperthermia-based ablative techniques, when performed by skilled operators, can successfully treat all liver tumors eligible for thermal ablation, and to date in most centers of interventional oncology or interventional radiology the choice of the technique usually depends on the physician’s preference and experience, or technical availability. However, RFA, MWA, and LTA have peculiar advantages and limitations that can make each of them more suitable than the other ones to treat patients and tumors with different characteristics. When all the three thermal ablation techniques are available, the choice among RFA, MWA, and LTA should be guided by their advantages and disadvantages, number, size, and location of the liver nodules, and cost-saving considerations, in order to give patients the best treatment option.

  3. Stereotactic body radiation therapy of liver tumors: post-treatment appearances and evaluation of treatment response: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Mustafa M; Merrell, Kenneth W; Hallemeier, Christopher L; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Mounajjed, Taofic; Olivier, Kenneth R; Fidler, Jeff L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2016-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a noninvasive treatment technique for selected patients with primary liver tumors and liver-confined oligometastatic disease. Recently, SBRT has emerged as an alternative treatment option in non-surgical candidates and in whom percutaneous treatment methods are not possible or contraindicated. The experience with SBRT continues to grow. There are currently no imaging guidelines for assessment of tumor response and follow-up schedule following SBRT. SBRT produces characteristic radiation-induced changes in the treated tumor and surrounding liver parenchyma. Knowledge of these changes is essential in the interpretation of follow-up imaging and assessment of treatment response. In this review, we will describe the CT, MRI, and PET imaging findings following SBRT of both the targeted liver tumor and surrounding hepatic parenchyma.

  4. Model-Based Tumor Growth Dynamics and Therapy Response in a Mouse Model of De Novo Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hadjiandreou, Marios M.; Rizki, Gizem; Achilleos, Achilleas; Strati, Katerina; Mitsis, Georgios D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a complex, multistep process that depends on numerous alterations within the cell and contribution from the surrounding stroma. The ability to model macroscopic tumor evolution with high fidelity may contribute to better predictive tools for designing tumor therapy in the clinic. However, attempts to model tumor growth have mainly been developed and validated using data from xenograft mouse models, which fail to capture important aspects of tumorigenesis including tumor-initiating events and interactions with the immune system. In the present study, we investigate tumor growth and therapy dynamics in a mouse model of de novo carcinogenesis that closely recapitulates tumor initiation, progression and maintenance in vivo. We show that the rate of tumor growth and the effects of therapy are highly variable and mouse specific using a Gompertz model to describe tumor growth and a two-compartment pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic model to describe the effects of therapy in mice treated with 5-FU. We show that inter-mouse growth variability is considerably larger than intra-mouse variability and that there is a correlation between tumor growth and drug kill rates. Our results show that in vivo tumor growth and regression in a double transgenic mouse model are highly variable both within and between subjects and that mathematical models can be used to capture the overall characteristics of this variability. In order for these models to become useful tools in the design of optimal therapy strategies and ultimately in clinical practice, a subject-specific modelling strategy is necessary, rather than approaches that are based on the average behavior of a given subject population which could provide erroneous results. PMID:26649886

  5. Development, differentiation, and vascular components of subcutaneous and intrahepatic Hepa129 tumors in a mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Gutierrez, Paula M; Baratta, Janie L; Thordarson, Kristoffer; Braslow, Joshua; Haynes, Sherry M; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2016-04-01

    Tumor models in mice offer opportunities for understanding tumor formation and development of therapeutic treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, subcutaneous or intra-hepatic Hepa129 tumors were established in C3H mice. Tumor growth was determined by daily measurements of subcutaneous tumors and post-mortem studies of subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors. Administration of Edu was used to determine cell generation dates of tumor cells. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies directed at CD31 or CD34, and intravenous injection of labeled tomato lectin revealed tumor vasculature. Tissue sections also were processed for immunohistochemistry using a panel of antibodies to proteoglycans. Comparison of Edu labeled cells with immunoreactivity allowed determination of development and differentiation of tumor cells after cell generation. Subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors displayed similar growth over 3 weeks. Immunohistochemistry showed strong labeling for glypican-3, 9BA12, and chondroitin sulfate of tumors in both loci, while normal liver was negative. Tumor regions containing Edu labeled cells did not show significant immunohistochemical labeling for the tumor markers until 2-3 days after Edu treatment; overlap of Edu labeled cells and immunohistochemically labeled tumor regions appeared to reach a maximum at 5 days after Edu treatment. Ectopic subcutaneous tumors displayed vascular ingrowth as the tumor cells expressed immunocytochemical markers; subcutaneous tumors displayed significantly more vascular elements than did intrahepatic tumors.

  6. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  7. Involvement of Notch1 in the development of mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Diévart, A; Beaulieu, N; Jolicoeur, P

    1999-10-28

    The MMTV/neu transgenic (Tg) mice spontaneously develop mammary tumors stochastically after a long latent period, suggesting that the c-neu/erbB2 oncogene is not sufficient for tumor formation. To identify putative collaborator(s) of the c-neu/erbB2, we used the provirus insertional mutagenesis approach with mammary tumors arising in MMTV/neu Tg mice infected with the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). The Notch1 gene was identified as a novel target for MMTV provirus insertional activation. In Notch1-rearranged tumors, the Notch1 gene was interrupted by the MMTV provirus insertion upstream of the exons coding for the TM domain. These insertions led to overexpression of novel 5' truncated approximately 7 kb RNA coding for 280 kDa mutant protein harboring only the Notch1 ectodomain, N(EC)mut. These may be involved in tumor formation. Another consequence of these insertions was the expression of truncated 3' Notch1 transcripts (3.5 - 4.5 kb) and proteins (86 - 110 kDa) deleted of most of the extracellular sequences (Notch1intra). We found that 3' truncated Notch1intra can transform HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Deletion analysis revealed that the ankyrin-repeats and the domain 1 (aa 1751 - 1821) are required, while a signal peptide, the two conserved cysteines (C1652 and C1685) and the OPA and PEST sequences are dispensable for transformation. These results indicate that the N-terminally truncated Notch1intra protein behaves as an oncogene in this system.

  8. Circulating exosomes potentiate tumor malignant properties in a mouse model of chronic sleep fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Almendros, Isaac; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Trzepizur, Wojciech; Mokhlesi, Babak; Huang, Lei; Andrade, Jorge; Farré, Ramon; Gozal, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) increases cancer aggressiveness in mice. Exosomes exhibit pleiotropic biological functions, including immune regulatory functions, antigen presentation, intracellular communication and inter-cellular transfer of RNA and proteins. We hypothesized that SF-induced alterations in biosynthesis and cargo of plasma exosomes may affect tumor cell properties. Results SF-derived exosomes increased tumor cell proliferation (~13%), migration (~2.3-fold) and extravasation (~10%) when compared to exosomes from SC-exposed mice. Similarly, Pre exosomes from OSA patients significantly enhanced proliferation and migration of human adenocarcinoma cells compared to Post. SF-exosomal cargo revealed 3 discrete differentially expressed miRNAs, and exploration of potential mRNA targets in TC1 tumor cells uncovered 132 differentially expressed genes that encode for multiple cancer-related pathways. Methods Plasma-derived exosomes from C57/B6 mice exposed to 6 wks of SF or sleep control (SC), and from adult human patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before (Pre) and after adherent treatment for 6 wks (Post) were co-cultured with mouse lung TC1 or human adenocarcinoma tumor cell lines, respectively. Proliferation, migration, invasion, endothelial barrier integrity and extravasation assays of tumor cells were performed. Plasma mouse exosomal miRNAs were profiled with arrays, and transcriptomic assessments of TC1 cells exposed to SF or SC exosomes were conducted to identify gene targets. Conclusions Chronic SF induces alterations in exosomal miRNA cargo that alter the biological properties of TC1 lung tumor cells to enhance their proliferative, migratory and extravasation properties, and similar findings occur in OSA patients, in whom SF is a constitutive component of their sleep disorder. Thus, exosomes could participate, at least in part, in the adverse cancer outcomes observed in OSA. PMID:27419627

  9. Metastases of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver as extremely rare indication for liver transplantation in children. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Hor; Broniszczak, Dorota; Markiewicz-Kijewska, Małgorzata; Ciopiński, Mateusz; Teisseyre, Joanna; Kluge, Przemysław; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Kościesza, Andrzej; Socha, Piotr; Kaliciński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are extremely rare in children (0.75 cases per 100,000 children and adolescents a year) and the majority of these tumors are benign or present low grade of malignancy. According to the American registry Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, less than 2% of all neuroendocrine tumors in children occur in the pancreas, making it a rare site for these tumors. The majority of them are found in children over 10years of age, especially those with malignant potential. Treatment of NET consists of different methods: surgery, somatostatin analogues and chemotherapy. Radical surgical resection remains the standard of treatment; however, it is not always feasible because of distant metastases. The authors present a case report of pancreatic NET with multiple metastases to the liver. The patient was treated with pancreatic resection and liver transplantation for liver metastases. Prior to liver transplantation, the patient was treated with somatostatin analogues, sunitinib and chemotherapy. Management of liver metastases with liver transplantation is discussed.

  10. Liver tumor promoting effect of omeprazole in rats and its possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hitomi; Shimamoto, Keisuke; Taniai, Eriko; Ishii, Yuji; Morita, Reiko; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Shibutani, Makoto; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole (OPZ), a proton pump inhibitor, is a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1/2 inducer. Some CYP1A inducers are known to have liver tumor promoting effects in rats and the ability to enhance oxidative stress. In this study, we performed a two-stage liver carcinogenesis bioassay in rats to examine the tumor promoting effect of OPZ (Experiment 1) and to clarify a possible mechanism of action (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, male F344 rats were subjected to a two-third partial hepatectomy, and treated with 0, 138 or 276 mg/kg OPZ by oral gavage once a day for six weeks after an intraperitoneal injection of N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Liver weights significantly increased in the DEN+OPZ groups, and the number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci significantly increased in the DEN+276 mg/kg OPZ group. In Experiment 2, the same experiment as Experiment 1 was performed, but the dosage of OPZ was 0 or 276 mg/kg. The number and area of GST-P positive foci as well as liver weights significantly increased in the DEN+276 mg/kg OPZ group. The number of proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells also significantly increased in the same group. Real-time RT-PCR showed that the expression of AhR battery genes including Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Ugt1a6 and Nqo1, and Nrf2 battery genes including Gpx2, Yc2, Akr7a3, Aldh1a1 Me1 and Ggt1 were significantly upregulated in this group. However, the production of microsomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) decreased, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content remained unchanged in this group. These results indicate that OPZ, CYP1A inducer, is a liver tumor promoter in rats, but oxidative stress is not involved in the liver tumor promoting effect of OPZ.

  11. Susceptibility of Different Mouse Wild Type Strains to Develop Diet-Induced NAFLD/AFLD-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Vera H. I.; Macheiner, Tanja; Kessler, Sonja M.; Czepukojc, Beate; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Kiemer, Alexandra K.; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Lackner, Carolin; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease have been intensively studied, concerning pathophysiological mechanisms are still incompletely understood. This may be due to the use of different animal models and resulting model-associated variation. Therefore, this study aimed to compare three frequently used wild type mouse strains in their susceptibility to develop diet-induced features of non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease associated clinical, biochemical, and histological features in C57BL/6, CD-1, and 129Sv WT mice were induced by (i) high-fat diet feeding, (ii) ethanol feeding only, and (iii) the combination of high-fat diet and ethanol feeding. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid profiles were compared in CD-1 and 129Sv mice. Additionally hepatic fatty acid composition was determined in 129Sv mice. In C57BL/6 mice dietary regimens resulted in heterogeneous hepatic responses, ranging from pronounced steatosis and inflammation to a lack of any features of fatty liver disease. Liver-related serum biochemistry showed high deviations within the regimen groups. CD-1 mice did not exhibit significant changes in metabolic and liver markers and developed no significant steatosis or inflammation as a response to dietary regimens. Although 129Sv mice showed no weight gain, this strain achieved most consistent features of fatty liver disease, apparent from concentration alterations of liver-related serum biochemistry as well as moderate steatosis and inflammation as a result of all dietary regimens. Furthermore, the hepatic lipid profile as well as the fatty acid composition of 129Sv mice were considerably altered, upon feeding the different dietary regimens. Accordingly, diet-induced non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease is most consistently promoted in 129Sv mice compared to C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. As a conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of genetic background of used mouse strains for modeling diet

  12. Comprehensive treatment of a functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with multifocal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Seeruttun, Sharvesh Raj; Fang, Cheng; Zhou, Zhiwei

    2014-08-01

    A 64-year-old man was admitted to the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center with chief complaints of recurrent abdominal pain and diarrhea for about 3 years and with a history of surgical repair for intestinal perforation owing to stress ulcer. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a primary tumor on the pancreatic tail with multifocal liver metastases. Pathological and immunohistochemistry staining revealed the lesion to be a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET). According to the latest World Health Organization (WHO, 2013) classification, the tumor was classified as stage IV functional G1 pNET. After referral to the multidisciplinary treatment board (MDT), the patient was started on periodic dose of omeprazole, somatostatin analogues and Interferon α (IFNα) and had scanning follow-ups. Based upon the imaging results, CT-guided radioactive iodine-125 ((125)I) seeds implantation therapy, radiofrequency ablation therapy (RFA) or microwave ablation technique were chosen for the treatment of the primary tumor. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), RFA and microwave ablation techniques were decided upon for liver metastases. The patient showed beneficial response to the treatment with clinically manageable low-grade side effects and attained partial remission (RECIST criteria) with a good quality of life.

  13. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of the liver tumor irreversible electroporation by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Figini, Matteo; Wang, Xifu; Lyu, Tianchu; Su, Zhanliang; Procissi, Daniele; Yaghmai, Vahid; Larson, Andrew C; Zhang, Zhuoli

    2017-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a relatively new technique for tumor ablation. It has shown promising results in difficult cases where surgery is not recommended and delicate anatomic structures are present near or within the tumor. Currently, liver cancer is one of the most common targets for IRE treatment. Pre-operative and post-operative imaging has a key role in IRE procedures and research studies. Although ultrasound is usually the first choice, especially for intra-operative guidance, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the visualization and characterization of tumor before and after IRE in clinical and preclinical studies. However, the appearance of liver lesions after IRE with different MRI sequences has never been systematically investigated, and the most common practice is to limit the acquisition protocol to only contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. In this work, the role of MRI in clinical and preclinical assessment of hepatic tumors treated with IRE is reviewed and discussed. PMID:28337285

  14. Research on stress-induced apoptosis of natural killer cells and the alteration of their killing activity in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Xin; Yu, Hai-Long; Li, Ming-Qi; Tomiyama-Miyaji, Chikako; Abo, Toru; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the stress-induced apoptosis of natural killer (NK) cells and the changes in their killing activity in mouse livers. METHODS: A restraint stress model was established in mice. Flow cytometry was employed to measure the percentage of NK cells and the changes in their absolute number in mouse liver. The cytotoxicity of hepatic and splenic NK cells was assessed against YAC-1 target cells via a 4 h 51Cr-release assay. RESULTS: The restraint stress stimulation induced the apoptosis of NK cells in the liver and the spleen, which decreased the cell number. The number and percentage of NK cells in the spleen decreased. However, the number of NK cells in the liver decreased, whereas the percentage of NK cells was significantly increased. The apoptosis of NK cells increased gradually with prolonged stress time, and the macrophage-1 (Mac-1)+ NK cells were more susceptible to apoptosis than Mac-1- NK cells. Large numbers of Mac-1- NK cells in the liver, which are more resistant to stress-induced apoptosis, were observed than the Mac-1- NK cells in the spleen. The stress stimulation diminished the killing activity of NK cells in the spleen was significantly decreased, but the retention of numerous Mac-1- NK cells in the liver maintained the killing ability. CONCLUSION: Significant stress-induced apoptosis was observed among Mac-1+ NK cells, but not Mac-1- NK cells in the mouse liver. Stress stimulation markedly decreased the killing activity of NK cells in the spleen but remained unchanged in the liver. PMID:24115824

  15. A Feasibility Study on Ribs as Anatomical Landmarks for Motion Tracking of Lung and Liver Tumors at External Beam Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nankali, Saber; Torshabi, Ahmad Esmaili; Miandoab, Payam Samadi

    2017-02-01

    At external beam radiotherapy for some tumors located at thorax region due to lack of information in gray scale fluoroscopic images tumor position determination is problematic. One of the clinical strategies is to implant clip as internal fiducial marker inside or near tumor to represent tumor position while the contrast of implanted clip is highly observable rather than tumor. As alternative, using natural anatomical landmarks located at thorax region of patient body is proposed to extract tumor position information without implanting clips that is invasive method with possible side effect. Among natural landmarks, ribs of rib-cage structure that result proper visualization at X-ray images may be optimal as representative for tumor motion. In this study, we investigated the existence of possible correlation between ribs as natural anatomical landmarks and various lung and liver tumors located at different sites as challenging issue. A simulation study was performed using data extracted from 4-dimensional extended cardiac-torso anthropomorphic phantom that is able to simulate motion effect of dynamic organs, as well. Several tumor sites with predefined distances originated from chosen ribs at anterior-posterior direction were simulated at 3 upper, middle, and lower parts of chest. Correlation coefficient between ribs and tumors was calculated to investigate the robustness of ribs as anatomical landmarks for tumor motion tracking. Moreover, a consistent correlation model was taken into account to track tumor motion with a rib as best candidate among selected ribs. Final results represent availability of using rib cage as anatomical landmark to track lung and liver tumors in a noninvasive way. Observations of our calculations showed a proper correlation between tumors and ribs while the degree of this correlation is changing depends on tumor site while lung tumors are more varied and complex with less correlation with ribs motion against liver tumors.

  16. Identification of Tumor Rejection Antigens for Breast Cancer Using a Mouse Tumor Rejection Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    high throughput antigen discovery tools have been developed that have greatly helped the identification of immunogenic proteins in breast cancer...streptomycin and L-glutamine. T cell enrichment Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) were harvested by mincing the tu- mor and screening. The TIL were...kinase 1. Multiple proteins involved in the Rho/Rho-associated, coiled coil–containing protein kinase (Rock) signal transduction pathway were found to

  17. Analysis of mouse liver membrane proteins using multidimensional separations and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuowei; Wang, Min; Tong, Wei

    2010-12-01

    In the field of proteomic investigation, the analysis of membrane proteins still faces many technical challenges. A fundamental question in this puzzle is how to maintain a proper solvent environment to allow the hydrophobic proteins to remain solubilized. We propose that the denaturation of membrane proteins in a highly concentrated urea solution enables them to be ionized such that ionic exchange chromatography can be employed to separate them. The membrane proteins prepared from the mouse liver were dissolved in 6M guanidine hydrochloride, 20mM Tris-HCl, pH 9.0, and loaded onto a tandem chromatography apparatus coupled with Q-Sepharose FF and Sephacryl S-200HR. These columns were able to adsorb 97.87% of the membrane protein preparations. Using a linear NaCl (0-1.0M) gradient, the bound proteins were eluted out at 0.1-1.0M NaCl, and examined by SDS-PAGE. Furthermore the protein bands underwent excision and digestion with trypsin, followed by reverse-phase chromatography for the separation of the digested peptides and ionic-trap mass spectrometry for the identification of the proteins. From the SDS-PAGE gels, the overlap between proteins from neighboring bands was only 21.34%, indicating that the anionic-size exclusion coupling chromatography efficiently separated these membrane proteins. Of a total of 392 proteins identified, 306 were membrane proteins or membrane-associated proteins. Based on the calculation of hydrophobicity, the GRAVY scores of 83 proteins are greater than, or equal to, 0.00. Taking all of this evidence together, our results revealed that this approach is satisfactory for studies on the membrane proteome from the mouse liver.

  18. Tumor loci and their interactions on mouse chromosome 19 that contribute to testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex genetic factors underlie testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) development. One experimental approach to dissect the genetics of TGCT predisposition is to use chromosome substitution strains, such as the 129.MOLF-Chr 19 (M19). M19 carries chromosome (Chr) 19 from the MOLF whereas all other chromosomes are from the 129 strain. 71% of M19 males develop TGCTs in contrast to 5% in 129 strain. To identify and map tumor loci from M19 we generated congenic strains harboring MOLF chromosome 19 segments on 129 strain background and monitored their TGCT incidence. Results We found 3 congenic strains that each harbored tumor promoting loci that had high (14%-32%) whereas 2 other congenics had low (4%) TGCT incidences. To determine how multiple loci influence TGCT development, we created double and triple congenic strains. We found additive interactions were predominant when 2 loci were combined in double congenic strains. Surprisingly, we found an example where 2 loci, both which do not contribute significantly to TGCT, when combined in a double congenic strain resulted in greater than expected TGCT incidence (positive interaction). In an opposite example, when 2 loci with high TGCT incidences were combined, males of the double congenic showed lower than expected TGCT incidence (negative interaction). For the triple congenic strain, depending on the analysis, the overall TGCT incidence could be additive or could also be due to a positive interaction of one region with others. Additionally, we identified loci that promote bilateral tumors or testicular abnormalities. Conclusions The congenic strains each with their characteristic TGCT incidences, laterality of tumors and incidence of testicular abnormalities, are useful for identification of TGCT susceptibility modifier genes that map to Chr 19 and also for studies on the genetic and environmental causes of TGCT development. TGCTs are a consequence of aberrant germ cell and testis development. By defining

  19. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  20. Carcinogenicity evaluation: comparison of tumor data from dual control groups in the CD-1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul; Reeve, Lesley

    2007-06-01

    Current regulatory thinking allows for the use of single control groups for rodent carcinogenicity testing although there has been a trend until recently to use dual control groups. To date, virtually nothing has been published on whether a shift from dual to single control groups will affect the identification of tumorigenic risk potential in these studies. A recent evaluation of dual control carcinogenicity data in the rat (Baldrick, Toxicol Pathol 2005, 33: 283-291) showed that although no major differences in tumor incidences between the control groups were found, some interstudy variation occurred and in cases were a notable difference was seen, the use of 2 control groups, as well as robust, contemporary background data, allowed an easier interpretation of findings in drug-treated groups. In this paper, the results of 10 mouse carcinogenicity studies, performed between 1991 and 2004, with 2 control groups, are presented. As in the rat, interstudy variation was seen and in some cases, the use of dual control groups assisted in the tumor risk assessment. Thus, the continued use of 2 control groups can have a vital role in mouse carcinogenicity studies. The paper also presents an update on survival, on the range and extent of background spontaneous neoplasms and comments on genetic drift in this commonly used mouse strain.

  1. Total tumor volume predicts survival following liver resection in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Mu-Xing; Zhao, Hong; Bi, Xin-Yu; Li, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Zhen; Han, Yue; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Ye-Fan; Wei, Wen-Qiang; Zhao, Dong-Bin; Cai, Jian-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Assessing the prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by the number and size of tumors is sometimes difficult. The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of total tumor volume (TTV), which combines the two factors, in patients with HCC who underwent liver resection. We retrospectively reviewed 521 HCC patients from January 2001 to December 2008 in our center. Patients were categorized using the tertiles of TTV. The prognostic value of TTV was assessed. With a median follow-up of 116 months, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates of the patients were 93.1 , 69.9, and 46.3 %, respectively. OS was significantly differed by TTV tertile groups, and higher TTV was associated with shorter OS (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that TTV was an independent prognostic factor for OS. Larger TTV was significantly associated with higher alpha-fetoprotein level, presence of macrovascular invasion, multiple tumor lesions, larger tumor size, and advanced tumor stages (all P < 0.05). Within the first and second tertiles of TTV (TTV ≤ 73.5 cm(3)), no significant differences in OS were detected in patients within and beyond Milan criteria (P = 0.183). TTV-based Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score gained the lowest Akaike information criterion value, the highest χ (2) value of likelihood ratio test, and the highest C-index among the tested staging systems. Our results suggested that TTV is a good indicator of tumor burden in patients with HCC. Further studies are warranted to validate the prognostic value of TTV.

  2. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyasu, Hirotaka; Garbe, John R.; Cornax, Ingrid; Amaya, Clarissa; O'Sullivan, M. Gerard; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteosarcoma (OS) is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2) for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of OS. PMID

  3. Increased expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs is associated with 3MC-induced mouse tumor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shekhar; Dey, Sumit K; Das, Provas; Jana, Siddhartha S

    2011-11-01

    Administration of the chemical carcinogen, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), in the hind leg induces the progressive formation of tumors in mice within 110 days. Previous reports suggest that transformation of muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes of tumor formation. Molecular events that lead to transformation of normal cells to atypical cells are not well understood. Here, we investigate the effect of 3MC on the expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs (NM IIs) which are known to be involved in cell migration, division and adhesion. Mass spectroscopy analysis reveals that tumor tissue contains 64.5% NM II-A, 34% II-B and only 1.5% II-C of total NM IIs, whereas these three isoforms of NM IIs are undetectable by mass spectroscopy in normal tissue associated with the tumor (NTAT) from the hind leg. Quantification of heavy chain mRNAs of NM II suggests that tumor tissue contains 25.7-fold and 19.03-fold more of NM II-A and II-B, respectively, compared with NTAT. Unlike NM II-B, which is detected only after tumor formation, II-A is detectable as early as day 7 after a second dose of 3MC. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy reveals that fibroblast cells which are sparsely distributed in normal tissue are densely populated but of atypical shape in the tumor. These findings suggest that transformation of fibroblasts or non-fibroblast cells to atypical, cancerous cells is associated with increased levels of NM II-A and NM II-B expression in the 3MC-induced tumor mouse model. 3MC-induced transformation is further demonstrated in C2C12 myotubes.

  4. ras proto-oncogene activation in dichloroacetic acid-, trichloroethylene- and tetrachloroethylene-induced liver tumors in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Anna, C H; Maronpot, R R; Pereira, M A; Foley, J F; Malarkey, D E; Anderson, M W

    1994-10-01

    The frequency and mutation spectra of proto-oncogene activation in hepatocellular neoplasms induced by tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene and dichloroacetic acid were examined to help define the molecular basis for their carcinogenicity. H-ras codon 61 activation was not significantly different among dichloroacetic acid- and trichloroethylene-induced and combined historical and concurrent control hepatocellular tumors (62%, 51% and 69% respectively). The mutation spectra of H-ras codon 61 mutations showed a significant decrease in AAA and increase in CTA mutations for dichloroacetic acid- and trichloroethylene-induced tumors when compared to combined controls. The H-ras codon 61 mutation frequency for tetrachloroethylene-induced tumors was significantly lower (24%) than that of combined controls and also that of the two other chemicals. Mutations at codons 13 and 117 plus a second exon insert contributed 4% to the total H-ras frequencies for trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. There was also a higher incidence of K-ras activation (13%) in tetrachloroethylene-induced tumors than in the other chemically induced or control tumors. Four liver tumors were found to contain insertions of additional bases within the second exon of K- or H-ras. These findings suggest that exposure to dichloroacetic acid, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene provides a selective growth advantage to spontaneously occurring mutations in codon 61 of H-ras and, at the same time, is responsible for a small number of unique molecular lesions suggestive of either a random genotoxic mode of action or a non-specific result of secondary DNA damage. However, the absence of ras activation in many of the liver neoplasms suggests that alternative mechanisms are also important in B6C3F1 mouse hepatocarcinogenesis.

  5. A mode of action for induction of liver tumors by Pyrethrins in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Roger J.; Walters, David G.; Finch, John M.; Gabriel, Karl L.; Capen, Charles C.; Osimitz, Thomas G. . E-mail: tom@sciencestrategies.com; Lake, Brian G.

    2007-01-15

    High doses of Pyrethrins produce liver tumors in female rats. To elucidate the mode of action for tumor formation, the hepatic effects of Pyrethrins have been investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley CD rats were fed diets containing 0 (control) and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins and female rats' diets containing 0, 100, 3000 and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins for periods of 7, 14 and 42 days and 42 days followed by 42 days of reversal. As a positive control, rats were also fed diets containing 1200-1558 ppm sodium Phenobarbital (NaPB) for 7 and 14 days. The treatment of male rats with 8000 ppm Pyrethrins, female rats with 3000 and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins and both sexes with NaPB resulted in increased liver weights, which were associated with hepatocyte hypertrophy. Hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis was also increased by treatment with Pyrethrins and NaPB. The treatment of male and female rats with Pyrethrins and NaPB produced significant increases in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) content and a marked induction of CYP2B-dependent 7-pentoxyresorufin O-depentylase and testosterone 16{beta}-hydroxylase activities. Significant increases were also observed in CYP3A-dependent testosterone 6{beta}-hydroxylase activity. The hepatic effects of Pyrethrins were dose-dependent in female rats with 100 ppm being a no effect level and on cessation of treatment were reversible in both sexes. This study demonstrates that Pyrethrins are mitogenic CYP2B form inducers in rat liver. The mode of action for Pyrethrins-induced rat liver tumor formation appears to be similar to that of NaPB and some other non-genotoxic CYP2B inducers of hepatic xenobiotic metabolism.

  6. Predicting Mouse Liver Microsomal Stability with “Pruned” Machine Learning Models and Public Data

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, Alexander L.; Stratton, Thomas P.; Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mouse efficacy studies are a critical hurdle to advance translational research of potential therapeutic compounds for many diseases. Although mouse liver microsomal (MLM) stability studies are not a perfect surrogate for in vivo studies of metabolic clearance, they are the initial model system used to assess metabolic stability. Consequently, we explored the development of machine learning models that can enhance the probability of identifying compounds possessing MLM stability. Methods Published assays on MLM half-life values were identified in PubChem, reformatted, and curated to create a training set with 894 unique small molecules. These data were used to construct machine learning models assessed with internal cross-validation, external tests with a published set of antitubercular compounds, and independent validation with an additional diverse set of 571 compounds (PubChem data on percent metabolism). Results “Pruning” out the moderately unstable/moderately stable compounds from the training set produced models with superior predictive power. Bayesian models displayed the best predictive power for identifying compounds with a half-life ≥1 hour. Conclusions Our results suggest the pruning strategy may be of general benefit to improve test set enrichment and provide machine learning models with enhanced predictive value for the MLM stability of small organic molecules. This study represents the most exhaustive study to date of using machine learning approaches with MLM data from public sources. PMID:26415647

  7. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha; Massey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  8. Plutonium- or americium-induced liver tumors and lesions in beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.N.; Lloyd, R.D.; Mays, C.W.; Angus, W.; Miller, S.C.; Shabestari, L.; Hahn, F.F. )

    1991-09-01

    Plutonium-239 or 241Am administered intravenously in the monomeric citrate form was initially deposited in beagle livers principally in the hepatocytes and to a much lesser extent in the sinusoidal macrophages and connective tissues. The initial distribution was quite uniform throughout the hepatic parenchyma; however, at later postinjection intervals, depending on the amount of injected activity, the liver burden became increasingly more focal due to: (1) a progressive shift of the radionuclide from the hepatic epithelium to the macrophages; (2) the movement of such macrophages toward the portal or central regions of the lobule; and (3) the displacement of the older more radioactive tissue by regenerating hepatocytes, which generally have a much lower radionuclide content. The hepatic lesions produced by Pu or Am included: (1) necrosis and degenerative changes that were clinically serious or fatal in some of the animals injected with approximately 107 kBq kg-1; (2) marked structural and circulatory changes resulting from necrosis and focal hepatocyte hyperplasia; (3) a significant incidence of both benign and malignant primary liver tumors. In both Pu- and Am-treated dogs, the most frequently appearing neoplasm was the bile duct adenoma, followed by the cholangiocarcinoma. The most obvious difference between Pu- and Am-induced liver neoplasia was the greater frequency of fibrosarcomas and mast cell sarcomas in the Am-treated groups. Hepatomas were of relatively low frequency in animals with Pu or Am burdens. Although the incidence of bone neoplasia was high among the dogs in these studies, the risk of liver tumors, especially in the Am-treated animals, exceeded that of the skeleton in some of the lower dosage levels where the survival times were long.

  9. Treatment of Liver Tumors with Lipiodol TACE: Technical Recommendations from Experts Opinion

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de; Arai, Yasuaki; Lencioni, Riccardo; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Rilling, William; Salem, Riad; Matsui, Osamu; Soulen, Michael C.

    2016-03-15

    Transarterial chemoembolization with Lipiodol (Lipiodol TACE), also called conventional TACE, was developed in the early 1980s and widely adopted worldwide after randomized control trials and meta-analysis demonstrated superiority of Lipiodol TACE to best supportive care. Presently, there is no level one evidence that other TACE techniques are superior to Lipiodol TACE for intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which includes patients with preserved liver function and nonsurgical large or multinodular HCC without distant metastases. In addition, TACE is part of the treatment for progressive or symptomatic liver metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. When injected into the hepatic artery, Lipiodol has the unique property of selective uptake and retention in hyperarterialyzed liver tumors. Lipiodol/drug emulsion followed by particle embolization has been demonstrated to improve the pharmacokinetic of the drug and tumor response. Radio opacity of Lipiodol helps to monitor treatment delivery, with retention of Lipiodol serving as an imaging biomarker for tumor response. For 30 years, Lipiodol TACE has been inconsistently referenced in many publications with various levels of details for the method of preparation and administration, with reported progressive outcomes following improvements in the technique and the devices used to deliver the treatment and better patient selection. Consequently, there is no consensus on the standard method of TACE regarding the use of anticancer agents, embolic material, technical details, and the treatment schedule. In order to develop an internationally validated technical recommendation to standardize the Lipiodol TACE procedure, a worldwide panel of experts participated in a consensus meeting held on May 10, 2014.

  10. Distinct role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 in oval cell- mediated liver regeneration and inflammation-associated hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Xi; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Cang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and TNF receptor-1(TNFR1) have been shown to involve in oval cell proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. However, their role in these processes is still unclear. In the present study, by using hepatocytes-specific DDB1 deletion mouse models, we explored the role and mechanism of IL6, TNFα and TNFR1 in oval cell proliferation and HCC development in the context of inflammation, which is the common features of HCC pathogenesis in humans. Our results showed that IL6 promotes oval cell proliferation and liver regeneration, while TNFα/TNFR1 does not affect this process. Deletion of IL6 accelerates HCC development and increases tumor burden. The number of natural killer(NK) cells is significantly decreased in tumors without IL6, implying that IL6 suppresses HCC by NK cells. In contrast to IL6, TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway promotes HCC development, and deletion of TNFR1 reduced tumor incidence. Increased apoptosis, compensatory proliferation and activation of MAPK/MEK/ERK cascade contribute to the oncogenic function of TNFR1-mediated signaling pathway. Intriguingly, deletion of TNFα accelerates tumor development, which shows divergent roles of TNFα and TNFR1 in hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27556180

  11. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  12. Mutant IDH1 Disrupts the Mouse Subventricular Zone and Alters Brain Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Christopher J; Carpenter, Austin B; Waitkus, Matthew S; Wang, Catherine Y; Zhu, Huishan; Hansen, Landon J; Chen, Lee H; Greer, Paula K; Feng, Jie; Wang, Yu; Bock, Cheryl B; Fan, Ping; Spasojevic, Ivan; McLendon, Roger E; Bigner, Darell D; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai

    2017-02-01

    IDH1 mutations occur in the majority of low-grade gliomas and lead to the production of the oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG). To understand the effects of tumor-associated mutant IDH1 (IDH1-R132H) on both the neural stem cell (NSC) population and brain tumorigenesis, genetically faithful cell lines and mouse model systems were generated. Here, it is reported that mouse NSCs expressing Idh1-R132H displayed reduced proliferation due to p53-mediated cell cycle arrest as well as a decreased ability to undergo neuronal differentiation. In vivo, Idh1-R132H expression reduced proliferation of cells within the germinal zone of the subventricular zone (SVZ). The NSCs within this area were dispersed and disorganized in mutant animals, suggesting that Idh1-R132H perturbed the NSCs and the microenvironment from which gliomas arise. Additionally, tumor-bearing animals expressing mutant Idh1 displayed a prolonged survival and also overexpressed Olig2, features consistent with IDH1-mutated human gliomas. These data indicate that mutant Idh1 disrupts the NSC microenvironment and the candidate cell of origin for glioma; thus, altering the progression of tumorigenesis. Additionally, this study provides a mutant Idh1 brain tumor model that genetically recapitulates human disease, laying the foundation for future investigations on mutant IDH1-mediated brain tumorigenesis and targeted therapy.

  13. Effects of butyric acid and arsenic on isolated pancreatic islets and liver mitochondria of male mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Rezae, Mohsen; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Alboghobeish, Soheila; Zeinvand, Marzieh

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the different doses of Butyric acid (BA) and Arsenic (As) in liver mitochondria oxidative stress and pancreatic islet insulin secretion of male mouse. Background: BA is found in many foods and As as a toxic metal is present in drinking water. They can induce oxidative stress in tissues. Methods: In this experimental study, Liver mitochondria were isolated by administration of the different centrifugation method and pancreatic islets were isolated by collagenase method. Mitochondria were incubated by BA (35, 75, 150, 300 μM) and As (20, 50, 100, 200 μM) as the islets were incubated by BA (250, 500, 1000, 1500 μM) and As (50, 100, 200 μM) for 1 hour. At the end of the experiment, mitochondrial viability and membrane potential, ROS, MDA, GSH and islets insulin secretion were measured by their specific methods. Results: BA and As administration increased mitochondrial levels of ROS, MDA and decreased GSH and pancreatic islet insulin secretion in a dose dependent manner (p<0.05). The doses of BA 75μM and As 100μM have been revealed the most mitochondria toxic concentrations. Also, the doses of 1000μM for BA and 100μM for As were considered as reducing concentrations for islets insulin secretion. Additionally, co administration of them intensified more these effects Conclusion: Alone or in combination administration of BA and As induced oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and decreased insulin secretion of pancreatic islets. PMID:28331564

  14. Mouse model of liver ischemia and reperfusion injury: method for studying reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuta; Hines, Ian N; Zibari, Gazi; Pavlick, Kevin; Gray, Laura; Kitagawa, Yuko; Grisham, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    The mouse model of liver ischemia and reperfusion injury has proven to be valuable for our understanding of the role that reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites play in postischemic tissue injury. This methods paper provides a detailed protocol for inducing partial liver ischemia followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia is induced in anesthetized mice by cross-clamping the hepatic artery and portal vein for varying lengths of time, resulting in deprivation of blood flow to approximately 70% of the liver. Restoration of blood flow to the ischemic lobes enhances superoxide production concomitant with a rapid and marked decrease in the bioavailability of nitric oxide, resulting in alterations in the redox state of the liver in favor of a more oxidative environment. This hepatocellular oxidative stress induces the activation of oxidant-sensitive transcription factors followed by the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and mediators that ultimately lead to liver injury. This model can be induced in any strain or sex of mouse and requires 1-2 months of practice to become proficient in the surgery and animal manipulation. The roles of various reactive metabolites of oxygen and nitrogen may be evaluated using genetically engineered mice as well as selective molecular, cellular, and/or pharmacological agents.

  15. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor BIBF1120 ameliorates inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis in CCl4-induced liver fibrogenesis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk Akcora, Büsra; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai; Bansal, Ruchi

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis, a progressive chronic disease mainly caused by hepatitis viral infections, alcohol abuse or metabolic syndrome leading to liver dysfunction and is the growing cause of mortality worldwide. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor BIBF1120 (Nintedanib) has been evaluated in clinical trials for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and advanced Hepatocellular carcinoma, but has not been explored for liver fibrosis yet. In this study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and mechanism of BIBF1120 in liver fibrogenesis. The effects of BIBF1120 were evaluated in TGFβ-activated mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, LX2 cells, primary human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and CCl4-induced liver fibrogenesis mouse model. Fibroblasts-conditioned medium studies were performed to assess the paracrine effects on macrophages and endothelial cells. In-vitro in TGFβ-activated fibroblasts, BIBF1120 significantly inhibited expression of major fibrotic parameters, wound-healing and contractility. In vivo in CCl4-induced acute liver injury model, post-disease BIBF1120 administration significantly attenuated collagen accumulation and HSC activation. Interestingly, BIBF1120 drastically inhibited intrahepatic inflammation and angiogenesis. To further elucidate the mechanism of action, 3T3-conditioned medium studies demonstrated increased 3T3-mediated macrophage chemotaxis and endothelial cells tube formation and activation, which was significantly decreased by BIBF1120. These results suggests that BIBF1120 can be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:28291245

  16. Assessment of intratumor hypoxia by integrated 18F-FDG PET / perfusion CT in a liver tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Stewart, Errol; Desjardins, Lise; Hadway, Jennifer; Morrison, Laura; Crukley, Cathie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Hypoxia in solid tumors occurs when metabolic demands in tumor cells surpass the delivery of oxygenated blood. We hypothesize that the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) metabolism and tumor blood flow mismatch would correlate with tumor hypoxia. Methods Liver perfusion computed tomography (CT) and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging were performed in twelve rabbit livers implanted with VX2 carcinoma. Under CT guidance, a fiber optic probe was inserted into the tumor to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Tumor blood flow (BF) and standardized uptake value (SUV) were measured to calculate flow-metabolism ratio (FMR). Tumor hypoxia was further identified using pimonidazole immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the imaging parameters and pO2 and pimonidazole staining. Results Weak correlations were found between blood volume (BV) and pO2 level (r = 0.425, P = 0.004), SUV and pO2 (r = -0.394, P = 0.007), FMR and pimonidazole staining score (r = -0.388, P = 0.031). However, there was stronger correlation between tumor FMR and pO2 level (r = 0.557, P < 0.001). Conclusions FMR correlated with tumor oxygenation and pimonidazole staining suggesting it may be a potential hypoxic imaging marker in liver tumor. PMID:28264009

  17. Deficient liver regeneration after carbon tetrachloride injury in mice lacking type 1 but not type 2 tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y.; Fausto, N.

    1998-01-01

    Signaling by tumor necrosis factor type 1 receptor (TNFR-1) is required for the initiation of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Using knockout mice that lack either TNFR-1 or TNFR-2, we determined whether signaling through TNF receptors is important for liver injury and hepatocyte proliferation induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Lack of TNFR-1 inhibited hepatocyte DNA synthesis after CCl4 injection. At 44 hours after the injection, replication of hepatocytes in TNFR-1 was 50% to 90% lower than in wild-type (WT) animals, depending on the dose injected. In WT animals, hepatocyte replication was essentially completed by 4 days after CCl4 injection, but replication at a low level persisted in TNFR-1 mice for at least 2 weeks. TNFR-1 knockout mice had little detectable NF-kappa B and STAT3 binding during the first 5 hours after CCl4, high plasma TNF, and reduced levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and liver IL-6 mRNA. Injection of IL-6 30 minutes before CCl4 administration corrected the deficiency of hepatocyte replication at 44 hours and restored STAT3 binding to normal levels. In contrast, mice lacking TNFR-2 did not differ significantly from WT mice in NF-kappa B and STAT3 binding, IL-6 and TNF levels, or hepatocyte replication. Although AP-1 binding was induced in WT TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 knockout mice, binding in TNFR-2 knockouts was lower than in WT mice. C/EBP binding was much lower in TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 knockout mice than in WT mice. As assessed by morphological analysis and alanine aminotransferase levels, the acute injury caused by CCl4 appeared to be similar in the three groups of animals, but subsequent regeneration was impaired in mice lacking TNFR-1. We conclude that a TNFR-1 signaling pathway involving NF-kappa B, IL-6, and STAT3 is an important component of the hepatocyte mitogenic response induced by CCl4 injury in mouse liver. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 12 PMID:9626061

  18. IFN-γ Rα is a key determinant of CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor elimination or tumor escape and relapse in FVB mouse.

    PubMed

    Kmieciak, Maciej; Payne, Kyle K; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Manjili, Masoud H

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade, the dual function of the immune system in tumor inhibition and tumor progression has become appreciated. We have previously reported that neu-specific T cells can induce rejection of neu positive mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC) and also facilitate tumor relapse by inducing neu antigen loss and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here, we sought to determine the mechanism by which CD8+ T cells either eliminate the tumor, or maintain tumor cells in a dormant state and eventually facilitate tumor relapse. We show that tumor cells that express high levels of IFN-γ Rα are eliminated by CD8+ T cells. In contrast, tumor cells that express low levels of IFN-γ Rα do not die but remain dormant and quiescent in the presence of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells until they hide themselves from the adaptive immune system by losing the tumor antigen, neu. Relapsed tumor cells show CD44+CD24- phenotype with higher rates of tumorigenesis, in vivo. Acquisition of CD44+CD24- phenotype in relapsed tumors was not solely due to Darwinian selection. Our data suggest that tumor cells control the outcome of tumor immune surveillance through modulation of the expression of    IFN-γ Rα.

  19. A Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin Supramolecular Hydrogel for liver tumor targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoqin; Li, Jinliang; Cai, Yanbin; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Jie; Song, Mingcai; Shi, Yang; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-03-10

    Curcumin (Cur), a phenolic anti-oxidant compound obtained from Curcuma longa plant, possesses a variety of therapeutic properties. However, it is suffered from its low water solubility and low bioavailability property, which seriously restricts its clinical application. In this study, we developed a glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) modified curcumin supramolecular pro-gelator (GA-Cur) and a control compound Nap-Cur by replacing GA with the naphthylacetic acid (Nap). Both compounds showed good water solubility and could form supramolecular gels by disulfide bond reduction triggered by glutathione (GSH) in vitro. Both formed gels could sustainedly release Cur in buffer solutions. We also investigated the cytotoxicity of pro-gelators to HepG2 cells by a MTT assay and determined the cellular uptake behaviours of them by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS. Due to the over expression of GA receptor in liver cancer cells, our pro-gelator of GA-Cur showed an enhanced cellular uptake and better inhibition capacity to liver tumor cells than Nap-Cur. Therefore, the GA-Cur could significantly inhibit HepG2 cell growth. Our study provides a novel nanomaterial for liver tumor chemotherapy.

  20. A Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin Supramolecular Hydrogel for liver tumor targeting therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoqin; Li, Jinliang; Cai, Yanbin; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Jie; Song, Mingcai; Shi, Yang; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin (Cur), a phenolic anti-oxidant compound obtained from Curcuma longa plant, possesses a variety of therapeutic properties. However, it is suffered from its low water solubility and low bioavailability property, which seriously restricts its clinical application. In this study, we developed a glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) modified curcumin supramolecular pro-gelator (GA-Cur) and a control compound Nap-Cur by replacing GA with the naphthylacetic acid (Nap). Both compounds showed good water solubility and could form supramolecular gels by disulfide bond reduction triggered by glutathione (GSH) in vitro. Both formed gels could sustainedly release Cur in buffer solutions. We also investigated the cytotoxicity of pro-gelators to HepG2 cells by a MTT assay and determined the cellular uptake behaviours of them by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS. Due to the over expression of GA receptor in liver cancer cells, our pro-gelator of GA-Cur showed an enhanced cellular uptake and better inhibition capacity to liver tumor cells than Nap-Cur. Therefore, the GA-Cur could significantly inhibit HepG2 cell growth. Our study provides a novel nanomaterial for liver tumor chemotherapy. PMID:28281678

  1. A Glycyrrhetinic Acid-Modified Curcumin Supramolecular Hydrogel for liver tumor targeting therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoqin; Li, Jinliang; Cai, Yanbin; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Jie; Song, Mingcai; Shi, Yang; Yang, Zhimou

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin (Cur), a phenolic anti-oxidant compound obtained from Curcuma longa plant, possesses a variety of therapeutic properties. However, it is suffered from its low water solubility and low bioavailability property, which seriously restricts its clinical application. In this study, we developed a glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) modified curcumin supramolecular pro-gelator (GA-Cur) and a control compound Nap-Cur by replacing GA with the naphthylacetic acid (Nap). Both compounds showed good water solubility and could form supramolecular gels by disulfide bond reduction triggered by glutathione (GSH) in vitro. Both formed gels could sustainedly release Cur in buffer solutions. We also investigated the cytotoxicity of pro-gelators to HepG2 cells by a MTT assay and determined the cellular uptake behaviours of them by fluorescence microscopy and LC-MS. Due to the over expression of GA receptor in liver cancer cells, our pro-gelator of GA-Cur showed an enhanced cellular uptake and better inhibition capacity to liver tumor cells than Nap-Cur. Therefore, the GA-Cur could significantly inhibit HepG2 cell growth. Our study provides a novel nanomaterial for liver tumor chemotherapy.

  2. Quantifying Rigid and Nonrigid Motion of Liver Tumors During Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qianyi; Hanna, George; Grimm, Jimm; Kubicek, Gregory; Pahlajani, Niraj; Asbell, Sucha; Fan, Jiajin; Chen, Yan; LaCouture, Tamara

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify rigid and nonrigid motion of liver tumors using reconstructed 3-dimensional (3D) fiducials from stereo imaging during CyberKnife-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-three liver patients treated with 3 fractions of SBRT were used in this study. After 2 orthogonal kilovoltage images were taken during treatment, the 3D locations of the fiducials were generated by the CyberKnife system and validated using geometric derivations. A total of 4824 pairs of kilovoltage images from start to end of treatment were analyzed. For rigid motion, the rotational angles and translational shifts were reported by aligning 3D fiducial groups from different image pairs, using least-squares fitting. For nonrigid motion, we quantified interfractional tumor volume variations by using the proportional volume derived from the fiducials, which correlates to the sum of interfiducial distances. The individual fiducial displacements were also reported (1) after rigid corrections and (2) without angle corrections. Results: The proportional volume derived by the fiducials demonstrated a volume-increasing trend in the second (101.9% ± 3.6%) and third (101.0 ± 5.9%) fractions among most patients, possibly due to radiation-induced edema. For all patients, the translational shifts in left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior directions were 2.1 ± 2.3 mm, 2.9 ± 2.8 mm, and 6.4 ± 5.5 mm, respectively. The greatest translational shifts occurred in the superoinferior direction, likely due to respiratory motion from the diaphragm. The rotational angles in roll, pitch, and yaw were 1.2° ± 1.8°, 1.8° ± 2.4°, and 1.7° ± 2.1°, respectively. The 3D individual fiducial displacements with rigid corrections were 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and increased to 0.5 ± 0.4 mm without rotational corrections. Conclusions: Accurate 3D locations of internal fiducials can be reconstructed from stereo imaging during treatment. As an

  3. Characterization of c-Ki-ras and N-ras oncogenes in aflatoxin B1-induced rat liver tumors.

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, G; Davis, E F; Huber, L J; Kim, Y; Wogan, G N

    1990-01-01

    c-Ki-ras and N-ras oncogenes have been characterized in aflatoxin B1-induced hepatocellular carcinomas. Detection of different protooncogene and oncogene sequences and estimation of their frequency distribution were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction, cloning, and plaque screening methods. Two c-Ki-ras oncogene sequences were identified in DNA from liver tumors that contained nucleotide changes absent in DNA from livers of untreated control rats. Sequence changes involving G.C to T.A or G.C to A.T nucleotide substitutions in codon 12 were scored in three of eight tumor-bearing animals. Distributions of c-Ki-ras sequences in tumors and normal liver DNA indicated that the observed nucleotide changes were consistent with those expected to result from direct mutagenesis of the germ-line protooncogene by aflatoxin B1. N-ras oncogene sequences were identified in DNA from two of eight tumors. Three N-ras gene regions were identified, one of which was shown to be associated with an oncogene containing a putative activating amino acid residing at codon 13. All three N-ras sequences, including the region detected in N-ras oncogenes, were present at similar frequencies in DNA samples from control livers as well as liver tumors. The presence of a potential germ-line oncogene may be related to the sensitivity of the Fischer rat strain to liver carcinogenesis by aflatoxin B1 and other chemical carcinogens. Images PMID:2105496

  4. C-KIT-positive undifferentiated tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHU, HYUN HEE; CHO, BAIK HWAN; SONG, JI SOO; KIM, KYUNG MI; MOON, WOO SUNG

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances in cancer stem cell analysis, it has been postulated that the transformation of hepatic stem and progenitor cells underlies the development of certain liver cancers. Human C-KIT is a transmembrane type III receptor protein with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity that has been proposed as a marker for human embryonic stem cells. In addition, human C-KIT functions in maintaining the undifferentiated state of stem cells, and has been identified as a marker for human hematopoietic and hepatic stem/progenitor cells. The present study identified an unusual case of a C-KIT-positive hepatic tumor with an undifferentiated stem cell phenotype distinct from existing descriptions of liver tumors. A 69-year-old male with Ampulla of Vater (AoV) cancer was admitted to the hospital for the treatment of a hepatic mass that was incidentally detected during evaluation of AoV cancer. Microscopically, the hepatic tumor was composed of solidly packed small, round and uniform undifferentiated cells, which resembled that of a small-blue-round-cell tumor. The immunophenotype of neoplastic cells (C-KIT+/EpCAM+/E-cadherin+/keratin 7−/keratin 19−/α-fetoprotein−/albumin−) supported primitive stem cell features with no hepatic or biliary phenotypes. Polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing revealed no C-KIT mutations. It is suggested that this tumor may have originated from transformed C-KIT+/EpCAM+/E-cadherin+ cells, which are more primitive and undifferentiated than bipotential hepatic progenitor cells. PMID:25202388

  5. Topical application of ochratoxin A causes DNA damage and tumor initiation in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Ansari, Kausar M; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Dhawan, Alok; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Jain, Swatantra K; Das, Mukul

    2012-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer and 2-3 million new cases are being diagnosed globally each year. Along with UV rays, environmental pollutants/chemicals including mycotoxins, contaminants of various foods and feed stuffs, could be one of the aetiological factors of skin cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the DNA damaging potential and dermal carcinogenicity of a mycotoxin, ochratoxin A (OTA), with the rationale that dermal exposure to OTA in workers may occur during their involvement in pre and post harvest stages of agriculture. A single topical application of OTA (20-80 µg/mouse) resulted in significant DNA damage along with elevated γ-H2AX level in skin. Alteration in oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl, glutathione content and antioxidant enzymes was observed in a dose (20-80 µg/mouse) and time-dependent (12-72 h) manner. The oxidative stress was further emphasized by the suppression of Nrf2 translocation to nucleus following a single topical application of OTA (80 µg/mouse) after 24 h. OTA (80 µg/mouse) application for 12-72 h caused significant enhancement in- (a) reactive oxygen species generation, (b) activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPKs, (c) cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase (37-67%), (d) induction of apoptosis (2.0-11.0 fold), (e) expression of p53, p21/waf1, (f) Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, (g) cytochrome c level, (h) activities of caspase 9 (1.2-1.8 fold) and 3 (1.7-2.2 fold) as well as poly ADP ribose polymerase cleavage. In a two-stage mouse skin tumorigenesis protocol, it was observed that a single topical application of OTA (80 µg/mouse) followed by twice weekly application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate for 24 week leads to tumor formation. These results suggest that OTA has skin tumor initiating property which may be related to oxidative stress, MAPKs signaling and DNA damage.

  6. [Four resections of metachronous liver metastases and lateral lymph node metastases of a rectal carcinoid tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takayuki; Koyama, Fumikazu; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ueda, Takeshi; Nishigori, Naoto; Inoue, Takashi; Kawasaki, Keijirou; Obara, Shinsaku; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The authors present a case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lateral lymph node metastases and liver metastases that was successfully treated by 4 resections. A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (20 mm in diameter) with submucosal (SM) invasion. Radical resection was performed at 25 months, 38 months, and 57 months, when abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed metachronous liver metastases of the rectal carcinoid tumor. At 50 months, metachronous lateral lymph node metastases were also revealed. Three hepatectomies and a laparoscopic lateral lymph node dissection were performed. The patient is currently free of disease at 25 months after the last intervention.

  7. Gene expression profiles in liver of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Dayong; Zhang, Xuxiang; Kong, Zhiming; Cheng, Shupei

    2009-10-01

    cDNA micorarray approach was applied to hepatic transcriptional profile analysis in male mouse (Mus musculus, ICR) to assess the potential health effects of drinking water in Nanjing, China. Mice were treated with continuous exposure to drinking water for 90 days. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed with Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 arrays, and pathway analysis was carried out by Molecule Annotation System 2.0 and KEGG pathway database. A total of 836 genes were found to be significantly altered (1.5-fold, P < or = 0.05), including 294 up-regulated genes and 542 down-regulated genes. According to biological pathway analysis, drinking water exposure resulted in aberration of gene expression and biological pathways linked to xenobiotic metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle and oxidative stress response. Further, deregulation of several genes associated with carcinogenesis or tumor progression including Ccnd1, Egfr, Map2k3, Mcm2, Orc2l and Smad2 was observed. Although transcription changes in identified genes are unlikely to be used as a sole indicator of adverse health effects, the results of this study could enhance our understanding of early toxic effects of drinking water exposure and support future studies on drinking water safety.

  8. Treatment of Liver Metastases in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Harring, Theresa R.; Nguyen, N. Thao N.; Goss, John A.; O'Mahony, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Tumors (NET) often are also diagnosed with Neuroendocrine Liver Metastases (NLM) during the course of their disease. NLM can cause significant morbidity and mortality, oftentimes much more than compared to patients with NET. Treatment options have been limited in the past, focusing on surgical resections, for which only a minority of patients are candidates. However, developments of new treatment modalities have progressed rapidly and patients with NLM now have significantly more options, including surgical-directed therapies; liver-directed therapies; and nonsurgical, non-liver-directed therapies. This review provides information about the roles of hepatic resection, orthotopic liver resection, radiofrequency ablation, hepatic artery embolization and hepatic artery chemoembolization, hepatic artery radioembolization and selective internal radiation therapy, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, systemic chemotherapy, biotherapies including somatostatin analogs and interferon-α, vascular endothelial growth factor and mTOR targets, and microRNA-regulated pathways. Given these new options, the clinician can tailor therapy specific to the patient diagnosed with NLM, thereby giving the patient the best possible chance of prolonged survival. PMID:22013537

  9. Metabolism of aildenafil in vivo in rats and in vitro in mouse, rat, dog, and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Linan; Gu, Yuan; Si, Duanyun; Liu, Changxiao

    2014-06-01

    Aildenafil, 1-{[3-(6, 7-dihydro-1-methyl-7-oxo-3-propyl-1H-pyrazolo [4, 3-d] primidin-5-yl)-4-ethoxyphenyl] sulfonyl}-cis-3, 5-dimethylpiperazine, a phosphodiesterase type V enzyme inhibitor (PDE5I), is under development for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). The purpose of this study was to elucidate metabolism of aildenafil in vivo in rats and in vitro in mouse, rat, dog, and human liver microsomes. Thirty-one phase I metabolites have been found by LTQ/Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometry in rat urine, faeces, and bile after oral administration. Major biotransformation pathways of aildenafil included N-dealkylation of the piperazine ring, hydroxylation and dehydrogenation, aliphatic hydroxylation and loss of alkyl group of piperazine ring. Minor pathways involved hydroxylation on the phenyl ring, pyrazole N-demethylation, O-deethylation, loss of piperazine ring (cleavage of N-S bond) and dehydrogenation on the piperazine ring. Similar metabolic pathways of aildenafil were observed in the incubations of liver microsomes from mouse, rat, and dog as well as from human. The depletion rate of parent drug in mouse and rat liver microsomes was significantly different from that in human liver microsomes. The cytochrome P450 reaction phenotyping analysis was conducted using isozyme-specific inhibitors. The results indicated that CYP3A was the main isoenzyme involved in oxidative metabolism of aildenafil. Overall, these in vitro and in vivo findings should provide valuable information on possible metabolic behaviours of aildenafil in humans.

  10. Generation and analysis of mouse intestinal tumors and organoids harboring APC and K-Ras mutations.

    PubMed

    van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models of intestinal cancer are experimental systems in which mice are genetically manipulated to develop malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract. These models enable researchers to study the mechanisms of onset, progression, and metastasis of the disease. They also provide a valuable biological system which is suitable for testing (novel) drugs in vivo. Recently, an in vitro culture model has been established in which intestinal epithelial stem cells can grow into three-dimensional, ever-expanding epithelial organoids that retain their original organ identity and genetic stability. This culture system has been applied to diseased epithelia, such as adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and Barrett's epithelium. These organoids can be particularly useful for studying the mechanisms of intestinal tumors and to test (novel) drugs in vitro. Here, we describe our current laboratory protocols to generate and analyze intestinal tumors and organoids harboring APC and K-Ras double mutations.

  11. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB) and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg) 28 days post-exposure (P < 0.001). SB were detected in lung at all doses on post-exposure day 1 (P < 0.001) and remained elevated at the two highest doses until day 28 (P < 0.05). BAL cell DNA SB were elevated relative to controls at least at the highest dose on all post-exposure days (P < 0.05). The level of FPG sensitive sites in lung was increased throughout with significant increases occurring on post-exposure days 1 and 3, in comparison to controls (P < 0.001-0.05). SB in liver were detected on post-exposure days 1 (P < 0.001) and 28 (P < 0.001). Polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell counts in BAL correlated strongly with FPG sensitive sites in lung (r = 0.88, P < 0.001), whereas no such correlation was observed with SB (r = 0.52, P = 0.08). CBNP increased the expression of Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses), 3 (all doses) and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg), but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the

  12. Biologically based dose-response model for liver tumors induced by trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C W

    2000-01-01

    The existing extensive laboratory data on trichloroethylene (TCE) and its two metabolites, dichloroacetic (DCA) and trichloroacetic (TCA), are used to explore the relationship among these three compounds. Under the hypothesis that these compounds induce liver tumors in mice through promotion of preexisting initiated cells, it is demonstrated that DCA alone could be responsible for all the response of carcinomas in liver of B6CF(1) mice. The focus of this paper is on how a plausible biological assumption could impact on low-dose risk estimates, rather than on the risk estimate per se. The findings suggest that low-dose risk estimates to humans would be overestimated unless the different background rates between mice and humans are properly accounted for. PMID:10807563

  13. Diminution of mouse epidermal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by tumor promotors

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Rana, R.S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters and related compounds on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were examined. The treatment of adult mouse skin with 2 ..mu..g 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in a sustained decrease in the basal levels of both SOD and catalase activities in the epidermis. A decline in SOD activity occurred within 2 h after application and the maximum effect was seen at 16-17 h. The decrease in SOD activity was always accompanied by a similar decline in the epidermal catalase activity. The alterations in both enzymes occurred against a high background of enhanced protein synthesis which indicates that the effect of TPA is selective for SOD and catalase. Other tumor promoters such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and the non-phorbol tumor promoter anthraline also lowered the activities of both the enzymes. Mezerein, a resiniferonol derivative with weak promoting activity but a potent stage-II promoter, appeared to be more potent than TPA in lowering the basal levels. These results indicate that damage which favors neoplastic progression would occur in TPA-treated mouse skin due to the accumulation of free radicals resulting from low levels of SOD and catalase activity. In addition, the TPA-caused decrease in the levels of SOD and catalase was not prevented by either retinoic acid, fluocinolone acetonide, tosyl amino-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, or butylated hydroxytoluene, suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion by these agents is not mediated through alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities which decrease free radical concentrations.

  14. Loss of Dnmt3b function upregulates the tumor modifier Ment and accelerates mouse lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hlady, Ryan A; Novakova, Slavomira; Opavska, Jana; Klinkebiel, David; Peters, Staci L; Bies, Juraj; Hannah, Jay; Iqbal, Javeed; Anderson, Kristi M; Siebler, Hollie M; Smith, Lynette M; Greiner, Timothy C; Bastola, Dhundy; Joshi, Shantaram; Lockridge, Oksana; Simpson, Melanie A; Felsher, Dean W; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Chan, Wing C; Christman, Judith K; Opavsky, Rene

    2012-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (Dnmt3b) belongs to a family of enzymes responsible for methylation of cytosine residues in mammals. DNA methylation contributes to the epigenetic control of gene transcription and is deregulated in virtually all human tumors. To better understand the generation of cancer-specific methylation patterns, we genetically inactivated Dnmt3b in a mouse model of MYC-induced lymphomagenesis. Ablation of Dnmt3b function using a conditional knockout in T cells accelerated lymphomagenesis by increasing cellular proliferation, which suggests that Dnmt3b functions as a tumor suppressor. Global methylation profiling revealed numerous gene promoters as potential targets of Dnmt3b activity, the majority of which were demethylated in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas, but not in Dnmt3b-/- pretumor thymocytes, implicating Dnmt3b in maintenance of cytosine methylation in cancer. Functional analysis identified the gene Gm128 (which we termed herein methylated in normal thymocytes [Ment]) as a target of Dnmt3b activity. We found that Ment was gradually demethylated and overexpressed during tumor progression in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas. Similarly, MENT was overexpressed in 67% of human lymphomas, and its transcription inversely correlated with methylation and levels of DNMT3B. Importantly, knockdown of Ment inhibited growth of mouse and human cells, whereas overexpression of Ment provided Dnmt3b+/+ cells with a proliferative advantage. Our findings identify Ment as an enhancer of lymphomagenesis that contributes to the tumor suppressor function of Dnmt3b and suggest it could be a potential target for anticancer therapies.

  15. Enhanced liver tumor promotion activity in rats subjected to combined administration of phenobarbital and orphenadrine.

    PubMed

    Morita, Reiko; Yafune, Atsunori; Shiraki, Ayako; Itahashi, Megu; Akane, Hirotoshi; Nakane, Fumiyuki; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Shibutani, Makoto; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) and orphenadrine (ORPH) are cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B inducers and have liver tumor-promoting effects in rats. In this study, we performed a rat two-stage liver carcinogenesis bioassay to examine the tumor-promoting effect of PB and ORPH co-administration. Twelve male rats per group were given an intraperitoneal injection of N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN) for initiation. Two-week after DEN administration, rats were given PB (60 or 120 ppm in drinking water), ORPH (750 or 1,500 ppm in diet) or 60 ppm PB+750 ppm ORPH for 6-week. One-week after the PB/ORPH treatment, all rats were subjected to two-thirds partial hepatectomy. To evaluate the effect of the combined administration, we used two statistical models: a heteroadditive model and an isoadditive model. In the heteroadditive model, the net values of the number and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci, Cyp2b1/2, Gstm3 and Gpx2 mRNA levels, microsomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances level in the PB+ORPH group were significantly higher than the sum of the net values of those in the Low PB and Low ORPH groups. In the isoadditive model, the average values of the area of GST-P positive foci and PCNA positive hepatocyte ratio and Gstm3 mRNA level in the PB+ORPH group were significantly higher than the average values of those in the High PB and High ORPH groups. These results suggest that PB and ORPH co-administration causes synergistic effects in liver tumor-promoting activity in rats resulting from oxidative stress due to enhanced microsomal ROS production.

  16. Extract of Vernonia condensata, Inhibits Tumor Progression and Improves Survival of Tumor-allograft Bearing Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Somasagara, Ranganatha R.; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are considered as one of the ideal sources for cancer therapy due to their bioactive contents and low toxicity to humans. Vernonia genus is one of the common medicinal plants, which has wide spread usage in food and medicine. However, there are limited studies to explore its anticancer properties. In the current study, we have used Vernonia condensata, to explore its anticancer activity using various approaches. Here, we show that extract prepared from Vernonia condensata (VCE) exhibits cytotoxic properties against various cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, when treated with VCE, there was no significant cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that although VCE induced cell death, arrest was not observed. VCE treatment led to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in a concentration dependent manner resulting in activation of apoptosis culminating in cell death. Immunoblotting studies revealed that VCE activated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, VCE treatment resulted in tumor regression leading to significant enhancement in life span in treated mice, without showing any detectable side effects. Therefore, for the first time our study reveals the potential of extract from Vernonia condensata to be used as an anticancer agent. PMID:27009490

  17. Comparative analysis of the relationship between trichloroethylene metabolism and tissue-specific toxicity among inbred mouse strains: liver effects.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B; Bodnar, Wanda M; Ball, Louise M; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of interindividual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. A hypothesis was tested that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with hepatic-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in subacute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 d; 7 inbred mouse strains) and subchronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 wk; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. The quantitative relationship was evaluated between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P-450-mediated oxidation (trichloroacetic acid [TCA], dichloroacetic acid [DCA], and trichloroethanol) and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various hepatic toxicity phenotypes. In subacute study, interstrain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No marked induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and hepatic levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1 but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In subchronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Hepatic protein levels of CYP2E1, ADH, and ALDH2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE.

  18. Chondrocytic differentiation of peripheral neuroectodermal tumor cell line in nude mouse xenograft.

    PubMed

    Goji, J; Sano, K; Nakamura, H; Ito, H

    1992-08-01

    We have established a cell line (KU-SN) from a peripheral neuroectodermal tumor originating in the left scapula of a 4-year-old girl. The original tumor was immunoreactive with antibodies for neurofilament proteins, neuron-specific enolase, vimentin, S100 protein, and beta 2-microglobulin. Dense core granules, 50-150 nm in diameter, were identified by electron microscopy. The cell line was established from tumor cells in metastatic lung fluid. KU-SN cells were immunoreactive with the antibodies for neurofilament proteins, vimentin, neuron-specific enolase, S100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, cytokeratin, and carcinoembryonic antigen. Besides these neuronal features, KU-SN cells express type 2 collagen and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. The addition of insulin-like growth factor 1 (100 ng/ml) increased the growth rate of KU-SN cells 2.1-fold over control. Some cells were positive for Alcian blue and alkaline phosphatase staining. Cytogenetic analysis of KU-SN cells disclosed a reciprocal chromosomal translocation [t(11,22)]. Northern blot analysis of KU-SN cells demonstrated amplified expression of the c-myc gene but not the N-myc gene. When tumor cells were transplanted into nude mice, cartilage was formed. The cartilage was immunoreactive with the antibody for HLA-ABC, indicating that it was derived from the tumor cells, not from mouse tissue. Chondrocytic differentiation was not observed in xenografts of Ewing's sarcoma cell lines SK-ES or RD-ES or the peripheral neuroectodermal tumor cell line SK-N-MC. These results indicate that KU-SN cells represent primitive neural crest cells having the potential for chondrocytic differentiation.

  19. Boswellic acid suppresses growth and metastasis of human pancreatic tumors in an orthotopic nude mouse model through modulation of multiple targets.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoungduck; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is one of the most lethal cancers, with an estimated 5-year survival of <5% even when patients are given the best treatment available. In addition, these treatments are often toxic and expensive, thus new agents which are safe, affordable and effective are urgently needed. We describe here the results of our study with acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), an agent obtained from an Ayurvedic medicine, gum resin of Boswellia serrata. Whether AKBA has an activity against human PaCa, was examined in in vitro models and in an orthotopic nude mouse model of PaCa. We found that AKBA inhibited the proliferation of four different PaCa cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-28, and MIA PaCa-2 with K-Ras and p53 mutations, and BxPC-3 with wild-type K-Ras and p53 mutation). These effects correlated with an inhibition of constitutively active NF-κB and suppression of NF-κB regulating gene expression. AKBA also induced apoptosis, and sensitized the cells to apoptotic effects of gemcitabine. In the orthotopic nude mouse model of PaCa, p.o. administration of AKBA alone (100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the tumor growth; this activity was enhanced by gemcitabine. In addition, AKBA inhibited the metastasis of the PaCa to spleen, liver, and lungs. This correlated with decreases in Ki-67, a biomarker of proliferation, and CD31, a biomarker of microvessel density, in the tumor tissue. AKBA produced significant decreases in the expression of NF-κB regulating genes in the tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis also showed AKBA downregulated the expression of COX-2, MMP-9, CXCR4, and VEGF in the tissues. Overall these results demonstrate that AKBA can suppress the growth and metastasis of human pancreatic tumors in an orthotopic nude mouse model that correlates with modulation of multiple targets.

  20. p53 dependent Nestin regulation links tumor suppression to cellular plasticity in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Xue, Wen; Calvisi, Diego F; Evert, Matthias; Michurina, Tatyana V; Dow, Lukas E; Banito, Ana; Katz, Sarah F; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Weissmueller, Susann; Huang, Chun-Hao; Lechel, Andre; Andersen, Jesper B; Capper, David; Zender, Lars; Longerich, Thomas; Enikolopov, Grigori; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    Summary The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of anti-proliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells and, as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor cell-associated protein nestin in an Sp1/3 transcription factor-dependent manner and that nestin is required for tumor initiation in vivo. Moreover, loss of p53 facilitates dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes into nestin-positive progenitor-like cells, which are poised to differentiate into hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) or cholangiocarcinomas (CCs) in response to lineage-specific mutations that target Wnt and Notch signaling, respectively. Many human HCCs and CCs show elevated nestin expression, which correlates with p53 loss of function and is associated with decreased patient survival. Therefore, transcriptional repression of Nestin by p53 restricts cellular plasticity and tumorigenesis in liver cancer. PMID:25083869

  1. Fiber-optic technologies for advanced thermo-therapy applied ex vivo to liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, D.; Perrone, G.; Vallan, A.; Braglia, A.; Liu, Y.; Macchi, E. G.; Braschi, G.; Gallati, M.; Cigada, A.; Poeggel, S.; Duraibabu, D. B.; Leen, G.; Lewis, E.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal ablation, using radiofrequency, microwave, and laser sources, is a common treatment for hepatic tumors. Sensors allow monitoring, at the point of treatment, the evolution of thermal ablation procedures. We present optical fiber sensors that allow advanced capabilities for recording the biophysical phenomena occurring in the tissue in real time. Distributed or quasi-distributed thermal sensors allow recording temperature with spatial resolution ranging from 0.1 mm to 5 mm. In addition, a thermally insensitive pressure sensor allows recording pressure rise, supporting advanced treatment of encapsulated tumors. Our investigation is focused on two case studies: (1) radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tissue, performed on a phantom with a stem-shaped applicator; (2) laser ablation of a liver phantom, performed with a fiber laser. The main measurement results are discussed, comparing the technologies used for the investigation, and drawing the potential for using optical fiber sensors for "smart"-ablation.

  2. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize development of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by performing liver biopsy in wild-type and genetically obese mice. METHODS: Male wild-type C57BL/6J (C57) mice (DIO-NASH) and male Lepob/Lepob (ob/ob) mice (ob/ob-NASH) were maintained on a diet high in trans-fat (40%), fructose (22%) and cholesterol (2%) for 26 and 12 wk, respectively. A normal chow diet served as control in C57 mice (lean chow) and ob/ob mice (ob/ob chow). After the diet-induction period, mice were liver biopsied and a blinded histological assessment of steatosis and fibrosis was conducted. Mice were then stratified into groups counterbalanced for steatosis score and fibrosis stage and continued on diet and to receive daily PO dosing of vehicle for 8 wk. Global gene expression in liver tissue was assessed by RNA sequencing and bioinformatics. Metabolic parameters, plasma liver enzymes and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides) as well as hepatic lipids and collagen content were measured by biochemical analysis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) (steatosis/inflammation/ballooning degeneration) and fibrosis were scored. Steatosis and fibrosis were also quantified using percent fractional area. RESULTS: Diet-induction for 26 and 12 wk in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice, respectively, elicited progressive metabolic perturbations characterized by increased adiposity, total cholesterol and elevated plasma liver enzymes. The diet also induced clear histological features of NASH including hepatosteatosis and fibrosis. Overall, the metabolic NASH phenotype was more pronounced in ob/ob-NASH vs DIO-NASH mice. During the eight week repeated vehicle dosing period, the metabolic phenotype was sustained in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice in conjunction with hepatomegaly and increased hepatic lipids and collagen accumulation. Histopathological scoring demonstrated significantly increased NAS of DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 4.7 ± 0.4, P < 0.001 compared to lean chow

  3. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) potentiates autoimmune hepatitis in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Peter; Messmer, Marie; Bayer, Monika; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Hintermann, Edith; Christen, Urs

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more severe development non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasing worldwide. In particular NASH, which is characterized by an active hepatic inflammation, has often severe consequences including progressive fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we investigated how metabolic liver injury is influencing the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We used the CYP2D6 mouse model in which wild type C57BL/6 mice are infected with an Adenovirus expressing the major liver autoantigen cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Such mice display several features of human AIH, including interface hepatitis, formation of LKM-1 antibodies and CYP2D6-specific T cells, as well as hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD was induced with a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that pre-existing NAFLD potentiates the severity of AIH. Mice fed for 12 weeks with a HFD displayed increased cellular infiltration of the liver, enhanced hepatic fibrosis and elevated numbers of liver autoantigen-specific T cells. Our data suggest that a pre-existing metabolic liver injury constitutes an additional risk for the severity of an autoimmune condition of the liver, such as AIH.

  4. Study of the primo vascular system utilizing a melanoma tumor model in a green fluorescence protein expressing mouse.

    PubMed

    Heo, Chaejeong; Hong, Min Young; Jo, Areum; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2011-09-01

    A melanoma tumor is a representative malignant tumor. Melanoma tumor growth involves vigorous angiogenesis around the tumor and a vasculogenic-like network inside an aggressive tumor. Primo vessels (PVs) are also found on the surface of the tumor and coexist alongside blood vessels (BVs), and sometimes within the BVs. We hypothesized that the primo vessels system plays a significant role in regulating the development of a melanoma tumor, and therefore has a tight coupling with BVs and angiogenesis. To prove this hypothesis, we developed a murine melanoma model by inoculating melanoma cell lines into the abdominal region. We used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing mouse as a host to distinguish the endogenous source of the tumor PVs. We found strong formation of PVs on the tumor that coexisted with BVs and expression of GFP. PVs also had a tight coupling with adipose tissues, especially with white adipose tissue. These data suggest that the PVs of an induced melanoma tumor evolve endogenously from the host body and may be highly related to BVs and adipose tissue. This model of PVs in an overexpressing GFP mouse is a useful system for observing PVs, primo nodes, and primo vessel networks, and has potential to be developed as a model for examining novel treatments for cancer metastasis.

  5. Mouse mammary tumor like virus sequences in breast milk from healthy lactating women.

    PubMed

    Johal, Harpreet; Ford, Caroline; Glenn, Wendy; Heads, Joy; Lawson, James; Rawlinson, William

    2011-08-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been a long standing candidate as a potential cause of some human breast cancers. Forty years ago, electron microscopic images of MMTV-like particles were identified in milk from 5% of healthy lactating women. These observations, however, have not been confirmed by modern methods. The purpose of this study was to confirm the presence of MMTV-like DNA sequences in human milk from normal lactating women. Standard and in situ PCR analyses were conducted on DNA extracted from fresh breast milk samples collected from a group of 91 healthy lactating women volunteers. The MMTV-like viral positive PCR products were sequenced and a phylogenetic tree was constructed to compare these sequences. Immunohistochemistry analyses were performed on breast milk cells using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against affinity-purified MMTV envelope glycoproteins 52/36. MMTV-like envelope gene sequences were identified by PCR in 5% (4/91) of breast milk samples from healthy lactating women volunteers. These observations were confirmed by in situ PCR and immunohistochemistry using MMTV gp52/36 antibodies. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in human milk. As MMTV is transmitted via milk from mouse mothers to their newborn pups to cause mammary tumors when they become adults, this indicates a means of transmission of this virus in humans.

  6. Triton X-114 phase separation in the isolation and purification of mouse liver microsomal membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Rommel A; Chen, Yuan-Shou; Kapp, Eugene A; Greening, David W; Mathivanan, Suresh; Simpson, Richard J

    2011-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) mediate several cellular functions including cell adhesion, ion and nutrient transport, and cell signalling. IMPs are typically hard to isolate and purify due to their hydrophobic nature and low cellular abundance, however, microsomes are small lipid vesicles rich in IMPs, which form spontaneously when cells are mechanically disrupted. In this study, we have employed mouse liver microsomes as a model for optimising a method for IMP isolation and characterisation. Microsomes were collected by differential centrifugation, purified with sodium carbonate, and subjected to GeLC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 1124 proteins were identified in the microsome fraction, with 47% (524/1124) predicted by TMHMM to contain at least one transmembrane domain (TMD). The ability of phase partitioning using the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) to further enrich for membrane proteins was evaluated. Microsomes were subjected to successive rounds of solubility-based phase separation, with proteins partitioning into the aqueous phase, detergent phase, or TX-114-insoluble pellet fraction. GeLC-MS/MS analysis of the three TX-114 fractions identified 1212 proteins, of which 146 were not detected in the un-fractionated microsome sample. Conspicuously, IMPs partitioned to the detergent phase, with 56% (435/770) of proteins identified in that fraction containing at least one TMD. GO Slim characterisation of the microsome proteome revealed enrichment of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, endosome, and cytoplasm. Further, enzymes including monooxygenases were well represented with 35 cytochrome P450 identifications (CYPs 1A2, 2A5, 2A12, 2B10, 2C29, 2C37, 2C39, 2C44, 2C50, 2C54. 2C67, 2C68, 2C70, 2D10, 2D11, 2D22, 2D26, 2D9, 2E1, 2F2, 2J5, 2U1, 3A11, 3A13, 3A25, 4A10, 4A12A, 4A12B, 4F13, 4F14, 4F15, 4V3, 51,7B1, and 8B1). Evaluation of biological processes showed enrichment of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and

  7. A Balanced Diet Is Necessary for Proper Entrainment Signals of the Mouse Liver Clock

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Akiko; Tahara, Yu; Kimura, Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2009-01-01

    Background The peripheral circadian clock in mice is entrained not only by light-dark cycles but also by daily restricted feeding schedules. Behavioral and cell culture experiments suggest an increase in glucose level as a factor in such feeding-induced entrainment. For application of feeding-induced entrainment in humans, nutrient content and dietary variations should be considered. Principal Finding To elucidate the food composition necessary for dietary entrainment, we examined whether complete or partial substitution of dietary nutrients affected phase shifts in liver clocks of mice. Compared with fasting mice or ad libitum fed mice, the liver bioluminescence rhythm advanced by 3–4 h on the middle day in Per2::luciferase knock-in mice that were administered a standard mouse diet, i.e. AIN-93M formula [0.6–0.85 g/10 g mouse BW] (composition: 14% casein, 47% cornstarch, 15% gelatinized cornstarch, 10% sugar, 4% soybean oil, and 10% other [fiber, vitamins, minerals, etc.]), for 2 days. When each nutrient was tested alone (100% nutrient), an insignificant weak phase advance was found to be induced by cornstarch and soybean oil, but almost no phase advance was induced by gelatinized cornstarch, high-amylose cornstarch, glucose, sucrose, or casein. A combination of glucose and casein without oil, vitamin, or fiber caused a significant phase advance. When cornstarch in AIN-93M was substituted with glucose, sucrose, fructose, polydextrose, high-amylose cornstarch, or gelatinized cornstarch, the amplitude of phase advance paralleled the increase in blood glucose concentration. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest the following: (1) balanced diets containing carbohydrates/sugars and proteins are good for restricted feeding-induced entrainment of the peripheral circadian clock and (2) a balanced diet that increases blood glucose, but not by sugar alone, is suitable for entrainment. These findings may assist in the development of dietary recommendations for on

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Ra