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Sample records for mouse lung carcinogenesis

  1. Carcinogen exposure differentially modulates RAR-beta promoter hypermethylation, an early and frequent event in mouse lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vuillemenot, Brian R; Pulling, Leah C; Palmisano, William A; Hutt, Julie A; Belinsky, Steven A

    2004-04-01

    The retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-beta) gene encodes one of the primary receptors for retinoic acid, an important signaling molecule in lung growth, differentiation and carcinogenesis. RAR-beta has been shown to be down-regulated by methylation in human lung cancer. We have used previously lung tumors induced in mice to evaluate the timing and effect of specific carcinogen exposures on targeting genes altered in human lung cancer. These studies were extended to characterize the role of methylation of the RAR-beta gene in murine lung cancers. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), RAR-beta was re-expressed in silenced cell lines or expressed at a higher rate than without DAC, supporting methylation as the inactivating mechanism. Bisulfite sequencing detected dense methylation in the area of the CpG island that contained the 5' untranslated region and the first translated exon in non-expressing cell lines, compared with minimal and heterogeneous methylation in normal mouse lung. Methylation-specific PCR revealed that this gene is targeted differentially by carcinogen exposures with the detection of methylated alleles in virtually all primary tumors associated with cigarette smoke or 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-butanone (NNK) in contrast to half of tumors induced by methylene chloride or vinyl carbamate. RAR-beta methylation was also detected in 54% of preneoplastic hyperplasias induced by treatment with NNK. Bisulfite sequencing of both premalignant and malignant lesions detected dense methylation in the same area observed in cell lines, substantiating that this gene is functionally inactivated at the earliest histologic stage of adenocarcinoma development. These studies demonstrate that aberrant methylation of RAR-beta is an early and common alteration in murine lung tumors induced by several environmentally relevant exposures. PMID:14656941

  2. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  3. The roles of diol epoxide and o-quinone pathways in mouse lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a)pyrene: relevance to human lung carcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is sufficient epidemiological evidence supported by experimental data that some PAH-containing complex environmental mixtures pose risks to human health by increasing lung cancer incidence. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has determined that human respirator...

  4. MUSTARD GAS EXPOSURE AND CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-khalili, Alireza; Haines, David D; Modirian, Ehsan; Soroush, Mohammadreza; Khateri, Shahriar; Joshi, Rashmi; Zendehdel, Kazem; Ghanei, Mostafa; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is an alkylating compound used as a chemical weapon in World War I and by Iraqi forces against Iranians and indigenous Iraqi Kurds during the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. Although SM is a proven carcinogen there are conflicting views regarding the carcinogenicity of a single exposure. The present study characterizes lung cancers formed in mustard gas victims from the Iran-Iraq War. Methods and Materials Demographic information and tumor specimens were collected from 20 Iranian male lung cancer patients with single high-dose SM exposures during the Iran-Iraq war. Formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded lung cancers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for p53 protein. In addition, DNA was extracted from the tissues, PCR amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the p53 and KRAS genes associated with SM exposure. Results A relatively early age of lung cancer onset (ranging from 28 to 73 with a mean of 48) in mustard gas victims, particularly those in the non-smoking population (mean age of 40.7), may be an indication of a unique etiology for these cancers. Seven of the 20 patients developed lung cancer before the age of 40. Five of 16 cancers from which DNA sequence data was obtainable provided information on eight p53 mutations (within exons 5–8). These mutations were predominately G to A transitions; a mutation consistent with the DNA lesion caused by SM. Two of the lung cancers had multiple p53 point mutations, similar to results obtained from factory workers chronically exposed to mustard agent. No mutations were detected in the KRAS gene. Discussion The distinguishing characteristics of lung carcinogenesis in these mustard gas victims suggest that a single exposure may increase the risk of lung cancer development in some individuals. PMID:19559099

  5. PHLPP2 Downregulation Contributes to Lung Carcinogenesis Following B[a]P/B[a]PDE Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haishan; Pan, Xiaofu; Jin, Honglei; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Caili; Liu, Pei; Liu, Ya; Chen, Lili; Li, Jingxia; Zhu, Junlan; Zeng, Xingruo; Fu, Kai; Chen, Guorong; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The carcinogenic capacity of B[a]P/B[a]PDE is supported by epidemiologic studies. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for B[a]P/B[a]PDE-caused lung cancer have not been well investigated. We evaluated here the role of novel target PHLPP2 in lung inflammation and carcinogenesis upon B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. Experimental Design We used the Western blotting, RT-PCR, [35S]methionine pulse and immunohistochemistry staining to determine PHLPP2 downregulation following B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. Both B[a]PDE-induced Beas-2B cell transformation model and B[a]P-caused mouse lung cancer model were used to elucidate the mechanisms leading to PHLPP2 downregulation and lung carcinogenesis. The important findings were also extended to in vivo human studies. Results We found that B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure downregulated PHLPP2 expression in human lung epithelial cells in vitro and in mouse lung tissues in vivo. The ectopic expression of PHLPP2 dramatically inhibited cell transformation upon B[a]PDE exposure. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-205 induction was crucial for inhibition of PHLPP2 protein translation by targeting PHLPP2-3′-UTR. Interestingly, PHLPP2 expression was inversely associated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) expression, with low PHLPP2 and high TNFα expression in lung cancer tissues compared with the paired adjacent normal lung tissues. Additional studies revealed that PHLPP2 exhibited its antitumorigenic effect of B[a]P/B[a]PDE through the repression of inflammatory TNFα transcription. Conclusions Our studies not only first time identify PHLPP2 downregulation by lung carcinogen B[a]P/B[a]PDE, but also elucidate a novel molecular mechanisms underlying lung inflammation and carcinogenesis upon B[a]P/B[a]PDE exposure. PMID:25977341

  6. Autophagy in non-small cell lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuan; Yang, Heng; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In a mouse model of non-small cell lung carcinogenesis, we recently found that the inactivation of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 causes an acceleration of the early phases of oncogenesis. Thus, hyperplastic lesions and adenomas are more frequent at early stages after adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase via inhalation, when Cre—in addition to activating the KRasG12D oncogene—inactivates both alleles of the Atg5 gene. The accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors developing in KRas;Atg5fl/fl mice (as compared with autophagy-competent KRas;Atg5fl/+ control tumors) correlates with an increased infiltration by FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Depletion of such Tregs by means of specific monoclonal antibodies inhibits the accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors down to the level observed in autophagy-competent controls. Subsequent analyses revealed that the combination of KRas activation and Atg5 inactivation favors the expression of ENTPD1/CD39, an ecto-ATPase that initiates the conversion of extracellular ATP, which is immunostimulatory, into adenosine, which is immunosuppressive. Pharmacological inhibition of ENTPD1 or blockade of adenosinergic receptors reduces the infiltration of KRas;Atg5fl/fl tumors by Tregs and reverses accelerated oncogenesis. Altogether these data favor a model according to which autophagy deficiency favors oncogenesis via changes in the tumor microenvironment that ultimately entail the Treg-mediated inhibition of anticancer immunosurveillance. PMID:24413089

  7. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. PMID:27509656

  8. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  9. Neutrophils are required for 3-methylcholanthrene-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene-promoted lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vikis, Haris G; Gelman, Andrew E; Franklin, Andrew; Stein, Lauren; Rymaszewski, Amy; Zhu, Jihong; Liu, Pengyuan; Tichelaar, Jay W; Krupnick, Alexander S; You, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Multiple studies have shown a link between chronic inflammation and lung tumorigenesis. Inbred mouse strains vary in their susceptibility to methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether neutrophils play a role in strain dependent differences in susceptibility to lung tumor promotion. We observed a significant elevation in homeostatic levels of neutrophils in the lungs of tumor-susceptible BALB/cByJ (BALB) mice compared to tumor-resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Additionally, BHT treatment further elevated neutrophil numbers as well as neutrophil chemoattractant keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC)/chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (Cxcl1) levels in BALB lung airways. Lung CD11c+ cells were a major source of KC expression and depletion of neutrophils in BALB mice resulted in a 71% decrease in tumor multiplicity. However, tumor multiplicity did not depend on the presence of T cells, despite the accumulation of T cells following BHT treatment. These data demonstrate that neutrophils are essential to promote tumor growth in the MCA/BHT two-step lung carcinogenesis model.

  10. The Anticancer Role of Capsaicin in Experimentallyinduced Lung Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anandakumar, Pandi; Kamaraj, Sattu; Jagan, Sundaram; Ramakrishnan, Gopalakrishnan; Asokkumar, Selvamani; Naveenkumar, Chandrashekar; Raghunandhakumar, Subramanian; Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Capsaicin (CAP) is the chief pungent principle found in the hot red peppers and the chili peppers that have long been used as spices, food additives and drugs. This study investigated the anticancer potential of CAP through its ability to modify extracellular matrix components and proteases during mice lung carcinogenesis. Methods: Swiss albino mice were treated with benzo(a) pyrene (50 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil) orally twice a week for four successive weeks to induce lung cancer at the end of 14th week. CAP was administrated (10 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil) intraperitoneally. Extracellular matrix components were assayed; Masson’s trichome staining of lung tissues was performed. Western blot analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 were also carried out. Results: In comparison with the control animals, animals in which benzo(a)pyrene had induced lung cancer showed significant increases in extracellular matrix components such as collagen (hydroxy proline), elastin, uronic acid and hexosamine and in glycosaminoglycans such as hyaluronate, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate and dermatan sulfate. The above alterations in extracellular matrix components were effectively counteracted in benzo(a)pyrene along with CAP supplemented animals when compared to benzo(a) pyrene alone supplemented animals. The results of Masson’s trichome staining for collagen and of, immunoblotting analyses of matrix metalloproteases 2 and 9 further supported the biochemical findings. Conclusion: The apparent potential of CAP in modulating extracellular matrix components and proteases suggests that CAP plays a chemomodulatory and anti- cancer role working against experimentally induced lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26120484

  11. Biological parameters for lung cancer in mathematical models of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Jacob, V

    2003-01-01

    Applications of the two-step model of carcinogenesis with clonal expansion (TSCE) to lung cancer data are reviewed, including those on atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. British doctors, Colorado Plateau miners and Chinese tin miners. Different sets of identifiable model parameters are used in the literature. The parameter set which could be determined with the lowest uncertainty consists of the net proliferation rate gamma of intermediate cells, the hazard h55 at an intermediate age and the hazard h(infinity) at an asymptotically large age. Also, the values of these three parameters obtained in the various studies are more consistent than other identifiable combinations of the biological parameters. Based on representative results for these three parameters, implications for the biological parameters in the TSCE model are derived. PMID:14579892

  12. Epithelial NF-κB signaling promotes EGFR-driven lung carcinogenesis via macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Saxon, Jamie A; Sherrill, Taylor P; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Sai, Jiqing; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; McLoed, Allyson G; Gulleman, Peter M; Barham, Whitney; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Hunt, Raphael P; Gleaves, Linda A; Richmond, Ann; Young, Lisa R; Yull, Fiona E; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that NF-κB activation is common in lung cancer; however, the mechanistic links between NF-κB signaling and tumorigenesis remain to be fully elucidated. We investigated the function of NF-κB signaling in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung tumors using a transgenic mouse model with doxycycline (dox)-inducible expression of oncogenic EGFR in the lung epithelium with or without a dominant inhibitor of NF-κB signaling. NF-κB inhibition resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden in both EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-sensitive and resistant tumors. However, NF-κB inhibition did not alter epithelial cell survival in vitro or in vivo, and no changes were detected in activation of EGFR downstream signaling pathways. Instead, we observed an influx of inflammatory cells (macrophages and neutrophils) in the lungs of mice with oncogenic EGFR expression that was blocked in the setting of NF-κB inhibition. To investigate whether inflammatory cells play a role in promoting EGFR-mutant lung tumors, we depleted macrophages and neutrophils during tumorigenesis and found that neutrophil depletion had no effect on tumor formation, but macrophage depletion caused a significant reduction in tumor burden. Together, these data suggest that epithelial NF-κB signaling supports carcinogenesis in a non-cell autonomous manner in EGFR-mutant tumors through recruitment of pro-tumorigenic macrophages. PMID:27471643

  13. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linxin; Li, Hong; Guo, Zhenzhen; Ma, Xiaofang; Cao, Ning; Zheng, Yaqiu; Geng, Shengnan; Duan, Yongjian; Han, Guang; Du, Gangjun

    2015-01-01

    The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine) from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  14. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Pacurari, M.; Qian, Y.; Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M.; Wan, Y.; Luo, D.; Ding, M.; Castranova, V.; Guo, N.L.

    2011-08-15

    Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for

  15. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  16. Inhibition of lung carcinogenesis by retinoids and vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the world today. Despite great efforts to improve the treatment of patients with lung cancer, the survival rate for people diagnosed with this disease has not significantly improved over the past 30 years. Cigarette smoking is the dominant caus...

  17. SAHA-induced loss of tumor suppressor Pten gene promotes thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuguang; Kim, Dong Wook; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Novel approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic thyroid cancers. FDA approval of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, for the treatment of hematological malignancies led to the clinical trials of vorinostat for advanced thyroid cancer. However, patients were resistant to vorinostat treatment. To understand the molecular basis of resistance, we tested the efficacy of SAHA in two mouse models of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer: Thrb(PV/PV) and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. In both, thyroid cancer is driven by overactivation of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the latter exhibit more aggressive cancer progression due to haplodeficiency of the tumor suppressor, the Pten gene. SAHA had no effects on thyroid cancer progression in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, indicative of resistance to SAHA. Unexpectedly, thyroid cancer progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice with accelerated occurrence of vascular invasion, anaplastic foci, and lung metastasis. Molecular analyses showed further activated PI3K-AKT in thyroid tumors of SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice, resulting in the activated effectors, p-Rb, CDK6, p21(Cip1), p-cSrc, ezrin, and matrix metalloproteinases, to increase proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. Single-molecule DNA analysis indicated that the wild-type allele of the Pten gene was progressively lost, whereas carcinogenesis progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Thus, this study has uncovered a novel mechanism by which SAHA-induced loss of the tumor suppressor Pten gene to promote thyroid cancer progression. Effectors downstream of the Pten loss-induced signaling may be potential targets to overcome resistance of thyroid cancer to SAHA.

  18. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  19. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. PMID:27345200

  20. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  1. Role of Exosomal Noncoding RNAs in Lung Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Kalionis, Bill; Lv, Guoying; Xia, Shijin; Gao, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Novel, recently discovered classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have diverse functional and regulatory activities and increasing evidence suggests crucial roles for deregulated ncRNAs in the onset and progression of cancer, including lung cancer. Exosomes are small extracellular membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by many cells and are found in most body fluids. Tumor-derived exosomes mediate tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor growth and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subclass of ncRNAs that are present in exosomes. miRNAs are taken up by neighboring or distant cells and modulate various functions of recipient cells. Here, we review exosome-derived ncRNAs with a focus on miRNAs and their role in lung cancer biology. PMID:26583084

  2. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research. PMID:23828036

  3. Intranasal Administration of Type V Collagen Reduces Lung Carcinogenesis through Increasing Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis in a Urethane-Induced Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Alveno, Renata Antunes; Faustino, Carolina Brito; Corrêa, Paula Yume Sato Serzedello; Vargas, Camilla Mutai; de Morais, Jymenez; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Velosa, Ana Paula Pereira; Fabro, Alexandre Todorovic; Teodoro, Walcy Rosolia; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2016-08-01

    Type V collagen (Col V) is a "minor" component of normal lung extracellular matrix, which is subjected to decreased and abnormal synthesis in human lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma. We previously reported that a direct link between low amounts of Col V and decreased cell apoptosis may favor cancer cell growth in the mouse lung after chemical carcinogenesis. Moreover, this collagen species was able to trigger DNA fragmentation and impair survival of neoplastic cells. In this study, we have extended our investigation with the aim to obtain further evidence that the death induced by Col V-treatment is of the caspase-9 apoptotic type. We used (1) optical and electron microscopy, (2) quantitation of TUNEL-labeled cells and (3) analysis of the expression levels of Col V and selected genes coding for apoptosis-linked factors, by conventional RT-PCR. BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1.5 g/kg body weight of urethane. After urethane injection, the animals received intranasal administration of 20 µg/20 µl of Col V every day during 2 months. We report here that Col V treatment was able to determine significant increase in Col V protein and gene expression and in the percentage of TUNEL-positive cells, to up-regulate caspase-9, resulting in low growth of tumor cells. Our data validate chemical carcinogenesis as a suitable "in vivo" model for further and more detailed studies on the molecular mechanisms of the death response induced by Col V in lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma opening new strategies for treatment.

  4. [Molecular basis of carcinogenesis in lung cancer induced by cigarette smoking].

    PubMed

    Damps, I; Jassem, E; Siemińska, A

    2001-06-01

    An association between cigarette smoking and lung cancer carcinogenesis is reviewed. It is highly possible, that "individual susceptibility" for tumor development exists and is related to polymorphic variants of genes encoding for enzymes, which are employed in metabolism of xenobiotic substances. The gathering of highly reactive molecules due to modified metabolic processes results in DNA adducts forming and increased tendency for mutations. Group of genes, responsible for proliferation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage repair are frequently altered. PMID:11503248

  5. Wnt5a Is Associated with Cigarette Smoke-Related Lung Carcinogenesis via Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jae Sook; Ju, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Kyong Hwa; Lee, Jong Won; Koh, In Song; Kim, Yeul Hong

    2013-01-01

    Wnt5a is overexpressed during the progression of human non-small cell lung cancer. However, the roles of Wnt5a during smoking-related lung carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We investigated the associations between Wnt5a and the early development of cigarette smoke related lung cancer using human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells (NHBE, BEAS-2B, 1799, 1198 and 1170I) at different malignant stages established by exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). Abnormal up-regulation of Wnt5a mRNA and proteins was detected in CSC-exposed transformed 1198 and tumorigenic 1170I cells as compared with other non-CSC exposed HBE cells. Tumor tissues obtained from smokers showed higher Wnt5a expressions than matched normal tissues. In non-CSC exposed 1799 cells, treatment of recombinant Wnt5a caused the activations of PKC and Akt, and the blockage of Wnt5a and PKC significantly decreased the viabilities of CSC-transformed 1198 cells expressing high levels of Wnt5a. This reduced cell survival rate was associated with increased apoptosis via the down-regulation of Bcl2 and the induction of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase. Moreover, CSC-treated 1799 cells showed induction of Wnt5a expression and enhanced colony-forming capacity. The CSC-induced colony forming efficiency was suppressed by the co-incubation with a PKC inhibitor. In conclusion, these results suggest that cigarette smoke induces Wnt5a-coupled PKC activity during lung carcinogenesis, which causes Akt activity and anti-apoptosis in lung cancer. Therefore, current study provides novel clues for the crucial role of Wnt5a in the smoking-related lung carcinogenesis. PMID:23349696

  6. Lung carcinogenesis from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and contribution of signal transducers and lung stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Hata, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are closely related. The annual incidence of lung cancer arising from COPD has been reported to be 0.8-1.7 %. Treatment of lung cancer from COPD is very difficult due to low cardiopulmonary function, rapid tumor growth, and resistance to molecularly targeted therapies. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment occurs during cycles of tissue injury and repair. Cellular damage can induce induction of necrotic cell death and loss of tissue integrity. Quiescent normal stem cells or differentiated progenitor cells are introduced to repair injured tissues. However, inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Many of the protumorgenic effects of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in immune cells are mediated through paracrine signaling. NF-κB and STAT3 also contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To improve lung cancer treatment outcomes, lung cancer from COPD must be overcome. In this article, we review the characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment. We also propose the necessity of identifying the mechanisms underlying progression of COPD to lung cancer, and comment on the clinical implications with respect to lung cancer prevention, screening, and therapy.

  7. Multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin: Fundamentals and applications

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Erika L.; Angel, Joe M; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2011-01-01

    For more than 60 years, the chemical induction of tumors in mouse skin has been used to study mechanisms of epithelial carcinogenesis and evaluate modifying factors. In the traditional two-stage skin carcinogenesis model, initiation is accomplished by the application of a subcarcinogenic dose of a carcinogen. Subsequently, tumor development is elicited by repeated treatment with a tumor promoting agent. The initiation protocol can be completed within 1–3 hours depending on the number of mice used, while the promotion phase requires twice weekly treatments (1–2 hours) and once weekly tumor palpation (1–2 hours) for the duration of the study. A highly reproducible papilloma burden is expected within 10–20 weeks with progression of a portion of the tumors to squamous cell carcinomas within 20–50 weeks. In contrast to complete skin carcinogenesis, the two-stage model allows for greater yield of premalignant lesions as well as separation of the initiation and promotion phases. PMID:19713956

  8. Amarogentin regulates self renewal pathways to restrict liver carcinogenesis in experimental mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Banerjee, Kaustav; Mandal, Suvra; Das, Ashes; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside isolated from medicinal plant Swertia chirata, was found to restrict CCl4 /N-nitrosodiethyl amine (NDEA) induced mouse liver carcinogenesis by modulating G1/S cell cycle check point and inducing apoptosis. To understand its therapeutic efficacy on stem cell self renewal pathways, prevalence of CD44 positive cancer stem cell (CSC) population, expressions (mRNA/protein) of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog pathways along with expressions of E-cadherin and EGFR were analyzed during the liver carcinogenesis and in liver cancer cell line HepG2. It was observed that amarogentin could significantly reduce CD44 positive CSCs in both pre and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis than carcinogen control mice. In Wnt pathway, amarogentin could inhibit expressions of β-catenin, phospho β-catenin (Y-654) and activate expressions of antagonists sFRP1/2 and APC in the liver lesions. In Hedgehog pathway, decreased expressions of Gli1, sonic hedgehog ligand, and SMO along with up-regulation of PTCH1 were seen in the liver lesions due to amarogentin treatment. Moreover, amarogentin could up-regulate E-cadherin expression and down-regulate expression of EGFR in the liver lesions. Similarly, amarogentin could inhibit HepG2 cell growth along with expression and prevalence of CD44 positive CSCs. Similar to in vivo analysis, amarogentin could modulate the expressions of the key regulatory genes of the Wnt and hedgehog pathways and EGFR in HepG2 cells. Thus, our data suggests that the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by amarogentin might be due to reduction of CD44 positive CSCs and modulation of the self renewal pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26154024

  9. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fifty years of tobacco carcinogenesis research: from mechanisms to early detection and prevention of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Stephen S; Szabo, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The recognition of the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer in the 1964 Surgeon General's Report initiated definitive and comprehensive research on the identification of carcinogens in tobacco products and the relevant mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The resultant comprehensive data clearly illustrate established pathways of cancer induction involving carcinogen exposure, metabolic activation, DNA adduct formation, and consequent mutation of critical genes along with the exacerbating influences of inflammation, cocarcinogenesis, and tumor promotion. This mechanistic understanding has provided a framework for the regulation of tobacco products and for the development of relevant tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers that can be applied in cancer prevention. Simultaneously, the recognition of the link between smoking and lung cancer paved the way for two additional critical approaches to cancer prevention that are discussed here: detection of lung cancer at an early, curable stage, and chemoprevention of lung cancer. Recent successes in more precisely identifying at-risk populations and in decreasing lung cancer mortality with helical computed tomography screening are notable, and progress in chemoprevention continues, although challenges with respect to bringing these approaches to the general population exist. Collectively, research performed since the 1964 Report demonstrates unequivocally that the majority of deaths from lung cancer are preventable.

  11. Identification of a nuclear protein, LRRC42, involved in lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujitomo, Takashi; Daigo, Yataro; Matsuda, Koichi; Ueda, Koji; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-07-01

    On the basis of the gene expression profiles of 120 lung cancer cases using a cDNA microarray containing 27,648 genes or expressed sequence tags (ESTs), we identified LRRC42 (Leucine-rich repeat containing 42) to be significantly upregulated in the majority of lung cancers. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that LRRC42 was expressed only in testis among normal tissues examined. Knockdown of LRRC42 expression by siRNA against LRRC42 significantly suppressed the growth of lung cancer cells. On the other hand, stable induction of LRRC42 expression significantly promoted cell growth. LRRC42, which was found to localize in the nucleus of mammalian cells, is likely to interact with and stabilize GATAD2B (GATA zinc finger domain-containing 2B) and MBD3 (Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 3) proteins that could contribute to lung cancer cell proliferation partly through the regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1. Our findings suggest that LRRC42 overexpression as well as its interaction with LRRC42-GATAD2B might play essential roles in lung carcinogenesis, and be a promising molecular target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24806090

  12. Deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibits K-ras–induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Jiang, Yan; Tan, Lin; K. Ravoori, Murali; Gagea, Mihai; Vikas Kundra, Vikus; Fischer, Susan M.; Yang, Peiying

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the role COX-2 plays in K-ras–induced lung carcinogenesis. We crossed COX-2–homozygous knockout mice with K-rasLA1 (G12D) expressing mice to obtain COX-2–deficient mice with K-ras expression (K-ras/COX-2−/− mice) and COX-2 wild type mice with K-ras expression (K-ras mice). At 3.5 months of age, the K-ras/COX-2−/− mice had significantly fewer lung adenocarcinomas and substantially smaller tumors than K-ras mice. K-ras/COX-2−/− mice also had significantly fewer bronchioalveolar hyperplasias than K-ras mice. Compared with lung tumors from K-Ras mice, the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were significantly lower, whereas levels of the PGE2 metabolite 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2 were significantly higher, in lung tumors from K-ras/COX-2−/− mice. In addition, K-ras/COX-2−/− mice had strikingly lower rates of tumor cell proliferation and expressed less MEK and p-Erk1/2 protein than K-ras mice did. In line with this, knocking down COX-2 in mutant K-ras non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells reduced colony formation, PGE2 synthesis and ERK phosphorylation compared to that of vector control cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that COX-2 deletion contributes to the repression of K-ras–induced lung tumorigenesis by reducing tumor cell proliferation, decreasing the production of PGE2, and increasing the production of 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2, possibly via the MAPK pathway. Thus, COX-2 is likely important in lung tumorigenesis, and COX-2 and its product, PGE2, are potential targets for lung cancer prevention. PMID:26452035

  13. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, N.B.R.; Rangel, M.P.; Martins, V.; Hage, M.; Gelain, D.P.; Barbeiro, D.F.; Grisolia, C.K.; Parra, E.R.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days) significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:26200231

  14. Estimation of the effects of smoking and DNA repair capacity on coefficients of a carcinogenesis model for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Kimmel, Marek; Foy, Millennia; Spitz, Margaret; Wei, Qingyi; Gorlova, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Numerous prospective and retrospective studies have clearly demonstrated a dose-related increased lung cancer risk associated with cigarette smoking, with evidence also for a genetic component to risk. In this study, using the two-stage clonal expansion stochastic model framework, for the first time we investigated the roles of both genetic susceptibility and smoking history in the initiation, clonal expansion, and malignant transformation processes in lung carcinogenesis, integrating information collected by a case–control study and a large-scale prospective cohort study. Our results show that individuals with suboptimal DNA repair capacity have enhanced transition rates of key events in carcinogenesis. PMID:19123470

  15. Vital-dye-enhanced multimodal imaging of neoplastic progression in a mouse model of oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebust, Anne; Rosbach, Kelsey; Wu, Jessica Keren; Nguyen, Jennifer; Gillenwater, Ann; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    In this longitudinal study, a mouse model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis was used to assess the ability of optical imaging with exogenous and endogenous contrast to detect neoplastic lesions in a heterogeneous mucosal surface. Widefield autofluorescence and fluorescence images of intact 2-NBDG-stained and proflavine-stained tissues were acquired at multiple time points in the carcinogenesis process. Confocal fluorescence images of transverse fresh tissue slices from the same specimens were acquired to investigate how changes in tissue microarchitecture affect widefield fluorescence images of intact tissue. Widefield images were analyzed to develop and evaluate an algorithm to delineate areas of dysplasia and cancer. A classification algorithm for the presence of neoplasia based on the mean fluorescence intensity of 2-NBDG staining and the standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity of proflavine staining was found to separate moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and cancer from non-neoplastic regions of interest with 91% sensitivity and specificity. Results suggest this combination of noninvasive optical imaging modalities can be used in vivo to discriminate non-neoplastic from neoplastic tissue in this model with the potential to translate this technology to the clinic.

  16. Pharmacological Modulation of Lung Carcinogenesis in Smokers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    De Flora, Silvio; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Micale, Rosanna T; Steele, Vernon E; Balansky, Roumen

    2016-02-01

    Many drugs in common use possess pleiotropic properties that make them capable of interfering with carcinogenesis mechanisms. We discuss here the ability of pharmacological agents to mitigate the pulmonary carcinogenicity of mainstream cigarette smoke. The evaluated agents include anti-inflammatory drugs (budesonide, celecoxib, aspirin, naproxen, licofelone), antidiabetic drugs (metformin, pioglitazone), antineoplastic agents (lapatinib, bexarotene, vorinostat), and other drugs and supplements (phenethyl isothiocyanate, myo-inositol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, berry extracts). These drugs have been evaluated in mouse models mimicking interventions either in current smokers or in ex-smokers, or in prenatal chemoprevention. They display a broad spectrum of activities by attenuating either smoke-induced preneoplastic lesions or benign tumors and/or malignant tumors. Together with epidemiological data, these findings provide useful information to predict the potential effects of pharmacological agents in smokers. PMID:26726119

  17. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner Cohorts: Accounting for Missing Information on Smoking.

    PubMed

    van Dillen, Teun; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-control study onto an entire cohort by means of a Monte Carlo resampling technique. As a proof of principle, this method is tested on a subcohort of 35,084 former uranium miners employed at the WISMUT company (Germany), with 461 lung cancer deaths in the follow-up period 1955-1998. After applying the proposed imputation technique, a biologically-based carcinogenesis model is employed to analyze the cohort's lung cancer mortality data. A sensitivity analysis based on a set of 200 independent projections with subsequent model analyses yields narrow distributions of the free model parameters, indicating that parameter values are relatively stable and independent of individual projections. This technique thus offers a possibility to account for unknown smoking habits, enabling us to unravel risks related to radon, to smoking, and to the combination of both.

  18. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner Cohorts: Accounting for Missing Information on Smoking.

    PubMed

    van Dillen, Teun; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-control study onto an entire cohort by means of a Monte Carlo resampling technique. As a proof of principle, this method is tested on a subcohort of 35,084 former uranium miners employed at the WISMUT company (Germany), with 461 lung cancer deaths in the follow-up period 1955-1998. After applying the proposed imputation technique, a biologically-based carcinogenesis model is employed to analyze the cohort's lung cancer mortality data. A sensitivity analysis based on a set of 200 independent projections with subsequent model analyses yields narrow distributions of the free model parameters, indicating that parameter values are relatively stable and independent of individual projections. This technique thus offers a possibility to account for unknown smoking habits, enabling us to unravel risks related to radon, to smoking, and to the combination of both. PMID:27198876

  19. miR-196b Is Epigenetically Silenced during the Premalignant Stage of Lung Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Carmen S; Juri, Daniel E; Do, Kieu; Picchi, Maria A; Wang, Teresa; Liu, Gang; Spira, Avrum; Belinsky, Steven A

    2016-08-15

    miRNA silencing by promoter hypermethylation may represent a mechanism by which lung cancer develops and progresses, but the miRNAs involved during malignant transformation are unknown. We previously established a model of premalignant lung cancer wherein we treated human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) with low doses of tobacco carcinogens. Here, we demonstrate that next-generation sequencing of carcinogen-transformed HBECs treated with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine revealed miR-196b and miR-34c-5p to be epigenetic targets. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed dense promoter hypermethylation indicative of silencing in multiple malignant cell lines and primary tumors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies further demonstrated an enrichment in repressive histone marks on the miR-196b promoter during HBEC transformation. Restoration of miR-196b expression by transfecting transformed HBECs with specific mimics led to cell-cycle arrest mediated in part through transcriptional regulation of the FOS oncogene, and miR-196b reexpression also significantly reduced the growth of tumor xenografts. Luciferase assays demonstrated that forced expression of miR-196b inhibited the FOS promoter and AP-1 reporter activity. Finally, a case-control study revealed that methylation of miR-196b in sputum was strongly associated with lung cancer (OR = 4.7, P < 0.001). Collectively, these studies highlight miR-196b as a tumor suppressor whose silencing early in lung carcinogenesis may provide a selective growth advantage to premalignant cells. Targeted delivery of miR-196b could therefore serve as a preventive or therapeutic strategy for the management of lung cancer. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4741-51. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302168

  20. Curcumin and resveratrol in combination modulate drug-metabolizing enzymes as well as antioxidant indices during lung carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Wu, Y-M; Yu, Y; Cao, C-S; Zhang, J-H; Li, K; Zhang, P-Y

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated combined chemopreventive potential of curcumin and resveratrol during benzo(a)pyrene (BP)-induced lung carcinogenesis in mice. The mice were segregated into five groups that included normal control, BP-treated, BP + curcumin-treated, BP + resveratrol-treated, and BP + curcumin + resveratrol-treated groups. A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) was observed in the lungs of mice after 22 weeks of single dose of benzo(a)pyrene. Further, BP treatment also resulted in a significant increase in the enzyme activities of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase as well as drug-metabolizing enzymes, namely cytocrome P450 and cytochrome b5. On the other hand, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were found to be significantly decreased following BP treatment. Supplementation with curcumin and resveratrol to BP-treated mice significantly decreased the LPO levels, GSH levels, and enzyme activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Further, treatment of curcumin and resveratrol to BP-treated mice significantly elevated the activities of SOD, GR, and GST. Histoarchitectural studies showed well-differentiated signs of lung carcinogenesis following BP administration to mice. However, combined treatment with curcumin and resveratrol resulted in a noticeable improvement in the lung histoarchitecture. This study, therefore, concludes that curcumin and resveratrol when supplemented in combination regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes as well as antioxidant enzymes during lung carcinogenesis in mice.

  1. Antioxidant and antitumor efficacy of Luteolin, a dietary flavone on benzo(a)pyrene-induced experimental lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2016-08-01

    The present study is designed to assess the antioxidant and antitumor potential of luteolin against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced lung carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Here, we reported that oral administration of B(a)P (50mg/kg body weight) to mice resulted in raised lipid peroxides (LPO), lung specific tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) with concomitant decrease in the levels of both enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and non-enzymatic antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and vitamin C. Luteolin treatment (15mg/kg body weight, p.o) significantly counteracted all these alterations and maintained cellular normalcy. Moreover, assessment of protein expression levels by western blot analysis revealed that luteolin treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Furthermore, histopathology of lung tissue and immunohistochemistry of CYP1A1 were carried out to substantiate the anti- lung cancer effect of luteolin. Overall, these findings confirm the chemopreventive potential of luteolin against B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis.

  2. Micro-imaging of the Mouse Lung via MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    Quantitative measurement of lung microstructure is of great significance in assessment of pulmonary disease, particularly in the earliest stages. Conventional stereological assessment of ex-vivo fixed tissue specimens under the microscope has a long and successful tradition and is regarded as a gold standard, but the invasive nature limits its applications and the practicality of use in longitudinal studies. The technique for diffusion MRI-based 3He lung morphometry was previously developed and validated for human lungs, and was recently extended to ex-vivo mouse lungs. The technique yields accurate, quantitative information about the microstructure and geometry of acinar airways. In this dissertation, the 3He lung morphometry technique is for the first time successfully implemented for in-vivo studies of mice. It can generate spatially-resolved maps of parameters that reveal the microstructure of mouse lung. Results in healthy mice indicate excellent agreement between in-vivo morphometry via 3He MRI and microscopic morphometry after sacrifice. The implementation and validation of 3He morphometry in healthy mice open up new avenues for application of the technique as a precise, noninvasive, in-vivo biomarker of changes in lung microstructure, within various mouse models of lung disease. We have applied 3He morphometry to the Sendai mouse model of lung disease. Specifically, the Sendai-virus model of chronic obstructive lung disease has demonstrated an innate immune response in mouse airways that exhibits similarities to the chronic airway inflammation in human COPD and asthma, but the effect on distal lung parenchyma had not been investigated. We imaged the time course and regional distribution of mouse lung microstructural changes in vivo after Sendai virus (SeV) infection with 1H and 3He diffusion MRI. 1H MR images detected the SeV-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo and 3He lung morphometry showed modest increase in alveolar duct radius distal to airway

  3. Flavonoids Extracted from Licorice Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xiaowei; Liu, Dongyu; Gao, Li; Li, Liyong; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is generally considered as a major risk factor in the progression of colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC). Thus, it is well accepted that ameliorating inflammation creates a potential to achieve an inhibitory effect on CAC. Licorice flavonoids (LFs) possess strong anti-inflammatory activity, making it possible to investigate its pharmacologic role in suppressing CAC. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tumor potential of LFs, and further explore the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse model was established and administered with or without LFs for 10 weeks, and then the severity of CAC was examined macroscopically and histologically. Subsequently, the effects of LFs on expression of proteins associated with apoptosis and proliferation, levels of inflammatory cytokine, expression of phosphorylated-Janus kinases 2 (p-Jak2) and phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-Stat3), and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) and P53 were assessed. We found that LFs could significantly reduce tumorigenesis induced by AOM/DSS. Further study revealed that LFs treatment substantially reduced activation of NFκB and P53, and subsequently suppressed production of inflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat3 in AOM/DSS-induced mice. Taken together, LFs treatment alleviated AOM/DSS induced CAC via P53 and NFκB/IL-6/Jak2/Stat3 pathways, highlighting the potential of LFs in preventing CAC. PMID:27563884

  4. Flavonoids Extracted from Licorice Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaowei; Liu, Dongyu; Gao, Li; Li, Liyong; Cao, Li

    2016-08-24

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is generally considered as a major risk factor in the progression of colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC). Thus, it is well accepted that ameliorating inflammation creates a potential to achieve an inhibitory effect on CAC. Licorice flavonoids (LFs) possess strong anti-inflammatory activity, making it possible to investigate its pharmacologic role in suppressing CAC. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tumor potential of LFs, and further explore the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse model was established and administered with or without LFs for 10 weeks, and then the severity of CAC was examined macroscopically and histologically. Subsequently, the effects of LFs on expression of proteins associated with apoptosis and proliferation, levels of inflammatory cytokine, expression of phosphorylated-Janus kinases 2 (p-Jak2) and phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-Stat3), and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) and P53 were assessed. We found that LFs could significantly reduce tumorigenesis induced by AOM/DSS. Further study revealed that LFs treatment substantially reduced activation of NFκB and P53, and subsequently suppressed production of inflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat3 in AOM/DSS-induced mice. Taken together, LFs treatment alleviated AOM/DSS induced CAC via P53 and NFκB/IL-6/Jak2/Stat3 pathways, highlighting the potential of LFs in preventing CAC.

  5. Flavonoids Extracted from Licorice Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaowei; Liu, Dongyu; Gao, Li; Li, Liyong; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is generally considered as a major risk factor in the progression of colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC). Thus, it is well accepted that ameliorating inflammation creates a potential to achieve an inhibitory effect on CAC. Licorice flavonoids (LFs) possess strong anti-inflammatory activity, making it possible to investigate its pharmacologic role in suppressing CAC. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tumor potential of LFs, and further explore the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse model was established and administered with or without LFs for 10 weeks, and then the severity of CAC was examined macroscopically and histologically. Subsequently, the effects of LFs on expression of proteins associated with apoptosis and proliferation, levels of inflammatory cytokine, expression of phosphorylated-Janus kinases 2 (p-Jak2) and phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-Stat3), and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) and P53 were assessed. We found that LFs could significantly reduce tumorigenesis induced by AOM/DSS. Further study revealed that LFs treatment substantially reduced activation of NFκB and P53, and subsequently suppressed production of inflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat3 in AOM/DSS-induced mice. Taken together, LFs treatment alleviated AOM/DSS induced CAC via P53 and NFκB/IL-6/Jak2/Stat3 pathways, highlighting the potential of LFs in preventing CAC. PMID:27563884

  6. ESR measurement of radical clearance in lung of whole mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, K.; Utsumi, H.; Hamada, A. )

    1991-06-14

    Clearance of the nitroxide radicals, hydroxy-TEMPO and carboxy-PROxYL, in whole-mouse lung was directly measured by in vivo ESR. After injecting a nitroxide radical, distribution of the nitroxide radical all over the lung was confirmed by ESR imaging. The ESR signal of hydroxy-TEMPO was reduced in the lung and the clearance obeyed first-order kinetics, whereas the signal of carboxy-PROxYL remained constant. Comparison of the clearance rates of live and dead mice indicated the presence of 2 different clearance systems in the lung: loss of its paramagnetism in the lung, and transfer from alveolar to the blood circulation system.

  7. EGF-receptor and extracellular matrix changes in mouse pulmonary carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.J.; Morris, C.; Leigh, D.; Rhodes, G.C.; Wong, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Malignant Balb/c mouse lung cell clones related to alveologenic carcinoma exhibited low levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor activity compared to nonmalignant cell clones. Immunoprecipitation of cell homogenates and immunohistochemistry on urethane-induced lung tumors suggest that the absence of activity reflects decreased amounts of EGF receptor protein. Low levels of EGF receptor alone cannot cause neoplastic transformation, since a nonneoplastic cell cone, B5D3, exhibited low levels of EGF receptor despite its nontransformed phenotype. The reduced levels of EGF receptor in malignant clones have been mimicked by long-term (12 h) treatment of a nontransformed cell clone with 200 nM phorbol dibutyrate. The detection of mutated ras oncogene in the transformed cell lines, taken together with the EGF receptor findings, suggests that more than one alteration in the signal transduction pathway may be necessary for transformation in alveologenic adenoma and carcinoma cell systems. A further phenotypic feature of transformation, reduced expression of the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and laminin, may be mediated at the transcriptional level.

  8. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  9. Overexpression of CRM1: A Characteristic Feature in a Transformed Phenotype of Lung Carcinogenesis and a Molecular Target for Lung Cancer Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weimin; Lu, Chuanwen; Chen, Lixia; Keohavong, Phouthone

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study showed that chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1), a nuclear export receptor for various cancer-associated "cargo" proteins, was important in regulating lung carcinogenesis in response to a tobacco carcinogen, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). The objectives of this study are to comprehensively evaluate the significance of CRM1 in lung cancer development and investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting CRM1 for lung cancer treatment using both in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that CRM1 was overexpressed not only in lung tumor tissues from both lung cancer patients and mice treated with NNK but also in NNK-transformed BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Furthermore, stable overexpression of CRM1 in BEAS-2B cells by plasmid vector transfection led to malignant cellular transformation. Moreover, a decreased CRM1 expression level in A549 cells by short hairpin siRNA transfection led to a decreased tumorigenic activity both in vitro and in nude mice, suggesting the potential to target CRM1 for lung cancer treatment. Indeed, we showed that the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on A549 cells with CRM1 down-regulated by short hairpin siRNA were significantly increased, compared with A549 cells, and the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin became further enhanced when the drug was used in combination with leptomycin B, a CRM1 inhibitor, in both in vitro and in vivo models. Cancer target genes were significantly involved in these processes. These data suggest that CRM1 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis and provides a novel target for lung cancer adjuvant therapy.

  10. Angiogenesis of lung cancer utilizes existing blood vessels rather than developing new vessels using signals from carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Uramoto, Hidetaka; Yamada, Sohsuke; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2013-05-01

    Cancer cells metastasize via angiogenesis and are a long-standing therapeutic target in malignant tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies have been developed for clinical use, with limited benefits. Therefore, identifying the underlying mechanisms of angiogenesis regarding whether tumor vessels are derived from cancer cells or blood vessels in existence, is highly anticipated. Recently, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies were utilized to detect cancer cells with somatic mutations of EGFR. The concordance rate is high for detection between immunohistochemical staining and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. We hypothesized that endothelial cells exhibiting lymphatic and venous tumor invasiveness will be immunoreactive if new blood vessels are derived from the lung cancer itself, because EGFR mutations occur at a relatively early phase in carcinogenesis. We examined endothelial cells with EGFR mutations exhibiting lymphatic and venous tumor invasiveness using these antibodies. Tumor samples were obtained from 848 consecutive patients with lung cancer. Among 153 of 595 adenocarcinomas with EGFR-sensitive mutations, the number of lymphatic and venous invasive tumors was 35 and 19, respectively. Consequently, 12 available tumor specimens (five specimens for delE746-A750 and seven specimens for L858R) with both factors were evaluated. The main cancer cells were highly immunoreactive; however, no obvious lesions were detected with endothelial cells exhibiting lymphatic or venous invasiveness. Therefore, the angiogenesis of lung cancer seems to utilize blood vessels in existence, rather than create new vessels using signals from carcinogenesis.

  11. The Effect of Different Doses of Cigarette Smoke in a Mouse Lung Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ludmilla Nadir; de Camargo Fenley, Juliana; Braga, Lúcia Campanario; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Cury, Patrícia M.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have used Balb/c mice as an animal model for lung carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of different doses of cigarette smoking in the urethane-induced Balb/c mouse lung cancer model. After injection of 3mg/kg urethane intraperitoneally, the mice were then exposed to tobacco smoke once or twice a day, five times a week, in a closed chamber. The animals were randomly divided into four groups. The control group (G0) received urethane only. The experimental groups (G1, G2 and G3) received urethane and exposure to the smoke of 3 cigarettes for 10 minutes once a day, 3 cigarettes for 10 minutes twice a day, and 6 cigarettes for 10 minutes twice a day, respectively. The mice were sacrificed after 16 weeks of exposure, and the number of nodules and hyperplasia in the lungs was counted. The results showed no statistically significant difference in the mean number of nodules and hyperplasia among the different groups, suggesting that the Balb/c mice are not suitable to study the pathogenesis of tobacco smoking-induced tumor progression in the lungs. PMID:19079653

  12. Proteome Analysis for Downstream Targets of Oncogenic KRAS - the Potential Participation of CLIC4 in Carcinogenesis in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Okudela, Koji; Katayama, Akira; Woo, Tetsukan; Mitsui, Hideaki; Suzuki, Takehisa; Tateishi, Yoko; Umeda, Shigeaki; Tajiri, Michihiko; Masuda, Munetaka; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Kitamura, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the proteome modulated by oncogenic KRAS in immortalized airway epithelial cells. Chloride intracellular channel protein 4 (CLIC4), S100 proteins (S100A2 and S100A11), tropomyosin 2, cathepsin L1, integrinsα3, eukaryotic elongation factor 1, vimentin, and others were discriminated. We here focused on CLIC4 to investigate its potential involvement in carcinogenesis in the lung because previous studies suggested that some chloride channels and chloride channel regulators could function as tumor suppressors. CILC4 protein levels were reduced in some lung cancer cell lines. The restoration of CLIC4 in lung cancer cell lines in which CLIC4 expression was reduced attenuated their growth activity. The immunohistochemical expression of the CLIC4 protein was weaker in primary lung cancer cells than in non-tumorous airway epithelial cells and was occasionally undetectable in some tumors. CLIC4 protein levels were significantly lower in a subtype of mucinous ADC than in others, and were also significantly lower in KRAS-mutated ADC than in EGFR-mutated ADC. These results suggest that the alteration in CLIC4 could be involved in restrictedly the development of a specific fraction of lung adenocarcinomas. The potential benefit of the proteome modulated by oncogenic KRAS to lung cancer research has been demonstrated. PMID:24503901

  13. Preconditioning allows engraftment of mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Chava; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Klionsky, Yael Zlotnikov; Yaakov, Yasmin; Assayag, Miri; Biton, Inbal Eti; Tal, Orna; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Shneider, David; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, Oscar; Evron, Shmuel; Freud, Enrique; Shoseyov, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Berkman, Neville; Fibbe, Willem E; Hagin, David; Hillel-Karniel, Carmit; Krentsis, Irit Milman; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2015-08-01

    Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche.

  14. Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Guindon, Katherine A.; Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2008-03-01

    The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

  15. Early changes in pulmonary gene expression following tobacco exposure shed light on the role of estrogen metabolism in lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Siegfried, Jill M

    2010-06-01

    This perspective on Meireles et al. (beginning on p. 707 in this issue of the journal) discusses the increasing evidence for the role of female steroid hormones in lung cancer development and progression. The novel work of Meireles et al. is the first evidence for the rapid upregulation by tobacco smoke of a key cytochrome P450 gene that can metabolize estrogens such as beta-estradiol to potentially carcinogenic catechol and quinine forms, as well as the first evidence for the colocalization of beta-estradiol and estrogen receptors in murine airway epithelium. Actions of estrogens that contribute to lung carcinogenesis, especially in the presence of tobacco smoke, may involve both reactive intermediates that damage DNA and steroid hormone receptor signaling that promotes growth.

  16. Lung regeneration by fetal lung tissue implantation in a mouse pulmonary emphysema model.

    PubMed

    Uyama, Koh; Sakiyama, Shoji; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kenzaki, Koichiro; Toba, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Okumura, Kazumasa; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Kondo, Kazuya; Tangoku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are high. However, no radical therapy has been developed to date. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether fetal mouse lung tissue can grow and differentiate in the emphysematous lung. Fetal lung tissue from green fluorescent protein C57BL/6 mice at 16 days' gestation was used as donor material. Twelve-month-old pallid mice were used as recipients. Donor lungs were cut into small pieces and implanted into the recipient left lung by performing thoracotomy under anesthesia. The recipient mice were sacrificed at day 7, 14, and 28 after implantation and used for histological examination. Well-developed spontaneous pulmonary emphysema was seen in 12-month-old pallid mice. Smooth and continuous connection between implanted fetal lung tissue and recipient lung was recognized. Air space expansion and donor tissue differentiation were observed over time. We could clearly distinguish the border zones between injected tissue and native tissue by the green fluorescence of grafts. Fetal mouse lung fragments survived and differentiated in the emphysematous lung of pallid mice. Implantation of fetal lung tissue in pallid mice might lead to further lung regeneration research from the perspective of respiratory and exercise function. J. Med. Invest. 63: 182-186, August, 2016. PMID:27644555

  17. Curcumin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced procarcinogenic signals in lung cancer cells, and curbs B[a]P-induced mutagenesis and lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar T; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Vijayakurup, Vinod; Antony, Jayesh; Bava, Smitha V; Anwar, Shabna; Sundaram, Sankar; Anto, Ruby John

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene is a procarcinogen present in environment and cigarette smoke, which could be bio-transformed in vivo to B[a]PDE, a potent carcinogen known to form DNA adducts and induce mutations. We observed that curcumin, a known chemopreventive, could significantly inhibit the survival of lung cancer cells exposed to B[a]PDE. It also downregulates B[a]PDE-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB as assessed by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) and NF-κB-dependent reporter gene assay. Ames assay demonstrated its ability to revert the mutagenic property of benzo[a]pyrene. These observations prompted us to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin in preventing B[a]P-induced lung carcinogenesis in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanism associated with it. The average number of tumor nodules present in the lungs of the Swiss albino mice, which received benzo[a]pyrene, was significantly high compared to that received curcumin as 2% diet along with B[a]P. Curcumin treatment significantly reverted histopathological deviations in the lung tissues due to benzo[a]pyrene ingestion. Moreover, curcumin diet reduced benzo[a]pyrene-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling and Cox-2 transcription in lung tissues of mice. Taken together, this study illustrates multifaceted efficacy of curcumin in preventing lung cancer.

  18. ERBB3 is required for tumor promotion in a mouse model of skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Maik; Schäfer, Matthias; Muzumdar, Sukalp; Rose, Christian; Schneider, Marlon R

    2015-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a key role in skin inflammation, wound healing, and carcinogenesis. Less is known about the functions of the structurally related receptor ERBB3 (HER3) in the skin. We assessed the requirement of ERBB3 for skin homeostasis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis by crossing mice carrying a conditional Erbb3 allele with animals expressing cre under the control of the keratin 5 promoter. Erbb3(del) mice, lacking ERBB3 specifically in keratinocytes, showed no obvious abnormalities. The EGFR was upregulated in Erbb3(del) skin, possibly compensating the loss of ERBB3. Nonetheless, healing of full-thickness excisional wounds was negatively affected by ERBB3 deficiency. To analyze the function of ERBB3 during tumorigenesis, we employed the established DMBA/TPA multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Erbb3(del) mice remained free of papillomas for a longer time and had significantly reduced tumor burden compared to control littermates. Tumor cell proliferation was considerably reduced in Erbb3(del) mice, and loss of ERBB3 also impaired keratinocyte proliferation after a single application of TPA. In human skin tumor samples, upregulated ERBB3 expression was observed in squamous cell carcinoma, condyloma, and malignant melanoma. Thus, we conclude that ERBB3, while dispensable for the development and the homeostasis of the epidermis and its appendages, is required for proper wound healing and for the progression of skin tumors during multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mice. ERBB3 may also be important for human skin cancer progression. The latter effects most probably reflect a key role for ERBB3 in increasing cell proliferation after stimuli as wounding or carcinogenesis.

  19. Antiproliferative and antioxidant potential of hesperetin against benzo(a)pyrene-induced lung carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Barua, Chandana C; Karnam, Kalyani Chowdary; Dahiya, Vicky; Ellutla, Maheswara

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is the foremost cause of cancer mortality and is a growing economic burden worldwide. Chemoprevention, employing the use of natural, dietary or synthetic agents has become an appealing strategy to combat the increasing cases of cancers worldwide. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanism-based chemopreventive nature of hesperetin (HSP) against B[a]P induced lung carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. We analyzed the chemopreventive potential of HSP by estimating the status of lipid peroxidation (LPO), enzymic (SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, and GST), nonenzymic antioxidants (GSH, Vit C and Vit E), proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α), western blotting (CYP1A1, PCNA, Nrf2 and NF-κB expression) and histopathology of lung tissues of control and experimental mice. Administration of B[a]P (50 mg/kg, p.o.) resulted in an increase in lung weight, LPO with concomitant decrease in body weight, enzymic (SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, and GST) and non-enzymic (GSH, Vit C and Vit E) antioxidants. Histological examination of lungs revealed severe alveolar and bronchiolar damages in B[a]P-induced mice. Further, elevated levels of TNF-α along with activated expression of NF-κB, PCNA and CYP1A1, and downregulation of Nrf2 was observed in B[a]P intoxicated animals. Pre- and post-treatment with HSP effectively suppressed B[a]P induced lung carcinoma and the associated preneoplastic lesions by alleviating LPO, modulating antioxidants and decreasing the expression of NF-κB, PCNA and CYP1A1. These findings demonstrate that HSP possesses a potential chemopreventive activity against B[a]P induced lung cancer and this is attributed to its free radical scavenging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative properties.

  20. Tea polyphenols epigallocatechin gallete and theaflavin restrict mouse liver carcinogenesis through modulation of self-renewal Wnt and hedgehog pathways.

    PubMed

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Mandal, Syamsundar; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of tea polyphenols epigallocatechin gallete (EGCG) and theaflavin (TF) on self-renewal Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways during CCl4/N-nitosodiethylamine-induced mouse liver carcinogenesis. For this purpose, the effect of EGCG/TF was investigated in liver lesions of different groups at pre-, continuous and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis. Comparatively increased body weights were evident due to EGCG/TF treatment than carcinogen control mice. Both EGCG and TF could restrict the development of hepatocellular carcinoma at 30th week of carcinogen application showing potential chemoprevention in continuous treated group (mild dysplasia) followed by pretreated (moderate dysplasia) and therapeutic efficacy in posttreated group (mild dysplasia). This restriction was associated with significantly reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, decreased prevalence of hepatocyte progenitor cell (AFP) and stem cell population (CD44) irrespective of EGCG/TF treatments. The EGCG/TF could modulate the Wnt pathway by reducing β-catenin and phospho-β-catenin-Y-654 expressions along with up-regulation of sFRP1 (secreted frizzled-related protein 1) and adenomatosis polyposis coli during the restriction. In case of the Hh pathway, EGCG/TF could also reduce expressions of glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli1) and SMO (smoothened homolog) along with up-regulation of PTCH1 (patched homolog 1). As a result, in Wnt/Hh regulatory pathways decreased expressions of β-catenin/Gli1 target genes like CyclinD1, cMyc and EGFR/phospho-EGFR-Y-1173 and up-regulation of E-cadherin were seen during the restriction. Thus, the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by EGCG/TF was due to reduction in hepatocyte progenitor cell/stem cell population along with modulation of Wnt/Hh and other regulatory pathways. PMID:26386739

  1. Instillation and Fixation Methods Useful in Mouse Lung Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Mock, Jason; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The ability to instill live agents, cells, or chemicals directly into the lung without injuring or killing the mice is an important tool in lung cancer research. Although there are a number of methods that have been published showing how to intubate mice for pulmonary function measurements, none are without potential problems for rapid tracheal instillation in large cohorts of mice. In the present paper, a simple and quick method is described that enables an investigator to carry out such instillations in an efficient manner. The method does not require any special tools or lighting and can be learned with very little practice. It involves anesthetizing a mouse, making a small incision in the neck to visualize the trachea, and then inserting an intravenous catheter directly. The small incision is quickly closed with tissue adhesive, and the mice are allowed to recover. A skilled student or technician can do instillations at an average rate of 2 min/mouse. Once the cancer is established, there is frequently a need for quantitative histologic analysis of the lungs. Traditionally pathologists usually do not bother to standardize lung inflation during fixation, and analyses are often based on a scoring system that can be quite subjective. While this may sometime be sufficiently adequate for gross estimates of the size of a lung tumor, any proper stereological quantification of lung structure or cells requires a reproducible fixation procedure and subsequent lung volume measurement. Here we describe simple reliable procedures for both fixing the lungs under pressure and then accurately measuring the fixed lung volume. The only requirement is a laboratory balance that is accurate over a range of 1 mg-300 g. The procedures presented here thus could greatly improve the ability to create, treat, and analyze lung cancers in mice. PMID:26381993

  2. Cholera toxin, a potent inducer of epidermal hyperplasia but with no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, T.; Chida, K.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, Y.

    1986-05-29

    Intracutaneous injection of cholera toxin into mice induced epidermal hyperplasia to a greater extent than 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate. It also induced adenylate cyclase and through weakly, ornithine decarboxylase of the epidermis. Cholera toxin, however, showed no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis. In the single stage promotion, cholera toxin (50 ng) was injected once a week for 10 weeks into the skin of SENCAR mice initiated with 25 ..mu..g 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene, but no tumors developed. In the two-stage promotion test, cholera toxin (10-100 ng) was injected for one or two weeks into the initiated skin and then mezerein (4 ..mu..g) was applied twice a week for 18 weeks, but the toxin did not increase incidence or numbers of papillomas.

  3. In vivo compartmental analysis of leukocytes in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijesh V; Tatham, Kate C; Wilson, Michael R; O'Dea, Kieran P; Takata, Masao

    2015-10-01

    The lung has a unique structure consisting of three functionally different compartments (alveolar, interstitial, and vascular) situated in an extreme proximity. Current methods to localize lung leukocytes using bronchoalveolar lavage and/or lung perfusion have significant limitations for determination of location and phenotype of leukocytes. Here we present a novel method using in vivo antibody labeling to enable accurate compartmental localization/quantification and phenotyping of mouse lung leukocytes. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal labeling with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CD45 antibodies, and lung single-cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry. The combined in vivo intravenous and intratracheal CD45 labeling enabled robust separation of the alveolar, interstitial, and vascular compartments of the lung. In naive mice, the alveolar compartment consisted predominantly of resident alveolar macrophages. The interstitial compartment, gated by events negative for both intratracheal and intravenous CD45 staining, showed two conventional dendritic cell populations, as well as a Ly6C(lo) monocyte population. Expression levels of MHCII on these interstitial monocytes were much higher than on the vascular Ly6C(lo) monocyte populations. In mice exposed to acid aspiration-induced lung injury, this protocol also clearly distinguished the three lung compartments showing the dynamic trafficking of neutrophils and exudative monocytes across the lung compartments during inflammation and resolution. This simple in vivo dual-labeling technique substantially increases the accuracy and depth of lung flow cytometric analysis, facilitates a more comprehensive examination of lung leukocyte pools, and enables the investigation of previously poorly defined "interstitial" leukocyte populations during models of inflammatory lung diseases.

  4. Progression of mouse skin carcinogenesis is associated with increased ERα levels and is repressed by a dominant negative form of ERα.

    PubMed

    Logotheti, Stella; Papaevangeliou, Dimitra; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Sideridou, Maria; Tsimaratou, Katerina; Christodoulou, Ioannis; Pyrillou, Katerina; Gorgoulis, Vassilis; Vlahopoulos, Spiros; Zoumpourlis, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER), namely ERα and ERβ, are hormone-activated transcription factors with an important role in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the implication of ERα in skin cancer, using chemically-induced mouse skin tumours, as well as cell lines representing distinct stages of mouse skin oncogenesis. First, using immunohistochemical staining we showed that ERα is markedly increased in aggressive mouse skin tumours in vivo as compared to the papilloma tumours, whereas ERβ levels are low and become even lower in the aggressive spindle tumours of carcinogen-treated mice. Then, using the multistage mouse skin carcinogenesis model, we showed that ERα gradually increases during promotion and progression stages of mouse skin carcinogenesis, peaking at the most aggressive stage, whereas ERβ levels only slightly change throughout skin carcinogenesis. Stable transfection of the aggressive, spindle CarB cells with a dominant negative form of ERα (dnERα) resulted in reduced ERα levels and reduced binding to estrogen responsive elements (ERE)-containing sequences. We characterized two highly conserved EREs on the mouse ERα promoter through which dnERα decreased endogenous ERα levels. The dnERα-transfected CarB cells presented altered protein levels of cytoskeletal and cell adhesion molecules, slower growth rate and impaired anchorage-independent growth in vitro, whereas they gave smaller tumours with extended latency period of tumour onset in vivo. Our findings suggest an implication of ERα in the aggressiveness of spindle mouse skin cancer cells, possibly through regulation of genes affecting cell shape and adhesion, and they also provide hints for the effective targeting of spindle cancer cells by dnERα. PMID:22870269

  5. Impaired CK1 Delta Activity Attenuates SV40-Induced Cellular Transformation In Vitro and Mouse Mammary Carcinogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hirner, Heidrun; Günes, Cagatay; Bischof, Joachim; Wolff, Sonja; Grothey, Arnhild; Kühl, Marion; Oswald, Franz; Wegwitz, Florian; Bösl, Michael R.; Trauzold, Anna; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Peifer, Christian; Leithäuser, Frank; Deppert, Wolfgang; Knippschild, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a powerful tool to study cellular transformation in vitro, as well as tumor development and progression in vivo. Various cellular kinases, among them members of the CK1 family, play an important role in modulating the transforming activity of SV40, including the transforming activity of T-Ag, the major transforming protein of SV40, itself. Here we characterized the effects of mutant CK1δ variants with impaired kinase activity on SV40-induced cell transformation in vitro, and on SV40-induced mammary carcinogenesis in vivo in a transgenic/bi-transgenic mouse model. CK1δ mutants exhibited a reduced kinase activity compared to wtCK1δ in in vitro kinase assays. Molecular modeling studies suggested that mutation N172D, located within the substrate binding region, is mainly responsible for impaired mutCK1δ activity. When stably over-expressed in maximal transformed SV-52 cells, CK1δ mutants induced reversion to a minimal transformed phenotype by dominant-negative interference with endogenous wtCK1δ. To characterize the effects of CK1δ on SV40-induced mammary carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing mutant CK1δ under the control of the whey acidic protein (WAP) gene promoter, and crossed them with SV40 transgenic WAP-T-antigen (WAP-T) mice. Both WAP-T mice as well as WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T bi-transgenic mice developed breast cancer. However, tumor incidence was lower and life span was significantly longer in WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T bi-transgenic animals. The reduced CK1δ activity did not affect early lesion formation during tumorigenesis, suggesting that impaired CK1δ activity reduces the probability for outgrowth of in situ carcinomas to invasive carcinomas. The different tumorigenic potential of SV40 in WAP-T and WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T tumors was also reflected by a significantly different expression of various genes known to be involved in tumor progression, specifically of those involved in wnt-signaling and DNA repair. Our data

  6. Overlapping loss of heterozygosity by mitotic recombination on mouse chromosome 7F1-ter in skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, A B; Navone, N M; Aldaz, C M; Conti, C J

    1991-01-01

    A significant role for mouse chromosome 7 abnormalities during chemically induced skin carcinogenesis has been advanced based on previous cytogenetic and molecular studies. To determine the frequency of allelic losses at different loci of chromosome 7 in skin tumors induced in the outbred SENCAR mouse stock by a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, we compared the constitutional and tumor genotypes of premalignant papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas for loss of heterozygosity at different informative loci. In a previous study, these tumors had been analyzed for their allelic composition at the Harvey ras-1 (Ha-ras-1) locus and it was found that 39% of squamous cell carcinomas had lost the normal Ha-ras-1 allele exhibiting 3 or 2 copies of the mutated counterpart or gene amplification. In the present study, by combining Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction fragment length polymorphism analyses, we detected complete loss of heterozygosity at the beta-globin (Hbb) locus, distal to Ha-ras-1, in 15 of 20 (75%) skin carcinomas. In addition, 5 of 5 informative cases attained homozygosity at the int-2 locus, 27 centimorgans distal to Hbb. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA extracted from papillomas devoid of stromal contamination by fluorescence-activated sorting of single cell dispersions immunolabeled with anti-keratin 13 antibody revealed loss of heterozygosity at the Hbb locus, demonstrating that this event occurs during premalignant stages of tumor development. Interestingly, loss of heterozygosity was only detected in late-stage lesions exhibiting a high degree of dysplasia and areas of microinvasion. Analysis of allelic ratios by densitometric scanning of tumors that had become homozygous at Hbb but retained heterozygosis at Ha-ras-1 indicated mitotic recombination as the mechanism underlying loss of heterozygosity on mouse chromosome 7 during chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. These findings are consistent with the presence of a putative

  7. Methods of in-vivo mouse lung micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Nixon, Earl; Thiesse, Jacqueline; McLennan, Geoffrey; Ross, Alan; Hoffman, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Micro-CT will have a profound influence on the accumulation of anatomical and physiological phenotypic changes in natural and transgenetic mouse models. Longitudinal studies will be greatly facilitated, allowing for a more complete and accurate description of events if in-vivo studies are accomplished. The purpose of the ongoing project is to establish a feasible and reproducible setup for in-vivo mouse lung micro-computed tomography (μCT). We seek to use in-vivo respiratory-gated μCT to follow mouse models of lung disease with subsequent recovery of the mouse. Methodologies for optimizing scanning parameters and gating for the in-vivo mouse lung are presented. A Scireq flexiVent ventilated the gas-anesthetized mice at 60 breaths/minute, 30 cm H20 PEEP, 30 ml/kg tidal volume and provided a respiratory signal to gate a Skyscan 1076 μCT. Physiologic monitoring allowed the control of vital functions and quality of anesthesia, e.g. via ECG monitoring. In contrary to longer exposure times with ex-vivo scans, scan times for in-vivo were reduced using 35μm pixel size, 158ms exposure time and 18μm pixel size, 316ms exposure time to reduce motion artifacts. Gating via spontaneous breathing was also tested. Optimal contrast resolution was achieved at 50kVp, 200μA, applying an aluminum filter (0.5mm). There were minimal non-cardiac related motion artifacts. Both 35μm and 1μm voxel size images were suitable for evaluation of the airway lumen and parenchymal density. Total scan times were 30 and 65 minutes respectively. The mice recovered following scanning protocols. In-vivo lung scanning with recovery of the mouse delivered reasonable image quality for longitudinal studies, e.g. mouse asthma models. After examining 10 mice, we conclude μCT is a feasible tool evaluating mouse models of lung pathology in longitudinal studies with increasing anatomic detail available for evaluation as one moves from in-vivo to ex-vivo studies. Further developments include automated

  8. Hyperpolarized helium-3 mouse lung MRI: Studies of lung structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Joseph Paul

    Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human and animal lungs has displayed promising and useful applications to studies of lung structure and function in both healthy and diseased lungs. Hyperpolarized 3He MRI allows the visualization of gas in the gas-exchange spaces of the lungs (as opposed to tissue) and has proven especially effective in studying diseases that are characterized by ventilation defects, such as emphysema. In particular, in-vivo measurements of the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can quantify lung structure by measuring its restrictive effects on the motion of 3He spins. This allows for detection and longitudinal tracking of changes in micro-architecture that result from disease destruction of alveolar walls. Due, in part, to the difficulties inherent in administering and imaging hyperpolarized 3He within the small (0.5 cc volume) mouse lung, applications of hyperpolarized 3He MRI techniques to laboratory mice are scarce. We have been able to implement and improve the techniques of hyperpolarized 3He mouse lung MRI and subsequently apply them to studies of several mouse models of disease, including elastase-induced emphysema, smoking-induced emphysema, and lung cancer. Here we detail the design, development, and implementation of a versatile, electronically-controlled, small animal ventilator that is capable of delivering tiny volumes of hyperpolarized 3He, mixed with oxygen, to the mouse and is also compatible with both the easily depolarized 3He gas and the highly magnetic environment within and around an imaging magnet. Also described are NM techniques developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our images and effectively utilize the gas hyperpolarization. Applications of these technologies and techniques to small animal models of disease are presented wherein we have measured up to a 35% increase in 3He ADC in mice with elastase-induced emphysema as compared to healthy mice. We also demonstrate the potential

  9. Downregulation of Keratin 76 Expression during Oral Carcinogenesis of Human, Hamster and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Emma; Pandey, Manishkumar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kane, Shubhada; Patil, Asawari; Maru, Girish B.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Watt, Fiona M.; Mahimkar, Manoj B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Keratins are structural marker proteins with tissue specific expression; however, recent reports indicate their involvement in cancer progression. Previous study from our lab revealed deregulation of many genes related to structural molecular integrity including KRT76. Here we evaluate the role of KRT76 downregulation in oral precancer and cancer development. Methods We evaluated KRT76 expression by qRT-PCR in normal and tumor tissues of the oral cavity. We also analyzed K76 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal, oral precancerous lesion (OPL), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and in hamster model of oral carcinogenesis. Further, functional implication of KRT76 loss was confirmed using KRT76-knockout (KO) mice. Results We observed a strong association of reduced K76 expression with increased risk of OPL and OSCC development. The buccal epithelium of DMBA treated hamsters showed a similar trend. Oral cavity of KRT76-KO mice showed preneoplastic changes in the gingivobuccal epithelium while no pathological changes were observed in KRT76 negative tissues such as tongue. Conclusion The present study demonstrates loss of KRT76 in oral carcinogenesis. The KRT76-KO mice data underlines the potential of KRT76 being an early event although this loss is not sufficient to drive the development of oral cancers. Thus, future studies to investigate the contributing role of KRT76 in light of other tumor driving events are warranted. PMID:23936238

  10. Implantation of fibrin gel on mouse lung to study lung-specific angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Mammoto, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent significant advances in stem cell research and bioengineering techniques have made great progress in utilizing biomaterials to regenerate and repair damage in simple tissues in the orthopedic and periodontal fields. However, attempts to regenerate the structures and functions of more complex three-dimensional (3D) organs such as lungs have not been very successful because the biological processes of organ regeneration have not been well explored. It is becoming clear that angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, plays key roles in organ regeneration. Newly formed vasculatures not only deliver oxygen, nutrients and various cell components that are required for organ regeneration but also provide instructive signals to the regenerating local tissues. Therefore, to successfully regenerate lungs in an adult, it is necessary to recapitulate the lung-specific microenvironments in which angiogenesis drives regeneration of local lung tissues. Although conventional in vivo angiogenesis assays, such as subcutaneous implantation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich hydrogels (e.g., fibrin or collagen gels or Matrigel - ECM protein mixture secreted by Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm mouse sarcoma cells), are extensively utilized to explore the general mechanisms of angiogenesis, lung-specific angiogenesis has not been well characterized because methods for orthotopic implantation of biomaterials in the lung have not been well established. The goal of this protocol is to introduce a unique method to implant fibrin gel on the lung surface of living adult mouse, allowing for the successful recapitulation of host lung-derived angiogenesis inside the gel. This approach enables researchers to explore the mechanisms by which the lung-specific microenvironment controls angiogenesis and alveolar regeneration in both normal and pathological conditions. Since implanted biomaterials release and supply physical and chemical signals to adjacent lung tissues, implantation of these

  11. Dimethyl fumarate and the oleanane triterpenoids, CDDO-imidazolide and CDDO-methyl ester, both activate the Nrf2 pathway but have opposite effects in the A/J model of lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    To, Ciric; Ringelberg, Carol S; Royce, Darlene B; Williams, Charlotte R; Risingsong, Renee; Sporn, Michael B; Liby, Karen T

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the highest number of cancer-related deaths in the USA, highlighting the need for better prevention and therapy. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway detoxifies harmful insults and reduces oxidative stress, thus preventing carcinogenesis in various preclinical models. However, constitutive activation of the Nrf2 pathway has been detected in numerous cancers, which confers a survival advantage to tumor cells and a poor prognosis. In our study, we compared the effects of two clinically relevant classes of Nrf2 activators, dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and the synthetic oleanane triterpenoids, CDDO-imidazolide (CDDO-Im) and CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells, in VC1 lung cancer cells and in the A/J model of lung cancer. Although the triterpenoids and DMF both activated the Nrf2 pathway, CDDO-Im and CDDO-Me were markedly more potent than DMF. All of these drugs reduced the production of reactive oxygen species and inhibited nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 cells, but the triterpenoids were 100 times more potent than DMF in these assays. Microarray analysis revealed that only 52 of 99 Nrf2-target genes were induced by all three compounds, and each drug regulated a unique subset of Nrf2 genes. These drugs also altered the expression of other genes important in lung cancer independent of Nrf2. Although all three compounds enhanced the phosphorylation of CREB, only DMF increased the phosphorylation of Akt. CDDO-Me, at either 12.5 or 50mg/kg of diet, was the most effective drug in our lung cancer mouse model. Specifically, CDDO-Me significantly reduced the average tumor number, size and burden compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Additionally, 52% of the tumors in the control group were high-grade tumors compared with only 14% in the CDDO-Me group. Though less potent, CDDO-Im had similar activity as CDDO-Me. In contrast, 61-63% of the tumors in the DMF groups (400-1200mg/kg diet) were high-grade tumors compared with

  12. Dimethyl fumarate and the oleanane triterpenoids, CDDO-imidazolide and CDDO-methyl ester, both activate the Nrf2 pathway but have opposite effects in the A/J model of lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    To, Ciric; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Royce, Darlene B.; Williams, Charlotte R.; Risingsong, Renee; Sporn, Michael B.; Liby, Karen T.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for the highest number of cancer-related deaths in the USA, highlighting the need for better prevention and therapy. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway detoxifies harmful insults and reduces oxidative stress, thus preventing carcinogenesis in various preclinical models. However, constitutive activation of the Nrf2 pathway has been detected in numerous cancers, which confers a survival advantage to tumor cells and a poor prognosis. In our study, we compared the effects of two clinically relevant classes of Nrf2 activators, dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and the synthetic oleanane triterpenoids, CDDO-imidazolide (CDDO-Im) and CDDO-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells, in VC1 lung cancer cells and in the A/J model of lung cancer. Although the triterpenoids and DMF both activated the Nrf2 pathway, CDDO-Im and CDDO-Me were markedly more potent than DMF. All of these drugs reduced the production of reactive oxygen species and inhibited nitric oxide production in RAW264.7 cells, but the triterpenoids were 100 times more potent than DMF in these assays. Microarray analysis revealed that only 52 of 99 Nrf2-target genes were induced by all three compounds, and each drug regulated a unique subset of Nrf2 genes. These drugs also altered the expression of other genes important in lung cancer independent of Nrf2. Although all three compounds enhanced the phosphorylation of CREB, only DMF increased the phosphorylation of Akt. CDDO-Me, at either 12.5 or 50mg/kg of diet, was the most effective drug in our lung cancer mouse model. Specifically, CDDO-Me significantly reduced the average tumor number, size and burden compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Additionally, 52% of the tumors in the control group were high-grade tumors compared with only 14% in the CDDO-Me group. Though less potent, CDDO-Im had similar activity as CDDO-Me. In contrast, 61–63% of the tumors in the DMF groups (400–1200mg/kg diet) were high-grade tumors compared

  13. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17. PMID:26271098

  14. Chemopreventive effects of Korean Angelica vs. its major pyranocoumarins on two lineages of transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Since decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage-treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse) or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN vs. D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN-and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN-and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, invasion-metastasis and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca. PMID:26116406

  15. Chemopreventive Effects of Korean Angelica versus Its Major Pyranocoumarins on Two Lineages of Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Su-Ni; Zhang, Jinhui; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Peixin; Puppala, Manohar; Zhang, Yong; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-09-01

    We showed previously that daily gavage of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root ethanolic extract starting 8 weeks of age inhibited growth of prostate epithelium and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NE-Ca) in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Because decursin (D) and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are major pyranocoumarins in AGN extract, we tested the hypothesis that D/DA represented active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP carcinogenesis. Three groups of male C57BL/6 TRAMP mice were gavage treated daily with excipient vehicle, AGN (5 mg per mouse), or equimolar D/DA (3 mg per mouse) from 8 weeks to 16 or 28 weeks of age. Measurement of plasma and NE-Ca D, DA, and their common metabolite decursinol indicated similar retention from AGN versus D/DA dosing. The growth of TRAMP dorsolateral prostate (DLP) in AGN- and D/DA-treated mice was inhibited by 66% and 61% at 16 weeks and by 67% and 72% at 28 weeks, respectively. Survival of mice bearing NE-Ca to 28 weeks was improved by AGN, but not by D/DA. Nevertheless, AGN- and D/DA-treated mice had lower NE-Ca burden. Immunohistochemical and mRNA analyses of DLP showed that AGN and D/DA exerted similar inhibition of TRAMP epithelial lesion progression and key cell-cycle genes. Profiling of NE-Ca mRNA showed a greater scope of modulating angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion-metastasis, and inflammation genes by AGN than D/DA. The data therefore support D/DA as probable active/prodrug compounds against TRAMP epithelial lesions, and they cooperate with non-pyranocoumarin compounds to fully express AGN efficacy against NE-Ca.

  16. Keratin modifications in epidermis, papillomas, and carcinomas during two-stage carcinogenesis in the SENCAR mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.G.; Slaga, T.J.

    1982-10-01

    To elucidate the role of keratin modification in tumor promotion, the authors investigated the keratin polypeptide patterns of mouse epidermis, papillomas, and carcinomas throughout an initiation-promotion experiment. The epidermal keratin modifications induced by repetitive 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatments in both initiated and noninitiated mouse skin were essentially identical to those observed with a single 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate application. These changes were even more pronounced in epidermal papillomas. As the experiment progressed, there appeared to be a selective loss of one group of high-molecular-weight keratins (M/sub r/ 62,000) in some of the papillomas. Interestingly, the carcinomas that appeared at this time had significant reduction in both groups of high-molecular-weight keratins. In fact, the keratin profiles of carcinomas were very similar to the patterns observed in basal cells after a single 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment of adult epidermis. This may indicate that the program of keratin expression of a carcinoma becomes permanently fixed at a basal cell pattern. Changes in keratin patterns may serve as a biochemical marker of malignant progression in mouse epidermis.

  17. Dosimetry of PAH skin carcinogenesis: covalent binding of benzo(a)pyrene to mouse epidermal DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.; Holland, J.M.; Rahn, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is metabolized to the chemically reactive anti and syn isomers of the 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxides of BaP (BPDE) which bind covalently to DNA to form DNA/BPDE complexes. Tetrols liberated from the DNA/BPDE complex by acid hydrolysis are easily quantified by h.p.l.c. using fluorescence detection. This approach allows femtomole amounts of BPDE associated with the DNA isolated from a single mouse to be detected using conventional instrumentation. The usefulness of this technique to estimate the interaction of BaP with DNA of mouse skin, both in the intact animal and in organ culture, was investigated. With mouse skin in organ culture it could be demonstrated that: (1) upon a single topical application of 5 ..mu..g of BaP, binding to DNA occurred via BPDE at a linear rate for up to 65 h, (2) the amount of binding was dose dependent at concentrations of BaP <10 ..mu..g.

  18. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-04-01

    Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

  19. Targeted Foxe1 Overexpression in Mouse Thyroid Causes the Development of Multinodular Goiter But Does Not Promote Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nikitski, Alyaksandr; Saenko, Vladimir; Shimamura, Mika; Nakashima, Masahiro; Matsuse, Michiko; Suzuki, Keiji; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Bogdanova, Tetiana; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Masanobu; Nagayama, Yuji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms in the forkhead box E1 gene (FOXE1) locus, which are strongly associated with the risk for thyroid cancer. In addition, our recent work has demonstrated FOXE1 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinomas. To assess possible contribution of Foxe1 to thyroid carcinogenesis, transgenic mice overexpressing Foxe1 in their thyroids under thyroglobulin promoter (Tg-Foxe1) were generated. Additionally, Tg-Foxe1 mice were exposed to x-rays at the age of 5 weeks or crossed with Pten(+/-) mice to examine the combined effect of Foxe1 overexpression with radiation or activated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway, respectively. In 5- to 8-week-old Tg-Foxe1 mice, severe hypothyroidism was observed, and mouse thyroids exhibited hypoplasia of the parenchyma. Adult 48-week-old mice were almost recovered from hypothyroidism, their thyroids were enlarged, and featured colloid microcysts and multiple benign nodules of macrofollicular-papilloid growth pattern, but no malignancy was found. Exposure of transgenic mice to 1 or 8 Gy of x-rays and Pten haploinsufficiency promoted hyperplastic nodule formation also without carcinogenic effect. These results indicate that Foxe1 overexpression is not directly involved in the development of thyroid cancer and that proper Foxe1 dosage is essential for achieving normal structure and function of the thyroid.

  20. Targeted Foxe1 Overexpression in Mouse Thyroid Causes the Development of Multinodular Goiter But Does Not Promote Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nikitski, Alyaksandr; Saenko, Vladimir; Shimamura, Mika; Nakashima, Masahiro; Matsuse, Michiko; Suzuki, Keiji; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Bogdanova, Tetiana; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Masanobu; Nagayama, Yuji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms in the forkhead box E1 gene (FOXE1) locus, which are strongly associated with the risk for thyroid cancer. In addition, our recent work has demonstrated FOXE1 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinomas. To assess possible contribution of Foxe1 to thyroid carcinogenesis, transgenic mice overexpressing Foxe1 in their thyroids under thyroglobulin promoter (Tg-Foxe1) were generated. Additionally, Tg-Foxe1 mice were exposed to x-rays at the age of 5 weeks or crossed with Pten(+/-) mice to examine the combined effect of Foxe1 overexpression with radiation or activated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway, respectively. In 5- to 8-week-old Tg-Foxe1 mice, severe hypothyroidism was observed, and mouse thyroids exhibited hypoplasia of the parenchyma. Adult 48-week-old mice were almost recovered from hypothyroidism, their thyroids were enlarged, and featured colloid microcysts and multiple benign nodules of macrofollicular-papilloid growth pattern, but no malignancy was found. Exposure of transgenic mice to 1 or 8 Gy of x-rays and Pten haploinsufficiency promoted hyperplastic nodule formation also without carcinogenic effect. These results indicate that Foxe1 overexpression is not directly involved in the development of thyroid cancer and that proper Foxe1 dosage is essential for achieving normal structure and function of the thyroid. PMID:26982637

  1. Nickel carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Kazimierz S; Sunderman, F William; Salnikow, Konstantin

    2003-12-10

    Human exposure to highly nickel-polluted environments, such as those associated with nickel refining, electroplating, and welding, has the potential to produce a variety of pathologic effects. Among them are skin allergies, lung fibrosis, and cancer of the respiratory tract. The exact mechanisms of nickel-induced carcinogenesis are not known and have been the subject of numerous epidemiologic and experimental investigations. These mechanisms are likely to involve genetic and epigenetic routes. The present review provides evidence for the genotoxic and mutagenic activity of Ni(II) particularly at high doses. Such doses are best delivered into the cells by phagocytosis of sparingly soluble nickel-containing dust particles. Ni(II) genotoxicity may be aggravated through the generation of DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the inhibition of DNA repair by this metal. Broad spectrum of epigenetic effects of nickel includes alteration in gene expression resulting from DNA hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation, as well as activation or silencing of certain genes and transcription factors, especially those involved in cellular response to hypoxia. The investigations of the pathogenic effects of nickel greatly benefit from the understanding of the chemical basis of Ni(II) interactions with intracellular targets/ligands and oxidants. Many pathogenic effects of nickel are due to the interference with the metabolism of essential metals such as Fe(II), Mn(II), Ca(II), Zn(II), or Mg(II). Research in this field allows for identification of putative Ni(II) targets relevant to carcinogenesis and prediction of pathogenic effects caused by exposure to nickel. Ultimately, the investigations of nickel carcinogenesis should be aimed at the development of treatments that would inhibit or prevent Ni(II) interactions with critical target molecules and ions, Fe(II) in particular, and thus avert the respiratory tract cancer and other adverse health effects in nickel workers

  2. The role of stromal fibroblasts in lung carcinogenesis: A target for chemoprevention?

    PubMed

    Mahale, Jagdish; Smagurauskaite, Gintare; Brown, Karen; Thomas, Anne; Howells, Lynne M

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays an essential role in the development and spread of cancers. Tumour cells interact with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), embedded within which, are a variety of non-cancer cells including cells of the vasculature, immune system and fibroblasts. The essential role of fibroblasts in the cultivation and maintenance of an environment in which tumour cells are able to maintain their aggressive phenotypic traits is becoming increasingly well documented. Cancer-associated fibroblasts are able to secrete a vast array of ECM-modulating factors, meaning that they have potential for a functional role in every step of the carcinogenic process. In particular, they are likely to have a role in early tumour-initiating inflammatory events, and so may provide a potential target for chemopreventive intervention. This review summarises the known interactions between lung tumour cells and surrounding reactive fibroblasts, highlighting the need to further investigate cancer-associated fibroblasts as therapeutic targets in lung cancer chemoprevention strategies. PMID:25611701

  3. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  4. Induction of apoptosis in mouse and human carcinoma cell lines by Emblica officinalis polyphenols and its effect on chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rajeshkumar, N V; Pillai, M Radahakrishna; Kuttan, R

    2003-06-01

    Plant-derived phenolic compounds manifest many beneficial effects and can potentially inhibit several stages of carcinogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of Emblica officinalis (E. officinalis) polyphenol fraction (EOP) on the induction of apoptosis in mouse and human carcinoma cell lineses and its modulatory effect on N- nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) induced liver tumors in rats. The results indicate that EOP treatment could induce apoptosis in Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites (DLA) and CeHa cell lines At 200 microg/ml dose EOP induced membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation and intenucleosomal breaks as evident from the morphology and DNA ladder pattern obtained in gel electrophoresis. The results also suggested that EOP treatment could decrease the liver tumour development induced by NDEA. Animals administered (oral) with NDEA (0.02%, 2.5 ml/rat, 5 days a week, 20 weeks) developed visible liver tumours by the end of the 20th week and the liver weight raised to 5.2 +/- 1.1 g/ 100 g body weight. Only 11% of the animals treated with EOP (60 mg/kg, oral, 5 days a week for 20 weeks) developed visible liver tumours by this period and the liver weights were reduced to 3.2 +/- 0.7 g/ 100 g body weight. gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was raised to 88.4 +/- 16.2 U/l in serum of NDEA treated group was reduced to 48.4 +/- 14.8 U/l by EOP treatment. Elevated levels of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), bilirubin, liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) in the NDEA administered group were significantly reduced by EOP treatment. The EOP was found to scavenge superoxide and hydroxyl radicals and inhibit lipid peroxidation in vitro. EOP also inhibited DNA topoisomerase I in Saccharomyces cervisiae mutant cell cultures and the activity of cdc25 tyrosine phosphatase. PMID:12866570

  5. Downregulation of glutathione S-transferase M1 protein in N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced mouse bladder carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Jing-Jing; Dai, Yuan-Chang; Lin, Yung-Lun; Chen, Yang-Yi; Lin, Wei-Han; Chan, Hong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2014-09-15

    Bladder cancer is highly recurrent following specific transurethral resection and intravesical chemotherapy, which has prompted continuing efforts to develop novel therapeutic agents and early-stage diagnostic tools. Specific changes in protein expression can provide a diagnostic marker. In our present study, we investigated changes in protein expression during urothelial carcinogenesis. The carcinogen BBN was used to induce mouse bladder tumor formation. Mouse bladder mucosa proteins were collected and analyzed by 2D electrophoresis from 6 to 20 weeks after commencing continuous BBN treatment. By histological examination, the connective layer of the submucosa showed gradual thickening and the number of submucosal capillaries gradually increased after BBN treatment. At 12-weeks after the start of BBN treatment, the urothelia became moderately dysplastic and tumors arose after 20-weeks of treatment. These induced bladder lesions included carcinoma in situ and connective tissue invasive cancer. In protein 2D analysis, the sequentially downregulated proteins from 6 to 20 weeks included GSTM1, L-lactate dehydrogenase B chain, keratin 8, keratin 18 and major urinary proteins 2 and 11/8. In contrast, the sequentially upregulated proteins identified were GSTO1, keratin 15 and myosin light polypeptide 6. Western blotting confirmed that GSTM1 and NQO-1 were decreased, while GSTO1 and Sp1 were increased, after BBN treatment. In human bladder cancer cells, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased the GSTM1 mRNA and protein expression. These data suggest that the downregulation of GSTM1 in the urothelia is a biomarker of bladder carcinogenesis and that this may be mediated by DNA CpG methylation. - Highlights: • GSTM1 and NQO-1 proteins decreased in the mouse bladder mucosa after BBN treatment. • BBN induced GSTO1 and Sp1 protein expression in the mouse bladder mucosa. • 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased GSTM1 mRNA and protein in human bladder cancer cell. • GSTM1

  6. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  7. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  8. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  9. RECENT ADVANCES IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS: MODES OF ACTION, ANIMAL MODEL SYSTEMS AND METHYLATED ARSENIC METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract:

    Recent advances in our knowledge of arsenic carcinogenesis include the development of rat or mouse models for all human organs in which inorganic arsenic is known to cause cancer -skin, lung, urinary bladder, liver and kidney. Tumors can be produced from eit...

  10. Collagen metabolism in mouse lung after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.C.; Parkins, C.S.

    1987-09-01

    Collagen and total protein synthesis rates have been determined in the lungs of CBA mice irradiated with single doses of X rays between 8 and 16 Gy. Mice were injected with (/sup 3/H)proline accompanied by a large dose of unlabeled proline, and synthesis rates were measured at 2-month intervals from 8 to 31 weeks after irradiation. At 2 months after radiation treatment, collagen and total protein synthesis rates were significantly depressed but they had recovered by 4 months. By 6 months collagen synthesis rates had increased above control in a dose-dependent manner, so that in the 14-Gy dose group the fractional synthesis rate for collagen was 4.6 times higher than in control mice as measured by incorporation of (/sup 3/H)proline. However, a significant net accumulation of collagen was seen only in the lungs of the highest dose group at 31 weeks, as indicated by total hydroxyproline measurements. There was a slight increase in the ratio of types I and III collagen. Late radiation damage in the CBA mouse lung is characterized by increased collagen metabolism, which may or may not lead to a net accumulation of collagen.

  11. Beyond Two-Stage Models for Lung Carcinogenesis in the Mayak Workers: Implications for Plutonium Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Sascha; Sokolnikov, Mikhail E.; Eidemüller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic multi-stage models are used to analyze lung-cancer mortality after Plutonium exposure in the Mayak-workers cohort, with follow-up until 2008. Besides the established two-stage model with clonal expansion, models with three mutation stages as well as a model with two distinct pathways to cancer are studied. The results suggest that three-stage models offer an improved description of the data. The best-fitting models point to a mechanism where radiation increases the rate of clonal expansion. This is interpreted in terms of changes in cell-cycle control mediated by bystander signaling or repopulation following cell killing. No statistical evidence for a two-pathway model is found. To elucidate the implications of the different models for radiation risk, several exposure scenarios are studied. Models with a radiation effect at an early stage show a delayed response and a pronounced drop-off with older ages at exposure. Moreover, the dose-response relationship is strongly nonlinear for all three-stage models, revealing a marked increase above a critical dose. PMID:26000637

  12. Beyond two-stage models for lung carcinogenesis in the Mayak workers: implications for plutonium risk.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Sascha; Sokolnikov, Mikhail E; Eidemüller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic multi-stage models are used to analyze lung-cancer mortality after Plutonium exposure in the Mayak-workers cohort, with follow-up until 2008. Besides the established two-stage model with clonal expansion, models with three mutation stages as well as a model with two distinct pathways to cancer are studied. The results suggest that three-stage models offer an improved description of the data. The best-fitting models point to a mechanism where radiation increases the rate of clonal expansion. This is interpreted in terms of changes in cell-cycle control mediated by bystander signaling or repopulation following cell killing. No statistical evidence for a two-pathway model is found. To elucidate the implications of the different models for radiation risk, several exposure scenarios are studied. Models with a radiation effect at an early stage show a delayed response and a pronounced drop-off with older ages at exposure. Moreover, the dose-response relationship is strongly nonlinear for all three-stage models, revealing a marked increase above a critical dose.

  13. Identifying Efficacious Approaches to Chemoprevention with chlorophyllin, purified chlorophylls and freeze-dried spinach in a Mouse Model of Transplacental Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, David J.; Lohr, Christiane V.; Fischer, Kay A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Bailey, George S.; Williams, David E.

    2009-02-01

    The carcinogenic potential of dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) has been well characterized in numerous animal models. We have previously documented that a single dose of 15 mg/Kg DBP to pregnant mice late in gestation (GD 17) produces an aggressive T-cell lymphoma as well as lung and liver cancer in offspring. The current study examines the chemopreventative properties of chlorophyllin (CHL) and chlorophyll (Chl) in this transplacental carcinogenesis model. Pregnant B6129SF1 females, bred to 129S1/SvIm males, received purified diets incorporated with either 2000 ppm CHL, 2000 ppm Chl, or 10% freeze-dried spinach beginning at gestation day 9. Lymphoma-dependent mortality was not significantly altered by maternal consumption of any of the diet and little effect on lung tumor burden in mice surviving to 10 months of age was observed. However, co-administration of CHL at 380 mg/Kg with DBP by gavage (molar ratio of 10:1, CHL:DBP) provided significant protection against DBP initiated carcinogenesis. Offspring born to dams receiving CHL co-gavaged with DBP exhibited markedly fewer lymphoma-dependent mortalities (p< 0.001). The degree of protection by CHL, compared to controls dosed with DBP in tricaprylin (TCP) as the vehicle, were less marked, but still significant. Co-administration of CHL (TCP as vehicle) also reduced lung tumor multiplicity in mice by approximately 50% and this was observed throughout the study (p< 0.005). This is the first demonstration that CHL can provide potent chemoprotection in a transplacental carcinogenesis model and supports a mechanism involving complex-mediated reduction of carcinogen uptake.

  14. An improved simple method of mouse lung intubation

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Kelvin D.; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Mitzner, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Given the ubiquitous use of mice to study lung disease, it is curious that more investigators do not use repeated intubation to study mechanical and cellular changes in individual mice. One of the reasons for this limited use of intubation is that it is relatively difficult, despite there being several published studies that describe ways to achieve it. In this paper, we describe a complete procedure, including novel approaches that simplify this intubation, so that it can be routinely accomplished with relatively little training. The technique can also be set up with relatively little expense and expertise. This should make it possible for any laboratory to routinely carry out this intubation, thereby allowing longitudinal studies in individual mice and potentially increasing the statistical power by using each mouse as its own control. PMID:19150857

  15. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Poroyko, Valeriy; Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2015-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3-V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents.

  16. Cytochrome P450 1b1 in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced skin carcinogenesis: Tumorigenicity of individual PAHs and coal-tar extract, DNA adduction and expression of select genes in the Cyp1b1 knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Bunde, Kristi L.; Harper, Tod A.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Krueger, Sharon K.; and others

    2015-09-01

    FVB/N mice wild-type, heterozygous or null for Cyp 1b1 were used in a two-stage skin tumor study comparing PAH, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), and coal tar extract (CTE, SRM 1597a). Following 20 weeks of promotion with TPA the Cyp 1b1 null mice, initiated with DBC, exhibited reductions in incidence, multiplicity, and progression. None of these effects were observed with BaP or CTE. The mechanism of Cyp 1b1-dependent alteration of DBC skin carcinogenesis was further investigated by determining expression of select genes in skin from DBC-treated mice 2, 4 and 8 h post-initiation. A significant reduction in levels of Cyp 1a1, Nqo1 at 8 h and Akr 1c14 mRNA was observed in Cyp 1b1 null (but not wt or het) mice, whereas no impact was observed in Gst a1, Nqo 1 at 2 and 4 h or Akr 1c19 at any time point. Cyp 1b1 mRNA was not elevated by DBC. The major covalent DNA adducts, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-(±)-11,12-dihydrodiol-cis and trans-13,14-epoxide-deoxyadenosine (DBCDE-dA) were quantified by UHPLC-MS/MS 8 h post-initiation. Loss of Cyp1 b1 expression reduced DBCDE-dA adducts in the skin but not to a statistically significant degree. The ratio of cis- to trans-DBCDE-dA adducts was higher in the skin than other target tissues such as the spleen, lung and liver (oral dosing). These results document that Cyp 1b1 plays a significant role in bioactivation and carcinogenesis of DBC in a two-stage mouse skin tumor model and that loss of Cyp 1b1 has little impact on tumor response with BaP or CTE as initiators. - Highlights: • Cyp1b1 null mice exhibit lower skin cancer sensitivity to DBC but not BaP or CTE. • Cyp1b1 expression impacts expression of other PAH metabolizing enzymes. • cis/trans-DBCDE-dA ratio significantly higher in the skin than the spleen, lung or liver • Potency of DBC and CTE in mouse skin is higher than predicted by RPFs.

  17. Histopathological data of iron and calcium in the mouse lung after asbestos exposure

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Elisa; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Pascolo, Lorella; Pascotto, Ernesto; Casarsa, Claudia; Lucattelli, Monica; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cavarra, Eleonora; Bartalesi, Barbara; Zweyer, Marina; Borelli, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    This data article contains data related to the research article entitled, “Synchrotron X-ray microscopy reveals early calcium and iron interaction with crocidolite fibers in the lung of exposed mice” [1]. Asbestos fibers disrupt iron homeostasis in the human and mouse lung, leading to the deposition of iron (Fe) onto longer asbestos fibers which forms asbestos bodies (AB) [2]. Similar to Fe, calcium (Ca) is also deposited in the coats of the AB. This article presents data on iron and calcium in the mouse lung after asbestos exposure detected by histochemical evaluation. PMID:26909387

  18. Regulation of IL-33 by Oncostatin M in Mouse Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Izakelian, Laura; Dubey, Anisha; Zhang, Grace; Wong, Steven; Kwofie, Karen; Qureshi, Aatif; Botelho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    IL-33 modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses at tissue sites including lung and may play critical roles in inflammatory lung disease. Although IL-33 expression can be altered upon NF-Kappa B activation, here we examine regulation by Oncostatin M, a gp130 cytokine family member, in mouse lung tissue. Responses were assessed in BALB/c mouse lung at day 7 of transient overexpression using endotracheally administered adenovirus encoding OSM (AdOSM) or empty vector (AdDel70). Whole lung extracts showed induction of IL-33 mRNA (>20-fold) and protein (10-fold increase in immunoblots) by AdOSM relative to AdDel70. Immunohistochemistry for IL-33 indicated a marked induction of nuclear staining in alveolar epithelial cells in vivo. Oncostatin M stimulated IL-33 mRNA and IL-33 full length protein in C10 mouse type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in culture in time-dependent and dose-dependent fashion, whereas IL-6, LIF, IL-31, IL-4, or IL-13 did not, and TGFβ repressed IL-33. IL-33 induction was associated with activation of STAT3, and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 ameliorated IL-33 levels. These results indicate Oncostatin M as a potent inducer of IL-33 in mouse lung epithelial cells and suggest that an OSM/IL-33 axis may participate in innate immunity and inflammatory conditions in lung. PMID:27703303

  19. A genome-scale study of transcription factor expression in the branching mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Herriges, John C.; Yi, Lan; Hines, Elizabeth A.; Harvey, Julie F.; Xu, Guoliang; Gray, Paul; Ma, Qiufu; Sun, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammalian lung development consists of a series of precisely choreographed events that drive the progression from simple lung buds to the elaborately branched organ that fulfills the vital function of gas exchange. Strict transcriptional control is essential for lung development. Among the large number of transcription factors encoded in the mouse genome, only a small portion of them are known to be expressed and function in the developing lung. Thus a systematic investigation of transcription factors expressed in the lung is warranted. Results To enrich for genes that may be responsible for regional growth and patterning, we performed a screen using RNA in situ hybridization to identify genes that show restricted expression patterns in the embryonic lung. We focused on the pseudoglandular stage during which the lung undergoes branching morphogenesis, a cardinal event of lung development. Using a genome-scale probe set that represents over 90% of the transcription factors encoded in the mouse genome, we identified sixty-two transcription factor genes with localized expression in the epithelium, mesenchyme or both. Many of these genes have not been previously implicated in lung development. Conclusions Our findings provide new starting points for the elucidation of the transcriptional circuitry that controls lung development. PMID:22711520

  20. Response and resistance to NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Meylan, Etienne; Oliver, Trudy G.; Feldser, David M.; Winslow, Monte M.; Bronson, Roderick; Jacks, Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is a frequently diagnosed cancer type and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. We recently demonstrated in an autochthonous mouse model of this disease that genetic inhibition of the NF-κB pathway affects both the initiation and maintenance of lung cancer, identifying this pathway as a promising therapeutic target. In this study, we tested the efficacy of small molecule NF-κB inhibitors in mouse models of lung cancer. In murine lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with high NF-κB activity, the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib efficiently reduced nuclear p65, repressed NF-κB target genes and rapidly induced apoptosis. Bortezomib also induced lung tumor regression in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor bearing KrasLSL-G12D/wt;p53flox/flox mice. In contrast, KrasG12D/wt lung tumors, which have low levels of nuclear NF-κB, do not respond to Bortezomib, suggesting that nuclear NF-κB may be a biomarker to predict treatment response to drugs of this class. Following repeated treatment, initially sensitive lung tumors became resistant to Bortezomib. A second NF-κB inhibitor, Bay-117082, showed similar therapeutic efficacy and acquired-resistance in mice. Our results using preclinical mouse models support the NF-κB pathway as a potential therapeutic target for a defined subset of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21874163

  1. Chromosomal changes in high- and low-invasive mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Linda M. Ensell, Mang X.; Ostvold, Anne-Carine; Baldwin, Kimberly T.; Kashon, Michael L.; Lowry, David T.; Senft, Jamie R.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Li Zhi; Tyson, Frederick L.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2008-11-15

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is increasing in the United States, however, the difficulties in obtaining lung cancer families and representative samples of early to late stages of the disease have lead to the study of mouse models for lung cancer. We used Spectral Karyotyping (SKY), mapping with fluorescently labeled genomic clones (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays, gene expression arrays, Western immunoblot and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze nine pairs of high-invasive and low-invasive tumor cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells to detect molecular changes associated with tumor invasion. The duplication of chromosomes 1 and 15 and deletion of chromosome 8 were significantly associated with a high-invasive phenotype. The duplication of chromosome 1 at band C4 and E1/2-H1 were the most significant chromosomal changes in the high-invasive cell strains. Mapping with FISH and CGH array further narrowed the minimum region of duplication of chromosome 1 to 71-82 centimorgans (cM). Expression array analysis and confirmation by real time PCR demonstrated increased expression of COX-2, Translin (TB-RBP), DYRK3, NUCKS and Tubulin-{alpha}4 genes in the high-invasive cell strains. Elevated expression and copy number of these genes, which are involved in inflammation, cell movement, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and telomere elongation, were associated with an invasive phenotype. Similar linkage groups are altered in invasive human lung adenocarcinoma, implying that the mouse is a valid genetic model for the study of the progression of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. AKT1E¹⁷K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6-2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype.

  3. Mechanical properties of acellular mouse lungs after sterilization by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Juan J; Nonaka, Paula N; Campillo, Noelia; Palma, Renata K; Melo, Esther; de Oliveira, Luis V F; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-12-01

    Lung bioengineering using decellularized organ scaffolds is a potential alternative for lung transplantation. Clinical application will require donor scaffold sterilization. As gamma-irradiation is a conventional method for sterilizing tissue preparations for clinical application, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of lung scaffold sterilization by gamma irradiation on the mechanical properties of the acellular lung when subjected to the artificial ventilation maneuvers typical within bioreactors. Twenty-six mouse lungs were decellularized by a sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent protocol. Eight lungs were used as controls and 18 of them were submitted to a 31kGy gamma irradiation sterilization process (9 kept frozen in dry ice and 9 at room temperature). Mechanical properties of acellular lungs were measured before and after irradiation. Lung resistance (RL) and elastance (EL) were computed by linear regression fitting of recorded signals during mechanical ventilation (tracheal pressure, flow and volume). Static (Est) and dynamic (Edyn) elastances were obtained by the end-inspiratory occlusion method. After irradiation lungs presented higher values of resistance and elastance than before irradiation: RL increased by 41.1% (room temperature irradiation) and 32.8% (frozen irradiation) and EL increased by 41.8% (room temperature irradiation) and 31.8% (frozen irradiation). Similar increases were induced by irradiation in Est and Edyn. Scanning electron microscopy showed slight structural changes after irradiation, particularly those kept frozen. Sterilization by gamma irradiation at a conventional dose to ensure sterilization modifies acellular lung mechanics, with potential implications for lung bioengineering. PMID:25241281

  4. Cytochrome P450 1b1 in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced skin carcinogenesis: Tumorigenicity of individual PAHs and coal-tar extract, DNA adduction and expression of select genes in the Cyp1b1 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Siddens, Lisbeth K; Bunde, Kristi L; Harper, Tod A; McQuistan, Tammie J; Löhr, Christiane V; Bramer, Lisa M; Waters, Katrina M; Tilton, Susan C; Krueger, Sharon K; Williams, David E; Baird, William M

    2015-09-01

    FVB/N mice wild-type, heterozygous or null for Cyp 1b1 were used in a two-stage skin tumor study comparing PAH, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), and coal tar extract (CTE, SRM 1597a). Following 20 weeks of promotion with TPA the Cyp 1b1 null mice, initiated with DBC, exhibited reductions in incidence, multiplicity, and progression. None of these effects were observed with BaP or CTE. The mechanism of Cyp 1b1-dependent alteration of DBC skin carcinogenesis was further investigated by determining expression of select genes in skin from DBC-treated mice 2, 4 and 8h post-initiation. A significant reduction in levels of Cyp 1a1, Nqo1 at 8h and Akr 1c14 mRNA was observed in Cyp 1b1 null (but not wt or het) mice, whereas no impact was observed in Gst a1, Nqo 1 at 2 and 4h or Akr 1c19 at any time point. Cyp 1b1 mRNA was not elevated by DBC. The major covalent DNA adducts, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-(±)-11,12-dihydrodiol-cis and trans-13,14-epoxide-deoxyadenosine (DBCDE-dA) were quantified by UHPLC-MS/MS 8h post-initiation. Loss of Cyp1 b1 expression reduced DBCDE-dA adducts in the skin but not to a statistically significant degree. The ratio of cis- to trans-DBCDE-dA adducts was higher in the skin than other target tissues such as the spleen, lung and liver (oral dosing). These results document that Cyp 1b1 plays a significant role in bioactivation and carcinogenesis of DBC in a two-stage mouse skin tumor model and that loss of Cyp 1b1 has little impact on tumor response with BaP or CTE as initiators. PMID:26049101

  5. Mitigating role of baicalein on lysosomal enzymes and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme status during lung carcinogenesis of Swiss albino mice induced by benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Naveenkumar, Chandrashekar; Raghunandakumar, Subramanian; Asokkumar, Selvamani; Binuclara, John; Rajan, Balan; Premkumar, Thandavamoorthy; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2014-06-01

    The lungs mainly serve as a primary site for xenobiotic metabolism and constitute an important defense mechanism against inhalation of carcinogens. Our current study aimed to evaluate the chemotherapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) in Swiss albino mice exposed to tobacco-specific carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] for its ability to mitigate pulmonary carcinogenesis. Here, we report that altered activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes (cathepsin-D, cathepsin-B, acid phosphatase, β-D-galactosidase, β-D-glucuronidase, and β-D-N-acetyl glucosaminidase), phase I biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase), and phase II enzymes (glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronyl transferase, and DT-diaphorase) were observed in the B(a)P-induced mice. Treatment with BE significantly restored back the activities/levels of lysosomal enzymes, phase I and phase II biotransformation enzymes. Moreover, assessment of lysosomal abnormalities by transmission electron microscopic examination revealed that BE treatment effectively counteract B(a)P-induced oxidative damages. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot analysis of CYP1A1 revealed that BE treatment effectively negate B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of CYP1A1. Further analysis of scanning electron microscopic studies in lung was carried out to substantiate the anticarcinogenic effect of BE. The overall data suggest that BE treatment significantly inhibits lysosomal and microsomal dysfunction, thus revealing its potent anticarcinogenic effect.

  6. Genetically manipulated mouse models of lung disease: potential and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Alexander J. S.; Owen, Caroline A.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Gene targeting in mice (transgenic and knockout) has provided investigators with an unparalleled armamentarium in recent decades to dissect the cellular and molecular basis of critical pathophysiological states. Fruitful information has been derived from studies using these genetically engineered mice with significant impact on our understanding, not only of specific biological processes spanning cell proliferation to cell death, but also of critical molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of human disease. This review will focus on the use of gene-targeted mice to study various models of lung disease including airways diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, pneumonia, and acute lung injury. We will attempt to review the current technological approaches of generating gene-targeted mice and the enormous dataset derived from these studies, providing a template for lung investigators. PMID:22198907

  7. Molecular biology of nickel carcinogenesis: identification of differentially expressed genes in morphologically transformed C3H10T1/2 Cl 8 mouse embryo fibroblast cell lines induced by specific insoluble nickel compounds.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rini; Ramnath, Jamuna; Clemens, Farrah; Kaspin, Lisa C; Landolph, Joseph R

    2004-01-01

    Inhalation of mixtures of insoluble and soluble nickel compounds by humans during nickel refining has been associated with excess lung and nasal sinus cancers. Insoluble nickel subsulfide (Ni3S2) and nickel oxide (NiO) are carcinogenic to rodents by inhalation. We previously showed that insoluble Ni3S2, crystalline nickel monosulfide (NiS), and green (high temperature, HT) and black (low temperature, LT) NiO, induced morphological transformation in cultured C3H/10T1/2 Cl 8 (10T1/2) mouse embryo cells. To understand molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis by insoluble nickel compounds, we used random, arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (RAP-PCR) mRNA differential display and identified nine cDNA fragments that were differentially expressed between nontransformed and nickel-transformed cell lines in approximately 10.0% of the total mRNA. Expression of the calnexin gene (encoding a type I membrane protein/molecular chaperone), the ect-2 proto-oncogene, and the stress-inducible gene, Wdr1, was upregulated. Expression of six genes--the vitamin D interacting protein/thyroid hormone activating protein 80 (DRIP/TRAP-80) gene, the insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGFR1) gene, the small nuclear activating protein (SNAP C3) gene, and three unknown genes, was down-regulated, in nickel-transformed cell lines. We hypothesize that these resulting aberrations in gene expression could contribute to the induction and/or maintenance of morphological transformation induced by specific insoluble nickel compounds. PMID:14971661

  8. Cadmium carcinogenesis in review.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, M P

    2000-04-01

    Cadmium is an inorganic toxicant of great environmental and occupational concern which was classified as a human carcinogen in 1993. Occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer in humans. Cadmium exposure has also, on occasion, been linked to human prostate cancer. The epidemiological data linking cadmium and pulmonary cancer are much stronger than for prostatic cancer. Other target sites for cadmium carcinogenesis in humans (liver, kidney, stomach) are considered equivocal. In rodents, cadmium causes tumors at several sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats results in pulmonary adenocarcinomas, supporting a role in human lung cancer. Prostate tumors and preneoplastic proliferative lesions can be induced in rats after cadmium ingestion or injection. Prostatic carcinogenesis in rats occurs only at cadmium doses below those that induce chronic degeneration and dysfunction of the testes, a well-known effect of cadmium, confirming the androgen dependency of prostate tumors. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the testes, adrenals, injection sites, and hematopoietic system. Various treatments can modify cadmium carcinogenesis including supplemental zinc, which prevents cadmium-induced injection site and testicular tumors while facilitating prostatic tumors. Cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect mechanisms, although the precise mechanisms remain unknown. PMID:10830873

  9. Cadmium carcinogenesis in review.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, M P

    2000-04-01

    Cadmium is an inorganic toxicant of great environmental and occupational concern which was classified as a human carcinogen in 1993. Occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer in humans. Cadmium exposure has also, on occasion, been linked to human prostate cancer. The epidemiological data linking cadmium and pulmonary cancer are much stronger than for prostatic cancer. Other target sites for cadmium carcinogenesis in humans (liver, kidney, stomach) are considered equivocal. In rodents, cadmium causes tumors at several sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats results in pulmonary adenocarcinomas, supporting a role in human lung cancer. Prostate tumors and preneoplastic proliferative lesions can be induced in rats after cadmium ingestion or injection. Prostatic carcinogenesis in rats occurs only at cadmium doses below those that induce chronic degeneration and dysfunction of the testes, a well-known effect of cadmium, confirming the androgen dependency of prostate tumors. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the testes, adrenals, injection sites, and hematopoietic system. Various treatments can modify cadmium carcinogenesis including supplemental zinc, which prevents cadmium-induced injection site and testicular tumors while facilitating prostatic tumors. Cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect mechanisms, although the precise mechanisms remain unknown.

  10. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-06-01

    The quantitative estimation of the carcinogenic risk of low-dose, high-LET radiation in the case of exposure to radon daughters and lung-cancer is subject to numerous uncertainties. The greatest of these concerns the parametric values of the dose-response curve. We lack knowledge and an understanding of the dosimetry and the distribution of aggregates of radioactivity that remain localized as hot spots in specific regions of the lungs and the influence on greater or lesser risk of lung cancer per average lung dose than uniformly deposited radiation (NRC76). We have only a limited understanding of the response to exposure to high-LET radiations, such as alpha particles, for which linear risk estimates for low doses are less likely to overestimate the risk, and may, in fact, underestimate the risk (BEIR80). Other uncertainties include the length of the latency period, the RBE for alpha radiation relative to gamma radiation, the period during which the radiation risk is expressed, the risk projection model used - whether absolute or relative - for projecting risk beyond the period of observation, the effect of dose rate and protraction of dose, and the influence of differences in the natural incidence of lung cancer in different populations. In addition, uncertainties are introduced by the biological and life-style risk characteristics of humans, for example, the effect of sex, the effect of age at the time of irradiation and at the time of appearance of the cancer, the influence of length of observation or follow-up of the study populations, and the influence of perhaps the most important confounding bias, cigarette-smoking. The collective influence of these uncertainties is such as to deny great credibility to any estimate of human lung cancer risk and other cancer risk that can be made for low-dose, high-LET radon daughter radiation exposure.

  11. Morphological analysis of mouse lungs after treatment with magnetite-based magnetic fluid stabilized with DMSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Mônica Pereira; Miranda Parca, Renata; Braun Chaves, Sacha; Paulino Silva, Luciano; Djalma Santos, Antonio; Guerrero Marques Lacava, Zulmira; César Morais, Paulo; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2005-05-01

    Mouse lungs injected with magnetic fluids based on magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid were studied. We observed clusters of magnetic nanoparticles inside blood vessels, within the organ parenchyma and cells, as well as increased numbers of leukocytes in the organ. Both the particle concentration and organ inflammation diminished in a time-dependent manner.

  12. Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil in the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay and the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Azuine, Magnus A; Tokuda, Harukuni; Takasaki, Midori; Mukainaka, Teruo; Konoshima, Takao; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-06-01

    Resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil are known natural dietary components with intrinsic cancer chemopreventive potentials. As a part of our study of dietary constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, we have assessed the anti-cancer potentials of these products in the promotion stage of cancer development employing the in vitro Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, we studied the activities of these compounds in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay as well as on the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging bioassay with a view to comparing some of the mechanisms of their anti-cancer activity. Finally, we compared the observed chemoprotective capabilities of the four products in the in vivo 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiated and TPA-promoted mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. All the products tested showed a profound inhibitory effect on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen induction using Raji cells. Comparatively, sesame oil was the most potent followed by sesamol and then resveratrol. Only sesamol and resveratrol showed a remarkable cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assays as well as profound free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH bioassay. In both test systems, sesamol exhibited a more remarkable activity than resveratrol while sesame oil and sunflower oil did not exhibit any appreciable activity even at the highest concentrations tested (4000 microg ml(-1) ). In our in vivo assay at a 50-fold molar ratio to TPA, sesamol offered 50% reduction in mouse skin papillomas at 20 weeks after promotion with TPA. Under an identical molar ratio to TPA, resveratrol offered a 60% reduction in the papillomas in mouse at 20 weeks. Thus sesamol seems to be an almost equally potent chemopreventive agent. Sesame oil and sunflower oil offered 20 and 40% protection, respectively, in the mouse

  13. Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil in the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay and the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Azuine, Magnus A; Tokuda, Harukuni; Takasaki, Midori; Mukainaka, Teruo; Konoshima, Takao; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-06-01

    Resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil are known natural dietary components with intrinsic cancer chemopreventive potentials. As a part of our study of dietary constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, we have assessed the anti-cancer potentials of these products in the promotion stage of cancer development employing the in vitro Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, we studied the activities of these compounds in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay as well as on the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging bioassay with a view to comparing some of the mechanisms of their anti-cancer activity. Finally, we compared the observed chemoprotective capabilities of the four products in the in vivo 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiated and TPA-promoted mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. All the products tested showed a profound inhibitory effect on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen induction using Raji cells. Comparatively, sesame oil was the most potent followed by sesamol and then resveratrol. Only sesamol and resveratrol showed a remarkable cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assays as well as profound free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH bioassay. In both test systems, sesamol exhibited a more remarkable activity than resveratrol while sesame oil and sunflower oil did not exhibit any appreciable activity even at the highest concentrations tested (4000 microg ml(-1) ). In our in vivo assay at a 50-fold molar ratio to TPA, sesamol offered 50% reduction in mouse skin papillomas at 20 weeks after promotion with TPA. Under an identical molar ratio to TPA, resveratrol offered a 60% reduction in the papillomas in mouse at 20 weeks. Thus sesamol seems to be an almost equally potent chemopreventive agent. Sesame oil and sunflower oil offered 20 and 40% protection, respectively, in the mouse

  14. Flow cytometric analysis of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Misharin, Alexander V; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Perlman, Harris

    2013-10-01

    The lung hosts multiple populations of macrophages and dendritic cells, which play a crucial role in lung pathology. The accurate identification and enumeration of these subsets are essential for understanding their role in lung pathology. Flow cytometry is a mainstream tool for studying the immune system. However, a systematic flow cytometric approach to identify subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) accurately and consistently in the normal mouse lung has not been described. Here we developed a panel of surface markers and an analysis strategy that accurately identify all known populations of macrophages and DCs, and their precursors in the lung during steady-state conditions and bleomycin-induced injury. Using this panel, we assessed the polarization of lung macrophages during the course of bleomycin-induced lung injury. Alveolar macrophages expressed markers of alternatively activated macrophages during both acute and fibrotic phases of bleomycin-induced lung injury, whereas markers of classically activated macrophages were expressed only during the acute phase. Taken together, these data suggest that this flow cytometric panel is very helpful in identifying macrophage and DC populations and their state of activation in normal, injured, and fibrotic lungs.

  15. Longitudinal in vivo microcomputed tomography of mouse lungs: No evidence for radiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vande Velde, Greetje; De Langhe, Ellen; Poelmans, Jennifer; Bruyndonckx, Peter; d'Agostino, Emiliano; Verbeken, Erik; Bogaerts, Ria; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Before microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) can be exploited to its full potential for longitudinal monitoring of transgenic and experimental mouse models of lung diseases, radiotoxic side effects such as inflammation or fibrosis must be considered. We evaluated dose and potential radiotoxicity to the lungs for long-term respiratory-gated high-resolution micro-CT protocols. Free-breathing C57Bl/6 mice underwent four different retrospectively respiratory gated micro-CT imaging schedules of repeated scans during 5 or 12 wk, followed by ex vivo micro-CT and detailed histological and biochemical assessment of lung damage. Radiation exposure, dose, and absorbed dose were determined by ionization chamber, thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Despite the relatively large radiation dose delivered per micro-CT acquisition, mice did not show any signs of radiation-induced lung damage or fibrosis when scanned weekly during 5 and up to 12 wk. Doubling the scanning frequency and once tripling the radiation dose as to mimic the instant repetition of a failed scan also stayed without detectable toxicity after 5 wk of scanning. Histological analyses confirmed the absence of radiotoxic damage to the lungs, thereby demonstrating that long-term monitoring of mouse lungs using high-resolution micro-CT is safe. This opens perspectives for longitudinal monitoring of (transgenic) mouse models of lung diseases and therapeutic response on an individual basis with high spatial and temporal resolution, without concerns for radiation toxicity that could potentially influence the readout of micro-CT-derived lung biomarkers. This work further supports the introduction of micro-CT for routine use in the preclinical pulmonary research field where postmortem histological approaches are still the gold standard. PMID:26024893

  16. Lung tumor promotion by chromium-containing welding particulate matter in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiology suggests that occupational exposure to welding particulate matter (PM) may increase lung cancer risk. However, animal studies are lacking to conclusively link welding with an increased risk. PM derived from stainless steel (SS) welding contains carcinogenic metals such as hexavalent chromium and nickel. We hypothesized that welding PM may act as a tumor promoter and increase lung tumor multiplicity in vivo. Therefore, the capacity of chromium-containing gas metal arc (GMA)-SS welding PM to promote lung tumors was evaluated using a two-stage (initiation-promotion) model in lung tumor susceptible A/J mice. Methods Male mice (n = 28-30/group) were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA;10 μg/g; IP) or vehicle (corn oil) followed by 5 weekly pharyngeal aspirations of GMA-SS (340 or 680 μg/exposure) or PBS. Lung tumors were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. Results MCA initiation followed by GMA-SS welding PM exposure promoted tumor multiplicity in both the low (12.1 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse) and high (14.0 ± 1.8 tumors/mouse) exposure groups significantly above MCA/sham (4.77 ± 0.7 tumors/mouse; p = 0.0001). Multiplicity was also highly significant (p < 0.004) across all individual lung regions of GMA-SS-exposed mice. No exposure effects were found in the corn oil groups at 30 weeks. Histopathology confirmed the gross findings and revealed increased inflammation and a greater number of malignant lesions in the MCA/welding PM-exposed groups. Conclusions GMA-SS welding PM acts as a lung tumor promoter in vivo. Thus, this study provides animal evidence to support the epidemiological data that show welders have an increased lung cancer risk. PMID:24107379

  17. Bromelain nanoparticles protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya B; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2015-04-01

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy leads to severe side effects, which limits its use. Nanoparticles (NPs) based delivery systems offer an effective alternative. Several evidences highlight the importance of Bromelain (BL), a proteolytic enzyme, as an anti-tumor agent which however has been limited due to the requirement of high doses at the tumor site. Therefore, we illustrate the development of BL loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs that show enhanced anti-tumor effects compared to free BL. The formulated NPs with a mean particle size of 130.4 ± 8.81 nm exhibited sustained release of BL. Subsequent investigation revealed enhanced anti-tumor ability of NPs in 2-stage skin tumorigenesis mice model. Reduction in average number of tumors (∼ 2.3 folds), delay in tumorigenesis (∼ 2 weeks), percent tumorigenesis (∼ 4 folds), and percent mortality rate as well as a reduction in the average tumor volume (∼ 2.5 folds) in mice as compared to free BL were observed. The NPs were found to be superior in exerting chemopreventive effects over chemotherapeutic effects at 10 fold reduced dose than free BL, validated by the enhanced ability of NPs (∼ 1.8 folds) to protect the DNA from induced damage. The effects were also supported by histopathological evaluations. NPs were also capable of modulating the expression of pro-apoptotic (P53, Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) proteins. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that developed NPs formulation could be used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by exerting chemo-preventive effects against induced carcinogenesis at lower dosages. PMID:25619920

  18. Bromelain nanoparticles protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya B; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2015-04-01

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy leads to severe side effects, which limits its use. Nanoparticles (NPs) based delivery systems offer an effective alternative. Several evidences highlight the importance of Bromelain (BL), a proteolytic enzyme, as an anti-tumor agent which however has been limited due to the requirement of high doses at the tumor site. Therefore, we illustrate the development of BL loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs that show enhanced anti-tumor effects compared to free BL. The formulated NPs with a mean particle size of 130.4 ± 8.81 nm exhibited sustained release of BL. Subsequent investigation revealed enhanced anti-tumor ability of NPs in 2-stage skin tumorigenesis mice model. Reduction in average number of tumors (∼ 2.3 folds), delay in tumorigenesis (∼ 2 weeks), percent tumorigenesis (∼ 4 folds), and percent mortality rate as well as a reduction in the average tumor volume (∼ 2.5 folds) in mice as compared to free BL were observed. The NPs were found to be superior in exerting chemopreventive effects over chemotherapeutic effects at 10 fold reduced dose than free BL, validated by the enhanced ability of NPs (∼ 1.8 folds) to protect the DNA from induced damage. The effects were also supported by histopathological evaluations. NPs were also capable of modulating the expression of pro-apoptotic (P53, Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) proteins. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that developed NPs formulation could be used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by exerting chemo-preventive effects against induced carcinogenesis at lower dosages.

  19. Eugenol precludes cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis in mouse by preventing oxidative stress and inflammation and by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2010-03-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the protective efficacy of eugenol against skin cancer and probe into the mechanistic aspects. Skin tumors were initiated by applying 160 nmol DMBA and promoted by twice weekly applications of 8.5 nmol TPA for 28 wk. All mice developed tumors by 13 wk of promotion. However, in mice pretreated with 30 microL eugenol, no tumors were detected until 8 wk (following anti-initiation protocol) and until 14 wk (following antipromotion protocol) of tumor promotion. PCNA and TUNEL immunohistochemistry of tumors revealed eugenol to ameliorate cell proliferation and elevate apoptosis respectively. The effect of eugenol was assessed on specific stages of carcinogenesis. Initiation with DMBA led to a significant upregulation of p53 expression with a concomitant increase in p21(WAF1) levels in epidermal cells indicating induction of damage to the DNA. However, pretreatment with eugenol led to overexpression of these genes, which probably helped stimulate apoptosis of the initiated cells. To ascertain the molecular mechanisms implicated in the antitumor promoting activity of eugenol, its effect was investigated on markers of tumor promotion and inflammation: ODC activity and iNOS and COX-2 expression, and on levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-alpha, and PGE(2)). Eugenol markedly inhibited all. Eugenol also inhibited the upstream signaling molecule: NF-kappaB, which regulates the expression of these genes. TPA-induced depletion of cutaneous GSH and antioxidant enzymes armory was also precluded by eugenol. From these results, it could be concluded that eugenol markedly protects against chemically induced skin cancer and acts possibly by virtue of its antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities.

  20. Mouse models of human non-small-cell lung cancer: raising the bar.

    PubMed

    Kim, C F B; Jackson, E L; Kirsch, D G; Grimm, J; Shaw, A T; Lane, K; Kissil, J; Olive, K P; Sweet-Cordero, A; Weissleder, R; Jacks, T

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease that presents a challenge to basic research to provide new steps toward therapeutic advances. The cell-type-specific responses to oncogenic mutations that initiate and regulate lung cancer remain poorly defined. A better understanding of the relevant signaling pathways and mechanisms that control therapeutic outcome could also provide new insight. Improved conditional mouse models are now available as tools to improve the understanding of the cellular and molecular origins of adenocarcinoma. These models have already proven their utility in proof-of-principle experiments with new technologies including genomics and imaging. Integrated thinking to apply technological advances while using the appropriate mouse model is likely to facilitate discoveries that will significantly improve lung cancer detection and intervention.

  1. Maternally imprinted microRNAs are differentially expressed during mouse and human lung development

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Andrew E.; Moschos, Sterghios A.; Perry, Mark M.; Barnes, Peter J.; Lindsay, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of non-coding genes that regulate the translation of target mRNA. More than 300 miRNAs have now been discovered in humans, although the function of most is still unknown. A highly sensitive, semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was utilised to reveal the differential expression of a number of miRNAs during the development of both mouse and human lung. Of note was the upregulation in neonatal mouse and fetal human lung of a maternally imprinted miRNA cluster located at human chromosome 14q32.21 (mouse chromosome 12F2), which includes the miR-154 and miR-335 families and is situated within the Gtl2-Dio3 domain. Conversely, several miRNAs were upregulated in adult compared to neonatal/fetal lung including miR-29a and miR-29b. Differences in the spatial expression patterns of miR-154, miR-29a and miR-26a was demonstrated using in situ hybridisation of mouse neonatal and adult tissue using miRNA-specific LNA probes. Interestingly, miR-154 appeared to be localised to the stroma of fetal but not adult lungs. The overall expression profile was similar for mouse and human tissue suggesting evolutionary conservation of miRNA expression during lung development and demonstrating the importance of maternally imprinted miRNAs in the developmental process. PMID:17191223

  2. Impact of Prostate Inflammation on Lesion Development in the POET3+Pten+/− Mouse Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Burcham, Grant N.; Cresswell, Gregory M.; Snyder, Paul W.; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A.; Henry, Michael D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten+/−) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten+/− mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b+Gr1+ cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten+/− model of cancer. PMID:25455686

  3. Impact of prostate inflammation on lesion development in the POET3(+)Pten(+/-) mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burcham, Grant N; Cresswell, Gregory M; Snyder, Paul W; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A; Henry, Michael D; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2014-12-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten(+/-)) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten(+/-) mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten(+/-) model of cancer.

  4. Stable Somatic Gene Expression in Mouse Lungs Following Electroporation-mediated Tol2 Transposon Delivery.

    PubMed

    Muliawan, Hary Sakti; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Yagi, Keiko; Ikeda, Koji; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Emoto, Noriaki

    2015-10-07

    Gene delivery to the lung has rapidly progressed as an important method for studying various chronic lung diseases. Viral vectors, albeit highly efficient, are limited by the host immune response. Electroporation, a well-known non-viral method, can efficiently deliver genes to the lung, but is unable to induce stable gene expression. The Tol2 transposon is another non-viral method that can induce stable gene expression by reinserting its genes into the host genome. In this study, we combined electroporation and Tol2 transposons to obtain stable, high-level gene expression in the mouse lung. Tol2 transposon plasmids (pT2A-EGFP; Tol2, pCAGGS-TP; transposase) were optimized in vitro, and the electroporation procedure (pCAG-EGFP) was optimized in mouse lungs. After optimization, a combination of electroporation plus the Tol2 transposon was used in a comparative analysis with electroporation plus pCAG-EGFP. GFP expression levels were quantified and visualized on days 4 and 7 post-electroporation. We successfully reproduced the Tol2 transposon system in vitro and the electroporation procedure in vivo. We observed sustainable GFP expression using electroporation plus the Tol2 transposon on days 4 and 7, while electroporation plus pCAG-EGFP resulted in decreased GFP expression on day 7. We were able to induce high-level, stable gene expression in mouse lungs using a combination of electroporation and the Tol2 transposon. This represents a safer method for lung gene delivery that can be used as an alternative to viral vectors.

  5. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  6. Bexarotene plus erlotinib suppress lung carcinogenesis independent of KRAS mutations in two clinical trials and transgenic models.

    PubMed

    Dragnev, Konstantin H; Ma, Tian; Cyrus, Jobin; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Memoli, Vincent; Busch, Alexander M; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Seltzer, Marc; Johnstone, David; Erkmen, Cherie P; Nugent, William; Rigas, James R; Liu, Xi; Freemantle, Sarah J; Kurie, Jonathan M; Waxman, Samuel; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2011-06-01

    The rexinoid bexarotene represses cyclin D1 by causing its proteasomal degradation. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) erlotinib represses cyclin D1 via different mechanisms. We conducted a preclinical study and 2 clinical/translational trials (a window-of-opportunity and phase II) of bexarotene plus erlotinib. The combination repressed growth and cyclin D1 expression in cyclin-E- and KRAS/p53-driven transgenic lung cancer cells. The window-of-opportunity trial in early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (10 evaluable), including cases with KRAS mutations, repressed cyclin D1 (in tumor biopsies and buccal swabs) and induced necrosis and inflammatory responses. The phase II trial in heavily pretreated, advanced NSCLC patients (40 evaluable; a median of two prior relapses per patient (range, 0-5); 21% with prior EGFR-inhibitor therapy) produced three major clinical responses in patients with prolonged progression-free survival (583-, 665-, and 1,460-plus days). Median overall survival was 22 weeks. Hypertriglyceridemia was associated with an increased median overall survival (P = 0.001). Early PET (positron emission tomographic) response did not reliably predict clinical response. The combination was generally well tolerated, with toxicities similar to those of the single agents. In conclusion, bexarotene plus erlotinib was active in KRAS-driven lung cancer cells, was biologically active in early-stage mutant KRAS NSCLC, and was clinically active in advanced, chemotherapy-refractory mutant KRAS tumors in this study and previous trials. Additional lung cancer therapy or prevention trials with this oral regimen are warranted.

  7. Alcohol exposure alters mouse lung inflammation in response to inhaled dust.

    PubMed

    McCaskill, Michael L; Romberger, Debra J; DeVasure, Jane; Boten, Jessica; Sisson, Joseph H; Bailey, Kristina L; Poole, Jill A; Wyatt, Todd A

    2012-07-01

    Alcohol exposure is associated with increased lung infections and decreased mucociliary clearance. Occupational workers exposed to dusts from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are at risk for developing chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Agricultural worker co-exposure to alcohol and organic dust has been established, although little research has been conducted on the combination effects of alcohol and organic dusts on the lung. Previously, we have shown in a mouse model that exposure to hog dust extract (HDE) collected from a CAFO results in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC), elevated lavage fluid cytokines/chemokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the development of significant lung pathology. Because alcohol blocks airway epithelial cell release of IL-6 in vitro, we hypothesized that alcohol exposure would alter mouse lung inflammatory responses to HDE. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were fed 20% alcohol or water ad libitum for 6 weeks and treated with 12.5% HDE by intranasal inhalation method daily during the final three weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), tracheas and lungs were collected. HDE stimulated a 2-4 fold increase in lung and tracheal PKCε (epsilon) activity in mice, but no such increase in PKCε activity was observed in dust-exposed mice fed alcohol. Similarly, alcohol-fed mice demonstrated significantly less IL-6 in lung lavage in response to dust than that observed in control mice instilled with HDE. TNFα levels were also inhibited in the alcohol and HDE-exposed mouse lung tissue as compared to the HDE only exposed group. HDE-induced lung inflammatory aggregates clearly present in the tissue from HDE only exposed animals were not visually detectable in the HDE/alcohol co-exposure group. Statistically significant weight reductions and 20% mortality were also observed in the mice co-exposed to HDE and alcohol. These data suggest that alcohol exposure depresses the ability of the lung to activate PKCε

  8. Alcohol Exposure Alters Mouse Lung Inflammation in Response to Inhaled Dust

    PubMed Central

    McCaskill, Michael L.; Romberger, Debra J.; DeVasure, Jane; Boten, Jessica; Sisson, Joseph H.; Bailey, Kristina L.; Poole, Jill A.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol exposure is associated with increased lung infections and decreased mucociliary clearance. Occupational workers exposed to dusts from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are at risk for developing chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Agricultural worker co-exposure to alcohol and organic dust has been established, although little research has been conducted on the combination effects of alcohol and organic dusts on the lung. Previously, we have shown in a mouse model that exposure to hog dust extract (HDE) collected from a CAFO results in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC), elevated lavage fluid cytokines/chemokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the development of significant lung pathology. Because alcohol blocks airway epithelial cell release of IL-6 in vitro, we hypothesized that alcohol exposure would alter mouse lung inflammatory responses to HDE. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were fed 20% alcohol or water ad libitum for 6 weeks and treated with 12.5% HDE by intranasal inhalation method daily during the final three weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), tracheas and lungs were collected. HDE stimulated a 2–4 fold increase in lung and tracheal PKCε (epsilon) activity in mice, but no such increase in PKCε activity was observed in dust-exposed mice fed alcohol. Similarly, alcohol-fed mice demonstrated significantly less IL-6 in lung lavage in response to dust than that observed in control mice instilled with HDE. TNFα levels were also inhibited in the alcohol and HDE-exposed mouse lung tissue as compared to the HDE only exposed group. HDE-induced lung inflammatory aggregates clearly present in the tissue from HDE only exposed animals were not visually detectable in the HDE/alcohol co-exposure group. Statistically significant weight reductions and 20% mortality were also observed in the mice co-exposed to HDE and alcohol. These data suggest that alcohol exposure depresses the ability of the lung to activate PKCε

  9. Identification of candidate lung cancer susceptibility genes in mouse using oligonucleotide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, W; Bernert, H; Sun, H; Wang, Y; You, M

    2002-01-01

    We applied microarray gene expression profiling to lungs from mouse strains having variable susceptibility to lung tumour development as a means to identify, within known quantitative trait loci (QTLs), candidate genes responsible for susceptibility or resistance to lung cancer. At least eight chromosomal regions of mice have been mapped and verified to be linked with lung tumour susceptibility or resistance. In this study, high density oligonucleotide arrays were used to measure the relative expression levels of >36 000 genes and ESTs in lung tissues of A/J, BALB/cJ, SM/J, C3H/HeJ, and C57BL/6J mice. A number of differentially expressed genes were found in each of the lung cancer susceptibility QTLs. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes located within QTLs produced 28 susceptibility candidates and 22 resistance candidates. These candidates may be extremely helpful in the ultimate identification of the precise genes responsible for lung tumour susceptibility or resistance in mice and, through follow up, humans. Complete data sets are available at http://thinker.med.ohio-state.edu. PMID:12205107

  10. Mechanistic study on lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort supports important role of clonal expansion in lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zaballa, I; Eidemüller, M

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort was analyzed using the two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model. A total of 2996 lung cancer deaths among the 58,695 male workers were observed during the follow-up period between 1946 and 2003. Adjustment to silica exposure was performed to find a more accurate estimation of the risk of radon exposure. An additional analysis with the descriptive excess relative risk (ERR) model was carried out for comparison. The TSCE model that best describes the data is nonlinear in the clonal expansion with radon exposure and has a saturation level at an exposure rate of [Formula: see text]. The excess relative risk decreases with age and shows an inverse exposure rate effect. In comparison with the ERR model, the TSCE model predicts a considerably larger risk for low exposures rates below [Formula: see text]. Comparison to other mechanistic studies of lung cancer after exposure to alpha particles using the TSCE model reveals an extraordinary consistency in the main features of the exposure response, given the diversity in the characteristics of the cohorts and the exposure across different studies. This suggests that a nonlinear response mechanism in the clonal expansion, with some level of saturation at large exposure rates, may be playing a crucial role in the development of lung cancer after alpha particle irradiation. PMID:27334643

  11. Mechanistic study on lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort supports important role of clonal expansion in lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zaballa, I; Eidemüller, M

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort was analyzed using the two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model. A total of 2996 lung cancer deaths among the 58,695 male workers were observed during the follow-up period between 1946 and 2003. Adjustment to silica exposure was performed to find a more accurate estimation of the risk of radon exposure. An additional analysis with the descriptive excess relative risk (ERR) model was carried out for comparison. The TSCE model that best describes the data is nonlinear in the clonal expansion with radon exposure and has a saturation level at an exposure rate of [Formula: see text]. The excess relative risk decreases with age and shows an inverse exposure rate effect. In comparison with the ERR model, the TSCE model predicts a considerably larger risk for low exposures rates below [Formula: see text]. Comparison to other mechanistic studies of lung cancer after exposure to alpha particles using the TSCE model reveals an extraordinary consistency in the main features of the exposure response, given the diversity in the characteristics of the cohorts and the exposure across different studies. This suggests that a nonlinear response mechanism in the clonal expansion, with some level of saturation at large exposure rates, may be playing a crucial role in the development of lung cancer after alpha particle irradiation.

  12. Functional expression of mouse relaxin and mouse relaxin-3 in the lung from an Ebola virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivirus via tracheal delivery.

    PubMed

    Silvertown, Josh D; Walia, Jagdeep S; Summerlee, Alastair J; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2006-08-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin is a known modulator of connective tissue and the extracellular matrix by virtue of its ability to regulate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Relaxin knockout mice exhibit age-related pulmonary fibrosis, and delivery of recombinant human H2 relaxin ameliorates fibrotic-like conditions in the mouse lung. We investigated whether lentiviral vectors (LVs) engineering the expression of murine relaxins could induce MMP activity in the mouse lung. Mouse relaxin and mouse relaxin-3 peptides engineered by recombinant LVs were biologically active as shown by stimulation of cAMP from both THP-1 and 293T cells stably expressing relaxin receptor LGR7 and by up-regulation of MMP-2 activity from primary C57BL/6 lung cell cultures. To provide the virions with enhanced tropism for the lung, LVs were pseudotyped with the Zaire strain of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (EboZ GP) and delivered by endotracheal intubation. LVs engineering luciferase pseudotyped with EboZ GP, but not with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein resulted in successful LV transduction and transgene expression in C57BL/6 mouse lung by as early as d 4. Mice treated via tracheal delivery with EboZ GP pseudotyped LVs that engineered expression of mouse relaxins exhibited increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in lung tissue up until the end of our study at d 21. Taken together, this study provides proof-of- principle that relaxin gene expression targeted to the mouse lungs can result in enhanced MMP activity offering potential for alleviating disease conditions characterized by dysregulation of extracellular matrix protein accumulation.

  13. AKT1E17K Is Oncogenic in Mouse Lung and Cooperates with Chemical Carcinogens in Inducing Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malanga, Donatella; Belmonte, Stefania; Colelli, Fabiana; Scarfò, Marzia; De Marco, Carmela; Oliveira, Duarte Mendes; Mirante, Teresa; Camastra, Caterina; Gagliardi, Monica; Rizzuto, Antonia; Mignogna, Chiara; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Fagman, Henrik; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The hotspot AKT1E17K mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT1 occurs in approximately 0.6–2% of human lung cancers. Recently, we have demonstrated that AKT1E17K transforms immortalized human bronchial cells. Here by use of a transgenic Cre-inducible murine strain in the wild type Rosa26 (R26) locus (R26-AKT1E17K mice) we demonstrate that AKT1E17K is a bona-fide oncogene and plays a role in the development of lung cancer in vivo. In fact, we report that mutant AKT1E17K induces bronchial and/or bronchiolar hyperplastic lesions in murine lung epithelium, which progress to frank carcinoma at very low frequency, and accelerates tumor formation induced by chemical carcinogens. In conclusion, AKT1E17K induces hyperplasia of mouse lung epithelium in vivo and cooperates with urethane to induce the fully malignant phenotype. PMID:26859676

  14. High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet Enhances Mammary Carcinogenesis and Local Inflammation in MMTV-PyMT Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, Sarah; McLaughlin, Sarah L.; Hobbs, Gerald; Coad, James; Martin, Karen H.; Olfert, I. Mark; Vona-Davis, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that obesity and the associated adipose tissue inflammation are risk factors for breast cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of a high-fat/high-calorie diet on mammary carcinogenesis in the immunocompetent MMTV-PyMT murine model. Four-week old female mice (20/group) were randomized to receive either a high-fat (HF; 60% kcal as fat) or a low-fat (LF; 16% kcal) diet for eight weeks. Body weights were determined, and tumor volumes measured by ultrasound, each week. At necropsy, the tumors and abdominal visceral fat were weighed and plasma collected. The primary mammary tumors, adjacent mammary fat, and lungs were preserved for histological and immunohistochemical examination and quantification of infiltrating macrophages, crown-like structure (CLS) formation, and microvessel density. The body weight gains, visceral fat weights, the primary mammary tumor growth rates and terminal weights, were all significantly greater in the HF-fed mice. Adipose tissue inflammation in the HF group was indicated by hepatic steatosis, pronounced macrophage infiltration and CLS formation, and elevations in plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), leptin and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. HF intake was also associated with higher tumor-associated microvascular density and the proangiogenic factor MCP-1. This study provides preclinical evidence in a spontaneous model of breast cancer that mammary adipose tissue inflammation induced by diet, enhances the recruitment of macrophages and increases tumor vascular density suggesting a role for obesity in creating a microenvironment favorable for angiogenesis in the progression of breast cancer. PMID:26132316

  15. Ozone-related fluorescent compounds in mouse liver and lung

    SciTech Connect

    Csallany, A.S.; Manwaring, J.D.; Menken, B.Z.

    1985-08-01

    Groups of ten female, weanling mice were fed a basal, vitamin E-deficient diet or a basal diet supplemented with RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate for 14 months. During the last month one group from each dietary regimen was exposed for 30-60 min/day to 1.5 ppm ozone (25 hr total ozone exposure) and the remaining groups to control ambient air. The liver and lung tissues were homogenized and extracted with 2:1 chloroform:methanol and water. Excitation and emission wavelengths for the eluting fractions were determined by continuous emission scans from 250 to 600 nm for each excitation wavelength between 250 and 500 nm. Ozone exposure did not effect the concentration of any of the fluorescent materials examined in the lung, but it resulted in a significant increase in two of four water-soluble compounds in the liver with excitation wavelength maxima/emission wavelength maxima of 270 nm/310 nm and 275 nm/350 nm (smaller molecular weight material) suggesting in vivo lipid oxidation.

  16. Effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) on DNA damage and development of urothelial tumors in a mouse bladder carcinogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Spinardi-Barbisan, Ana Lúcia Tozzi; Rocha, Noeme Sousa; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero; Barbisan, Luís Fernando

    2006-10-01

    Extracts of the spice ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) are rich in gingerols and shogaols, which exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antimycobacterial, and anticarcinogenic proprieties. The present study evaluated the chemoprotective effects of a ginger extract on the DNA damage and the development of bladder cancer induced by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxibutyl) nitrosamine (BBN)/N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) in male Swiss mice. Groups G1-G3 were given 0.05% BBN in drinking water for 18 weeks and four i.p. injections of 30 mg/kg body weight MNU at 1, 3, 10, and 18 weeks. Group G4 and G5 received only the BBN or MNU treatments, respectively, and groups G6 and G7 were not treated with BBN or MNU. Additionally, Groups G2, G3, and G6 were fed diets containing 1, 2, and 2% ginger extract, respectively, while Groups G1, G4, G5, and G7 were fed basal diet. Samples of peripheral blood were collected during the experiment for genotoxicity analysis; blood collected 4 hr after each MNU dose was used for the analysis of DNA damage with the Comet assay (assay performed on leukocytes from all groups), while reticulocytes collected 24 hr after the last MNU treatment of Groups G5-G7 were used for the micronucleus assay. At the end of the experiment, the urinary bladder was removed, fixed, and prepared for histopathological, cell proliferation, and apoptosis evaluations. Ginger by itself was not genotoxic, and it did not alter the DNA damage levels induced by the BBN/MNU treatment during the course of the exposure. The incidence and multiplicity of simple and nodular hyperplasia and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) were increased by the BBN/MNU treatment, but dietary ginger had no significant effect on these responses. However, in Group G2 (BBN/MNU/2% ginger-treated group), there was an increased incidence of Grade 2 TCC. The results suggest that ginger extract does not inhibit the development of BBN-induced mouse bladder tumors. PMID:16878317

  17. Early recognition of lung cancer by integrin targeted imaging in K-ras mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Aichler, Michaela; Kayser, Gian; Walch, Axel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by slow progression and high heterogeneity of tumors. Integrins play an important role in lung cancer development and metastasis and were suggested as a tumor marker; however their role in anticancer therapy remains controversial. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of integrin-targeted imaging to recognize early lesions in transgenic mouse model of lung cancer based on spontaneous introduction of mutated human gene bearing K-ras mutation. We conducted ex vivo and fluorescence molecular tomography-X-ray computed tomography (FMT-XCT) in vivo imaging and analysis for specific targeting of early lung lesions and tumors in rodent preclinical model for lung cancer. The lesions and tumors were characterized by histology, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using a panel of cancer markers. Ex vivo, the integrin-targeted fluorescent signal significantly differed between wild type lung tissue and K-ras pulmonary lesions (PL) at all ages studied. The panel of immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that PL, which only partially show cancer cell features were detected by αvβ3-integrin targeted imaging. Human patient material analysis confirmed the specificity of target localization in different lung cancer types. Most importantly, small tumors in the lungs of 4-week-old animals could be noninvasively detected in vivo on the fluorescence channel of FMT-XCT. Our findings demonstrated αvβ3-integrin targeted fluorescent imaging to specifically detect premalignant pleural lesions in K-ras mice. Integrin targeted imaging may find application areas in preclinical research and clinical practice, such as early lung cancer diagnostics, intraoperative assistance or therapy monitoring.

  18. Susceptibility to quantum dot induced lung inflammation differs widely among the Collaborative Cross founder mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Scoville, David K; White, Collin C; Botta, Dianne; McConnachie, Lisa A; Zadworny, Megan E; Schmuck, Stefanie C; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; Yu, Jianbo; Dills, Russell L; Sheppard, Lianne; Delaney, Martha A; Griffith, William C; Beyer, Richard P; Zangar, Richard C; Pounds, Joel G; Faustman, Elaine M; Kavanagh, Terrance J

    2015-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered semiconductor nanoparticles with unique physicochemical properties that make them potentially useful in clinical, research and industrial settings. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that like other engineered nanomaterials, QDs have the potential to be respiratory hazards, especially in the context of the manufacture of QDs and products containing them, as well as exposures to consumers using these products. The overall goal of this study was to investigate the role of mouse strain in determining susceptibility to QD-induced pulmonary inflammation and toxicity. Male mice from 8 genetically diverse inbred strains (the Collaborative Cross founder strains) were exposed to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs stabilized with an amphiphilic polymer. QD treatment resulted in significant increases in the percentage of neutrophils and levels of cytokines present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from NOD/ShiLtJ and NZO/HlLtJ mice relative to their saline (Sal) treated controls. Cadmium measurements in lung tissue indicated strain-dependent differences in disposition of QDs in the lung. Total glutathione levels in lung tissue were significantly correlated with percent neutrophils in BALF as well as with lung tissue Cd levels. Our findings indicate that QD-induced acute lung inflammation is mouse strain dependent, that it is heritable, and that the choice of mouse strain is an important consideration in planning QD toxicity studies. These data also suggest that formal genetic analyses using additional strains or recombinant inbred strains from these mice could be useful for discovering potential QD-induced inflammation susceptibility loci. PMID:26476918

  19. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  20. An orthotopic mouse model of small cell lung cancer reflects the clinical course in patients.

    PubMed

    Taromi, Sanaz; Kayser, Gian; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Reichardt, Wilfried; Braun, Friederike; Weber, Wolfgang A; Zeiser, Robert; Burger, Meike

    2016-10-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive subtype of lung cancer with very poor prognosis due to early metastatic spread and development of chemoresistance. In the last 30 years the study of SCLC has been constrained by a lack of primary human tumor specimen thus highlighting the need of a suitable mouse model. In this article we present the establishment of an orthotopic xenograft mouse model which accurately reproduced the clinical course of SCLC. Orthotopic implantation enabled engraftment of primary lung tumors in all injected mice. Furthermore, immunodeficiency of mice allowed formation of spontaneous metastases in characteristic organs. Bioluminescence Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron emission tomography were applied to monitor engraftment, metabolism and the exact growth of tumors over time. In order to mimic the extensive disease stage, mice were injected with aggressive human chemoresistant cells leading to development of chemoresistant tumors and early metastatic spread. As a proof of concept treatment of tumor-bearing mice with conventional chemotherapeutics reduced tumor volumes, but a complete regression of tumors was not achieved. By mimicking the extensive disease stage our mouse model can facilitate the study of mechanisms contributing to chemoresistance and metastasis formation, as well as drug screening and evaluation of new treatment strategies for SCLC patients. PMID:27380917

  1. Endothelins and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Olender, Jacek; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Endothelins are a family of four endogenous peptides (ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, ET-4) secreted primarily in an inactive form by the endothelium. They are activated with the participation of converting enzyme. Numerous studies have described their pleiotropic biological activity. These peptides are involved, inter alia, in the regulation of processes such as cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Their important role in the regulation of blood pressure, tissue perfusion (especially in the central nervous system), and myocardial systolic function is also known. Moreover, changes in transcriptional activity of endothelin and its receptors may be involved, with the participation of a number of signaling pathways, in carcinogenesis, and the pathogenesis of numerous diseases (heart, kidney, lung and skin disorders, especially with the component of fibrosis). Their role has been documented in the development of breast, prostatic, colorectal, ovarian, lung, kidney, and endometrial cancer, and in melanoma. In this article we present a brief description of the endothelin group and the participation of them and their receptors in carcinogenesis. We also try to show their role as prognostic and predictive factors in human malignant tumors. The article also refers to clinical trials on the use of preparations of endothelin receptor antagonists in the design of molecular therapeutic strategies in human malignancies. PMID:27594562

  2. Real-time X-ray Imaging of Lung Fluid Volumes in Neonatal Mouse Lung.

    PubMed

    Van Avermaete, Ashley E; Trac, Phi T; Gauthier, Theresa W; Helms, My N

    2016-01-01

    At birth, the lung undergoes a profound phenotypic switch from secretion to absorption, which allows for adaptation to breathing independently. Promoting and sustaining this phenotype is critically important in normal alveolar growth and gas exchange throughout life. Several in vitro studies have characterized the role of key regulatory proteins, signaling molecules, and steroid hormones that can influence the rate of lung fluid clearance. However, in vivo examinations must be performed to evaluate whether these regulatory factors play important physiological roles in regulating perinatal lung liquid absorption. As such, the utilization of real time X-ray imaging to determine perinatal lung fluid clearance, or pulmonary edema, represents a technological advancement in the field. Herein, we explain and illustrate an approach to assess the rate of alveolar lung fluid clearance and alveolar flooding in C57BL/6 mice at post natal day 10 using X-ray imaging and analysis. Successful implementation of this protocol requires prior approval from institutional animal care and use committees (IACUC), an in vivo small animal X-ray imaging system, and compatible molecular imaging software. PMID:27500410

  3. Real-time X-ray Imaging of Lung Fluid Volumes in Neonatal Mouse Lung.

    PubMed

    Van Avermaete, Ashley E; Trac, Phi T; Gauthier, Theresa W; Helms, My N

    2016-01-01

    At birth, the lung undergoes a profound phenotypic switch from secretion to absorption, which allows for adaptation to breathing independently. Promoting and sustaining this phenotype is critically important in normal alveolar growth and gas exchange throughout life. Several in vitro studies have characterized the role of key regulatory proteins, signaling molecules, and steroid hormones that can influence the rate of lung fluid clearance. However, in vivo examinations must be performed to evaluate whether these regulatory factors play important physiological roles in regulating perinatal lung liquid absorption. As such, the utilization of real time X-ray imaging to determine perinatal lung fluid clearance, or pulmonary edema, represents a technological advancement in the field. Herein, we explain and illustrate an approach to assess the rate of alveolar lung fluid clearance and alveolar flooding in C57BL/6 mice at post natal day 10 using X-ray imaging and analysis. Successful implementation of this protocol requires prior approval from institutional animal care and use committees (IACUC), an in vivo small animal X-ray imaging system, and compatible molecular imaging software.

  4. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of mouse lung development and Nmyc target genes

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian; Kislinger, Thomas; Wigle, Dennis A; Kannan, Anitha; Brown, Kevin; Okubo, Tadashi; Hogan, Brigid; Jurisica, Igor; Frey, Brendan; Rossant, Janet; Emili, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Although microarray analysis has provided information regarding the dynamics of gene expression during development of the mouse lung, no extensive correlations have been made to the levels of corresponding protein products. Here, we present a global survey of protein expression during mouse lung organogenesis from embryonic day E13.5 until adulthood using gel-free two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to shotgun tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT). Mathematical modeling of the proteomic profiles with parallel DNA microarray data identified large groups of gene products with statistically significant correlation or divergence in coregulation of protein and transcript levels during lung development. We also present an integrative analysis of mRNA and protein expression in Nmyc loss- and gain-of-function mutants. This revealed a set of 90 positively and negatively regulated putative target genes. These targets are evidence that Nmyc is a regulator of genes involved in mRNA processing and a repressor of the imprinted gene Igf2r in the developing lung. PMID:17486137

  5. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer. PMID:20007486

  6. Erlotinib resistance in mouse models of epidermal growth factor receptor-induced lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Politi, Katerina; Fan, Pang-Dian; Shen, Ronglai; Zakowski, Maureen; Varmus, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of lung adenocarcinomas with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations respond to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib; however, drug-resistant tumors eventually emerge. In 60% of cases, resistant tumors carry a secondary mutation in EGFR (T790M), amplification of MET, or both. Here, we describe the establishment of erlotinib resistance in lung tumors, which were induced by mutant EGFR, in transgenic mice after multiple cycles of drug treatment; we detect the T790M mutation in five out of 24 tumors or Met amplification in one out of 11 tumors in these mice. This preclinical mouse model, therefore, recapitulates the molecular changes responsible for resistance to TKIs in human tumors and holds promise for the discovery of additional mechanisms of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  7. Two Nested Developmental Waves Demarcate a Compartment Boundary in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Alanis, Denise Martinez; Chang, Daniel R.; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Krasnow, Mark A.; Chen, Jichao

    2014-01-01

    The lung is a branched tubular network with two distinct compartments — the proximal conducting airways and the peripheral gas exchange region — separated by a discrete boundary termed the bronchoalveolar duct junction (BADJ). Here we image the developing mouse lung in three dimensions and show that two nested developmental waves demarcate the BADJ under the control of a global hormonal signal. A first wave of branching morphogenesis progresses throughout embryonic development, generating branches for both compartments. A second wave of conducting airway differentiation follows the first wave but terminates earlier, specifying the proximal compartment and setting the BADJ. The second wave is terminated by a glucocorticoid signaling: premature activation or loss of glucocorticoid signaling causes a proximal or distal shift, respectively, in BADJ location. The results demonstrate a novel mechanism of boundary formation in complex, three-dimensional organs and provide new insights into glucocorticoid therapies for lung defects in premature birth. PMID:24879355

  8. Two nested developmental waves demarcate a compartment boundary in the mouse lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis, Denise Martinez; Chang, Daniel R.; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Krasnow, Mark A.; Chen, Jichao

    2014-05-01

    The lung is a branched tubular network with two distinct compartments—the proximal conducting airways and the peripheral gas exchange region—separated by a discrete boundary termed the bronchoalveolar duct junction (BADJ). Here we image the developing mouse lung in three-dimensions (3D) and show that two nested developmental waves demarcate the BADJ under the control of a global hormonal signal. A first wave of branching morphogenesis progresses throughout embryonic development, generating branches for both compartments. A second wave of conducting airway differentiation follows the first wave but terminates earlier, specifying the proximal compartment and setting the BADJ. The second wave is terminated by a glucocorticoid signalling: premature activation or loss of glucocorticoid signalling causes a proximal or distal shift, respectively, in BADJ location. The results demonstrate a new mechanism of boundary formation in complex, 3D organs and provide new insights into glucocorticoid therapies for lung defects in premature birth.

  9. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis.

    We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  10. Effect of urethane, dimethylnitrosamine, paraquat, and butylated hydroxytoluene on the activities of glycolytic key enzymes in mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Arany, I.; Rady, P.; Bojan, I.; Kertai, P.

    1981-12-01

    Effects of carcinogens and noncarcinogenic pulmonary toxicants on the activities of glycolytic key enzymes in the mouse lung were investigated. The carcinogens urethane (URTH) and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) permanently enhanced, and the noncarcinogenic pulmonary toxicants paraquat (PAR) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) temporarily, enhanced the activities of hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and pyruvate kinase (PK) in the lungs of mice.

  11. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-Expressing Glia in the Mouse Lung.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Mier, Gabriela B; Buckwalter, Marion S

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic nerves regulate important functions in visceral organs, including the lung. The postganglionic portion of these nerves is ensheathed by glial cells known as non-myelinating Schwann cells. In the brain, glia play important functional roles in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. Similarly, enteric glia are now known to have analogous roles in gastrointestinal neurotransmission, inflammatory response, and barrier formation. In contrast to this, very little is known about the function of glia in other visceral organs. Like the gut, the lung forms a barrier between airborne pathogens and the bloodstream, and autonomic lung innervation is known to affect pulmonary inflammation and lung function. Lung glia are described as non-myelinating Schwann cells but their function is not known, and indeed no transgenic tools have been validated to study them in vivo. The primary goal of this research was, therefore, to investigate the relationship between non-myelinating Schwann cells and pulmonary nerves in the airways and vasculature and to validate existing transgenic mouse tools that would be useful for studying their function. We focused on the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, which is a cognate marker of astrocytes that is expressed by enteric glia and non-myelinating Schwann cells. We describe the morphology of non-myelinating Schwann cells in the lung and verify that they express glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100, a classic glial marker. Furthermore, we characterize the relationship of non-myelinating Schwann cells to pulmonary nerves. Finally, we report tools for studying their function, including a commercially available transgenic mouse line.

  12. Cell-specific oxidative stress and cytotoxicity after wildfire coarse particulate matter instillation into mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Williams, Keisha M; Franzi, Lisa M; Last, Jerold A

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5)) from wildfire smoke is more toxic to lung macrophages on an equal dose (by mass) basis than coarse PM isolated from normal ambient air, as evidenced by decreased numbers of macrophages in lung lavage fluid 6 and 24hours after PM instillation into mouse lungs in vivo and by cytotoxicity to a macrophage cell line observed directly in vitro. We hypothesized that pulmonary macrophages from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM would undergo more cytotoxicity than macrophages from controls, and that there would be an increase in oxidative stress in their lungs. Cytotoxicity was quantified as decreased viable macrophages and increased percentages of dead macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM. At 1hour after PM instillation, we observed both decreased numbers of viable macrophages and increased dead macrophage percentages as compared to controls. An increase in free isoprostanes, an indicator of oxidative stress, from control values of 28.1±3.2pg/mL to 83.9±12.2pg/mL was observed a half-hour after PM instillation. By 1hour after PM instillation, isoprostane values had returned to 30.4±7.6pg/mL, not significantly different from control concentrations. Lung sections from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM showed rapid Clara cell responses, with decreased intracellular staining for the Clara cell secretory protein CCSP 1hour after wildfire PM instillation. In conclusion, very rapid cytotoxicity occurs in pulmonary macrophages and oxidative stress responses are seen 0.5-1hour after wildfire coarse PM instillation. These results define early cellular and biochemical events occurring in vivo and support the hypothesis that oxidative stress-mediated macrophage toxicity plays a key role in the initial response of the mouse lung to wildfire PM exposure.

  13. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-Expressing Glia in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Mier, Gabriela B.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic nerves regulate important functions in visceral organs, including the lung. The postganglionic portion of these nerves is ensheathed by glial cells known as non-myelinating Schwann cells. In the brain, glia play important functional roles in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. Similarly, enteric glia are now known to have analogous roles in gastrointestinal neurotransmission, inflammatory response, and barrier formation. In contrast to this, very little is known about the function of glia in other visceral organs. Like the gut, the lung forms a barrier between airborne pathogens and the bloodstream, and autonomic lung innervation is known to affect pulmonary inflammation and lung function. Lung glia are described as non-myelinating Schwann cells but their function is not known, and indeed no transgenic tools have been validated to study them in vivo. The primary goal of this research was, therefore, to investigate the relationship between non-myelinating Schwann cells and pulmonary nerves in the airways and vasculature and to validate existing transgenic mouse tools that would be useful for studying their function. We focused on the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, which is a cognate marker of astrocytes that is expressed by enteric glia and non-myelinating Schwann cells. We describe the morphology of non-myelinating Schwann cells in the lung and verify that they express glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100, a classic glial marker. Furthermore, we characterize the relationship of non-myelinating Schwann cells to pulmonary nerves. Finally, we report tools for studying their function, including a commercially available transgenic mouse line. PMID:26442852

  14. Gene expression profiling in mouse lung following polymeric hexamethylene diisocyanate exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-T.; Ylostalo, Joni; Friedman, Mitchell; Hoyle, Gary W. . E-mail: ghoyle@tulane.edu

    2005-05-15

    Isocyanates are a common cause of occupational lung disease. Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), a component of polyurethane spray paints, can induce respiratory symptoms, inflammation, lung function impairment, and isocyanate asthma. The predominant form of HDI in polyurethane paints is a nonvolatile polyisocyanate known as HDI biuret trimer (HDI-BT). Exposure of mice to aerosolized HDI-BT results in pathological effects, including pulmonary edema, lung inflammation, cellular proliferation, and fibrotic lesions, which occur with distinct time courses following exposure. To identify genes that mediate lung pathology in the distinct temporal phases after exposure, gene expression profiles in HDI-BT-exposed C57BL/6J mouse lungs were analyzed. RNase protection assay (RPA) of genes involved in apoptosis, cell survival, and inflammation revealed increased expression of I{kappa}B{alpha}, Fas, Bcl-X{sub L}, TNF{alpha}, KC, MIP-2, IL-6, and GM-CSF following HDI-BT exposure. Microarray analysis of approximately 10 000 genes was performed on lung RNA collected from mice 6, 18, and 90 h after HDI-BT exposure and from unexposed mice. Classes of genes whose expression was increased 6 h after exposure included those involved in stress responses (particularly oxidative stress and thiol redox balance), growth arrest, apoptosis, signal transduction, and inflammation. Types of genes whose expression was increased at 18 h included proteinases, anti-proteinases, cytoskeletal molecules, and inflammatory mediators. Transcripts increased at 90 h included extracellular matrix components, transcription factors, inflammatory mediators, and cell cycle regulators. This characterization of the gene expression profile in lungs exposed to HDI-BT will provide a basis for investigating injury and repair pathways that are operative during isocyanate-induced lung disease.

  15. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-08-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  16. Mechanisms related to reduction of radical in mouse lung using an L-band ESR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, K; Hamada, A; Utsumi, H

    1999-04-01

    Reduction of radicals in mouse lung was characterized in whole animals using an L-band ESR technique and nitroxide radicals as probes. An aqueous solution of nitroxide radical was immediately instilled intratracheally to mouse after euthanasia. Nitroxide radicals without charged groups were reduced significantly in the lung, while radicals with charged groups were only slightly reduced. Permeation rates across lung plasma membrane were not rate limiting of the stage of reduction of the noncharged nitroxides. Michaelis parameters, apparent Km and apparent Vmax, were obtained from the Lineweaver-Burk plots of the reduction. Among noncharged nitroxides with constant apparent Vmax, radicals with a larger n-octanol/water partition coefficient showed a lower apparent Km, thereby suggesting that the concentration of these nitroxides in the membrane contributes to apparent Km. The reduction rate of noncharged nitroxide, hydroxy-TEMPO, was influenced by noncharged SH reagents instilled together with the nitroxide; dithiothreitol stimulated the reduction, while the oxidized reagent inhibited it. The Lineweaver-Burk plots of the nitroxide reduction in the presence of various concentrations of dithiothreitol suggest the possibility that the reduction system for hydroxy-TEMPO is based on a kind of ping pong bi-reactant mechanism, and that the reduction system utilizes SH as an electron donor. Endogenous glutathione contributed partially to the reduction.

  17. Cell kinetics in mouse lung following administration of carcinogens and butylated hydroxytoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.; Morse, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    A series of experiments is described which was designed to test the hypothesis that, in mouse lung, enhancement of tumor development could occur independently of overall alveolar cell hyperplasia. Male A/J mice were given 1000 mg/kg of urethane or 10 mg/kg of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Alveolar cells were labeled through continuous infusion of (TH)thymidine for 6 weeks after administration of the carcinogen. Urethane produced a significant hyperplasia of the type II alveolar cell population, whereas MCA had no such effect. Five repeated injections of 300 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), a procedure known to enhance lung tumor development, produced cell hyperplasia only during the first 2 weeks; later the mice became resistant to the action of BHT. In animals treated with piperonyl butoxide prior to BHT, cell proliferation was abolished. BHT still had a small but significant enhancing effect on tumor development. However, this effect was dwarfed by the observation that piperonyl butoxide alone greatly inhibited tumor development. The data do not allow exclusion of alveolar cell hyperplasia as a mechanism in BHT-mediated enhancement of mouse lung tumor development. 19 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Pius

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a heavy metal of considerable occupational and environmental concern, has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The carcinogenic potential of Cd as well as the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis following exposure to Cd has been studied using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models. Exposure of cells to Cd results in their transformation. Administration of Cd in animals results in tumors of multiple organs/tissues. Also, a causal relationship has been noticed between exposure to Cd and the incidence of lung cancer in human. It has been demonstrated that Cd induces cancer by multiple mechanisms and the most important among them are aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, induction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of apoptosis. The available evidence indicates that, perhaps, oxidative stress plays a central role in Cd carcinogenesis because of its involvement in Cd-induced aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and apoptosis.

  19. Cell-specific oxidative stress and cytotoxicity after wildfire coarse particulate matter instillation into mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Keisha M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10-2.5}) from wildfire smoke is more toxic to lung macrophages on an equal dose (by mass) basis than coarse PM isolated from normal ambient air, as evidenced by decreased numbers of macrophages in lung lavage fluid 6 and 24 hours after PM instillation into mouse lungs in vivo and by cytotoxicity to a macrophage cell line observed directly in vitro. We hypothesized that pulmonary macrophages from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM would undergo more cytotoxicity than macrophages from controls, and that there would be an increase in oxidative stress in their lungs. Cytotoxicity was quantified as decreased viable macrophages and increased percentages of dead macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM. At 1 hour after PM instillation, we observed both decreased numbers of viable macrophages and increased dead macrophage percentages as compared to controls. An increase in free isoprostanes, an indicator of oxidative stress, from control values of 28.1 ± 3.2 pg/mL to 83.9 ± 12.2 pg/mL was observed a half-hour after PM instillation. By 1 hour after PM instillation, isoprostane values had returned to 30.4 ± 7.6 pg/mL, not significantly different from control concentrations. Lung sections from mice instilled with wildfire coarse PM showed rapid Clara cell responses, with decreased intracellular staining for the Clara cell secretory protein CCSP 1 hour after wildfire PM instillation. In conclusion, very rapid cytotoxicity occurs in pulmonary macrophages and oxidative stress responses are seen 0.5–1 hour after wildfire coarse PM instillation. These results define early cellular and biochemical events occurring in vivo and support the hypothesis that oxidative stress-mediated macrophage toxicity plays a key role in the initial response of the mouse lung to wildfire PM exposure. -- Highlights: ► We studied very early events (0.5–1 hour) after

  20. Non-ionic surfactant modified cationic liposomes mediated gene transfection in vitro and in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wuxiao; Izumisawa, Tomohiro; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Qi, Xianrong; Kitamoto, Dai; Maitani, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    As reported previously, cationic liposomes formulated with dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and N,N-methyl hydroxyethyl aminopropane carbamoyl cholesterol (MHAPC-liposomes) achieved efficient gene transfection in the mouse lung following intratracheal injection. We have studied here the role of surfactants, mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) and polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), in affecting gene transfection of MHAPC-lipoplexes (complex with pCMV-luc DNA) in A549 cells and in the mouse lung. MEL-A increased gene transfection of MHAPC-lipoplexes significantly in vitro and slightly in the mouse lung, while Tween 80 decreased it both in vitro and in vivo. As assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence imaging, MEL-A might faciliate gene dissociation from MHAPC-lipoplexes with fluorescein-labeled oligodeoxynucleotide (FITC-ODN) after internalization into the cells and retained the lipoplexes in the mouse lung for prolonged time, while Tween 80 was inefficient to deliver foreign gene into target cells and in the lung. These results demonstrated that MEL-A is advantageous to Tween 80 in the modification of cationic liposomes as gene delivery vectors in the lung. PMID:19182397

  1. High Inorganic Phosphate Intake Promotes Tumorigenesis at Early Stages in a Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Somin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Ah-Young; Park, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Doble, Philip; Bishop, David; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is required by all living organisms for the development of organs such as bone, muscle, brain, and lungs, regulating the expression of several critical genes as well as signal transduction. However, little is known about the effects of prolonged dietary Pi consumption on lung cancer progression. This study investigated the effects of a high-phosphate diet (HPD) in a mouse model of adenocarcinoma. K-rasLA1 mice were fed a normal diet (0.3% Pi) or an HPD (1% Pi) for 1, 2, or 4 months. Mice were then sacrificed and subjected to inductively coupled plasma mass/optical emission spectrometry and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry analyses, western blot analysis, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and immunocytochemical analyses to evaluate tumor formation and progression (including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis), changes in ion levels and metabolism, autophagy, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and protein translation in the lungs. An HPD accelerated tumorigenesis, as evidenced by increased adenoma and adenocarcinoma rates as well as tumor size. However, after 4 months of the HPD, cell proliferation was arrested, and marked increases in liver and lung ion levels and in energy production via the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the liver were observed, which were accompanied by increased autophagy and decreased angiogenesis and apoptosis. These results indicate that an HPD initially promotes but later inhibits lung cancer progression because of metabolic adaptation leading to tumor cell quiescence. Moreover, the results suggest that carefully regulated Pi consumption are effective in lung cancer prevention. PMID:26285136

  2. High Inorganic Phosphate Intake Promotes Tumorigenesis at Early Stages in a Mouse Model of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Somin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hong, Seong-Ho; Lee, Ah-Young; Park, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Doble, Philip; Bishop, David; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is required by all living organisms for the development of organs such as bone, muscle, brain, and lungs, regulating the expression of several critical genes as well as signal transduction. However, little is known about the effects of prolonged dietary Pi consumption on lung cancer progression. This study investigated the effects of a high-phosphate diet (HPD) in a mouse model of adenocarcinoma. K-rasLA1 mice were fed a normal diet (0.3% Pi) or an HPD (1% Pi) for 1, 2, or 4 months. Mice were then sacrificed and subjected to inductively coupled plasma mass/optical emission spectrometry and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry analyses, western blot analysis, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and immunocytochemical analyses to evaluate tumor formation and progression (including cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis), changes in ion levels and metabolism, autophagy, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and protein translation in the lungs. An HPD accelerated tumorigenesis, as evidenced by increased adenoma and adenocarcinoma rates as well as tumor size. However, after 4 months of the HPD, cell proliferation was arrested, and marked increases in liver and lung ion levels and in energy production via the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the liver were observed, which were accompanied by increased autophagy and decreased angiogenesis and apoptosis. These results indicate that an HPD initially promotes but later inhibits lung cancer progression because of metabolic adaptation leading to tumor cell quiescence. Moreover, the results suggest that carefully regulated Pi consumption are effective in lung cancer prevention. PMID:26285136

  3. Evaluation of Lung Metastasis in Mouse Mammary Tumor Models by Quantitative Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Melissa A.; Grek, Christina L.; Ghatnekar, Gautam S.; Yeh, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the spread of malignant tumor cells from the primary cancer site to a distant organ and is the primary cause of cancer associated death 1. Common sites of metastatic spread include lung, lymph node, brain, and bone 2. Mechanisms that drive metastasis are intense areas of cancer research. Consequently, effective assays to measure metastatic burden in distant sites of metastasis are instrumental for cancer research. Evaluation of lung metastases in mammary tumor models is generally performed by gross qualitative observation of lung tissue following dissection. Quantitative methods of evaluating metastasis are currently limited to ex vivo and in vivo imaging based techniques that require user defined parameters. Many of these techniques are at the whole organism level rather than the cellular level 3–6. Although newer imaging methods utilizing multi-photon microscopy are able to evaluate metastasis at the cellular level 7, these highly elegant procedures are more suited to evaluating mechanisms of dissemination rather than quantitative assessment of metastatic burden. Here, a simple in vitro method to quantitatively assess metastasis is presented. Using quantitative Real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), tumor cell specific mRNA can be detected within the mouse lung tissue. PMID:26862835

  4. Carcinogenesis models: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1992-12-31

    Biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are not only an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment but also raise fundamental questions about the nature of the events leading to malignancy. In this paper two such models are reviewed. The first is the multistage model proposed by Armitage and Doll in the 1950s; most of the paper is devoted to a discussion of the two-mutation model proposed by the author and his colleagues. This model is a generalization of the idea of recessive oncogenesis proposed by Knudson and has been shown to be consistent with a large body of epidemiologic and experimental data. The usefulness of the model is illustrated by analyzing a large experimental data set in which rats exposed to radon developed malignant lung tumors.

  5. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB) and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg) 28 days post-exposure (P < 0.001). SB were detected in lung at all doses on post-exposure day 1 (P < 0.001) and remained elevated at the two highest doses until day 28 (P < 0.05). BAL cell DNA SB were elevated relative to controls at least at the highest dose on all post-exposure days (P < 0.05). The level of FPG sensitive sites in lung was increased throughout with significant increases occurring on post-exposure days 1 and 3, in comparison to controls (P < 0.001-0.05). SB in liver were detected on post-exposure days 1 (P < 0.001) and 28 (P < 0.001). Polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell counts in BAL correlated strongly with FPG sensitive sites in lung (r = 0.88, P < 0.001), whereas no such correlation was observed with SB (r = 0.52, P = 0.08). CBNP increased the expression of Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses), 3 (all doses) and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg), but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the

  6. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-05-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium.

  7. Systems Biology-Based Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Persistence Genes in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Veeramani, Balaji; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Karakousis, Petros C.; Bader, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identifying Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence genes is important for developing novel drugs to shorten the duration of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. We developed computational algorithms that predict M. tuberculosis genes required for long-term survival in mouse lungs. As the input, we used high-throughput M. tuberculosis mutant library screen data, mycobacterial global transcriptional profiles in mice and macrophages, and functional interaction networks. We selected 57 unique, genetically defined mutants (18 previously tested and 39 untested) to assess the predictive power of this approach in the murine model of TB infection. We observed a 6-fold enrichment in the predicted set of M. tuberculosis genes required for persistence in mouse lungs relative to randomly selected mutant pools. Our results also allowed us to reclassify several genes as required for M. tuberculosis persistence in vivo. Finally, the new results implicated additional high-priority candidate genes for testing. Experimental validation of computational predictions demonstrates the power of this systems biology approach for elucidating M. tuberculosis persistence genes. PMID:24549847

  8. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium. PMID:25966338

  9. INDUCTION OF DNA ADDUCTS, TUMORS, AND KI-RAS ONCOGENE MUTATIONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG BY IP. ADMINISTRATION OF DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of DNA adducts, tumors, and Ki-ras oncogene mutations in strain AlJ mouse lung by ip. administration of dibenz[a,h]anthracene

    Previous studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) induced lung tumors in the strain NJ mouse model system have demonstrated qua...

  10. Erythronium japonicum attenuates histopathological lung abnormalities in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    SEO, JI-HYE; BANG, MI-AE; KIM, GYEYEOP; CHO, SEUNG SIK; PARK, DAE-HUN

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic lung condition that can induce mucus hypersecretion and pulmonary obstruction and may even cause death, particularly in children and older individuals. Erythronium japonicum (E. japonicum) is a traditional herb used in Korea and East Asian countries that has been found to exert free radical scavenging activity and anti-proliferative effects in human colorectal carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-asthmatic effects of an extract of E. japonicum in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of OVA and aluminum hydroxide hydrate on days 1 and 8 and then received the following treatments on days 21 to 25: i) control (no treatment), ii) sterilized tap water (given orally), iii) 1 mg/kg/day dexamethasone (administered orally), iv) 60 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract, and v) 600 mg/kg/day E. japonicum extract. On the same days, all the mice except those in the control group were challenged 1 h later with nebulized 5% OVA for 30 min. We found that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced increase in the number of white blood cells and decreased the IgE level in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained from the mice. Histopathological analysis of the lung tissues revealed that E. japonicum attenuated the asthma-related morphological changes in the mouse lung tissue, including the increased secretion of mucus in the bronchioles, eosinophil infiltration around the bronchioles and vessels, and goblet cell and epithelial cell hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that treatment with E. japonicum extract suppressed the OVA-induced proliferation of T helper cells (CD4+) and B cells (CD19+) in the mouse lung tissue. Furthermore, treatment with E. japonicum extract modulated the expression of both T helper 2 cell-related factors [GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5

  11. Enhanced reseeding of decellularized rodent lungs with mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lecht, Shimon; Stabler, Collin T.; Rylander, Alexis L.; Chiaverelli, Rachel; Schulman, Edward S.; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lelkes, Peter I.

    2016-01-01

    Repopulation of decellularized lung scaffolds (DLS) is limited due to alterations in the repertoire and ratios of the residual extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, characterized by e.g., the retention of type I collagen and loss of glycoproteins. We hypothesized that pre-treatment of decellularized matrices with defined ECM proteins, which match the repertoire of integrin receptors expressed by the cells to be seeded (e.g., embryonic stem cells) can increase the efficacy of the reseeding process. To test this hypothesis, we first determined the integrin receptors profile of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Mouse ESCs express α3, α5, α6, α9 and β1, but not α1, α2 and α4 integrin subunits, as established by Western blotting and adhesion to laminin and fibronectin, but not to collagens type I and IV. Reseeding of DLS with mESCs was inefficient (6.9 ± 0.5%), but was significantly enhanced (2.3 ± 0.1 fold) by pre-treating the scaffolds with media conditioned by A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells, which we found to contain ~5 μg/ml laminin. Furthermore, pre-treatment with A549-conditioned media resulted in a significantly more uniform distribution of the seeded mESCs throughout the engineered organ as compared to untreated DLS. Our study may advance whole lung engineering by stressing the importance of matching the integrin receptor repertoire of the seeded cells and the cell binding motifs of DLS. PMID:24439414

  12. Early response of gene clusters is associated with mouse lung resistance or sensitivity to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Cavarra, Eleonora; Fardin, Paolo; Fineschi, Silvia; Ricciardi, Annamaria; De Cunto, Giovanna; Sallustio, Fabio; Zorzetto, Michele; Luisetti, Maurizio; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Varesio, Luigi

    2009-03-01

    We have investigated the effects of cigarette smoke exposure in three different strains of mice. DBA/2 and C57BL/6J are susceptible to smoke and develop different lung changes in response to chronic exposure, whereas ICR mice are resistant to smoke and do not develop emphysema. The present study was carried out to determine early changes in the gene expression profile of mice exposed to cigarette smoke with either a susceptible or resistant phenotype. The three strains of mice were exposed to smoke from three cigarettes per day, 5 days/wk, for 4 wk. Microarray analysis was carried out on total RNA extracted from the lung using the Affymetrix platform. Cigarette smoke modulates several clusters of genes (i.e., proemphysematous, acute phase response, and cell adhesion) in smoke-sensitive DBA/2 or C57BL/6J strains, but the same genes are not altered by smoke in ICR resistant mice. Only a few genes were commonly modulated by smoke in the three strains of mice. This pattern of gene expression suggests that the response to smoke is strain-dependent and may involve different molecular signaling pathways. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to verify the pattern of modulation of selected genes and their potential biological relevance. We conclude that gene expression response to smoke is highly dependent on the mouse genetic background. We speculate that the definition of gene clusters associated, to various degrees, with mouse susceptibility or resistance to smoke may be instrumental in defining the molecular basis of the individual response to smoke-induced lung injury in humans.

  13. Deuterium depleted water effects on survival of lung cancer patients and expression of Kras, Bcl2, and Myc genes in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyi, Zoltán; Budán, Ferenc; Szabó, István; Ember, István; Kiss, István; Krempels, Krisztina; Somlyai, Ildikó; Somlyai, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Although advances in cancer therapies continue to develop, the shortness of the survival of lung cancer patients is still disappointing. Therefore, finding new adjuvant strategies is within the focus of cancer cure. Based on observations that deuterium depletion inhibits the growth of cancer cell lines and suppresses certain proto-oncogenes, we have conducted a clinical study in 129 patients with small cell and nonsmall cell lung cancers who consumed deuterium-depleted drinking water (DDW) as a nontoxic agent in addition to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Median survival time (MST) was 25.9 mo in males and 74.1 mo in female patients; the difference between genders was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Median survival of subjects with brain metastasis was 27.1 mo. Cumulative 5-yr survival probabilities were 19%, 52%, and 33% in males, females, and all patients with brain metastasis, respectively. Gene expression analysis in mouse lung indicated that DDW attenuates 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced expression of Bcl2, Kras, and Myc in females. In conclusion, DDW counteracts the DMBA-induced overexpression of Bcl2, Kras and Myc genes in mouse lung, and it may extend survival of lung cancer patients as a nontoxic anticancer dietary supplement, especially for women with tumors overexpressing cancer-related genes, because MST of DDW-consuming group was 2-4 times longer than it is generally observed in lung cancer patients.

  14. Strain-dependent Damage in Mouse Lung After Carbon Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moritake, Takashi; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Yanagisawa, Mitsuru; Nakawatari, Miyako; Imadome, Kaori; Nakamura, Etsuko; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether inherent factors produce differences in lung morbidity in response to carbon ion (C-ion) irradiation, and to identify the molecules that have a key role in strain-dependent adverse effects in the lung. Methods and Materials: Three strains of female mice (C3H/He Slc, C57BL/6J Jms Slc, and A/J Jms Slc) were locally irradiated in the thorax with either C-ion beams (290 MeV/n, in 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak) or with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays as a reference beam. We performed survival assays and histologic examination of the lung with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, we performed immunohistochemical staining for hyaluronic acid (HA), CD44, and Mac3 and assayed for gene expression. Results: The survival data in mice showed a between-strain variance after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. The median survival time of C3H/He was significantly shortened after C-ion irradiation at the higher dose of 12.5 Gy. Histologic examination revealed early-phase hemorrhagic pneumonitis in C3H/He and late-phase focal fibrotic lesions in C57BL/6J after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. Pleural effusion was apparent in C57BL/6J and A/J mice, 168 days after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. Microarray analysis of irradiated lung tissue in the three mouse strains identified differential expression changes in growth differentiation factor 15 (Gdf15), which regulates macrophage function, and hyaluronan synthase 1 (Has1), which plays a role in HA metabolism. Immunohistochemistry showed that the number of CD44-positive cells, a surrogate marker for HA accumulation, and Mac3-positive cells, a marker for macrophage infiltration in irradiated lung, varied significantly among the three mouse strains during the early phase. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a strain-dependent differential response in mice to C-ion thoracic irradiation. Our findings identified candidate molecules that could be implicated in the between-strain variance to early

  15. Time course of inflammation, oxidative stress and tissue damage induced by hyperoxia in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Akinori C; Bezerra, Frank S; Lanzetti, Manuella; Lopes, Alan A; Silva, Marco Aurélio S; Porto, Luís Cristóvão; Valença, Samuel S

    2012-08-01

    In this study our aim was to investigate the time courses of inflammation, oxidative stress and tissue damage after hyperoxia in the mouse lung. Groups of BALB/c mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in a chamber for 12, 24 or 48 h. The controls were subjected to normoxia. The results showed that IL-6 increased progressively after 12 (P < 0.001) and 24 h (P < 0.001) of hyperoxia with a reduction at 48 h (P < 0.01), whereas TNF-α increased after 24 (P < 0.001) and 48 h (P < 0.001). The number of macrophages increased after 24 h (P < 0.001), whereas the number of neutrophils increased after 24 h (P < 0.01) and 48 h (P < 0.001). Superoxide dismutase activity decreased in all groups exposed to hyperoxia (P < 0.01). Catalase activity increased only at 48 h (P < 0.001). The reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio decreased after 12 h (P < 0.01) and 24 h (P < 0.05). Histological evidence of lung injury was observed at 24 and 48 h. This study shows that hyperoxia initially causes an inflammatory response at 12 h, resulting in inflammation associated with the oxidative response at 24 h and culminating in histological damage at 48 h. Knowledge of the time course of inflammation and oxidative stress prior to histological evidence of acute lung injury can improve the safety of oxygen therapy in patients.

  16. Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, David G.; Politi, Katerina; Bhutkar, Arjun; Chen, Frances K.; Song, Xiaoling; Pirun, Mono; Santiago, Philip M.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Platt, James T.; Lee, Emily; Hodges, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Jacks, Tyler; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity. PMID:27702896

  17. Time course of inflammation, oxidative stress and tissue damage induced by hyperoxia in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Nagato, Akinori C; Bezerra, Frank S; Lanzetti, Manuella; Lopes, Alan A; Silva, Marco Aurélio S; Porto, Luís Cristóvão; Valença, Samuel S

    2012-01-01

    In this study our aim was to investigate the time courses of inflammation, oxidative stress and tissue damage after hyperoxia in the mouse lung. Groups of BALB/c mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in a chamber for 12, 24 or 48 h. The controls were subjected to normoxia. The results showed that IL-6 increased progressively after 12 (P < 0.001) and 24 h (P < 0.001) of hyperoxia with a reduction at 48 h (P < 0.01), whereas TNF-α increased after 24 (P < 0.001) and 48 h (P < 0.001). The number of macrophages increased after 24 h (P < 0.001), whereas the number of neutrophils increased after 24 h (P < 0.01) and 48 h (P < 0.001). Superoxide dismutase activity decreased in all groups exposed to hyperoxia (P < 0.01). Catalase activity increased only at 48 h (P < 0.001). The reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio decreased after 12 h (P < 0.01) and 24 h (P < 0.05). Histological evidence of lung injury was observed at 24 and 48 h. This study shows that hyperoxia initially causes an inflammatory response at 12 h, resulting in inflammation associated with the oxidative response at 24 h and culminating in histological damage at 48 h. Knowledge of the time course of inflammation and oxidative stress prior to histological evidence of acute lung injury can improve the safety of oxygen therapy in patients. PMID:22804763

  18. Inhibition of EGFR-STAT3 signaling with erlotinib prevents carcinogenesis in a chemically-induced mouse model of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leeman-Neill, Rebecca J; Seethala, Raja R; Singh, Shivendra V; Freilino, Maria L; Bednash, Joseph S; Thomas, Sufi M; Panahandeh, Mary C; Gooding, William E; Joyce, Sonali C; Lingen, Mark W; Neill, Daniel B; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2011-02-01

    Chemoprevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), a disease associated with high mortality rates and frequent occurrence of second primary tumor (SPT), is an important clinical goal. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 signaling pathway is known to play a key role in HNSCC growth, survival, and prognosis, thereby serving as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of HNSCC. In the current study, the 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced murine model of oral carcinogenesis was utilized to investigate the chemopreventive activities of compounds that target the EGFR-STAT3 signaling pathway. This model mimics the process of oral carcinogenesis in humans. The drugs under investigation included erlotinib, a small molecule inhibitor of the EGFR, and guggulipid, the extract of an Ayurvedic medicinal plant, which contains guggulsterone, a compound known to inhibit STAT3. Dietary administration of guggulipid failed to confer protection against oral carcinogenesis. On the other hand, the mice placed on erlotinib-supplemented diet exhibited a 69% decrease (P < 0.001) in incidence of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions compared with mice on the control diet. Immunostaining of dysplastic lesions demonstrated modest decreases in STAT3 levels, with both drug treatments, that were not statistically significant. The results of the present study provide the basis for exploring the efficacy of erlotinib for prevention of HNSCC in a clinical setting. PMID:21163936

  19. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of lung

  20. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume

    PubMed Central

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of

  1. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J

    2016-01-01

    In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of lung

  2. A genetic mouse model to investigate hyperoxic acute lung injury survival.

    PubMed

    Prows, Daniel R; Hafertepen, Amanda P; Gibbons, William J; Winterberg, Abby V; Nick, Todd G

    2007-08-20

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a devastating disease that maintains a high mortality rate, despite decades of research. Hyperoxia, a universal treatment for ALI and other critically ill patients, can itself cause pulmonary damage, which drastically restricts its therapeutic potential. We stipulate that having the ability to use higher levels of supplemental O2 for longer periods would improve recovery rates. Toward this goal, a mouse model was sought to identify genes contributing to hyperoxic ALI (HALI) mortality. Eighteen inbred mouse strains were screened in continuous >95% O2. A significant survival difference was identified between sensitive C57BL/6J and resistant 129X1/SvJ strains. Although resistant, only one-fourth of 129X1/SvJ mice survived longer than any C57BL/6J mouse, demonstrating decreased penetrance of resistance. A survival time difference between reciprocal F1 mice implicated a parent-of-origin (imprinting) effect. To further evaluate imprinting and begin to delineate the genetic components of HALI survival, we generated and phenotyped offspring from all four possible intercrosses. Segregation analysis supported maternal inheritance of one or more genes but paternal inheritance of one or more contributor genes. A significant sex effect was demonstrated, with males more resistant than females for all F2 crosses. Survival time ranges and sensitive-to-resistant ratios of the different F2 crosses also supported imprinting and predicted that increased survival is due to dominant resistance alleles contributed by both the resistant and sensitive parental strains. HALI survival is multigenic with a complex mode of inheritance, which should be amenable to genetic dissection with this mouse model.

  3. THE REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES (ROS) THEORY OF ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Arsenic is a human carcinogen in skin, lung, liver, urinary bladder
    and kidney. At this time, there is not a scientific consensus on the
    mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis. Proposed
    mechanisms/modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesi...

  4. CD8+IL-17+ T Cells Mediate Neutrophilic Airway Obliteration in T-bet–Deficient Mouse Lung Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Dodd-o, Jeffrey M.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Miller, Hannah L.; Ganguly, Sudipto; Popescu, Iulia; O'Donnell, Christopher P.; Cardenes, Nayra; Levine, Melanie; Rojas, Mauricio; Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; McDyer, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection is a known risk factor for the development of obliterative bronchiolitis, which limits the long-term survival of lung transplant recipients. However, the T cell effector mechanisms in both of these processes remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated whether C57BL/6 T-bet−/− recipients of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched BALB/c lung grafts develop rejection pathology and allospecific cytokine responses that differ from wild-type mice. T-bet−/− recipients demonstrated vigorous allograft rejection at 10 days, characterized by neutrophilic inflammation and predominantly CD8+ T cells producing allospecific IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, in contrast to IFN-γ–dominant responses in WT mice. CD4+ T cells produced IL-17 but not IFN-γ responses in T-bet−/− recipients, in contrast to WT controls. Costimulation blockade using anti-CD154 Ab significantly reduced allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ responses in both T-bet−/− and WT mice but had no attenuating effect on lung rejection pathology in T-bet−/− recipients or on the development of obliterative airway inflammation that occurred only in T-bet−/− recipients. However, neutralization of IL-17A significantly attenuated costimulation blockade–resistant rejection pathology and airway inflammation in T-bet−/− recipients. In addition, CXCL1 (neutrophil chemokine) was increased in T-bet−/− allografts, and IL-17 induced CXCL1 from mouse lung epithelial cells in vitro. Taken together, our data show that T-bet–deficient recipients of complete MHC-mismatched lung allografts develop costimulation blockade–resistant rejection characterized by neutrophilia and obliterative airway inflammation that is predominantly mediated by CD8+IL-17+ T cells. Our data support T-bet–deficient mouse recipients of lung allografts as a viable animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of small airway injury in lung transplantation

  5. A 2-year dose-response study of lesion sequences during hepatocellular carcinogenesis in the male B6C3F(1) mouse given the drinking water chemical dichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Julia H; Carter, Harry W; Deddens, James A; Hurst, Bernadette M; George, Michael H; DeAngelo, Anthony B

    2003-01-01

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is carcinogenic to the B6C3F(1) mouse and the F344 rat. Given the carcinogenic potential of DCA in rodent liver and the known concentrations of this compound in drinking water, reliable biologically based models to reduce the uncertainty of risk assessment for human exposure to DCA are needed. Development of such models requires identification and quantification of premalignant hepatic lesions, identification of the doses at which these lesions occur, and determination of the likelihood that these lesions will progress to cancer. In this study we determined the dose response of histopathologic changes occurring in the livers of mice exposed to DCA (0.05-3.5 g/L) for 26-100 weeks. Lesions were classified as foci of cellular alteration smaller than one liver lobule (altered hepatic foci; AHF), foci of cellular alteration larger than one liver lobule (large foci of cellular alteration; LFCA), adenomas (ADs), or carcinomas (CAs). Histopathologic analysis of 598 premalignant lesions revealed that (a)) each lesion class had a predominant phenotype; (b)) AHF, LFCA, and AD demonstrated neoplastic progression with time; and (c)) independent of DCA dose and length of exposure effects, some toxic/adaptive changes in non-involved liver were related to this neoplastic progression. A lesion sequence for carcinogenesis in male B6C3F(1) mouse liver has been proposed that will enable development of a biologically based mathematical model for DCA. Because all classes of premalignant lesions and CAs were found at both lower and higher doses, these data are consistent with the conclusion that nongenotoxic mechanisms, such as negative selection, are relevant to DCA carcinogenesis at lower doses where DCA genotoxicity has not been observed. PMID:12515679

  6. Wound-healing error model for radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei

    1995-12-31

    Epidemiological studies of lung cancer in uranium miners exposed to radon suggest that radon is a tumor promoter. I will refine this notion by applying the wound-healing error model proposed for radiation carcinogenesis in general.

  7. The effect of culture conditions on cytodifferentiation of fetal mouse lung respiratory passageways.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, S R; Schneck, S L; Brown, J W

    1986-01-01

    Differentiation of the respiratory region of fetal mouse lungs was investigated in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors and hormones. Terminal buds from the margins of a lobe were removed from 16-day fetuses and organ cultures prepared either in submersion culture or at the air-medium interface. It was found that glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine, transferrin, and somatostatin were sufficient to promote branching in the absence of serum. However, type II pneumocytes containing lamellar bodies formed only in the presence of thyroxine or dexamethasone. At concentrations of these hormones slightly above the physiological range most of the cells became cuboidal and contained lamellar bodies; at lower concentrations regions of flattened cells appeared. In submersion culture a large, central cavity surrounded by saccules was formed rather than a branched tree. Thus, the pattern of differentiation is significantly influenced by culture conditions. PMID:2869941

  8. Monitoring Cyp2b10 mRNA expression at cessation of 2-year carcinogenesis bioassay in mouse liver provides evidence for a carcinogenic mechanism devoid of human relevance: The dalcetrapib experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hoflack, J-C.; Mueller, L. Fowler, S.; Braendli-Baiocco, A.; Flint, N.; Kuhlmann, O.; Singer, T.; Roth, A.

    2012-03-15

    Introduction: Dalcetrapib is a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) modulator in clinical assessment for cardiovascular outcome benefits. In compliance with regulatory requirements, dalcetrapib was evaluated in rodent 2-year carcinogenesis bioassays. In the mouse bioassay, male mice demonstrated increased liver weight and statistically increased incidences of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma. Hepatic cytochrome p450 (Cyp) 2b10 mRNA induction and increased Cyp2b10 enzyme activity signify activation of hepatic nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a widely established promoter of rodent-specific hepatic tumors. We therefore monitored hepatic Cyp2b10 mRNA and its enzyme activity in a subset of dalcetrapib-treated male mice from the bioassay. Methods: Liver samples were obtained from ∼ 1/3 of male mice from each dose group including vehicle-controls (mean and earliest study day of death 678 and 459 respectively). Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to determine Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and Cyp1a-, Cyp2b10- and Cyp3a-selective activities were monitored. Results: Cyp2b10 mRNA was strongly induced by dalcetrapib with an expected wide inter-individual variation (5–1421-fold). Group average fold-induction versus vehicle-controls showed a dose-related increase from 48-fold (250 mg/kg/day) to 160-fold (750 mg/kg/day), which declined slightly at 2000 mg/kg/day (97-fold). Cyp enzyme activities showed approximate doubling of total Cyp P450 content per milligram protein and a 9-fold increase in Cyp2b10-selective pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activity (750 mg/kg/day). Discussion: These data from hepatic Cyp2b10 monitoring are strongly suggestive of CAR activation by dalcetrapib, a mechanism devoid of relevance towards hepatocarcinogenesis in humans; results show feasibility of Cyp2b10 as a surrogate marker for this mechanism at cessation of a carcinogenesis bioassay. -- Highlights: ► Liver tumors were induced in male mice by dalcetrapib

  9. Inhibitory effect of the flowers of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) on TPA-induced inflammation and tumor promotion in two-stage carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Ken; Matsubara, Hideki; Sano, Yuri

    2010-07-01

    The methanol extract of the flowers of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus) exhibited remarkable antitumor activity in an in vivo two-stage carcinogenesis test in mice, using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene as an initiator and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as a promoter. From the active fraction of the methanol extract, four triterpene alcohols and their corresponding acetates were isolated and identified. These compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on TPA-induced inflammation (1 microg/ear) in mice and showed marked anti-inflammatory effects, with a 50% inhibitory dose of 0.50-0.91 micromol/ear.

  10. Pulmonary microRNA profiling in a mouse model of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Vergadi, Eleni; Kaniaris, Evangelos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Lagoudaki, Eleni; Georgopoulos, Dimitrios; Zapol, Warren M.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Iliopoulos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes induced by high tidal volume ventilation (HVTV) in pulmonary expression of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and identify potential target genes and corresponding miRNA-gene networks. Using a real-time RT-PCR-based array in RNA samples from lungs of mice subjected to HVTV for 1 or 4 h and control mice, we identified 65 miRNAs whose expression changed more than twofold upon HVTV. An inflammatory and a TGF-β-signaling miRNA-gene network were identified by in silico pathway analysis being at highest statistical significance (P = 10−43 and P = 10−28, respectively). In the inflammatory network, IL-6 and SOCS-1, regulated by miRNAs let-7 and miR-155, respectively, appeared as central nodes. In TGF-β-signaling network, SMAD-4, regulated by miR-146, appeared as a central node. The contribution of miRNAs to the development of lung injury was evaluated in mice subjected to HVTV treated with a precursor or antagonist of miR-21, a miRNA highly upregulated by HVTV. Lung compliance was preserved only in mice treated with anti-miR-21 but not in mice treated with pre-miR-21 or negative-control miRNA. Both alveolar-arterial oxygen difference and protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage were lower in mice treated with anti-miR-21 than in mice treated with pre-miR-21 or negative-control miRNA (DA-a: 66 ± 27 vs. 131 ± 22, 144 ± 10 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001; protein concentration: 1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.3 ± 1, 2.1 ± 0.4 mg/ml, respectively, P < 0.01). Our results show that HVTV induces changes in miRNA expression in mouse lungs. Modulation of miRNA expression can affect the development of HVTV-induced lung injury. PMID:22659882

  11. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-05-01

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  12. Adsorption of surfactant lipids by single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse lung upon pharyngeal aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kapralov, Alexander A; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E; Kisin, Elena R; Kotchey, Gregg P; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2012-05-22

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells, and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids: phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (∼108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted "coating" whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B, and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model.

  13. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-04-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF{sub 1} mice irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from {gamma}-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5{prime} region of the mRb gene.

  14. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, M.E.; Gemmell, M.A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF[sub 1] mice irradiated with [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from [gamma]-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5[prime] region of the mRb gene.

  15. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models.

    PubMed

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2014-02-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  16. Interactions between the otitis media gene, Fbxo11, and p53 in the mouse embryonic lung.

    PubMed

    Tateossian, Hilda; Morse, Susan; Simon, Michelle M; Dean, Charlotte H; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-12-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of hearing loss in children, and tympanostomy (ear tube insertion) to alleviate the condition remains the commonest surgical intervention in children in the developed world. Chronic and recurrent forms of otitis media (OM) are known to have a very substantial genetic component; however, until recently, little was known of the underlying genes involved. The Jeff mouse mutant carries a mutation in the Fbxo11 gene, a member of the F-box family, and develops deafness due to a chronic proliferative OM. We previously reported that Fbxo11 is involved in the regulation of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling by regulating the levels of phospho-Smad2 in the epithelial cells of palatal shelves, eyelids and airways of the lungs. It has been proposed that FBXO11 regulates the cell's response to TGF-β through the ubiquitination of CDT2. Additional substrates for FBXO11 have been identified, including p53. Here, we have studied both the genetic and biochemical interactions between FBXO11 and p53 in order to better understand the function of FBXO11 in epithelial development and its potential role in OM. In mice, we show that p53 (also known as Tp53) homozygous mutants and double heterozygous mutants (Jf/+ p53/+) exhibit similar epithelial developmental defects to Fbxo11 homozygotes. FBXO11 and p53 interact in the embryonic lung, and mutation in Fbxo11 prevents the interaction with p53. Both p53 and double mutants show raised levels of pSMAD2, recapitulating that seen in Fbxo11 homozygotes. Overall, our results support the conclusion that FBXO11 regulates the TGF-β pathway in the embryonic lung via cross-talk with p53.

  17. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models.

    PubMed

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2014-02-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  18. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models

    PubMed Central

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2013-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  19. Comparing histone deacetylase inhibitor responses in genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models and a window of opportunity trial in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Erkmen, Cherie P; Memoli, Vincent; Chinyengetere, Fadzai; Sempere, Lorenzo; Beumer, Jan H; Anyang, Bean N; Nugent, William; Johnstone, David; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Kurie, Jonathan M; Li, Hua; Direnzo, James; Guo, Yongli; Freemantle, Sarah J; Dragnev, Konstantin H; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2013-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi; vorinostat) responses were studied in murine and human lung cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models. Findings were compared with a window of opportunity trial in aerodigestive tract cancers. In human (HOP62, H522, and H23) and murine transgenic (ED-1, ED-2, LKR-13, and 393P, driven, respectively, by cyclin E, degradation-resistant cyclin E, KRAS, or KRAS/p53) lung cancer cell lines, vorinostat reduced growth, cyclin D1, and cyclin E levels, but induced p27, histone acetylation, and apoptosis. Other biomarkers also changed. Findings from transgenic murine lung cancer models were integrated with those from a window of opportunity trial that measured vorinostat pharmacodynamic responses in pre- versus posttreatment tumor biopsies. Vorinostat repressed cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression in murine transgenic lung cancers and significantly reduced lung cancers in syngeneic mice. Vorinostat also reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, but increased p27 levels in post- versus pretreatment human lung cancer biopsies. Notably, necrotic and inflammatory responses appeared in posttreatment biopsies. These depended on intratumoral HDACi levels. Therefore, HDACi treatments of murine genetically engineered lung cancer models exert similar responses (growth inhibition and changes in gene expression) as observed in lung cancer cell lines. Moreover, enhanced pharmacodynamic responses occurred in the window of opportunity trial, providing additional markers of response that can be evaluated in subsequent HDACi trials. Thus, combining murine and human HDACi trials is a strategy to translate preclinical HDACi treatment outcomes into the clinic. This study uncovered clinically tractable mechanisms to engage in future HDACi trials.

  20. Use of N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine)-antibody conjugate as a carrier for targeted gene delivery in mouse lung endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Kennel, S J; Huang, L

    1992-01-01

    A DNA targeted delivery and expression system has been designed based on an N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine) (NPLL)-antibody conjugate, which readily forms a complex with plasmid DNA. Monoclonal antibodies against the cell-surface thrombomodulin conjugated with NPLL were used for targeted delivery of foreign plasmid DNA to an antigen-expressing mouse lung endothelial cell line in vitro and to mouse lungs in vivo. In both cases significant amounts of DNA can be specifically bound to the target cells or tissues. Specific gene expression was observed in the treated mouse lung endothelial cells.

  1. Metabolism of the anti-tuberculosis drug ethionamide by mouse and human FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3 and mouse and human lung microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Morre, Jeffrey T.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2008-12-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) results from infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and remains endemic throughout the world with one-third of the world's population infected. The prevalence of multi-drug resistant strains necessitates the use of more toxic second-line drugs such as ethionamide (ETA), a pro-drug requiring bioactivation to exert toxicity. M. tuberculosis possesses a flavin monooxygenase (EtaA) that oxygenates ETA first to the sulfoxide and then to 2-ethyl-4-amidopyridine, presumably through a second oxygenation involving sulfinic acid. ETA is also a substrate for mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). We examined activity of expressed human and mouse FMOs toward ETA, as well as liver and lung microsomes. All FMOs converted ETA to the S-oxide (ETASO), the first step in bioactivation. Compared to M. tuberculosis, the second S-oxygenation to the sulfinic acid is slow. Mouse liver and lung microsomes, as well as human lung microsomes from an individual expressing active FMO, oxygenated ETA in the same manner as expressed FMOs, confirming this reaction functions in the major target organs for therapeutics (lung) and toxicity (liver). Inhibition by thiourea, and lack of inhibition by SKF-525A, confirm ETASO formation is primarily via FMO, particularly in lung. ETASO production was attenuated in a concentration-dependent manner by glutathione. FMO3 in human liver may contribute to the toxicity and/or affect efficacy of ETA administration. Additionally, there may be therapeutic implications of efficacy and toxicity in human lung based on the FMO2 genetic polymorphism, though further studies are needed to confirm that suggestion.

  2. Promotion of lung tumors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.

    1981-01-01

    Several elements of two-stage carcinogenesis apply to the development of lung tumors in mice. At least three agents, identified as promoters, will also enhance tumor formation in lung: phorbol, saccharin, and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The antioxidant BHT is effective only if animals are treated after exposure to an initiating agent. Administration can be delayed up to 5 months after urethan treatment and still enhance tumor formation. BHT enhances lung tumor formation regardless of its route of administration. The lowest dose required to produce an effect has not yet been determined. In at least one mouse strain, BHT also enhances tumor formation in animals initiated with 3-methylcholanthren or diethylnitrosaine. No evidence is available yet to show that BHT would enhance tumor development in animals treated with subcarcinogenic doses of an initiating compound. Nor has it been possible to produce more tumors with BHT in mouse strains which have a low spontaneous tumor incidence and respond poorly to urethan. Neveretheless, the data collected on the effects of BHT on mouse lung tumor development have broadened the concept of two-stage carcinogenesis and complement the evidence for initiation-promotion available for other epithelial tissues. (ERB)

  3. Protease-mediated release of chemotherapeutics from mesoporous silica nanoparticles to ex vivo human and mouse lung tumors.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Sabine H; Bölükbas, Deniz A; Argyo, Christian; Datz, Stefan; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Bein, Thomas; Meiners, Silke

    2015-03-24

    Nanoparticles allow for controlled and targeted drug delivery to diseased tissues and therefore bypass systemic side effects. Spatiotemporal control of drug release can be achieved by nanocarriers that respond to elevated levels of disease-specific enzymes. For example, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is overexpressed in tumors, is known to enhance the metastatic potency of malignant cells, and has been associated with poor prognosis of lung cancer. Here, we report the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) tightly capped by avidin molecules via MMP9 sequence-specific linkers to allow for site-selective drug delivery in high-expressing MMP9 tumor areas. We provide proof-of-concept evidence for successful MMP9-triggered drug release from MSNs in human tumor cells and in mouse and human lung tumors using the novel technology of ex vivo 3D lung tissue cultures. This technique allows for translational testing of drug delivery strategies in diseased mouse and human tissue. Using this method we show MMP9-mediated release of cisplatin, which induced apoptotic cell death only in lung tumor regions of Kras mutant mice, without causing toxicity in tumor-free areas or in healthy mice. The MMP9-responsive nanoparticles also allowed for effective combinatorial drug delivery of cisplatin and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which had a synergistic effect on the (therapeutic) efficiency. Importantly, we demonstrate the feasibility of MMP9-controlled drug release in human lung tumors.

  4. Protease-mediated release of chemotherapeutics from mesoporous silica nanoparticles to ex vivo human and mouse lung tumors.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Sabine H; Bölükbas, Deniz A; Argyo, Christian; Datz, Stefan; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Bein, Thomas; Meiners, Silke

    2015-03-24

    Nanoparticles allow for controlled and targeted drug delivery to diseased tissues and therefore bypass systemic side effects. Spatiotemporal control of drug release can be achieved by nanocarriers that respond to elevated levels of disease-specific enzymes. For example, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is overexpressed in tumors, is known to enhance the metastatic potency of malignant cells, and has been associated with poor prognosis of lung cancer. Here, we report the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) tightly capped by avidin molecules via MMP9 sequence-specific linkers to allow for site-selective drug delivery in high-expressing MMP9 tumor areas. We provide proof-of-concept evidence for successful MMP9-triggered drug release from MSNs in human tumor cells and in mouse and human lung tumors using the novel technology of ex vivo 3D lung tissue cultures. This technique allows for translational testing of drug delivery strategies in diseased mouse and human tissue. Using this method we show MMP9-mediated release of cisplatin, which induced apoptotic cell death only in lung tumor regions of Kras mutant mice, without causing toxicity in tumor-free areas or in healthy mice. The MMP9-responsive nanoparticles also allowed for effective combinatorial drug delivery of cisplatin and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which had a synergistic effect on the (therapeutic) efficiency. Importantly, we demonstrate the feasibility of MMP9-controlled drug release in human lung tumors. PMID:25703655

  5. Distinct expression and function of the novel mouse chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-5 in lung allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse CC chemokine cDNA from the lung during an allergic inflammatory reaction. The protein encoded by this cDNA is chemotactic for eosinophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Based on its similarities in sequence and function with other CC chemokines, we have named it mouse monocyte chemotactic protein-5 (mMCP- 5). Under noninflammatory conditions, expression of mMCP-5 in the lymph nodes and thymus is constitutive and is generally restricted to stromal cells. Neutralization of mMCP-5 protein with specific antibodies during an allergic inflammatory reaction in vivo resulted in a reduction in the number of eosinophils that accumulated in the lung. Moreover, mMCP- 5 mRNA expression in vivo is regulated differently from that of other major CC chemokines in the lung during the allergic reaction, including Eotaxin. The presence of lymphocytes is essential for expression of mMCP-5 by alveolar macrophages and smooth muscle cells in the lung, and the induction of mMCP-5 RNA occurs earlier than that of the eosinophil chemokine Eotaxin during allergic inflammation. In contrast to Eotaxin, mRNA for mMCP-5 can be produced by mast cells. From these results, we postulate that mMCP-5 plays a pivotal role during the early stages of allergic lung inflammation. PMID:8920881

  6. Responses of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mouse lung epithelial cell lines to electrophilic metabolites of the tumor promoter butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yude; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D; Malkinson, Alvin M; Zhang, Yan Ling; Thompson, John A

    2003-03-01

    A model system to investigate the promotion phase of pulmonary carcinogenesis involves chronic exposure of carcinogen-initiated mice to the food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Previous studies strongly suggested that this activity is due to the cytochrome p450-catalyzed formation of quinone methides 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylenecyclohexa-2,5-dienone (BHT-QM) and 6-tert-butyl-2-(1',1'-dimethyl-2'-hydroxy)ethyl-4-methylenecyclohexa-2,5-dienone (BHTOH-QM). The effects of these electrophiles on non-tumorigenic C10 and E10 epithelial cell lines derived from a normal mouse lung explant were compared with effects on their corresponding neoplastic siblings, the A5 and E9 spontaneous transformants, respectively. The tumorigenic cells were more resistant to cell killing, with LC(50) values of 165-180 microM for BHT-QM and 12-22 microM for BHTOH-QM, versus LC(50) values in the non-tumorigenic cells of 105-118 microM and 5.0-6.0 microM, respectively. Constitutive glutathione (GSH) concentrations were 12-20 nmol/10(6) cells, and BHT-QM toxicity was enhanced >2-fold by depleting GSH with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Formation of the GSH conjugate of BHT-QM accounted for a substantial fraction of the cellular GSH lost by quinone methide exposure. Enhanced lipid peroxidation and superoxide formation occurred in all cell lines treated with BHT-QM, but both tumorigenic lines contained higher levels of GSH S-transferase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. These data suggest the possibility that BHT-derived quinone methides may exert their promoting effects by inducing oxidative stress; such stress is better tolerated by tumorigenic cells, which have higher levels of antioxidant enzymes. Normal cells are destroyed more readily which allows neoplastic cells to expand their proliferation.

  7. Lentivirus IL-10 gene therapy down-regulates IL-17 and attenuates mouse orthotopic lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, S; Sato, M; Loisel-Meyer, S; Matsuda, Y; Oishi, H; Guan, Z; Saito, T; Yeung, J; Cypel, M; Hwang, D M; Medin, J A; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy to target lung allograft rejection in a mouse orthotopic left lung transplantation model. IL-10 may regulate posttransplant immunity mediated by IL-17. Lentivirus-mediated trans-airway luciferase gene transfer to the donor lung resulted in persistent luciferase activity up to 6 months posttransplant in the isograft (B6 to B6); luciferase activity decreased in minor-mismatched allograft lungs (B10 to B6) in association with moderate rejection. Fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation (BALB/c to B6) resulted in severe rejection and complete loss of luciferase activity. In minor-mismatched allografts, IL-10-encoding lentivirus gene therapy reduced the acute rejection score compared with the lentivirus-luciferase control at posttransplant day 28 (3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD); p = 0.025; n = 6/group). IL-10 gene therapy also significantly reduced gene expression of IL-17, IL-23, and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt without affecting levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Cells expressing IL-17 were dramatically reduced in the allograft lung. In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy significantly reduced expression of IL-17 and other associated genes in the transplanted allograft lung and attenuated posttransplant immune responses after orthotopic lung transplantation. PMID:23601206

  8. Metabolite signatures in hydrophilic extracts of mouse lungs exposed to cigarette smoke revealed by 1H NMR metabolomics investigation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Mary Y.

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations ofmore » adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.« less

  9. Network inference algorithms elucidate Nrf2 regulation of mouse lung oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ronald C; Acquaah-Mensah, George; Singhal, Mudita; Malhotra, Deepti; Biswal, Shyam

    2008-01-01

    A variety of cardiovascular, neurological, and neoplastic conditions have been associated with oxidative stress, i.e., conditions under which levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are elevated over significant periods. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) regulates the transcription of several gene products involved in the protective response to oxidative stress. The transcriptional regulatory and signaling relationships linking gene products involved in the response to oxidative stress are, currently, only partially resolved. Microarray data constitute RNA abundance measures representing gene expression patterns. In some cases, these patterns can identify the molecular interactions of gene products. They can be, in effect, proxies for protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Traditional techniques used for clustering coregulated genes on high-throughput gene arrays are rarely capable of distinguishing between direct transcriptional regulatory interactions and indirect ones. In this study, newly developed information-theoretic algorithms that employ the concept of mutual information were used: the Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR). These algorithms captured dependencies in the gene expression profiles of the mouse lung, allowing the regulatory effect of Nrf2 in response to oxidative stress to be determined more precisely. In addition, a characterization of promoter sequences of Nrf2 regulatory targets was conducted using a Support Vector Machine classification algorithm to corroborate ARACNE and CLR predictions. Inferred networks were analyzed, compared, and integrated using the Collective Analysis of Biological Interaction Networks (CABIN) plug-in of Cytoscape. Using the two network inference algorithms and one machine learning algorithm, a number of both previously known and novel targets of Nrf2 transcriptional activation were identified. Genes predicted as

  10. Low oxygen tension enhances the generation of lung progenitor cells from mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Garreta, Elena; Melo, Esther; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-07-16

    Whole-organ decellularization technology has emerged as a new alternative for the fabrication of bioartificial lungs. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are potentially useful for recellularization since they can be directed to express phenotypic marker genes of lung epithelial cells. Normal pulmonary development takes place in a low oxygen environment ranging from 1 to 5%. By contrast, in vitro ESC and iPSC differentiation protocols are usually carried out at room-air oxygen tension. Here, we sought to determine the role played by oxygen tension on the derivation of Nkx2.1+ lung/thyroid progenitor cells from mouse ESC and iPSC. A step-wise differentiation protocol was used to generate Nkx2.1+ lung/thyroid progenitors under 20% and 5% oxygen tension. On day 12, gene expression analysis revealed that Nkx2.1 and Foxa2 (endodermal and early lung epithelial cell marker) were significantly upregulated at 5% oxygen tension in ESC and iPSC differentiated cultures compared to 20% oxygen conditions. In addition, quantification of Foxa2+Nkx2.1+Pax8- cells corresponding to the lung field, with exclusion of the potential thyroid fate identified by Pax8 expression, confirmed that the low physiologic oxygen tension exerted a significant positive effect on early pulmonary differentiation of ESC and iPSC. In conclusion, we found that 5% oxygen tension enhanced the derivation of lung progenitors from mouse ESC and iPSC compared to 20% room-air oxygen tension.

  11. Cigarette side-stream smoke lung and bladder carcinogenesis: inducing mutagenic acrolein-DNA adducts, inhibiting DNA repair and enhancing anchorage-independent-growth cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Chin, Chiu; Huang, William; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Rom, William N; Chen, Lung-Chi; Tang, Moon-shong

    2015-10-20

    Second-hand smoke (SHS) is associated with 20-30% of cigarette-smoke related diseases, including cancer. Majority of SHS (>80%) originates from side-stream smoke (SSS). Compared to mainstream smoke, SSS contains more tumorigenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and acrolein (Acr). We assessed SSS-induced benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)- and cyclic propano-deoxyguanosine (PdG) adducts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung, heart, liver, and bladder-mucosa from mice exposed to SSS for 16 weeks. In SSS exposed mice, Acr-dG adducts were the major type of PdG adducts formed in BAL (p < 0.001), lung (p < 0.05), and bladder mucosa (p < 0.001), with no significant accumulation of Acr-dG adducts in heart or liver. SSS exposure did not enhance BPDE-DNA adduct formation in any of these tissues. SSS exposure reduced nucleotide excision repair (p < 0.01) and base excision repair (p < 0.001) in lung tissue. The levels of DNA repair proteins, XPC and hOGG1, in lung tissues of exposed mice were significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) lower than the levels in lung tissues of control mice. We found that Acr can transform human bronchial epithelial and urothelial cells in vitro. We propose that induction of mutagenic Acr-DNA adducts, inhibition of DNA repair, and induction of cell transformation are three mechanisms by which SHS induces lung and bladder cancers. PMID:26431382

  12. Cigarette side-stream smoke lung and bladder carcinogenesis: inducing mutagenic acrolein-DNA adducts, inhibiting DNA repair and enhancing anchorage-independent-growth cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Chin, Chiu; Huang, William; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Rom, William N; Chen, Lung-Chi; Tang, Moon-shong

    2015-10-20

    Second-hand smoke (SHS) is associated with 20-30% of cigarette-smoke related diseases, including cancer. Majority of SHS (>80%) originates from side-stream smoke (SSS). Compared to mainstream smoke, SSS contains more tumorigenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and acrolein (Acr). We assessed SSS-induced benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)- and cyclic propano-deoxyguanosine (PdG) adducts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung, heart, liver, and bladder-mucosa from mice exposed to SSS for 16 weeks. In SSS exposed mice, Acr-dG adducts were the major type of PdG adducts formed in BAL (p < 0.001), lung (p < 0.05), and bladder mucosa (p < 0.001), with no significant accumulation of Acr-dG adducts in heart or liver. SSS exposure did not enhance BPDE-DNA adduct formation in any of these tissues. SSS exposure reduced nucleotide excision repair (p < 0.01) and base excision repair (p < 0.001) in lung tissue. The levels of DNA repair proteins, XPC and hOGG1, in lung tissues of exposed mice were significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) lower than the levels in lung tissues of control mice. We found that Acr can transform human bronchial epithelial and urothelial cells in vitro. We propose that induction of mutagenic Acr-DNA adducts, inhibition of DNA repair, and induction of cell transformation are three mechanisms by which SHS induces lung and bladder cancers.

  13. Pre-irradiation of mouse mammary gland stimulates cancer cell migration and development of lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, G; Bouvette, G; Therriault, H; Bujold, R; Saucier, C; Paquette, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: In most patients with breast cancer, radiotherapy induces inflammation that is characterised by an increase of promigratory factors in healthy tissues surrounding the tumour. However, their role in the emergence of the migration phenotype and formation of metastases is still unclear. Methods: A single mammary gland of BALB/c mice was irradiated with four doses of 6 Gy given at a 24-h interval. After the last session of irradiation, treated and control mammary glands were either collected for quantification of promigratory and proinflammatory factors or were implanted with fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI)-expressing mouse mammary cancer D2A1 cells. The migration of cancer cells in the mammary glands was monitored by optical imaging. On day 21, mammary tumours and lungs were collected for histology analyses and the quantification of metastases. Results: Pre-irradiation of the mammary gland increased by 1.8-fold the migration of cancer cells, by 2-fold the quantity of circulating cancer cells and by 2.4-fold the number of lung metastases. These adverse effects were associated with the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conclusion: The emergence of the metastasis phenotype is believed to be associated with the accumulation of mutations in cancer cells. Our results suggest an alternative mechanism based on promigratory factors from irradiated mammary glands. In clinic, the efficiency of radiotherapy could be improved by anti-inflammatory agents that would prevent the stimulation of cancer cell migration induced by radiation. PMID:24002607

  14. Repair in mouse lung between multiple small doses of X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, E.L.; Parkins, C.S.; Down, J.D.; Fowler, J.F.; Thames, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    Multiple fraction experiments have been carried out to determine the response of mouse lung to repeated small doses of 240 kV X rays down to 150 rad/fraction using breathing rate and lethality to assess damage. Two experimental approaches were used to measure the effect of small doses in vivo: (1) multiple equal doses and (2) multiple priming doses followed by a large test dose. Analysis was performed using the multitarget two-component model and the linear test dose. The amount of repair was calculated as a function of either dose per fraction (F/sub R/) or total dose (F/sub rec/). Both F/sub R/ and F/sub rec/ increased with decreasing dose per fraction but the change in F/sub R/ was small. The advantage of F/sub rec/ was that it varied more rapidly with dose per fraction than F/sub R/, so that possible differences between tissue repair capabilities are more visible on plots of repair as a function of dose per fraction. F/sub R/ and F/sub rec/ both decreased with the level of single-dose isoeffect injury; thus neither parameter is acceptable for comparing repair capability of different normal tissues with widely differing single-dose end point levels. Beta/alpha values were calculated and found to be a more acceptable index of repair capability than either F/sub R/ or F/sub rec/ because unlike those two parameters, ..beta../..cap alpha.. varied little with level of damage. Beta/alpha values of 1.7 to 4.2 krad/sup -1/ were obtained for both lung death and increased breathing rate and are clearly intermediate between the lower ..beta../..cap alpha.. ratios for acute reactions, i.e., skin and intestine, and the higher values for late reactions in kidney and spinal cord.

  15. Proteoglycans maintain lung stability in an elastase-treated mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2014-07-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling and tissue rupture contribute to the progression of emphysema. Lung tissue elasticity is governed by the tensile stiffness of fibers and the compressive stiffness of proteoglycans. It is not known how proteoglycan remodeling affects tissue stability and destruction in emphysema. The objective of this study was to characterize the role of remodeled proteoglycans in alveolar stability and tissue destruction in emphysema. At 30 days after treatment with porcine pancreatic elastase, mouse lung tissue stiffness and alveolar deformation were evaluated under varying tonicity conditions that affect the stiffness of proteoglycans. Proteoglycans were stained and measured in the alveolar walls. Computational models of alveolar stability and rupture incorporating the mechanical properties of fibers and proteoglycans were developed. Although absolute tissue stiffness was only 24% of normal, changes in relative stiffness and alveolar shape distortion due to changes in tonicity were increased in emphysema (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan amount per unit alveolar wall length, which is responsible for proteoglycan stiffness, was higher in emphysema (P < 0.001). Versican expression increased in the tissue, but decorin decreased. Our network model predicted that the rate of tissue deterioration locally governed by mechanical forces was reduced when proteoglycan stiffness was increased. Consequently, this general network model explains why increasing proteoglycan deposition protects the alveolar walls from rupture in emphysema. Our results suggest that the loss of proteoglycans observed in human emphysema contributes to disease progression, whereas treatments that promote proteoglycan deposition in the extracellular matrix should slow the progression of emphysema. PMID:24450478

  16. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; Hsieh, David; Au, Alfred; Jablons, David M.; Li, Hui; You, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor developmentmore » in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of γ-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and γ-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.« less

  17. Cationic amphiphiles with fatty acyl chain asymmetry of coconut oil deliver genes selectively to mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekhar, Voshavar; Srujan, Marepally; Prabhakar, Rairala; Reddy, Rakesh C; Sreedhar, Bojja; Rentam, Kiran K R; Kanjilal, Sanjit; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2011-03-16

    Recent structure-activity studies have revealed a dramatic influence of hydrophobic chain asymmetry in enhancing gene delivery efficacies of synthetic cationic amphiphiles (Nantz, M. H. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2010, 7, 786-794; Koynova, R. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2009, 6, 951-958). The present findings demonstrate for the first time that such a transfection enhancing influence of asymmetric hydrocarbon chains observed in pure synthetic cationic amphiphiles also works for cationic amphiphiles designed with natural, asymmetric fatty acyl chains of a food-grade oil. Herein, we demonstrate that cationic amphiphiles designed with the natural fatty acyl chain asymmetry of food-grade coconut oil are less cytotoxic and deliver genes selectively to mouse lung. Despite lauroyl chains being the major fatty acyl chains of coconut oil, both the in vitro and In vivo gene transfer efficiencies of such cationic amphiphiles were found to be remarkably superior (>4-fold) to those of their pure dilauroyl analogue. Mechanistic studies involving the technique of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed higher biomembrane fusibility of the cationic liposomes of the coconut amphiphiles than that of the symmetric dilauroyl analogue. AFM study revealed pronounced fusogenic nonlamellar structures of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles. Findings in the FRET and cellular uptake study, taken together, support the notion that the higher cellular uptake resulting from the more fusogenic nature of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles 1 are likely to play a dominant role in making the coconut amphiphiles transfection competent.

  18. Airway segmentation and analysis for the study of mouse models of lung disease using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaechevarria, X.; Pérez-Martín, D.; Ceresa, M.; de Biurrun, G.; Blanco, D.; Montuenga, L. M.; van Ginneken, B.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C.; Muñoz-Barrutia, A.

    2009-11-01

    Animal models of lung disease are gaining importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms of diseases such as emphysema and lung cancer. Micro-CT allows in vivo imaging of these models, thus permitting the study of the progression of the disease or the effect of therapeutic drugs in longitudinal studies. Automated analysis of micro-CT images can be helpful to understand the physiology of diseased lungs, especially when combined with measurements of respiratory system input impedance. In this work, we present a fast and robust murine airway segmentation and reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm is based on a propagating fast marching wavefront that, as it grows, divides the tree into segments. We devised a number of specific rules to guarantee that the front propagates only inside the airways and to avoid leaking into the parenchyma. The algorithm was tested on normal mice, a mouse model of chronic inflammation and a mouse model of emphysema. A comparison with manual segmentations of two independent observers shows that the specificity and sensitivity values of our method are comparable to the inter-observer variability, and radius measurements of the mainstem bronchi reveal significant differences between healthy and diseased mice. Combining measurements of the automatically segmented airways with the parameters of the constant phase model provides extra information on how disease affects lung function.

  19. Emodin Attenuates Cigarette Smoke Induced Lung Injury in a Mouse Model via Suppression of Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen-Hua; Shi, Xiu-Qin; Liang, Shu-Hong; Zhou, Lin; Liu, Ke-Feng; Zhao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Emodin has antioxidative activities. Here, we investigated the effects of emodin on cigarette smoke (CS)-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice (C57BL/6) were exposed to CS. Emodin was administrated with intraperitoneal bolus injection of emodin (20 or 40 mg/kg) daily 1 h before CS exposure. Emodin inhibited CS-induced inflammatory cells infiltration in mouse lungs, especially at 40 mg/kg. Moreover, emodin resulted in significant reductions in total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cells, as compared with air exposure control, coupled with decreases in BALF cytokines. The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were remarkably enhanced by emodin in CS-exposed mice. Emodin enhanced CS-induced expression of heme oxygenase-1 and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (both are antioxidative genes) at both mRNA and protein levels, and profoundly promoted their activities in CS-treated mice. Collectively, our results suggested that emodin protects mouse lung from CS-induced lung inflammation and oxidative damage, most likely through its antioxidant activity.

  20. AKT and N-Ras co-activation in the mouse liver promotes rapid carcinogenesis via mTORC1, FOXM1/SKP2, and c-Myc pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Coral; Wang, Chunmei; Mattu, Sandra; Destefanis, Giulia; Ladu, Sara; Delogu, Salvatore; Armbruster, Julia; Fan, Lingling; Lee, Susie A.; Jiang, Lijie; Dombrowski, Frank; Evert, Matthias; Chen, Xin; Calvisi, Diego F.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) and Ras pathways is often implicated in carcinogenesis. However, the oncogenic cooperation between these two cascades in relationship to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development remains undetermined. To investigate this issue, we generated a mouse model characterized by combined overexpression of activated forms of AKT and neuroblastoma Ras viral oncogene homolog (N-Ras) protooncogenes in the liver via hydrodynamic gene transfer. The molecular mechanisms underlying crosstalk between AKT and N-Ras were assessed in the mouse model and further evaluated in human and murine HCC cell lines. We found that co-expression of AKT and N-Ras resulted in a dramatic acceleration of liver tumor development when compared with mice overexpressing AKT alone, whereas N-Ras alone did not lead to tumor formation. At the cellular level, concomitant upregulation of AKT and N-Ras resulted in increased proliferation and microvascularization when compared with AKT injected mice. Mechanistic studies suggested that accelerated hepatocarcinogenesis driven by AKT and N-Ras resulted from a strong activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Furthermore, elevated expression of FOXM1/SKP2 and c-Myc also contributed to rapid tumor growth in AKT/Ras mice, yet via mTORC1-independent mechanisms. The biological effects of co-activation of AKT and N-Ras were then recapitulated in vitro using HCC cell lines, which supports the functional significance of mTORC1, FOXM1/SKP2 and c-Myc signaling cascades in mediating AKT and N-Ras induced liver tumor development. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the in vivo crosstalk between the AKT and Ras pathways in promoting liver tumor development, and the pivotal role of mTORC1-dependent and independent pathways in mediating AKT and Ras induced hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:21993994

  1. Effects of ethanol on RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated calcium sensitization in mouse lung parenchymal tissue.

    PubMed

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Ergurhan Kiroglu, Olcay; Astarci, Erhan; Balli, Ebru; Ogulener, Nuran

    2015-10-01

    Calcium sensitization by the RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway contributes to the contraction in smooth muscle. Contractile stimuli can sensitize myosin to Ca(2+) by activating RhoA/Rho-kinase that inhibits myosin light chain phosphatase activity. The present study was aimed at investigating the possible involvement of RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway in contractile responses to agonist (phenylephrine) and depolarizing (KCl) of mouse lung parenchymal tissues. Also, we investigated the effect of ethanol on RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Phenylephrine (10(-8)-10(-4) M) and KCl (10-80 mM) induced sustained contractions in parenchymal strips. Ethanol significantly attenuated the contractions to phenylephrine and KCl. The Rho-kinase inhibitors fasudil (5×10(-5) M) and Y-27632 (5×10(-5) M) inhibited contractions to in both control and ethanol-treated parenchymal strips. In addition, the relaxations induced by fasudil (10(-4) M) and Y-27632 (5×10(-4) M) on parenchymal strips contracted by phenylephrine but not KCl was decreased in ethanol-treatment group. Also, RhoA, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expressions were detected in mouse lung parenchymal tissue. In ethanol-treated group, expression of RhoA and ROCK1 but not ROCK2 decreased compared to control. Furthermore, ethanol causes apoptotic changes in alveolar type I epithelial cells of parenchymal tissue. These results suggest that RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway plays an important role in phenylephrine- and KCl-induced Ca(2)(+) sensitization in mouse lung parenchymal tissue. Also, ethanol may be decrease phenylephrine- and KCl-induced contraction due to lowering the RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated Ca(2+)-sensitizing by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway in parenchymal tissue. These results may be lead to important insights into the mechanisms of lung diseases due to alcohol consumption.

  2. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Georgy, K A; Mei, M; Durante, M; Craise, L M

    1995-10-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  3. Radiogenic cell transformation and carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Mei, M.; Durante, M.; Craise, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation carcinogenesis is one of the major biological effects considered important in the risk assessment for space travel. Various biological model systems, including both cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenic effects of space radiations, which consist of energetic electrons, protons and heavy ions. The development of techniques for studying neoplastic cell transformation in culture has made it possible to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. Cultured cell systems are thus complementary to animal models. Many investigators have determined the oncogenic effects of ionizing and nonionizing radiation in cultured mammalian cells. One of the cell systems used most often for radiation transformation studies is mouse embryonic cells (C3H10T1/2), which are easy to culture and give good quantitative dose-response curves. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for heavy ions with various energies and linear energy transfer (LET) have been obtained with this cell system. Similar RBE and LET relationship was observed by investigators for other cell systems. In addition to RBE measurements, fundamental questions on repair of sub- and potential oncogenic lesions, direct and indirect effect, primary target and lesion, the importance of cell-cell interaction and the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in radiogenic carcinogenesis have been studied, and interesting results have been found. Recently several human epithelial cell systems have been developed, and ionizing radiation have been shown to transform these cells. Oncogenic transformation of these cells, however, requires a long expression time and/or multiple radiation exposures. Limited experimental data indicate high-LET heavy ions can be more effective than low-LET radiation in inducing cell transformation. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can be performed with cloned transformants to provide insights into basic genetic

  4. Flaxseed Mitigates Acute Oxidative Lung Damage in a Mouse Model of Repeated Radiation and Hyperoxia Exposure Associated with Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2015-01-01

    Background Spaceflight missions may require crewmembers to conduct extravehicular activities (EVA). Pre-breathe protocols in preparation for an EVA entail 100% hyperoxia exposure that may last for a few hours and be repeated 2-3 times weekly. Each EVA is associated with additional challenges such as low levels of total body cosmic/galactic radiation exposure that may present a threat to crewmember health. We have developed a mouse model of total body radiation and hyperoxia exposure and identified acute damage of lung tissues. In the current study we evaluated the usefulness of dietary flaxseed (FS) as a countermeasure agent for such double-hit exposures. Methods We evaluated lung tissue changes 2 weeks post-initiation of exposure challenges. Mouse cohorts (n=5/group) were pre-fed diets containing either 0% FS or 10% FS for 3 weeks and exposed to: a) normoxia (Untreated); b) >95% O2 (O2); c) 0.25Gy single fraction gamma radiation (IR); or d) a combination of O2 and IR (O2+IR) 3 times per week for 2 consecutive weeks, where 8-hour hyperoxia treatments were spanned by normoxic intervals. Results At 2 weeks post challenge, while control-diet fed mice developed significant lung injury and inflammation across all challenges, FS protected lung tissues by decreasing bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils (p<0.003) and protein levels, oxidative tissue damage, as determined by levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.008) and nitrosative stress as determined by nitrite levels. Lung hydroxyproline levels, a measure of lung fibrosis, were significantly elevated in mice fed 0% FS (p<0.01) and exposed to hyperoxia/radiation or the combination treatment, but not in FS-fed mice. FS also decreased levels of a pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrogenic cytokine (TGF-β1) gene expression levels in lung. Conclusion Flaxseed mitigated adverse effects in lung of repeat exposures to radiation/hyperoxia. This data will provide useful information in the design of countermeasures to early

  5. Effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on lung pathology and inflammation in ovalbumin-induced asthma in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Maryam; Boskabady, Mohammad Hosein; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Jahromi, Gila Pirzad; Omidi, Amene; Nejad, Amir Kavian; Khamse, Safoura; Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have attracted significant interest to treat asthma and its complication. In this study, the effects of BMSCs on lung pathology and inflammation in an ovalbumin-induced asthma model in mouse were examined. Materials and Methods: BALB/c mice were divided into three groups: control group (animals were not sensitized), asthma group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin), asthma+BMSC group (animals were sensitized by ovalbumin and treated with BMSCs). BMSCs were isolated and characterized and then labeled with Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). After that the cells transferred into asthmatic mice. Histopathological changes of the airways, BMSCs migration and total and differential white blood cell (WBC) count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were evaluated. Results: A large number of BrdU-BMSCs were found in the lungs of mice treated with BMSCs. The histopathological changes, BAL total WBC counts and the percentage of neutrophils and eosinophils were increased in asthma group compared to the control group. Treatment with BMSCs significantly decreased airway pathological indices, inflammatory cell infiltration, and also goblet cell hyperplasia. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that BMSCs therapy significantly suppressed the lung pathology and inflammation in the ovalbumin induced asthma model in mouse. PMID:27096065

  6. Primary mouse lung fibroblasts help macrophages to tackle Mycobacterium tuberculosis more efficiently and differentiate into myofibroblasts up on bacterial stimulation.

    PubMed

    Verma, Subash Chand; Agarwal, Pooja; Krishnan, Manju Y

    2016-03-01

    Keeping with their classical role in wound healing, fibroblasts of the lung take part in the resolution of tubercular granulomas. They are totally absent in nascent granulomas, but surround necrotizing granulomas, and are the majority of cells in healed granulomas. Lung fibroblasts may become infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Two previous studies suggested an immunomodulatory effect of fibroblasts on infected macrophages. In the present study, we looked at the role of primary mouse lung fibroblasts on naive or activated mouse bone marrow macrophages infected with Mtb and the effect of infection on fibroblast properties. We observed that with fibroblasts in the vicinity, infected naive macrophages restricted the bacterial growth, while activated macrophages turned more bactericidal with concomitant increase in nitrite production. Neutralizing IL-1α in fibroblast supernatant reduced the nitrite production by infected macrophages. Secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 was down-regulated, while TNF-α was up-regulated in infected naive macrophages. In infected activated macrophages, the secretion of IL-6 was up-regulated, while that of MCP-1 and TNF-α was unaffected. The 'fibroblast effects' were enhanced when the fibroblasts too were infected. Mtb induced IL-1 secretion and pro-fibrotic responses by fibroblasts. Mtb-induced myofibroblast conversion was blocked by rapamycin suggesting cell signalling via mTOR.

  7. Conditional Gene Inactivation Reveals Roles for Fgf10 and Fgfr2 in Establishing a Normal Pattern of Epithelial Branching in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Lisa L.; Mansour, Suzanne L.; Sun, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) signaling through FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) is required for lung initiation. While studies indicate that Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are also important at later stages of lung development, their roles in early branching events remain unclear. We addressed this question through conditional inactivation of both genes in mouse subsequent to lung initiation. Inactivation of Fgf10 in lung mesenchyme resulted in smaller lobes with a reduced number of branches. Inactivation of Fgfr2 in lung epithelium resulted in disruption of lobes and small epithelial outgrowths that arose arbitrarily along the main bronchi. In both mutants, there was an increase in cell death. Also, the expression patterns of key signaling molecules implicated in branching morphogenesis were altered and a proximal lung marker was expanded distally. Our results indicate that both Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are required for a normal branching program and for proper proximal-distal patterning of the lung. PMID:19618463

  8. TH-E-BRF-07: Raman Spectroscopy for Radiation Treatment Response Assessment in a Lung Metastases Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Devpura, S; Barton, K; Brown, S; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Sethi, S; Klein, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Raman spectroscopy is an optical spectroscopic method used to probe chemical information about a target tissue. Our goal was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy is able to distinguish lung tumors from normal lung tissue and whether this technique can identify the molecular changes induced by radiation. Methods: 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into the flanks of 6 Balb/C female mice. Four additional mice were used as “normal lung” controls. After 14 days, 3 mice bearing tumors received 6Gy to the left lung with 6MV photons and the other three were treated as “unirradiated tumor” controls. At a 24-hour time point, lungs were excised and the specimens were sectioned using a cryostat; alternating sections were either stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) for evaluation by a pathologist or unstained for Raman measurements. 240 total Raman spectra were collected; 84 from normal lung controls; 63 from unirradiated tumors and 64 from tumors irradiated with 6Gy in a single fraction. Raman spectra were also collected from normal lung tissues of mice with unirradiated tumors. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) were performed to analyze the data. Results: Raman bands assignable to DNA/RNA showed prominent contributions in tumor tissues while Raman bands associated with hemoglobin showed strong contributions in normal lung tissue. PCA/DFA analysis identified normal lung tissue and tumor with 100% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively, relative to pathologic scoring. Additionally, normal lung tissues from unirradiated mice bearing tumors were classified as normal with 100% accuracy. In a model consisting of unirradiated and irradiated tumors identification accuracy was 79.4% and 93.8% respectively, relative to pathologic assessment. Conclusion: Initial results demonstrate the promise for Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis normal vs. lung metastases as well as the assessment of

  9. Lung Cancer Mortality (1950–1999) among Eldorado Uranium Workers: A Comparison of Models of Carcinogenesis and Empirical Excess Risk Models

    PubMed Central

    Eidemüller, Markus; Jacob, Peter; Lane, Rachel S. D.; Frost, Stanley E.; Zablotska, Lydia B.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer mortality after exposure to radon decay products (RDP) among 16,236 male Eldorado uranium workers was analyzed. Male workers from the Beaverlodge and Port Radium uranium mines and the Port Hope radium and uranium refinery and processing facility who were first employed between 1932 and 1980 were followed up from 1950 to 1999. A total of 618 lung cancer deaths were observed. The analysis compared the results of the biologically-based two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model to the empirical excess risk model. The spontaneous clonal expansion rate of pre-malignant cells was reduced at older ages under the assumptions of the TSCE model. Exposure to RDP was associated with increase in the clonal expansion rate during exposure but not afterwards. The increase was stronger for lower exposure rates. A radiation-induced bystander effect could be a possible explanation for such an exposure response. Results on excess risks were compared to a linear dose-response parametric excess risk model with attained age, time since exposure and dose rate as effect modifiers. In all models the excess relative risk decreased with increasing attained age, increasing time since exposure and increasing exposure rate. Large model uncertainties were found in particular for small exposure rates. PMID:22936975

  10. Comparative lung tumorigenicity of parent and mononitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the BLU:Ha newborn mouse assay

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, W.F. Jr.; Stevens, E.K.; Martin, C.N.; Chow, F.L.; Garner, R.C.

    1989-07-01

    A BLU:Ha newborn mouse lung adenoma bioassay was employed to compare the tumorigenicity of selected mononitroarenes and unsubstituted parent compounds 6 months after initial treatment. The presence of a nitro group had a variable effect upon compound potency in which tumorigenicity was increased, abolished, or unchanged. On the basis of results with equimolar doses, the potency of benzo(a)pyrene was greater than 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene (inactive), 6-nitrochrysene was much greater than chrysene (inactive), 3-nitrofluoranthene (active) was equal to fluoranthene (active), and 1-nitropyrene (inactive) was equivalent to pyrene (inactive). The potency series among the mononitroarenes was 6-nitrochyrsene much greater than 3-nitrofluoranthene greater than 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene (inactive) = 1-nitropyrene (inactive). Lung tumor incidence and multiplicity were similar for both males and females. No consistent pattern was observed for the occasional appearance of lymphoma or hepatic nodular hyperplasia in the various treatment groups.

  11. The genetic basis of strain-dependent differences in the early phase of radiation injury in mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Franko, A.J.; Sharplin, J.; Ward, W.F.; Hinz, J.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Substantial differences between mouse strains have been reported in the lesions present in the lung during the early phase of radiation injury. Some strains show only classical pneumonitis, while other strains develop substantial fibrosis and hyaline membranes which contribute appreciably to respiratory insufficiency, in addition to pneumonitis. Other strains are intermediate between these extremes. These differences correlate with intrinsic differences in activities of lung plasminogen activator and angiotensin converting enzyme. The genetic basis of these differences was assessed by examining histologically the early reaction in lungs of seven murine hybrids available commercially after whole-thorax irradiation. Crosses between fibrosing and nonfibrosing parents were uniformly nonfibrosing, and crosses between fibrosing and intermediate parents were uniformly intermediate. No evidence of sex linkage was seen. Thus the phenotype in which fibrosis is found is controlled by autosomal recessive determinants. Strains prone to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and hyaline membranes exhibited intrinsically lower activities of lung plasminogen activator and angiotensin converting enzyme than either the nonfibrosing strains or the nonfibrosing hybrid crosses. The median time of death of the hybrids was genetically determined primarily by the longest-lived parent regardless of the types of lesions expressed.

  12. Validation of Tuba1a as Appropriate Internal Control for Normalization of Gene Expression Analysis during Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aditi; Dobersch, Stephanie; Dammann, Reinhard H.; Bellusci, Saverio; Ilinskaya, Olga N.; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The expression ratio between the analysed gene and an internal control gene is the most widely used normalization method for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) expression analysis. The ideal reference gene for a specific experiment is the one whose expression is not affected by the different experimental conditions tested. In this study, we validate the applicability of five commonly used reference genes during different stages of mouse lung development. The stability of expression of five different reference genes (Tuba1a, Actb Gapdh, Rn18S and Hist4h4) was calculated within five experimental groups using the statistical algorithm of geNorm software. Overall, Tuba1a showed the least variability in expression among the different stages of lung development, while Hist4h4 and Rn18S showed the maximum variability in their expression. Expression analysis of two lung specific markers, surfactant protein C (SftpC) and Clara cell-specific 10 kDA protein (Scgb1a1), normalized to each of the five reference genes tested here, confirmed our results and showed that incorrect reference gene choice can lead to artefacts. Moreover, a combination of two internal controls for normalization of expression analysis during lung development will increase the accuracy and reliability of results. PMID:25723738

  13. Influence of butylated hydroxytoluene-induced cell proliferation on mouse lung damage after x rays or fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, R.L.; Meyer, K.R.

    1982-02-01

    To examine the relative importance of endothelial cells vs type II alveolar cells in the development of lung damage, we irradiated the lungs of mice with X rays either 2 or 6 days after treatment with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and determined LD/sub 50///sub 180/ values. LD/sub 50///sub 180/ was 959 rad when no BHT was given, 269 rad when 2 days elapsed after BHT treatment, and 1445 rad at 6 days after BHT. The pattern of response was similar after fission neutron irradiation to the thorax. LD/sub 50///sub 180/ after fission neutrons alone was 476 rad, but at 2 and 6 days after BHT, the LD/sub 50///sub 180/ values were 98 and 575 rad, respectively. Clearly 2 days after BHT, when radiation injury to type II cells predominated, the sensitivity to both X rays and fission neutrons increased markedly, suggesting that injury to alveolar epithelial cells may be of primary importance in the development of lung damage in the mouse. Further, since certain antineoplastic drugs may induce a proliferative response in the lung similar to that produced by BHT, these data stress the fact that the timing between chemotherapy and radiation may be critical in the treatment of some cancers to avoid serious complications.

  14. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  15. Dissecting the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) in colon, breast, and lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Jennifer E.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is a promising drug target since its agonists increase serum high-density lipoprotein; decrease low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and insulin associated with metabolic syndrome; improve insulin sensitivity; and decrease high fat diet-induced obesity. PPARβ/δ agonists also promote terminal differentiation and elicit anti-inflammatory activities in many cell types. However, it remains to be determined whether PPARβ/δ agonists can be developed as therapeutics because there are reports showing either pro- or anti-carcinogenic effects of PPARβ/δ in cancer models. This review examines studies reporting the role of PPARβ/δ in colon, breast, and lung cancers. The prevailing evidence would suggest that targeting PPARβ/δ is not only safe but could have anti-carcinogenic protective effects. PMID:22037942

  16. Carcinogenesis and aging

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    A suggested mechanism of carcinogenesis is presented. This scheme takes into account the effect of carcinogens at different integration levels: subcellular, tissue, and organism. Any of these levels may be age dependent. Age-associated changes in the activity of enzymes responsible for activation and inactivation of carcinogens, and variations in concentrations of lipids and proteins contributing to the transport of carcinogenic agents into cells, may play an important role in the modifying effect of age on carcinogenesis. The effects of age-associated changes in DNA repair need clarification. However, they are thought to exert a permissive influence on the age-associated rise in tumor incidence. It seems that proliferative activity of target tissues is the important modifying factor of carcinogenesis. Age-related changes of regulation at tissue and organism levels are also powerful factors in carcinogenesis modification. Age-dependent changes in the neuroendocrine system provide conditions for metabolic immunodepression and promotion of carcinogenesis. On the other hand, carcinogens per se (especially chemical and radiological) may intensify aging processes in the organism. Normalization, by drugs, of age-associated shifts requiring synthetic and energetic changes of a transformed tumor cells, and of immunological shifts, may exert both antitumor and geroprotective effects.

  17. Inhomogeneity of local stiffness in the extracellular matrix scaffold of fibrotic mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Melo, Esther; Cárdenes, Nayra; Garreta, Elena; Luque, Tomas; Rojas, Mauricio; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-09-01

    Lung disease models are useful to study how cell engraftment, proliferation and differentiation are modulated in lung bioengineering. The aim of this work was to characterize the local stiffness of decellularized lungs in aged and fibrotic mice. Mice (2- and 24-month old; 14 of each) with lung fibrosis (N=20) and healthy controls (N=8) were euthanized after 11 days of intratracheal bleomycin (fibrosis) or saline (controls) infusion. The lungs were excised, decellularized by a conventional detergent-based (sodium-dodecyl sulfate) procedure and slices of the acellular lungs were prepared to measure the local stiffness by means of atomic force microscopy. The local stiffness of the different sites in acellular fibrotic lungs was very inhomogeneous within the lung and increased according to the degree of the structural fibrotic lesion. Local stiffness of the acellular lungs did not show statistically significant differences caused by age. The group of mice most affected by fibrosis exhibited local stiffness that were ~2-fold higher than in the control mice: from 27.2±1.64 to 64.8±7.1kPa in the alveolar septa, from 56.6±4.6 to 99.9±11.7kPa in the visceral pleura, from 41.1±8.0 to 105.2±13.6kPa in the tunica adventitia, and from 79.3±7.2 to 146.6±28.8kPa in the tunica intima. Since acellular lungs from mice with bleomycin-induced fibrosis present considerable micromechanical inhomogeneity, this model can be a useful tool to better investigate how different degrees of extracellular matrix lesion modulate cell fate in the process of organ bioengineering from decellularized lungs.

  18. Towards the validation of a lung tumorigenesis model with mainstream cigarette smoke inhalation using the A/J mouse.

    PubMed

    Stinn, Walter; Berges, An; Meurrens, Kris; Buettner, Ansgar; Gebel, Stephan; Lichtner, Rosemarie B; Janssens, Kris; Veljkovic, Emilija; Xiang, Yang; Roemer, Ewald; Haussmann, Hans-Juergen

    2013-03-01

    A generally accepted and validated laboratory model for smoking-associated pulmonary tumorigenesis would be useful for both basic and applied research applications, such as the development of early diagnostic endpoints or the evaluation of modified risk tobacco products, respectively. The A/J mouse is susceptible for developing both spontaneous and induced lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas, and increased lung tumor multiplicities were also observed in previous cigarette smoke inhalation studies. The present study was designed to collect data useful towards the validation of an 18-month mainstream smoke (MS) inhalation model. Male and female A/J mice were exposed whole-body at three MS concentration levels for 6h/day, and the results were compared to a previous study in the same laboratory and with a similar design. A linear MS concentration-dependent increase in lung tumorigenesis was observed with similar slopes for both sexes and both studies and a maximal 5-fold increase in multiplicity beyond sham control. The minimal detectable difference in lung tumor multiplicity for the current study was 37%. In the larynx, papillomas were detectable in all MS-exposed groups in a non-concentration dependent manner. No other extra-pulmonary MS-dependent neoplastic lesions were found. Gene expression signatures of lung tumor tissues allowed a clear differentiation of sham- and high dose MS-exposed mice. In combination with data from previous smoke inhalation studies with A/J mice, the current data suggest that this model for MS inhalation-induced pulmonary tumorigenesis is reliable and relevant, two crucial requirements towards validation of such a model. PMID:23357402

  19. Integrative Metabolome and Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Discordant Energetic Stress between Mouse Strains with Differential Sensitivity to Acrolein-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fabisiak, James P.; Medvedovic, Mario; Alexander, Danny C.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Concel, Vincent J.; Bein, Kiflai; Jang, An Soo; Brendt, Annerose; Vuga, Louis J.; Brant, Kelly A.; Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Dopico, Richard A.; Ganguly, Koustav; Upadhyay, Swapna; Li, Qian; Hu, Zhen; Kaminski, Naftali; Leikauf, George D.

    2012-01-01

    A respiratory irritant, acrolein is generated by overheating cooking oils or by domestic cooking using biomass fuels, and is in tobacco smoke, an occupational health hazard in the restaurant workplace. To better understand the metabolic role of the lung and to generate insights into the pathogenesis of acrolein-induced acute lung injury, SM/J (sensitive) and 129×1/SvJ (resistant) inbred mouse strains were exposed and the lung metabolome was integrated with the transcriptome profile. A total of 280 small molecules were identified and mean values (log 2 >0.58 or <−0.58, .p<0.05) were considered different for between-strain comparisons or within-strain responses to acrolein treatment. At baseline, 24 small molecules increased and 33 small molecules decreased in the SM/J mouse lung as compared to 129×1/SvJ mouse lung. Notable among the increased compounds was malonyl carnitine. Following acrolein exposure, several compounds indicative of glycolysis and branched chain amino acid metabolism increased similarly in both strains, whereas SM/J mice were less effective in generating metabolites related to fatty acid β-oxidation. These findings suggest management of energetic stress varies between these strains, and that the ability to evoke auxiliary energy generating pathways rapidly and effectively may be critical in enhancing survival during acute lung injury in mice. PMID:21823223

  20. Influence of dietary selenium on mouse lung biochemical response and tolerance to ozone inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    This study examined whether altered selenium (Se) intake with or without ozone (O/sub 3/) stress would result in a possible 1) dose-response relationship between lung Se and glutathione peroxidase, 2) influence of Se on other lung parameters, 3) interrelationship between lung Se and vitamin E contents, and 4) alteration of lung sensitivity or tolerance to O/sub 3/. The results showed the following: 1) Omission of dietary Se resulted in a drastic decline in GP activity but did not affect the other enzyme activities studied. 2) A stimulation of the PPC and CAC activites with low-level O/sub 3/ exposure occurred only in Se-supplemented mice. The stimulation was greater in the lungs of mice fed 1.0 ppm Se compared to 0.15 ppm, i.e., the response was Se-dose dependent in this range. 3) Diminished GP activity possibly resulted in a decreased demand for NADPH produced via not only the PPC but also the CAC. 4) An inverse relationship was observed between Se and vitamin E contents in lung tissue, showing that a compensatory relationship existed between the two. 5) After each O/sub 3/ exposure Se content increased in lung tissue of both dietary groups, suggesting a possible mobilization of Se to the lung under O/sub 3/ stress. 6) Decreased GP activity due to Se deficiency and the ensuring lack of stimulated NADPH production in the lung did not alter the animal sensitivity to O/sub 3/, suggesting that GP reaction and NADPH production cycles were not crucial for animal tolerance.

  1. Anti-tumor activity of CpG-ODN aerosol in mouse lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Sfondrini, Lucia; Sommariva, Michele; Tortoreto, Monica; Meini, Alessandra; Piconese, Silvia; Calvaruso, Marco; Van Rooijen, Nick; Bonecchi, Raffaella; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Colombo, Mario P; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea

    2013-07-15

    Studies in preclinical models have demonstrated the superior anti-tumor effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) when administered at the tumor site rather than systemically. We evaluated the effect of aerosolized CpG-ODN on lung metastases in mice injected with immunogenic N202.1A mammary carcinoma cells or weakly immunogenic B16 melanoma cells. Upon reaching the bronchoalveolar space, aerosolized CpG-ODN activated a local immune response, as indicated by production of IL-12p40, IFN-γ and IL-1β and by recruitment and maturation of DC cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice. Treatment with aerosolized CpG-ODN induced an expansion of CD4+ cells in lung and was more efficacious than systemic i.p. administration against experimental lung metastases of immunogenic N202.1A mammary carcinoma cells, whereas only i.p. delivery of CpG-ODN provided anti-tumor activity, which correlated with NK cell expansion in the lung, against lung metastases of the poorly immunogenic B16 melanoma. The inefficacy of aerosol therapy to induce NK expansion was related to the presence of immunosuppressive macrophages in B16 tumor-bearing lungs, as mice depleted of these cells by clodronate treatment responded to aerosol CpG-ODN through expansion of the NK cell population and significantly reduced numbers of lung metastases. Our results indicate that tumor immunogenicity and the tumor-induced immunosuppressive environment are critical factors to the success of CpG therapy in the lung, and point to the value of routine sampling of the lung immune environment in defining an optimal immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:23319306

  2. Synergistic mechanisms in carcinogenesis by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and by tobacco smoke: a bio-historical perspective with updates.

    PubMed

    Rubin, H

    2001-12-01

    B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene) has been used as a prototype carcinogenic PAH since its isolation from coal tar in the 1930's. One of its diol epoxides, BPDE-2, is considered its ultimate carcinogen on the basis of its binding to DNA, mutagenicity and extreme pulmonary carcinogenicity in newborn mice. However, BPDE-1 has a similar binding to DNA and mutagenicity but it is not carcinogenic. In addition, BPDE-2 is a weak carcinogen relative to B[a]P when repeatedly applied to mouse skin, the conventional assay site. Its carcinogenicity is increased when applied once as an initiator followed repeatedly by a promoter. This indicates a major role for promotion in carcinogenesis by PAHs. Promotion itself is a 2-stage process, the second of which is selective propagation of the initiated cells. Persistent hyperplasia underlies selection by promoters. The non-carcinogenicity of BPDE-1 has yet to be resolved. PAHs have long been considered the main carcinogens of cigarette smoke but their concentration in the condensate is far too low to account by themselves for the production of skin tumors. The phenolic fraction does however have strong promotional activity when repeatedly applied to initiated mouse skin. Several constituents of cigarette smoke are co-carcinogenic when applied simultaneously with repeated applications of PAHs. Catechol is co-carcinogenic at concentrations found in the condensate. Since cigarette smoking involves protracted exposure to all the smoke constituents, co-carcinogenesis simulates its effects. Both procedures, however, indicate a major role for selection in carcinogenesis by cigarette smoke. That selection may operate on endogenous mutations as well as those induced by PAHs. There are indications that the nicotine-derived NNK which is a specific pulmonary carcinogen in animals contributes to smoking-induced lung cancer in man. Lung adenoma development by inhalation has been induced in mice by the gas phase of cigarette smoke. The role of selection has

  3. Lung tumors in strain A mice as a bioassay for carcinogenicity of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, G.D. )

    1991-03-01

    This report describes the protocol for the strain A mouse lung tumor bioassay and summarizes results on selected chemicals that have been tested for carcinogenicity in the assay. The assay is of 6 months duration and can distinguish 2-fold differences in carcinogenic potential of compounds from several chemical classes. Specifically, the assay is sensitive to polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines and nitrosoureas, carbamates, aflatoxin, certain metals, hydrazines, and others, but is relatively insensitive to aromatic amines, aliphatic halides, and other compounds that are carcinogenic in the rodent liver and/or bladder. Recommendations are made for future studies on the: (1) distribution and metabolism of chemicals in strain A mouse lung tissue and in specific lung cell types; (2) ability of the lung tumor bioassay to detect inhibitors and promoters of carcinogenesis; and (3) use of the assay for testing mixtures of chemicals for carcinogenic activity.

  4. Ratio of Active Matrix Metalloproteinases and Proenzymes during Growth and Metastasizing of Mouse Lewis Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kisarova, Ya A; Kaledin, V I; Bogdanova, L A; Korolenko, T A

    2015-08-01

    Ratio between proMMP and active MMP was studied in the dynamics of growth of the Lewis lung adenocarcinoma with lung metastasis. It was shown that tumor growth is associated with an increase in the content of proMMP (day 20; terminal stage), but the level of active MMP in tumor tissue did not signifi cantly change. The development of lung metastasis was accompanied by accumulation of active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) and a decrease in the content of pro-MMP (days 7, and 20) in comparison with the control. In the spleen of these mice (metastasis-free organ), an increase in the levels of proMMP (day 20) and especially active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) were found. The results suggest that tumor development shifts the proportion between active MMP and proenzymes in the tumor, lungs with metastasis, and spleen without metastasis. PMID:26392281

  5. Low-dose nicotine does not promote lung tumors in mouse models

    Cancer.gov

    Experiments in mice show that low levels of exposure to nicotine, equivalent to those in humans who use nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) to help them quit smoking, did not promote lung tumor growth.

  6. Ratio of Active Matrix Metalloproteinases and Proenzymes during Growth and Metastasizing of Mouse Lewis Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kisarova, Ya A; Kaledin, V I; Bogdanova, L A; Korolenko, T A

    2015-08-01

    Ratio between proMMP and active MMP was studied in the dynamics of growth of the Lewis lung adenocarcinoma with lung metastasis. It was shown that tumor growth is associated with an increase in the content of proMMP (day 20; terminal stage), but the level of active MMP in tumor tissue did not signifi cantly change. The development of lung metastasis was accompanied by accumulation of active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) and a decrease in the content of pro-MMP (days 7, and 20) in comparison with the control. In the spleen of these mice (metastasis-free organ), an increase in the levels of proMMP (day 20) and especially active MMP (days 7, 15, and 20) were found. The results suggest that tumor development shifts the proportion between active MMP and proenzymes in the tumor, lungs with metastasis, and spleen without metastasis.

  7. Bleomycin induced lung fibrosis increases work of breathing in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jonathan E; Peng, Ruoqi; Burns, Lisa; Harris, Paul; Garrido, Rosario; Tyagi, Gaurav; Fine, Jay S; Stevenson, Christopher S

    2012-08-01

    Bleomycin induces a transient lung fibrosis in mice that has been used to investigate mechanisms related to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Our aim was to determine a sensitive method for assessing lung function in bleomycin treated mice that correlated with the degree of lung fibrosis as measured by collagen immunohistochemistry. Bleomycin (2 U/kg) or saline was intratracheally microsprayed to male C57BL/6 mice under isoflurane anesthesia. Lung function (single compartment model, constant phase model, and work of breathing) was assessed using the flexiVent system, and after euthanasia lungs were inflated with formalin in situ for histological analysis. The lung fibrosis histopathology score for the bleomycin treated animals on day 21 was indicative of mild-to-moderate fibrosis (Saline treated control: 0 ± 0, Bleomycin treated: 4.9 ± 0.4). There were at least three large areas of fibrosis in the peribronchial alveolar regions of the lung, but less than 50% of each lung was affected by fibrosis. Although changes in lung function were less obvious, volume normalized dynamic work of breathing measured at 30 ml/kg tidal volume (Saline treated control: 9.2 ± 0.1 J/l, Bleomycin treated: 10.6 ± 0.3 J/l) and the oscillatory mechanics constant phase model parameter tissue elastance (H; Saline treated control: 31 ± 2 cm H(2)O/ml, Bleomycin treated: 38 ± 3 cm H(2)O/ml) were significantly increased on day 21. The work of breathing (r = 0.83) correlated slightly better with fibrosis histopathology score than H (r = 0.64). Work of breathing can detect decrements in lung function due to pulmonary fibrosis, correlates well with the amount of collagen in the lungs, and may be a more sensitive quantitative measure of efficacy for drugs being developed to treat pulmonary fibrosis.

  8. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV)-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18%) of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14%) of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population. PMID:21943279

  9. Comparison of efficacy and toxicity of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herbal mixture LQ and conventional chemotherapy on lung cancer metastasis and survival in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Chengyu; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiaoen; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Unlike Western medicine that generally uses purified compounds and aims to target a single molecule or pathway, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compositions usually comprise multiple herbs and components that are necessary for efficacy. Despite the very long-time and wide-spread use of TCM, there are very few direct comparisons of TCM and standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. In the present report, we compared the efficacy of the TCM herbal mixture LQ against lung cancer in mouse models with doxorubicin (DOX) and cyclophosphamide (CTX). LQ inhibited tumor size and weight measured directly as well as by fluorescent-protein imaging in subcutaneous, orthotopic, spontaneous experimental metastasis and angiogenesis mouse models of lung cancer. LQ was efficacious against primary and metastatic lung cancer without weight loss and organ toxicity. In contrast, CTX and DOX, although efficacious in the lung cancer models caused significant weight loss, and organ toxicity. LQ also had anti-angiogenic activity as observed in lung tumors growing in nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) transgenic nude mice, which selectively express GFP in nascent blood vessels. Survival of tumor-bearing mice was also prolonged by LQ, comparable to DOX. In vitro, lung cancer cells were killed by LQ as observed by time-lapse imaging, comparable to cisplatinum. LQ was more potent to induce cell death on cancer cell lines than normal cell lines unlike cytotoxic chemotherapy. The results indicate that LQ has non-toxic efficacy against metastatic lung cancer.

  10. Glutathione-Conjugate Transport by RLIP76 is required for Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis and Chemical Carcinogenesis**

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sharad S.; Wickramarachchi, Dilki; Yadav, Sushma; Singhal, Jyotsana; Leake, Kathryn; Vatsyayan, Rit; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Lelsani, Poorna; Suzuki, Sumihiro; Yang, Shaohua; Awasthi, Yogesh C.; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Targeted depletion of the RALBP1 encoded 76 kDa splice variant, RLIP76, causes marked and sustained regression of human xenografts of lung, colon, prostate, and kidney cancer without toxicity in nude mouse models. We proposed that the remarkable efficacy and broad-spectrum of RLIP76-targeted therapy is because its glutathione-conjugate (GS-E) transport-activity is required for clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE), that regulates all ligand-receptor signaling, and that RLIP76 is required not only for survival of cancer cells, but also for their very existence. We studied RLIP76 mutant proteins, and the functional consequences of their expression into RLIP76−/− MEFs, and identified key residues for GS-E binding in RLIP76, established the requirement of RLIP76-mediated GS-E transport for CDE, and demonstrated a direct correlation between GS-E transport activities with CDE. Depletion of RLIP76 nearly completely blocked signaling down-stream of EGF in a CDE-dependent manner, and Wnt5a signaling in a CDE-independent manner. The seminal prediction of this hypothesis, that RLIP76−/− mice will be deficient in chemical neoplasia, was confirmed. Benzo[a]pyrene, dimethylbenzanthracene and phorbol esters are ineffective in causing neoplasia in RLIP76−/−. PMA-induced skin carcinogenesis in RLIP76+/+ mouse was suppressed completely by depletion of either PKCα or RLIP76 by siRNA or antisense, and could be restored by topical application of RLIP76 protein in RLIP76−/− mouse skin. Likewise, chemical pulmonary carcinogenesis was absent in female and nearly absent in male RLIP76−/− mice. In RLIP76−/− mice, p53, p38, and JNK activation did not occur in response to either carcinogen. Our findings demonstrate a fundamental role of RLIP76 in chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:21220488

  11. Multi-Modal Imaging in a Mouse Model of Orthotopic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priya; Kato, Tatsuya; Ujiie, Hideki; Wada, Hironobu; Lee, Daiyoon; Hu, Hsin-pei; Hirohashi, Kentaro; Ahn, Jin Young; Zheng, Jinzi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation of CF800, a novel PEGylated nano-liposomal imaging agent containing indocyanine green (ICG) and iohexol, for real-time near infrared (NIR) fluorescence and computed tomography (CT) image-guided surgery in an orthotopic lung cancer model in nude mice. Methods CF800 was intravenously administered into 13 mice bearing the H460 orthotopic human lung cancer. At 48 h post-injection (peak imaging agent accumulation time point), ex vivo NIR and CT imaging was performed. A clinical NIR imaging system (SPY®, Novadaq) was used to measure fluorescence intensity of tumor and lung. Tumor-to-background-ratios (TBR) were calculated in inflated and deflated states. The mean Hounsfield unit (HU) of lung tumor was quantified using the CT data set and a semi-automated threshold-based method. Histological evaluation using H&E, the macrophage marker F4/80 and the endothelial cell marker CD31, was performed, and compared to the liposomal fluorescence signal obtained from adjacent tissue sections Results The fluorescence TBR measured when the lung is in the inflated state (2.0 ± 0.58) was significantly greater than in the deflated state (1.42 ± 0.380 (n = 7, p<0.003). Mean fluorescent signal in tumor was highly variable across samples, (49.0 ± 18.8 AU). CT image analysis revealed greater contrast enhancement in lung tumors (a mean increase of 110 ± 57 HU) when CF800 is administered compared to the no contrast enhanced tumors (p = 0.0002). Conclusion Preliminary data suggests that the high fluorescence TBR and CT tumor contrast enhancement provided by CF800 may have clinical utility in localization of lung cancer during CT and NIR image-guided surgery. PMID:27584018

  12. Five-year update on the mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation: Scientific uses, tricks of the trade, and tips for success

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xue; Li, Wenjun; Lai, Jiaming; Okazaki, Mikio; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Wang, Xingan; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It has been 5 years since our team reported the first successful model of orthotopic single lung transplantation in the mouse. There has been great demand for this technique due to the obvious experimental advantages the mouse offers over other large and small animal models of lung transplantation. These include the availability of mouse-specific reagents as well as knockout and transgenic technology. Our laboratory has utilized this mouse model to study both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms of lung transplant physiology while others have focused on models of chronic rejection. It is surprising that despite our initial publication in 2007 only few other laboratories have published data using this model. This is likely due to the technical complexity of the surgical technique and perioperative complications, which can limit recipient survival. As two of the authors (XL and WL) have a combined experience of over 2500 left and right single lung transplants, this review will summarize their experience and delineate tips and tricks necessary for successful transplantation. We will also describe technical advances made since the original description of the model. PMID:22754663

  13. Late gestational lung hypoplasia in a mouse model of the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongwei; Wessels, Andy; Chen, Jianliang; Phelps, Aimee L; Oatis, John; Tint, G Stephen; Patel, Shailendra B

    2004-01-01

    Background Normal post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis is important for mammalian embryonic development. Neonatal mice lacking functional dehydrocholesterol Δ7-reductase (Dhcr7), a model for the human disease of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, die within 24 hours of birth. Although they have a number of biochemical and structural abnormalities, one cause of death is from apparent respiratory failure due to developmental pulmonary abnormalities. Results In this study, we characterized further the role of cholesterol deficiency in lung development of these mice. Significant growth retardation, beginning at E14.5~E16.5, was observed in Dhcr7-/- embryos. Normal lobation but smaller lungs with a significant decrease in lung-to-body weight ratio was noted in Dhcr7-/- embryos, compared to controls. Lung branching morphogenesis was comparable between Dhcr7-/- and controls at early stages, but delayed saccular development was visible in all Dhcr7-/- embryos from E17.5 onwards. Impaired pre-alveolar development of varying severity, inhibited cell proliferation, delayed differentiation of type I alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and delayed vascular development were all evident in knockout lungs. Differentiation of type II AECs was apparently normal as judged by surfactant protein (SP) mRNAs and SP-C immunostaining. A significant amount of cholesterol was detectable in knockout lungs, implicating some maternal transfer of cholesterol. No significant differences of the spatial-temporal localization of sonic hedgehog (Shh) or its downstream targets by immunohistochemistry were detected between knockout and wild-type lungs and Shh autoprocessing occurred normally in tissues from Dhcr7-/- embryos. Conclusion Our data indicated that cholesterol deficiency caused by Dhcr7 null was associated with a distinct lung saccular hypoplasia, characterized by failure to terminally differentiate alveolar sacs, a delayed differentiation of type I AECs and an immature vascular network at late

  14. Selective inhibition and induction of CYP activity discriminates between the isoforms responsible for the activation of butylated hydroxytoluene and naphthalene in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Verschoyle, R D; Martin, J; Dinsdale, D

    1997-08-01

    1. Selective induction and inhibition experiments have been used to identify the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms responsible for butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) bioactivation in mouse lung. 2. Pre-treatment of BALB/c mice with O,O,O-trimethylphosphorothioate (OOOMeP(S)), which prevented all the signs of toxicity observed following BHT treatment, inhibited the pulmonary activity of pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) and coumarin hydroxylase but not 4-nitrophenol hydroxylase. 3. Pulmonary coumarin hydroxylase activity was greater in DBA than in BALB/c mice but the severity of BHT-induced lung injury was similar. 4. Pre-treatment with pyrazole, which exacerbated BHT-induced lung injury, did not affect pulmonary coumarin hydroxylase or 4-nitrophenol hydroxylase activity but increased that of PROD. 5. Pre-treatment with OOOMeP(S) prevented the lethargy and weight-loss associated with naphthalene poisoning but not the pulmonary injury. Pre-treatment with pyrazole did not exacerbate naphthalene-induced injury. 6. Members of both CYP2F and 2B sub-families have been shown to exhibit PROD activity and 2F2 activates naphthalene in mouse lung. The current studies, however, indicate that 2F2 is unlikely to be a significant component of PROD activity in mouse lung. 2F2, like coumarin hydroxylase (2A5) and 4-nitrophenol hydroxylase (2E1), is not responsible for the pulmonary activation of BHT, which is largely attributable to an isoform of 2B, probably 2B10.

  15. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  16. Transcriptome Profiling of the Newborn Mouse Lung Response to Acute Ozone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Loader, Joan E.; White, Carl W.; Dakhama, Azzeddine

    2014-01-01

    Ozone pollution is associated with adverse effects on respiratory health in adults and children but its effects on the neonatal lung remain unknown. This study was carried out to define the effect of acute ozone exposure on the neonatal lung and to profile the transcriptome response. Newborn mice were exposed to ozone or filtered air for 3h. Total RNA was isolated from lung tissues at 6 and 24h after exposure and was subjected to microarray gene expression analysis. Compared to filtered air-exposed littermates, ozone-exposed newborn mice developed a small but significant neutrophilic airway response associated with increased CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression in the lung. Transcriptome analysis indicated that 455 genes were down-regulated and 166 genes were up-regulated by at least 1.5-fold at 6h post-ozone exposure (t-test, p < .05). At 24h, 543 genes were down-regulated and 323 genes were up-regulated in the lungs of ozone-exposed, compared to filtered air-exposed, newborn mice (t-test, p < .05). After controlling for false discovery rate, 50 genes were identified as significantly down-regulated and only a few (RORC, GRP, VREB3, and CYP2B6) were up-regulated at 24h post-ozone exposure (q < .05). Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that cell cycle-associated functions including cell division/proliferation were the most impacted pathways, which were negatively regulated by ozone exposure, an adverse effect that was associated with reduced bromo-deoxyuridine incorporation. These results demonstrate that acute ozone exposure alters cell proliferation in the developing neonatal lung through a global suppression of cell cycle function. PMID:24336422

  17. Measurement of CD8 and CD4 T Cell Responses in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Fett, Craig; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Study of the adaptive immune response to a viral challenge in an animal model often includes analysis of the T cell response. Here we discuss in detail the methods that are used to characterize the CD8 and CD4 T cell response following viral challenge in the lung. PMID:27390762

  18. Enhanced clearance of silica from mouse lung after instillation of a leukocyte chemotactic factor.

    PubMed

    Adamson, I Y; Prieditis, H; Bowden, D H

    1994-01-01

    It has been suggested that increased recruitment of phagocytes and subsequent clearance of particles may follow instillation of a leukocyte chemoattractant to lungs containing silica. The present study quantitated serially the silica content in alveolar spaces, in lung tissue and in hilar lymph nodes of mice that received 2 mg silica only, compared to a group that also received 100 micrograms intratracheal chemotactic factor N-formyl-L-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) at 2 and 3 weeks after silica. These mice showed a supplemental increase in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, and an increase in silica was measured in lavaged cells and fluid soon after FMLP injection. At all times to 16 weeks, the silica content of lung tissue was significantly lower in mice that also received FMLP, and in this group, pulmonary fibrosis was much reduced, as shown morphologically and biochemically. In addition, there was reduced translocation of silica to lymph nodes in FMLP-treated mice. The results indicate that induction of a controlled inflammatory response in the alveoli at a time when particles are present in the pulmonary interstitium can accelerate clearance by increasing phagocyte traffic to the alveoli. The subsequent reduction in particle content of the lung is associated with a lower level of pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. A Human-Mouse Chimeric Model of Obliterative Bronchiolitis after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianmin; Zhu, Xuehai; George, M. Patricia; Myerburg, Michael M.; Stoner, Michael W.; Pilewski, Joseph W.; Duncan, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis is a frequent, morbid, and usually refractory complication of lung transplantation. Mechanistic study of obliterative bronchiolitis would be aided by development of a relevant model that uses human immune effector cells and airway targets. Our objective was to develop a murine chimera model that mimics obliterative bronchiolitis of lung allograft recipients in human airways in vivo. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were adoptively transferred to immunodeficient mice lacking activity of T, B, and NK cells, with and without concurrent transplantations of human small airways dissected from allogeneic cadaveric lungs. Chimerism with human T cells occurred in the majority of recipient animals. The chimeric T cells became highly activated, rapidly infiltrated into the small human airway grafts, and caused obliterative bronchiolitis. In contrast, airways implanted into control mice that did not also receive human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transfers remained intact. In vitro proliferation assays indicated that the chimeric T cells had enhanced specific proliferative responses to donor airway alloantigens. This model confirms the critical role of T cells in development of obliterative bronchiolitis among human lung allograft recipients and provides a novel and easily implemented mechanism for detailed, reductionist in vivo studies of human T-cell responses to allogeneic human small airways. PMID:21801868

  20. Effect of type 2 cell mitosis on the surfactant system of injured mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.J.

    1983-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of type 2 cell proliferation, and specifically mitosis, on the surfactant system after lung injury. Lung injury was produced in mice with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The lamellar body (LB) volume density and the LB area of tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-T) labeled and mitotic type 2 cells were determined by combining light microscopic autoradiography with electron microscopic morphometry. Over a 48-hour period, the LB volume density of proliferating (/sup 3/H-T-labeled) type 2 cells decreased from 20.7% to 7.6% and the LB area per cell decreased from 9.1 to 2.4 ..mu..m/sup 2/. These changes were closely related to type 2 cell mitosis, since the LB volume density decreased from 19.2% to 2.9% and the LB area per cell decreased from 9.1 to 1.7 ..mu.. m/sup 2/ between prophase and telophase, but they were independent of the time elapsed since injury. These results indicate that mitosis influenced the LB content of type 2 cells after lung injury and suggest a previously unrecognized link between cell division and the surfactant system of the lung. 38 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Genetic requirement for Mycl and efficacy of RNA Pol I inhibition in mouse models of small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Wu, Nan; Kim, Young-Chul; Cheng, Pei Feng; Basom, Ryan; Kim, Dongkyoon; Dunn, Colin T; Lee, Anastasia Y; Kim, Keebeom; Lee, Chang Sup; Singh, Andrew; Gazdar, Adi F; Harris, Chris R; Eisenman, Robert N; Park, Kwon-Sik; MacPherson, David

    2016-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a devastating neuroendocrine carcinoma. MYCL (L-Myc) is frequently amplified in human SCLC, but its roles in SCLC progression are poorly understood. We isolated preneoplastic neuroendocrine cells from a mouse model of SCLC and found that ectopic expression of L-Myc, c-Myc, or N-Myc conferred tumor-forming capacity. We focused on L-Myc, which promoted pre-rRNA synthesis and transcriptional programs associated with ribosomal biogenesis. Deletion of Mycl in two genetically engineered models of SCLC resulted in strong suppression of SCLC. The high degree of suppression suggested that L-Myc may constitute a therapeutic target for a broad subset of SCLC. We then used an RNA polymerase I inhibitor to target rRNA synthesis in an autochthonous Rb/p53-deleted mouse SCLC model and found significant tumor inhibition. These data reveal that activation of RNA polymerase I by L-Myc and other MYC family proteins provides an axis of vulnerability for this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:27298335

  2. Exposure to arsenic at levels found inU.S. drinking water modifies expression in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Angeline S; Bernardo, Viviane; Warnke, Linda A; Davey, Jennifer C; Hampton, Thomas; Mason, Rebecca A; Thorpe, Jessica E; Ihnat, Michael A; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2007-11-01

    The mechanisms of action of drinking water arsenic in the lung and the threshold for biologic effects remain controversial. Our study utilizes Affymetrix 22,690 transcript oligonucleotide microarrays to assess the long-term effects of increasing doses of drinking water arsenic on expression levels in the mouse lung. Mice were exposed at levels commonly found in contaminated drinking water wells in the United States (0, 0.1, 1 ppb), as well as the 50 ppb former maximum contaminant level, for 5 weeks. The expression profiles revealed modification of a number of important signaling pathways, many with corroborating evidence of arsenic responsiveness. We observed statistically significant expression changes for transcripts involved in angiogenesis, lipid metabolism, oxygen transport, apoptosis, cell cycle, and immune response. Validation by reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblot assays confirmed expression changes for a subset of transcripts. These data identify arsenic-modified signaling pathways that will help guide investigations into mechanisms of arsenic's health effects and clarify the threshold for biologic effects and potential disease risk.

  3. Combination Effect of Regulatory T-Cell Depletion and Ionizing Radiation in Mouse Models of Lung and Colon Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Cheol-Hun; Bae, Jae-Ho; Shin, Dong-Yeok; Lee, Hong-Rae; Jo, Wol-Soon; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CTX) and anti-CD25 antibody to prevent activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used LD-CTX and anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody as a means to inhibit Tregs and improve the therapeutic effect of radiation in a mouse model of lung and colon cancer. Mice were irradiated on the tumor mass of the right leg and treated with LD-CTX and anti-CD25 antibody once per week for 3 weeks. Results: Combined treatment of LD-CTX or anti-CD25 antibody with radiation significantly decreased Tregs in the spleen and tumor compared with control and irradiation only in both lung and colon cancer. Combinatorial treatments resulted in a significant increase in the effector T cells, longer survival rate, and suppressed irradiated and distal nonirradiated tumor growth. Specifically, the combinatorial treatment of LD-CTX with radiation resulted in outstanding regression of local and distant tumors in colon cancer, and almost all mice in this group survived until the end of the study. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Treg depletion strategies may enhance radiation-mediated antitumor immunity and further improve outcomes after radiation therapy.

  4. A soft agar colony assay for Lewis lung tumour and B16 melanoma taken directly from the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Courtenay, V. D.

    1976-01-01

    A soft agar colony assay has been developed for the B16 mouse melanoma and the Lewis lung tumour. The special features of the technique are the use of a gas phase with 5% O2 instead of air and the addition of rat red blood cells. Single cell suspensions are prepared by trypsinization from the solid tumour and the cells are plated out in 0-3% agar over a layer of 0-5% agar in 30-mm Petri dishes. After 8 to 15 days' incubation in 5% O2, colonies of more than 50 cells are produced. Plating efficiencies of between 30 and 50% are usually obtained. The addition of up to 10(4) heavily irradiated tumour cells gives some further improvement in plating efficiency for the B16 melanoma but not for the Lewis lung tumour. Applications of the technique to measure cell survival in the two tumours after treatment with cytotoxic drugs and radiation are reported. The scatter of experimental points is relatively small, and in comparative experiments good agreement has been obtained with results using in vivo assay techniques. PMID:782495

  5. Arsenic carcinogenesis in the skin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Su; Liao, Wei-Ting; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2006-09-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning is a world public health issue. Long-term exposure to inorganic arsenic (As) from drinking water has been documented to induce cancers in lung, urinary bladder, kidney, liver and skin in a dose-response relationship. Oxidative stress, chromosomal abnormality and altered growth factors are possible modes of action in arsenic carcinogenesis. Arsenic tends to accumulate in the skin. Skin hyperpigmentation and hyperkeratosis have long been known to be the hallmark signs of chronic As exposure. There are significant associations between these dermatological lesions and risk of skin cancer. The most common arsenic-induced skin cancers are Bowen's disease (carcinoma in situ), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) is able to transform into invasive BCC and SCC. Individuals with As-BD are considered for more aggressive cancer screening in the lung and urinary bladder. As-BD provides an excellent model for studying the early stages of chemical carcinogenesis in human beings. Arsenic exposure is associated with G2/M cell cycle arrest and DNA aneuploidy in both cultured keratinocytes and As-BD lesions. These cellular abnormalities relate to the p53 dysfunction induced by arsenic. The characteristic clinical figures of arsenic-induced skin cancer are: (i) occurrence on sun-protected areas of the body; (ii) multiple and recrudescent lesions. Both As and UVB are able to induce skin cancer. Arsenic treatment enhances the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and clastogenicity of UV in mammalian cells. Both As and UVB induce apoptosis in keratinocytes by caspase-9 and caspase-8 signaling, respectively. Combined UVB and As treatments resulted in the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects by stimulating both caspase pathways in the keratinocytes. UVB irradiation inhibited mutant p53 and ki-67 expression, as well as increased in the number of apoptotic cells in As-BD lesions which resulted in an

  6. Increased pulmonary arteriolar tone associated with lung oxidative stress and nitric oxide in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew M; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Vaishnav, Radhika A; Friedland, Robert P; Drinovac, Robert; Lin, Xingyu; Gozal, Evelyne

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dysfunction and decreased cerebral blood flow are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Loss of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress in human cerebrovascular endothelium increase expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and enhance production of the Aβ peptide, suggesting that loss of endothelial NO contributes to AD pathology. We hypothesize that decreased systemic NO bioavailability in AD may also impact lung microcirculation and induce pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. The acute effect of NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on pulmonary arteriolar tone was assessed in a transgenic mouse model (TgAD) of AD (C57BL/6-Tg(Thy1-APPSwDutIowa)BWevn/Mmjax) and age-matched wild-type controls (C57BL/6J). Arteriolar diameters were measured before and after the administration of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME Lung superoxide formation (DHE) and formation of nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress, inducible NOS (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression as indicators of inflammation. Administration of L-NAME caused either significant pulmonary arteriolar constriction or no change from baseline tone in wild-type (WT) mice, and significant arteriolar dilation in TgAD mice. DHE, 3-NT, TNF-α, and iNOS expression were higher in TgAD lung tissue, compared to WT mice. These data suggest L-NAME could induce increased pulmonary arteriolar tone in WT mice from loss of bioavailable NO In contrast, NOS inhibition with L-NAME had a vasodilator effect in TgAD mice, potentially caused by decreased reactive nitrogen species formation, while significant oxidative stress and inflammation were present. We conclude that AD may increase pulmonary microvascular tone as a result of loss of bioavailable NO and increased oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that AD may have systemic microvascular implications beyond central neural control mechanisms.

  7. Vitamin D Repletion Reduces the Progression of Premalignant Squamous Lesions in the NTCU Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mazzilli, Sarah A.; Hershberger, Pamela A.; Reid, Mary E.; Bogner, Paul N.; Atwood, Kristopher; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2015-01-01

    The chemopreventive actions of vitamin D were examined in the N-nitroso-tris-chloroethylurea (NTCU) mouse model, a progressive model of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SWR/J mice were fed a deficient diet (D) containing no vitamin D3, a sufficient diet (S) containing 2000 IU/kg vitamin D3, or the same diets in combination with the active metabolite of vitamin D, calcitriol (C) (80 μg/kg, weekly). The percentage (%) of the mucosal surface of large airways occupied by dysplastic lesions was determined in mice after treatment with a total dose of 15 or 25 μmol NTCU (N). After treatment with 15 μmol NTCU, the % of the surface of large airways containing high-grade dysplastic (HGD) lesions were vitamin D-deficient +NTCU (DN), 22.7 % (p<0.05 compared to vitamin D-sufficient +NTCU (SN)); DN + C, 12.3%; SN, 8.7%; and SN + C, 6.6%. The extent of HGD increased with NTCU dose in the DN group. Proliferation, assessed by Ki-67 labeling, increased upon NTCU treatment. The highest Ki-67 labeling index was seen in the DN group. As compared to SN mice, DN mice exhibited a 3-fold increase (p <0.005) in circulating white blood cells (WBC), a 20% (p <0.05) increase in IL-6 levels, and a 4 -fold (p <0.005) increase in WBC in bronchial lavages. Thus, vitamin D repletion reduces the progression of premalignant lesions, proliferation, and inflammation, and may thereby suppress development of lung SCC. Further investigations of the chemopreventive effects of vitamin D in lung SCC are warranted. PMID:26276745

  8. Increased pulmonary arteriolar tone associated with lung oxidative stress and nitric oxide in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew M; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Vaishnav, Radhika A; Friedland, Robert P; Drinovac, Robert; Lin, Xingyu; Gozal, Evelyne

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dysfunction and decreased cerebral blood flow are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Loss of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress in human cerebrovascular endothelium increase expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and enhance production of the Aβ peptide, suggesting that loss of endothelial NO contributes to AD pathology. We hypothesize that decreased systemic NO bioavailability in AD may also impact lung microcirculation and induce pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. The acute effect of NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on pulmonary arteriolar tone was assessed in a transgenic mouse model (TgAD) of AD (C57BL/6-Tg(Thy1-APPSwDutIowa)BWevn/Mmjax) and age-matched wild-type controls (C57BL/6J). Arteriolar diameters were measured before and after the administration of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME Lung superoxide formation (DHE) and formation of nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress, inducible NOS (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression as indicators of inflammation. Administration of L-NAME caused either significant pulmonary arteriolar constriction or no change from baseline tone in wild-type (WT) mice, and significant arteriolar dilation in TgAD mice. DHE, 3-NT, TNF-α, and iNOS expression were higher in TgAD lung tissue, compared to WT mice. These data suggest L-NAME could induce increased pulmonary arteriolar tone in WT mice from loss of bioavailable NO In contrast, NOS inhibition with L-NAME had a vasodilator effect in TgAD mice, potentially caused by decreased reactive nitrogen species formation, while significant oxidative stress and inflammation were present. We conclude that AD may increase pulmonary microvascular tone as a result of loss of bioavailable NO and increased oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that AD may have systemic microvascular implications beyond central neural control mechanisms. PMID:27604401

  9. Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis of Effects of the CMAH Deactivation on Mouse Lung, Kidney and Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Chang, Byung-Soo; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Background N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is generated by hydroxylation of CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc, catalyzed by CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (CMAH). However, humans lack this common mammalian cell surface molecule, Neu5Gc, due to inactivation of the CMAH gene during evolution. CMAH is one of several human-specific genes whose function has been lost by disruption or deletion of the coding frame. It has been suggested that CMAH inactivation has resulted in biochemical or physiological characteristics that have resulted in human-specific diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify differential gene expression profiles associated with the loss of Neu5Gc expression, we performed microarray analysis using Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip, using the main tissues (lung, kidney, and heart) from control mice and CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah) gene knock-out mice, respectively. Out of a total of 25,697 genes, 204, 162, and 147 genes were found to be significantly modulated in the lung, kidney, and heart tissues of the Cmah null mouse, respectively. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles, using three commercial pathway analysis software packages: Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis, and Pathway Studio. The gene ontology analysis revealed that the top 6 biological processes of these genes included protein metabolism and modification, signal transduction, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, nucleoside, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, immunity and defense, and carbohydrate metabolism. Gene interaction network analysis showed a common network that was common to the different tissues of the Cmah null mouse. However, the expression of most sialytransferase mRNAs of Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen, sialy-Tn antigen, Forssman antigen, and Tn antigen was significantly down-regulated in the liver tissue of Cmah null mice. Conclusions/Significance Mice bearing a human-like deletion of the Cmah gene

  10. Carbonyl reductase inactivation may contribute to mouse lung tumor promotion by electrophilic metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene: protein alkylation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shearn, Colin T; Fritz, Kristofer S; Meier, Brent W; Kirichenko, Oleg V; Thompson, John A

    2008-08-01

    Promotion of lung tumors in mice by the food additive butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is mediated by electrophilic metabolites produced in the target organ. Identifying the proteins alkylated by these quinone methides (QMs) is a necessary step in understanding the underlying mechanisms. Covalent adducts of the antioxidant enzymes peroxiredoxin 6 and Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase were detected previously in lung cytosols from BALB/c mice injected with BHT, and complimentary in vitro studies demonstrated that QM alkylation causes inactivation and enhances oxidative stress. In the present work, adducts of another protective enzyme, carbonyl reductase (CBR), were detected by Western blotting and mass spectrometry in mitochondria from lungs of mice one day after a single injection of BHT and throughout a 28-day period of weekly injections required to achieve tumor promotion. BHT treatment was accompanied by the accumulation of protein carbonyls in lung cytosol from sustained oxidative stress. Studies in vitro demonstrated that CBR activity in lung homogenates was susceptible to concentration- and time-dependent inhibition by QMs. Recombinant CBR underwent irreversible inhibition during QM exposure, and mass spectrometry was utilized to identify alkylation sites at Cys 51, Lys 17, Lys 189, Lys 201, His 28, and His 204. Except for Lys 17, all of these adducts were eliminated as a cause of enzyme inhibition either by chemical modification (cysteine) or site-directed mutagenesis (lysines and histidines). The data demonstrated that Lys 17 is the critical alkylation target, consistent with the role of this basic residue in NADPH binding. These data support the possibility that CBR inhibition occurs in BHT-treated mice, thereby compromising one pathway for inactivating lipid peroxidation products, particularly 4-oxo-2-nonenal. These data, in concert with previous evidence for the inactivation of antioxidant enzymes, provide a molecular basis to explain lung inflammation leading to

  11. Concordance in Genomic Changes Between Mouse Lungs and Human Airway Epithelial Cells Exposed to Diesel Exhaust Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human and animal toxicity studies have shown that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or their constituents affect multiple biological processes including immune and inflammatory pathways, mutagenesis and in some cases carcinogenesis. This study compared genomic changes by...

  12. Amitriptyline induces coenzyme Q deficiency and oxidative damage in mouse lung and liver.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Ferrufino, María Rosa; Cordero, Mario D; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio; Illanes, Matilde; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Navas, Plácido; de Miguel, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Amitriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant commonly prescribed for the treatment of several neuropathic and inflammatory illnesses. We have already reported that amitriptyline has cytotoxic effect in human cell cultures, increasing oxidative stress, and decreasing growth rate and mitochondrial activity. Coenzyme Q (CoQ), a component of the respiratory chain and a potent antioxidant, has been proposed as a mitochondrial dysfunction marker. In the present work we evaluated lipid peroxidation, a consequence of oxidative stress, and CoQ level in liver, lung, kidney, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and serum of mice treated with amitriptyline for two weeks. Lipid peroxidation was increased in a dose-dependent manner in all tissues analyzed. CoQ levels were increased in brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and serum, and strongly decreased in liver and lung. The relation between amitriptyline, CoQ, and oxidative stress is discussed.

  13. A quantitative histological study of strain-dependent differences in the effects of irradiation on mouse lung during the intermediate and late phases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharplin, J.; Franko, A.J. )

    1989-07-01

    Strain differences in the intermediate and late phases of the radiation response of mouse lung were investigated histologically. The proportion of lung impairment in mice at 28 and 52 weeks postirradiation and in mice dying of respiratory insufficiency was assessed by scoring lung acini as nonfunctional due to lesions which obstructed airflow, or open and presumably functional. The nine strains tested were divided into three groups on the basis of the late fibrotic response. Group 1 mice, three C57 strains, developed extensive contracted fibrosis and usually showed enough damage to explain late deaths. Group 2, SWR, A, and BALB/c strains, developed foci of contracted fibrosis. Group 3, CBA and two C3H strains, did not form fibrotic scars. Mice in Groups 2 and 3 that died with no pleural effusions appeared to have insufficient late lung damage to account for respiratory distress. Problems with pulmonary blood flow were indicated by evidence of loss of fine vasculature and right ventricular hypertrophy. In nondistressed, late-stage mice in Groups 2 and 3, loss of capillary perfusion in lung parenchyma free of obvious lesions was demonstrated by infusion of colloidal carbon. In one strain, A, an estimate of the proportion of nonperfused lung was made on distressed late-stage mice. Almost 50% of lung acini were nonfunctional as a result of nonperfusion, and an additional 9% of acini were nonfunctional due to lesions obstructing ventilation. It is suggested that nonperfusion of apparently normal lung acini is a major factor in late-phase deaths in those mouse strains which show little or no fibrosis.

  14. Environmental and chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wogan, Gerald N; Hecht, Stephen S; Felton, James S; Conney, Allan H; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2004-12-01

    People are continuously exposed exogenously to varying amounts of chemicals that have been shown to have carcinogenic or mutagenic properties in experimental systems. Exposure can occur exogenously when these agents are present in food, air or water, and also endogenously when they are products of metabolism or pathophysiologic states such as inflammation. It has been estimated that exposure to environmental chemical carcinogens may contribute significantly to the causation of a sizable fraction, perhaps a majority, of human cancers, when exposures are related to "life-style" factors such as diet, tobacco use, etc. This chapter summarizes several aspects of environmental chemical carcinogenesis that have been extensively studied and illustrates the power of mechanistic investigation combined with molecular epidemiologic approaches in establishing causative linkages between environmental exposures and increased cancer risks. A causative relationship between exposure to aflatoxin, a strongly carcinogenic mold-produced contaminant of dietary staples in Asia and Africa, and elevated risk for primary liver cancer has been demonstrated through the application of well-validated biomarkers in molecular epidemiology. These studies have also identified a striking synergistic interaction between aflatoxin and hepatitis B virus infection in elevating liver cancer risk. Use of tobacco products provides a clear example of cancer causation by a life-style factor involving carcinogen exposure. Tobacco carcinogens and their DNA adducts are central to cancer induction by tobacco products, and the contribution of specific tobacco carcinogens (e.g. PAH and NNK) to tobacco-induced lung cancer, can be evaluated by a weight of evidence approach. Factors considered include presence in tobacco products, carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, human uptake, metabolism and adduct formation, possible role in causing molecular changes in oncogenes or suppressor genes, and other relevant data

  15. Modulation of microRNA expression by volatile organic compounds in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Li, Chonglei; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yihe

    2014-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one of main pollutants indoors. Exposure to VOCs is associated with cancer, asthma disease, and multiple chemical allergies. Despite the adverse health effects of VOCs, the molecular mechanisms underlying VOCs-induced disease remain largely unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, may influence cellular disease state. To investigate whether lung miRNA expression profiles in mice are modified by VOCs mixture exposure, 44 male Kunming mice were exposed in 4 similar static chambers, 0 (control) and 3 different doses of VOCs mixture (groups 1-3). The concentrations of VOCs mixture were as follows: formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and xylene 3.0 + 3.3 + 6.0 + 6.0 mg/m(3) , 5.0 + 5.5 + 10.0 + 10.0 mg/m(3) , 10.0 + 11.0 + 20.0 + 20.0 mg/m(3) , respectively, which corresponded to 30, 50, and 100 times of indoor air quality standard in China, after exposure to 2 weeks (2 h/day, 5 days/week). Small RNAs in lung and protein isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected and analyzed for miRNA expression using microarray analysis and for interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. VOCs exposure altered the miRNA expression profiles in lung in mice. Specifically, 69 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in VOCs-exposed samples versus controls. Functional annotation analysis of the predicted miRNA transcript targets revealed that VOCs exposure potentially alters signaling pathways associated with cancer, chemokine signaling, Wnt signaling, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, and cell adhesion molecules. IL-8 isolated from BALF and nitric oxide synthase of lung increased significantly, whereas GSH of lung decreased significantly in mice exposed to VOCs. These results indicate that inhalation of VOCs alters miRNA patterns that regulate gene expression, potentially leading to the initiation of cancer and inflammatory

  16. Maternal IL-1β Production Prevents Lung Injury in a Mouse Model of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bäckström, Erica; Lappalainen, Urpo; Bry, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of maternal inflammation on neonatal outcome. Production of IL-1β in the lungs of newborn infants is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Using bitransgenic (bi-TG) mice in which human (h) IL-1β is expressed with a doxycycline-inducible system controlled by the Clara cell secretory protein promoter, we have shown that hIL-1β expression causes a bronchopulmonary dysplasia–like illness in infant mice. To study the hypothesis that maternal hIL-1β production modifies the response of the newborn to hIL-1β, doxycycline was administered to bi-TG and control dams from Embryonic Day 0, inducing production of hIL-1β by the bi-TG dams before hIL-1β production started in their bi-TG fetuses, or from Embryonic Day 15, inducing simultaneous production of hIL-1β by both the bi-TG dams and their bi-TG fetuses. In addition to the lungs, hIL-1β was expressed at low levels in the uteri of bi-TG dams. Maternal inflammation preceding fetal inflammation increased the survival and growth of hIL-1β–expressing pups, enhanced alveolarization, and protected the airways against remodeling and goblet cell hyperplasia. Maternal hIL-1β production preceding fetal hIL-1β production caused silencing of several inflammatory genes, including CXC and CC chemokines, murine IL-1β, serum amyloid A3, and Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and suppressed the expression of chitinase-like lectins Ym1 and Ym2 in the lungs of infant mice. Maternal inflammation protects the newborn against subsequent hIL-1β–induced lung inflammation and injury. In contrast, induction of hIL-1β production simultaneously in bi-TG dams and their fetuses offered no protection against inflammatory lung disease in the neonate. PMID:19411613

  17. Ventilation defects observed with hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Abe C; Nouls, John C; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Voltz, James W; Fubara, Boma; Foley, Julie; Bradbury, J Alyce; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2011-05-01

    Regions of diminished ventilation are often evident during functional pulmonary imaging studies, including hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography, and computed tomography (CT). The objective of this study was to characterize the hypointense regions observed via (3)He MRI in a murine model of acute lung injury. LPS at doses ranging from 15-50 μg was intratracheally administered to C57BL/6 mice under anesthesia. Four hours after exposure to either LPS or saline vehicle, mice were imaged via hyperpolarized (3)He MRI. All images were evaluated to identify regions of hypointense signals. Lungs were then characterized by conventional histology, or used to obtain tissue samples from regions of normal and hypointense (3)He signals and analyzed for cytokine content. The characterization of (3)He MRI images identified three distinct types of hypointense patterns: persistent defects, atelectatic defects, and dorsal lucencies. Persistent defects were associated with the administration of LPS. The number of persistent defects depended on the dose of LPS, with a significant increase in mean number of defects in 30-50-μg LPS-dosed mice versus saline-treated control mice. Atelectatic defects predominated in LPS-dosed mice under conditions of low-volume ventilation, and could be reversed with deep inspiration. Dorsal lucencies were present in nearly all mice studied, regardless of the experimental conditions, including control animals that did not receive LPS. A comparison of (3)He MRI with histopathology did not identify tissue abnormalities in regions of low (3)He signal, with the exception of a single region of atelectasis in one mouse. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were evident in concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-2, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (KC), TNFα, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 between hypointense and normally ventilated lung regions in LPS

  18. Oxidants, antioxidants and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ray, Gibanananda; Husain, Syed Akhtar

    2002-11-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), such as superoxide anions (O2*-) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (*OH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) are directly or indirectly involved in multistage process of carcinogenesis. They are mainly involved in DNA damage leading sometimes to mutations in tumour suppressor genes. They also act as initiator and/or promotor in carcinogenesis. Some of them are mutagenic in mammalian systems. O2*-, H2O2 and *OH are reported to be involved in higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome breaks and gaps (CBGs). MDA, a bi-product of lipid peroxidation (LPO), is said to be involved in DNA adduct formations, which are believed to be responsible for carcinogenesis. NO, on the other hand, plays a duel role in cancer. At high concentration it kills tumour cells, but at low concentration it promotes tumour growth and metastasis. It causes DNA single and double strand breaks. The metabolites of NO such as peroxynitrite (OONO-) is a potent mutagen that can induce transversion mutations. NO can stimulate O2*-/H2O2/*OH-induced LPO. These deleterious actions of oxidants can be countered by antioxidant defence system in humans. There are first line defense antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT). SOD converts O2*- to H2O2, which is further converted to H2O with the help of GPx and CAT. SOD inhibits *OH production. SOD also act as antipoliferative agent, anticarcinogens, and inhibitor at initiation and promotion/transformation stage in carcinogenesis. GPx is another antioxidative enzyme which catalyses to convert H2O2, to H2O. The most potent enzyme is CAT. GPx and CAT are important in the inactivation of many environmental mutagens. CAT is also found to reduce the SCE levels and chromosomal aberrations. Antioxidative vitamins such as vitamin A, E, and C have a number of biological activities such as immune stimulation, inhibition of

  19. Age-related activation of MKK/p38/NF-κB signaling pathway in lung: from mouse to human.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Du, Huadong; Li, Yan; Yao, Xiujuan; Huang, Junmin; Li, Zongli; Wang, Wei; Li, Junfa; Han, Song; Wang, Chen; Huang, Kewu

    2014-09-01

    We and others previously reported that the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 significantly accumulate with age in mouse lung. This is accompanied by elevated phosphorylation of p38. Here, we further investigate whether aging affects activation of p38 signaling and the inflammatory reaction after exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the lungs of mice in vivo and humans ex vivo. The data showed that activation of p38 peaked at 0.5h and then rapidly declined in young (2-month-old) mouse lung, after intranasal inhalation challenge with LPS. In contract, activation of p38 peaked at 24h and was sustained longer in aged (20-month-old) mice. As well as altered p38, activations of its upstream activator MKK and downstream substrate NF-κB were also changed in the lungs of aged mice, which corresponded with the absence in the early phase but delayed increases in concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Consistent with the above observations in mice, similar patterns of p38 signaling also occurred in human lungs. Compared with younger lungs from adult-middle aged subjects, the activation of p38, MKK and NF-κB, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly increased in the lungs of older subjects ex vivo. Exposure of human lung cells to LPS induced rapid activation of p38, MKK and NF-κB in these cells from adult-middle aged subjects, but not older subjects, with increases in the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines. The LPS-induced rapid activation in the lung cells from adult-middle aged subjects occurred as early as 0.25h after exposure, and then declined. Compared with adult-middle aged subjects, the LPS exposure did not induce marked changes in the early phase, either in the activation of p38, MKK and NF-κB, or in the production of TNF-α, IL-1β or IL-6 in the lung cells from older subjects. In contrast, these changes occurred relatively late, peaked at 16h and were

  20. Gremlin-1 Overexpression in Mouse Lung Reduces Silica-Induced Lymphocyte Recruitment – A Link to Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis through Negative Correlation with CXCL10 Chemokine

    PubMed Central

    Koli, Katri; Sutinen, Eva; Rönty, Mikko; Rantakari, Pia; Fortino, Vittorio; Pulkkinen, Ville; Greco, Dario; Sipilä, Petra; Myllärniemi, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by activation and injury of epithelial cells, the accumulation of connective tissue and changes in the inflammatory microenvironment. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor protein gremlin-1 is associated with the progression of fibrosis both in human and mouse lung. We generated a transgenic mouse model expressing gremlin-1 in type II lung epithelial cells using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter and the Cre-LoxP system. Gremlin-1 protein expression was detected specifically in the lung after birth and did not result in any signs of respiratory insufficiency. Exposure to silicon dioxide resulted in reduced amounts of lymphocyte aggregates in transgenic lungs while no alteration in the fibrotic response was observed. Microarray gene expression profiling and analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines indicated a reduced lymphocytic response and a downregulation of interferon-induced gene program. Consistent with reduced Th1 response, there was a downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of the anti-fibrotic chemokine CXCL10, which has been linked to IPF. In human IPF patient samples we also established a strong negative correlation in the mRNA expression levels of gremlin-1 and CXCL10. Our results suggest that in addition to regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during tissue injury, gremlin-1 modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and anti-fibrotic chemokine production in the lung. PMID:27428020

  1. Studies using structural analogs and inbred strain differences to support a role for quinone methide metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in mouse lung tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J A; Carlson, T J; Sun, Y; Dwyer-Nield, L D; Malkinson, A M

    2001-03-01

    Chronic treatment of BALB and GRS mice with BHT (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol) following a single urethane injection increases lung tumor multiplicity, but this does not occur in CXB4 mice. Previous data suggest that promotion requires the conversion of BHT to a tert-butyl-hydroxylated metabolite (BHTOH) in lung and the subsequent oxidation of this species to an electrophilic quinone methide. To obtain additional evidence for the importance of quinone methide formation, structural analogs that form less reactive quinone methides were tested and found to lack promoting activity in BHT-responsive mice. The possibility that promotion-unresponsive strains are unable to form BHTOH was tested by substituting this compound for BHT in the promotion protocol using CXB4 mice. No promotion occurred, and in-vitro work demonstrated that CXB4 mice are, in fact, capable of producing BHTOH and its quinone methide, albeit in smaller quantities. Incubations with BALB lung microsomes and radiolabeled substrates confirmed that more covalent binding to protein occurs with BHTOH than with BHT and, in addition, BHTOH quinone methide is considerably more toxic to mouse lung epithelial cells than BHT quinone methide. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a two-step oxidation process, i.e. hydroxylation and quinone methide formation, is required for the promotion of mouse lung tumors by BHT.

  2. Gremlin-1 Overexpression in Mouse Lung Reduces Silica-Induced Lymphocyte Recruitment - A Link to Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis through Negative Correlation with CXCL10 Chemokine.

    PubMed

    Koli, Katri; Sutinen, Eva; Rönty, Mikko; Rantakari, Pia; Fortino, Vittorio; Pulkkinen, Ville; Greco, Dario; Sipilä, Petra; Myllärniemi, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by activation and injury of epithelial cells, the accumulation of connective tissue and changes in the inflammatory microenvironment. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor protein gremlin-1 is associated with the progression of fibrosis both in human and mouse lung. We generated a transgenic mouse model expressing gremlin-1 in type II lung epithelial cells using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter and the Cre-LoxP system. Gremlin-1 protein expression was detected specifically in the lung after birth and did not result in any signs of respiratory insufficiency. Exposure to silicon dioxide resulted in reduced amounts of lymphocyte aggregates in transgenic lungs while no alteration in the fibrotic response was observed. Microarray gene expression profiling and analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines indicated a reduced lymphocytic response and a downregulation of interferon-induced gene program. Consistent with reduced Th1 response, there was a downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of the anti-fibrotic chemokine CXCL10, which has been linked to IPF. In human IPF patient samples we also established a strong negative correlation in the mRNA expression levels of gremlin-1 and CXCL10. Our results suggest that in addition to regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during tissue injury, gremlin-1 modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and anti-fibrotic chemokine production in the lung. PMID:27428020

  3. Metabolite signatures in hydrophilic extracts of mouse lungs exposed to cigarette smoke revealed by 1H NMR metabolomics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Mary Y.

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations of adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.

  4. Characterization of azoxymethane-induced colon tumor metastasis to lung in a mouse model relevant to human sporadic colorectal cancer and evaluation of grape seed extract efficacy.

    PubMed

    Derry, Molly M; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-08-01

    The second leading cause of cancer-related deaths (both genders combined) in the United States is colorectal cancer (CRC). This emphasizes the need to develop both effective therapies for CRC patients and pre-clinical models mimicking human disease that carry translational potential in drug-development. Notably, at present there are no in situ models of CRC metastasis to lung. In our azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis study in A/J mice assessing grape seed extract (GSE) efficacy, during necropsy we also found multiple lung nodules suggestive of colon tumor metastasis to lung that were significantly inhibited in GSE fed group. Both histopathological and molecular studies were performed to characterize and establish the origin of these lesions in lung. Histologically these nodules were determined as adenocarcinoma of mucin origin. Molecular analyses by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and RT-PCR revealed strong protein and transcript levels of colon specific markers CDX2 and CK20 in these lung nodules compared to uninvolved control lung tissue. Vis-à-vis, these nodules also showed minimally expressed lung specific biomarkers, specifically surfactant D and TTF-1, in IHC analysis. Additionally, 0.25% GSE supplementation in diet (w/w) decreased the incidence of these lung nodules by 53% and their total number by 66%. Together, the characterization of this unique in situ mouse model of CRC metastasis to lung provides translational opportunities in developing effective therapies to clinically manage and treat CRC at the advanced stage. Moreover, GSE efficacy in inhibiting CRC metastasis to lung in this model further supports its translational potential in controlling CRC growth, progression and metastasis in patients.

  5. Characterization of the cell of origin and propagation potential of the fibroblast growth factor 9-induced mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arai, Daisuke; Hegab, Ahmed E; Soejima, Kenzo; Kuroda, Aoi; Ishioka, Kota; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Kagawa, Shizuko; Hamamoto, Junko; Yin, Yongjun; Ornitz, David M; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is essential for lung development and is highly expressed in a subset of human lung adenocarcinomas. We recently described a mouse model in which FGF9 expression in the lung epithelium caused proliferation of the airway epithelium at the terminal bronchioles and led to rapid development of adenocarcinoma. Here, we used this model to characterize the effects of prolonged FGF9 induction on the proximal and distal lung epithelia, and examined the propagation potential of FGF9-induced lung tumours. We showed that prolonged FGF9 over-expression in the lung resulted in the development of adenocarcinomas arising from both alveolar type II and airway secretory cells in the lung parenchyma and airways, respectively. We found that tumour cells harboured tumour-propagating cells that were able to form secondary tumours in recipient mice, regardless of FGF9 expression. However, the highest degree of tumour propagation was observed when unfractionated tumour cells were co-administered with autologous, tumour-associated mesenchymal cells. Although the initiation of lung adenocarcinomas was dependent on activation of the FGF9-FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) signalling axis, maintenance and propagation of the tumour was independent of this signalling. Activation of an alternative FGF-FGFR axis and the interaction with tumour stromal cells is likely to be responsible for the development of this independence. This study demonstrates the complex role of FGF-FGFR signalling in the initiation, growth and propagation of lung cancer. Our findings suggest that analysing the expressions of FGF-FGFRs in human lung cancer will be a useful tool for guiding customized therapy.

  6. FIB-SEM imaging of carbon nanotubes in mouse lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Købler, Carsten; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Qvortrup, Klaus; Mølhave, Kristian

    2014-06-01

    Ultrastructural characterisation is important for understanding carbon nanotube (CNT) toxicity and how the CNTs interact with cells and tissues. The standard method for this involves using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, in particular, the sample preparation, using a microtome to cut thin sample sections for TEM, can be challenging for investigation of regions with agglomerations of large and stiff CNTs because the CNTs cut with difficulty. As a consequence, the sectioning diamond knife may be damaged and the uncut CNTs are left protruding from the embedded block surface excluding them from TEM analysis. To provide an alternative to ultramicrotomy and subsequent TEM imaging, we studied focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) of CNTs in the lungs of mice, and we evaluated the applicability of the method compared to TEM. FIB-SEM can provide serial section volume imaging not easily obtained with TEM, but it is time-consuming to locate CNTs in the tissue. We demonstrate that protruding CNTs after ultramicrotomy can be used to locate the region of interest, and we present FIB-SEM images of CNTs in lung tissue. FIB-SEM imaging was applied to lung tissue from mice which had been intratracheally instilled with two different multiwalled CNTs; one being short and thin, and the other longer and thicker. FIB-SEM was found to be most suitable for detection of the large CNTs (Ø ca. 70 nm), and to be well suited for studying CNT agglomerates in biological samples which is challenging using standard TEM techniques.

  7. Biochemical responses of rat and mouse lung to inhaled nickel compounds.

    PubMed

    Benson, J M; Burt, D G; Cheng, Y S; Hahan, F F; Haley, P J; Henderson, R F; Hobbs, C H; Pickrell, J A; Dunnick, J K

    1989-08-01

    Nickel subsulfide (Ni3S2), nickel sulfate (NiSO4), and nickel oxide (NiO) are encountered occupationally in the nickel refining and electroplating industries, with inhalation being a common route of exposure. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the biochemical responses of lungs of rats and mice exposed for 13 weeks to occupationally relevant aerosol concentrations of Ni3S2, NiSO4, and NiO, to correlate biochemical responses with histopathologic changes, and to rank the compounds by toxicity. Biochemical responses were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) recovered from lungs of exposed animals. Parameters evaluated in BALF were lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), beta-glucuronidase (BG), and total protein (TP). Total and differential cell counts were performed on cells recovered in BALF. All compounds produced an increase in LDH, BG, TP, and total nucleated cells, and an influx of neutrophils, indicating the presence of a cytotoxic and inflammatory response in the lungs of exposed rats and mice. Increases in BG were greater than increases in LDH and TP for both rats and mice. Chronic active inflammation, macrophage hyperplasia, and interstitial phagocytic cell infiltrates were observed histologically in rats and mice exposed to all compounds. Statistically significant increases in BG, TP, neutrophils, and macrophages correlated well with the degree of chronic active inflammation. Results indicated a toxicity ranking of NiSO4 greater than Ni3S2 greater than NiO, based on toxicities of the compounds at equivalent mg Ni/m3 exposure concentrations. PMID:2756527

  8. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  9. Effects of smoke inhalation on surfactant phospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in the mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Oulton, M.; Moores, H.K.; Scott, J.E.; Janigan, D.T.; Hajela, R. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of smoke inhalation on the pulmonary surfactant system were examined in mice exposed for 30 minutes to smoke generated from the burning of polyurethane foam. At 8 or 12 hours after exposure, surfactants were isolated separately from lung lavage (extracellular surfactant) and residual lung tissue (intracellular surfactant) for phospholipid analysis. Calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) was measured on a microsomal fraction prepared from the tissue homogenate. Smoke inhalation produced a twofold increase in extracellular surfactant total phospholipid. While there was no change in the total phospholipid or phosphatidylcholine (PC) content of the intracellular surfactant, smoke inhalation significantly decreased the disaturated species of PC (DSPC). The specific activity of PLA2 was reduced by more than 50% in both groups of exposed mice. Smoke inhalation appears to result in selective depletion of the DSPC of intracellular surfactant and PLA2 involved in its synthesis. This depletion may be compensated for by increased secretion or slower breakdown of the material present in the extracellular compartment.

  10. Protective effect of Jolkinolide B on LPS-induced mouse acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailing; Li, Yan; Huo, Pengfei; Li, Xiao-Ou; Kong, Daliang; Mu, Wei; Fang, Wei; Li, Lingxia; Liu, Ning; Fang, Ling; Li, Hongjun; He, Chengyan

    2015-05-01

    Jolkinolide B (JB), an ent-abietane diterpenoid, isolated from the dried root of Euphorbia fischeriana, has been reported to have potent anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of JB on acute lung injury (ALI) and underlying molecular mechanisms have not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of JB on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with dexamethasone or JB 1h before intranasal instillation of LPS. The results showed that JB markedly attenuated LPS-induced histological alterations, lung edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Furthermore, JB also significantly inhibited LPS-induced the degradation of IκBα and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and MAPK. Therefore, our study provides the first line of evidence that pretreatment of JB has a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of JB may be attributed to its suppression of NF-κB and MAPK activation.

  11. Detection of Sendai virus receptor, the ganglioside GDla, in target tissue (mouse lung)

    SciTech Connect

    Markwell, M.A.K.; Sato, E.

    1986-05-01

    Previously the authors had shown that the gangliosides GDla, GTlb, and GQlb derived from brain function as receptors for the paramyxovirus Sendai virus by their ability to induce infection when incubated with receptor-deficient cells. Analyses of MDBK, HeLa, and MDCK cells in culture demonstrated that these putative receptors were present in host cells in the quantities required for infection. The primary site of infection for Sendai virus in the whole animal is the respiratory tract, culminating in the lung. Therefore, the ganglioside content of this target organ was analyzed to determine the endogenous receptor population available to Sendai virus. The total ganglioside fraction of lung was resolved into individual species by HPTLC. Gangliosides of the gangliotetraose series were identified by the specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled tetanus and cholera toxins before and after exposure with sialidase. In this manner one of the major resorcinol-positive bands was identified as GDla. Evidence of the more complex ganglioside receptors for Sendai virus was also seen.

  12. Systemic Disease-Induced Salivary Biomarker Profiles in Mouse Models of Melanoma and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kai; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Lee, Jin Wook; Zhou, Qing; Hu, Shen; Wolinsky, Lawrence E.; Farrell, James; Eibl, Guido; Wong, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Saliva (oral fluids) is an emerging biofluid poised for detection of clinical diseases. Although the rationale for oral diseases applications (e.g. oral cancer) is intuitive, the rationale and relationship between systemic diseases and saliva biomarkers are unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used mouse models of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer and compared the transcriptome biomarker profiles of tumor-bearing mice to those of control mice. Microarray analysis showed that salivary transcriptomes were significantly altered in tumor-bearing mice vs. controls. Significant overlapping among transcriptomes of mouse tumors, serum, salivary glands and saliva suggests that salivary biomarkers have multiple origins. Furthermore, we identified that the expression of two groups of significantly altered transcription factors (TFs) Runx1, Mlxipl, Trim30 and Egr1, Tbx1, Nr1d1 in salivary gland tissue of melanoma-bearing mice can potentially be responsible for 82.6% of the up-regulated gene expression and 62.5% of the down-regulated gene expression, respectively, in the saliva of melanoma-bearing mice. We also showed that the ectopic production of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the melanoma tumor tissue as a tumor-released mediator can induce expression of the TF Egr-1 in the salivary gland. Conclusions Taken together, our data support the conclusion that upon systemic disease development, significant changes can occur in the salivary biomarker profile. Although the origins of the disease-induced salivary biomarkers may be both systemic and local, stimulation of salivary gland by mediators released from remote tumors plays an important role in regulating the salivary surrogate biomarker profiles. PMID:19517020

  13. PR-Set7 is degraded in a conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhidong; Mao, Jian -Hua; Hsieh, David; Au, Alfred; Jablons, David M.; Li, Hui; You, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Background and objective. Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential to ensure normal organismal development and to prevent diseases such as cancer. PR-Set7 (also known as Set8) is a cell cycle regulated enzyme that catalyses monomethylation of histone 4 at Lys20 (H4K20me1) to promote chromosome condensation and prevent DNA damage. Recent studies show that CRL4CDT2-mediated ubiquitylation of PR-Set7 leads to its degradation during S phase and after DNA damage. This might occur to ensure appropriate changes in chromosome structure during the cell cycle or to preserve genome integrity after DNA damage. Methods. We developed a new model of lung tumor development in mice harboring a conditionally expressed allele of Cul4A. We have therefore used a mouse model to demonstrate for the first time that Cul4A is oncogenic in vivo. With this model, staining of PR-Set7 in the preneoplastic and tumor lesions in AdenoCre-induced mouse lungs was performed. Meanwhile we identified higher protein level changes of γ-tubulin and pericentrin by IHC. Results. The level of PR-Set7 down-regulated in the preneoplastic and adenocarcinomous lesions following over-expression of Cul4A. We also identified higher levels of the proteins pericentrin and γ-tubulin in Cul4A mouse lungs induced by AdenoCre. Conclusion. PR-Set7 is a direct target of Cul4A for degradation and involved in the formation of lung tumors in the conditional Cul4A transgenic mouse model.

  14. Mouse lung inflammation after instillation of particulate matter collected from a working dairy barn

    SciTech Connect

    Wegesser, Teresa C.; Last, Jerold A.

    2009-05-01

    Coarse and fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5-10} and PM{sub 2.5}, respectively) are regulated ambient air pollutants thought to have major adverse health effects in exposed humans. The role of endotoxin and other bioaerosol components in the toxicity of PM from ambient air is controversial. This study evaluated the inflammatory lung response in mice instilled intratracheally with PM{sub 2.5-10} and PM{sub 2.5} emitted from a working dairy barn, a source presumed to have elevated concentrations of endotoxin. PM{sub 2.5-10} was more pro-inflammatory on an equal weight basis than was PM{sub 2.5}; both fractions elicited a predominantly neutrophilic response. The inflammatory response was reversible, with a peak response to PM{sub 2.5-10} observed at 24 h after instillation, and a return to control values by 72 h after instillation. The major active pro-inflammatory component in whole PM{sub 2.5-10}, but not in whole PM{sub 2.5}, is heat-labile, consistent with it being endotoxin. A heat treatment protocol for the gradual inactivation of biological materials in the PM fractions over a measurable time course was developed and optimized in this study using pure lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a model system. The time course of heat inactivation of pure LPS and of endotoxin activity in PM{sub 2.5-10} as measured by Limulus bioassay is identical. The active material in both PM{sub 2.5-10} and PM{sub 2.5} remained in the insoluble fraction when the whole PM samples were extracted with physiological saline solution. Histological analysis of lung sections from mice instilled with PM{sub 2.5-10} or PM{sub 2.5} showed evidence of inflammation consistent with the cellular responses observed in lung lavage fluid. The major pro-inflammatory components present in endotoxin-rich PM were found in the insoluble fraction of PM{sub 2.5-10}; however, in contrast with PM{sub 2.5-10} isolated from ambient air in the Central Valley of California, the active components in the insoluble

  15. Lung-Derived Microscaffolds Facilitate Diabetes Reversal after Mouse and Human Intraperitoneal Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pawlick, Rena L.; Kahana, Meygal; Pepper, Andrew R.; Bruni, Antonio; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Kin, Tatsuya; Mitrani, Eduardo; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to develop three-dimensional structures that mimic the natural islet tissue microenvironment. Endocrine micro-pancreata (EMPs) made up of acellular organ-derived micro-scaffolds seeded with human islets have been shown to express high levels of key beta-cell specific genes and secrete quantities of insulin per cell similar to freshly isolated human islets in a glucose-regulated manner for more than three months in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of EMPs to restore euglycemia in vivo after transplantation of mouse or human islets in chemically diabetic mice. We proposed that the organ-derived EMPs would restore the extracellular components of the islet microenvironment, generating favorable conditions for islet function and survival. EMPs seeded with 500 mouse islets were implanted intraperitoneally into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and reverted diabetes in 67% of mice compared to 13% of controls (p = 0.018, n = 9 per group). Histological analysis of the explanted grafts 60 days post-transplantation stained positive for insulin and exhibited increased vascular density in a collagen-rich background. EMPs were also seeded with human islets and transplanted into the peritoneal cavity of immune-deficient diabetic mice at 250 islet equivalents (IEQ), 500 IEQ and 1000 IEQ. Escalating islet dose increased rates of normoglycemia (50% of the 500 IEQ group and 75% of the 1000 IEQ group, n = 3 per group). Human c-peptide levels were detected 90 days post-transplantation in a dose-response relationship. Herein, we report reversal of diabetes in mice by intraperitoneal transplantation of human islet seeded on EMPs with a human islet dose as low as 500 IEQ. PMID:27227978

  16. Metabolism of styrene to styrene oxide and vinylphenols in cytochrome P450 2F2- and P450 2E1-knockout mouse liver and lung microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuijie; Li, Lei; Ding, Xinxin; Zheng, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity of styrene is initiated by cytochromes P450-dependent metabolic activation. P450 2E1 and P450 2F2 are considered to be two main cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes responsible for styrene metabolism in mice. The objective of the current study was to determine the correlation between the formation of styrene metabolites (i.e. styrene oxide and 4-vinylphenol) and pulmonary toxicity of styrene, using Cyp2e1- and Cyp2f2-null mouse models. Dramatic decrease in the formation of styrene glycol and 4-vinylphenol was found in Cyp2f2-null mouse lung microsomes, relative to that in the wild-type mouse lung microsomes. However, no significant difference in the production of the styrene metabolites was observed between lung microsomes obtained from Cyp2e1-null and the wild-type mice. The knock–out and wild-type mice were treated with styrene (6.0 mmol/kg, ip), and cell counts and LDH activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were monitored to evaluate the pulmonary toxicity induced by styrene. Cyp2e1-null mice displayed similar susceptibility to lung toxicity of styrene as the wild-type animals. However, Cyp2f2-null mice were resistant to styrene-induced pulmonary toxicity. In conclusion, both P450 2E1 and P450 2F2 are responsible for the metabolic activation of styrene. The latter enzyme plays an important role in styrene-induced pulmonary toxicity. Both styrene oxide and 4-vinylphenol are suggested to participate in the development of lung injury induced by styrene. PMID:24320693

  17. Age, Strain, and Gender as Factors for Increased Sensitivity of the Mouse Lung to Inhaled Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Vancza, Elizabeth M.; Galdanes, Karen; Gunnison, Al; Hatch, Gary; Gordon, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a respiratory irritant that leads to airway inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction. Animal studies show that neonates are more sensitive to O3 inhalation than adults, and children represent a potentially susceptible population. This latter notion is not well established, and biological mechanisms underlying a predisposition to pollution-induced pulmonary effects are unknown. We examined age and strain as interactive factors affecting differential pulmonary responses to inhaled O3. Male and female adult mice (15 weeks old) and neonates (15–16 days old) from eight genetically diverse inbred strains were exposed to 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h. Pulmonary injury and lung inflammation were quantified as total protein concentration and total polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) number in lavage fluid recovered 24-h postexposure. Dose-response and time-course curves were generated using SJL/J pups, and 18O lung burden dose was assessed in additional mice. Interstrain differences in response to O3 were seen in neonatal mice: Balb/cJ and SJL/J being most sensitive and A/J and 129x1/SvJ most resistant. The PMN response to O3 was greater in neonates than in adults, specifically for SJL/J and C3H/HeJ strains, independent of dose. Small gender differences were also observed in adult mice. Variation in protein concentrations and PMN counts between adults and pups were strain dependent, suggesting that genetic determinants do play a role in age-related sensitivity to O3. Further research will help to determine what genetic factors contribute to these heightened responses, and to quantify the relative contribution of genes vs. environment in O3-induced health effects. PMID:19066396

  18. Selective induction of apoptosis in mouse and human lung epithelial cell lines by the tert-butyl hydroxylated metabolite of butylated hydroxytoluene: a proposed role in tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Dwyer-Nield, L D; Thompson, J A; Peljak, G; Squier, M K; Barker, T D; Parkinson, A; Cohen, J J; Dinsdale, D; Malkinson, A M

    1998-09-15

    Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) causes lung injury in mice and promotes tumor formation. Hydroxylation of a tert-butyl group on BHT to yield the metabolite, 6-tert-butyl-2-[2'-(2'-hydroxymethyl)-propyl]-4-methylphenol (BHTOH), may be required. BHTOH is more potent than BHT on an equimolar basis in causing lung damage, enhancing lung tumor development, killing isolated bronchiolar non-ciliated Clara cells, and inhibiting lung epithelial gap junctional intercellular communication. One mechanism proposed for tumor promoting agents is selective cytotoxicity; killing normal cells allows uninhibited clonal expansion of neighboring initiated cells. We compared the abilities of BHT, BHTOH, and other BHT metabolites to kill non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic mouse and human lung cell lines, and examined the contribution of apoptosis to this cytotoxicity. These cells lack the cytochrome P450 2B isozyme necessary for converting BHT to BHTOH. BHTOH and 4-hydroperoxy-4-methyl-2,6-di-tert-butyl-2,5-cyclohex-adienone+ ++ (BHTOOH) were most toxic, BHT and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone (BHTQu) were less potent, and 4-methyl BHT metabolites that are not pneumotoxic were ineffective. BHTOH most strongly induced apoptosis, based on nuclear condensation and transmission electron microscopy. Non-tumorigenic cells were as susceptible to cell death as the neoplastic cell lines when apoptosis and necrosis are not distinguished, but more sensitive to BHTOH-induced apoptosis. An apoptotic mechanism may underlie the lung tumor promoting actions of BHTOH.

  19. Systemic chromosome instability in Shugoshin-1 mice resulted in compromised glutathione pathway, activation of Wnt signaling and defects in immune system in the lung.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H Y; Kumar, G; Zhang, Y; Rubin, E; Lightfoot, S; Dai, W; Rao, C V

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic error-mediated chromosome instability (CIN) can lead to aneuploidy, chromothripsis, DNA damage and/or whole chromosome gain/loss. CIN may prompt rapid accumulation of mutations and genomic alterations. Thus, CIN can promote carcinogenesis. This CIN process results from a mutation in certain genes or environmental challenge such as smoking, and is highly prevalent in various cancers, including lung cancer. A better understanding of the effects of CIN on carcinogenesis will lead to novel methods for cancer prevention and treatment. Previously Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1(-/+)) mice, a transgenic mouse model of CIN, showed mild proneness to spontaneous lung and liver cancers. In this study, adoptive (T/B-cell based) immunity-deficient RAG1(-/-) Sgo1(-/+) double mutant mice developed lung adenocarcinomas more aggressively than did Sgo1(-/+) or RAG1(-/-) mice, suggesting immune system involvement in CIN-mediated lung carcinogenesis. To identify molecular causes of the lung adenocarcinoma, we used systems biology approach, comparative RNAseq, to RAG1(-/-) and RAG1(-/-) Sgo1(-/+). The comparative RNAseq data and follow-up analyses in the lungs of naive Sgo1(-/+) mice demonstrate that, (i) glutathione is depleted, making the tissue vulnerable to oxidative stress, (ii) spontaneous DNA damage is increased, (iii) oncogenic Wnt signaling is activated, (iv) both major branches of the immune system are weakened through misregulations in signal mediators such as CD80 and calreticulin and (v) the actin cytoskeleton is misregulated. Overall, the results show multi-faceted roles of CIN in lung carcinoma development in Sgo1(-/+) mice. Our model presents various effects of CIN and will help to identify potential targets to prevent CIN-driven carcinogenesis in the lung. PMID:27526110

  20. Systemic chromosome instability in Shugoshin-1 mice resulted in compromised glutathione pathway, activation of Wnt signaling and defects in immune system in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, H Y; Kumar, G; Zhang, Y; Rubin, E; Lightfoot, S; Dai, W; Rao, C V

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic error-mediated chromosome instability (CIN) can lead to aneuploidy, chromothripsis, DNA damage and/or whole chromosome gain/loss. CIN may prompt rapid accumulation of mutations and genomic alterations. Thus, CIN can promote carcinogenesis. This CIN process results from a mutation in certain genes or environmental challenge such as smoking, and is highly prevalent in various cancers, including lung cancer. A better understanding of the effects of CIN on carcinogenesis will lead to novel methods for cancer prevention and treatment. Previously Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1−/+) mice, a transgenic mouse model of CIN, showed mild proneness to spontaneous lung and liver cancers. In this study, adoptive (T/B-cell based) immunity-deficient RAG1−/− Sgo1−/+ double mutant mice developed lung adenocarcinomas more aggressively than did Sgo1−/+ or RAG1−/− mice, suggesting immune system involvement in CIN-mediated lung carcinogenesis. To identify molecular causes of the lung adenocarcinoma, we used systems biology approach, comparative RNAseq, to RAG1−/− and RAG1−/− Sgo1−/+. The comparative RNAseq data and follow-up analyses in the lungs of naive Sgo1−/+ mice demonstrate that, (i) glutathione is depleted, making the tissue vulnerable to oxidative stress, (ii) spontaneous DNA damage is increased, (iii) oncogenic Wnt signaling is activated, (iv) both major branches of the immune system are weakened through misregulations in signal mediators such as CD80 and calreticulin and (v) the actin cytoskeleton is misregulated. Overall, the results show multi-faceted roles of CIN in lung carcinoma development in Sgo1−/+ mice. Our model presents various effects of CIN and will help to identify potential targets to prevent CIN-driven carcinogenesis in the lung. PMID:27526110

  1. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  2. Sawmill chemicals and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J

    2001-01-01

    Workers in wood industries are exposed to variable medleys of chemicals, both natural and synthetic. Additional exposures include fungi, bacteria, bark and wood dusts, solvents, paints, and various other wood coatings. These individual and conglomerate exposures have been associated with diverse occupational illnesses and hazards, including cancers. In this commentary, I summarize both experimental and epidemiologic carcinogenesis results for several chemicals used in the wood industry, as well as for wood dust. Working in the wood industries entails excess risks of cancers, among other diseases and workplace injuries. A key to preventing occupationally and environmentally associated cancers, as in the wood industries, is avoiding exposures to chemicals and wood dusts and, in particular, chemicals known to cause cancer in animals or/and humans. PMID:11333179

  3. FXR and liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiong-fei; Zhao, Wei-yu; Huang, Wen-dong

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor family and a ligand-modulated transcription factor. In the liver, FXR has been considered a multi-functional cell protector and a tumor suppressor. FXR can suppress liver carcinogenesis via different mechanisms: 1) FXR maintains the normal liver metabolism of bile acids, glucose and lipids; 2) FXR promotes liver regeneration and repair after injury; 3) FXR protects liver cells from death and enhances cell survival; 4) FXR suppresses hepatic inflammation, thereby preventing inflammatory damage; and 5) FXR can directly increase the expression of some tumor-suppressor genes and repress the transcription of several oncogenes. However, inflammation and epigenetic silencing are known to decrease FXR expression during tumorigenesis. The reactivation of FXR function in the liver may be a potential therapeutic approach for patients with liver cancer. PMID:25500874

  4. Cell proliferation in carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.M.; Ellwein, L.B. )

    1990-08-31

    Chemicals that induce cancer at high doses in animal bioassays often fail to fit the traditional characterization of genotoxins. Many of these nongenotoxic compounds (such as sodium saccharin) have in common the property that they increase cell proliferation in the target organ. A biologically based, computerized description of carcinogenesis was used to show that the increase in cell proliferation can account for the carcinogenicity of nongenotoxic compounds. The carcinogenic dose-response relationship for genotoxic chemicals (such as 2-acetylaminofluorene) was also due in part to increased cell proliferation. Mechanistic information is required for determination of the existence of a threshold for the proliferative (and carcinogenic) response of nongenotoxic chemicals and the estimation of risk for human exposure.

  5. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  6. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis. PMID:27055232

  7. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis. PMID:27055232

  8. Nutritional factors in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, M L

    1993-09-01

    There have been varying estimates of the role of nutritional as opposed to other contributors to carcinogenesis. Several considerations probably account for the different estimates: (1) genetic overestimates because of foetal and early life rearing practices and the nutritional modulation of genetic expression (2) errors in food intake methodology (3) the limitations of nutrient carcinogenesis hypotheses, ie models which are too naive and do not allow for non-nutrients in food, food patterns and the overall package which is food culture (4) indirect pathways connecting nutrition and cancer such as that via immunosurveillance. Examples of cancers where rapid change in nutritional thinking is underway are breast, prostatic, colorectal and pancreatic. With breast cancer, weakly oestrogenic compounds from foods may be comparable to tamoxifen. Changing food culture away from that rich in phyto-oestrogens may increase the risk of prostatic cancer in men as well. Colorectal cancer incidence has continued at high rates in urbanized society despite an awareness of dietary contribution comparable to the knowledge of diet and coronary heart disease is the analysis sufficiently stratified for large bowel site or nutritionally sophisticated enough to allow for aggregate food pattern effects? Pancreatic cancer on the rise presents questions about unidentified changes continuing in the diets of industrialized societies, possibly from an early age, and even during infant feeding. Nutritional surveillance with mathematical modelling of food intake at a more sophisticated level will be required to understand present food-cancer relationships, and those which may emerge with newer food technologies, especially those related to designer foods.

  9. Nutritional factors in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, M L

    1993-09-01

    There have been varying estimates of the role of nutritional as opposed to other contributors to carcinogenesis. Several considerations probably account for the different estimates: (1) genetic overestimates because of foetal and early life rearing practices and the nutritional modulation of genetic expression (2) errors in food intake methodology (3) the limitations of nutrient carcinogenesis hypotheses, ie models which are too naive and do not allow for non-nutrients in food, food patterns and the overall package which is food culture (4) indirect pathways connecting nutrition and cancer such as that via immunosurveillance. Examples of cancers where rapid change in nutritional thinking is underway are breast, prostatic, colorectal and pancreatic. With breast cancer, weakly oestrogenic compounds from foods may be comparable to tamoxifen. Changing food culture away from that rich in phyto-oestrogens may increase the risk of prostatic cancer in men as well. Colorectal cancer incidence has continued at high rates in urbanized society despite an awareness of dietary contribution comparable to the knowledge of diet and coronary heart disease is the analysis sufficiently stratified for large bowel site or nutritionally sophisticated enough to allow for aggregate food pattern effects? Pancreatic cancer on the rise presents questions about unidentified changes continuing in the diets of industrialized societies, possibly from an early age, and even during infant feeding. Nutritional surveillance with mathematical modelling of food intake at a more sophisticated level will be required to understand present food-cancer relationships, and those which may emerge with newer food technologies, especially those related to designer foods. PMID:24352145

  10. Nanotitanium dioxide toxicity in mouse lung is reduced in sanding dust from paint

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known of how the toxicity of nanoparticles is affected by the incorporation in complex matrices. We compared the toxic effects of the titanium dioxide nanoparticle UV-Titan L181 (NanoTiO2), pure or embedded in a paint matrix. We also compared the effects of the same paint with and without NanoTiO2. Methods Mice received a single intratracheal instillation of 18, 54 and 162 μg of NanoTiO2 or 54, 162 and 486 μg of the sanding dust from paint with and without NanoTiO2. DNA damage in broncheoalveolar lavage cells and liver, lung inflammation and liver histology were evaluated 1, 3 and 28 days after intratracheal instillation. Printex 90 was included as positive control. Results There was no additive effect of adding NanoTiO2 to paints: Therefore the toxicity of NanoTiO2 was reduced by inclusion into a paint matrix. NanoTiO2 induced inflammation in mice with severity similar to Printex 90. The inflammatory response of NanoTiO2 and Printex 90 correlated with the instilled surface area. None of the materials, except of Printex 90, induced DNA damage in lung lining fluid cells. The highest dose of NanoTiO2 caused DNA damage in hepatic tissue 1 day after intratracheal instillation. Exposure of mice to the dust from paints with and without TiO2 was not associated with hepatic histopathological changes. Exposure to NanoTiO2 or to Printex 90 caused slight histopathological changes in the liver in some of the mice at different time points. Conclusions Pulmonary inflammation and DNA damage and hepatic histopathology were not changed in mice instilled with sanding dust from NanoTiO2 paint compared to paint without NanoTiO2. However, pure NanoTiO2 caused greater inflammation than NanoTiO2 embedded in the paint matrix. PMID:22300483

  11. Clara cell adenomas of the mouse lung. Interaction with alveolar type 2 cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, K C

    1985-09-01

    Multiple pulmonary adenomas were induced in the offspring of pregnant Swiss-Webster mice by transplacental exposure to ethylnitrosourea (ENU) on the 15th day of gestation. Development and growth of tumors were followed for up to a year after birth. Morphologic assessment indicated that the majority of adenomas were of Clara-cell origin and were relatively normal on the basis of structural features. Histochemical studies, utilizing nitroblue tetrazolium reductase activity as a marker for normal Clara cells demonstrated that the Clara-cell-derived tumors possessed nearly normal enzyme activity. Microscopic studies of the tumors and adjacent parenchyma revealed a unique Type 2 cell response to the presence of Clara-cell adenomas occurring in the alveoli beyond the margins of the tumor. Otherwise normal-appearing Type 2 cells, in a narrow zone around the Clara-cell tumors, accumulated large amounts of surfactantlike osmiophilic lamellar material within cytoplasmic vacuoles as early as 30 days after birth. These changes were clearly a Clara-cell-tumor-related response, and not seen in association with other non-Clara-cell adenomas of the same lung. Furthermore, the alterations occurred exclusively in Type 2 cells. The extent of Type 2 cell change was correlated with tumor size and age. Autoradiographic studies with tritiated choline showed marked incorporation of the labeled precursor by the altered Type 2 cells. By electron microscopy, these inclusions were membrane-limited and contained osmiophilic lamellar structures similar to lamellar bodies in normal Type 2 cells. Because these Clara cell adenomas may act as a concentrated focus of normal Clara cells, the alterations seen in Type 2 cells may reflect an amplification of a normal interaction between bronchiolar Clara cells and alveolar Type 2 cells in the centriacinar and juxtabronchiolar alveoli.

  12. Lack of contribution of covalent benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-quinone-DNA adducts in benzo[a]pyrene-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Nesnow, Stephen; Nelson, Garret; Padgett, William T; George, Michael H; Moore, Tanya; King, Leon C; Adams, Linda D; Ross, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-30

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a potent human and rodent lung carcinogen. This activity has been ascribed in part to the formation of anti-trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroB[a]P-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts. Other carcinogenic mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the induction of apurinic sites from radical cation processes, and (2) the metabolic formation of B[a]P-7,8-quinone (BPQ) that can form covalent DNA adducts or reactive oxygen species which can damage DNA. The studies presented here sought to examine the role of stable BPQ-DNA adducts in B[a]P-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis. Male strain A/J mice were injected intraperitoneally once with BPQ or trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroB[a]P (BP-7,8-diol) at 30, 10, 3, or 0mg/kg. Lungs and livers were harvested after 24h, the DNA extracted and subjected to (32)P-postlabeling analysis. Additional groups of mice were dosed once with BPQ or BP-7,8-diol each at 30 mg/kg and tissues harvested 48 and 72 h later, or with B[a]P (50mg/kg, a tumorigenic dose) and tissues harvested 72 h later. No BPQ or any other DNA adducts were observed in lung or liver tissues 24, 48, or 72 h after the treatment with 30 mg/kg BPQ. BP-7,8-diol gave BPDE-DNA adducts at all time points in both tissues and B[a]P treatment gave BPDE-DNA adducts in the lung. In each case, no BPQ-DNA adducts were detected. Mouse body weights significantly decreased over time after BPQ or BP-7,8-diol treatments suggesting that systemic toxicity was induced by both agents. Model studies with BPQ and N-acetylcysteine suggested that BPQ is rapidly inactivated by sulfhydryl-containing compounds and not available for DNA adduction. We conclude that under these treatment conditions BPQ does not form stable covalent DNA adducts in the lungs or livers of strain A/J mice, suggesting that stable BPQ-covalent adducts are not a part of the complex of mechanisms involved in B[a]P-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis.

  13. Keratinocyte p38δ loss inhibits Ras-induced tumor formation, while systemic p38δ loss enhances skin inflammation in the early phase of chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Alexi; Koppel, Aaron C; Anders, Joanna; Cataisson, Christophe; Yuspa, Stuart H; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Efimova, Tatiana

    2016-05-01

    p38δ expression and/or activity are increased in human cutaneous malignancies, including invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and head and neck SCC, but the role of p38δ in cutaneous carcinogenesis has not been well-defined. We have reported that mice with germline loss of p38δ exhibited a reduced susceptibility to skin tumor development compared with wild-type mice in the two-stage 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) chemical skin carcinogenesis model. Here, we report that p38δ gene ablation inhibited the growth of tumors generated from v-ras(Ha) -transformed keratinocytes in skin orthografts to nude mice, indicating that keratinocyte-intrinsic p38δ is required for Ras-induced tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of v-ras(Ha) -transformed p38δ-null keratinocytes revealed transcriptional changes associated with cellular responses linked to tumor suppression, such as reduced proliferation and increased differentiation, cell adhesion, and cell communications. Notably, a short-term DMBA/TPA challenge, modeling the initial stages of chemical skin carcinogenesis treatment, elicited an enhanced inflammation in p38δ-null skin compared with skin of wild-type mice, as assessed by measuring the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and TNFα. Additionally, p38δ-null skin and p38δ-null keratinocytes exhibited increased p38α activation and signaling in response to acute inflammatory challenges, suggesting a role for p38α in stimulating the elevated inflammatory response in p38δ-null skin during the initial phases of the DMBA/TPA treatment compared with similarly treated p38δ(+/+) skin. Altogether, our results indicate that p38δ signaling regulates skin carcinogenesis not only by keratinocyte cell-autonomous mechanisms, but also by influencing the interaction between between the epithelial compartment of the developing skin tumor and its stromal microenvironment.

  14. Lung dendritic cells undergo maturation and polarization towards a T helper type 2-stimulating phenotype in a mouse model of asthma: Role of nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    QIN, QINGWU; WANG, ZHAN; PAN, PINHUA; CAO, ZU; XIA, QING; TAN, HONGYI; HU, CHENGPING

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and dendritic cells (DCs) have been hypothesized to modulate T cell responses in a mouse model of asthma. However, whether NGF plays a role in regulating the maturation and polarization of lung DCs remains unclear. In the present study, the effect of NGF inhibition on the maturation and phenotype of lung DCs was investigated in a mouse model of asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA), and subsequently received anti-NGF treatment. At 24 h following the last challenge, airway responsiveness and inflammation were examined. The concentrations of NGF, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 were analyzed. In addition, maturation and CD103 expression in the lung DCs were investigated. Anti-NGF treatment was found to significantly reduce airway hyperreactivity and inflammation in asthmatic mice. In addition, a subdued T helper 2 (Th2) response was observed, characterized by the downregulation of IL-4 and the upregulation of IFN-γ. Furthermore, the expression of the DC surface molecules, CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II, as well as the proportion of lung CD103+ DCs, decreased in the OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The proportion of lung CD103+ DCs also exhibited a positive correlation with the levels of plasma NGF in the mice. These results may provide an explanation for the role of NGF in amplifying the Th2 response in allergic diseases. Therefore, NGF may promote the maturation and polarization towards a Th2-stimulating phenotype of activated DCs, contributing to an amplification of the Th2 response in asthma. PMID:25289030

  15. MicroRNA-33b inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cell growth, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin/ZEB1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jingjing; Li, Min; An, Jian; Zhao, Bingrong; Zhong, Wen; Gu, Qihua; Cao, Liming; Yang, Huaping; Hu, Chengping

    2015-12-01

    Altered expression of microRNA (miRNA) is associated with lung carcinogenesis and metastasis. Our previous study of lung cancer miRNAs using the gene chip assay demonstrated altered miR-33b expression in lung adenocarcinoma. The present study further investigated miR-33b expression, function, and gene regulation in lung cancer cells in vitro and in nude mouse xenografts. Our data showed that the level of miR-33b expression was dramatically decreased in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues and that the reduced miR-33b expression was associated with tumor lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, restoration of miR-33b expression inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro. Luciferase assay revealed that miR-33b bound to ZEB1 3'-UTR region and inhibited ZEB1 expression, while expression of ZEB1 mRNA and miR-33b was inversely associated with lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and tissues. Subsequently, we found that miR-33b suppressed the activity of WNT/β-catenin signaling in lung adenocarcinoma cells and in turn suppressed tumor cell growth and EMT in vitro and in vivo nude mouse xenografts. In conclusion, the present study provided novel insight into the molecular mechanism of lung adenocarcinoma progression. MicroRNA-33b should be further investigated as a potential therapeutic target in human lung adenocarcinoma.

  16. Effects of Cigarette Smoke on the Activation of Oxidative Stress-Related Transcription Factors in Female A/J Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tharappel, Job C.; Cholewa, Jill; Espandiari, Parvaneh; Spear, Brett T.; Gairola, C. Gary; Glauert, Howard P.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke contains a high concentration of free radicals and induces oxidative stress in the lung and other tissues. Several transcription factors are known to be activated by oxidative stress, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Studies were therefore undertaken to examine if cigarette smoke could activate these transcription factors, as well as other transcription factors that may be important in lung carcinogenesis. Female A/J mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 42, or 56 days (6 hr/day, 5 days/wk). Cigarette smoke did not increase NF-κB activation at any of these times, but NF-κB DNA binding activity was lower after 15 days and 56 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of AP-1 was lower after 10 days and 56 days but was not changed after 42 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of HIF was quantitatively increased after 42 days of smoke exposure but decreased after 56 days. Whether the activation of other transcription factors in the lung could be altered after exposure to cigarette smoke was subsequently examined. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2, myc-CF1, RORE, and p53 were examined after 10 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53 were quantitatively increased, but those of myc-CF1 and RORE were unaffected. These studies show that cigarette smoke exposure leads to quantitative increases in DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53, while the activations of NF-κB, AP-1, and HIF are largely unaffected or reduced. PMID:20711931

  17. Up-regulation of nucleotide excision repair in mouse lung and liver following chronic exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} and its dependence on p53 genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Jeanne E.; Bondy, Genevieve S.; Mehta, Rekha; Massey, Thomas E.

    2014-03-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is biotransformed in vivo into an epoxide metabolite that forms DNA adducts that may induce cancer if not repaired. p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the regulation of global nucleotide excision repair (NER). Male heterozygous p53 knockout (B6.129-Trp53{sup tm1Brd}N5, Taconic) and wild-type mice were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} for 26 weeks. NER activity was assessed with an in vitro assay, using AFB{sub 1}-epoxide adducted plasmid DNA as a substrate. For wild-type mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua adducts was 124% and 96% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm and 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} respectively, and 224% greater in liver extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05). In heterozygous p53 knockout mice, repair of AFB{sub 1}–N7-Gua was only 45% greater in lung extracts from mice exposed to 0.2 ppm AFB{sub 1} (p < 0.05), and no effect was observed in lung extracts from mice treated with 1.0 ppm AFB{sub 1} or in liver extracts from mice treated with either AFB{sub 1} concentration. p53 genotype did not affect basal levels of repair. AFB{sub 1} exposure did not alter repair of AFB{sub 1}-derived formamidopyrimidine adducts in lung or liver extracts of either mouse genotype nor did it affect XPA or XPB protein levels. In summary, chronic exposure to AFB{sub 1} increased NER activity in wild-type mice, and this response was diminished in heterozygous p53 knockout mice, indicating that loss of one allele of p53 limits the ability of NER to be up-regulated in response to DNA damage. - Highlights: • Mice are chronically exposed to low doses of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). • The effects of AFB{sub 1} and p53 status on nucleotide excision repair are investigated. • AFB{sub 1} increases nucleotide excision repair in wild type mouse lung and liver. • This increase is attenuated in p53 heterozygous mouse lung and liver. • Results portray the role of p53 in

  18. Assessing the Relationship between Lung Density and Function with Oxygen-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Mouse Model of Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Zurek, Magdalena; Sladen, Louise; Johansson, Edvin; Olsson, Marita; Jackson, Sonya; Zhang, Hui; Mayer, Gaell; Hockings, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A magnetic resonance imaging method is presented that allows for the simultaneous assessment of oxygen delivery, oxygen uptake, and parenchymal density. The technique is applied to a mouse model of porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) induced lung emphysema in order to investigate how structural changes affect lung function. Method Nine-week-old female C57BL6 mice were instilled with saline or PPE at days 0 and 7. At day 19, oxygen delivery, oxygen uptake, and lung density were quantified from T1 and proton-density measurements obtained via oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OE-MRI) using an ultrashort echo-time imaging sequence. Subsequently, the lungs were sectioned for histological observation. Blood-gas analyses and pulmonary functional tests via FlexiVent were performed in separate cohorts. Principal Findings PPE-challenged mice had reduced density when assessed via MRI, consistent with the parenchyma loss observed in the histology sections, and an increased lung compliance was detected via FlexiVent. The oxygenation levels, as assessed via the blood-gas analysis, showed no difference between PPE-challenged animals and control. This finding was mirrored in the global MRI assessments of oxygen delivery and uptake, where the changes in relaxation time indices were matched between the groups. The heterogeneity of the same parameters however, were increased in PPE-challenged animals. When the oxygenation status was investigated in regions of varying density, a reduced oxygen-uptake was found in low-density regions of PPE-challenged mice. In high-density regions the uptake was higher than that of regions of corresponding density in control animals. The oxygen delivery was proportional to the oxygen uptake in both groups. Conclusions The proposed method allowed for the regional assessment of the relationship between lung density and two aspects of lung function, the oxygen delivery and uptake. When compared to global indices of lung function, an

  19. Nitrilase 1 modulates lung tumor progression in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong Antican; Sun, Yunguang; Le Blanc, Justin M.; Solomides, Charalambos; Zhan, Tingting; Lu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Uncovering novel growth modulators for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may lead to new therapies for these patients. Previous studies suggest Nit1 suppresses chemically induced carcinogenesis of the foregut in a mouse model. In this study we aimed to determine the role of Nit1 in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model driven by a G12D Kras mutation. Nit1 knockout mice (Nit1−/−) were crossed with KrasG12D/+ mice to investigate whether a G12D Kras mutation and Nit1 inactivation interact to promote or inhibit the development of NSCLC. We found that lung tumorigenesis was suppressed in the Nit1-null background (Nit1−/−:KrasG12D/+). Micro-CT scans and gross tumor measurements demonstrated a 5-fold reduction in total tumor volumes compared to Nit1+/+KrasG12D/+ (p<0.01). Furthermore, we found that Nit1 is highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and cell lines and use of siRNA against Nit1 decreased overall cell survival of lung cancer cells in culture. In addition, cisplatin response was enhanced in human lung cancer cells when Nit1 was knocked down and Nit1−/−:KrasG12D/+ tumors showed increased sensitivity to cisplatin in vivo. Together, our data indicate that Nit1 may play a supportive role in the modulation of lung tumorigenesis and represent a novel target for NSCLCs treatment. PMID:26967383

  20. DNA methylation and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, A V; Kisseljova, N P

    2001-03-01

    In the world of easy things truth is opposed to lie; in the world of complicated things one profound truth is opposed to another not less profound than the first. Neils Bohr The hypothesis of the exclusively genetic origin of cancer ("cancer is a disease of genes, a tumor without any damage to the genome does not exist") dominated in the oncology until recently. A considerable amount of data confirming this hypothesis was accumulated during the last quarter of the last century. It was demonstrated that the accumulation of damage of specific genes lies at the origin of a tumor and its following progression. The damage gives rise to structural changes in the respective proteins and, consequently, to inappropriate mitogenic stimulation of cells (activation of oncogenes) or to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes that inhibit cell division, or to the combination of both (in most cases). According to an alternative (epigenetic) hypothesis that was extremely unpopular until recently, a tumor is caused not by a gene damage, but by an inappropriate function of genes ("cancer is a disease of gene regulation and differentiation"). However, recent studies led to the convergence of these hypotheses that initially seemed to be contradictory. It was established that both factors--genetic and epigenetic--lie at the origin of carcinogenesis. The relative contribution of each varies significantly in different human tumors. Suppressor genes and genes of repair are inactivated in tumors due to their damage or methylation of their promoters (in the latter case an "epimutation", an epigenetic equivalent of a mutation, occurs, producing the same functional consequences). It is becoming evident that not only the mutagens, but various factors influencing cell metabolism, notably methylation, should be considered as carcinogens.

  1. Impact and mechanism of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs combined with chemotherapeutic drugs on human lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, WEIYI; CHEN, GANG

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of indomethacin treatment combined with oxaliplatin treatment on the expression of cluster of differentiation 44 variant 6 (CD44v6), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and survivin in human lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors. The human lung adenocarcinoma (A549)-nude mouse transplanted tumor model was established, and the mice were divided into a control group, an indomethacin treatment group, an oxaliplatin treatment group and an indomethacin-oxaliplatin combination treatment group. The tumor inhibition rate was calculated following sacrificing of the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and fluorescence reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were utilized to detect the protein and messenger (m)RNA expression of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin. The tumor inhibition rates of the indomethacin group, the oxaliplatin group and the combination group were 26.67, 47.70 and 68.88%, respectively. The protein and mRNA expression levels of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin in the transplanted tumors of each treatment group were reduced compared with the control group (P<0.05), and those of the combination group were lower compared with the single-drug treatment groups (P<0.05). Survivin and MMP-2, MMP-2 and CD44v6, and MMP-2 and CD44v6 all exhibited linear positive correlation. The present study provides evidence that the administration of indomethacin alone, or in combination with oxaliplatin, may significantly inhibit the growth of lung cancer-nude mouse transplanted tumors and the expression of CD44v6, MMP-2 and survivin inside the tumor. The combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with chemotherapeutic drugs may improve the antitumor effects. PMID:27313765

  2. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  3. Olive oil prevents benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced colon carcinogenesis through altered B(a)P metabolism and decreased oxidative damage in Apc(Min) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Banks, Leah D; Amoah, Priscilla; Niaz, Mohammad S; Washington, Mary K; Adunyah, Samuel E; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2016-02-01

    Colon cancer ranks third in cancer-related mortalities in the United States. Many studies have investigated factors that contribute to colon cancer in which dietary and environmental factors have been shown to play an integral role in the etiology of this disease. Specifically, human dietary intake of environmental carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has generated interest in looking at how it exerts its effects in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the preventative effects of olive oil on benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced colon carcinogenesis in adult Apc(Min) mice. Mice were assigned to a control (n=8) or treatment group (n=8) consisting of 25, 50 and 100-μg B(a)P/kg body weight (bw) dissolved in tricaprylin [B(a)P-only group] or olive oil daily via oral gavage for 60 days. Our studies showed that Apc(Min) mice exposed to B(a)P developed a significantly higher number (P<0.05) of larger dysplastic adenomas compared to those exposed to B(a)P + olive oil. Treatment of mice with B(a)P and olive oil significantly altered (P<0.05) the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in both the colon and liver tissues. However, only GST activity was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the liver of mice treated with 50- and 100-μg B(a)P/kg bw + olive oil. Lastly, olive oil promoted rapid detoxification of B(a)P by decreasing its organic metabolite concentrations and also decreasing the extent of DNA damage to colon and liver tissues (P<0.05). These results suggest that olive oil has a protective effect against B(a)P-induced colon tumors.

  4. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  5. Cationic liposomes enhance targeted delivery and expression of exogenous DNA mediated by N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine)-antibody conjugate in mouse lung endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Torchilin, V P; Kennel, S; Huang, L

    1992-07-15

    A new and improved system for targeted gene delivery and expression is described. Transfection efficiency of N-terminal modified poly(L-lysine) (NPLL) conjugated with anti-thrombomodulin antibody 34A can be improved by adding to the system a lipophilic component, cationic liposomes. DNA, antibody conjugate and cationic liposomes form a ternary electrostatic complex which preserves the ability to bind specifically to the target cells. At the same time the addition of liposomes enhance the specific transfection efficiency of antibody-polylysine/DNA binary complex by 10 to 20-fold in mouse lung endothelial cells in culture.

  6. Methods in laboratory investigation. Autoradiographic demonstration of the specific binding and nuclear localization of 3H-dexamethasone in adult mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Beer, D G; Cunha, G R; Malkinson, A M

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the first autoradiographic demonstration of specific nuclear localization of 3H-dexamethasone in different cell types of the lung. Adult mouse lung tissue was incubated in vitro for 90 minutes with 17 nM 3H-dexamethasone in the presence or absence of various nonradioactive steroids. After extensive washing to remove any nonspecifically bound ligand, the specimens were processed for autoradiography using the thaw-mount method. In the absence of competing steroids, silver grains were localized in the nuclei of alveolar type II cells, bronchiolar and arteriolar smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary vasculature. No significant nuclear concentration of label was observed in the bronchiolar epithelium, however. The specificity of 3H-dexamethasone labeling was demonstrated by incubating 17 nM 3H-dexamethasone with a 600-fold excess of either unlabeled dexamethasone, estrogen, dihydrotestosterone, or progesterone. These autoradiographic binding and steroid competition studies were confirmed by quantifying with liquid scintillation counting the specific 3H-dexamethasone binding in nuclear and cytosolic fractions prepared from lung tissues that had undergone identical incubation and washing procedures as those for autoradiography. These results demonstrate that many cell types in adult lung are targets for glucocorticoids and may respond to physiologic concentrations of this hormone.

  7. Evaluation of nose-only aerosol inhalation chamber and comparison of experimental results with mathematical simulation of aerosol deposition in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Nadithe, Venkatareddy; Rahamatalla, Muhib; Finlay, Warren H; Mercer, John R; Samuel, John

    2003-05-01

    In vivo small rodent efficacy testing of new synthetic and biological molecules for the pulmonary route requires an efficient delivery device. For this purpose, a nose-only inhalation chamber was used to deliver aerosolized aqueous compounds to the respiratory tract of mice. The aim of the study was to determine the efficiency of dose delivery and deposition in the lungs of the mice using this chamber. A secondary goal was to compare the experimental lung deposition results with values predicted from mathematical simulation. Experimental tests were conducted by generating aerosols of a radiolabeled formulation of human serum albumin (HSA) with a mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 3.9 +/- 0.5 microm and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 1.43 +/- 0.05 using PARI LC STAR jet nebulizers. Based on the total activity placed in the nebulizer, the chamber delivered 0.108 +/- 0.027% to the mice and 0.0087 +/- 0.0021% to the lungs of the mice. In vivo lung deposition was found to be 8.19 +/- 3.56% of total activity deposited in the mouse. Mathematical simulation predictions ranged between 5.89 and 4.40% for various breathing patterns, and did not differ significantly from the in vivo results (p > 0.10). These results provide important quantitative information relevant to aerosol delivery experiments in mouse models. Our results also suggest that the nose-only inhalation chamber would benefit from significant changes to increase the efficiency of deposition in mice such that it can be used for nebulization of expensive therapeutic drugs.

  8. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays. Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26427040

  9. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays.Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies.

  10. Dendritic Cell (DC) Vaccine in Mouse Lung Cancer Minimal Residual Model; Comparison of Monocyte-derived DC vs. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Derived-DC.

    PubMed

    Baek, Soyoung; Lee, Seog Jae; Kim, Myoung Joo; Lee, Hyunah

    2012-12-01

    The anti-tumor effect of monocyte-derived DC (MoDC) vaccine was studied in lung cancer model with feasible but weak Ag-specific immune response and incomplete blocking of tumor growth. To overcome this limitation, the hematopoietic stem cell-derived DC (SDC) was cultured and the anti-tumor effect of MoDC & SDC was compared in mouse lung cancer minimal residual model (MRD). Therapeutic DCs were cultured from either CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells with GM-CSF, SCF and IL-4 for 14 days (SDC) or monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4 for 7 days (MoDC). DCs were injected twice by one week interval into the peritoneum of mice that are inoculated with Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells (LLC) one day before the DC injection. Anti-tumor responses and the immune modulation were observed 3 weeks after the final DC injection. CD11c expression, IL-12 and TGF-β secretion were higher in SDC but CCR7 expression, IFN-γ and IL-10 secretion were higher in MoDC. The proportion of CD11c(+)CD8a(+) cells was similar in both DC cultures. Although both DC reduced the tumor burden, histological anti-tumor effect and the frequencies of IFN-γ secreting CD8(+) T cells were higher in SDC treated group than in MoDC. Conclusively, although both MoDC and SDC can induce the anti-tumor immunity, SDC may be better module as anti-tumor vaccine than MoDC in mouse lung cancer. PMID:23396889

  11. Mouse papillary lung tumors transplacentally induced by N-nitrosoethylurea: evidence for alveolar type II cell origin by comparative light microscopic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Rehm, S; Ward, J M; ten Have-Opbroek, A A; Anderson, L M; Singh, G; Katyal, S L; Rice, J M

    1988-01-01

    A histogenetic study was designed to evaluate controversial findings on the cell of origin of tubular/papillary lung tumors in mice, i.e., bronchiolar Clara cell versus alveolar type II cell. N-Nitrosoethylurea (0.5 mmol or 0.74 mmol/kg) was given to pregnant C3H (C3H/HeNCr MTV-) and Swiss Webster [Tac:(SW)fBR] mice as a single i.p. injection on Day 14, 15, 16, or 18 of gestation. The offspring were studied at various ages ranging from 7 days to 52 wk. Serial sections of the whole lung (100 to 200 sections per mouse) showed that solid/alveolar and papillary tumors arose from the pulmonary acinus, invading the bronchioles only as the tumors grew. Furthermore, a mixture of solid and papillary patterns within a single module did not represent a merging of two tumors but a progression from the solid to the papillary form. By use of two rabbit antisera against mouse lung surfactant apoproteins found in normal alveolar type II cells, it was shown by the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex procedure, by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique, and by indirect immunofluorescence that both solid and papillary tumors contained these proteins that are specific markers for alveolar type II cells. With a rabbit anti-rat Clara cell antiserum, none of the tumors studied was immunoreactive while normal Clara cells were reactive. The nitroblue tetrazolium formazan stain for dehydrogenase enzymes, found particularly in Clara cells, did not reveal these enzymes in any lung tumors from either strain. Ultrastructurally, no typical features of the mature Clara cell were detected in papillary or other pulmonary neoplasms. However, all tumors showed characteristic alveolar type II cell structures such as various stages of lamellar body formation, although these features were less well differentiated in the papillary tumors. Argentaffin dense bodies, representing lysosomes and immature forms of lamellar bodies, were commonly observed in papillary tumors. Some features of the papillary tumors

  12. Quantification of Kras mutant fraction in the lung DNA of mice exposed to aerosolized particulate vanadium pentoxide by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Banda, Malathi; McKim, Karen L; Haber, Lynne T; MacGregor, Judith A; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Parsons, Barbara L

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated whether Kras mutation is an early event in the development of lung tumors induced by inhalation of particulate vanadium pentoxide (VP) aerosols. A National Toxicology Program tumor bioassay of inhaled particulate VP aerosols established that VP-induced alveolar/bronchiolar carcinomas of the B6C3F1 mouse lung carried Kras mutations at a higher frequency than observed in spontaneous mouse lung tumors. Therefore, this study sought to: (1) characterize any Kras mutational response with respect to VP exposure concentration, and (2) investigate the possibility that amplification of preexisting Kras mutation is an early event in VP-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis. Male Big Blue B6C3F1 mice (6 mice/group) were exposed to aerosolized particulate VP by inhalation, 6h/day, 5 days/week for 4 or 8 weeks, using VP exposure concentrations of 0, 0.1, and 1 mg/m(3). The levels of two different Kras codon 12 mutations [GGT → GAT (G12D) and GGT → GTT (G12V)] were measured in lung DNAs by Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR (ACB-PCR). For both exposure concentrations (0.1 and 1.0mg/m(3)) and both time points (4 and 8 weeks), the mutant fractions observed in VP-exposed mice were not significantly different from the concurrent controls. Given that 8 weeks of inhalation of a tumorigenic concentration of particulate aerosols of VP did not result in a significant change in levels of lung Kras mutation, the data do not support either a direct genotoxic effect of VP on Kras or early amplification of preexisting mutation as being involved in the genesis of VP-induced mouse lung tumors under the exposure conditions used. Rather, the data suggest that accumulation of Kras mutation occurs later with chronic VP exposure and is likely not an early event in VP-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26232258

  13. Effect of the insecticides toxaphene and carbaryl on induction of lung tumors by benzo(a)pyrene in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Triolo, A.J.; Lang, W.R.; Coon, J.M.; Lindstrom, D.; Herr, D.L.

    1982-04-01

    The insecticides toxaphene and carbaryl, when fed in the diet alone for 20 wk, were not tumorigenic to female A/J mice. Dietary levels of these insecticides were investigated for their effects on the incidence of lung tumors induced by oral administration of benzo(a)pyrene (BP). A significant reduction in BP-induced lung tumors was found after feeding 100 ppm toxaphene for 12 wk or 200 ppm for 20 wk. In contrast, 1000 ppm carbaryl fed for 20 wk caused a significant enhancement of BP-induced lung tumors. Mice that received toxaphene in the diet alone, or toxaphene and BP, showed an increase in BP hydroxylase activity in the liver and a decrease in enzyme activity in the lung. Carbaryl and BP increased BP hydroxylase activity in the lung without altering enzyme activity in the liver. Inhibition of lung BP hydroxylase activity was paralleled by a reduction in BP-induced lung tumors in mice fed toxaphene. Conversely, increased lung BP hydroxylase activity was associated with an enhancement of BP-induced lung tumors in animals fed carbaryl. The metabolism of BP by organs susceptible to BP-induced tumors and possible mechanisms for interactions with the insecticides are discussed.

  14. Smoking and Hormesis as Confounding Factors in Radiation Pulmonary Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Charles L.; Scott, Bobby R.

    2008-01-01

    Confounding factors in radiation pulmonary carcinogenesis are passive and active cigarette smoke exposures and radiation hormesis. Significantly increased lung cancer risk from ionizing radiation at lung doses < 1 Gy is not observed in never smokers exposed to ionizing radiations. Residential radon is not a cause of lung cancer in never smokers and may protect against lung cancer in smokers. The risk of lung cancer found in many epi-demiological studies was less than the expected risk (hormetic effect) for nuclear weapons and power plant workers, shipyard workers, fluoroscopy patients, and inhabitants of high-dose background radiation. The protective effect was noted for low- and mixed high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations in both genders. Many studies showed a protection factor (PROFAC) > 0.40 (40% avoided) against the occurrence of lung cancer. The ubiquitous nature of the radiation hormesis response in cellular, animal, and epidemio-logical studies negates the healthy worker effect as an explanation for radiation hormesis. Low-dose radiation may stimulate DNA repair/apoptosis and immunity to suppress and eliminate cigarette-smoke-induced transformed cells in the lung, reducing lung cancer occurrence in smokers. PMID:18648572

  15. A TWO-YEAR DOSE-RESPONSE STUDY OF LESION SEQUENCES DURING HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOGENESIS IN THE MALE B6C3F1 MOUSE GIVEN THE DRINKING WATER CHEMICAL DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is carcinogenic to the B6C3F 1 mouse and the F344 rat. Given the carcinogenic potential of DCA in rodent liver, and the known concentrations of this compound in drinking water, reliable biologically-based models to reduce the uncertai...

  16. Tobacco Smoking and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the most established cause of lung carcinogenesis and other disease processes. Over the last 50 years, tobacco refinement and the introduction of filters have brought a change in histology, and now adenocarcinoma has become the most prevalent subtype. Over the last decade, smoking also has emerged as a strong prognostic and predictive patient characteristic along with other variables. This article briefly reviews scientific facts about tobacco, and the process and molecular pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers. The evidence from randomised trials about tobacco smoking’s impact on lung cancer outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:23984018

  17. Increased expression of SVCT2 in a new mouse model raises ascorbic acid in tissues and protects against paraquat-induced oxidative damage in lung.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Fiona Edith; Best, Jennifer Lee; Meredith, Martha Elizabeth; Gamlin, Clare Ruth; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; May, James Marion; May, James Michael

    2012-01-01

    A new transgenic mouse model for global increases in the Sodium Dependent Vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) has been generated. The SVCT2-Tg mouse shows increased SVCT2 mRNA levels in all organs tested and correspondingly increased ascorbic acid (ASC) levels in all organs except liver. The extent of the increase in transporter mRNA expression differed among mice and among organs. The increased ASC levels did not have any adverse effects on behavior in the SVCT2-Tg mice, which did not differ from wild-type mice on tests of locomotor activity, anxiety, sensorimotor or cognitive ability. High levels of SVCT2 and ASC were found in the kidneys of SVCT2-Tg mice and urinary albumin excretion was lower in these mice than in wild-types. No gross pathological changes were noted in kidneys from SVCT2-Tg mice. SVCT2 immunoreactivity was detected in both SVCT2 and wild-type mice, and a stronger signal was seen in tubules than in glomeruli. Six treatments with Paraquat (3x10 and 3x15 mg/kg i.p.) were used to induce oxidative stress in mice. SVCT2-Tg mice showed a clear attenuation of Paraquat-induced oxidative stress in lung, as measured by F(2)-isoprostanes. Paraquat also decreased SVCT2 mRNA signal in liver, lung and kidney in SVCT2-Tg mice.

  18. Increased Expression of SVCT2 in a New Mouse Model Raises Ascorbic Acid in Tissues and Protects against Paraquat-Induced Oxidative Damage in Lung

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Fiona Edith; Best, Jennifer Lee; Meredith, Martha Elizabeth; Gamlin, Clare Ruth; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; May, James Michael

    2012-01-01

    A new transgenic mouse model for global increases in the Sodium Dependent Vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) has been generated. The SVCT2-Tg mouse shows increased SVCT2 mRNA levels in all organs tested and correspondingly increased ascorbic acid (ASC) levels in all organs except liver. The extent of the increase in transporter mRNA expression differed among mice and among organs. The increased ASC levels did not have any adverse effects on behavior in the SVCT2-Tg mice, which did not differ from wild-type mice on tests of locomotor activity, anxiety, sensorimotor or cognitive ability. High levels of SVCT2 and ASC were found in the kidneys of SVCT2-Tg mice and urinary albumin excretion was lower in these mice than in wild-types. No gross pathological changes were noted in kidneys from SVCT2-Tg mice. SVCT2 immunoreactivity was detected in both SVCT2 and wild-type mice, and a stronger signal was seen in tubules than in glomeruli. Six treatments with Paraquat (3x10 and 3x15 mg/kg i.p.) were used to induce oxidative stress in mice. SVCT2-Tg mice showed a clear attenuation of Paraquat-induced oxidative stress in lung, as measured by F2-isoprostanes. Paraquat also decreased SVCT2 mRNA signal in liver, lung and kidney in SVCT2-Tg mice. PMID:22558179

  19. The biological activity of FasL in human and mouse lungs is determined by the structure of its stalk region

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Raquel; Kajikawa, Osamu; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Wang, Yi; Hagimoto, Naoki; Mongovin, Steve; Wong, Venus; Park, David R.; Brot, Nathan; Heinecke, Jay W.; Rosen, Henry; Goodman, Richard B.; Fu, Xiaoyun; Martin, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening condition in critically ill patients. Injury to the alveolar epithelium is a critical event in ALI, and accumulating evidence suggests that it is linked to proapoptotic Fas/FasL signals. Active soluble FasL (sFasL) is detectable in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of patients with ALI, but the mechanisms controlling its bioactivity are unclear. We therefore investigated how the structure of sFasL influences cellular activation in human and mouse lungs and the role of oxidants and proteases in modifying sFasL activity. The sFasL in BAL fluid from patients with ALI was bioactive and present in high molecular weight multimers and aggregates. Oxidants generated from neutrophil myeloperoxidase in BAL fluid promoted aggregation of sFasL in vitro and in vivo. Oxidation increased the biological activity of sFasL at low concentrations but degraded sFasL at high concentrations. The amino-terminal extracellular stalk region of human sFasL was required to induce lung injury in mice, and proteolytic cleavage of the stalk region by MMP-7 reduced the bioactivity of sFasL in human cells in vitro. The sFasL recovered from the lungs of patients with ALI contained both oxidized methionine residues and the stalk region. These data provide what we believe to be new insights into the structural determinants of sFasL bioactivity in the lungs of patients with ALI. PMID:21285513

  20. Involvement of EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a and associated molecules in pathogenesis of urethane induced mouse lung tumors: Potential targets for cancer control

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Manuraj; Sahay, Satya; Tiwari, Prakash; Upadhyay, Daya S.; Sultana, Sarwat; Gupta, Krishna P.

    2014-10-15

    In the present study, we showed the correlation of EZH2, SUV39H1 or G9a expression and histone modifications with the urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis in the presence or absence of antitumor agent, inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). Tumorigenesis and the molecular events involved therein were studied at 1, 4, 12 or 36 weeks after the exposure. There were no tumors at 1 or 4 weeks but tumors started appearing at 12 weeks and grew further till 36 weeks after urethane exposure. Among the molecular events, upregulation of EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions appeared to be time dependent, but G9a expression was altered significantly only at later stages of 12 or 36 weeks. Alteration in miR-138 expression supports the upregulation of its target, EZH2. H3K9me2, H3K27me3 or H4K20me3 was found to be altered at 12 or 36 weeks. However, ChIP analysis of p16 and MLH1 promoters showed their binding with H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 which was maximum at 36 weeks. Thus, histone modification and their interactions with gene promoter resulted in the reduced expression of p16 and MLH1. IP6 prevented the incidence and the size of urethane induced lung tumors. IP6 also prevented the urethane induced alterations in EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a expressions and histone modifications. Our results suggest that the alterations in the histone modification pathways involving EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions are among the early events in urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis and could be exploited for cancer control. - Highlights: • Urethane induces mouse lung tumor in a time dependent manner. • EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a induced by urethane and progress with time • Downregulation of miRNA-138 supports the EZH2 upregulation. • Methylation of histones showed a consequence of upregulated EZH2, SUV39H1 and G9a. • IP6 inhibits urethane induced changes and prevents tumor development.

  1. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  2. Involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis: insight into the gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Regucalcin, which its gene is located on the X chromosome, plays a multifunctional role as a suppressor protein in cell signal transduction in various types of cells and tissues. The suppression of regucalcin gene expression has been shown to involve in carcinogenesis. Regucalcin gene expression was uniquely downregulated in carcinogenesis of rat liver in vivo, although the expression of other many genes was upregulated, indicating that endogenous regucalcin plays a suppressive role in the development of hepatocarcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin was found to suppress proliferation of rat cloned hepatoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the regucalcin gene and its protein levels were demonstrated specifically to downregulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma by analysis with multiple gene expression profiles and proteomics. Regucalcin gene expression was also found to suppress in human tumor tissues including kidney, lung, brain, breast and prostate, suggesting that repressed regucalcin gene expression leads to the development of carcinogenesis in various tissues. Regucalcin may play a role as a suppressor protein in carcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin is suggested to reveal preventive and therapeutic effects on carcinogenesis. Delivery of the regucalcin gene may be a novel useful tool in the gene therapy of carcinogenesis. This review will discuss regarding to an involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis in insight into the gene therapy.

  3. Silica Triggers Inflammation and Ectopic Lymphoid Neogenesis in the Lungs in Parallel with Accelerated Onset of Systemic Autoimmunity and Glomerulonephritis in the Lupus-Prone NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition and environmental factors influence the development of human autoimmune disease. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica (cSiO2) has been etiologically linked to increased incidence of autoimmunity, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that early repeated short-term cSiO2 exposure will modulate both latency and severity of autoimmunity in the lupus-prone female NZBWF1 mouse. Weekly intranasal exposure to cSiO2 (0.25 and 1.0 mg) for 4 wk beginning at 9 wk of age both reduced latency and increased intensity of glomerulonephritis. cSiO2 elicited robust inflammatory responses in the lungs as evidenced by extensive perivascular and peribronchial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration consisting of IgG-producing plasma cells, and CD45R+ and CD3+ lymphocytes that were highly suggestive of ectopic lymphoid tissue (ELT). In addition, there were elevated concentrations of immunoglobulins and the cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. cSiO2-associated kidney and lung effects paralleled dose-dependent elevations of autoantibodies and proinflammatory cytokines in plasma. Taken together, cSiO2-induced pulmonary inflammation and ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the NZBWF1 mouse corresponded closely to systemic inflammatory and autoimmune responses as well as the early initiation of pathological outcomes in the kidney. These findings suggest that following airway exposure to crystalline silica, in mice genetically prone to SLE, the lung serves as a platform for triggering systemic autoimmunity and glomerulonephritis. PMID:25978333

  4. MWCNTs of different physicochemical properties cause similar inflammatory responses, but differences in transcriptional and histological markers of fibrosis in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sarah S; Saber, Anne T; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Købler, Carsten; Atluri, Rambabu; Pozzebon, Maria E; Mucelli, Stefano P; Simion, Monica; Rickerby, David; Mortensen, Alicja; Jackson, Petra; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Mølhave, Kristian; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jensen, Keld A; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are an inhomogeneous group of nanomaterials that vary in lengths, shapes and types of metal contamination, which makes hazard evaluation difficult. Here we present a toxicogenomic analysis of female C57BL/6 mouse lungs following a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of a small, curled (CNT(Small), 0.8 ± 0.1 μm in length) or large, thick MWCNT (CNT(Large), 4 ± 0.4 μm in length). The two MWCNTs were extensively characterized by SEM and TEM imaging, thermogravimetric analysis, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. Lung tissues were harvested 24h, 3 days and 28 days post-exposure. DNA microarrays were used to analyze gene expression, in parallel with analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung histology, DNA damage (comet assay) and the presence of reactive oxygen species (dichlorodihydrofluorescein assay), to profile and characterize related pulmonary endpoints. Overall changes in global transcription following exposure to CNT(Small) or CNT(Large) were similar. Both MWCNTs elicited strong acute phase and inflammatory responses that peaked at day 3, persisted up to 28 days, and were characterized by increased cellular influx in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, interstitial pneumonia and gene expression changes. However, CNT(Large) elicited an earlier onset of inflammation and DNA damage, and induced more fibrosis and a unique fibrotic gene expression signature at day 28, compared to CNT(Small). The results indicate that the extent of change at the molecular level during early response phases following an acute exposure is greater in mice exposed to CNT(Large), which may eventually lead to the different responses observed at day 28.

  5. FORMATION OF NON-INFECTIOUS INFLUENZA VIRUS IN MOUSE LUNGS: ITS DEPENDENCE UPON EXTENSIVE PULMONARY CONSOLIDATION INITIATED BY THE VIRAL INOCULUM

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Harold S.

    1954-01-01

    Formation of non-infectious virus—particles which hemagglutinate red blood cells and react with antibody to fix complement but do not infect the chick embryo or mouse—occurred when large quantities of certain strains of influenza viruses were inoculated intranasally into mice. Dependent upon the agent employed, 106.5 to 108.5 E.I.D. was essential to elicit this phenomenon. To accomplish this unusual multiplication it was essential to use a strain of virus which effected extensive pulmonary consolidation; strains of virus which did not produce marked lung lesions, even when as much as 108.5 E.I.D. was inoculated, did not form non-infectious virus. The development of this viral form was directly dependent upon the extent of cell damage obtained: consolidation of more than 50 per cent of the lung volume was required. The majority of non-infectious particles developed during the initial cycle of viral multiplication, and concurrently with the formation of non-infectious virus there was a corresponding decrease in the number of infectious viral particles. Non-infectious virus could not be propagated on serial passage in mouse lungs: on second lung passage only fully infectious virus was detectable. The formation of the non-infectious viral form was not the result of interference with synthesis of infectious virus by inactivated virus in the inoculum; for inoculation of heated infected allantoic fluid which contained more than 99 per cent of non-infectious virus did not result in the development of new non-infectious virus. Although inoculation of a large quantity of virus resulted in infection which yielded a relatively low titer of infectious and high titer of non-infectious virus, inoculation of a small quantity of the agent resulted in a high yield of infectious virus and no non-infectious that was detectable. In both instances the total quantity of antigenic viral material synthesized in the mouse lungs was the same. These data do not support the hypothesis that

  6. Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis lung infection in IL-18 and IL-12 knockout mice: IL-12 is dominant over IL-18 for protective immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H.; Yang, X.; Takeda, K.; Zhang, D.; Fan, Y.; Luo, M.; Shen, C.; Wang, S.; Akira, S.; Brunham, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon (IFN)-gamma is a key to protective immunity against a variety of intracellular bacterial infections, including Chlamydia trachomatis. Interleukin (IL)-18, a recently identified Th1 cytokine, together with IL-12 is a strong stimulator for IFN-gamma production. We investigated the relative roles of IL-18 and IL- 12 in protective immunity to C. trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) infection using gene knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were intranasally infected with C. trachomatis MoPn and protective immunity was assessed among groups of mice by daily body weight changes, lung growth of MoPn, and histopathological appearances at day 10 postinfection. The corresponding immune responses for each group of mice at the same postinfection time point were evaluated by measuring antigen-specific antibody isotype responses and cytokine profiles. RESULTS: Our results showed that IL-18 deficiency had little or no influence on clearance of MoPn from the lung, although KO mice exhibited slightly more severe inflammatory reactions in lung tissues, as well as reduced systemic and local IFN-gamma production, compared with WT mice. Results with IL-18 KO mice were in sharp contrast to those observed with IL-12 KO mice that showed substantially reduced clearance of MoPn from the lungs, substantial reductions of antigen-specific systemic and lung IFN-gamma production, decreased ratio of MoPn-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a/IgG1, and severe pathological changes in the lung with extensive polymorphonuclear, instead of mononuclear, cell infiltration. Exogenous IL-12 or IL-18 was able to increase IFN-gamma production in IL-18 KO mice; whereas, only exogenous IL-12, but not IL-18, enhanced IFN-gamma production in IL-12 KO mice. Caspase-1 is the key protease for activation of IL-18 precursor into the bioactive form, and caspase-1 KO mice also displayed similar bacterial clearance and body weight loss to that in WT mice at early stages

  7. MicroRNA expression profiles and networks in mouse lung infected with H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanyan; Gao, Yingjie; Jin, Yahong; Cong, Weihong; Pan, Xin; Cui, Xiaolan

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses can cause localized outbreaks and worldwide pandemics, owing to their high transmissibility and wide host range. As such, they are among the major diseases that cause human death. However, the molecular changes induced by influenza A virus infection in lung tissue are not entirely clear. Changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression occur in many pathological and physiological processes, and influenza A virus infection has been shown to alter miRNA expression in cultured cells and animal models. In this study, we mined key miRNAs closely related to influenza A virus infection and explored cellular regulatory mechanisms against influenza A virus infection, by building networks among miRNAs and genes, gene ontologies (GOs), and pathways. In this study, miRNAs and mRNAs induced by H1N1 influenza virus infection were measured by gene chips, and we found that 82 miRNAs and 3371 mRNAs were differentially expressed. The 82 miRNAs were further analyzed with the series test of cluster (STC) analysis. Three of the 16 cluster profiles identified by STC, which include 46 miRNAs in the three profiles, changed significantly. Using potential target genes of the 46 miRNAs, we looked for intersections of these genes with 3371 differentially expressed mRNAs; 719 intersection genes were identified. Based on the GO or KEGG databases, we attained GOs or pathways for all of the above intersection genes. Fisher's and χ (2) test were used to calculate p value and false discovery rate (FDR), and according to the standard of p < 0.001, 241 GOs and 76 pathways were filtered. Based on these data, miRNA-gene, miRNA-GO, and miRNA-pathway networks were built. We then extracted three classes of GOs (related to inflammatory and immune response, cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis, and signal transduction) to build three subgraphs, and pathways strictly related with H1N1 influenza virus infection were filtered to extract a subgraph of the miRNA-pathway network. Last, according

  8. Inhibiting DX2-p14/ARF Interaction Exerts Antitumor Effects in Lung Cancer and Delays Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ah-Young; Jung, Youn Sang; Kim, Jiseon; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Cho, Jung-Hyun; Chun, Ho-Young; Park, Soyoung; Park, Hyunchul; Lim, Sikeun; Ha, Nam-Chul; Park, Jong Sook; Park, Choon-Sik; Song, Gyu-Yong; Park, Bum-Joon

    2016-08-15

    The aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2) splice variant designated DX2 is induced by cigarette smoke carcinogens and is often detected in human lung cancer specimens. However, the function of DX2 in lung carcinogenesis is obscure. In this study, we found that DX2 expression was induced by oncogenes in human lung cancer tissues and cells. DX2 prevented oncogene-induced apoptosis and senescence and promoted drug resistance by directly binding to and inhibiting p14/ARF. Through chemical screening, we identified SLCB050, a novel compound that blocks the interaction between DX2 and p14/ARF in vitro and in vivo SLCB050 reduced the viability of human lung cancer cells, especially small cell lung cancer cells, in a p14/ARF-dependent manner. Moreover, in a mouse model of K-Ras-driven lung tumorigenesis, ectopic expression of DX2 induced small cell and non-small cell lung cancers, both of which could be suppressed by SLCB050 treatment. Taken together, our findings show how DX2 promotes lung cancer progression and how its activity may be thwarted as a strategy to treat patients with lung cancers exhibiting elevated DX2 levels. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4791-804. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27302160

  9. Vapors produced by electronic cigarettes and e-juices with flavorings induce toxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells and in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Chad A; Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Gerloff, Janice; Ossip, Deborah J; McIntosh, Scott; Robinson, Risa; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS)/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS) may be inhaled directly into the lung during a "vaping" session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used), and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292) in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that could lead to

  10. Vapors Produced by Electronic Cigarettes and E-Juices with Flavorings Induce Toxicity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammatory Response in Lung Epithelial Cells and in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Chad A.; Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Gerloff, Janice; Ossip, Deborah J.; McIntosh, Scott; Robinson, Risa; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS)/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS) may be inhaled directly into the lung during a “vaping” session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used), and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292) in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that could lead to

  11. Expression of genes involved in mouse lung cell differentiation/regulation after acute exposure to photons and protons with or without low-dose preirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Zhao, WeiLing; Tian, Sisi; Slater, James M; Deng, Zhiyong; Gridley, Daila S

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of acute 2 Gy irradiation with photons (0.8 Gy/min) or protons (0.9 Gy/min), both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays (0.01 Gy at 0.03 cGy/h), on 84 genes involved in stem cell differentiation or regulation in mouse lungs on days 21 and 56. Genes with a ≥1.5-fold difference in expression and P < 0.05 compared to 0 Gy controls are emphasized. Two proteins specific for lung stem cells/progenitors responsible for local tissue repair were also compared. Overall, striking differences were present between protons and photons in modulating the genes. More genes were affected by protons than by photons (22 compared to 2 and 6 compared to 2 on day 21 and day 56, respectively) compared to 0 Gy. Preirradiation with low-dose-rate γ rays enhanced the acute photon-induced gene modulation on day 21 (11 compared to 2), and all 11 genes were significantly downregulated on day 56. On day 21, seven genes (aldh2, bmp2, cdc2a, col1a1, dll1, foxa2 and notch1) were upregulated in response to most of the radiation regimens. Immunoreactivity of Clara cell secretory protein was enhanced by all radiation regimens. The number of alveolar type 2 cells positive for prosurfactant protein C in irradiated groups was higher on day 56 (12.4-14.6 cells/100) than on day 21 (8.5-11.2 cells/100) (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results showed that acute photons and protons induced different gene expression profiles in the lungs and that pre-exposure to low-dose-rate γ rays sometimes had modulatory effects. In addition, proteins associated with lung-specific stem cells/progenitors were highly sensitive to radiation.

  12. Aspect Ratio Plays a Role in the Hazard Potential of CeO2 Nanoparticles in Mouse Lung and Zebrafish Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dong, Yuan; Meng, Huan; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Song, Tze-Bin; Kohan, Sirus; Xia, Tian; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Lin, Shuo; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that there is a relationship between the aspect ratio (AR) of CeO2 nanoparticles and in vitro hazard potential. CeO2 nanorods with AR ≥ 22 induced lysosomal damage and progressive effects on IL-1β production and cytotoxicity in the human myeloid cell line, THP-1. In order to determine whether this toxicological paradigm for long aspect ratio (LAR) CeO2 is also relevant in vivo, we performed comparative studies in the mouse lung and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of zebrafish larvae. Although oropharyngeal aspiration could induce acute lung inflammation for CeO2 nanospheres and nanorods, only the nanorods with the highest AR (C5) induced significant IL-1β and TGF-β1 production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 21 days but not inducing pulmonary fibrosis. However, after a longer duration (44 days) exposure to 4 mg/kg of the C5 nanorods, more collagen production was seen with CeO2 nanorods vs. nanospheres after correcting for Ce lung burden. Using an oral-exposure model in zebrafish larvae, we demonstrated that C5 nanorods also induced significant growth inhibition, a decrease in body weight, and delayed vertebral calcification. In contrast, CeO2 nanospheres and shorter nanorods had no effect. Histological and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses showed that the key injury mechanism of C5 was in the epithelial lining of the GIT, which demonstrated blunted microvilli and compromised digestive function. All considered, these data demonstrate that, similar to cellular studies, LAR CeO2 nanorods exhibit more toxicity in the lung and GIT, which could be relevant to inhalation and environmental hazard potential. PMID:24720650

  13. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  14. [Hpv cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alvaro P; Tulio, Siumara; Cruz, Olívia Russo

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central rule in uterine cervix carcinogenesis. Other factors direct or indirectly influence the installation of this mechanism in cervical squamous epithelium. Investigations regarding mechanisms of interaction of these factors with viral elements are found in the literature of the last 20 years. The present review article discusses possible co-factors of HPV in the genesis of the squamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, taking into account only the factors whose association with the virus or cervical cancer has been documented by experimental studies, and not based just on clinical or epidemiological data. Among the approached parameters are immunological factors (local and humoral immune response), the association with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, genetic factors as protein p53 polymorphism, tabagism and the use of oral contraceptives. All these factors interact in variable intensity with oncoproteins and other HPV elements, increasing and facilitating the virus action in host cells, leading to the development of immortalization and carcinogenesis. PMID:12185639

  15. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T; Kallen, Caleb B; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans. PMID:26068229

  16. Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Hnin H.; Vasu, Vihas T.; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Corbacho, Ana M.; Kota, Rama S.; Lim, Yunsook; Obermueller-Jevic, Ute C.; Packer, Lester; Gohil, Kishorchandra

    2008-01-01

    Male C57BL/6 mice were fed diets supplemented with either β-carotene (BC) or lycopene (LY) that were formulated for human consumption. Four weeks of dietary supplementations results in plasma and lung carotenoid (CAR) concentrations that approximated the levels detected in humans. Bioactivity of the CARs was determined by assaying their effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (~8,500 mRNAs). Both CARs activated the cytochrome P450 1A1 gene but only BC induced the retinol dehydrogenase gene. The contrasting effects of the two CARs on the lung transcriptome were further uncovered in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 3 days; only LY activated ~50 genes detected in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. These genes encoded inflammatory-immune proteins. Our data suggest that mice offer a viable in vivo model for studying bioactivities of dietary CARs and their modulatory effects on lung genomic expression in both health and after exposure to CS toxicants. PMID:19104882

  17. Modeling intercellular interactions during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Rainer K; Chan, Michael; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2005-09-01

    By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or premalignant cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells can play a key role in carcinogenesis. However, current commonly used quantitative models for induction of cancers by ionizing radiation focus on single cells and their progeny. Intercellular interactions are neglected or assumed to be confined to unidirectional radiation bystander effect signals from cells of the same tissue type. We here formulate a parsimoniously parameterized two-stage logistic (TSL) carcinogenesis model that incorporates some effects of intercellular interactions during the growth of premalignant cells. We show that for baseline tumor rates, involving no radiation apart from background radiation, this TSL model gives acceptable fits to a number of data sets. Specifically, it gives the same baseline hazard function, using the same number of adjustable parameters, as does the commonly used two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model, so it is automatically applicable to the many data sets on baseline cancer that have been analyzed using the TSCE model. For perturbations of baseline rates due to radiation, the models differ. We argue from epidemiological and laboratory evidence, especially results for the atomic bomb survivors, that for radiation carcinogenesis the TSL model gives results at least as realistic as the TSCE or similar models, despite involving fewer adjustable parameters in many cases. PMID:16137206

  18. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in the Drinking Water Alters the Expression of Immune Response Genes in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Kozul, Courtney D.; Hampton, Thomas H.; Davey, Jennifer C.; Gosse, Julie A.; Nomikos, Athena P.; Eisenhauer, Phillip L.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Thorpe, Jessica E.; Ihnat, Michael A.; Hamilton, Joshua W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to drinking water arsenic is a significant worldwide environmental health concern. Exposure to As is associated with an increased risk of lung disease, which may make it a unique toxicant, because lung toxicity is usually associated with inhalation rather than ingestion. Objectives The goal of this study was to examine mRNA and protein expression changes in the lungs of mice exposed chronically to environmentally relevant concentrations of As in the food or drinking water, specifically examining the hypothesis that As may preferentially affect gene and protein expression related to immune function as part of its mechanism of toxicant action. Methods C57BL/6J mice fed a casein-based AIN-76A defined diet were exposed to 10 or 100 ppb As in drinking water or food for 5–6 weeks. Results Whole genome transcriptome profiling of animal lungs revealed significant alterations in the expression of many genes with functions in cell adhesion and migration, channels, receptors, differentiation and proliferation, and, most strikingly, aspects of the innate immune response. Confirmation of mRNA and protein expression changes in key genes of this response revealed that genes for interleukin 1β, interleukin 1 receptor, a number of toll-like receptors, and several cytokines and cytokine receptors were significantly altered in the lungs of As-exposed mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that chronic low-dose As exposure at the current U.S. drinking-water standard can elicit effects on the regulation of innate immunity, which may contribute to altered disease risk, particularly in lung. PMID:19654921

  19. Alterations of gene expression in skin and lung of mice exposed to light and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Cartiglia, Cristina; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Balansky, Roumen M; D'Agostini, Francesco; Lubet, Ronald A; De Flora, Silvio

    2004-10-01

    We previously showed that sunlight-mimicking light induces genotoxic damage not only in skin but also even in lung, bone marrow, and peripheral blood of hairless mice. Moreover, light and smoke acted synergically in the respiratory tract. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we investigated by cDNA-arrays the expression of 746 toxicologically relevant genes in skin and lungs of mice exposed for 28 days to light and/or environmental cigarette smoke. Glutathione-S-transferase-Pi and catalase were overexpressed in the lungs of mice exposed to light only. Moreover, the light induced in skin the expression of genes involved in carcinogenesis, photoaging, and production of genotoxic and oxidizing derivatives traveling at a distance. Smoke induced the expression of multiple genes in both skin and lung, which reflect adaptive responses and mechanisms related to cancer and, possibly, to emphysema and stroke. As shown in mice exposed to both light and smoke, the light tended to increase smoke-induced gene expression in lungs, while smoke tended to attenuate light-induced gene expression in skin. The oral administration of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac inhibited the light-induced overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 and oxidative stress-related genes in skin, and down-regulated smoke-induced genes involved in oxidative stress, removal of damaged proteins, inflammation, and immune response in lung. These results provide a mechanistic insight explaining the systemic alterations induced by both light and smoke in mouse skin and lungs.

  20. The Cysteine Dioxgenase Knockout Mouse: Altered Cysteine Metabolism in Nonhepatic Tissues Leads to Excess H2S/HS− Production and Evidence of Pancreatic and Lung Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Heather B.; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Krijt, Jakub; Valli, Alessandro; Kožich, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To define the consequences of loss of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) on cysteine metabolism at the tissue level, we determined levels of relevant metabolites and enzymes and evidence of H2S/HS− (gaseous hydrogen sulfide and its conjugate base) toxicity in liver, pancreas, kidney, and lung of CDO−/− mice that were fed either a taurine-free or taurine-supplemented diet. Results: CDO−/− mice had low tissue and serum taurine and hypotaurine levels and high tissue levels of cysteine, consistent with the loss of CDO. CDO−/− mice had elevated urinary excretion of thiosulfate, high tissue and serum cystathionine and lanthionine levels, and evidence of inhibition and destabilization of cytochrome c oxidase, which is consistent with excess production of H2S/HS−. Accumulation of cystathionine and lanthionine appeared to result from cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)-mediated cysteine desulfhydration. Very high levels of hypotaurine in pancreas of wild-type mice and very high levels of cystathionine and lanthionine in pancreas of CDO−/− mice were observed, suggesting a unique cysteine metabolism in the pancreas. Innovation: The CDO−/− mouse model provides new insights into tissue-specific cysteine metabolism, particularly the role of pancreas in metabolism of excess cysteine by CBS-catalyzed reactions, and will be a useful model for studying the effects of excess endogenous production of H2S/HS−. Conclusion: The CDO−/− mouse clearly demonstrates that H2S/HS− production in tissues can exceed the capacity of the animal to oxidize sulfide to sulfate and demonstrates that pancreas and lung are more susceptible to toxicity from endogenous H2S/HS−production than are liver and kidney. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1321–1336. PMID:23350603

  1. Amphiphilic Polymer-coated CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots Induce Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Expression in Mouse Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vivian; McMahan, Ryan S.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; Faustman, Elaine M.; Griffith, William C.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Eaton, David L.; McGuire, John K.; Parks, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (Qdots) are semiconductor nanoparticles with size-tunable fluorescence capabilities with diverse applications. Qdots typically contain cadmium or other heavy metals, hence raising concerns of their potential toxicity, especially in occupational settings where inhalation of nanomaterials may increase the risk of lung disease. Accordingly, we assessed the effects of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide, poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-tetradecene) (TOPO-PMAT) coated CdSe/ZnS Qdots on mouse lung epithelial cells and macrophages. Mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTEC), grown as organotypic cultures, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), and primary alveolar macrophages (AM) were derived from C57BL/6J or A/J mice and treated with TOPO-PMAT CdSe/ZnS Qdots (10–160 nM) for up to 24 h. Cadmium analysis showed that Qdots remained in the apical compartment of MTEC cultures, whereas they were avidly internalized by AM and BMDM, which did not differ between strains. In MTEC, Qdots selectively induced expression (mRNA and protein) of neutrophil chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2 but only low to no detectable levels of other factors assessed. In contrast, 4 h exposure to Qdots markedly increased expression of CXCL1, IL6, IL12, and other pro-inflammatory factors in BMDM. Higher inflammatory response was seen in C57BL/6J than in A/J BMDM. Similar expression responses were observed in AM, although overall levels were less robust than in BMDM. MTEC from A/J mice were more sensitive to Qdot pro-inflammatory effects while macrophages from C57BL/6J mice were more sensitive. These findings suggest that patterns of Qdot-induced pulmonary inflammation are likely to be cell type specific and genetic background dependent. PMID:24983898

  2. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  3. Requirement of TGFβ Signaling for SMO-mediated Carcinogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qipeng; He, Miao; Sheng, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Zhao, Xingbo; Xie, Jingwu

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, via the key signal transducer Smoothened (SMO) and Gli transcription factors, is essential for embryonic development and carcinogenesis. At present, the molecular mechanism of Hh signaling-mediated carcinogenesis is not completely understood. Using a mouse model (K14cre/R26SmoM2) of SMO-mediated basal cell carcinoma development, we identified TGFβ2 as a major Hh-regulated gene. TGFβ2 expression was high in the keratinocytes, with activated TGFβ signaling (indicated by elevated expression of phosphorylated SMAD2/3) detected in both tumor and stroma. The significance of TGFβ signaling for SMO function was demonstrated in two assays. Down-regulation of TGFβ2 expression prevented Hh signaling-dependent osteoblast differentiation and motor neuron differentiation. Furthermore, inhibition of TGFβ signaling by TGFβ receptor I inhibitor SD208 significantly reduced tumor area in K14cre/R26SmoM2 mice. Tumor shrinkage in mice was associated with an increased number of lymphocytes, suggesting an immune suppression role of TGFβ signaling. The relevance of our results to human cancer is reflected by the fact that human basal cell carcinomas, which almost always harbor activated Hh signaling, have activated TGFβ signaling, as indicated by high levels of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD3 in tumor and stroma. Together, our data indicate that TGFβ signaling is critical for Hh signaling-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:20858897

  4. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis.

  5. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Yanamala, Naveena; Birch, M. Eileen; Kisin, Elena; Bugarski, Aleksandar D.

    2013-10-15

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

  6. Genome wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression changes in the mouse lung following subchronic arsenate exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in DNA methylation have been proposed as a mechanism for the complex toxicological effects of arsenic. In this study, whole genome DNA methylation and gene expression changes were evaluated in lungs from female mice exposed for 90 days to 50 ppm arsenate (As) in drink...

  7. Summary Report: State-of-the-Science Workshop on Chemically-Induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA hosted a two-day, state-of-the-science workshop which covered a broad range of evidence from human, animal, and in vitro studies with a focus on specific chemicals (ethylbenzene, naphthalene, and styrene) that cause lung tumors in mice and are implicated in a proposed spe...

  8. Lentiviral Delivery of RNAi for In Vivo Lineage-Specific Modulation of Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew A; Kwok, Letty W; Porter, Emily L; Payne, Julie G; McElroy, Gregory S; Ohle, Sarah J; Greenhill, Sara R; Blahna, Matthew T; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Jean, Jyh C; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Kotton, Darrell N

    2013-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) has become a ubiquitous laboratory tool since its discovery 12 years ago, in vivo delivery to selected cell types remains a major technical challenge. Here, we report the use of lentiviral vectors for long-term in vivo delivery of RNAi selectively to resident alveolar macrophages (AMs), key immune effector cells in the lung. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of this approach by RNAi-based downregulation of p65 (RelA), a component of the pro-inflammatory transcriptional regulator, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and a key participant in lung disease pathogenesis. In vivo RNAi delivery results in decreased induction of NF-κB and downstream neutrophilic chemokines in transduced AMs as well as attenuated lung neutrophilia following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Through concurrent delivery of a novel lentiviral reporter vector (lenti-NF-κB-luc-GFP) we track in vivo expression of NF-κB target genes in real time, a critical step towards extending RNAi-based therapy to longstanding lung diseases. Application of this system reveals that resident AMs persist in the airspaces of mice following the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation, thus allowing these localized cells to be used as effective vehicles for prolonged RNAi delivery in disease settings. PMID:23403494

  9. Sendai virus-induced alterations in lung structure/function correlate with viral loads and reveal a wide resistance/susceptibility spectrum among mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Faisca, Pedro; Anh, Dao Bui Tran; Desmecht, Daniel J-M

    2005-11-01

    The Paramyxoviridae family includes some of the most important and ubiquitous disease-causing viruses of infants and children, most of which cause significant infections of the respiratory tract. Evidence is accumulating in humans that genetic factors are involved in the severity of clinical presentation. As a first step toward the identification of the genes involved, this study was undertaken to establish whether laboratory mouse strains differ in susceptibility to Sendai virus, the murine counterpart of human type-1 parainfluenza virus which, historically, has been used extensively in studies that have defined the basic biological properties of paramyxoviruses in general. With this purpose in mind, double-chamber plethysmography data were collected daily for 7 days after inoculation of Sendai virus in six inbred strains of mice. In parallel, histological examinations and lung viral titration were carried out from day 5 to day 7 after inoculation. Pulmonary structure/function values closely reflected the success of viral replication in the lungs and revealed a pattern of continuous variation with resistant, intermediate, and susceptible strains. The results unambiguously suggest that BALB/c (resistant) and 129Sv (susceptible) strains should be used in crossing experiments aimed at identifying the genes involved in resistance to Paramyxoviridae by the positional cloning approach.

  10. 2'-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel conjugate nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lei; Schorzman, Allison N; Ma, Ping; Madden, Andrew J; Zamboni, William C; Benhabbour, Soumya Rahima; Mumper, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    A nanoparticle (NP) formulation with 2'-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel (Br-16-PX) conjugate was developed in these studies for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lipophilic paclitaxel conjugate Br-C16-PX was synthesized and incorporated into lipid NPs where the 16-carbon chain enhanced drug entrapment in the drug delivery system and improved in vivo pharmacokinetics. The electron-withdrawing bromine group was used to facilitate the conversion of Br-C16-PX to paclitaxel at the tumor site. The developed system was evaluated in luciferase-expressing A549 cells in vitro and in an orthotopic NSCLC mouse model. The results demonstrated that the Br-C16-PX NPs had a higher maximum tolerated dose (75 mg/kg) than Taxol (19 mg/kg) and provided significantly longer median survival (88 days versus 70 days, P<0.05) in the orthotopic NSCLC model. An improved pharmacokinetic profile was observed for the Br-C16-PX NPs at 75 mg/kg compared to Taxol at 19 mg/kg. The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC)₀₋₉₆ h of Br-C16-PX from the NPs was 91.7-fold and 49.6-fold greater than Taxol in plasma and tumor-bearing lungs, respectively, which provided sustained drug exposure and higher antitumor efficacy in the NP-treated group.

  11. Identification of most stable endogenous control genes for microRNA quantification in the developing mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Bouhaddioui, Wafae; Provost, Pierre R; Tremblay, Yves

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non coding RNAs acting as negative regulators. miRNA are involved in lung development and pulmonary diseases. Measurement of their levels by qPCR is directly influenced by the stability of normalization gene(s), which can be affected by the experimental conditions. The developing lung is a changing tissue and one normalization gene showing stability on one developmental day may be modulated over time. Moreover, some developmental events are affected by sex, which also has to be considered. In this study, we compared stability of five putative control genes in the lung between sexes from the pseudoglandular to the alveolar stages and in adult lungs. Expression of sno135, sno142, sno202, sno234, and sno251 was studied by qPCR in male and female lung samples collected at seven time points from GD 15.5 to PN 30. Cq values of sno251 showed the highest variation across the different developmental stages, while sno234 was the most stable gene. Gene expression stability was studied by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Our data showed that ranking of genes based on expression stability changed according to developmental time and sex. sno135/sno234 and sno142/sno234 were proposed as best combinations of normalization genes when both sexes and all the studied developmental stages are considered. Normalization of let7-a RNA levels with different pairs of control genes proposed by geNorm and NormFinder gave similar data, while the use of less stable genes introduced a statistically significant difference on PN 0. In conclusion, variations in stability of normalization gene expression are observed over time and according to sex during lung development. Best pairs of normalization genes are presented for specific developmental stages, and for the period extending from the pseudoglandular to the alveolar stages. The use of normalization genes selected for their expression stability is essential in lung development studies.

  12. CXC Receptor 1 and 2 and Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors Alter Radiation-induced Lung Disease in the Mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Jessica; Haston, Christina K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We previously reported increased numbers of neutrophils to be associated with the development of the radiation-induced lung responses of alveolitis (pneumonitis) and fibrosis in mice. In the present study we investigated whether CXC receptor 1 and 2 antagonism with DF2156A, a small molecule inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, or the neutrophil elastase inhibitor sivelestat decreases the lung response to irradiation. Methods and Materials: KK/HIJ mice received 14 Gy whole-thorax irradiation, and a subset of them received drug treatment 3 times per week from the day of irradiation until they were killed because of respiratory distress symptoms. Results: Irradiated mice receiving sivelestat survived 18% longer than did mice receiving radiation alone (73 vs 60 days for female mice, 91 vs 79 days for male mice), whereas postirradiation survival times did not differ between the group of mice receiving DF2156A and the radiation-only group. The numbers of neutrophils in lung tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid did not differ among groups of irradiated mice, but they significantly exceeded the levels in unirradiated control mice. The extent of alveolitis, assessed histologically, did not differ between irradiated mice treated with either drug and those receiving radiation alone, when assessed at the end of the experiment, but it was significantly reduced, as were the neutrophil measures, in sivelestat-treated mice at the common kill time of 60 days after irradiation. Mice treated with radiation and DF2156A developed significantly less fibrosis than did mice receiving radiation alone, and this difference was associated with decreased expression of interleukin-13 in lung tissue. Conclusions: We conclude that neutrophil elastase inhibition affects alveolitis and prolongs survival, whereas CXCR1/2 antagonism reduces radiation-induced fibrotic lung disease in mice without affecting the onset of distress.

  13. Global expression profiling reveals gain-of-function onco-genic activity of a mutated thyroid hormone receptor in thyroid carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Mishra, Alok; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are critical in regulating gene expression in normal physiological processes. Decreased expression and/or somatic mutations of TRs have been shown to be associated several types of human cancers including liver, breast, lung, and thyroid. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which mutated TRs promote carcinogenesis, an animal model of follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) (Thrbpv/pv mice) was used in the present study. The Thrbpv/pv mouse harbors a knockin dominant negative PV mutation, identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone. To understand whether oncogenic actions of PV involve not only the loss of normal TR functions but also gain-of-function activities, we compared the gene expression profiles of thyroid lesions in Thrbpv/pv mice and Thra1-/- Thrb-/- mice that also spontaneously develop FTC, but with less severe malignancy. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data derived from microdissected thyroid tumor cells of these two mice showed contrasting global gene expression profiles. With stringent selection using 2.5-fold change (p<0.01) in cDNA microarray analysis, 241 genes with altered gene expression were identified. Nearly half of the genes (n=103: 42.7% of total) with altered gene expression in thyroid tumor cells of Thrbpv/pv mice were associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis; some of these genes function as oncogenes in human thyroid cancers. The remaining genes were found to function in transcriptional regulation, RNA processing, cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cytoskeleton modification. These results indicate that the more aggressive thyroid tumor progression in Thrbpv/pv mice was not due simply to the loss of tumor suppressor functions of TR via mutation but also, importantly, to gain-of-function in the oncogenic activities of PV to drive thyroid carcinogenesis. Thus, the present study identifies a novel mechanism by which a mutated TRβ evolves with an oncogenic advantage to promote

  14. MWCNTs of different physicochemical properties cause similar inflammatory responses, but differences in transcriptional and histological markers of fibrosis in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Købler, Carsten; Atluri, Rambabu; Pozzebon, Maria E.; Mucelli, Stefano P.; Simion, Monica; Rickerby, David; Mortensen, Alicja; Jackson, Petra; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; and others

    2015-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are an inhomogeneous group of nanomaterials that vary in lengths, shapes and types of metal contamination, which makes hazard evaluation difficult. Here we present a toxicogenomic analysis of female C57BL/6 mouse lungs following a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of a small, curled (CNT{sub Small}, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm in length) or large, thick MWCNT (CNT{sub Large}, 4 ± 0.4 μm in length). The two MWCNTs were extensively characterized by SEM and TEM imaging, thermogravimetric analysis, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Lung tissues were harvested 24 h, 3 days and 28 days post-exposure. DNA microarrays were used to analyze gene expression, in parallel with analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung histology, DNA damage (comet assay) and the presence of reactive oxygen species (dichlorodihydrofluorescein assay), to profile and characterize related pulmonary endpoints. Overall changes in global transcription following exposure to CNT{sub Small} or CNT{sub Large} were similar. Both MWCNTs elicited strong acute phase and inflammatory responses that peaked at day 3, persisted up to 28 days, and were characterized by increased cellular influx in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, interstitial pneumonia and gene expression changes. However, CNT{sub Large} elicited an earlier onset of inflammation and DNA damage, and induced more fibrosis and a unique fibrotic gene expression signature at day 28, compared to CNT{sub Small}. The results indicate that the extent of change at the molecular level during early response phases following an acute exposure is greater in mice exposed to CNT{sub Large}, which may eventually lead to the different responses observed at day 28. - Highlights: • We evaluate the toxicogenomic response in mice following MWCNT instillation. • Two MWCNTs of different properties were examined and thoroughly characterized. • MWCNT exposure leads to increased pulmonary

  15. N-acetyl cysteine improves the effects of corticosteroids in a mouse model of chlorine-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders; Jonasson, Sofia

    2015-02-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) causes tissue damage and a neutrophilic inflammatory response in the airways manifested by pronounced airway hyperreactivity (AHR). The importance of early anti-inflammatory treatment has previously been addressed. In the previous study, both high-dose and low-dose of dexamethasone (DEX) decreased the risk of developing delayed effects, such as persistent lung injuries, while only high-dose treatment could significantly counteract acute-phase effects. One aim of this study was to evaluate whether a low-dose of DEX in combination with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and if different treatments (Triptolide, Reparixin and Rolipram) administered 1h after Cl2-exposure could improve protection against acute lung injury in Cl2-exposed mice. BALB/c mice were exposed to 300 ppm Cl2 during 15 min. Assessment of AHR and inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage was analyzed 24h post exposure. Neither of DEX nor NAC reduced the AHR and displayed only minor effects on inflammatory cell influx when given as separate treatments. When given in combination, a protective effect on AHR and a significant reduction in inflammatory cells (neutrophils) was observed. Neither of triptolide, Reparixin nor Rolipram had an effect on AHR but Triptolide had major effect on the inflammatory cell influx. Treatments did not reduce the concentration of either fibrinogen or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in serum, thereby supporting the theory that the inflammatory response is not solely limited to the lung. These results provide a foundation for future studies aimed at identifying new concepts for treatment of chemical-induced lung injury. Studies addressing combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant treatment are highly motivated.

  16. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1 fetal mouse lung type II cell development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zscheppang, Katja; Giese, Ulrike; Hoenzke, Stefan; Wiegel, Dorothea; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2013-12-01

    TTF-1 is an important transcription factor in lung development and lung disease and is essential for lung cell differentiation, specifically surfactant protein (Sftp) expression. The molecular mechanisms that drive the expression and transcriptional control of TTF-1 are not fully understood. In the fetal lung, ErbB4 functions as a transcriptional co-factor and regulates the timely onset of fetal Sftp expression. We speculate that ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1 and regulates Sftpb expression via this pathway in alveolar type II cells. Neuregulin-induced ErbB4 and TTF-1 signaling interactions were studied by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Overexpression of ErbB4 and TTF-1 was analyzed in its effect on cell viability, Sftpb expression, TTF-1 expression, and Sftpb and TTF-1 promoter activity. The effect of ErbB4 deletion and ErbB4 nuclear translocation on TTF-1 expression was studied in primary fetal type II epithelial cells, isolated from transgenic HER4(heart(-/-)) mice. ErbB4 ligand neuregulin induces ErbB4 and TTF-1 co-precipitation and nuclear colocalization. Combined ErbB4 and TTF-1 overexpression inhibits cell viability, while promoting Sftpb expression more than single overexpression of each protein. NRG stimulates TTF-1 expression in ErbB4-overexpressing epithelial cells, while this effect is absent in ErbB4-depleted cells. In primary fetal type II cells, ErbB4 nuclear translocation is critical for its regulation of TTF-1-induced Sftpb upregulation. TTF-1 overexpression did not overcome this important requirement. We conclude that ErbB4 is a critical upstream regulator of TTF-1 in type II epithelial cells and that this interaction is important for Sftpb regulation.

  17. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Hatfield, Meghan K.; Farcas, Mariana T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hummer, Jon A.; Shurin, Michael R.; Birch, M. Eileen; Gutkin, Dmitriy W.; Kisin, Elena; Kagan, Valerian E.; Bugarski, Aleksandar D.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. PMID:23886933

  18. Identification of nuclear phosphoproteins as novel tobacco markers in mouse lung tissue following short-term exposure to tobacco smoke

    PubMed Central

    Niimori-Kita, Kanako; Ogino, Kiyoshi; Mikami, Sayaka; Kudoh, Shinji; Koizumi, Daikai; Kudoh, Noritaka; Nakamura, Fumiko; Misumi, Masahiro; Shimomura, Tadasuke; Hasegawa, Koki; Usui, Fumihiko; Nagahara, Noriyuki; Ito, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the progression of these diseases remain unclear. Therefore, we sought to identify signaling pathways activated by tobacco-smoke exposure, by analyzing nuclear phosphoprotein expression using phosphoproteomic analysis of lung tissue from mice exposed to tobacco smoke. Sixteen mice were exposed to tobacco smoke for 1 or 7 days, and the expression of phosphorylated peptides was analyzed by mass spectrometry. A total of 253 phosphoproteins were identified, including FACT complex subunit SPT16 in the 1-day exposure group, keratin type 1 cytoskeletal 18 (K18), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein, in the 7-day exposure group, and peroxiredoxin-1 (OSF3) and spectrin β chain brain 1 (SPTBN1), in both groups. Semi-quantitative analysis of the identified phosphoproteins revealed that 33 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between the control and exposed groups. The identified phosphoproteins were classified according to their biological functions. We found that the identified proteins were related to inflammation, regeneration, repair, proliferation, differentiation, morphogenesis, and response to stress and nicotine. In conclusion, we identified proteins, including OSF3 and SPTBN1, as candidate tobacco smoke-exposure markers; our results provide insights into the mechanisms of tobacco smoke-induced diseases. PMID:25349779

  19. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  20. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 3α Plays a Critical Role in Alveolarization and Distal Epithelial Cell Differentiation during Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yadi; Kapere Ochieng, Joshua; Kempen, Marjon Buscop-van; Munck, Anne Boerema-de; Swagemakers, Sigrid; van IJcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank; Tibboel, Dick; Rottier, Robbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Lung development occurs under relative hypoxia and the most important oxygen-sensitive response pathway is driven by Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF). HIFs are heterodimeric transcription factors of an oxygen-sensitive subunit, HIFα, and a constitutively expressed subunit, HIF1β. HIF1α and HIF2α, encoded by two separate genes, contribute to the activation of hypoxia inducible genes. A third HIFα gene, HIF3α, is subject to alternative promoter usage and splicing, leading to three major isoforms, HIF3α, NEPAS and IPAS. HIF3α gene products add to the complexity of the hypoxia response as they function as dominant negative inhibitors (IPAS) or weak transcriptional activators (HIF3α/NEPAS). Previously, we and others have shown the importance of the Hif1α and Hif2α factors in lung development, and here we investigated the role of Hif3α during pulmonary development. Therefore, HIF3α was conditionally expressed in airway epithelial cells during gestation and although HIF3α transgenic mice were born alive and appeared normal, their lungs showed clear abnormalities, including a post-pseudoglandular branching defect and a decreased number of alveoli. The HIF3α expressing lungs displayed reduced numbers of Clara cells, alveolar epithelial type I and type II cells. As a result of HIF3α expression, the level of Hif2α was reduced, but that of Hif1α was not affected. Two regulatory genes, Rarβ, involved in alveologenesis, and Foxp2, a transcriptional repressor of the Clara cell specific Ccsp gene, were significantly upregulated in the HIF3α expressing lungs. In addition, aberrant basal cells were observed distally as determined by the expression of Sox2 and p63. We show that Hif3α binds a conserved HRE site in the Sox2 promoter and weakly transactivated a reporter construct containing the Sox2 promoter region. Moreover, Hif3α affected the expression of genes not typically involved in the hypoxia response, providing evidence for a novel function of Hif3

  1. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  2. Analysis of intracellular pH (pHcyt) in mouse models of angiogenesis and carcinogenesis by spectral imaging microscopy, real-time confocal imaging microscopy, and multiphoton spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennoune, Souad; Maiti, Debasish; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2003-07-01

    We have shown that a specific cytosolic pH (pHcyt) regulatory mechanism, i.e., vacuolar type H+-ATPases at the plasma membrane (pmV-ATPases), allows angiogenic and metastatic cells to survive in an acidic and hostile environment. However, a functional evaluation of this pump's activity in situ (i.e., in living animal models) has not been attempted. We developed a mouse model of angiogenesis and metastasis based on the dorsal skin fold chamber, and implanted highly metastatic human tumor cells that have been engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP can be used as a pH reporter because its fluorescence is pH sensitive. Our studies in isolated single cells indicated that there are distinct pHcyt gradients in the invadipodia versus the lamellipodia due to the preferential expression of pmV-ATPases at the leading edge. We hypothesize that in vivo, these pH gradients also exist. We employed spectral imaging and real time confocal imaging microscopy, since these approaches are complementary and exhibited unsurpassed temporal and spectral resolution, thus allowing us to study pHcyt in discrete subcellular regions of the cells expressing GFP. We can acquire a full frame (i.e., 512 x 512 pixels) in real time confocal imaging at ca. 25-50 msec, whereas spectral imaging allow us to obtain spectral information from discrete domains of ca. 10 μm in the x-y plane and every 10 μm from leading to lagging edge within a time frame of 5 msec at 0.4 nm spectral resolution. This is possible because we employ frame transfer cooled CCD cameras and spectrographs. Studies are under way to evaluate proton gradients using multiphoton approaches since this will allow us to evaluate pH deeper into the tissue (i.e., 300-600 μm), and should allow us to follow pHcyt and the progression of tumor metastasis.

  3. Use of 51Cr-labeled mononuclear cells for measuring the cellular immune response in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkower, A.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Ferguson, F.G.

    1981-02-01

    Spleen cells labeled with 51Cr were used in sensitized syngeneic mice to measure the degree of mononuclear cell infiltration into antigen-challenged tissues. With this method, increased cellular infiltration was found after footpad challenge of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocyte, Escherichia coli, and BCG antigens. Cellular response also was determined by using this technique in the lungs of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocytes and BCG. This procedure offers the opportunity to measure cellular infiltration, whether due to cellular or humoral influences, in tissues not easily accessible to conventional immunological manipulation.

  4. Use of /sup 51/Cr-labeled mononuclear cells for measuring the cellular immune response in mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkower, A.; Scheuchenzuber, W.J.; Ferguson, F.G.

    1981-02-01

    Spleen cells labeled with /sup 51/Cr were used in sensitized syngeneic mice to measure the degree of mononuclear cell infiltration into antigen-challenged tissues. With this method, increased cellular infiltration was found after footpad challenge of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocyte, Escherichia coli, and BCG antigens. Cellular response also was determined by using this technique in the lungs of mice sensitized with sheep erythrocytes and BCG. This procedure offers the opportunity to measure cellular infiltration, whether due to cellular or humoral influences, in tissues not easily accessible to conventional immunological manipulation.

  5. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  6. IκB kinase β inhibitor, IMD-0354, prevents allergic asthma in a mouse model through inhibition of CD4(+) effector T cell responses in the lung-draining mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Maślanka, Tomasz; Otrocka-Domagała, Iwona; Zuśka-Prot, Monika; Mikiewicz, Mateusz; Przybysz, Jagoda; Jasiecka, Agnieszka; Jaroszewski, Jerzy J

    2016-03-15

    IκB kinase (IKK) is important for nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation under inflammatory conditions. It has been demonstrated that IMD-0354, i.e. a selective inhibitor of IKKβ, inhibited allergic inflammation in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma. The present study attempts to shed light on the involvement of CD4(+) effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T cells in the anti-asthmatic action of IMD-0354. The animals were divided into three groups: vehicle treated, PBS-sensitized/challenged mice (PBS group); vehicle treated, OVA-sensitized/challenged mice (OVA group); and IMD-0354-treated, OVA-sensitized/challenged mice. The analyzed parameters included the absolute counts of Treg cells (Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+)), activated Teff cells (Foxp3(-)CD25(+)CD4(+)) and resting T cells (CD25(-)CD4(+)) in the mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs), lungs and peripheral blood. Moreover, lung histopathology was performed to evaluate lung inflammation. It was found that the absolute number of cells in all studied subsets was considerably increased in the MLNs and lungs of mice from OVA group as compared to PBS group. All of these effects were fully prevented by treatment with IMD-0354. Histopathological examination showed that treatment with IMD-0354 protected the lungs from OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation. Our results indicate that IMD-0354 exerts anti-asthmatic action, at least partially, by blocking the activation and clonal expansion of CD4(+) Teff cells in the MLNs, which, consequently, prevents infiltration of the lungs with activated CD4(+) Teff cells. The beneficial effects of IMD-0354 in a mouse model of asthma are not mediated through increased recruitment of Treg cells into the MLNs and lungs and/or local generation of inducible Treg cells. PMID:26868187

  7. Identification of cytochrome P450 enzymes critical for lung tumorigenesis by the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK): insights from a novel Cyp2abfgs-null mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Megaraj, Vandana; Wei, Yuan; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes encoded by the mouse Cyp2abfgs gene cluster are preferentially expressed in the respiratory tract. Previous studies have demonstrated that pulmonary P450-mediated bioactivation is necessary for lung tumorigenesis induced by the tobacco-specific lung procarcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and that CYP2A5 mediates a noteworthy fraction, but not all, of NNK bioactivation in the lung. The aim of this study was to determine whether other P450s encoded by the Cyp2abfgs gene cluster also play significant roles in NNK lung tumorigenesis. A novel Cyp2abfgs-null mouse was generated, in which all Cyp2a, 2b, 2g, 2f and 2s genes are deleted. The Cyp2abfgs-null mouse was viable, fertile and without discernible physiological abnormalities or compensatory increases in the expression of other P450s. NNK bioactivation in vitro and NNK-induced DNA adduction and lung tumorigenesis in vivo were determined for wild-type (WT) and Cyp2abfgs-null mice; the results were compared with previous findings from Cyp2a5-null mice. The Cyp2abfgs-null mice exhibited significantly lower rates of NNK bioactivation in lung and liver microsomes, compared with either WT or Cyp2a5-null mice. The levels of lung O(6)-methyl guanine DNA adduct were also substantially reduced in Cyp2abfgs-null mice, compared with either WT or Cyp2a5-null mice. Moreover, the Cyp2abfgs-null mice were largely resistant to NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis at both low (50mg/kg) and high (200mg/kg) NNK doses, in contrast to the WT or Cyp2a5-null mice. These results indicate for the first time that, collectively, the CYP2A, 2B, 2F, 2G, and 2S enzymes are indispensable for NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis.

  8. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation.

  9. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe.

    PubMed

    Happo, Mikko S; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Halinen, Arja I; Jalava, Pasi I; Pennanen, Arto S; Sillanpaa, Markus; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM(2.5-0.2)) and coarse (PM(10-2.5)) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interleukin [IL]-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM(2.5-0.2) correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO3(-), NH4(+)) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO4(2-) had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca2+, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM(2.5-0.2)-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM(10-2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM(2.5-0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects.

  10. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    El-Aidy, Waleed K; Ebeid, Ahmad A; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M; Muhammad, Ibrahim E; Abbas, Ayman T; Kamal, M A; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2015-11-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells. PMID:26587007

  11. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model

    PubMed Central

    El-Aidy, Waleed K.; Ebeid, Ahmad A.; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M.; Muhammad, Ibrahim E.; Abbas, Ayman T.; Kamal, M.A.; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2014-01-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells. PMID:26587007

  12. Evaluation of propolis, honey, and royal jelly in amelioration of peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    El-Aidy, Waleed K; Ebeid, Ahmad A; Sallam, Abd El-Raouf M; Muhammad, Ibrahim E; Abbas, Ayman T; Kamal, M A; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj

    2015-11-01

    Bee products have been used since ancient times to treat many diseases, including respiratory ailments. The present study aimed to examine the modulatory effect of honey, royal jelly, and propolis extract on peripheral blood leukocytes and lung inflammation in a mouse conalbumin-induced asthma model. The mice in group I were not sensitised or treated; they were kept as controls. The mice in group II were sensitised and challenged with conalbumin. Twenty-four hours after the first challenge with antigen, the mice in group III received 0.5 mg/kg of dexamethasone intraperitoneally per day for 18 consecutive days and kept as positive controls. The mice in groups IV, V, and VI received 650, 1000, and 30 mg/kg of honey, royal jelly, and propolis (aqueous and ethanolic extract), respectively, once per day for 18 consecutive days. Blood was collected from all of the mice for white blood cell differentiation, and the lungs were removed for histopathological studies. The groups treated with propolis extract exhibited considerable ameliorative effects against asthma, which might be explained by the flavonoids and phenolics found in propolis, which might have antioxidative effects. Otherwise, the sensitised and honey- or royal jelly-treated groups exhibited an increased incidence of asthma cascade events due to increased inflammatory cells. These results might be due to the immunostimulatory and vasodilatory effects of royal jelly and honey, which are antagonistic to bronchial asthma cases. Histopathological examination revealed that the sensitised treated propolis extract groups had significant decreases in inflammatory scores compared with other treatments and the sensitised untreated group. These results confirmed the previous data of peripheral blood cells.

  13. TCDD and a putative endogenous AhR ligand, ITE, elicit the same immediate changes in gene expression in mouse lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ellen C; Welle, Stephen L; Gasiewicz, Thomas A

    2010-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1'H-indolo-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5muM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible.

  14. Some perspectives on dietary inhibition of carcinogenesis: studies with curcumin and tea.

    PubMed

    Conney, A H; Lou, Y R; Xie, J G; Osawa, T; Newmark, H L; Liu, Y; Chang, R L; Huang, M T

    1997-11-01

    Topical application of curcumin inhibits chemically induced carcinogenesis on mouse skin, and oral administration of curcumin inhibits chemically induced oral, forestomach, duodenal, and colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin and other inhibitors of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase are thought to inhibit carcinogenesis by preventing the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites. In contrast to our expectation of a tumorigenic effect of arachidonic acid, we found that treatment of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-initiated mouse skin with very high doses of arachidonic acid twice daily, 5 days a week for 26 weeks, failed to result in tumors. We considered the possibility that some of the cancer chemopreventive effects of curcumin may be related to an effect of this compound on cellular differentiation, and we investigated the effect of curcumin on differentiation in the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cell model system. Although curcumin alone had little or no effect on cellular differentiation, when it was combined with all-trans retinoic acid or 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 a synergistic effect was observed. It is possible that many dietary chemicals in fruits, vegetables, and other edible plants can prevent cancer by synergizing with endogenously produced stimulators of differentiation such as all-trans retinoic acid, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and butyrate. More research is needed to test this hypothesis. Administration of green or black tea inhibits carcinogenesis in several animal models, and tumor growth is also inhibited. Several examples were presented of chemopreventive agents that inhibit carcinogenesis in one animal model but enhance carcinogenesis in a different animal model. Greater efforts should be made to understand mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention and to determine whether a potential chemopreventive agent is useful in many experimental settings or whether it is useful in only a limited number of experimental settings.

  15. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  16. [Genetic factors in gastric carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ohgaki, H

    1983-02-01

    Genetic control of susceptibility of rats to gastro-carcinogenesis by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was studied in susceptible ACI strain rats, resistant Buffalo strain rats, and their F1 and F2 offsprings. Rats were given MNNG at a concentration of 83 micrograms/ml in drinking water for 32 weeks and sacrificed on week 72. The incidence of gastric adenocarcinomas in F1 was as low as that in Buffalo rats. The results showed that susceptibility to MNNG was controlled genetically and that the resistance of Buffalo strain rats was autosomal dominant. To clarify the mechanisms which determine susceptibility to MNNG, some biochemical parameters such as pH of gastric juice, glutathione content in the gastric mucosa and the binding of MNNG to DNA, were analysed. No difference was observed between ACI and Buffalo strains in regard to the events leading to the binding of MNNG to DNA.

  17. Endostatin enhances antitumor effect of tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cell therapy in mouse xenograft model of lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Liu, Xiaolin; Xie, Qi; Chen, Guoling; Li, Xingyu; Jia, Yanrui; Yin, Beibei; Qu, Xun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antitumor effect of endostatin combined with tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cell (DC)-T cell therapy on lung cancer. Methods Transplanted Lewis lung cancer (LLC) models of C57BL/6 mice were established by subcutaneous injection of LLC cells in left extremity axillary. Tumor antigen-pulsed DC-T cells from spleen cells and bone of mice were cultured in vitro. Tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into three groups, including DC-T+endostatin group, DC-T group, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. Microvessel density (MVD) of tumor tissue in tumor-bearing mice was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were determined by Western blotting and IHC staining. The proportions of CD8+ T cells, mature dendritic cells (mDC), tumor-associated macrophages [TAM (M1/M2)], and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in suspended cells of tumor tissue were determined by flow cytometry. The expressions of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-17, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in suspended cells of tumor tissue were detected by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Results DC-T cells combined with endostatin remarkably suppressed tumor growth. MVD of mice in DC-T+endostatin group was significantly lower than that of the control group and DC-T monotherapy group. The expressions of VEGF, IL-6 and IL-17 in tumors were markedly decreased, but IFN-γ and HIF-1α increased after treating with DC-T cells combined with endostatin, compared to control group and DC-T group. In the DC-T+endostatin group, the proportions of MDSC and TAM (M2 type) were significantly decreased, mDC and TAM (M1 type) were up-regulated, and CD8+ T cells were recruited to infiltrate tumors, in contrast to PBS control and DC-T monotherapy. DC-T cells combined with endostatin potently reduced the expressions of IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β and

  18. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toru; Sunamura, Makoto; Horii, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies. Intensive investigation of molecular pathogenesis might lead to identifying useful molecules for diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma harbors complicated aberrations of alleles including losses of 1p, 6q, 9p, 12q, 17p, 18q, and 21q, and gains of 8q and 20q. Pancreatic cancer is usually initiated by mutation of KRAS and aberrant expression of SHH. Overexpression of AURKA mapping on 20q13.2 may significantly enhance overt tumorigenesity. Aberrations of tumor suppressor genes synergistically accelerate progression of the carcinogenic pathway through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma. Abrogation of CDKN2A occurs in low-grade/early PanIN, whereas aberrations of TP53 and SMAD4 occur in high-grade/late PanIN. SMAD4 may play suppressive roles in tumorigenesis by inhibition of angiogenesis. Loss of 18q precedes SMAD4 inactivation, and restoration of chromosome 18 in pancreatic cancer cells results in tumor suppressive phenotypes regardless of SMAD4 status, indicating the possible existence of a tumor suppressor gene(s) other than SMAD4 on 18q. DUSP6 at 12q21-q22 is frequently abrogated by loss of expression in invasive ductal adenocarcinomas despite fairly preserved expression in PanIN, which suggests that DUSP6 works as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Restoration of chromosome 12 also suppresses growths of pancreatic cancer cells despite the recovery of expression of DUSP6; the existence of yet another tumor suppressor gene on 12q is strongly suggested. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis will likely provide novel clues for preventing, detecting, and ultimately curing this life-threatening disease. PMID:16367914

  19. The effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 deficiency on pulmonary surfactant in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Cory M; Cybulskie, Candice; Milos, Scott; Zuo, Yi Y; McCaig, Lynda A; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2016-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by arterial hypoxemia accompanied by severe inflammation and alterations to the pulmonary surfactant system. Published data has demonstrated a protective effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (Mmp3) deficiency against the inflammatory response associated with ARDS; however, the effect of Mmp3 on physiologic parameters and alterations to surfactant have not been previously studied. It was hypothesized that Mmp3 deficient (Mmp3(-/-)) mice would be protected against lung dysfunction associated with ARDS and maintain a functional pulmonary surfactant system. Wild type (WT) and Mmp3(-/-) mice were subjected to acid-aspiration followed by mechanical ventilation. Mmp3(-/-) mice maintained higher arterial oxygenation compared with WT mice at the completion of ventilation. Significant increase in functional large aggregate surfactant forms were observed in Mmp3(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. These findings further support a role of Mmp3 as an attractive therapeutic target for drug development in the setting of ARDS.

  20. Studies of styrene, styrene oxide and 4-hydroxystyrene toxicity in CYP2F2 knockout and CYP2F1 humanized mice support lack of human relevance for mouse lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Cruzan, G; Bus, J; Hotchkiss, J; Sura, R; Moore, C; Yost, G; Banton, M; Sarang, S

    2013-06-01

    Styrene (S) is lung tumorigenic in mice but not in rats. S and its alkene-oxidized metabolite styrene oxide (SO) were not lung toxic in CYP2F2(-/-) [knockout] mice, indicating S-induced mouse lung tumors are mediated through mouse-specific CYP2F2-generated ring-oxidized metabolite(s) in lung bronchioles. The human relevance of the CYP2F MOA was assessed by insertion of a human CYP2F1, 2A13, 2B6 transgene into CYP2F2(-/-) mice; CYP2F1 expression and activity were confirmed in the transgenic (TG) mice. No evidence of cytotoxicity or increased cell proliferation (BrdU labeling) was seen in TG mice treated with either S or SO (200mg/kg/day ip for 5days). In contrast to S and SO, 4HS (105mg/kg/day ip for 5days) increased BrdU labeling 5-10-fold in WT mice, <3-fold increase in KO mice and 2-4-fold in TG mice. The limited response of 4HS in KO and TG mice may result from intrinsic toxicity or from further metabolism; regardless of the MOA, these findings indicate that the CYP2F-mediated tumorigenic MOA in WT mice is not operative for S, SO, or for 4HS putatively derived from metabolism of S by CYP2F1 in humans, and thus S-induced mouse lung tumors are unlikely to be relevant to human risk.

  1. Subchronic Inhalation of Soluble Manganese Induces Expression of Hypoxia-associated Angiogenic Genes in Adult Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Bredow, Sebastian; Falgout, Melanie M.; March, Thomas H.; Yingling, Christin M.; Malkoski, Stephen P.; Aden, James; Bedrick, Edward J.; Lewis, Johnnye L.; Divine, Kevin K.

    2007-01-01

    Although the lung constitutes the major exposure route for airborne manganese (Mn), little is known about the potential pulmonary effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Transition metals can mimic a hypoxia-like response, activating the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor family. Through binding to the hypoxia-response element (HRE) these factors regulate expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Increases in VEGF, an important biomarker of angiogenesis, have been linked to respiratory diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to evaluate pulmonary hypoxia-associated angiogenic gene expression in response to exposure of soluble Mn(II) and to assess the genes' role as intermediaries of potential pulmonary Mn toxicity. In vitro, 0.25 mM Mn(II) altered morphology and slowed the growth of human pulmonary epithelial cell lines. Acute doses between 0.05 and 1 mM stimulated VEGF promoter activity up to 3.7-fold in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the HRE within the promoter had no effect on Mn(II)-induced VEGF expression but decreased cobalt [Co(II)]-induced activity 2-fold, suggesting that HIF-1 may not be involved in Mn(II)-induced VEGF gene transcription. Nose-only inhalation to 2 mg Mn(II)/m3 for 5 days at 6h/day produced no significant pulmonary inflammation but induced a 2-fold increase in pulmonary VEGF mRNA levels in adult mice and significantly altered expression of genes associated with murine angiogenesis. These findings suggest that even short-term exposures to soluble, occupationally relevant Mn(II) concentrations may alter pulmonary gene expression in pathways that ultimately could affect the lungs' susceptibility to respiratory disease. PMID:17467022

  2. Mouse lung-adapted mutation of E190G in hemagglutinin from H5N1 influenza virus contributes to attenuation in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengfei; Hu, Yi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Sen; Li, Yuchang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yinhui; Zhu, Qingyu; Jiang, Tao; Li, Jing; Qin, Chengfeng

    2015-11-01

    The highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus is one of the greatest influenza pandemic threats since 2003. The association of the receptor binding domain (RBD) with the virulence of influenza virus is rarely addressed, particularly of H5N1 influenza viruses. In this study, BALB/c mice were intranasally infected with A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (VN1194, H5N1). The mouse lung-adapted variants were isolated and the mutation of E190G (H3 numbering) in the RBD was recognized. The recombinant virus, rVN-E190G carrying E190G in hemagglutinin (HA) was designed and rescued using reverse genetics techniques. The receptor binding activity, growth curve and pathogenicity in mice of the rVN-E190G were investigated. Results demonstrated that rVN-E190G virus increased the binding avidity to α2,6 SA (sialic acid) and reduced the affinity to α2,3 SA, meanwhile weakened the viral replication in vitro. Moreover, the virulence assessment demonstrated that rVN-E190G was attenuated in mice. These results indicated that the mutation E190G in HA decreases H5N1 viral replication in vitro and significantly attenuates virulence in vivo. These findings identify one of the determinants in RBD which can be associated with H5N1 virulence in mice.

  3. High-mobility group nucleosome-binding domain 2 protein inhibits the invasion of Klebsiella pneumoniae into mouse lungs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuang; Ren, Laibin; Li, Heng; Shen, Xiaofei; Yang, Xiaolong; Li, Na; Wang, Xinyuan; Guo, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Ning

    2015-07-01

    Since bacterial invasion into host cells is a critical step in the infection process and the predominance of multiple-antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae strains, using molecular agents to interfere with K. pneumoniae invasion is an attractive approach for the prevention of infection and suppress the immune inflammatory response. In previous studies by our group, high-mobility group nucleosome-binding domain 2 (HMGN2) protein was shown to exhibit anti-bacterial activity in vitro. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of HMGN2 protein on the invasion of K. pneumoniae 03183 in vivo. The results showed that pre-treatment with 128 µg/ml HMGN2 significantly reduced K. pneumoniae 03183 invasion into mouse lungs and increased the mRNA expression of CXCL1 and LCN2 within 2 h. Immunohistochemical staining showed that F-actin expression was significantly decreased, and fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis further demonstrated that HMGN2 significantly blocked K. pneumoniae 03183-induced actin polymerization. These changes implied that HMGN2 may provide protection against K. pneumoniae 03183 infection in vivo.

  4. Synthesis of stereospecifically deuterated 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) iastereomers and metabolism by A/J mouse lung microsomes and cytochrome p450 2A5.

    PubMed

    Jalas, John R; Hecht, Stephen S

    2003-06-01

    The tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a lung carcinogen in mice and rats and is a putative human lung carcinogen. NNK undergoes cytochrome p450-mediated metabolic activation to DNA-binding intermediates but is also extensively reduced to 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) in vivo. Because NNAL is also tumorigenic, the carcinogenicity of NNK may actually be governed by the metabolic activation of NNAL, rather than direct activation of NNK. Metabolism of NNK and NNAL at the 4-position generates the same critical DNA lesion, O(6)-methylguanine, the levels of which are correlated to tumorigenicity in the A/J mouse model. In an effort to better understand the bioactivation of NNAL and the effect of carbinol-carbon stereochemistry on prochiral selectivity at the 4-position, (R)- and (S)-NNAL, along with the stereospecifically 4-deuterated diastereomers (1R,4R)-[4-(2)H(1)]NNAL, (1R,4S)-[4-(2)H(1)]NNAL, (1S,4R)-[4-(2)H(1)]NNAL, and (1S,4S)-[4-(2)H(1)]NNAL, were synthesized. The in vitro metabolism of these compounds was investigated using A/J mouse lung microsomes and Spodoptera frugiperda-expressed mouse cytochrome p450 2A5. Carbinol-carbon stereochemistry did not appreciably influence stereoselectivity at the 4-position in the metabolism of these compounds by mouse lung microsomes or p450 2A5 but did influence the regiochemistry of metabolism. The ratio of 4- to N-methyl hydroxylation was approximately 1:1 for the A/J mouse lung microsome-mediated metabolism of all substrates, but this ratio was higher for (1S) substrates than for their (1R) counterparts when p450 2A5 was used. Interestingly, p450 2A5 converted substrates with (1S) stereochemistry to the respective N-oxides, but this metabolite was not formed from substrates with (1R) stereochemistry. Furthermore, p450 2A5 catalyzed the formation of NNK from (1S) substrates at significantly greater maximal rates than from (1R) substrates. The

  5. Folate and carcinogenesis-mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large and growing body of both pre-clinical and clinical studies pertaining to colorectal neoplasms constitutes the most compelling evidence for the protective effect of folate against the development of cancer, although evidence is also accruing in this regard for cancers of the breast, lung, pan...

  6. Overexpression of RAR{beta}4 and p53 in murine lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, M.; Bradley, W.E.C.

    1994-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in western societies. There are four major histological types: small cell, epidemoid carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma, the adenocarcinoma being the only type generally found in the mouse. Earlier studies have shown that the transgenes coding for isoform 4 of the retinoic acid receptor {beta} and a mutant form of the tumor suppressor p53 are involved in the development of lung cancer. These results led us to ask whether the two genes may contribute to lung carcinogenesis in a synergistic manner. Mice overexpressing a RAR{beta}4-like isoform transgene (which causes very marked hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells) and mutated p53 transgene were crossed and progeny were analyzed after treatment with the lung carcinogen urethane. The results to date suggest that in the double transgenic mice, lung tumor kinetics do not result from cooperation between those transgenes since the effect of the transgenes was additive rather than synergistic. We conclude that RAR{beta}4 and p53 are involved in different tumorigenic pathways.

  7. Gene regulation mediated by microRNAs in response to green tea polyphenol EGCG in mouse lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been demonstrated to inhibit cancer in experimental studies through its antioxidant activity and modulations on cellular functions by binding specific proteins. We demonstrated previously that EGCG upregulates the expression of microRNA (i.e. miR-210) by binding HIF-1α, resulting in reduced cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. However, the binding affinities of EGCG to HIF-1α and many other targets are higher than the EGCG plasma peak level in experimental animals administered with high dose of EGCG, raising a concern whether the microRNA regulation by HIF-1α is involved in the anti-cancer activity of EGCG in vivo. Results We employed functional genomic approaches to elucidate the role of microRNA in the EGCG inhibition of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumors in A/J mice. By analysing the microRNA profiles, we found modest changes in the expression levels of 21 microRNAs. By correlating these 21 microRNAs with the mRNA expression profiles using the computation methods, we identified 26 potential targeted genes of the 21 microRNAs. Further exploration using pathway analysis revealed that the most impacted pathways of EGCG treatment are the regulatory networks associated to AKT, NF-κB, MAP kinases, and cell cycle, and the identified miRNA targets are involved in the networks of AKT, MAP kinases and cell cycle regulation Conclusions These results demonstrate that the miRNA-mediated regulation is actively involved in the major aspects of the anti-cancer activity of EGCG in vivo. PMID:25559244

  8. Caffeic acid directly targets ERK1/2 to attenuate solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ge; Fu, Yang; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Zhu, Feng; Yao, Ke; Li, Haitao; Chen, Hanyong; Li, Wei; Lim, Do Young; Sheng, Yuqiao; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is a well-known phenolic phytochemical present in coffee and reportedly has anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and targeted proteins involved in the suppression of carcinogenesis by caffeic acid are not fully understood. In this study, we report that caffeic acid significantly inhibits colony formation of human skin cancer cells and EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of HaCaT cells dose-dependently. Caffeic acid topically applied to dorsal mouse skin significantly suppressed tumor incidence and volume in a solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis mouse model. A substantial reduction of phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was observed in mice treated with caffeic acid either before or after solar UV exposure. Caffeic acid directly interacted with ERK1/2 and inhibited ERK1/2 activities in vitro. Importantly, we resolved the co-crystal structure of ERK2 complexed with caffeic acid. Caffeic acid interacted directly with ERK2 at amino acid residues Q105, D106 and M108. Moreover, A431 cells expressing knockdown of ERK2 lost sensitivity to caffeic acid in a skin cancer xenograft mouse model. Taken together, our results suggest that caffeic acid exerts chemopreventive activity against solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by targeting ERK1 and 2. PMID:25104643

  9. Differential modulation of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene transplacental carcinogenesis: Maternal diets rich in indole-3-carbinol versus sulforaphane

    SciTech Connect

    Shorey, Lyndsey E.; Madeen, Erin P.; Atwell, Lauren L.; Ho, Emily; Löhr, Christiane V.; Pereira, Clifford B.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Williams, David E.

    2013-07-01

    Cruciferous vegetable components have been documented to exhibit anticancer properties. Targets of action span multiple mechanisms deregulated during cancer progression, ranging from altered carcinogen metabolism to the restoration of epigenetic machinery. Furthermore, the developing fetus is highly susceptible to changes in nutritional status and to environmental toxicants. Thus, we have exploited a mouse model of transplacental carcinogenesis to assess the impact of maternal dietary supplementation on cancer risk in offspring. In this study, transplacental and lactational exposure to a maternal dose of 15 mg/Kg B.W. of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) resulted in significant morbidity of offspring due to an aggressive T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. As in previous studies, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, feed to the dam at 100, 500 or 1000 ppm), derived from cruciferous vegetables, dose-dependently reduced lung tumor multiplicity and also increased offspring survival. Brussels sprout and broccoli sprout powders, selected for their relative abundance of I3C and the bioactive component sulforaphane (SFN), respectively, surprisingly enhanced DBC-induced morbidity and tumorigenesis when incorporated into the maternal diet at 10% wt/wt. Purified SFN, incorporated in the maternal diet at 400 ppm, also decreased the latency of DBC-dependent morbidity. Interestingly, I3C abrogated the effect of SFN when the two purified compounds were administered in equimolar combination (500 ppm I3C and 600 ppm SFN). SFN metabolites measured in the plasma of neonates positively correlated with exposure levels via the maternal diet but not with offspring mortality. These findings provide justification for further study of the safety and bioactivity of cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals at supplemental concentrations during the perinatal period. - Highlights: • Dietary supplementation may modulate cancer risk in a mouse model of lymphoma. • Cruciferous vegetables may not contain sufficient I3C

  10. MicroRNA expression in the aging mouse thymus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yaqiong; Li, Daotong; Ouyang, Dan; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yuan; Ma, Yongjiang; Li, Yugu

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the process of aging in many model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, and in many organs, such as the mouse lung and human epididymis. However, the role of miRNAs in the thymus tissues of the aging mouse remains unclear. To address this question, we investigated the miRNA expression profiles in the thymuses of 1-, 10- and 19-month-old mice using miRNA array and qRT-PCR assays. A total of 223 mouse miRNAs were screened, and the expression levels of those miRNAs exhibited gradual increases and decreases over the course of thymus aging. Fifty miRNAs in the 10-month-old thymus and 81 miRNAs in the 19-month-old thymus were defined as differentially expressed miRNAs (p<0.05) in comparison with their levels in the 1-month-old mouse, and approximately one-third of these miRNAs were grouped within 11 miRNA clusters. Each miRNA cluster contained 2 to 5 miRNA genes, and most of the cluster members displayed similar expression patterns, being either increased or decreased. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software and the IPA database were used to analyze the 12 miRNAs that exhibited significant expression changes, revealing that as many as 15 pathways may be involved. Thus, our current study determined the expression profiles of miRNAs in the mouse thymus during the process of aging. The results suggested that these miRNAs could become meaningful biomarkers for studying thymus aging and that the aging-related alternations in miRNA expression may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, development and carcinogenesis/tumorigenesis.

  11. Strain-Specific Variation in Murine Natural Killer Gene Complex Contributes to Differences in Immunosurveillance for Urethane-Induced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kreisel, Daniel; Gelman, Andrew E.; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Lin, Xue; Vikis, Haris G.; White, J. Michael; Toth, Kelsey A.; Deshpande, Charuhas; Carreno, Beatriz M.; You, Ming; Taffner, Samantha M.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Bui, Jack D.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Krupnick, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and results from a complex interaction between carcinogen exposure and inherent susceptibility. Despite its prevalence genetic factors that predispose to the development of lung cancer remain elusive. Inbred mouse models offer a unique and clinically relevant tool to study genetic factors that contribute to lung carcinogenesis due to the development of tumors that resemble human adenocarcinoma and broad strain-specific variation in cancer incidence after carcinogen administration. Here we set out to investigate whether strain-specific variability in tumor immunosurveillance contributes to differences in lung cancer. Using bone marrow transplantation we determined that hematopoietic cells from lung cancer-resistant mice could significantly impede the development of cancer in a susceptible strain. Furthermore, we show that this is not due to differences in tumor-promoting inflammatory changes or variability in immunosurveillance by the adaptive immune system, but results from strain-specific differences in natural killer cell (NK) cytotoxicity. Using a newly discovered congenic strain of mice we demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for strain-specific polymorphisms in the natural killer gene complex (NKC) in immunosurveillance for carcinogen-induced lung cancer. Since polymorphisms in the NKC are highly prevalent in man, our data may explain why certain individuals without obvious risk factors develop lung cancer while others remain resistant to the disease despite heavy environmental carcinogen exposure. PMID:22751136

  12. Metal carcinogenesis in total joint arthroplasty. Animal models.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C G; Sunderman, F W

    1996-08-01

    As early as 1956, laboratory investigations into the carcinogenicity of modern dental and orthopaedic alloys were undertaken. Such studies were prompted by the observation that workers, particularly in nickel and chromate refining, had increased risks of nasal and lung tumors. For the past 25 years, sporadic case reports have documented the development of malignant neoplasms proximate to an orthopaedic implant. Although the results of epidemiologic studies have not shown an excessive number of tumors in patients receiving stainless steel or superalloy implants, the possibility of carcinogenesis, given the corrosive environment in which metal implants exist, has prompted ongoing laboratory studies. Leaching of metal ions from implants, the synovial processing of metallic wear debris, and the effects of exposure to intraarticular metal particles have been the subjects of numerous laboratory studies. The results of these studies are summarized and recommended parameters for future laboratory investigations are given. PMID:8769340

  13. Broad-spectrum antimicrobial efficacy of peptide A3-APO in mouse models of multidrug-resistant wound and lung infections cannot be explained by in vitro activity against the pathogens involved.

    PubMed

    Ostorhazi, Eszter; Holub, Marianna Csilla; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Harmos, Ferenc; Cassone, Marco; Wade, John D; Otvos, Laszlo

    2011-05-01

    Although the designer proline-rich antimicrobial peptide A3-APO has only modest activity against Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii in vitro, in mouse models of systemic and wound infections it shows superior efficacy compared with conventional antibiotics. In this study, the efficacy of A3-APO in several additional mouse models was investigated, including Staphylococcus aureus wound infection, mixed Klebsiella pneumoniae-A. baumannii-Proteus mirabilis wound infection and K. pneumoniae lung infection, mimicking blast wound infections, foot ulcers and ventilator-induced nosocomial infections, respectively. Whilst the peptide practically did not kill the strains in vitro, when administered intramuscularly or as an aerosol it significantly improved mouse survival and reduced bacterial counts at the infection site and in blood. In the lung infection study, the blood bacterial counts following A3-APO treatment were as low as after treatment with colistin and were lower than after treatment with imipenem or amikacin. The wounds of treated animals, unlike their untreated counterparts, lacked pus and signs of inflammation. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, A3-APO upregulated the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 by four- to six-fold. One of the mechanisms mediating the in vivo protective effects might be the prevention of inflammation around bacterial infiltration.

  14. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Lam, Stephen; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor. Former smokers are at a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer compared with lifetime never smokers. Chemoprevention refers to the use of specific agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the process of carcinogenesis. This article reviews the major agents that have been studied for chemoprevention. Methods: Articles of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention trials were reviewed and summarized to obtain recommendations. Results: None of the phase 3 trials with the agents β-carotene, retinol, 13-cis-retinoic acid, α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, or selenium has demonstrated beneficial and reproducible results. To facilitate the evaluation of promising agents and to lessen the need for a large sample size, extensive time commitment, and expense, surrogate end point biomarker trials are being conducted to assist in identifying the most promising agents for later-stage chemoprevention trials. With the understanding of important cellular signaling pathways and the expansion of potentially important targets, agents (many of which target inflammation and the arachidonic acid pathway) are being developed and tested which may prevent or reverse lung carcinogenesis. Conclusions: By integrating biologic knowledge, additional early-phase trials can be performed in a reasonable time frame. The future of lung cancer chemoprevention should entail the evaluation of single agents or combinations that target various pathways while working toward identification and validation of intermediate end points. PMID:23649449

  15. Decorin deficiency promotes hepatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Zsolt; Kovalszky, Ilona; Fullár, Alexandra; Kiss, Katalin; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Iozzo, Renato V.; Baghy, Kornélia

    2014-01-01

    experimental carcinogenesis by providing an environment devoid of this potent pan-RTK inhibitor. Thus, our results support future utilization of decorin as an antitumor agent in liver cancer. PMID:24361483

  16. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of "what dose does?" in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of "what dose is?" Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

  17. Radiation carcinogenesis: lessons from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Williams, D

    2008-12-01

    Radiation is a carcinogen, interacting with DNA to produce a range of mutations. Irradiated cells also show genomic instability, as do adjacent non-irradiated cells (the bystander effect); the importance to carcinogenesis remains to be established. Current knowledge of radiation effects is largely dependent on evidence from exposure to atomic bomb whole body radiation, leading to increases in a wide range of malignancies. In contrast, millions of people were exposed to radioactive isotopes in the fallout from the Chernobyl accident, within the first 20 years there was a large increase in thyroid carcinoma incidence and a possible radiation-related increase in breast cancer, but as yet there is no general increase in malignancies. The increase in thyroid carcinoma, attributable to the very large amounts of iodine 131 released, was first noticed in children with a strong relationship between young age at exposure and risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The extent of the increase, the reasons for the relationship to age at exposure, the reduction in attributable fraction with increasing latency and the role of environmental factors are discussed. The large number of radiation-induced PTCs has allowed new observations. The subtype and molecular findings change with latency; most early cases were solid PTCs with RET-PTC3 rearrangements, later cases were classical PTCs with RET-PTC1 rearrangements. Small numbers of many other RET rearrangements have occurred in 'Chernobyl' PTCs, and also rearrangement of BRAF. Five of the N-terminal genes found in papillary carcinoma rearrangements are also involved in rearrangements in hematological malignancies; three are putative tumor suppressor genes, and two are further genes fused to RET in PTCs. Radiation causes double-strand breaks; the rearrangements common in these radiation-induced tumors reflect their etiology. It is suggested that oncogenic rearrangements may commonly involve both a tumor-suppressor gene

  18. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  19. Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis—A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rivina, Leena; Schiestl, Robert

    2012-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:23271302

  20. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, assessing cancer risk, and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from research using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as interventions with molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy. PMID:21772845

  1. Quantitative trait locus mapping of susceptibilities to butylated hydroxytoluene-induced lung tumor promotion and pulmonary inflammation in CXB mice.

    PubMed

    Malkinson, Alvin M; Radcliffe, Richard A; Bauer, Alison K

    2002-03-01

    We have reported previously [Bauer,A.K. et al. (2001) Exp. Lung Res., 27, 197-216] that the 13 CXB recombinant inbred mouse strains derived from BALB/cByJ and C57BL/6J progenitors vary in their responsiveness to both lung tumor promotion and pulmonary inflammation induced by chronic administration of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Herein we have applied these data, along with markers known to be polymorphic among these strains, to conduct linkage analysis of these susceptibilities. This enabled us to assign provisional quantitative trait loci (QTL) that govern these strain variations in susceptibility as a genetic approach to assessing the influence of inflammation on tumorigenesis. A Chr 15 (39.1-55.6 cM) QTL regulated susceptibility to two-stage carcinogenesis, a protocol in which chronic BHT exposure followed a single urethane injection; a similar QTL on Chr 15 (46.7-61.7 cM) influenced BHT induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. A Chr 18 (37-41 cM) QTL modulated both the number of lung tumors induced by 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) injection with subsequent treatment with BHT as well as BHT-induced ingress of macrophages into airways. Other chromosomal sites that affected either the degree of BHT-elicited macrophage infiltration, Chr 9 (48-61 cM), or COX-2 induction, Chr 10 (59-65 cM), were reported to influence susceptibility to lung tumorigenesis in other strains. The fact that common chromosomal locations regulate both inflammation and carcinogenesis suggests a pathogenic role of inflammatory mediators in tumor development that may be exploited for chemoprevention of lung cancer.

  2. Specific single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies to angiotensin II AT(2) receptor: evaluation of the angiotensin II receptor expression in normal and tumor-bearing mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masaaki; Yan, Heping; Zegarra-Moro, Ofelia; Edl, Jennifer; Oursler, Stephanie; Chard-Bergstrom, Cindy; Andrews, Gordon; Kanehira, Tsutomu; Takekoshi, Susumu; Mernaugh, Ray

    2008-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism by which angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)) regulates carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, we have newly developed anti-AT(2) single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies using a rodent phage-displayed recombinant antibody library with various peptide fragments of the receptor protein, and investigated the expression of the AT(2) receptor protein. The specificity of the antibodies was verified using AT(2) over-expressing COS-7 cells and AT(2) naturally expressing PC12W cells. In control wild type mouse lung, a stronger immunoreactivity was observed in bronchial epithelial cells. A moderate immunoreactivity was detected in pulmonary vascular walls and vascular endothelial cells. In the lungs possessing tobacco-specific nitrosamine (NNK)-induced tumors, significantly increased AT(2) and AT(1 )immunostaining was observed in adenomatous lesions. These data suggest that the increase in both receptors' expression in the alveolar epithelial cells may be accompanied with the onset of NNK-induced tumorigenesis and hence play important roles in lung tumorigenesis.

  3. Specific Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibodies to Angiotensin II AT2 Receptor: Evaluation of the Angiotensin II Receptor Expression in Normal and Tumor-bearing Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masaaki; Yan, Heping; Zegarra-Moro, Ofelia; Edl, Jennifer; Oursler, Stephanie; Chard-Bergstrom, Cindy; Andrews, Gordon; Kanehira, Tsutomu; Takekoshi, Susumu; Mernaugh, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Summary To gain insight into the mechanism by which angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) regulates carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, we have newly developed anti-AT2 single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies using a rodent phage-displayed recombinant antibody library with various peptide fragments of the receptor protein, and investigated the expression of the AT2 receptor protein. The specificity of the antibodies was verified using AT2 over-expressing COS-7 cells and AT2 naturally expressing PC12W cells. In control wild type mouse lung, a stronger immunoreactivity was observed in bronchial epithelial cells. A moderate immunoreactivity was detected in pulmonary vascular walls and vascular endothelial cells. In the lungs possessing tobacco-specific nitrosamine (NNK)-induced tumors, significantly increased AT2 and AT1 immunostaining was observed in adenomatous lesions. These data suggest that the increase in both receptors' expression in the alveolar epithelial cells may be accompanied with the onset of NNK-induced tumorigenesis and hence play important roles in lung tumorigenesis. PMID:18438736

  4. Dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acid-containing fish oil suppresses F2-isoprostanes but enhances inflammatory cytokine response in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huiyong; Liu, Wei; Goleniewska, Kasia; Porter, Ned A; Morrow, Jason D; Peebles, R Stokes

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological and clinical evidence has suggested that increased dietary intake of fish oil containing omega-3 fatty acids including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may be associated with a reduced risk of asthma. However, interventional studies on these effects have been equivocal and controversial. Free radical oxidation products of lipids and cyclooxygenases-derived prostaglandins are believed to play an important role in asthma, and fish oil supplementation may modulate the levels of these critical lipid mediators. We employed a murine model of allergic inflammation produced by sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) to study the effects of fish oil supplementation on airway inflammation. Our studies demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids were dose dependently incorporated into mouse lung tissue after dietary supplementation. We examined the oxidative stress status by measuring the levels of isoprostanes (IsoPs), the gold standard for oxidative stress in vivo. OVA challenge caused significant increase of F(2)-IsoPs in mouse lung, suggesting an elevated level of oxidative stress. Compared to the control group, fish oil supplementation led to a significant reduction of F(2)-IsoP (from arachidonic acid) with a concomitant increase of F(3)-IsoPs (from EPA) and F(4)-IsoPs (from DHA). Surprisingly, however, fish oil supplementation enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-5 and IL-13. Furthermore, fish oil supplementation suppressed the production of pulmonary protective PGE(2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) while the level of urinary metabolites of the PGE(2) was increased. Our data suggest that augmented lung inflammation after fish oil supplementation may be due to the reduction of PGE(2) production in the lung and these dichotomous results bring into question the role of fish oil supplementation in the treatment of asthma.

  5. A Quadruple Knockout of lasIR and rhlIR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 That Retains Wild-Type Twitching Motility Has Equivalent Infectivity and Persistence to PAO1 in a Mouse Model of Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lazenby, James J.; Griffin, Phoebe E.; Kyd, Jennelle; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Cooley, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been widely reported that quorum-sensing incapable strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are less virulent than wild type strains. However, quorum sensing mutants of P. aeruginosa have been shown to develop other spontaneous mutations under prolonged culture conditions, and one of the phenotypes of P. aeruginosa that is frequently affected by this phenomenon is type IV pili-dependent motility, referred to as twitching motility. As twitching motility has been reported to be important for adhesion and colonisation, we aimed to generate a quorum-sensing knockout for which the heritage was recorded and the virulence factor production in areas unrelated to quorum sensing was known to be intact. We created a lasIRrhlIR quadruple knockout in PAO1 using a published technique that allows for the deletion of antibiotic resistance cartridges following mutagenesis, to create an unmarked QS knockout of PAO1, thereby avoiding the need for use of antibiotics in culturing, which can have subtle effects on bacterial phenotype. We phenotyped this mutant demonstrating that it produced reduced levels of protease and elastase, barely detectable levels of pyoverdin and undetectable levels of the quorum sensing signal molecules N-3-oxododecanoly-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl homoserine lactone, but retained full twitching motility. We then used a mouse model of acute lung infection with P. aeruginosa to demonstrate that the lasIRrhlIR knockout strain showed equal persistence to wild type parental PAO1, induced equal or greater neutrophil infiltration to the lungs, and induced similar levels of expression of inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and similar antibody responses, both in terms of magnitude and isotype. Our results suggest, in contrast to previous reports, that lack of quorum sensing alone does not significantly affect the immunogenicity, infectiveness and persistence of P. aeruginosa in a mouse model of acute lung infection. PMID:23593362

  6. Chemoprevention of dibenzo[a,l]pyrene transplacental carcinogenesis in mice born to mothers administered green tea: primary role of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Castro, David J; Yu, Zhen; Löhr, Christiane V; Pereira, Clifford B; Giovanini, Jack N; Fischer, Kay A; Orner, Gayle A; Dashwood, Roderick H; Williams, David E

    2008-08-01

    Our laboratory recently developed a mouse model of transplacental induction of lymphoma, lung and liver cancer by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP). Pregnant B6129SF1 females, bred to 129S1/SvIm males, were treated on day 17 of gestation with an oral dose of 15 mg/kg DBP. Beginning on day 0 of gestation, dams were given (ad lib) buffered water, 0.5% green tea, 0.5% decaffeinated green tea, caffeine or epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) (both at equivalent concentrations found in tea). The concentration of the teas (and corresponding caffeine and EGCG) was increased to 1.0% upon entering the second trimester, 1.5% at onset of the third trimester and continued at 1.5% until pups were weaned at 21 days of age. Offspring were raised with normal drinking water and AIN93G diet. Beginning at 2 months of age, offspring experienced significant mortalities due to an aggressive T-cell lymphoma as seen in our previous studies. Ingestion of caffeinated, but not decaffeinated, green tea provided modest but significant protection (P = 0.03) against mortality. Caffeine provided a more robust (P = 0.006) protection, but EGCG was without effect. Offspring also developed DBP-dependent lung adenomas. All treatments significantly reduced lung tumor multiplicity relative to controls (P < 0.02). EGCG was most effective at decreasing tumor burden (P = 0.005) by on average over 40% compared with controls. Induction of Cytochrome P450 (Cyp)1b1 in maternal liver may reduce bioavailability of DBP to the fetus as a mechanism of chemoprevention. This is the first demonstration that maternal ingestion of green tea, during pregnancy and nursing, provides protection against transplacental carcinogenesis.

  7. Lineage fate of ductular reactions in liver injury and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jörs, Simone; Jeliazkova, Petia; Ringelhan, Marc; Thalhammer, Julian; Dürl, Stephanie; Ferrer, Jorge; Sander, Maike; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Schmid, Roland M.; Siveke, Jens T.; Geisler, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ductular reactions (DRs) are observed in virtually all forms of human liver disease; however, the histogenesis and function of DRs in liver injury are not entirely understood. It is widely believed that DRs contain bipotential liver progenitor cells (LPCs) that serve as an emergency cell pool to regenerate both cholangiocytes and hepatocytes and may eventually give rise to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we used a murine model that allows highly efficient and specific lineage labeling of the biliary compartment to analyze the histogenesis of DRs and their potential contribution to liver regeneration and carcinogenesis. In multiple experimental and genetic liver injury models, biliary cells were the predominant precursors of DRs but lacked substantial capacity to produce new hepatocytes, even when liver injuries were prolonged up to 12 months. Genetic modulation of NOTCH and/or WNT/β-catenin signaling within lineage-tagged DRs impaired DR expansion but failed to redirect DRs from biliary differentiation toward the hepatocyte lineage. Further, lineage-labeled DRs did not produce tumors in genetic and chemical HCC mouse models. In summary, we found no evidence in our system to support mouse biliary-derived DRs as an LPC pool to replenish hepatocytes in a quantitatively relevant way in injury or evidence that DRs give rise to HCCs. PMID:25915586

  8. Inverse relationship of tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia infiltration in the lungs of F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, D.L.; Griffith, W.C.; Hahn, F.F.

    1995-12-01

    In 1970 and F344 rat, along with the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse, were selected as the standard rodents for the National Cancer Institute Carcinogenic Bioassay program for studies of potentially carcinogenic chemicals. The F344 rat has also been used in a variety of other carcinogenesis studies, including numerous studies at ITRI. A major concern to be considered in evaluating carcinogenic bioassay studies using the F344 rat is the relatively high background incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia (MCL) (also referred to as large granular lymphocytic leukemia, Fischer rat leukemia, or monocytic leukemia). Incidences of MCL ranging from 10 to 72% in male F344 rats to 6 to 31% in female F344 rats have been reported. Gaining the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the negative correlations noted should enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of lung cancer.

  9. TFAP2B overexpression contributes to tumor growth and a poor prognosis of human lung adenocarcinoma through modulation of ERK and VEGF/PEDF signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background TFAP2B is a member of the AP2 transcription factor family, which orchestrates a variety of cell processes. However, the roles of TFAP2B in regulating carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of TFAP2B on lung adenocarcinomas growth and identified the underlying mechanisms of actions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods We first examined the expression of TFAP2B in lung cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. We also analyzed the prognostic predicting value of TFAP2B in lung adenocarcinomas. Then we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which TFAP2B knockdown or overexpression regulated lung cancer cell growth, angiogenesis and apoptosis, and further confirmed the role of TFAP2B in tumor growth in a lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Results TFAP2B was highly expressed in NSCLC cell lines and tumor tissues. Strong TFAP2B expression showed a positive correlation with the poor prognoses of patients with lung adenocarcinomas (P < 0.001). TFAP2B knockdown by siRNA significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in a lung cancer subcutaneous xenograft model, whereas TFAP2B overexpression promoted cell growth. The observed regulation of cell growth was accompanied by the TFAP2B-mediated modulation of the ERK/p38, caspase/cytochrome-c and VEGF/PEDF-dependent signaling pathways in NSCLC cells. Conclusions These results indicate that TFAP2B plays a critical role in regulating lung adenocarcinomas growth and could serve as a promising therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment. PMID:24766673

  10. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides. (PSB)

  11. Nature and nurture - lessons from chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luch, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    The roles of genetic constitution versus environmental factors in cancer development have been a matter of debate even long before the discovery of 'oncogenes'. Evidence from epidemiological, occupational and migration studies has consistently pointed to environmental factors as the major contributing factors to cancer, so it seems reasonable to discuss the importance of chemical carcinogenesis in the present 'age of cancer genetics'. PMID:15660110

  12. Multiple genetic alterations in human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, T; Terada, M; Yokota, J; Hirohashi, S; Wakabayashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Cancer development in man appeared to be a multistage process as suggested by epidemiological studies on commonly occurring gastric, colon, and breast cancers and also on human retrovirus-related leukemia, and by the finding by physicians and surgeons of precancerous lesions for many types of neoplasias. In the last 10 years it has become evident that human cancers have multiple genetic alterations caused by point mutations, recombinations, amplifications, and/or deletions. The genes affected include both oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes and genes that accelerate cell proliferation and metastasis. Cancers with more malignant properties and poorer prognosis are generally associated with larger numbers of genetic alterations. These multiple genetic alterations are considered to be a direct reflection of the multiple steps involved in carcinogenesis. The multiple genetic alterations are caused by multiple environmental carcinogenic substances or factors, each of which usually exists only at minute concentrations and does not exert any major impact alone except under particular occupational, iatrogenic, and locally geographic conditions. The fact that carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving multiple genetic alterations clearly needs to be taken into consideration in assessing the risks of environmental carcinogenic substances or factors. The increasing incidence of multiple primary cancers is also most easily understood from the viewpoint of multiple steps in carcinogenesis. Possible multiple approaches to cancer prevention should therefore be considered in relation to multistep carcinogenesis and multiple carcinogenic factors. PMID:1486862

  13. A Systems Approach to Radiation Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlatky, Lynn

    Understanding carcinogenesis risk is complicated by a number of factors, among these the lack of a common platform to integrate and analyze the available data, and the inherently systemsbiologic nature of the problem. We have investigated mechanistic approaches to radiogenic risk estimation that draw on unifying biological principles and incorporate data from multiscale sources. The resultant modeling takes into account that carcinogenesis is a multi-scale phenomenon, critically influenced by determinants not only at the molecular level, but at the cell and tissue-levels as well. To account for cell-level carcinogenesis progression as influenced by inter-tissue signaling, we have developed a dynamic carrying capacity construct that couples the growth of a tumor with the degree of induced vascularization. We have also characterized the molecular responses to radiation incorporating tissue-level angiogenesis implications, and have found striking radiation-quality-dependent responses. The molecular-level events of initiation and promotion are considered in our Two-Stage Logistic model, while incorporating in a rudimentary way the larger-scale growth-limiting role of cell-cell interactions. These and other recent studies undertaken to elaborate radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed, in pursuit of a more complete paradigm for understanding radiation induction of cancer and the consequent risk.

  14. SMC4, which is essentially involved in lung development, is associated with lung adenocarcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengli; Kuang, Manchao; Li, Meng; Feng, Lin; Zhang, Kaitai; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-01-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosome 4 (SMC4) is a core subunit of condensin complexes that mainly contributes to chromosome condensation and segregation. Our previous study demonstrated that the gene expression profile during lung development is of great values for the study of lung cancer. In this study, we identified SMC4 through co-expression network analysis and clique percolation clustering using genes that constant changes during four stages of lung development. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis demonstrated that SMC4 is closely related to cell cycle, cell adhesion, and RNA processing in lung development and carcinogenesis. Moreover, SMC4 is overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and acts as an independent prognostic factor. SMC4 knockdown significantly inhibits the proliferation and invasion of A549 cells. Furthermore, we found that SMC4 interacts with DDX46 (DEAD-box helicase 46). In conclusion, the pivotal role of SMC4 in lung development and carcinogenesis suggests that genes with a similar expression pattern to SMC4 in lung development may also contribute to lung cancer progression. The identification of genes that are essentially involved in development through a comparative study between development and cancer may be a practical strategy for discovering potential biomarkers and illuminating the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. PMID:27687868

  15. Mechanisms of Caffeine-Induced Inhibition of UVB Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Conney, Allan H; Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Kawasumi, Masaoki; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Sunlight-induced non-melanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than two million cases per year. Several studies have shown an inhibitory effect of caffeine administration on UVB-induced skin cancer in mice, and these studies are paralleled by epidemiology studies that indicate an inhibitory effect of coffee drinking on non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Strikingly, decaffeinated coffee consumption had no such inhibitory effect. Mechanism studies indicate that caffeine has a sunscreen effect that inhibits UVB-induced formation of thymine dimers and sunburn lesions in the epidermis of mice. In addition, caffeine administration has a biological effect that enhances UVB-induced apoptosis thereby enhancing the elimination of damaged precancerous cells, and caffeine administration also enhances apoptosis in tumors. Caffeine administration enhances UVB-induced apoptosis by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Exploration of the p53-independent effect indicated that caffeine administration enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the UVB-induced increase in ATR-mediated formation of phospho-Chk1 (Ser345) and abolishing the UVB-induced decrease in cyclin B1 which resulted in caffeine-induced premature and lethal mitosis in mouse skin. In studies with cultured primary human keratinocytes, inhibition of ATR with siRNA against ATR inhibited Chk1 phosphorylation and enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis. Transgenic mice with decreased epidermal ATR function that were irradiated chronically with UVB had 69% fewer tumors at the end of the study compared with irradiated littermate controls with normal ATR function. These results, which indicate that genetic inhibition of ATR (like pharmacologic inhibition of ATR via caffeine) inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis support the concept that ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1 is an important target for caffeine's inhibitory effect on UVB-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23785666

  16. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie Qu Wei; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  17. Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lei; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Pearl, Dennis K; Erdman, John W; Moran, Nancy E; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-12-01

    Consumption of tomato products containing the carotenoid lycopene is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. To identify gene expression patterns associated with early testosterone-driven prostate carcinogenesis, which are impacted by dietary tomato and lycopene, wild-type (WT) and transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice were fed control or tomato- or lycopene-containing diets from 4 to 10 weeks of age. Eight-week-old mice underwent sham surgery, castration, or castration followed by testosterone repletion (2.5 mg/kg/d initiated 1 week after castration). Ten-week-old intact TRAMP mice exhibit early multifocal prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Of the 200 prostate cancer-related genes measured by quantitative NanoString, 189 are detectable, 164 significantly differ by genotype, 179 by testosterone status, and 30 by diet type (P < 0.05). In TRAMP, expression of Birc5, Mki67, Aurkb, Ccnb2, Foxm1, and Ccne2 is greater compared with WT and is decreased by castration. In parallel, castration reduces Ki67-positive staining (P < 0.0001) compared with intact and testosterone-repleted TRAMP mice. Expression of genes involved in androgen metabolism/signaling pathways is reduced by lycopene feeding (Srd5a1) and by tomato feeding (Srd5a2, Pxn, and Srebf1). In addition, tomato feeding significantly reduced expression of genes associated with stem cell features, Aldh1a and Ly6a, whereas lycopene feeding significantly reduced expression of neuroendocrine differentiation-related genes, Ngfr and Syp. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a profile of testosterone-regulated genes associated with early prostate carcinogenesis that are potential mechanistic targets of dietary tomato components. Future studies on androgen signaling/metabolism, stem cell features, and neuroendocrine differentiation pathways may elucidate the mechanisms by which dietary tomato and lycopene impact prostate cancer risk. PMID:25315431

  18. Umbelliprenin induced production of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and reduced IL-10, IL-4, Foxp3 and TGF-β in a mouse model of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khaghanzadeh, Narges; Samiei, Afshin; Ramezani, Mohammad; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2014-02-01

    Umbelliprenin is a member of the 7-prenyloxycoumarins with potential therapeutic properties such as cytotoxic effects on various cancer cells. The present study investigates the effect of umbelliprenin on predominance of Th1 and Th2 responses in Lewis lung cancer (LLC) mouse model. The cytotoxic effect of umbelliprenin was explored on LLC cells and mouse splenocytes by MTT assay. Mice into which LLC had been transplanted were treated with umbelliprenin on alternate days, at 2.5 mg/200 µl intraperitoneally. Foxp3, TNF-α and TGF-β mRNA expressions were assessed in tumor and lung tissues of LLC mice. In addition, IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-4 levels were determined in sera and also in splenocyte culture supernatants at the presence of tumor cell lysate (10 µg/ml) and Con A (3 µg/ml) after 72 h. Results showed the cytotoxic effects of umbelliprenin on LLC cells (IC₅₀ = 51.6 ± 5.4 µM) while no adverse effect was seen at this concentration on normal splenocytes. TNF-α mRNA expression in both lung and tumor tissues was increased. However, Foxp3 and TGF-β expressions were decreased in tumor tissues. Serum level of IFN-γ was elevated in the umbelliprenin treated cancerous mice compared to the control group while IL-10 and IL-4 secretions were reduced. Tumor size was also decreased in umbelliprenin treated group. In summary, umbelliprenin has shown a partially Th1 bias with a reduction of regulatory immune response. Although the mechanism behind this action is not known, it is speculated that upon changing the Th1/Th2 balance in favour of Th1, umbelliprenin induces its antitumor activity.