Science.gov

Sample records for mouse phenotypic characterization

  1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of Bst+/− mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Riazifar, Hamidreza; Sun, Guoli; Wang, Xinjian; Rupp, Alan; Vemaraju, Shruti; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Lang, Richard A.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Hattar, Samer; Guan, Min-Xin; Huang, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The belly spot and tail (Bst+/−) mouse phenotype is caused by mutations of the ribosomal protein L24 (Rpl24). Among various phenotypes in Bst+/− mice, the most interesting are its retinal abnormalities, consisting of delayed closure of choroid fissures, decreased ganglion cells and subretinal vascularization. We further characterized the Bst+/− mouse and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms to assess the feasibility of using this strain as a model for stem cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss. We found that, although RGCs are significantly reduced in retinal ganglion cell layer in Bst+/− mouse, melanopsin+ RGCs, also called ipRGCs, appear to be unchanged. Pupillary light reflex was completely absent in Bst+/− mice but they had a normal circadian rhythm. In order to examine the pathological abnormalities in Bst+/− mice, we performed electron microscopy in RGC and found that mitochondria morphology was deformed, having irregular borders and lacking cristae. The complex activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were significantly decreased. Finally, for subretinal vascularization, we also found that angiogenesis is delayed in Bst+/− associated with delayed hyaloid regression. Characterization of Bst+/− retina suggests that the Bst+/− mouse strain could be a useful murine model. It might be used to explore further the pathogenesis and strategy of treatment of retinal degenerative diseases by employing stem cell technology. PMID:26035379

  2. A diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (SLC26A2) mutant mouse: morphological and biochemical characterization of the resulting chondrodysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forlino, Antonella; Piazza, Rocco; Tiveron, Cecilia; Della Torre, Sara; Tatangelo, Laura; Bonafè, Luisa; Gualeni, Benedetta; Romano, Assunta; Pecora, Fabio; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Cetta, Giuseppe; Rossi, Antonio

    2005-03-15

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST or SLC26A2) cause a family of recessively inherited chondrodysplasias including, in order of decreasing severity, achondrogenesis 1B, atelosteogenesis 2, diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. The gene encodes a widely distributed sulfate/chloride antiporter of the cell membrane whose function is crucial for the uptake of inorganic sulfate, which is needed for proteoglycan sulfation. To provide new insights in the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to skeletal and connective tissue dysplasia and to obtain an in vivo model for therapeutic approaches to DTD, we generated a Dtdst knock-in mouse with a partial loss of function of the sulfate transporter. In addition, the intronic neomycine cassette in the mutant allele contributed to the hypomorphic phenotype by inducing abnormal splicing. Homozygous mutant mice were characterized by growth retardation, skeletal dysplasia and joint contractures, thereby recapitulating essential aspects of the DTD phenotype in man. The skeletal phenotype included reduced toluidine blue staining of cartilage, chondrocytes of irregular size, delay in the formation of the secondary ossification center and osteoporosis of long bones. Impaired sulfate uptake was demonstrated in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. In spite of the generalized nature of the sulfate uptake defect, significant proteoglycan undersulfation was detected only in cartilage. Chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis studies suggested that reduced proliferation and/or lack of terminal chondrocyte differentiation might contribute to reduced bone growth. The similarity with human DTD makes this mouse strain a useful model to explore pathogenetic and therapeutic aspects of DTDST-related disorders. PMID:15703192

  3. International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) —

    Cancer.gov

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comprises a group of major mouse genetics research institutions along with national funding organisations formed to address the challenge of developing an encyclopedia of mammalian gene function.

  4. The spontaneous ataxic mouse mutant tippy is characterized by a novel Purkinje cell morphogenesis and degeneration phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Evelyn K.; Sekerková, Gabriella; Ohtsuki, Gen; Aldinger, Kimberly A.; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Hansel, Christian; Mugnaini, Enrico; Millen, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    This study represents the first detailed analysis of the spontaneous neurological mouse mutant, tippy, uncovering its unique cerebellar phenotype. Homozygous tippy mutant mice are small, ataxic and die around weaning. Although the cerebellum shows grossly normal foliation, tippy mutants display a complex cerebellar Purkinje cell phenotype consisting of abnormal dendritic branching with immature spine features and patchy, non-apoptotic cell death that is associated with widespread dystrophy and degeneration of the Purkinje cell axons throughout the white matter, the cerebellar nuclei and the vestibular nuclei. Moderate anatomical abnormalities of climbing fiber innervation of tippy mutant Purkinje cells were not associated with changes in climbing fiber-EPSC amplitudes. However, decreased ESPC amplitudes were observed in response to parallel fiber stimulation and correlated well with anatomical evidence for patchy dark cell degeneration of Purkinje cell dendrites in the molecular layer. The data suggest that the Purkinje neurons are a primary target of the tippy mutation. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the Purkinje cell axonal pathology together with disruptions in the balance of climbing fiber and parallel fiber Purkinje cell input in the cerebellar cortex underlie the ataxic phenotype in these mice. The constellation of Purkinje cell dendritic malformation and degeneration phenotypes in tippy mutants is unique and has not been reported in any other neurologic mutant. Fine mapping of the tippy mutation to a 2.1MB region of distal chromosome 9, which does not encompass any gene previously implicated in cerebellar development or neuronal degeneration, confirms that the tippy mutation identifies novel biology and gene function. PMID:25626522

  5. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  6. Prevention of the polycystic ovarian phenotype and characterization of ovulatory capacity in the estrogen receptor-alpha knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Couse, J F; Bunch, D O; Lindzey, J; Schomberg, D W; Korach, K S

    1999-12-01

    Ovarian-derived estradiol plays a critical endocrine role in the regulation of gonadotropin synthesis and secretion from the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. In turn, several para/autocrine effects of estrogen within the ovary are known, including increased ovarian weight, stimulation of granulosa cell growth, augmentation of FSH action, and attenuation of apoptosis. The estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) is present in all three components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis of the mouse. In contrast, estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) is easily detectable in ovarian granulosa cells but is low to absent in the pituitary of the adult mouse. This distinct expression pattern for the two ERs suggests the presence of separate roles for each in the regulation of ovarian function. Herein, we definitively show that a lack of ERalpha in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of the ERalpha-knockout (alphaERKO) mouse results in chronic elevation of serum LH and is the primary cause of the ovarian phenotype of polycystic follicles and anovulation. Prolonged treatment with a GnRH antagonist reduced serum LH levels and prevented the alphaERKO cystic ovarian phenotype. To investigate a direct role for ERalpha within the ovary, immature alphaERKO females were stimulated to ovulate with exogenous gonadotropins. Ovulatory capacity in the immature alphaERKO female was reduced compared with age-matched wild-type (14.5+/-2.9 vs. 40.6+/-2.6 oocytes/animal, respectively); however, oocytes collected from the alphaERKO were able to undergo successful in vitro fertilization. A similar discrepancy in oocyte yield was observed after superovulation of peripubertal (42 days) wild-type and alphaERKO females. In addition, ovaries from immature superovulated alphaERKO females possessed several ovulatory but unruptured follicles. Investigations of the possible reasons for the reduced number of ovulations in the alphaERKO included ribonuclease protection assays to assess the mRNA levels of several markers

  7. Large-scale mouse knockouts and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Ryder, Edward; Houghton, Richard; White, Jacqueline K; Bottomley, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Standardized phenotypic analysis of mutant forms of every gene in the mouse genome will provide fundamental insights into mammalian gene function and advance human and animal health. The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences, the development of embryonic stem cell mutagenesis technology, the standardization of phenotypic analysis pipelines, and the paradigm-shifting industrialization of these processes have made this a realistic and achievable goal. The size of this enterprise will require global coordination to ensure economies of scale in both the generation and primary phenotypic analysis of the mutant strains, and to minimize unnecessary duplication of effort. To provide more depth to the functional annotation of the genome, effective mechanisms will also need to be developed to disseminate the information and resources produced to the wider community. Better models of disease, potential new drug targets with novel mechanisms of action, and completely unsuspected genotype-phenotype relationships covering broad aspects of biology will become apparent. To reach these goals, solutions to challenges in mouse production and distribution, as well as development of novel, ever more powerful phenotypic analysis modalities will be necessary. It is a challenging and exciting time to work in mouse genetics.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Lineage(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL Phenotypic Cells Residing in Adult Mouse Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Ryusuke; Iwaki, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Sumide, Keisuke; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Yutaka; Uemura, Yasushi; Asano, Hiroaki; Kwon, A-Hon; Sonoda, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Murine bone marrow (BM)-derived very small embryonic-like stem cells (BM VSELs), defined by a lineage-negative (Lin(-)), CD45-negative (CD45(-)), Sca-1-positive (Sca-1(+)) immunophenotype, were previously reported as postnatal pluripotent stem cells (SCs). We developed a highly efficient method for isolating Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) small cells using enzymatic treatment of murine bone. We designated these cells as bone-derived VSELs (BD VSELs). The incidences of BM VSELs in the BM-derived nucleated cells and that of BD VSELs in bone-derived nucleated cells were 0.002% and 0.15%, respectively. These BD VSELs expressed a variety of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), and endothelial cell markers. The gene expression profile of the BD VSELs was clearly distinct from those of HSCs, MSCs, and ES cells. In the steady state, the BD VSELs proliferated slowly, however, the number of BD VSELs significantly increased in the bone after acute liver injury. Moreover, green fluorescent protein-mouse derived BD VSELs transplanted via tail vein injection after acute liver injury were detected in the liver parenchyma of recipient mice. Immunohistological analyses suggested that these BD VSELs might transdifferentiate into hepatocytes. This study demonstrated that the majority of the Lin(-)CD45(-)Sca-1(+) VSEL phenotypic cells reside in the bone rather than the BM. However, the immunophenotype and the gene expression profile of BD VSELs were clearly different from those of other types of SCs, including BM VSELs, MSCs, HSCs, and ES cells. Further studies will therefore be required to elucidate their cellular and/or SC characteristics and the potential relationship between BD VSELs and BM VSELs.

  9. NIH Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers: the power of centralized phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Kent Lloyd, K. C.; Cline, Gary W.; Wasserman, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers (MMPCs) were founded in 2001 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to advance biomedical research by providing the scientific community with standardized, high-quality phenotyping services for mouse models of diabetes, obesity, and their complications. The intent is to allow researchers to take optimum advantage of the many new mouse models produced in labs and in high-throughput public efforts. The six MMPCs are located at universities around the country and perform complex metabolic tests in intact mice and hormone and analyte assays in tissues on a fee-for-service basis. Testing is subsidized by the NIH in order to reduce the barriers for mouse researchers. Although data derived from these tests belong to the researcher submitting mice or tissues, these data are archived after publication in a public database run by the MMPC Coordinating and Bioinformatics Unit. It is hoped that data from experiments performed in many mouse models of metabolic diseases, using standard protocols, will be useful in understanding the nature of these complex disorders. The current areas of expertise include energy balance and body composition, insulin action and secretion, whole-body and tissue carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular and renal function, and metabolic pathway kinetics. In addition to providing services, the MMPC staff provides expertise and advice to researchers, and works to develop and refine test protocols to best meet the community’s needs in light of current scientific developments. Test technology is disseminated by publications and through annual courses. PMID:22940748

  10. MPHASYS: a mouse phenotype analysis system

    PubMed Central

    Calder, R Brent; Beems, Rudolf B; van Steeg, Harry; Mian, I Saira; Lohman, Paul HM; Vijg, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background Systematic, high-throughput studies of mouse phenotypes have been hampered by the inability to analyze individual animal data from a multitude of sources in an integrated manner. Studies generally make comparisons at the level of genotype or treatment thereby excluding associations that may be subtle or involve compound phenotypes. Additionally, the lack of integrated, standardized ontologies and methodologies for data exchange has inhibited scientific collaboration and discovery. Results Here we introduce a Mouse Phenotype Analysis System (MPHASYS), a platform for integrating data generated by studies of mouse models of human biology and disease such as aging and cancer. This computational platform is designed to provide a standardized methodology for working with animal data; a framework for data entry, analysis and sharing; and ontologies and methodologies for ensuring accurate data capture. We describe the tools that currently comprise MPHASYS, primarily ones related to mouse pathology, and outline its use in a study of individual animal-specific patterns of multiple pathology in mice harboring a specific germline mutation in the DNA repair and transcription-specific gene Xpd. Conclusion MPHASYS is a system for analyzing multiple data types from individual animals. It provides a framework for developing data analysis applications, and tools for collecting and distributing high-quality data. The software is platform independent and freely available under an open-source license [1]. PMID:17553167

  11. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  12. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  13. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of a mouse model of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy reveals severe muscular atrophy restricted to fast glycolytic fibres.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Venema, Andrea; Hargreaves, Iain P; Foster, Keith; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Negroni, Elisa; Hourde, Christophe; Baraibar, Martin A; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Davies, Janet E; Rubinsztein, David C; Heales, Simon J; Mouly, Vincent; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Raz, Vered; Dickson, George

    2010-06-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by ptosis, dysphagia and proximal limb weakness. Autosomal-dominant OPMD is caused by a short (GCG)(8-13) expansions within the first exon of the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1), leading to an expanded polyalanine tract in the mutated protein. Expanded PABPN1 forms insoluble aggregates in the nuclei of skeletal muscle fibres. In order to gain insight into the different physiological processes affected in OPMD muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model of OPMD (A17.1) and performed transcriptomic studies combined with a detailed phenotypic characterization of this model at three time points. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a massive gene deregulation in the A17.1 mice, among which we identified a significant deregulation of pathways associated with muscle atrophy. Using a mathematical model for progression, we have identified that one-third of the progressive genes were also associated with muscle atrophy. Functional and histological analysis of the skeletal muscle of this mouse model confirmed a severe and progressive muscular atrophy associated with a reduction in muscle strength. Moreover, muscle atrophy in the A17.1 mice was restricted to fast glycolytic fibres, containing a large number of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). The soleus muscle and, in particular, oxidative fibres were spared, even though they contained INIs albeit to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate a fibre-type specificity of muscle atrophy in this OPMD model. This study improves our understanding of the biological pathways modified in OPMD to identify potential biomarkers and new therapeutic targets.

  14. Using Mouse Models to Explore Genotype-Phenotype Relationship in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Ahmad; Faizi, Mehrdad; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Mobley, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) caused by trisomy 21 is characterized by a variety of phenotypes and involves multiple organs. Sequencing of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) and subsequently of its orthologues on mouse chromosome 16 have created an unprecedented opportunity to explore the complex relationship between various DS phenotypes and the extra copy of…

  15. Removing the cloak of invisibility: phenotyping the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Monica J.

    2008-01-01

    If you study a human disease, it is likely that you have tried to generate a mouse model. Sometimes, these models are excellent; others are disappointing. Or, so we think. How often does our mouse mutant not model the human disease because of limitations in how we may look at it? In any living organism, many factors work together to produce the phenotype. Here, new phenotyping paradigms for assessing mouse biology and physiology are described and proposed. Advances in mouse phenotype assessments have paralleled human clinical diagnostics. The future brings a multitude of mouse strains that might be exposed to a variety of conditions. To assess health will require the ability to perform a broad-based phenotype assessment of every animal until we can understand how the perturbation of one system affects others. PMID:19048073

  16. Phenotype ontologies for mouse and man: bridging the semantic gap

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Gruenberger, Michael; Sundberg, John P.; Hancock, John M.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge of the post-genomic era is coding phenotype data from humans and model organisms such as the mouse, to permit the meaningful translation of phenotype descriptions between species. This ability is essential if we are to facilitate phenotype-driven gene function discovery and empower comparative pathobiology. Here, we review the current state of the art for phenotype and disease description in mice and humans, and discuss ways in which the semantic gap between coding systems might be bridged to facilitate the discovery and exploitation of new mouse models of human diseases. PMID:20427557

  17. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Richardson, Joel E; Kadin, James A; Smith, Cynthia L; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  18. Live four-dimensional optical coherence tomography reveals embryonic cardiac phenotype in mouse mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L., III; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-09-01

    Efficient phenotyping of developmental defects in model organisms is critical for understanding the genetic specification of normal development and congenital abnormalities in humans. We previously reported that optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with live embryo culture is a valuable tool for mouse embryo imaging and four-dimensional (4-D) cardiodynamic analysis; however, its capability for analysis of mouse mutants with cardiac phenotypes has not been previously explored. Here, we report 4-D (three-dimensional+time) OCT imaging and analysis of the embryonic heart in a Wdr19 mouse mutant, revealing a heart looping defect. Quantitative analysis of cardiac looping revealed a statistically significant difference between mutant and control embryos. Our results indicate that live 4-D OCT imaging provides a powerful phenotyping approach to characterize embryonic cardiac function in mouse models.

  19. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen.

    PubMed

    Adissu, Hibret A; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hooks, Yvette; Carragher, Damian M; Clarke, Kay; Karp, Natasha A; Newbigging, Susan; Jones, Nora; Morikawa, Lily; White, Jacqueline K; McKerlie, Colin

    2014-05-01

    The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30) or without (n=20) clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3%) in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14%) presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  20. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  1. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, T. M.; Leach, P. T.; Crawley, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. PMID:26403076

  2. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease. PMID:20092628

  3. Induction of the metastatic phenotype in a mouse tumor model by 5-azacytidine, and characterization of an antigen associated with metastatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, L; Forchhammer, J

    1984-01-01

    The murine Lewis lung carcinoma is a long-term grafted tumor that, after subcutaneous inoculation, forms metastases to the lungs. Forty-two cell lines were established from a primary tumor site and 40 were established from lung metastatic foci. Cloned sublines were established from the original 82 lines, and 2 sublines among 405 were found to be tumorigenic but not metastatic (T+/M-), whereas the remaining 403 sublines were both tumorigenic and metastatic (T+/M+). The T+/M- phenotype was shown to be stable for greater than 2 yr. However, treatment of the T+/M- cell lines for 3 days with 3 microM 5-azacytidine resulted in reexpression of the metastatic phenotype in otherwise stable T+/M- lines. Also, 5-azacytidine treatment could result in loss of the metastatic phenotype in lines that had been stable T+/M+. The changes in tumorigenic and metastatic phenotypes were not associated with altered immunogenicity of the cells. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against T+/M+ cells, and one antibody ( M36D3 ) was found to bind only to T+/M+ cells. Reactivity of the antibody was found to co-vary with expression of the metastatic phenotype. The antigen recognized by M36D3 antibody thus seems to be associated with metastatic capability. The antigen was found by two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis to be a cellular protein of Mr approximately equal to 45,000 and pI approximately equal to 6.7. Images PMID:6203119

  4. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium Web Portal, a unified point of access for knockout mice and related phenotyping data.

    PubMed

    Koscielny, Gautier; Yaikhom, Gagarine; Iyer, Vivek; Meehan, Terrence F; Morgan, Hugh; Atienza-Herrero, Julian; Blake, Andrew; Chen, Chao-Kung; Easty, Richard; Di Fenza, Armida; Fiegel, Tanja; Grifiths, Mark; Horne, Alan; Karp, Natasha A; Kurbatova, Natalja; Mason, Jeremy C; Matthews, Peter; Oakley, Darren J; Qazi, Asfand; Regnart, Jack; Retha, Ahmad; Santos, Luis A; Sneddon, Duncan J; Warren, Jonathan; Westerberg, Henrik; Wilson, Robert J; Melvin, David G; Smedley, Damian; Brown, Steve D M; Flicek, Paul; Skarnes, William C; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) web portal (http://www.mousephenotype.org) provides the biomedical community with a unified point of access to mutant mice and rich collection of related emerging and existing mouse phenotype data. IMPC mouse clinics worldwide follow rigorous highly structured and standardized protocols for the experimentation, collection and dissemination of data. Dedicated 'data wranglers' work with each phenotyping center to collate data and perform quality control of data. An automated statistical analysis pipeline has been developed to identify knockout strains with a significant change in the phenotype parameters. Annotation with biomedical ontologies allows biologists and clinicians to easily find mouse strains with phenotypic traits relevant to their research. Data integration with other resources will provide insights into mammalian gene function and human disease. As phenotype data become available for every gene in the mouse, the IMPC web portal will become an invaluable tool for researchers studying the genetic contributions of genes to human diseases.

  5. Learning from stargazin: the mouse, the phenotype and the unexpected.

    PubMed

    Osten, Pavel; Stern-Bach, Yael

    2006-06-01

    The stargazin gene (also referred to as Cacng2) has been identified by forward genetics in a spontaneous mouse mutant with ataxic gait, upward head-elevating movements (hence the name stargazer for the mouse) and episodes of spike-wave discharges. Stargazin is related to the gamma-1 subunit of skeletal muscle voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC), and a deficit in its role as auxiliary VDCC subunit was proposed to underlie the epileptic phenotype of the mouse; yet, a conclusive demonstration of stargazin function in VDCC regulation is still lacking. In contrast, stargazin and its three closely related isoforms gamma-3, gamma-4 and gamma-8 were shown to function as auxiliary subunits for a very different ion channel - the AMPA-type glutamate receptor - prominently regulating early intracellular transport, synaptic targeting and anchoring, and ion channel functions of this major excitatory receptor in the brain.

  6. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqueline K; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Michael R; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; Fertak, Lahcen El; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Edward; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Wattenhofer-Donze, Marie; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  7. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqueline K; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Michael R; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; Fertak, Lahcen El; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Edward; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Wattenhofer-Donze, Marie; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems.

  8. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP).

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F; Stanley, E Richard

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/- and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/- mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/- mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/- mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches. Furthermore

  9. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  10. High-Throughput Automated Phenotyping of Two Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Balci, Fuat; Oakeshott, Stephen; Shamy, Jul Lea; El-Khodor, Bassem F; Filippov, Igor; Mushlin, Richard; Port, Russell; Connor, David; Paintdakhi, Ahmad; Menalled, Liliana; Ramboz, Sylvie; Howland, David; Kwak, Seung; Brunner, Dani

    2013-01-01

    Phenotyping with traditional behavioral assays constitutes a major bottleneck in the primary screening, characterization, and validation of genetic mouse models of disease, leading to downstream delays in drug discovery efforts. We present a novel and comprehensive one-stop approach to phenotyping, the PhenoCube™. This system simultaneously captures the cognitive performance, motor activity, and circadian patterns of group-housed mice by use of home-cage operant conditioning modules (IntelliCage) and custom-built computer vision software. We evaluated two different mouse models of Huntington's Disease (HD), the R6/2 and the BACHD in the PhenoCube™ system. Our results demonstrated that this system can efficiently capture and track alterations in both cognitive performance and locomotor activity patterns associated with these disease models. This work extends our prior demonstration that PhenoCube™ can characterize circadian dysfunction in BACHD mice and shows that this system, with the experimental protocols used, is a sensitive and efficient tool for a first pass high-throughput screening of mouse disease models in general and mouse models of neurodegeneration in particular. PMID:23863947

  11. MausDB: An open source application for phenotype data and mouse colony management in large-scale mouse phenotyping projects

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Holger; Lengger, Christoph; Simic, Bruno; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Background Large-scale, comprehensive and standardized high-throughput mouse phenotyping has been established as a tool of functional genome research by the German Mouse Clinic and others. In all these projects, vast amounts of data are continuously generated and need to be stored, prepared for data-mining procedures and eventually be made publicly available. Thus, central storage and integrated management of mouse phenotype data, genotype data, metadata and linked external data are highly important. Requirements most probably depend on the individual mouse housing unit or project and the demand for either very specific individual database solutions or very flexible solutions that can be easily adapted to local demands. Not every group has the resources and/or the know-how to develop software for this purpose. A database application has been developed for the German Mouse Clinic in order to meet all requirements mentioned above. Results We present MausDB, the German Mouse Clinic web-based database application that integrates standard mouse colony management, phenotyping workflow scheduling features and mouse phenotyping result data management. It links mouse phenotype data with genotype data, metadata and external data such as public web databases, which is a prerequisite for comprehensive data analysis and mining. We describe how this can be achieved with a lean and user-friendly system built on open standards. Conclusion MausDB is suited for large-scale, high-throughput phenotyping facilities but can also be used exclusively for mouse colony management within smaller units or projects. The system is successfully used as the primary mouse and data management tool of the German Mouse Clinic and other mouse facilities. We offer MausDB to the scientific community as open source software to provide a system for storage of data from functional genomics projects in a well-structured, easily accessible form. PMID:18366799

  12. Behavioral phenotyping of mouse models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tonya N.; Greene, James G.; Miller, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative movement disorder afflicting millions of people in the United States. The advent of transgenic technologies has contributed to the development of several new mouse models, many of which recapitulate some aspects of the disease; however, no model has been demonstrated to faithfully reproduce the full constellation of symptoms seen in human PD. This may be due in part to the narrow focus on the dopamine-mediated motor deficits. As current research continues to unmask PD as a multi-system disorder, animal models should similarly evolve to include the non-motor features of the disease. This requires that typically cited behavioral test batteries be expanded. The major non-motor symptoms observed in PD patients include hyposmia, sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal dysfunction, autonomic dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and cognitive decline. Mouse behavioral tests exist for all of these symptoms and while some models have begun to be reassessed for the prevalence of this broader behavioral phenotype, the majority has not. Moreover, all behavioral paradigms should be tested for their responsiveness to L-DOPA so these data can be compared to patient response and help elucidate which symptoms are likely not dopamine-mediated. Here, we suggest an extensive, yet feasible, battery of behavioral tests for mouse models of PD aimed to better assess both non-motor and motor deficits associated with the disease. PMID:20211655

  13. Innovations in phenotyping of mouse models in the German Mouse Clinic.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Neschen, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Bohla, Alexander; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cohrs, Christian; Dewert, Anna; Fridrich, Barbara; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Hurt, Anja; Janas, Eva; Janik, Dirk; Kahle, Melanie; Kistler, Martin; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Lengger, Christoph; Ludwig, Tonia; Maier, Holger; Marschall, Susan; Micklich, Kateryna; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Räss, Michael; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Scheerer, Markus; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Steinkamp, Ralph; Stöger, Claudia; Sun, Minxuan; Szymczak, Wilfried; Treise, Irina; Vargas Panesso, Ingrid Liliana; Vernaleken, Alexandra M; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolff-Muscate, Annemarie; Zeh, Ramona; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Eickelberg, Oliver; Favor, Jack; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Höschen, Christoph; Katus, Hugo; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Stöger, Tobias; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Under the label of the German Mouse Clinic (GMC), a concept has been developed and implemented that allows the better understanding of human diseases on the pathophysiological and molecular level. This includes better understanding of the crosstalk between different organs, pleiotropy of genes, and the systemic impact of envirotypes and drugs. In the GMC, experts from various fields of mouse genetics and physiology, in close collaboration with clinicians, work side by side under one roof. The GMC is an open-access platform for the scientific community by providing phenotypic analysis in bilateral collaborations ("bottom-up projects") and as a partner and driver in international large-scale biology projects ("top-down projects"). Furthermore, technology development is a major topic in the GMC. Innovative techniques for primary and secondary screens are developed and implemented into the phenotyping pipelines (e.g., detection of volatile organic compounds, VOCs).

  14. Morphological phenotyping of mouse hearts using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Lin, Eric; Lee, Ling; Sheng, Xiaoye; Wong, Kevin S. K.; Tibbits, Glen F.; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2014-11-01

    Transgenic mouse models have been instrumental in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind many genetically based cardiovascular diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS). However, the characterization of their cardiac morphology has been hampered by the small size of the mouse heart. In this report, we adapted optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging fixed adult mouse hearts, and applied tools from computational anatomy to perform morphometric analyses. The hearts were first optically cleared and imaged from multiple perspectives. The acquired volumes were then corrected for refractive distortions, and registered and stitched together to form a single, high-resolution OCT volume of the whole heart. From this volume, various structures such as the valves and myofibril bundles were visualized. The volumetric nature of our dataset also allowed parameters such as wall thickness, ventricular wall masses, and luminal volumes to be extracted. Finally, we applied the entire acquisition and processing pipeline in a preliminary study comparing the cardiac morphology of wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of MFS.

  15. Phenotypic and pathologic evaluation of the myd mouse. A candidate model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.D.; Rapisarda, D.; Bailey, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown pathogenesis which is characterized by weakness of the face and shoulder girdle. It is associated with a sensorineural hearing loss which may be subclinical. FSHD has been mapped to the distalmost portion of 4q35, although the gene has not yet been identified. Distal 4q has homology with a region of mouse chromosome 8 to which a mouse mutant, myodystrophy (myd), has been mapped. Muscle from homozygotes for the myd mutation appears dystrophic, showing degenerating and regenerating fibers, inflammatory infiltrates, central nuclei, and variation in fiber size. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials reveal a sensorineural hearing loss in myd homozygotes. Based on the homologous genetic map locations, and the phenotypic syndrome of dystrophic muscle with sensorineural hearing loss, we suggest that myd represents an animal model for the human disease FSHD. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Characterization of mutations at the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase locus

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.D.; Charlton, C.K.

    1997-02-01

    Two genetic mouse models for human phenylketonuria have been characterized by DNA sequence analysis. For each, a distinct mutation was identified within the protein coding sequence of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. This establishes that the mutated locus is the same as that causing human phenylketonuria and allows a comparison between these mouse phenylketonuria models and the human disease. A genotype/phenotype relationship that is strikingly similar to the human disease emerges, underscoring the similarity of phenylketonuria in mouse and man. In PAH{sup ENU1}, the phenotype is mild. The Pah{sup enu1} mutation predicts a conservative valine to alanine amino acid substitution and is located in exon 3, a gene region where serious mutations are rare in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2} the phenotype is severe. The Pah{sup enu2} mutation predicts a radical phenylalanine to serine substitution and is located in exon 7, a gene region where serious mutations are common in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2}, the sequence information was used to devise a direct genotyping system based on the creation of a new Alw26I restriction endonuclease site. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Phenotypic Characterization of Chicken Thymic Stromal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Trevor J.; Bean, Andrew G.; Ward, Harry A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    1992-01-01

    Phenotypic profiles of the thymic stromal components provide an excellent approach to elucidating the nature of the microenvironment of this organ. To address this issue in chickens, we have produced an extensive panel of 18 mAb to the thymic stroma. These mAb have been extensively characterized with respect to their phenotypic specificities and reveal that the stromal cells are equally as complex as the T cells whose maturation they direct. They further demonstrate that, in comparison to the mammalian thymus, there is a remarkable degree of conservation in thymic architecture between phylogenetically diverse species. Eleven mAb reacted with thymic epithelial cells: MUI-73 was panepithelium, MUI-54 stained all cortical and medullary epithelium but only a minority of the subcapsule, MUI-52 was specific for isolated stellate cortical epithelial cells, MUI-62, -69, and -71 were specific for the medulla (including Hassall’s corpusclelike structures), MUI-51, -53, -70, and -75 reacted only with the type-I epithelium, or discrete regions therein, lining the subcapsular and perivascular regions and MUI-58 demonstrated the antigenic similarity between the subcapsule and the medulla. Seven other mAb identified distinct isolated stromal cells throughout the cortex and medulla. Large thymocyte-rich regions, which often spanned from the outer cortex to medulla, lacked epithelial cells. These mAb should prove invaluable for determining the functional significance of thymic stromal-cell subsets to thymopoiesis. PMID:1387829

  18. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach using drugs that have been approved for PD: 10 approved PD drugs were ranked within top 10% among 1197 candidates. In predicting novel PD drugs, our approach achieved a mean average precision of 0.24, which is significantly higher (pmouse phenotype data. Comparison of gene expression profiles between PD and top-ranked drug candidates indicates that quetiapine has the potential to treat PD.

  19. Live 4D optical coherence tomography for early embryonic mouse cardiac phenotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Studying embryonic mouse development is important for our understanding of normal human embryogenesis and the underlying causes of congenital defects. Our research focuses on imaging early development in the mouse embryo to specifically understand cardiovascular development using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have previously developed imaging approaches that combine static embryo culture, OCT imaging and advanced image processing to visualize the whole live mouse embryos and obtain 4D (3D+time) cardiodynamic datasets with cellular resolution. Here, we present the study of using 4D OCT for dynamic imaging of early embryonic heart in live mouse embryos to assess mutant cardiac phenotypes during development, including a cardiac looping defect. Our results indicate that the live 4D OCT imaging approach is an efficient phenotyping tool that can reveal structural and functional cardiac defects at very early stages. Further studies integrating live embryonic cardiodynamic phenotyping with molecular and genetic approaches in mouse mutants will help to elucidate the underlying signaling defects.

  20. Reporting phenotypes in mouse models when considering body size as a potential confounder.

    PubMed

    Oellrich, Anika; Meehan, Terrence F; Parkinson, Helen; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; White, Jacqueline K; Karp, Natasha A

    2016-01-01

    Genotype-phenotype studies aim to identify causative relationships between genes and phenotypes. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is a high throughput phenotyping program whose goal is to collect phenotype data for a knockout mouse strain of every protein coding gene. The scale of the project requires an automatic analysis pipeline to detect abnormal phenotypes, and disseminate the resulting gene-phenotype annotation data into public resources. A body weight phenotype is a common result of knockout studies. As body weight correlates with many other biological traits, this challenges the interpretation of related gene-phenotype associations. Co-correlation can lead to gene-phenotype associations that are potentially misleading. Here we use statistical modelling to account for body weight as a potential confounder to assess the impact. We find that there is a considerable impact on previously established gene-phenotype associations due to an increase in sensitivity as well as the confounding effect. We investigated the existing ontologies to represent this phenotypic information and we explored ways to ontologically represent the results of the influence of confounders on gene-phenotype associations. With the scale of data being disseminated within the high throughput programs and the range of downstream studies that utilise these data, it is critical to consider how we improve the quality of the disseminated data and provide a robust ontological representation.

  1. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  2. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-aki K.; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (“Kibo”) on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides “space-based controls” by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  3. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments.

  4. Modeling Suggests TRPC3 Hydrogen Bonding and Not Phosphorylation Contributes to the Ataxia Phenotype of the Moonwalker Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Sansom, Mark S P; Becker, Esther B E

    2015-07-01

    A gain-of-function mutation (T635A) in the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPC3 results in abnormal channel gating and causes cerebellar ataxia in the dominant Moonwalker (Mwk) mouse mutant. However, the underlying molecular and structural mechanisms are unclear. Here, we used a combined approach of computational modeling and functional characterization of proposed TRPC3 mutants. Our findings support a mechanism by which the hydrogen bonding capability of threonine 635 plays a significant role in maintaining a stable, closed state channel. This capability is lost in the Mwk mutant, suggesting a structural basis for the disease-causing phenotype in the Mwk mouse.

  5. Automated pipeline for anatomical phenotyping of mouse embryos using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael D; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Lerch, Jason P; Henkelman, R Mark

    2014-06-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) plans to phenotype 20,000 single-gene knockout mice to gain an insight into gene function. Approximately 30% of these knockout mouse lines will be embryonic or perinatal lethal. The IMPC has selected three-dimensional (3D) imaging to phenotype these mouse lines at relevant stages of embryonic development in an attempt to discover the cause of lethality using detailed anatomical information. Rate of throughput is paramount as IMPC production centers have been given the ambitious task of completing this phenotyping project by 2021. Sifting through the wealth of data within high-resolution 3D mouse embryo data sets by trained human experts is infeasible at this scale. Here, we present a phenotyping pipeline that identifies statistically significant anatomical differences in the knockout, in comparison with the wild type, through a computer-automated image registration algorithm. This phenotyping pipeline consists of three analyses (intensity, deformation, and atlas based) that can detect missing anatomical structures and differences in volume of whole organs as well as on the voxel level. This phenotyping pipeline was applied to micro-CT images of two perinatal lethal mouse lines: a hypomorphic mutation of the Tcf21 gene (Tcf21-hypo) and a knockout of the Satb2 gene. With the proposed pipeline we were able to identify the majority of morphological phenotypes previously published for both the Tcf21-hypo and Satb2 mutant mouse embryos in addition to novel phenotypes. This phenotyping pipeline is an unbiased, automated method that highlights only those structural abnormalities that survive statistical scrutiny and illustrates them in a straightforward fashion.

  6. Divergent cellular phenotypes of human and mouse cells lacking the Werner syndrome RecQ helicase

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Kiranjit K.; Sidorova, Julia M.; Albertson, Tina M.; Anderson, Judith B.; Ladiges, Warren C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Preston, Bradley D.; Monnat, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a human autosomal recessive genetic instability and cancer predisposition syndrome with features of premature aging. Several genetically determined mouse models of WS have been generated, however none develops features of premature aging or an elevated risk of neoplasia unless additional genetic perturbations are introduced. In order to determine whether differences in cellular phenotype could explain the discrepant phenotypes of Wrn−/− mice and WRN-deficient humans, we compared the cellular phenotype of newly derived Wrn−/− mouse primary fibroblasts with previous analyses of primary and transformed fibroblasts from WS patients and with newly derived, WRN-depleted human primary fibroblasts. These analyses confirmed previously reported cellular phenotypes of WRN-mutant and WRN-deficient human fibroblasts, and demonstrated that the human WRN-deficient cellular phenotype can be detected in cells grown in 5% or in 20% oxygen. In contrast, we did not identify prominent cellular phenotypes present in WRN-deficient human cells in Wrn−/− mouse fibroblasts. Our results indicate that human and mouse fibroblasts have different functional requirements for WRN protein, and that the absence of a strong cellular phenotype may in part explain the failure of Wrn−/− mice to develop an organismal phenotype resembling Werner syndrome. PMID:19896421

  7. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  8. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of colonic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, G; Hausmann, M; Vogl, D; Aschenbrenner, E; Andus, T; Falk, W; Andreesen, R; SchÖlmerich, J; Gross, V

    1998-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the intestinal mucosal immune system. However, they are a poorly defined cell population. We therefore determined their phenotype in normal colonic mucosa. Macrophages were isolated from colonic biopsies and surgical specimens by collagenase digestion. Colonic macrophages were positively sorted by anti-CD33 magnetic beads. Flow cytometric triple fluorescence analysis was applied to study CD14, CD16, CD33, CD44, CD11b, CD11c, CD64, HLA-DR, CD80, CD86 and CD3/CD19 expression. CD33 was evaluated as a positive marker for intestinal macrophages. CD33+ cells isolated from normal colonic mucosa showed co-expression of the established intracellular macrophage marker CD68 in FACS analysis. CD33+ cells were capable of phagocytosis. Isolation of this cell population by magnetic anti-CD33 beads and culture resulted in a 4.2–40-fold increase in IL-1β and 4.5–44-fold increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion compared with unsorted lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC). Of the CD33+ cells, 90.9 ± 6.9% (mean ± s.d.) were CD44+. However, macrophages from colonic mucosa showed only a low expression of CD14 (10.5 ± 3.8%), CD16 (10.1 ± 3.9%), HLA-DR (27.3 ± 9.2%), CD11b (17.4 ± 6.8%), CD11c (17.8 ± 10.4%). Furthermore, expression of CD80 (9.2 ± 4.2%) and CD86 (15.1 ± 7.3%) was low, suggesting a low ability of normal intestinal macrophages to activate T cells and T cell-mediated immune responses. We conclude that CD33 is useful for the isolation and flow cytometric characterization of colonic macrophages. These cells exhibit a single phenotype in normal mucosa (CD33++, CD44++, CD14−, CD16−, CD11b−, CD11c−, HLA-DRlow, CD80−, CD86−) lacking lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor and costimulatory molecules. PMID:9649182

  9. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit extensive developmental and phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Prabhat K; Sassi, Slim; Lan, Lan; Au, Patrick; Halvorsen, Stefan C; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Seed, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of embryonic fibroblasts from GFP reporter mice indicates that the fibroblast cell type harbors a large collection of developmentally and phenotypically heterogeneous subtypes. Some of these cells exhibit multipotency, whereas others do not. Multiparameter flow cytometry analysis shows that a large number of distinct populations of fibroblast-like cells can be found in cultures initiated from different embryonic organs, and cells sorted according to their surface phenotype typically retain their characteristics on continued propagation in culture. Similarly, surface phenotypes of individual cloned fibroblast-like cells exhibit significant variation. The fibroblast cell class appears to contain a very large number of denumerable subtypes. PMID:26699463

  10. Development and characterization of mouse hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Mechetner, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Cell fusion protocols that were developed by Kohler and Milstein in the mid-1970s and aimed at producing and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) remain the gold standard of hybridoma development. Despite tremendous progress in using MAbs in multiple research, diagnostic, and therapeutic areas, major experimental flaws in designing and carrying out hybridoma experimentation often result in the production of hybridomas exhibiting poor growth parameters and secreting low-specificity and low-affinity antibodies. This methodology chapter is built around the conventional hybridoma protocol, with a special emphasis on tissue culture and biochemical techniques aimed at producing truly monospecific and highly active mouse MAbs.

  11. Phenotyping the central nervous system of the embryonic mouse by magnetic resonance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, M A; Pacheco-Torres, J; Borrell, V; Canals, S

    2014-08-15

    Genetic mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders are being massively generated, but technologies for their high-throughput phenotyping are missing. The potential of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for structural phenotyping has been demonstrated before. However, application to the embryonic mouse central nervous system has been limited by the insufficient anatomical detail. Here we present a method that combines staining of live embryos with a contrast agent together with MR microscopy after fixation, to provide unprecedented anatomical detail at relevant embryonic stages. By using this method we have phenotyped the embryonic forebrain of Robo1/2(-/-) double mutant mice enabling us to identify most of the well-known anatomical defects in these mutants, as well as novel more subtle alterations. We thus demonstrate the potential of this methodology for a fast and reliable screening of subtle structural abnormalities in the developing mouse brain, as those associated to defects in disease-susceptibility genes of neurologic and psychiatric relevance.

  12. Bloomsbury report on mouse embryo phenotyping: recommendations from the IMPC workshop on embryonic lethal screening

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David; Baldock, Richard; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Copp, Andrew J.; Dickinson, Mary; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Henkelman, Mark; Justice, Monica; Mohun, Timothy; Murray, Stephen A.; Pauws, Erwin; Raess, Michael; Rossant, Janet; Weaver, Tom; West, David

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genes that are important for embryo development is a crucial first step towards understanding their many functions in driving the ordered growth, differentiation and organogenesis of embryos. It can also shed light on the origins of developmental disease and congenital abnormalities. Current international efforts to examine gene function in the mouse provide a unique opportunity to pinpoint genes that are involved in embryogenesis, owing to the emergence of embryonic lethal knockout mutants. Through internationally coordinated efforts, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) has generated a public resource of mouse knockout strains and, in April 2012, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), supported by the EU InfraCoMP programme, convened a workshop to discuss developing a phenotyping pipeline for the investigation of embryonic lethal knockout lines. This workshop brought together over 100 scientists, from 13 countries, who are working in the academic and commercial research sectors, including experts and opinion leaders in the fields of embryology, animal imaging, data capture, quality control and annotation, high-throughput mouse production, phenotyping, and reporter gene analysis. This article summarises the outcome of the workshop, including (1) the vital scientific importance of phenotyping embryonic lethal mouse strains for basic and translational research; (2) a common framework to harmonise international efforts within this context; (3) the types of phenotyping that are likely to be most appropriate for systematic use, with a focus on 3D embryo imaging; (4) the importance of centralising data in a standardised form to facilitate data mining; and (5) the development of online tools to allow open access to and dissemination of the phenotyping data. PMID:23519032

  13. Phenosite: a web database integrating the mouse phenotyping platform and the experimental procedures in mice.

    PubMed

    Masuya, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Sumi; Heida, Naohiko; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2007-12-01

    Recently, a number of collaborative large-scale mouse mutagenesis programs have been launched. These programs aim for a better understanding of the roles of all individual coding genes and the biological systems in which these genes participate. In international efforts to share phenotypic data among facilities/institutes, it is desirable to integrate information obtained from different phenotypic platforms reliably. Since the definitions of specific phenotypes often depend on a tacit understanding of concepts that tends to vary among different facilities, it is necessary to define phenotypes based on the explicit evidence of assay results. We have developed a website termed PhenoSITE (Phenome Semantics Information with Terminology of Experiments: http://www.gsc.riken.jp/Mouse/), in which we are trying to integrate phenotype-related information using an experimental-evidence-based approach. The site's features include (1) a baseline database for our phenotyping platform; (2) an ontology associating international phenotypic definitions with experimental terminologies used in our phenotyping platform; (3) a database for standardized operation procedures of the phenotyping platform; and (4) a database for mouse mutants using data produced from the large-scale mutagenesis program at RIKEN GSC. We have developed two types of integrated viewers to enhance the accessibility to mutant resource information. One viewer depicts a matrix view of the ontology-based classification and chromosomal location of each gene; the other depicts ontology-mediated integration of experimental protocols, baseline data, and mutant information. These approaches rely entirely upon experiment-based evidence, ensuring the reliability of the integrated data from different phenotyping platforms.

  14. Ultrasonic vocalizations: a tool for behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Crawley, Jacqueline; Ricceri, Laura

    2009-04-01

    In neonatal mice ultrasonic vocalizations have been studied both as an early communicative behaviour of the pup-mother dyad and as a sign of an aversive affective state. Adult mice of both sexes produce complex ultrasonic vocalization patterns in different experimental/social contexts. Vocalizations are becoming an increasingly valuable assay for behavioural phenotyping throughout the mouse life-span and alterations of the ultrasound patterns have been reported in several mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we also show that the modulation of vocalizations by maternal cues (maternal potentiation paradigm) - originally identified and investigated in rats - can be measured in C57BL/6 mouse pups with appropriate modifications of the rat protocol and can likely be applied to mouse behavioural phenotyping. In addition we suggest that a detailed qualitative evaluation of neonatal calls together with analysis of adult mouse vocalization patterns in both sexes in social settings, may lead to a greater understanding of the communication value of vocalizations in mice. Importantly, both neonatal and adult USV altered patterns can be determined during the behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of human neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, starting from those in which deficits in communication are a primary symptom.

  15. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn S.; Fields, Natasha R.; Chaudoin, Tammy R; Epstein, Adrian A.; Makarov, Edward; Akhter, Sidra P.; Gorantla, Santhi; Bonasera, Stephen J.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization. PMID:26353862

  16. Practical application of ontologies to annotate and analyse large scale raw mouse phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Tim; Morgan, Hugh; Blake, Andrew; Wells, Sara; Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Large-scale international projects are underway to generate collections of knockout mouse mutants and subsequently to perform high throughput phenotype assessments, raising new challenges for computational researchers due to the complexity and scale of the phenotype data. Phenotypes can be described using ontologies in two differing methodologies. Traditionally an individual phenotypic character has either been defined using a single compound term, originating from a species-specific dedicated phenotype ontology, or alternatively by a combinatorial annotation, using concepts from a range of disparate ontologies, to define a phenotypic character as an entity with an associated quality (EQ). Both methods have their merits, which include the dedicated approach allowing use of community standard terminology, and the combinatorial approach facilitating cross-species phenotypic statement comparisons. Previously databases have favoured one approach over another. The EUMODIC project will generate large amounts of mouse phenotype data, generated as a result of the execution of a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and will implement both ontological approaches to capture the phenotype data generated. Results For all SOPs a four-tier annotation is made: a high-level description of the SOP, to broadly define the type of data generated by the SOP; individual parameter annotation using the EQ model; annotation of the qualitative data generated for each mouse; and the annotation of mutant lines after statistical analysis. The qualitative assessments of phenodeviance are made at the point of data entry, using child PATO qualities to the parameter quality. To facilitate data querying by scientists more familiar with single compound terms to describe phenotypes, the mappings between the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) ontology and the EQ PATO model are exploited to allow querying via MP terms. Conclusion Well-annotated and comparable phenotype databases can be achieved

  17. Characterizing the ADHD Phenotype for Genetic Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jim; Asherson, Phil; Hay, David; Levy, Florence; Swanson, Jim; Thapar, Anita; Willcutt, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The genetic study of ADHD has made considerable progress. Further developments in the field will be reliant in part on identifying the most appropriate phenotypes for genetic analysis. The use of both categorical and dimensional measures of symptoms related to ADHD has been productive. The use of multiple reporters is a valuable feature of the…

  18. High-throughput screening of mouse gene knockouts identifies established and novel skeletal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brommage, Robert; Liu, Jeff; Hansen, Gwenn M; Kirkpatrick, Laura L; Potter, David G; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian; Powell, David R; Vogel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Screening gene function in vivo is a powerful approach to discover novel drug targets. We present high-throughput screening (HTS) data for 3 762 distinct global gene knockout (KO) mouse lines with viable adult homozygous mice generated using either gene-trap or homologous recombination technologies. Bone mass was determined from DEXA scans of male and female mice at 14 weeks of age and by microCT analyses of bones from male mice at 16 weeks of age. Wild-type (WT) cagemates/littermates were examined for each gene KO. Lethality was observed in an additional 850 KO lines. Since primary HTS are susceptible to false positive findings, additional cohorts of mice from KO lines with intriguing HTS bone data were examined. Aging, ovariectomy, histomorphometry and bone strength studies were performed and possible non-skeletal phenotypes were explored. Together, these screens identified multiple genes affecting bone mass: 23 previously reported genes (Calcr, Cebpb, Crtap, Dcstamp, Dkk1, Duoxa2, Enpp1, Fgf23, Kiss1/Kiss1r, Kl (Klotho), Lrp5, Mstn, Neo1, Npr2, Ostm1, Postn, Sfrp4, Slc30a5, Slc39a13, Sost, Sumf1, Src, Wnt10b), five novel genes extensively characterized (Cldn18, Fam20c, Lrrk1, Sgpl1, Wnt16), five novel genes with preliminary characterization (Agpat2, Rassf5, Slc10a7, Slc26a7, Slc30a10) and three novel undisclosed genes coding for potential osteoporosis drug targets. PMID:26273529

  19. Novel skin phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide mouse reverse genetic screen

    PubMed Central

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Heath, Emma; Smedley, Damian P.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; DiTommaso, Tia; White, Jacqueline K.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Smyth, Ian; Steel, Karen P.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    Permanent stop-and-shop large-scale mouse mutant resources provide an excellent platform to decipher tissue phenogenomics. Here we analyse skin from 538 knockout mouse mutants generated by the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project. We optimize immunolabelling of tail epidermal wholemounts to allow systematic annotation of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and interfollicular epidermal abnormalities using ontology terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. Of the 50 mutants with an epidermal phenotype, 9 map to human genetic conditions with skin abnormalities. Some mutant genes are expressed in the skin, whereas others are not, indicating systemic effects. One phenotype is affected by diet and several are incompletely penetrant. In-depth analysis of three mutants, Krt76, Myo5a (a model of human Griscelli syndrome) and Mysm1, provides validation of the screen. Our study is the first large-scale genome-wide tissue phenotype screen from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium and provides an open access resource for the scientific community. PMID:24721909

  20. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach using drugs that have been approved for PD: 10 approved PD drugs were ranked within top 10% among 1197 candidates. In predicting novel PD drugs, our approach achieved a mean average precision of 0.24, which is significantly higher (pmouse phenotype data. Comparison of gene expression profiles between PD and top-ranked drug candidates indicates that quetiapine has the potential to treat PD. PMID:26958284

  1. Phenotyping structural abnormalities in mouse embryos using high-resolution episcopic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Geyer, Stefan H.; Martineau, Alexandrine; Galli, Antonella; Adams, David J.; Wilson, Robert; Mohun, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The arrival of simple and reliable methods for 3D imaging of mouse embryos has opened the possibility of analysing normal and abnormal development in a far more systematic and comprehensive manner than has hitherto been possible. This will not only help to extend our understanding of normal tissue and organ development but, by applying the same approach to embryos from genetically modified mouse lines, such imaging studies could also transform our knowledge of gene function in embryogenesis and the aetiology of developmental disorders. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is coordinating efforts to phenotype single gene knockouts covering the entire mouse genome, including characterising developmental defects for those knockout lines that prove to be embryonic lethal. Here, we present a pilot study of 34 such lines, utilising high-resolution episcopic microscopy (HREM) for comprehensive 2D and 3D imaging of homozygous null embryos and their wild-type littermates. We present a simple phenotyping protocol that has been developed to take advantage of the high-resolution images obtained by HREM and that can be used to score tissue and organ abnormalities in a reliable manner. Using this approach with embryos at embryonic day 14.5, we show the wide range of structural abnormalities that are likely to be detected in such studies and the variability in phenotypes between sibling homozygous null embryos. PMID:25256713

  2. If the skull fits: magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for combined analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Brian J; Blank, Marissa C; Roman, Brian B; Henkelman, R Mark; Millen, Kathleen J

    2012-10-17

    The mammalian brain and skull develop concurrently in a coordinated manner, consistently producing a brain and skull that fit tightly together. It is common that abnormalities in one are associated with related abnormalities in the other. However, this is not always the case. A complete characterization of the relationship between brain and skull phenotypes is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause them to be coordinated or divergent and to provide perspective on the potential diagnostic or prognostic significance of brain and skull phenotypes. We demonstrate the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse. Co-registration of brain and skull images allows comparison of the relationship between phenotypes in the brain and those in the skull. We observe a close fit between the brain and skull of two genetic mouse models that both show abnormal brain and skull phenotypes. Application of these three-dimensional image analyses in a broader range of mouse mutants will provide a map of the relationships between brain and skull phenotypes generally and allow characterization of patterns of similarities and differences.

  3. If the skull fits: magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for combined analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Marissa C.; Roman, Brian B.; Henkelman, R. Mark; Millen, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain and skull develop concurrently in a coordinated manner, consistently producing a brain and skull that fit tightly together. It is common that abnormalities in one are associated with related abnormalities in the other. However, this is not always the case. A complete characterization of the relationship between brain and skull phenotypes is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause them to be coordinated or divergent and to provide perspective on the potential diagnostic or prognostic significance of brain and skull phenotypes. We demonstrate the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse. Co-registration of brain and skull images allows comparison of the relationship between phenotypes in the brain and those in the skull. We observe a close fit between the brain and skull of two genetic mouse models that both show abnormal brain and skull phenotypes. Application of these three-dimensional image analyses in a broader range of mouse mutants will provide a map of the relationships between brain and skull phenotypes generally and allow characterization of patterns of similarities and differences. PMID:22947655

  4. Impact of Temporal Variation on Design and Analysis of Mouse Knockout Phenotyping Studies

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Natasha A.; Speak, Anneliese O.; White, Jacqueline K.; Adams, David J.; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Hérault, Yann; Mott, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    A significant challenge facing high-throughput phenotyping of in-vivo knockout mice is ensuring phenotype calls are robust and reliable. Central to this problem is selecting an appropriate statistical analysis that models both the experimental design (the workflow and the way control mice are selected for comparison with knockout animals) and the sources of variation. Recently we proposed a mixed model suitable for small batch-oriented studies, where controls are not phenotyped concurrently with mutants. Here we evaluate this method both for its sensitivity to detect phenotypic effects and to control false positives, across a range of workflows used at mouse phenotyping centers. We found the sensitivity and control of false positives depend on the workflow. We show that the phenotypes in control mice fluctuate unexpectedly between batches and this can cause the false positive rate of phenotype calls to be inflated when only a small number of batches are tested, when the effect of knockout becomes confounded with temporal fluctuations in control mice. This effect was observed in both behavioural and physiological assays. Based on this analysis, we recommend two approaches (workflow and accompanying control strategy) and associated analyses, which would be robust, for use in high-throughput phenotyping pipelines. Our results show the importance in modelling all sources of variability in high-throughput phenotyping studies. PMID:25343444

  5. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  6. The overshoot and phenotypic equilibrium in characterizing cancer dynamics of reversible phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiufang; Wang, Yue; Feng, Tianquan; Yi, Ming; Zhang, Xingan; Zhou, Da

    2016-02-01

    The paradigm of phenotypic plasticity indicates reversible relations of different cancer cell phenotypes, which extends the cellular hierarchy proposed by the classical cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Since it is still questionable if the phenotypic plasticity is a crucial improvement to the hierarchical model or just a minor extension to it, it is worthwhile to explore the dynamic behavior characterizing the reversible phenotypic plasticity. In this study we compare the hierarchical model and the reversible model in predicting the cell-state dynamics observed in biological experiments. Our results show that the hierarchical model shows significant disadvantages over the reversible model in describing both long-term stability (phenotypic equilibrium) and short-term transient dynamics (overshoot) in cancer cell populations. In a very specific case in which the total growth of population due to each cell type is identical, the hierarchical model predicts neither phenotypic equilibrium nor overshoot, whereas the reversible model succeeds in predicting both of them. Even though the performance of the hierarchical model can be improved by relaxing the specific assumption, its prediction to the phenotypic equilibrium strongly depends on a precondition that may be unrealistic in biological experiments. Moreover, it still does not show as rich dynamics as the reversible model in capturing the overshoots of both CSCs and non-CSCs. By comparison, it is more likely for the reversible model to correctly predict the stability of the phenotypic mixture and various types of overshoot behavior.

  7. Optical coherence tomography for live phenotypic analysis of embryonic ocular structures in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Sudheendran, Narendran; Overbeek, Paul A.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-08-01

    Mouse models of ocular diseases provide a powerful resource for exploration of molecular regulation of eye development and pre-clinical studies. Availability of a live high-resolution imaging method for mouse embryonic eyes would significantly enhance longitudinal analyses and high-throughput morphological screening. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used for live embryonic ocular imaging throughout gestation. At all studied stages, the whole eye is within the imaging distance of the system and there is a good optical contrast between the structures. We also performed OCT eye imaging in the embryonic retinoblastoma mouse model Pax6-SV40 T-antigen, which spontaneously forms lens and retinal lesions, and demonstrate that OCT allows us to clearly differentiate between the mutant and wild type phenotypes. These results demonstrate that OCTin utero imaging is a potentially useful tool to study embryonic ocular diseases in mouse models.

  8. EuroPhenome: a repository for high-throughput mouse phenotyping data.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Hugh; Beck, Tim; Blake, Andrew; Gates, Hilary; Adams, Niels; Debouzy, Guillaume; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Melvin, David; Meziane, Hamid; Richardson, Dave; Wells, Sara; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Brown, Steve D M; Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The broad aim of biomedical science in the postgenomic era is to link genomic and phenotype information to allow deeper understanding of the processes leading from genomic changes to altered phenotype and disease. The EuroPhenome project (http://www.EuroPhenome.org) is a comprehensive resource for raw and annotated high-throughput phenotyping data arising from projects such as EUMODIC. EUMODIC is gathering data from the EMPReSSslim pipeline (http://www.empress.har.mrc.ac.uk/) which is performed on inbred mouse strains and knock-out lines arising from the EUCOMM project. The EuroPhenome interface allows the user to access the data via the phenotype or genotype. It also allows the user to access the data in a variety of ways, including graphical display, statistical analysis and access to the raw data via web services. The raw phenotyping data captured in EuroPhenome is annotated by an annotation pipeline which automatically identifies statistically different mutants from the appropriate baseline and assigns ontology terms for that specific test. Mutant phenotypes can be quickly identified using two EuroPhenome tools: PhenoMap, a graphical representation of statistically relevant phenotypes, and mining for a mutant using ontology terms. To assist with data definition and cross-database comparisons, phenotype data is annotated using combinations of terms from biological ontologies.

  9. EuroPhenome: a repository for high-throughput mouse phenotyping data

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Hugh; Beck, Tim; Blake, Andrew; Gates, Hilary; Adams, Niels; Debouzy, Guillaume; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Melvin, David; Meziane, Hamid; Richardson, Dave; Wells, Sara; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Brown, Steve D. M.; Hancock, John M.; Mallon, Ann-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The broad aim of biomedical science in the postgenomic era is to link genomic and phenotype information to allow deeper understanding of the processes leading from genomic changes to altered phenotype and disease. The EuroPhenome project (http://www.EuroPhenome.org) is a comprehensive resource for raw and annotated high-throughput phenotyping data arising from projects such as EUMODIC. EUMODIC is gathering data from the EMPReSSslim pipeline (http://www.empress.har.mrc.ac.uk/) which is performed on inbred mouse strains and knock-out lines arising from the EUCOMM project. The EuroPhenome interface allows the user to access the data via the phenotype or genotype. It also allows the user to access the data in a variety of ways, including graphical display, statistical analysis and access to the raw data via web services. The raw phenotyping data captured in EuroPhenome is annotated by an annotation pipeline which automatically identifies statistically different mutants from the appropriate baseline and assigns ontology terms for that specific test. Mutant phenotypes can be quickly identified using two EuroPhenome tools: PhenoMap, a graphical representation of statistically relevant phenotypes, and mining for a mutant using ontology terms. To assist with data definition and cross-database comparisons, phenotype data is annotated using combinations of terms from biological ontologies. PMID:19933761

  10. Graded Maximal Exercise Testing to Assess Mouse Cardio-Metabolic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, Jennifer M.; Heiss, Valerie J.; Maurya, Santosh K.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Periasamy, Muthu; LaFountain, Richard A.; Wilson, Jacob M.; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2016-01-01

    Functional assessments of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) are needed to establish animal models of dysfunction, test the effects of novel therapeutics, and establish the cardio-metabolic phenotype of mice. In humans, the graded maximal exercise test (GXT) is a standardized diagnostic for assessing CVF and mortality risk. These tests, which consist of concurrent staged increases in running speed and inclination, provide diagnostic cardio-metabolic parameters, such as, VO2max, anaerobic threshold, and metabolic crossover. Unlike the human-GXT, published mouse treadmill tests have set, not staged, increases in inclination as speed progress until exhaustion (PXT). Additionally, they often lack multiple cardio-metabolic parameters. Here, we developed a mouse-GXT with the intent of improving mouse-exercise testing sensitivity and developing translatable parameters to assess CVF in healthy and dysfunctional mice. The mouse-GXT, like the human-GXT, incorporated staged increases in inclination, speed, and intensity; and, was designed by considering imitations of the PXT and differences between human and mouse physiology. The mouse-GXT and PXTs were both tested in healthy mice (C57BL/6J, FVBN/J) to determine their ability to identify cardio-metabolic parameters (anaerobic threshold, VO2max, metabolic crossover) observed in human-GXTs. Next, theses assays were tested on established diet-induced (obese-C57BL/6J) and genetic (cardiac isoform Casq2-/-) models of cardiovascular dysfunction. Results showed that both tests reported VO2max and provided reproducible data about performance. Only the mouse-GXT reproducibly identified anaerobic threshold, metabolic crossover, and detected impaired CVF in dysfunctional models. Our findings demonstrated that the mouse-GXT is a sensitive, non-invasive, and cost-effective method for assessing CVF in mice. This new test can be used as a functional assessment to determine the cardio-metabolic phenotype of various animal models or the effects of

  11. Graded Maximal Exercise Testing to Assess Mouse Cardio-Metabolic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Petrosino, Jennifer M; Heiss, Valerie J; Maurya, Santosh K; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Periasamy, Muthu; LaFountain, Richard A; Wilson, Jacob M; Simonetti, Orlando P; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2016-01-01

    Functional assessments of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) are needed to establish animal models of dysfunction, test the effects of novel therapeutics, and establish the cardio-metabolic phenotype of mice. In humans, the graded maximal exercise test (GXT) is a standardized diagnostic for assessing CVF and mortality risk. These tests, which consist of concurrent staged increases in running speed and inclination, provide diagnostic cardio-metabolic parameters, such as, VO2max, anaerobic threshold, and metabolic crossover. Unlike the human-GXT, published mouse treadmill tests have set, not staged, increases in inclination as speed progress until exhaustion (PXT). Additionally, they often lack multiple cardio-metabolic parameters. Here, we developed a mouse-GXT with the intent of improving mouse-exercise testing sensitivity and developing translatable parameters to assess CVF in healthy and dysfunctional mice. The mouse-GXT, like the human-GXT, incorporated staged increases in inclination, speed, and intensity; and, was designed by considering imitations of the PXT and differences between human and mouse physiology. The mouse-GXT and PXTs were both tested in healthy mice (C57BL/6J, FVBN/J) to determine their ability to identify cardio-metabolic parameters (anaerobic threshold, VO2max, metabolic crossover) observed in human-GXTs. Next, theses assays were tested on established diet-induced (obese-C57BL/6J) and genetic (cardiac isoform Casq2-/-) models of cardiovascular dysfunction. Results showed that both tests reported VO2max and provided reproducible data about performance. Only the mouse-GXT reproducibly identified anaerobic threshold, metabolic crossover, and detected impaired CVF in dysfunctional models. Our findings demonstrated that the mouse-GXT is a sensitive, non-invasive, and cost-effective method for assessing CVF in mice. This new test can be used as a functional assessment to determine the cardio-metabolic phenotype of various animal models or the effects of

  12. Nonallele Specific Silencing of Ataxin-7 Improves Disease Phenotypes in a Mouse Model of SCA7

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Pavitra S; Boudreau, Ryan L; Schaefer, Kellie A; La Spada, Albert R; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by ataxia and vision loss with no effective treatments in the clinic. The most striking feature is the degeneration of Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum caused by the presence of polyglutamine-expanded ataxin-7. Ataxin-7 is part of a transcriptional complex, and, in the setting of mutant ataxin-7, there is misregulation of target genes. Here, we designed RNAi sequences to reduce the expression of both wildtype and mutant ataxin-7 to test if reducing ataxin-7 in Purkinje cells is both tolerated and beneficial in an animal model of SCA7. We observed sustained reduction of both wildtype and mutant ataxin-7 as well as a significant improvement of ataxia phenotypes. Furthermore, we observed a reduction in cerebellar molecular layer thinning and nuclear inclusions, a hallmark of SCA7. In addition, we observed recovery of cerebellar transcripts whose expression is disrupted in the presence of mutant ataxin-7. These data demonstrate that reduction of both wildtype and mutant ataxin-7 by RNAi is well tolerated, and contrary to what may be expected from reducing a component of the Spt-Taf9-Gcn5 acetyltransferase complex, is efficacious in the SCA7 mouse. PMID:24930601

  13. Automated, Computerized, Feature-Based Phenotype Analysis of Slit Lamp Images of the Mouse Lens

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Jenny; Li, Yi; Shapiro, Linda G.; Clark, John I.; Arnett, Ernest; Sage, E. Helene; Brinkley, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of a variety of transgenic mouse models for lens development can create substantial challenges in database management and analysis. We report a novel, automated, feature-based informatics approach to screening lens phenotypes in a large database of slit lamp images. Digital slit lamp images of normal and abnormal lenses in eyes of wild type (wt), SC1 null and SPARC null transgenic mice were recorded for quantitative evaluation of their structural phenotype. The images were processed to improve the contrast of structural features that corresponded to rings of opacity and fluctuations in scattering intensity in the lenses. Measurable attributes were assigned to the features in the lens images and given as an output vector of 46 dimensions. Characteristic patterns correlated with the structural phenotype of each mutant and wt lens and a statistical fit for each phenotype was defined. The genotype was identified correctly in nearly 85% of the slit lamp images on the basis of an automated computer analysis of the lens structural phenotype. The automated computer algorithm has the potential to evaluate a large database of slit lamp images and distinguish mouse genotypes on the basis of lens phenotypes objectively using a neural network analysis of the structural features observed in the slit lamp images. The neural network approach is a promising technology for objective evaluation of genotype/phenotype relationships based on structural features and light scattering in lenses. Further improvements in the automated method can be expected to simplify and increase the accuracy and efficiency of the feature based analysis of structural phenotypes linked to genetic variation. PMID:18304532

  14. Genetic deletion of mouse platelet glycoprotein Ibbeta produces a Bernard-Soulier phenotype with increased alpha-granule size.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kazunobu; Martinez, Constantino; Russell, Susan; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan; Fiering, Steven; Ware, Jerry

    2004-10-15

    Here we report the characterization of a mouse model of the Bernard-Soulier syndrome generated by a targeted disruption of the gene encoding the glycoprotein (GP) Ibbeta subunit of the GP Ib-IX complex. Similar to a Bernard-Soulier model generated by disruption of the mouse GP Ibalpha subunit, GP Ibbeta(Null) mice display macrothrombocytopenia and a severe bleeding phenotype. When examined by transmission electron microscopy, the large platelets produced by a GP Ibbeta(Null) genotype revealed alpha-granules with increased size as compared with the alpha-granules from control mouse platelets. Data are presented linking the overexpression of a septin protein, SEPT5, to the presence of larger alpha-granules in the GP Ibbeta(Null) platelet. The SEPT5 gene resides approximately 250 nucleotides 5' to the GP Ibbeta gene and has been associated with modulating exocytosis from neurons and platelets as part of a presynaptic protein complex. Fusion mRNA transcripts present in megakaryocytes can contain both the SEPT5 and GP Ibbeta coding sequences as a result in an imperfect polyadenylation signal within the 3' end of both the human and mouse SEPT5 genes. We observed a 2- to 3-fold increase in SEPT5 protein levels in platelets from GP Ibbeta(Null) mice. These results implicate SEPT5 levels in the maintenance of normal alpha-granule size and may explain the variant granules associated with human GP Ibbeta mutations and the Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

  15. High-throughput mouse phenotyping using non-rigid registration and robust principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhongliu; Kitamoto, Asanobu; Tamura, Masaru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Gillies, Duncan

    2016-03-01

    Intensive international efforts are underway towards phenotyping the mouse genome, by knocking out each of its ≍25,000 genes one-by-one for comparative study. With vast amounts of data to analyze, the traditional method using time-consuming histological examination is clearly impractical, leading to an overwhelming demand for some high-throughput phenotyping framework, especially with the employment of biomedical image informatics to efficiently identify phenotypes concerning morphological abnormality. Existing work has either excessively relied on volumetric analytics which is insensitive to phenotypes associated with no severe volume variations, or tailored for specific defects and thus fails to serve a general phenotyping purpose. Furthermore, the prevailing requirement of an atlas for image segmentation in contrast to its limited availability further complicates the issue in practice. In this paper we propose a high-throughput general-purpose phenotyping framework that is able to efficiently perform batch-wise anomaly detection without prior knowledge of the phenotype and the need for atlas-based segmentation. Anomaly detection is centered on the combined use of group-wise non-rigid image registration and robust principal component analysis (RPCA) for feature extraction and decomposition.

  16. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-01-28

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. PMID:26675351

  17. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-01-28

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease.

  18. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. PMID:26675351

  19. 15q13.3 homozygous knockout mouse model display epilepsy-, autism- and schizophrenia-related phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Forsingdal, A; Fejgin, K; Nielsen, V; Werge, T; Nielsen, J

    2016-01-01

    The 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome is caused by a 1.5-MB hemizygous microdeletion located on 15q13.3 affecting seven genes: FAN1; MTMR10; TRPM1; miR-211; KLF13; OTUD7A; and CHRNA7. The 15q13.3 microdeletion increases the risk of intellectual disability, epilepsy, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia, though the clinical profile varies considerably. Two mouse models of this syndrome, with hemizygous deletion of the orthologous region in the murine genome, have recently been shown to recapitulate a number of the behavioral and physiological deficits that characterize the human condition. Still, little is known of the underlying biological mechanisms. Eleven human cases with homozygous deletion of the 15q13.3 region have been reported, all with severe functional and physiological impairments. We therefore hypothesized that a 15q13.3 homozygous knockout would confer more pronounced behavioral and physiological deficits in mice than the 15q13.3 hemizygous deletion. Here we report the characterization of a 15q13.3 knockout mouse. We observed marked deficits including altered seizure susceptibility, autistic behavior-related phenotypes, and auditory sensory processing. Several of these deficits, albeit less pronounced, were also found in the 15q13.3 hemizygous littermates indicating a gene-dosage dependency. Our findings strongly indicate that studies of the hemi- and homozygous 15q13.3 mouse strains will facilitate understanding of the biological mechanisms of severe mental disorders.

  20. Characterization of systemic metabolic phenotypes associated with subclinical atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Würtz, Peter; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Savolainen, Markku J; Juonala, Markus; Viikari, Jorma S; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2011-02-01

    Detailed molecular phenotyping gives insight into disease mechanisms and can individualize medical practice for improved risk assessment and treatment. We show in an epidemiological study (n = 4309) that the multi-metabolic profiles obtained by serum NMR metabonomics inherently associate with the extent of atherosclerosis already in preclinical stages. Data-driven analysis of the spectral profiles of healthy, young adults revealed three distinct metabolic phenotypes associated with high carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease. The phenotypes were characterized by varying combinations of well-known metabolic disturbances like elevated VLDL and LDL and low HDL levels. Low IMT was also associated with distinct metabolic phenotypes with lipoprotein as well as other biochemical characteristics partly opposing those found for the high IMT phenotypes. Profiles of low-molecular-weight metabolites quantified from the experimentation were also characteristic for the metabolic phenotypes and substantiate developments toward the use of multi-metabolic risk phenotypes. The methodology can be taken as a direct extension for the routine analytics used for the risk assessment of atherosclerosis; quantification of metabolites will complement and might even replace conventional lipid measurements. Serum NMR metabonomics is therefore anticipated as a rational option for comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment.

  1. Recapitulation of the hairless mouse phenotype using catalytic oligonucleotides: implications for permanent hair removal.

    PubMed

    Cserhalmi-Friedman, Peter B; Panteleyev, Andrey A; Christiano, Angela M

    2004-03-01

    Ribozyme technology is widely used to target mRNA in a sequence-specific fashion and thus change the expression pattern of cells or tissues. While the goal of mRNA targeting is usually the cleavage of mutant mRNAs with the prospect of gene therapy for inherited diseases, in certain instances, targeting of wild-type genes can be used therapeutically. Lack of expression of the mouse hairless gene due to inherited mutations leads to the complete and irreversible loss of hair known as atrichia. We designed this study to recapitulate the hairless phenotype in a restricted manner by topical application of deoxyribozyme-targeting molecules to specifically cleave the mouse hairless mRNA. Histological samples taken from treated skin at different times demonstrated a decreased number of hair follicles, an involution of the remaining follicles, a separation of the dermal papillae, and the presence of dermal cysts, all characteristics of the hairless phenotype, but not normally present in the skin of C57Bl/6 J mice. In this study, we successfully recapitulated the hairless phenotype using topically applied target-specific catalytic oligonucleotides designed to cleave the mouse hairless mRNA. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using ribozyme technology to alter the gene expression in the skin via topical application and provide proof of principle for the development of this strategy for permanent hair removal.

  2. Molecular characterization of hepatocarcinogenesis using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Wei Wei; Xie, Min; Vijayaraghavan, Aadhitthya; Yaligar, Jadegoud; Tong, Wei Min; Goh, Liang Kee; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly disease, often unnoticed until the late stages, when treatment options become limited. Thus, there is a crucial need to identify biomarkers for early detection of developing HCC, as well as molecular pathways that would be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Although analysis of human HCC tissues and serum components may serve these purposes, inability of early detection also precludes possibilities of identification of biomarkers or pathways that are sequentially perturbed at earlier phases of disease progression. We have therefore explored the option of utilizing mouse models to understand in a systematic and longitudinal manner the molecular pathways that are progressively deregulated by various etiological factors in contributing to HCC formation, and we report the initial findings in characterizing their validity. Hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mice, which had been exposed to aflatoxin B1 at various stages in life, were used as a hepatitis model. Our findings confirm a synergistic effect of both these etiological factors, with a gender bias towards males for HCC predisposition. Time-based aflatoxin B1 treatment also demonstrated the requirement of non-quiescent liver for effective transformation. Tumors from these models with various etiologies resemble human HCCs histologically and at the molecular level. Extensive molecular characterization revealed the presence of an 11-gene HCC-expression signature that was able to discern transformed human hepatocytes from primary cells, regardless of etiology, and from other cancer types. Moreover, distinct molecular pathways appear to be deregulated by various etiological agents en route to formation of HCCs, in which common pathways converge, highlighting the existence of etiology-specific as well as common HCC-specific molecular perturbations. This study therefore highlights the utility of these mouse models, which provide a rich resource for the

  3. Immunological variation between inbred laboratory mouse strains: points to consider in phenotyping genetically immunomodified mice.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R S; Clifford, C B; Treuting, P M; Brayton, C

    2012-01-01

    Inbred laboratory mouse strains are highly divergent in their immune response patterns as a result of genetic mutations and polymorphisms. The generation of genetically engineered mice (GEM) has, in the past, used embryonic stem (ES) cells for gene targeting from various 129 substrains followed by backcrossing into more fecund mouse strains. Although common inbred mice are considered "immune competent," many have variations in their immune system-some of which have been described-that may affect the phenotype. Recognition of these immune variations among commonly used inbred mouse strains is essential for the accurate interpretation of expected phenotypes or those that may arise unexpectedly. In GEM developed to study specific components of the immune system, accurate evaluation of immune responses must take into consideration not only the gene of interest but also how the background strain and microbial milieu contribute to the manifestation of findings in these mice. This article discusses points to consider regarding immunological differences between the common inbred laboratory mouse strains, particularly in their use as background strains in GEM.

  4. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan J; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O'Leary, Timothy P; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-10

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming.

  5. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle improves aging phenotypes in the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Williams, Siôn L; Hida, Aline; Peacock, Jacqueline D; Prolla, Tomas A; Lincoln, Joy; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-05-15

    Aging is an intricate process that increases susceptibility to sarcopenia and cardiovascular diseases. The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is believed to contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction, potentially shortening lifespan. The mtDNA mutator mouse, a mouse model with a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ, was shown to develop a premature aging phenotype, including sarcopenia, cardiomyopathy and decreased lifespan. This phenotype was associated with an accumulation of mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a crucial regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, in the muscle of mutator mice increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function and also improved the skeletal muscle and heart phenotypes of the mice. Deep sequencing analysis of their mtDNA showed that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis did not reduce the accumulation of mtDNA mutations but rather caused a small increase. These results indicate that increased muscle PGC-1α expression is able to improve some premature aging phenotypes in the mutator mice without reverting the accumulation of mtDNA mutations.

  6. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  7. Characterization of a Spontaneous Retinal Neovascular Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Eiichi; Sweigard, Harry; Husain, Deeba; Olivares, Ana M.; Chang, Bo; Smith, Kaylee E.; Birsner, Amy E.; D’Amato, Robert J.; Michaud, Norman A.; Han, Yinan; Vavvas, Demetrios G.; Miller, Joan W.; Haider, Neena B.; Connor, Kip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vision loss due to vascular disease of the retina is a leading cause of blindness in the world. Retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) is a subgroup of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), whereby abnormal blood vessels develop in the retina leading to debilitating vision loss and eventual blindness. The novel mouse strain, neoretinal vascularization 2 (NRV2), shows spontaneous fundus changes associated with abnormal neovascularization. The purpose of this study is to characterize the induction of pathologic angiogenesis in this mouse model. Methods The NRV2 mice were examined from postnatal day 12 (p12) to 3 months. The phenotypic changes within the retina were evaluated by fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis. The pathological neovascularization was imaged by confocal microscopy and reconstructed using three-dimensional image analysis software. Results We found that NRV2 mice develop multifocal retinal depigmentation in the posterior fundus. Depigmented lesions developed vascular leakage observed by fluorescein angiography. The spontaneous angiogenesis arose from the retinal vascular plexus at postnatal day (p)15 and extended toward retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). By three months of age, histological analysis revealed encapsulation of the neovascular lesion by the RPE in the photoreceptor cell layer and subretinal space. Conclusions The NRV2 mouse strain develops early neovascular lesions within the retina, which grow downward towards the RPE beginning at p15. This retinal neovascularization model mimics early stages of human retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and will likely be a useful in elucidating targeted therapeutics for patients with ocular neovascular disease. PMID:25188381

  8. Neuroanatomical Phenotypes Are Consistent With Autism-Like Behavioral Phenotypes in the 15q11-13 Duplication Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ellegood, Jacob; Nakai, Nobuhiro; Nakatani, Jin; Henkelman, Mark; Takumi, Toru; Lerch, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Paternally and maternally inherited deletions and duplications of human chromosome 15q11-13 are relatively common in the human population. Furthermore, duplications in the 15q region are often associated with autism. Both maternal and paternal interstitial 15q11-13 duplication mouse models have been previously created, where several behavioral differences were found in the paternal duplication (patDp/+) mouse but not in the maternal duplication (matDp/+). These included decreased sociability, behavioral inflexibility, abnormal ultrasonic vocalizations, decreased spontaneous activity, and increased anxiety. Similarly, in the current study, we found several anatomical differences in the patDp/+ mice that were not seen in the matDp/+ mice. Regional differences that are evident only in the paternal duplication are a smaller dentate gyrus and smaller medial striatum. These differences may be responsible for the behavioral inflexibility. Furthermore, a smaller dorsal raphe nucleus could be responsible for the reported serotonin defects. This study highlights consistency that can be found between behavioral and anatomical phenotyping.

  9. Novel BAC mouse model of Huntington’s disease with 225 CAG repeats exhibits an early widespread and stable degenerative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Bichell, Terry Jo; Soares, Barbara D.; Loth, Meredith K.; McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Alikhan, Fatima S.; Hua, Kegang; Coughlin, Jennifer M.; Holt, Hunter K.; Jetter, Christopher S.; Mori, Susumu; Pomper, Martin G.; Osmand, Alexander P.; Guilarte, Tomás R.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unusually large CAG repeat expansions (>60) in exon one of Huntingtin (HTT) are invariably associated with a juvenile-onset form of Huntington’s disease (HD), characterized by a more extensive and rapidly progressing neuropathology than the more prevalent adult-onset form. However, existing mouse models of HD that express the full-length Htt gene with CAG repeat lengths associated with juvenile HD (ranging between ~75 to ~150 repeats in published models) exhibit selective neurodegenerative phenotypes more consistent with adult-onset HD. OBJECTIVE To determine if a very large CAG repeat (>200) in full-length Htt elicits neurodegenerative phenotypes consistent with juvenile HD. METHODS Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated mice expressing full-length mouse Htt with ~225 CAG repeats under control of the mouse Htt promoter. Mice were characterized using behavioral, neuropathological, biochemical and brain imaging methods. RESULTS BAC-225Q mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with a subset of features seen in juvenile-onset HD: very early motor behavior abnormalities, reduced body weight, widespread and progressive increase in Htt aggregates, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Early striatal pathology was observed, including reactive gliosis and loss of dopamine receptors, prior to detectable volume loss. HD-related blood markers of impaired energy metabolism and systemic inflammation were also increased. Aside from an age-dependent progression of diffuse nuclear aggregates at 6 months of age to abundant neuropil aggregates at 12 months of age, other pathological and motor phenotypes showed little to no progression. CONCLUSIONS The HD phenotypes present in animals 3 to 12 months of age make the BAC-225Q mice a unique and stable model of full-length mutant Htt associated phenotypes, including body weight loss, behavioral impairment and HD-like neurodegenerative phenotypes characteristic of juvenile-onset HD and/or late-stage adult

  10. Mitochondrial phenotype of marsupial torpor: Fuel metabolic switch in the Chilean mouse-opossum Thylamys elegans.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Pablo Andres; Bacigalupe, Leonardo Daniel; Mondaca, Fredy; Desrosiers, Véronique; Blier, Pierre U

    2016-01-01

    Torpor is a phenotype characterized by a controlled decline of metabolic rate and body temperature. During arousal from torpor, organs undergo rapid metabolic reactivation and rewarming to near normal levels. As torpor progress, animals show a preference for fatty acids over glucose as primary source of energy. Here, we analyzed for first time the changes in the maximal activity of key enzymes related to fatty acid (Carnitine palmitoyltransferase and β-Hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase) and carbohydrate (Pyruvate kinase, Phosphofructokinase and Lactate dehydrogenase) catabolism, as well as mitochondrial oxidative capacity (Citrate synthase), in six organs of torpid, arousing and euthermic Chilean mouse-opossums (Thylamys elegans). Our results showed that activity of enzymes related to fatty acid and carbohydrate catabolism were different among torpor phases and the pattern of variation differs among tissues. In terms of lipid utilization, maximal enzymatic activities differ in tissues with high oxidative capacity such as heart, kidney, and liver. In terms of carbohydrate use, lower enzymatic activities were observed during torpor in brain and liver. Interestingly, citrate synthase activity did not differ thought torpor-arousal cycle in any tissues analyzed, suggesting no modulation of mitochondrial content in T. elegans. Overall results provide an indication that modulation of enzymes associated with carbohydrate and fatty-acid pathways is mainly oriented to limit energy expensive processes and sustain energy metabolism during transition from torpor to euthermy. Future studies are required to elucidate if physiological events observed for T. elegans are unique from other marsupials, or represents a general response in marsupials. J. Exp. Zool. 325A:41-51, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26553608

  11. Mitochondrial phenotype of marsupial torpor: Fuel metabolic switch in the Chilean mouse-opossum Thylamys elegans.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Pablo Andres; Bacigalupe, Leonardo Daniel; Mondaca, Fredy; Desrosiers, Véronique; Blier, Pierre U

    2016-01-01

    Torpor is a phenotype characterized by a controlled decline of metabolic rate and body temperature. During arousal from torpor, organs undergo rapid metabolic reactivation and rewarming to near normal levels. As torpor progress, animals show a preference for fatty acids over glucose as primary source of energy. Here, we analyzed for first time the changes in the maximal activity of key enzymes related to fatty acid (Carnitine palmitoyltransferase and β-Hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase) and carbohydrate (Pyruvate kinase, Phosphofructokinase and Lactate dehydrogenase) catabolism, as well as mitochondrial oxidative capacity (Citrate synthase), in six organs of torpid, arousing and euthermic Chilean mouse-opossums (Thylamys elegans). Our results showed that activity of enzymes related to fatty acid and carbohydrate catabolism were different among torpor phases and the pattern of variation differs among tissues. In terms of lipid utilization, maximal enzymatic activities differ in tissues with high oxidative capacity such as heart, kidney, and liver. In terms of carbohydrate use, lower enzymatic activities were observed during torpor in brain and liver. Interestingly, citrate synthase activity did not differ thought torpor-arousal cycle in any tissues analyzed, suggesting no modulation of mitochondrial content in T. elegans. Overall results provide an indication that modulation of enzymes associated with carbohydrate and fatty-acid pathways is mainly oriented to limit energy expensive processes and sustain energy metabolism during transition from torpor to euthermy. Future studies are required to elucidate if physiological events observed for T. elegans are unique from other marsupials, or represents a general response in marsupials. J. Exp. Zool. 325A:41-51, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Phenotypical Analysis of Atypical PKCs In Vivo Function Display a Compensatory System at Mouse Embryonic Day 7.5

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Sebastian; Braun, Ursula; Roos, Norbert; Li, Shaohua; Lüdtke, Timo H.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The atypical protein kinases C (PKC) isoforms ι/λ and ζ play crucial roles in many cellular processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Possible redundancy between the two isoforms has always been an issue since most biochemical tools do not differentiate between the two proteins. Thus, much effort has been made during the last decades to characterize the functions of aPKCs using gene targeting approaches and depletion studies. However, little is known about the specific roles of each isoform in mouse development. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate the importance of PKCι in mouse development we designed PKCι deletion mutants using the gene targeting approach. We show that the deletion of PKCι, results in a reduced size of the amniotic cavity at E7.5 and impaired growth of the embryo at E8.5 with subsequent absorption of the embryo. Our data also indicate an impaired localization of ZO-1 and disorganized structure of the epithelial tissue in the embryo. Importantly, using electron microscopy, embryoid body formation and immunofluorescence analysis, we found, that in the absence of PKCι, tight junctions and apico-basal polarity were still established. Finally, our study points to a non-redundant PKCι function at E9.5, since expression of PKCζ is able to rescue the E7.5 phenotype, but could not prevent embryonic lethality at a later time-point (E9.5). Conclusion Our data show that PKCι is crucial for mouse embryogenesis but is dispensable for the establishment of polarity and tight junction formation. We present a compensatory function of PKCζ at E7.5, rescuing the phenotype. Furthermore, this study indicates at least one specific, yet unknown, PKCι function that cannot be compensated by the overexpression of PKCζ at E9.5. PMID:23690951

  13. A comparative phenotypic and genomic analysis of C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mouse inbred line C57BL/6J is widely used in mouse genetics and its genome has been incorporated into many genetic reference populations. More recently large initiatives such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) are using the C57BL/6N mouse strain to generate null alleles for all mouse genes. Hence both strains are now widely used in mouse genetics studies. Here we perform a comprehensive genomic and phenotypic analysis of the two strains to identify differences that may influence their underlying genetic mechanisms. Results We undertake genome sequence comparisons of C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N to identify SNPs, indels and structural variants, with a focus on identifying all coding variants. We annotate 34 SNPs and 2 indels that distinguish C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N coding sequences, as well as 15 structural variants that overlap a gene. In parallel we assess the comparative phenotypes of the two inbred lines utilizing the EMPReSSslim phenotyping pipeline, a broad based assessment encompassing diverse biological systems. We perform additional secondary phenotyping assessments to explore other phenotype domains and to elaborate phenotype differences identified in the primary assessment. We uncover significant phenotypic differences between the two lines, replicated across multiple centers, in a number of physiological, biochemical and behavioral systems. Conclusions Comparison of C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N demonstrates a range of phenotypic differences that have the potential to impact upon penetrance and expressivity of mutational effects in these strains. Moreover, the sequence variants we identify provide a set of candidate genes for the phenotypic differences observed between the two strains. PMID:23902802

  14. GBM heterogeneity characterization by radiomic analysis of phenotype anatomical planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary tumor of the central nervous system, characterized among other traits by rapid metastatis. Three tissue phenotypes closely associated with GBMs, namely, necrosis (N), contrast enhancement (CE), and edema/invasion (E), exhibit characteristic patterns of texture heterogeneity in magnetic resonance images (MRI). In this study, we propose a novel model to characterize GBM tissue phenotypes using gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) in three anatomical planes. The GLCM encodes local image patches in terms of informative, orientation-invariant texture descriptors, which are used here to sub-classify GBM tissue phenotypes. Experiments demonstrate the model on MRI data of 41 GBM patients, obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Intensity-based automatic image registration is applied to align corresponding pairs of fixed T1˗weighted (T1˗WI) post-contrast and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. GBM tissue regions are then segmented using the 3D Slicer tool. Texture features are computed from 12 quantifier functions operating on GLCM descriptors, that are generated from MRI intensities within segmented GBM tissue regions. Various classifier models are used to evaluate the effectiveness of texture features for discriminating between GBM phenotypes. Results based on T1-WI scans showed a phenotype classification accuracy of over 88.14%, a sensitivity of 85.37% and a specificity of 96.1%, using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. This model has the potential to provide important characteristics of tumors, which can be used for the sub-classification of GBM phenotypes.

  15. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Lore; Kling, Eva; Schiller, Evelyn; Zeh, Ramona; Schrewe, Anja; Hölter, Sabine M; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Strecker, Valentina; Wittig, Ilka; Dumitru, Iulia; Wenz, Tina; Bender, Andreas; Aichler, Michaela; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Walch, Axel; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Floss, Thomas; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Wurst, Wolfgang; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Klopstock, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1) were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  16. DeltaNp63alpha overexpression induces downregulation of Sirt1 and an accelerated aging phenotype in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Matthias; Poliak, Nina; Upadhyay, Sunil; Ratovitski, Edward; Nelkin, Barry D; Donehower, Lawrence A; Sidransky, David

    2006-09-01

    p63 is highly expressed in the skin and appears to be an early marker of keratinocyte differentiation. To examine the role of p63 in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress deltaNp63alpha in the skin. These mice exhibited an accelerated aging phenotype in the skin characterized by striking wound healing defects, decreased skin thickness, decreased subcutaneous fat tissue, hair loss, and decreased cell proliferation. The accelerated skin aging was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in longevity of the mice. We found that aging in deltaNp63alpha transgenic mice and other mouse models correlated with levels of Sirt1, a mammalian SIR2 orthologue thought to extend the lifespan in lower species. Moreover, increased deltaNp63alpha expression induced cellular senescence that was rescued by Sirt1. Our data suggest that deltaNp63alpha levels may affect aging in mammals, at least in part, through regulation of Sirt1.

  17. Outstanding Phenotypic Differences in the Profile of Amyloid-β between Tg2576 and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Allué, José Antonio; Sarasa, Leticia; Izco, María; Pérez-Grijalba, Virginia; Fandos, Noelia; Pascual-Lucas, María; Ogueta, Samuel; Pesini, Pedro; Sarasa, Manuel

    2016-05-30

    APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg2576 are very common transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), used in many laboratories as tools to research the mechanistic process leading to the disease. In order to augment our knowledge about the amyloid-β (Aβ) isoforms present in both transgenic mouse models, we have developed two chromatographic methods, one acidic and the other basic, for the characterization of the Aβ species produced in the brains of the two transgenic mouse models. After immunoprecipitation and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, 10 species of Aβ, surprisingly all of human origin, were detected in the brain of Tg2576 mouse, whereas 39 species, of both murine and human origin, were detected in the brain of the APP/PS1 mouse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the identification of such a high number of Aβ species in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse, whereas, in contrast, a much lower number of Aβ species were identified in the Tg2576 mouse. Therefore, this study brings to light a relevant phenotypic difference between these two popular mice models of AD. PMID:27258422

  18. Electroretinographic genotype-phenotype correlations for mouse and man at the dmd/DMD locus

    SciTech Connect

    Millers, D.M.; Weleber, R.G.; Woodward, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    Reduced or absent b-waves in the dark-adapted electroretinogram (ERG) of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) patients led to the identification of dystrophin in human retina and the proposal that it plays a role in retinal electrophysiology. Study of a large group of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy males to determine their ocular characteristics indicated that there were position-specific effects of deletions, with 3{prime} defects associated with severe electroretinographic changes, whereas some 5{prime} patients demonstrated less severe, or even normal, ERGs. We studied the mdx mouse, a model with X-linked muscular dystrophy and defective full-length dystrophin, which failed to show any ERG abnormalities. Given the presence of alternate isoforms of dystrophin in retina, and the 5{prime} deletion DMD/BMD patients with normal ERGs, we studied mouse models with differing dystrophin mutations (mdx{sup Cv3}, mdx{sup Cv5}) to determine the usefulness of alternate strains as models for the visual effects of dystropin. Abnormal ERGs similar to those seen in DMD/BMS patients exist in the mdx{sup Cv3} strain of muscular dystrophy mice. Normal ERGs were found the mdx{sup Cv5} strain. The mutations in the mdx and mdx{sup Cv5} mice have been mapped to the 5{prime} end of the dmd gene, while the mutation in the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse is in the 3{prime} end. Thus, there are position effects of the gene defect on the ERG phenotype that are conserved in the mouse. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may reflect differential expression of shorter isoforms of dystrophin.

  19. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate. PMID:26519470

  20. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate.

  1. Lifetime development of behavioural phenotype in the house mouse (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With each trajectory taken during the ontogeny of an individual, the number of optional behavioural phenotypes that can be expressed across its life span is reduced. The initial range of phenotypic plasticity is largely determined by the genetic material/composition of the gametes whereas interacting with the given environment shapes individuals to adapt to/cope with specific demands. In mammalian species, the phenotype is shaped as the foetus grows, depending on the environment in the uterus, which in turn depends on the outer environment the mother experiences during pregnancy. After birth, a complex interaction between innate constitution and environmental conditions shapes individual lifetime trajectories, bringing about a wide range of diversity among individual subjects. In laboratory mice inbreeding has been systematically induced in order to reduce the genetic variability between experimental subjects. In addition, within most laboratories conducting behavioural phenotyping with mice, breeding and housing conditions are highly standardised. Despite such standardisation efforts a considerable amount of variability persists in the behaviour of mice. There is good evidence that phenotypic variation is not merely random but might involve individual specific behavioural patterns consistent over time. In order to understand the mechanisms and the possible adaptive value of the maintenance of individuality we review the emergence of behavioural phenotypes over the course of the life of (laboratory) mice. We present a literature review summarizing developmental stages of behavioural development of mice along with three illustrative case studies. We conclude that the accumulation of environmental differences and experiences lead to a “mouse individuality” that becomes increasingly stable over the lifetime. PMID:26816516

  2. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, Ana; Airey, David; Thompson, Brent; Zhu, C; Rinchik, Eugene M; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Erikson, Keith; Blakely, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  3. A Novel Drug-Mouse Phenotypic Similarity Method Detects Molecular Determinants of Drug Effects

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Jeanette; Vogt, Ingo; Adornetto, Gianluca; Campillos, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that translate drug treatment into beneficial and unwanted effects are largely unknown. We present here a novel approach to detect gene-drug and gene-side effect associations based on the phenotypic similarity of drugs and single gene perturbations in mice that account for the polypharmacological property of drugs. We scored the phenotypic similarity of human side effect profiles of 1,667 small molecules and biologicals to profiles of phenotypic traits of 5,384 mouse genes. The benchmarking with known relationships revealed a strong enrichment of physical and indirect drug-target connections, causative drug target-side effect links as well as gene-drug links involved in pharmacogenetic associations among phenotypically similar gene-drug pairs. The validation by in vitro assays and the experimental verification of an unknown connection between oxandrolone and prokineticin receptor 2 reinforces the ability of this method to provide new molecular insights underlying drug treatment. Thus, this approach may aid in the proposal of novel and personalized treatments. PMID:27673331

  4. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P < 0.05) with no obvious changes in the growth rate, and a lower plasma lipids profile (cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, 0.001 < P< 0.05). The muscle structure of the animals was examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  5. The Invalidation of HspB1 Gene in Mouse Alters the Ultrastructural Phenotype of Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kammoun, Malek; Picard, Brigitte; Astruc, Thierry; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Aubert, Denise; Bonnet, Muriel; Blanquet, Véronique; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Even though abundance of Hsp27 is the highest in skeletal muscle, the relationships between the expression of HspB1 (encoding Hsp27) and muscle characteristics are not fully understood. In this study, we have analysed the effect of Hsp27 inactivation on mouse development and phenotype. We generated a mouse strain devoid of Hsp27 protein by homologous recombination of the HspB1 gene. The HspB1-/- mouse was viable and fertile, showing neither apparent morphological nor anatomical alterations. We detected a gender dimorphism with marked effects in males, a lower body weight (P < 0.05) with no obvious changes in the growth rate, and a lower plasma lipids profile (cholesterol, HDL and triglycerides, 0.001 < P< 0.05). The muscle structure of the animals was examined by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Not any differences in the characteristics of muscle fibres (contractile and metabolic type, shape, perimeter, cross-sectional area) were detected except a trend for a higher proportion of small fibres. Different myosin heavy chains electrophoretic profiles were observed in the HspB1-/- mouse especially the presence of an additional isoform. Electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the myofibrillar structure of the HspB1-/- mouse mutant mice (e.g. destructured myofibrils and higher gaps between myofibrils) especially in the m. Soleus. Combined with our previous data, these findings suggest that Hsp27 could directly impact the organization of muscle cytoskeleton at the molecular and ultrastructural levels. PMID:27512988

  6. Characterization of a male reproductive transcriptome for Peromyscus eremicus (Cactus mouse)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rodents of the genus Peromyscus have become increasingly utilized models for investigations into adaptive biology. This genus is particularly powerful for research linking genetics with adaptive physiology or behaviors, and recent research has capitalized on the unique opportunities afforded by the ecological diversity of these rodents. Well characterized genomic and transcriptomic data is intrinsic to explorations of the genetic architecture responsible for ecological adaptations. Therefore, this study characterizes the transcriptome of three male reproductive tissues (testes, epididymis and vas deferens) of Peromyscus eremicus (Cactus mouse), a desert specialist. The transcriptome assembly process was optimized in order to produce a high quality and substantially complete annotated transcriptome. This composite transcriptome was generated to characterize the expressed transcripts in the male reproductive tract of P. eremicus, which will serve as a crucial resource for future research investigating our hypothesis that the male Cactus mouse possesses an adaptive reproductive phenotype to mitigate water-loss from ejaculate. This study reports genes under positive selection in the male Cactus mouse reproductive transcriptome relative to transcriptomes from Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse) and Mus musculus. Thus, this study expands upon existing genetic research in this species, and we provide a high quality transcriptome to enable further explorations of our proposed hypothesis for male Cactus mouse reproductive adaptations to minimize seminal fluid loss. PMID:27812417

  7. Genetic characterization of senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM).

    PubMed

    Higuchi, K

    1997-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains are unique and appropriate models for genetic studies on aging because the SAMP strains have an "accelerated senescence" phenotype for which the SAMR strains are controls, and each SAMP strain has a strain-specific age-associated disorder. Furthermore, because they have gone through sufficient generations of sister-brother mating, they can be considered inbred strains, which can be analyzed genetically. There are now 11 SAMP strains and 3 SAMR strains descended from the progenitor litters. Analysis with the Gompertz function shows that the SAMP strains have the same initial mortality rate (IMR) as the SAMR strains but a shorter mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), presumably due to genes that accelerated the rate of senescence in the SAMP strains. This accelerated senescence may also occur in cultured fibroblast-like cells. We performed molecular genetic characterization of all the SAM strains to acquire a base of genetic information from which we could develop hypotheses on the mechanism of development of SAM strains and genetic factors that contribute to accelerated senescence. PMID:9088910

  8. Genotype, phenotype, and karyotype correlation in the XO mouse model of Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Probst, Frank J; Cooper, Mitchell Lance; Cheung, Sau Wai; Justice, Monica J

    2008-01-01

    The murine model for Turner Syndrome is the XO mouse. Unlike their human counterparts, XO mice are typically fertile, and their lack of a second sex chromosome can be transmitted from one generation to the next as an X-linked dominant trait with male lethality. The introduction of an X-linked coat-color marker (tabby) has greatly facilitated the maintenance of this useful mouse strain. XO mice can be produced in large numbers, generation after generation, and rapidly identified on the basis of their sex and coat color. Although this breeding scheme appears to be effective at the phenotype level, its utility has never been conclusively proved at the molecular or cytogenetic levels. Here, we clone and sequence the tabby deletion break point and present a multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based assay for the tabby mutation. By combining the results of this assay with whole-chromosome painting data, we demonstrate that genotype, phenotype, and karyotype all show perfect correlation in the publicly available XO breeding stock. This work lays the foundation for the use of this strain to study Turner Syndrome in particular and the X chromosome in general. PMID:18499648

  9. Structural and Functional Concepts in Current Mouse Phenotyping and Archiving Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kollmus, Heike; Post, Rainer; Brielmeier, Markus; Fernández, Julia; Fuchs, Helmut; McKerlie, Colin; Montoliu, Lluis; Otaegui, Pedro J; Rebelo, Manuel; Riedesel, Hermann; Ruberte, Jesús; Sedlacek, Radislav; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Schughart, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Collecting and analyzing available information on the building plans, concepts, and workflow from existing animal facilities is an essential prerequisite for most centers that are planning and designing the construction of a new animal experimental research unit. Here, we have collected and analyzed such information in the context of the European project Infrafrontier, which aims to develop a common European infrastructure for high-throughput systemic phenotyping, archiving, and dissemination of mouse models. A team of experts visited 9 research facilities and 3 commercial breeders in Europe, Canada, the United States, and Singapore. During the visits, detailed data of each facility were collected and subsequently represented in standardized floor plans and descriptive tables. These data showed that because the local needs of scientists and their projects, property issues, and national and regional laws require very specific solutions, a common strategy for the construction of such facilities does not exist. However, several basic concepts were apparent that can be described by standardized floor plans showing the principle functional units and their interconnection. Here, we provide detailed information of how individual facilities addressed their specific needs by using different concepts of connecting the principle units. Our analysis likely will be valuable to research centers that are planning to design new mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities. PMID:23043807

  10. Phylogenetic Characterization of Virulence and Resistance Phenotypes of Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Michael S. H.; Morgan, Robyn L.; Sarkar, Sara F.; Wang, Pauline W.; Guttman, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Individual strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae vary in their ability to produce toxins, nucleate ice, and resist antimicrobial compounds. These phenotypes enhance virulence, but it is not clear whether they play a dominant role in specific pathogen-host interactions. To investigate the evolution of these virulence-associated phenotypes, we used functional assays to survey for the distribution of these phenotypes among a collection of 95 P. syringae strains. All of these strains were phylogenetically characterized via multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We surveyed for the production of coronatine, phaseolotoxin, syringomycin, and tabtoxin; for resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, rifampin, streptomycin, tetracycline, kanamycin, and copper; and for the ability to nucleate ice at high temperatures via the ice-nucleating protein INA. We found that fewer than 50% of the strains produced toxins and significantly fewer strains than expected produced multiple toxins, leading to the speculation that there is a cost associated with the production of multiple toxins. None of these toxins was associated with host of isolation, and their distribution, relative to core genome phylogeny, indicated extensive horizontal genetic exchange. Most strains were resistant to ampicillin and copper and had the ability to nucleate ice, and yet very few strains were resistant to the other antibiotics. The distribution of the rare resistance phenotypes was also inconsistent with the clonal history of the species and did not associate with host of isolation. The present study provides a robust phylogenetic foundation for the study of these important virulence-associated phenotypes in P. syringae host colonization and pathogenesis. PMID:16151103

  11. Intracellular Calcium Measurements for Functional Characterization of Neuronal Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Talita; Castillo, Ana Regina G; Oliveira, Ágatha; Ulrich, Henning

    2016-01-01

    The central and peripheral nervous system is built by a network of many different neuronal phenotypes together with glial and other supporting cells. The repertoire of expressed receptors and secreted neurotransmitters and neuromodulators are unique for each single neuron leading to intracellular signaling cascades, many of them involving intracellular calcium signaling. Here we suggest the use of calcium signaling analysis upon specific agonist application to reliably identify neuronal phenotypes, being important not only for basic science, but also providing a reliable tool for functional characterization of cells prior to transplantation. Calcium imaging provides various cellular information including signaling amplitudes, cell localization, duration, and frequency. Microfluorimetry reveals a signal summarizing the entire population, and its use is indicated for high-throughput screening purposes.

  12. Mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) change their phenotype when cultured with fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Levi-Schaffer, F.; Austen, K.F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1986-03-05

    The heparin-containing mast cells (HP-MC) that reside in the connective tissues of the mouse, but not the chondroitin sulfate containing mast cells in the gastrointestinal mucosa, stain with safranin when exposed to alcian blue/safranin. Mouse BMMC (the presumptive in vitro counterpart of the in vivo differentiated mucosal mast cell) were cultured for 2-14 days with confluent skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts in RPMI-1640 containing 10% fetal calf serum and 50% WEHI-3 conditioned medium. Although the BMMC adhered to the fibroblast monolayer, they continued to divide, probably due to the presence of interleukin-3 in the conditioned medium. The mast cells remained viable throughout the period of co-culture, since they failed to release LDG and because they increased their histamine content per cell approx.15-fold. After 8-9 days of co-culture, >50% of the BMMC changed histochemically becoming safranin positive. At this time, 30-50% of the (/sup 35/S)glycosaminoglycans on the proteoglycans synthesized by these co-cultured mass cells were heparin, whereas the initial BMMC synthesized proteoglycans containing only chondroitin sulfate E. That interleukin 3-dependent mouse BMMC can be induced to undergo a phenotypic change so as to express characteristics of a HP-MC suggests that the tissue microenvironment determines the differentiated characteristics of these cells.

  13. Dietary phosphorus overload aggravates the phenotype of the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Wada, Eiji; Yoshida, Mizuko; Kojima, Yoriko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Shiozuka, Masataka; Date, Munehiro; Higashi, Tetsuo; Nishino, Ichizo; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disease with no effective treatment. Progressive muscle degeneration, increased macrophage infiltration, and ectopic calcification are characteristic features of the mdx mouse, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Because dietary phosphorus/phosphate consumption is increasing and adverse effects of phosphate overloading have been reported in several disease conditions, we examined the effects of dietary phosphorus intake in mdx mice phenotypes. On weaning, control and mdx mice were fed diets containing 0.7, 1.0, or 2.0 g phosphorus per 100 g until they were 90 days old. Dystrophic phenotypes were evaluated in cryosections of quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscles, and maximal forces and voluntary activity were measured. Ectopic calcification was analyzed by electron microscopy to determine the cells initially responsible for calcium deposition in skeletal muscle. Dietary phosphorus overload dramatically exacerbated the dystrophic phenotypes of mdx mice by increasing inflammation associated with infiltration of M1 macrophages. In contrast, minimal muscle necrosis and inflammation were observed in exercised mdx mice fed a low-phosphorus diet, suggesting potential beneficial therapeutic effects of lowering dietary phosphorus intake on disease progression. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that dietary phosphorus intake directly affects muscle pathological characteristics of mdx mice. Dietary phosphorus overloading promoted dystrophic disease progression in mdx mice, whereas restricting dietary phosphorus intake improved muscle pathological characteristics and function.

  14. Evaluating age-associated phenotypes in a mouse model of protein dyshomeostasis.

    PubMed

    Min, Jin-Na; Patterson, Cam

    2011-03-01

    Proteotoxicity caused by an imbalanced protein quality control surveillance system is believed to contribute to the phenotypes associated with aging as well as many neurodegenerative diseases. Understanding and monitoring the impact of proteotoxicity in these processes offers researchers keen insight into the biology of aging, as well as other conditions that share similar pathological etiologies. In Section 2, we present various technical approaches that can be used to calculate and characterize the phenotypes associated with aging that are linked to increased proteotoxicity. Methods such as the measurement of oligomer protein expression and the capacity of proteasome function are useful tools in observing both aging phenotypes and neurodegenerative diseases, both of which share the phenomenon of impaired protein homeostasis.

  15. Augmentation of phenotype in a transgenic Parkinson mouse heterozygous for a Gaucher mutation.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Ianai; Kuo, Yien-Ming; Giasson, Benoit I; Nussbaum, Robert L

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of the protein α-synuclein (SNCA) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is strongly supported by the facts that (i) missense and copy number mutations in the SNCA gene can cause inherited Parkinson's disease; and (ii) Lewy bodies in sporadic Parkinson's disease are largely composed of aggregated SNCA. Unaffected heterozygous carriers of Gaucher disease mutations have an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. As mutations in the GBA gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GBA) are known to interfere with lysosomal protein degradation, GBA heterozygotes may demonstrate reduced lysosomal SNCA degradation, leading to increased steady-state SNCA levels and promoting its aggregation. We have created mouse models to investigate the interaction between GBA mutations and synucleinopathies. We investigated the rate of SNCA degradation in cultured primary cortical neurons from mice expressing wild-type mouse SNCA, wild-type human SNCA, or mutant A53T SNCA, in a background of either wild-type Gba or heterozygosity for the L444P GBA mutation associated with Gaucher disease. We also tested the effect of this Gaucher mutation on motor and enteric nervous system function in these transgenic animals. We found that human SNCA is stable, with a half-life of 61 h, and that the A53T mutation did not significantly affect its half-life. Heterozygosity for a naturally occurring Gaucher mutation, L444P, reduced GBA activity by 40%, reduced SNCA degradation and triggered accumulation of the protein in culture. This mutation also resulted in the exacerbation of motor and gastrointestinal deficits found in the A53T mouse model of Parkinson's disease. This study demonstrates that heterozygosity for a Gaucher disease-associated mutation in Gba interferes with SNCA degradation and contributes to its accumulation, and exacerbates the phenotype in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25351739

  16. Characterization of Obesity Phenotypes in Psammomys Obesus (Israeli Sand Rats)

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Richard P.; Morton, Greg J.; Zimmet, Paul Z.; Collier, Greg R.

    2000-01-01

    Psammomys obesus (the Israeli sand rat) has been well studied as an animal model of Type 2 diabetes. However, obesity phenotypes in these animals have not been fully characterized. We analyzed phenotypic data including body weight, percentage body fat, blood glucose and plasma insulin concentration for over 600 animals from the Psammomys obesus colony at Deakin University to investigate the relationships between body fat, body weight and Type 2 diabetes using regression analysis and general linear modelling. The body weight distribution in Psammomys obesus approximates a normal distribution and closely resembles that observed in human populations. Animals above the 75th percentile for body weight had increased body fat content and a greater risk of developing diabetes. Increased visceral fat content .was also associated with elevated blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations in these animals. A familial effect was also demonstrated in Psammomys obesus, and accounted for 51% of the variation in body weight, and 23–26% of the variation in blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations in these animals. Psammomys obesus represents an excellent animal model of.obesity and Type 2 diabetes that exhibits a phenotypic pattern closely resembling that observed in human population studies. The obesity described in these animals was familial in nature and was significantly associated with Type 2 diabetes. PMID:11467408

  17. New phenotypic aspects of the decidual spiral artery wall during early post-implantation mouse pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Elia, Artemis; Charalambous, Fotini; Georgiades, Pantelis

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spiral artery (SA) wall remodeling (SAR) is ill-defined and clinically important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA muscular phenotype prior to and during SAR in mice is underexplored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA muscular wall consists of contractile and non-contractile components. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA wall non-contractile component may be synthetic smooth muscle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Timing and extent of SA wall contractile component loss is revealed. -- Abstract: During pregnancy the walls of decidual spiral arteries (SAs) undergo clinically important structural modifications crucial for embryo survival/growth and maternal health. However, the mechanisms of SA remodeling (SAR) are poorly understood. Although an important prerequisite to this understanding is knowledge about the phenotype of SA muscular wall prior to and during the beginning of mouse SAR, this remains largely unexplored and was the main aim of this work. Using histological and immunohistochemical techniques, this study shows for the first time that during early mouse gestation, from embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5) to E10.5, the decidual SA muscular coat is not a homogeneous structure, but consists of two concentric layers. The first is a largely one cell-thick sub-endothelial layer of contractile mural cells (positive for {alpha}-smooth muscle actin, calponin and SM22{alpha}) with pericyte characteristics (NG2 positive). The second layer is thicker, and evidence is presented that it may be of the synthetic/proliferative smooth muscle phenotype, based on absence ({alpha}-smooth muscle actin and calponin) or weak (SM22{alpha}) expression of contractile mural cell markers, and presence of synthetic smooth muscle characteristics (expression of non-muscle Myosin heavy chain-IIA and of the cell proliferation marker PCNA). Importantly, immunohistochemistry and morphometrics showed that the contractile mural cell layer although prominent at E7.5-E8

  18. Mapping Pathological Phenotypes in a Mouse Model of CDKL5 Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, Elena; Zhan, Yang; Mattucci, Camilla; Castroflorio, Enrico; Calcagno, Eleonora; Fuchs, Claudia; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Silingardi, Davide; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Farley, Dominika; Ciani, Elisabetta; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Giustetto, Maurizio; Gross, Cornelius T.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) cause early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, a neurodevelopmental disorder with similarities to Rett Syndrome. Here we describe the physiological, molecular, and behavioral phenotyping of a Cdkl5 conditional knockout mouse model of CDKL5 disorder. Behavioral analysis of constitutive Cdkl5 knockout mice revealed key features of the human disorder, including limb clasping, hypoactivity, and abnormal eye tracking. Anatomical, physiological, and molecular analysis of the knockout uncovered potential pathological substrates of the disorder, including reduced dendritic arborization of cortical neurons, abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG) responses to convulsant treatment, decreased visual evoked responses (VEPs), and alterations in the Akt/rpS6 signaling pathway. Selective knockout of Cdkl5 in excitatory and inhibitory forebrain neurons allowed us to map the behavioral features of the disorder to separable cell-types. These findings identify physiological and molecular deficits in specific forebrain neuron populations as possible pathological substrates in CDKL5 disorder. PMID:24838000

  19. Characterization of Bcor expression in mouse development.

    PubMed

    Wamstad, Joseph A; Bardwell, Vivian J

    2007-04-01

    Mutation of the gene encoding the transcriptional corepressor BCOR results in the X-linked disorder Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD or MCOPS2). Female OFCD patients suffer from severe ocular, craniofacial, cardiac, and digital developmental defects and males do not survive through gestation. BCOR can mediate transcriptional repression by the oncoprotein BCL6 and has the ability to reduce transcriptional activation by AF9, a known mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion partner. The essential role of BCOR in development and its ability to modulate activity of known oncogenic proteins prompted us to determine the expression profile of Bcor during mouse development. Identification of independently transcribed exons in the 5' untranslated region of Bcor suggests that three independent promoters control the expression of Bcor in mice. Although Bcor is widely expressed in adult mouse tissues, analysis of known spliced isoforms in the coding region of Bcor reveals differential isoform usage. Whole mount in situ hybridization of mouse embryos shows that Bcor is strongly expressed in the extraembryonic tissue during gastrulation and expression significantly increases throughout the embryo after embryonic turning. During organogenesis and fetal stages Bcor is differentially expressed in multiple tissue lineages, with a notable presence in the developing nervous system. Strikingly, we observed that Bcor expression in the eye, brain, neural tube, and branchial arches correlates with tissues affected in OFCD patients. PMID:17344103

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of P23H line 1 rat model.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Elise; Dalkara, Deniz; Neuillé, Marion; Lechauve, Christophe; Michiels, Christelle; Picaud, Serge; Léveillard, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Naash, Muna I; Lavail, Matthew M; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease, for which no therapy is currently available. The P23H rat is one of the most commonly used autosomal dominant RP models. It has been created by incorporation of a mutated mouse rhodopsin (Rho) transgene in the wild-type (WT) Sprague Dawley rat. Detailed genetic characterization of this transgenic animal has however never been fully reported. Here we filled this knowledge gap on P23H Line 1 rat (P23H-1) and provide additional phenotypic information applying non-invasive and state-of-the-art in vivo techniques that are relevant for preclinical therapeutic evaluations. Transgene sequence was analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Using quantitative PCR, transgene copy number was calculated and its expression measured in retinal tissue. Full field electroretinography (ERG) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed at 1-, 2-, 3- and 6-months of age. Sanger sequencing revealed that P23H-1 rat carries the mutated mouse genomic Rho sequence from the promoter to the 3' UTR. Transgene copy numbers were estimated at 9 and 18 copies in the hemizygous and homozygous rats respectively. In 1-month-old hemizygous P23H-1 rats, transgene expression represented 43% of all Rho expressed alleles. ERG showed a progressive rod-cone dysfunction peaking at 6 months-of-age. SD-OCT confirmed a progressive thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer leading to the disappearance of the outer retina by 6 months with additional morphological changes in the inner retinal cell layers in hemizygous P23H-1 rats. These results provide precise genotypic information of the P23H-1 rat with additional phenotypic characterization that will serve basis for therapeutic interventions, especially for those aiming at gene editing. PMID:26009893

  1. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of P23H Line 1 Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, Elise; Dalkara, Deniz; Neuillé, Marion; Lechauve, Christophe; Michiels, Christelle; Picaud, Serge; Léveillard, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Naash, Muna I.; Lavail, Matthew M.; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Rod-cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), is the most common inherited degenerative photoreceptor disease, for which no therapy is currently available. The P23H rat is one of the most commonly used autosomal dominant RP models. It has been created by incorporation of a mutated mouse rhodopsin (Rho) transgene in the wild-type (WT) Sprague Dawley rat. Detailed genetic characterization of this transgenic animal has however never been fully reported. Here we filled this knowledge gap on P23H Line 1 rat (P23H-1) and provide additional phenotypic information applying non-invasive and state-of-the-art in vivo techniques that are relevant for preclinical therapeutic evaluations. Transgene sequence was analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Using quantitative PCR, transgene copy number was calculated and its expression measured in retinal tissue. Full field electroretinography (ERG) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed at 1-, 2-, 3- and 6-months of age. Sanger sequencing revealed that P23H-1 rat carries the mutated mouse genomic Rho sequence from the promoter to the 3’ UTR. Transgene copy numbers were estimated at 9 and 18 copies in the hemizygous and homozygous rats respectively. In 1-month-old hemizygous P23H-1 rats, transgene expression represented 43% of all Rho expressed alleles. ERG showed a progressive rod-cone dysfunction peaking at 6 months-of-age. SD-OCT confirmed a progressive thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer leading to the disappearance of the outer retina by 6 months with additional morphological changes in the inner retinal cell layers in hemizygous P23H-1 rats. These results provide precise genotypic information of the P23H-1 rat with additional phenotypic characterization that will serve basis for therapeutic interventions, especially for those aiming at gene editing. PMID:26009893

  2. Cellular characterization of MPZ mutations presenting with diverse clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chung; Lin, Kon-Ping; Chang, Ming-Hong; Liao, Yi-Chu; Tsai, Ching-Piao; Liao, Kwong-Kum; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in MPZ, which encodes myelin protein zero (P(0)), may lead to different subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular manifestations of various MPZ mutations associated with CMT1, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) and CMT2, and to correlate their cellular and clinical phenotypes. Nine P(0) mutants associated with CMT1 (P(0)S63F, R98H, R277S, and S233fs), DSS (P(0) I30T and R98C), and CMT2 (P(0)S44F, D75V, and T124M), were investigated. Wild-type and mutant P(0) fused with fluorescent proteins were expressed in vitro to monitor their intracellular localization. An adhesiveness assay was used to evaluate the adhesiveness of the transfected cells. Protein localization and cell adhesiveness of each mutant protein were compared and correlated with their clinical phenotypes. Three different intracellular localization patterns of the mutant P(0) were observed. Wild-type P(0), P(0)I30T, S44F, S63F, D75V, T124M, and R227S were mostly localized on the cell membrane, P(0)R98H, and R98C were found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, and P(0)S233fs formed aggregates within the ER. Cells expressing mutant P(0), as compared with those expressing wild-type P(0), demonstrated variable degrees of reduction in the cell adhesiveness. The molecular patho-mechanisms of MPZ mutations are likely very complex and the clinical phenotype must be influenced by many genetic or environmental factors. This complexity may contribute to the highly variable clinical manifestations resulting from different MPZ mutations. PMID:20461396

  3. Amyloid and tau pathology of familial Alzheimer's disease APP/PS1 mouse model in a senescence phenotype background (SAMP8).

    PubMed

    Porquet, D; Andrés-Benito, P; Griñán-Ferré, C; Camins, A; Ferrer, I; Canudas, A M; Del Valle, J; Pallàs, Mercè

    2015-02-01

    The amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of familial AD-like pattern at early ages, whereas senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) has a remarkable early senescence phenotype with pathological similarities to AD. The aim of this study was the investigation and characterization of cognitive and neuropathological AD markers in a novel mouse model that combines the characteristics of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model with a senescence-accelerated background of SAMP8 mice. Initially, significant differences were found regarding amyloid plaque formation and cognitive abnormalities. Bearing these facts in mind, we determined a general characterization of the main AD brain molecular markers, such as alterations in amyloid pathway, neuroinflammation, and hyperphosphorylation of tau in these mice along their lifetimes. Results from this analysis revealed that APP/PS1 in SAMP8 background mice showed alterations in the pathways studied in comparison with SAMP8 and APP/PS1, demonstrating that a senescence-accelerated background exacerbated the amyloid pathology and maintained the cognitive dysfunction present in APP/PS1 mice. Changes in tau pathology, including the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β), differs, but not in a parallel manner, with amyloid disturbances. PMID:25663420

  4. Characterizing root response phenotypes by neural network analysis.

    PubMed

    Hatzig, Sarah V; Schiessl, Sarah; Stahl, Andreas; Snowdon, Rod J

    2015-09-01

    Roots play an immediate role as the interface for water acquisition. To improve sustainability in low-water environments, breeders of major crops must therefore pay closer attention to advantageous root phenotypes; however, the complexity of root architecture in response to stress can be difficult to quantify. Here, the Sholl method, an established technique from neurobiology used for the characterization of neural network anatomy, was adapted to more adequately describe root responses to osmotic stress. This method was used to investigate the influence of in vitro osmotic stress on early root architecture and distribution in drought-resistant and -susceptible genotypes of winter oilseed rape. Interactive changes in root architecture can be easily captured by individual intersection profiles generated by Sholl analysis. Validation using manual measurements confirmed that the number of lateral roots decreased, while mean lateral root length was enhanced, under osmotic stress conditions. Both genotypes reacted to osmotic stress with a shift in their intersection patterns measured with Sholl analysis. Changes in interactive root architecture and distribution under stress were more pronounced in the drought-resistant genotype, indicating that these changes may contribute to drought resistance under mild osmotic stress conditions. The Sholl methodology is presented as a promising tool for selection of cultivars with advantageous root phenotypes under osmotic stress conditions. PMID:26019255

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS VIRULENCE USING AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED MOUSE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An immunocompromised mouse model was used to characterize Aeromonas strains for their ability to cause opportunistic, extraintestinal infections. A total of 34 isolates of Aeromonas (A. hydrophila [n = 12]), A. veronii biotype sobria [n = 7], A. caviae [n = 4], A. enchelia [n = 4...

  6. Rett syndrome like phenotypes in the R255X Mecp2 mutant mouse are rescued by MECP2 transgene.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Meagan R; Herrera, José A; Buffington, Shelly A; Kochukov, Mikhail Y; Merritt, Jonathan K; Fisher, Amanda R; Schanen, N Carolyn; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that is usually caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding Protein 2 (MECP2). Four of the eight common disease causing mutations in MECP2 are nonsense mutations and are responsible for over 35% of all cases of RTT. A strategy to overcome disease-causing nonsense mutations is treatment with nonsense mutation suppressing drugs that allow expression of full-length proteins from mutated genes with premature in-frame stop codons. To determine if this strategy is useful in RTT, we characterized a new mouse model containing a knock-in nonsense mutation (p.R255X) in the Mecp2 locus (Mecp2(R255X)). To determine whether the truncated gene product acts as a dominant negative allele and if RTT-like phenotypes could be rescued by expression of wild-type protein, we genetically introduced an extra copy of MECP2 via an MECP2 transgene. The addition of MECP2 transgene to Mecp2(R255X) mice abolished the phenotypic abnormalities and resulted in near complete rescue. Expression of MECP2 transgene Mecp2(R255X) allele also rescued mTORC1 signaling abnormalities discovered in mice with loss of function and overexpression of Mecp2. Finally, we treated Mecp2(R255X) embryonic fibroblasts with the nonsense mutation suppressing drug gentamicin and we were able to induce expression of full-length MeCP2 from the mutant p.R255X allele. These data provide proof of concept that the p.R255X mutation of MECP2 is amenable to the nonsense suppression therapeutic strategy and provide guidelines for the extent of rescue that can be expected by re-expressing MeCP2 protein.

  7. Rett syndrome like phenotypes in the R255X Mecp2 mutant mouse are rescued by MECP2 transgene

    PubMed Central

    Pitcher, Meagan R.; Herrera, José A.; Buffington, Shelly A.; Kochukov, Mikhail Y.; Merritt, Jonathan K.; Fisher, Amanda R.; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that is usually caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-binding Protein 2 (MECP2). Four of the eight common disease causing mutations in MECP2 are nonsense mutations and are responsible for over 35% of all cases of RTT. A strategy to overcome disease-causing nonsense mutations is treatment with nonsense mutation suppressing drugs that allow expression of full-length proteins from mutated genes with premature in-frame stop codons. To determine if this strategy is useful in RTT, we characterized a new mouse model containing a knock-in nonsense mutation (p.R255X) in the Mecp2 locus (Mecp2R255X). To determine whether the truncated gene product acts as a dominant negative allele and if RTT-like phenotypes could be rescued by expression of wild-type protein, we genetically introduced an extra copy of MECP2 via an MECP2 transgene. The addition of MECP2 transgene to Mecp2R255X mice abolished the phenotypic abnormalities and resulted in near complete rescue. Expression of MECP2 transgene Mecp2R255X allele also rescued mTORC1 signaling abnormalities discovered in mice with loss of function and overexpression of Mecp2. Finally, we treated Mecp2R255X embryonic fibroblasts with the nonsense mutation suppressing drug gentamicin and we were able to induce expression of full-length MeCP2 from the mutant p.R255X allele. These data provide proof of concept that the p.R255X mutation of MECP2 is amenable to the nonsense suppression therapeutic strategy and provide guidelines for the extent of rescue that can be expected by re-expressing MeCP2 protein. PMID:25634563

  8. Phenotype-Genotype Correlations in Mouse Models of Amelogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Amelx and Enam Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Coxon, Thomas Liam; Brook, Alan Henry; Barron, Martin John; Smith, Richard Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in human and in mouse orthologous genes Amelx and Enam result in a diverse range of enamel defects. In this study we aimed to investigate the phenotype-genotype correlation between the mutants and the wild-type controls in mouse models of amelogenesis imperfecta using novel measurement approaches. Ten hemi-mandibles and incisors were dissected from each group of AmelxWT, AmelxX/Y64H, AmelxY/Y64H, AmelxY64H/Y64H, and EnamWT, EnamRgsc395 heterozygous and EnamRgsc395 homozygous mice. Their macro-morphology, colour and micro-topography were assessed using bespoke 2D and 3D image analysis systems and customized colour and whiteness algorithms. The novel methods identified significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between the Amelx groups for mandible and incisor size and enamel colour and between the Enam groups for incisor size and enamel colour. The AmelxWT mice had the largest mandibles and incisors, followed in descending order of size by the AmelxX/Y64H, AmelxY/Y64H and AmelxY64H/Y64H mice. Within the Enam groups the EnamWT incisors were largest and the EnamRgsc395 heterozygous mice were smallest. The effect on tooth morphology was also reflected by the severity of the enamel defects in the colour and whiteness assessment. Amelogenin affected mandible morphology and incisor enamel formation, while enamelin only affected incisors, supporting the multifunctional role of amelogenin. The enamelin mutation was associated with earlier forming enamel defects. The study supported the critical involvement of amelogenin and enamelin in enamel mineralization. PMID:22759786

  9. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of the species Acinetobacter venetianus

    PubMed Central

    Fondi, Marco; Maida, Isabel; Perrin, Elena; Orlandini, Valerio; La Torre, Laura; Bosi, Emanuele; Negroni, Andrea; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio; Decorosi, Francesca; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Fani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that can produce serious environmental problems and whose removal is highly demanding in terms of human and technological resources. The potential use of microbes as bioremediation agents is one of the most promising fields in this area. Members of the species Acinetobacter venetianus have been previously characterized for their capability to degrade n-alkanes and thus may represent interesting model systems to implement this process. Although a preliminary experimental characterization of the overall hydrocarbon degradation capability has been performed for five of them, to date, the genetic/genomic features underlying such molecular processes have not been identified. Here we have integrated genomic and phenotypic information for six A. venetianus strains, i.e. VE-C3, RAG-1T, LUH 13518, LUH 7437, LUH 5627 and LUH 8758. Besides providing a thorough description of the A. venetianus species, these data were exploited to infer the genetic features (presence/absence patterns of genes) and the short-term evolutionary events possibly responsible for the variability in n-alkane degradation efficiency of these strains, including the mechanisms of interaction with the fuel droplet and the subsequent catabolism of this pollutant. PMID:26902269

  10. Phenotypic characterization of collagen gel embedded primary human breast epithelial cells in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Guzman, R C; Popnikolov, N; Bandyopadhyay, G K; Christov, K; Collins, G; Nandi, S

    1994-06-30

    We have developed a method to characterize the phenotypes and tumorigenicity of dissociated human breast epithelial cells. The dissociated cells were first embedded in collagen gels and subsequently transplanted subcutaneously in vivo in athymic nude mice. The transplantation of dissociated epithelial cells from reduction mammoplasties, presumed to be normal, always resulted in normal histomorphology. Epithelial cells were arranged as short tubular structures consisting of lumina surrounded by epithelial cells with an occasional more complex branching structure. These outgrowths were surrounded by intact basement membrane and were embedded in collagen gel that, at termination, contained collagenous stroma with fibroblasts and blood vessels. In contrast, transplantation of dissociated breast epithelial cells from breast cancer specimens resulted in outgrowths with an invasive pattern infiltrating the collagen gel as well as frank invasion into vascular space, nerves and muscles. These observations were made long before the subsequent palpable stage which resulted if left in the mouse for a long enough time. The dissociated human breast epithelial cells thus retained their intrinsic property to undergo morphogenesis to reflect their original phenotype when placed in a suitable environment, the collagen gel.

  11. Characterization of a mouse model of headache.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyue; Ren, Lynn; Qiu, Chang-Shen; Liu, Ping; Peterson, Jonathan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Migraine and other primary headache disorders affect a large population and cause debilitating pain. Establishing animal models that display behavioral correlates of long-lasting and ongoing headache, the most common and disabling symptom of migraine, is vital for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and identification of drug targets. We have developed a mouse model of headache, using dural application of capsaicin along with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (IScap) to simulate the induction of a headache episode. This elicited intermittent head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Interestingly, dural application of IScap preferentially induced FOS protein expression in the excitatory but not inhibitory cervical/medullary dorsal horn neurons. The duration of IScap-induced behavior and the number of FOS-positive neurons correlated positively in individual mice; both were reduced to the control level by the pretreatment of antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Dural application of CGRP(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, also effectively blocked IScap-induced behavior, which suggests that the release of endogenous CGRP in the dura is necessary for IScap-induced nociception. These data suggest that dural IScap-induced nocifensive behavior in mice may be mechanistically related to the ongoing headache in humans. In addition, dural application of IScap increased resting time in female mice. Taken together, we present the first detailed study using dural application of IScap in mice. This headache model can be applied to genetically modified mice to facilitate research on the mechanisms and therapeutic targets for migraine headache. PMID:27058678

  12. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance. PMID:19320048

  13. The hairless gene of the mouse: relationship of phenotypic effects with expression profile and genotype.

    PubMed

    Cachón-González, M B; San-José, I; Cano, A; Vega, J A; García, N; Freeman, T; Schimmang, T; Stoye, J P

    1999-10-01

    Various mutations of the hairless (hr) gene of mice result in hair loss and other integument defects. To examine the role of the hr gene in mouse development, the expression profile of hr has been determined by in situ hybridisation and correlated to the nature of genetic changes and morphological abnormalities in different mutant animals. Four variant alleles have been characterised at the molecular level. hr/hr mice produce reduced, but significant, levels of hr mRNA whereas other alleles contain mutations which would be expected to preclude the synthesis of functional product, demonstrating a correlation between allelic variation at the hr locus and phenotypic severity. hr expression was shown to be widespread and temporally regulated. It was identified in novel tissues such as cartilage, developing tooth, inner ear, retina, and colon as well as in skin and brain. Analysis of mice homozygous for the rhino allele of hairless revealed that, although no morphological defects were detectable in many tissues normally expressing hr, previously undescribed abnormalities were present in several tissues including inner ear, retina, and colon. These findings indicate that the hairless gene product plays a wider role in development than previously suspected. Dev Dyn 1999;216:113-126. PMID:10536052

  14. A novel Caspr mutation causes the shambling mouse phenotype by disrupting axoglial interactions of myelinated nerves.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Okabe, Erina; Chishima, Yûko; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Murase, Shiori; Mizumura, Kazue; Inaba, Mie; Komatsu, Yukio; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Peles, Elior; Oda, Sen-ichi; Murata, Yoshiharu

    2009-11-01

    The neurological mouse mutation shambling (shm) exhibits ataxia and hindlimb paresis. Positional cloning of shm showed that it encodes contactin-associated protein (Caspr), which is required for formation of the paranodal junction in myelinated nerves. The shm mutation is a TT insertion in the Caspr gene that results in a frame shift and a premature stop codon at the COOH-terminus. The truncated Caspr protein that is generated lacks the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Here, we found that the nodal/paranodal axoplasm of shm mice lack paranodal junctions and contain large mitochondria and abnormal accumulations of cytoplasmic organelles that indicate altered axonal transport. Immunohistochemical analysis of mutant mice showed reduced expression of Caspr, contactin, and neurofascin 155, which are thought to form a protein complex in the paranodal region; protein 4.1B, however, was normally distributed. The mutant mice had aberrant localization of voltage-gated ion channels on the axolemma of nodal/paranodal regions. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that the velocity of saltatory conduction was reduced in sciatic nerves and that the visual response was attenuated in the primary visual cortex. These abnormalities likely contribute to the neurological phenotype of the mutant mice. PMID:19816196

  15. Mutant Mouse Models: Genotype-Phenotype Relationships to Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Kirby, Brian P.; Moran, Paula M.; Waddington, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Negative symptoms encompass diminution in emotional expression and motivation, some of which relate to human attributes that may not be accessible readily in animals. Additionally, their refractoriness to treatment precludes therapeutic validation of putative models. This review considers critically the application of mutant mouse models to the study of the pathobiology of negative symptoms. It focuses on 4 main approaches: genes related to the pathobiology of schizophrenia, genes associated with risk for schizophrenia, neurodevelopmental-synaptic genes, and variant approaches from other areas of neurobiology. Despite rapid advances over the past several years, it is clear that we continue to face substantive challenges in applying mutant models to better understand the pathobiology of negative symptoms: the majority of evidence relates to impairments in social behavior, with only limited data relating to anhedonia and negligible data concerning avolition and other features; even for the most widely examined feature, social behavior, studies have used diverse assessments thereof; modelling must proceed in cognizance of increasing evidence that genes and pathobiologies implicated in schizophrenia overlap with other psychotic disorders, particularly bipolar disorder. Despite the caveats and challenges, several mutant lines evidence a phenotype for at least one index of social behavior. Though this may suggest superficially some shared relationship to negative symptoms, it is not yet possible to specify either the scope or the pathobiology of that relationship for any given gene. The breadth and depth of ongoing studies in mutants hold the prospect of addressing these shortcomings. PMID:19934211

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of peptidoglycan hydrolases of Lactobacillus sakei.

    PubMed

    Najjari, Afef; Amairi, Houda; Chaillou, Stéphane; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Zagorec, Monique; Ouzari, Hadda

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei, a lactic acid bacterium naturally found in fresh meat and sea products, is considered to be one of the most important bacterial species involved in meat fermentation and bio-preservation. Several enzymes of Lb. sakei species contributing to microbial safeguarding and organoleptic properties of fermented-meat were studied. However, the specific autolytic mechanisms and associated enzymes involved in Lb. sakei are not well understood. The autolytic phenotype of 22 Lb. sakei strains isolated from Tunisian meat and seafood products was evaluated under starvation conditions, at pH 6.5 and 8.5, and in the presence of different carbon sources. A higher autolytic rate was observed when cells were grown in the presence of glucose and incubated at pH 6.5. Almost all strains showed high resistance to mutanolysin, indicating a minor role of muramidases in Lb. sakei cell lysis. Using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells as a substrate in activity gels zymogram, peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) patterns for all strains was characterized by two lytic bands of ∼80 (B1) and ∼70 kDa (B2), except for strain BMG.167 which harbored two activity signals at a lower MW. Lytic activity was retained in high salt and in acid/basic conditions and was active toward cells of Lb. sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii and Listeria innocua. Analysis of five putative PGH genes found in the Lb. sakei 23 K model strain genome, indicated that one gene, lsa1437, could encode a PGH (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) containing B1 and B2 as isoforms. According to this hypothesis, strain BMG.167 showed an allelic version of lsa1437 gene deleted of one of the five LysM domains, leading to a reduction in the MW of lytic bands and the high autolytic rate of this strain. Characterization of autolytic phenotype of Lb. sakei should expand the knowledge of their role in fermentation processes where they represent the dominant species. PMID:26843981

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of peptidoglycan hydrolases of Lactobacillus sakei

    PubMed Central

    Najjari, Afef; Amairi, Houda; Chaillou, Stéphane; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Zagorec, Monique; Ouzari, Hadda

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei, a lactic acid bacterium naturally found in fresh meat and sea products, is considered to be one of the most important bacterial species involved in meat fermentation and bio-preservation. Several enzymes of Lb. sakei species contributing to microbial safeguarding and organoleptic properties of fermented-meat were studied. However, the specific autolytic mechanisms and associated enzymes involved in Lb. sakei are not well understood. The autolytic phenotype of 22 Lb. sakei strains isolated from Tunisian meat and seafood products was evaluated under starvation conditions, at pH 6.5 and 8.5, and in the presence of different carbon sources. A higher autolytic rate was observed when cells were grown in the presence of glucose and incubated at pH 6.5. Almost all strains showed high resistance to mutanolysin, indicating a minor role of muramidases in Lb. sakei cell lysis. Using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells as a substrate in activity gels zymogram, peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) patterns for all strains was characterized by two lytic bands of ∼80 (B1) and ∼70 kDa (B2), except for strain BMG.167 which harbored two activity signals at a lower MW. Lytic activity was retained in high salt and in acid/basic conditions and was active toward cells of Lb. sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii and Listeria innocua. Analysis of five putative PGH genes found in the Lb. sakei 23 K model strain genome, indicated that one gene, lsa1437, could encode a PGH (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) containing B1 and B2 as isoforms. According to this hypothesis, strain BMG.167 showed an allelic version of lsa1437 gene deleted of one of the five LysM domains, leading to a reduction in the MW of lytic bands and the high autolytic rate of this strain. Characterization of autolytic phenotype of Lb. sakei should expand the knowledge of their role in fermentation processes where they represent the dominant species. PMID:26843981

  18. Mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B: relation of phenotypic features to background strain.

    PubMed

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Willing, Alison E; Haas, Ken; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Sanberg, Paul R

    2003-12-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B or mucopolysaccharidosis type III B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disorder that is inherited in autosomal recessive manner. It is characterized by systemic heparan sulfate accumulation in lysosomes due to deficiency of the enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu). Devastating clinical abnormalities with severe central nervous system involvement and somatic disease lead to premature death. A mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B was created by targeted disruption of the gene encoding Naglu, providing a powerful tool for understanding pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. However, the JAX GEMM Strain B6.129S6-Naglutm1Efn mouse, although showing biochemical similarities to humans with Sanfilippo syndrome, exhibits aging and behavioral differences. We observed idiosyncrasies, such as skeletal dysmorphism, hydrocephalus, ocular abnormalities, organomegaly, growth retardation, and anomalies of the integument, in our breeding colony of Naglu mutant mice and determined that several of them were at least partially related to the background strain C57BL/6. These background strain abnormalities, therefore, potentially mimic or overlap signs of the induced syndrome in our mice. Our observations may prove useful in studies of Naglu mutant mice. The necessity for distinguishing background anomalies from signs of the modeled disease is apparent. PMID:14727810

  19. Phenotypic and Neuropathological Characterization of Fetal Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pirot, Nathalie; Crahes, Marie; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Soares, Anais; Bucourt, Martine; Boutron, Audrey; Carbillon, Lionel; Mignot, Cyril; Trestard, Laetitia; Bekri, Soumeya; Laquerrière, Annie

    2016-03-01

    To distinguish pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH) from other antenatal neurometabolic disorders thereby improving prenatal diagnosis, we describe imaging findings, clinical phenotype, and brain lesions in fetuses from 3 families with molecular characterization of this condition. Neuropathological analysis was performed in 4 autopsy cases from 3 unrelated families with subsequent biochemical and molecular confirmation of PDH complex deficiency. In 2 families there were mutations in the PDHA1 gene; in the third family there was a mutation in the PDHB gene. All fetuses displayed characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism of varying severity, absence of visceral lesions, and associated encephaloclastic and developmental supra- and infratentorial lesions. Neurodevelopmental abnormalities included microcephaly, migration abnormalities (pachygyria, polymicrogyria, periventricular nodular heterotopias), and cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia with hypoplastic dentate nuclei and pyramidal tracts. Associated clastic lesions included asymmetric leukomalacia, reactive gliosis, large pseudocysts of germinolysis, and basal ganglia calcifications. The diagnosis of PDH deficiency should be suspected antenatally with the presence of clastic and neurodevelopmental lesions and a relatively characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism. Postmortem examination is essential for excluding other closely related entities, thereby allowing for biochemical and molecular confirmation. PMID:26865159

  20. Phenotypical characterization of regulatory T cells in humans and rodents.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Perea, A L; Arcia, E D; Rueda, C M; Velilla, P A

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) constitute a fascinating subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells due to their ability to limit the immune response against self and non-self antigens. Murine models and antibodies directed against surface and intracellular molecules have allowed elucidation of the mechanisms that govern their development and function. However, these markers used to their classification lack of specificity, as they can be expressed by activated T cells. Similarly, there are slight differences between animal models, in steady state and pathological conditions, anatomical localization and strategy of analysis by flow cytometry. Here, we revised the most common markers utilized for Treg typification by flow cytometry such as CD25, forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) and CD127, along with our data obtained in different body compartments of humans, mice and rats. Furthermore, we revised and determined the expression of other molecules important for the phenotypical characterization of Treg cells. We draw attention to the drawbacks of those markers used in chronic states of inflammation. However, until a specific marker for the identification of Tregs is discovered, the best combination of markers will depend upon the tissue or the degree of inflammation from which Tregs derive. PMID:27124481

  1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of Bacillus anthracis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keehoon; Costerton, J W; Ravel, Jacques; Auerbach, Raymond K; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Leid, Jeff G

    2007-06-01

    Biofilms, communities of micro-organisms attached to a surface, are responsible for many chronic diseases and are often associated with environmental reservoirs or lifestyles. Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium and is the aetiological agent of pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cutaneous anthrax. Anthrax infections are part of the natural lifecycle of many ruminants in North America, including cattle and bison, and B. anthracis is thought to be a central part of this ecosystem. However, in endemic areas in which humans and livestock interact, chronic cases of cutaneous anthrax are commonly reported. This suggests that biofilms of B. anthracis exist in the environment and are part of the ecology associated with its lifecycle. Currently, there are few data that account for the importance of the biofilm mode of life in B. anthracis, yet biofilms have been characterized in other pathogenic and non-pathogenic Bacillus species, including Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis, respectively. This study investigated the phenotypic and functional role of biofilms in B. anthracis. The results demonstrate that B. anthracis readily forms biofilms which are inherently resistant to commonly prescribed antibiotics, and that antibiotic resistance is not solely the function of sporulation.

  2. Does 3D Phenotyping Yield Substantial Insights in the Genetics of the Mouse Mandible Shape?

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Nicolas; Maga, A. Murat

    2016-01-01

    We describe the application of high-resolution 3D microcomputed tomography, together with 3D landmarks and geometric morphometrics, to validate and further improve previous quantitative genetic studies that reported QTL responsible for variation in the mandible shape of laboratory mice using a new backcross between C57BL/6J and A/J inbred strains. Despite the increasing availability of 3D imaging techniques, artificial flattening of the mandible by 2D imaging techniques seems at first an acceptable compromise for large-scale phenotyping protocols, thanks to an abundance of low-cost digital imaging systems such as microscopes or digital cameras. We evaluated the gain of information from considering explicitly this additional third dimension, and also from capturing variation on the bone surface where no precise anatomical landmark can be marked. Multivariate QTL mapping conducted with different landmark configurations (2D vs. 3D; manual vs. semilandmarks) broadly agreed with the findings of previous studies. Significantly more QTL (23) were identified and more precisely mapped when the mandible shape was captured with a large set of semilandmarks coupled with manual landmarks. It appears that finer phenotypic characterization of the mandibular shape with 3D landmarks, along with higher density genotyping, yields better insights into the genetic architecture of mandibular development. Most of the main variation is, nonetheless, preferentially embedded in the natural 2D plane of the hemi-mandible, reinforcing the results of earlier influential investigations. PMID:26921296

  3. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of the claudin-low intrinsic subtype of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In breast cancer, gene expression analyses have defined five tumor subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like and claudin-low), each of which has unique biologic and prognostic features. Here, we comprehensively characterize the recently identified claudin-low tumor subtype. Methods The clinical, pathological and biological features of claudin-low tumors were compared to the other tumor subtypes using an updated human tumor database and multiple independent data sets. These main features of claudin-low tumors were also evaluated in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models. Results Claudin-low tumors are characterized by the low to absent expression of luminal differentiation markers, high enrichment for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers, immune response genes and cancer stem cell-like features. Clinically, the majority of claudin-low tumors are poor prognosis estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (triple negative) invasive ductal carcinomas with a high frequency of metaplastic and medullary differentiation. They also have a response rate to standard preoperative chemotherapy that is intermediate between that of basal-like and luminal tumors. Interestingly, we show that a group of highly utilized breast cancer cell lines, and several genetically engineered mouse models, express the claudin-low phenotype. Finally, we confirm that a prognostically relevant differentiation hierarchy exists across all breast cancers in which the claudin-low subtype most closely resembles the mammary epithelial stem cell. Conclusions These results should help to improve our understanding of the biologic heterogeneity of breast cancer and provide tools for the further evaluation of the unique biology of claudin-low tumors and cell lines. PMID:20813035

  4. Phenotypic characterization of glioblastoma identified through shape descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes quantitatively describing the shape of glioblastoma (GBM) tissue phenotypes as a set of shape features derived from segmentations, for the purposes of discriminating between GBM phenotypes and monitoring tumor progression. GBM patients were identified from the Cancer Genome Atlas, and quantitative MR imaging data were obtained from the Cancer Imaging Archive. Three GBM tissue phenotypes are considered including necrosis, active tumor and edema/invasion. Volumetric tissue segmentations are obtained from registered T1˗weighted (T1˗WI) postcontrast and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI modalities. Shape features are computed from respective tissue phenotype segmentations, and a Kruskal-Wallis test was employed to select features capable of classification with a significance level of p < 0.05. Several classifier models are employed to distinguish phenotypes, where a leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. Eight features were found statistically significant for classifying GBM phenotypes with p <0.05, orientation is uninformative. Quantitative evaluations show the SVM results in the highest classification accuracy of 87.50%, sensitivity of 94.59% and specificity of 92.77%. In summary, the shape descriptors proposed in this work show high performance in predicting GBM tissue phenotypes. They are thus closely linked to morphological characteristics of GBM phenotypes and could potentially be used in a computer assisted labeling system.

  5. Long-term bezafibrate treatment improves skin and spleen phenotypes of the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Hida, Aline; Garcia, Sofia; Prolla, Tomas A; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological agents, such as bezafibrate, that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and PPAR γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathways have been shown to improve mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mouse is a mouse model of aging that harbors a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ. These mice develop many features of premature aging including hair loss, anemia, osteoporosis, sarcopenia and decreased lifespan. They also have increased mtDNA mutations and marked mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that mutator mice treated with bezafibrate for 8-months had delayed hair loss and improved skin and spleen aging-like phenotypes. Although we observed an increase in markers of fatty acid oxidation in these tissues, we did not detect a generalized increase in mitochondrial markers. On the other hand, there were no improvements in muscle function or lifespan of the mutator mouse, which we attributed to the rodent-specific hepatomegaly associated with fibrate treatment. These results showed that despite its secondary effects in rodent's liver, bezafibrate was able to improve some of the aging phenotypes in the mutator mouse. Because the associated hepatomegaly is not observed in primates, long-term bezafibrate treatment in humans could have beneficial effects on tissues undergoing chronic bioenergetic-related degeneration.

  6. Phenotype consequences of myophosphorylase dysfunction: insights from the McArdle mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Brull, Astrid; de Luna, Noemí; Blanco-Grau, Albert; Lucia, Alejandro; Martin, Miguel Angel; Arenas, Joaquin; Martí, Ramon; Andreu, Antoni L; Pinós, Tomàs

    2015-01-01

    McArdle disease, caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP-MM), is arguably the paradigm of exercise intolerance. The recent knock-in (p.R50X/p.R50X) mouse disease model allows an investigation of the phenotypic consequences of muscle glycogen unavailability and the physiopathology of exercise intolerance. We analysed, in 2-month-old mice [wild-type (wt/wt), heterozygous (p.R50X/wt) and p.R50X/p.R50X)], maximal endurance exercise capacity and the molecular consequences of an absence of GP-MM in the main glycogen metabolism regulatory enzymes: glycogen synthase, glycogen branching enzyme and glycogen debranching enzyme, as well as glycogen content in slow-twitch (soleus), intermediate (gastrocnemius) and glycolytic/fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus; EDL) muscles. Compared with wt/wt, exercise capacity (measured in a treadmill test) was impaired in p.R50X/p.R50X (∼48%) and p.R50X/wt mice (∼18%). p.R50X/p.R50X mice showed an absence of GP-MM in the three muscles. GP-MM was reduced in p.R50X/wt mice, especially in the soleus, suggesting that the function of ‘slow-twitch’ muscles is less dependent on glycogen catabolism. p.R50X/p.R50X mice showed increased glycogen debranching enzyme in the soleus, increased glycogen branching enzyme in the gastrocnemius and EDL, as well as reduced levels of mucle glycogen synthase protein in the three muscles (mean ∼70%), reflecting a protective mechanism for preventing deleterious glycogen accumulation. Additionally, glycogen content was highest in the EDL of p.R50X/p.R50X mice. Amongst other findings, the present study shows that the expression of the main muscle glycogen regulatory enzymes differs depending on the muscle phenotype (slow- vs. fast-twitch) and that even partial GP-MM deficiency affects maximal endurance capacity. Our knock-in model might help to provide insights into the importance of glycogen on muscle function. PMID:25873271

  7. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  8. Digastric Muscle Phenotypes of the Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Nadine P.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome is frequently associated with complex difficulties in oromotor development, feeding, and swallowing. However, the muscle phenotypes underlying these deficits are unclear. We tested the hypotheses that the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS has significantly altered myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform profiles of the muscles involved in feeding and swallowing, as well as reductions in the speed of these movements during behavioral assays. SDS-PAGE, immunofluorescence, and qRT-PCR were used to assess MyHC isoform expression in pertinent muscles, and functional feeding and swallowing performance were quantified through videofluoroscopy and mastication assays. We found that both the anterior digastric (ADG) and posterior digastric (PDG) muscles in 11-day old and 5–6 week old Ts65Dn groups showed significantly lower MyHC 2b protein levels than in age-matched euploid control groups. In videofluoroscopic and videotape assays used to quantify swallowing and mastication performance, 5–6 week old Ts65Dn and euploid controls showed similar swallow rates, inter-swallow intervals, and mastication rates. In analysis of adults, 10–11 week old Ts65Dn mice revealed significantly less MyHC 2b mRNA expression in the posterior digastric, but not the anterior digastric muscle as compared with euploid controls. Analysis of MyHC 2b protein levels across an adult age range (10–53 weeks of age) revealed lower levels of MyHC 2b protein in the PDG of Ts65Dn than in euploids, but similar levels of MyHC 2b in the ADG. Cumulatively, these results indicate biochemical differences in some, but not all, muscles involved in swallowing and jaw movement in Ts65Dn mice that manifest early in post-natal development, and persist into adulthood. These findings suggest potential utility of this model for future investigations of the mechanisms of oromotor difficulties associated with Down syndrome. PMID:27336944

  9. Characterization of the Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyal D.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Kennel, Allison; Mutch, P. Jane; Parker-Athill, E. Carla; Hanks, Camille E.; Lewin, Adam B.; Storch, Eric A.; Toufexis, Megan D.; Dadlani, Gul H.; Rodriguez, Carina A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) is a subtype of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) marked by an abrupt onset or exacerbation of neuropsychiatric symptoms. We aim to characterize the phenotypic presentation of youth with PANS. Methods: Forty-three youth (ages 4–14 years) meeting criteria for PANS were assessed using self-report and clinician-administered measures, medical record reviews, comprehensive clinical evaluation, and laboratory measures. Results: Youth with PANS presented with an early age of OCD onset (mean=7.84 years) and exhibited moderate to severe obsessive compulsive symptoms upon evaluation. All had comorbid anxiety and emotional lability, and scored well below normative means on all quality of life subscales. Youth with elevated streptococcal antibody titers trended toward having higher OCD severity, and presented more frequently with dilated pupils relative to youth without elevated titers. A cluster analysis of core PANS symptoms revealed three distinct symptom clusters that included core characteristic PANS symptoms, streptococcal-related symptoms, and cytokine-driven/physiological symptoms. Youth with PANS who had comorbid tics were more likely to exhibit a decline in school performance, visuomotor impairment, food restriction symptoms, and handwriting deterioration, and they reported lower quality of life relative to youth without tics. Conclusions: The sudden, acute onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms, high frequency of comorbidities (i.e., anxiety, behavioral regression, depression, and suicidality), and poor quality of life capture the PANS subgroup as suddenly and severely impaired youth. Identifying clinical characteristics of youth with PANS will allow clinicians to diagnose and treat this subtype of OCD with a more strategized and effective approach. PMID:25314221

  10. Characterization of transgenic mice--a comparison of protocols for welfare evaluation and phenotype characterization of mice with a suggestion on a future certificate of instruction.

    PubMed

    Jegstrup, I; Thon, R; Hansen, A K; Hoitinga, M Ritskes

    2003-01-01

    A thorough welfare evaluation performed as part of a general phenotype characterization for both transgenic and traditional mouse strains could not only contribute to the improvement of the welfare of laboratory animals, but could also be of benefit to scientists, laboratory veterinarians and the inspecting authorities. A literature review has been performed to identify and critically evaluate already existing protocols for phenotype and welfare characterization. There are several relevant schemes available, among others the SHIRPA method, the modified score sheet of Morton and Griffiths, the FRIMORFO phenotype characterization scheme and the behavioural phenotype schemes as described by Crawley. These protocols have been evaluated according to four goals: Their ability (1) to reveal any special needs or problems with a transgenic strain, (2) to cover the informational needs of the purchaser/user of the strain, (3) to refine the welfare of the transgenic animal model by identifying relevant humane endpoints, (4) to prevent the duplication of animal models that have already been developed. The protocols described are useful for characterizing the phenotype and judging welfare disturbances, however the total amount of information and the degree of detail varies considerably from one scheme to another. We present a proposal regarding the practical application of the various schemes that will secure proper treatment and the identification of humane endpoints. It is advocated that with every purchase of a particular strain, an instruction document should accompany the strain. This document needs to give detailed descriptions of the typical characteristics of the strain, as well as necessary actions concerning relevant treatment and humane endpoints. At the moment no such documents are required. The introduction of these types of documents will contribute to improvements in animal welfare as well as experimental results in laboratory animal experimentation.

  11. Of mothers and myelin: Aberrant myelination phenotypes in mouse model of Angelman Syndrome are dependent on maternal and dietary influences

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Mark D.; Carson, Robert P.; Lagrange, Andre H.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a number of neurological problems, including developmental delay, movement disorders and epilepsy. AS results from the loss of UBE3A (an imprinted gene) expressed from the maternal chromosome in neurons. Given the ubiquitous expression of Ube3a and the devastating nature of AS, the role of environmental and maternal effects has been largely ignored. Severe ataxia, anxiety-like behaviors and learning deficits are well-documented in patients and AS mice. More recently, clinical imaging studies of AS patients suggest myelination may be delayed or reduced. Utilizing a mouse model of AS, we found disrupted expression of cortical myelin proteins, the magnitude of which is influenced by maternal status, in that the aberrant myelination in the AS pups of AS affected mothers were more pronounced than those seen in AS pups raised by unaffected (Ube3a (m+/p-)) Carrier mothers. Furthermore, feeding the breeding mothers a higher fat (11% vs 5%) diet normalizes these myelin defects. These effects are not limited to myelin proteins. Since AS mice have abnormal stress responses, including altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, we measured GR expression in pups from Carrier and affected AS mothers. AS pups had higher GR expression than their WT littermates. However, we also found an effect of maternal status, with reduced GR levels in pups from affected mothers compared to genotypically identical pups raised by unaffected Carrier mothers. Taken together, our findings suggest that the phenotypes observed in AS mice may be modulated by factors independent of Ube3a genotype. PMID:26028516

  12. Of mothers and myelin: Aberrant myelination phenotypes in mouse model of Angelman syndrome are dependent on maternal and dietary influences.

    PubMed

    Grier, Mark D; Carson, Robert P; Lagrange, Andre H

    2015-09-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a number of neurological problems, including developmental delay, movement disorders, and epilepsy. AS results from the loss of UBE3A (an imprinted gene) expressed from the maternal chromosome in neurons. Given the ubiquitous expression of Ube3a and the devastating nature of AS, the role of environmental and maternal effects has been largely ignored. Severe ataxia, anxiety-like behaviors and learning deficits are well-documented in patients and AS mice. More recently, clinical imaging studies of AS patients suggest myelination may be delayed or reduced. Utilizing a mouse model of AS, we found disrupted expression of cortical myelin proteins, the magnitude of which is influenced by maternal status, in that the aberrant myelination in the AS pups of AS affected mothers were more pronounced than those seen in AS pups raised by unaffected (Ube3a (m+/p-)) Carrier mothers. Furthermore, feeding the breeding mothers a higher fat (11% vs 5%) diet normalizes these myelin defects. These effects are not limited to myelin proteins. Since AS mice have abnormal stress responses, including altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, we measured GR expression in pups from Carrier and affected AS mothers. AS pups had higher GR expression than their WT littermates. However, we also found an effect of maternal status, with reduced GR levels in pups from affected mothers compared to genotypically identical pups raised by unaffected Carrier mothers. Taken together, our findings suggest that the phenotypes observed in AS mice may be modulated by factors independent of Ube3a genotype. PMID:26028516

  13. Breeding and preliminarily phenotyping of a congenic mouse model with alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    GU, Mei-Er; SONG, Xiao-Ming; ZHU, Chun-Feng; YIN, Hong-Ping; LIU, Gui-Jie; YU, Li-Ping; YANG, Wei-Wei; NI, Li-Feng; ZHANG, Yan-Li; WU, Bao-Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, the alopecia areata gene was introduced into the C57BL/6 (B6) mouse through repeated backcrossing/intercrossing, and the allelic homozygosity of congenic AAtjmice (named B6.KM-AA) was verified using microsatellites. The gross appearance, growth characteristics, pathological changes in skin, and major organs of B6.KM-AA mice were observed. Counts and proportions of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood were determined by flow cytometry. Results show that congenic B6.KM-AA mice were obtained after 10 generations of backcrossing/intercrossing. B6.KM-AA mice grew slower than B6 control mice and AA skin lesions were developed by four weeks of age. The number of hair follicles was reduced, but hair structures were normal. Loss of hair during disease progression was associated with CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes infiltration peri- and intra- hair follicles. No pathological changes were found in other organs except for the skin. In the peripheral blood of B6.KM-AA mice, the percentage of CD4+ T cells was lower and percentage of CD8+ T cells higher than in control mice. These findings indicate that B6.KM-AA mice are characterized by a dysfunctional immune system, retarded development and T-cell infiltration mediated hair loss, making them a promising new animal model for human alopecia areata. PMID:25017742

  14. Transgenerational changes of metabolic phenotypes in two selectively bred mouse colonies for different susceptibilities to diet-induced glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Mototsugu; Asai, Akira; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Oikawa, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    We recently established 2 mouse lines with different susceptibilities (prone and resistant) to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced glucose intolerance by selective breeding (designated selectively bred diet-induced glucose intolerance-prone [SDG-P] and -resistant [SDG-R], respectively). In the present study, we analyzed transgenerational changes in metabolic phenotypes in these 2 mouse colonies to explore how the distinct phenotypes have emerged through the repetitive selection. Using C57BL/6, C3H, and AKR as background strains, mice showing inferior and superior glucose tolerance after HFD feeding were selected and bred repetitively over 20 generations to produce SDG-P and SDG-R, respectively. In addition to the blood glucose levels, HFD intake and body weight were also measured over the selective breeding period. As the generations proceeded, SDG-P mice became more susceptible to HFD-induced glucose intolerance and body weight gain, whereas SDG-R mice had gradually reduced HFD intake. The differences in fasting and post-glucose challenge blood glucose levels, body weight, and HFD intake became more evident between the 2 colonies through the selective breeding, mainly due to the HFD-induced glucose metabolism impairment and body weight gain in SDG-P mice and the reduction of HFD intake in SDG-R mice. These transgenerational changes in the metabolic phenotypes suggest that the genetic loci associated with the quantitative traits have been selectively enriched in SDG-P and SDG-R.

  15. Tumor and reproductive traits are linked by RNA metabolism genes in the mouse ovary: a transcriptome-phenotype association analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The link between reproductive life history and incidence of ovarian tumors is well known. Periods of reduced ovulations may confer protection against ovarian cancer. Using phenotypic data available for mouse, a possible association between the ovarian transcriptome, reproductive records and spontaneous ovarian tumor rates was investigated in four mouse inbred strains. NIA15k-DNA microarrays were employed to obtain expression profiles of BalbC, C57BL6, FVB and SWR adult ovaries. Results Linear regression analysis with multiple-test control (adjusted p ≤ 0.05) resulted in ovarian tumor frequency (OTF) and number of litters (NL) as the top-correlated among five tested phenotypes. Moreover, nearly one-hundred genes were coincident between these two traits and were decomposed in 76 OTF(–) NL(+) and 20 OTF(+) NL(–) genes, where the plus/minus signs indicate the direction of correlation. Enriched functional categories were RNA-binding/mRNA-processing and protein folding in the OTF(–) NL(+) and the OTF(+) NL(–) subsets, respectively. In contrast, no associations were detected between OTF and litter size (LS), the latter a measure of ovulation events in a single estrous cycle. Conclusion Literature text-mining pointed to post-transcriptional control of ovarian processes including oocyte maturation, folliculogenesis and angiogenesis as possible causal relationships of observed tumor and reproductive phenotypes. We speculate that repetitive cycling instead of repetitive ovulations represent the actual link between ovarian tumorigenesis and reproductive records. PMID:21210965

  16. Automatic classification framework for ventricular septal defects: a pilot study on high-throughput mouse embryo cardiac phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhongliu; Liang, Xi; Guo, Liucheng; Kitamoto, Asanobu; Tamura, Masaru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Gillies, Duncan

    2015-10-01

    Intensive international efforts are underway toward phenotyping the entire mouse genome by modifying all its [Formula: see text] genes one-by-one for comparative studies. A workload of this scale has triggered numerous studies harnessing image informatics for the identification of morphological defects. However, existing work in this line primarily rests on abnormality detection via structural volumetrics between wild-type and gene-modified mice, which generally fails when the pathology involves no severe volume changes, such as ventricular septal defects (VSDs) in the heart. Furthermore, in embryo cardiac phenotyping, the lack of relevant work in embryonic heart segmentation, the limited availability of public atlases, and the general requirement of manual labor for the actual phenotype classification after abnormality detection, along with other limitations, have collectively restricted existing practices from meeting the high-throughput demands. This study proposes, to the best of our knowledge, the first fully automatic VSD classification framework in mouse embryo imaging. Our approach leverages a combination of atlas-based segmentation and snake evolution techniques to derive the segmentation of heart ventricles, where VSD classification is achieved by checking whether the left and right ventricles border or overlap with each other. A pilot study has validated our approach at a proof-of-concept level and achieved a classification accuracy of 100% through a series of empirical experiments on a database of 15 images. PMID:26835488

  17. Compound deletion of Fgfr3 and Fgfr4 partially rescues the Hyp mouse phenotype.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Martin, Aline; David, Valentin; Quarles, L Darryl

    2011-03-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the physiologically relevant fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor (FGFR) for FGF23 in the kidney and the precise tubular segments that are targeted by FGF23. Current data suggest that FGF23 targets the FGFR1c-Klotho complex to coordinately regulate phosphate transport and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] production in the proximal tubule. In studies using the Hyp mouse model, which displays FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemia and aberrant vitamin D, deletion of Fgfr3 or Fgfr4 alone failed to correct the Hyp phenotype. To determine whether FGFR1 is sufficient to mediate the renal effects of FGF23, we deleted Fgfr3 and Fgfr4 in Hyp mice, leaving intact the FGFR1 pathway by transferring compound Fgfr3/Fgfr4-null mice on the Hyp background to create wild-type (WT), Hyp, Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-), and Hyp/Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) mice. We found that deletion of Fgfr3 and Fgfr4 in Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) and Hyp/Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) mice induced an increase in 1,25(OH)(2)D. In Hyp/Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) mice, it partially corrected the hypophosphatemia (P(i) = 9.4 ± 0.9, 6.1 ± 0.2, 9.1 ± 0.4, and 8.0 ± 0.5 mg/dl in WT, Hyp, Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-), and Hyp/Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) mice, respectively), increased Na-phosphate cotransporter Napi2a and Napi2c and Klotho mRNA expression in the kidney, and markedly increased serum FGF23 levels (107 ± 20, 3,680 ± 284, 167 ± 22, and 18,492 ± 1,547 pg/ml in WT, Hyp, Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-), and Hyp/Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) mice, respectively), consistent with a compensatory response to the induction of end-organ resistance. Fgfr1 expression was unchanged in Hyp/Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) mice and was not sufficient to transduce the full effects of FGF23 in Hyp/Fgfr3(-/-)/Fgfr4(-/-) mice. These studies suggest that FGFR1, FGFR3, and FGFR4 act in concert to mediate FGF23 effects on the kidney and that loss of FGFR function leads to feedback stimulation of Fgf23 expression in bone.

  18. Comprehensive Behavioral Phenotyping of Ts65Dn Mouse Model of Down Syndrome: Activation of β1-Adrenergic Receptor by Xamoterol as a Potential Cognitive Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Bader, Patrick L.; Tun, Christine; Encarnacion, Angelo; Kleschevnikov, Alexander; Belichenko, Pavel; Saw, Nay; Priestley, Matthew; Tsien, Richard W; Mobley, William C; Shamloo, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent form of mental retardation caused by genetic abnormalities in humans. This has been successfully modeled in mice to generate the Ts65Dn mouse, a genetic model of DS. This transgenic mouse model shares a number of physical and functional abnormalities with people with DS, including changes in the structure and function of neuronal circuits. Significant abnormalities in noradrenergic (NE-ergic) afferents from the locus coeruleus to the hippocampus, as well as deficits in NE-ergic neurotransmission are detected in these animals. In the current study we characterized in detail the behavioral phenotype of Ts65Dn mice, in addition to using pharmacological tools for identification of target receptors mediating the learning and memory deficits observed in this model of DS. We undertook a comprehensive approach to mouse phenotyping using a battery of standard and novel tests encompassing: i) locomotion (Activity Chamber, PhenoTyper, and CatWalk), ii) learning and memory (spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, fear conditioning, and Intellicage), and iii) social behavior. Ts65Dn mice showed increased locomotor activity in novel and home cage environments. There were significant and reproducible deficits in learning and memory tests including spontaneous alternation, delayed matching-to-place water maze, Intellicage place avoidance and contextual fear conditioning. Although Ts65Dn mice showed no deficit in sociability in the 3-chamber test, a marked impairment in social memory was detected. Xamoterol, a β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-ADR) agonist, effectively restored the memory deficit in contextual fear conditioning, spontaneous alternation and novel object recognition. These behavioral improvements were reversed by betaxolol, a selective β1-ADR antagonist. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that this mouse model of Down Syndrome display cognitive deficits which is mediated by imbalance in noradrenergic

  19. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  20. Metabolic characterization of a Sirt5 deficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiujiu; Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Noriega, Lilia G; Moullan, Norman; He, Bin; Weiss, Robert S; Lin, Hening; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Sirt5, localized in the mitochondria, is a member of sirtuin family of NAD⁺-dependent deacetylases. Sirt5 was shown to deacetylate and activate carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1. Most recently, Sirt5 was reported to be the predominant protein desuccinylase and demalonylase in the mitochondria because the ablation of Sirt5 enhanced the global succinylation and malonylation of mitochondrial proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. In order to determine the physiological role of Sirt5 in metabolic homeostasis, we generated a germline Sirt5 deficient (Sirt5⁻/⁻) mouse model and performed a thorough metabolic characterization of this mouse line. Although a global protein hypersuccinylation and elevated serum ammonia during fasting were observed in our Sirt5⁻/⁻ mouse model, Sirt5 deficiency did not lead to any overt metabolic abnormalities under either chow or high fat diet conditions. These observations suggest that Sirt5 is likely to be dispensable for the metabolic homeostasis under the basal conditions. PMID:24076663

  1. Metabolic Characterization of a Sirt5 deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiujiu; Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Noriega, Lilia G.; Moullan, Norman; He, Bin; Weiss, Robert S.; Lin, Hening; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Sirt5, localized in the mitochondria, is a member of sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases. Sirt5 was shown to deacetylate and activate carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1. Most recently, Sirt5 was reported to be the predominant protein desuccinylase and demalonylase in the mitochondria because the ablation of Sirt5 enhanced the global succinylation and malonylation of mitochondrial proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. In order to determine the physiological role of Sirt5 in metabolic homeostasis, we generated a germline Sirt5 deficient (Sirt5−/−) mouse model and performed a thorough metabolic characterization of this mouse line. Although a global protein hypersuccinylation and elevated serum ammonia during fasting were observed in our Sirt5−/− mouse model, Sirt5 deficiency did not lead to any overt metabolic abnormalities under either chow or high fat diet conditions. These observations suggest that Sirt5 is likely to be dispensable for the metabolic homeostasis under the basal conditions. PMID:24076663

  2. Outstanding Phenotypic Differences in the Profile of Amyloid-β between Tg2576 and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allué, José Antonio; Sarasa, Leticia; Izco, María; Pérez-Grijalba, Virginia; Fandos, Noelia; Pascual-Lucas, María; Ogueta, Samuel; Pesini, Pedro; Sarasa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    APPswe/PS1dE9 and Tg2576 are very common transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), used in many laboratories as tools to research the mechanistic process leading to the disease. In order to augment our knowledge about the amyloid-β (Aβ) isoforms present in both transgenic mouse models, we have developed two chromatographic methods, one acidic and the other basic, for the characterization of the Aβ species produced in the brains of the two transgenic mouse models. After immunoprecipitation and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, 10 species of Aβ, surprisingly all of human origin, were detected in the brain of Tg2576 mouse, whereas 39 species, of both murine and human origin, were detected in the brain of the APP/PS1 mouse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the identification of such a high number of Aβ species in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse, whereas, in contrast, a much lower number of Aβ species were identified in the Tg2576 mouse. Therefore, this study brings to light a relevant phenotypic difference between these two popular mice models of AD. PMID:27258422

  3. Characterization of the mouse pancreatic islet proteome and comparative analysis with other mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Hinault, Charlotte; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Singhal, Mudita; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans and insulin-producing beta cells in particular play a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and the islet dysfunction is associated with the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To contribute to the understanding of the biology of the pancreatic islets we applied proteomic techniques based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Here as an initial step we present the first comprehensive proteomic characterization of pancreas islets of the mouse, the commonly used animal model for diabetes research. Two-dimensional SCX LC/RP LC-MS/MS has been applied to characterize of the mouse islet proteome, resulting in the confident identification of 17,350 different tryptic peptides covering 2,612 proteins with at least two unique peptide identifications per protein. The dataset also allowed identification of a number of post-translational modifications including several modifications relevant to oxidative stress and phosphorylation. While many of the identified phosphorylation sites corroborates with previous known sites, the oxidative modifications observed on cysteinyl residues potentially reveal novel information related to the role of oxidation stress in islet functions. Comparative analysis of the islet proteome database with 15 available proteomic datasets from other mouse tissues and cells revealed a set of 68 proteins uniquely detected only in the pancreatic islets. Besides proteins with known functions, like islet secreted peptide hormones, this unique set contains a number of proteins with yet unknown functions. The resulting peptide and protein database will be available at ncrr.pnl.gov web site of the NCRR proteomic center (ncrr.pnl.gov).

  4. Mdm2-p53 signaling regulates epidermal stem cell senescence and premature aging phenotypes in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Hugh S; Donehower, Lawrence A; Lyle, Stephen; Jones, Stephen N

    2011-05-01

    The p53 transcription factor is activated by various types of cell stress or DNA damage and induces the expression of genes that control cell growth and inhibit tumor formation. Analysis of mice that express mutant forms of p53 suggest that inappropriate p53 activation can alter tissue homeostasis and life span, connecting p53 tumor suppressor functions with accelerated aging. However, other mouse models that display increased levels of wildtype p53 in various tissues fail to corroborate a link between p53 and aging phenotypes, possibly due to the retention of signaling pathways that negatively regulate p53 activity in these models. In this present study, we have generated mice lacking Mdm2 in the epidermis. Deletion of Mdm2, the chief negative regulator of p53, induced an aging phenotype in the skin of mice, including thinning of the epidermis, reduced wound healing, and a progressive loss of fur. These phenotypes arise due to an induction of p53-mediated senescence in epidermal stem cells and a gradual loss of epidermal stem cell function. These results reveal that activation of endogenous p53 by ablation of Mdm2 can induce accelerated aging phenotypes in mice.

  5. Overexpression of Metallothionein-1 Modulates the Phenotype of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Manso, Yasmina; Comes, Gemma; López-Ramos, Juan C; Belfiore, Mónica; Molinero, Amalia; Giralt, Mercedes; Carrasco, Javier; Adlard, Paul A; Bush, Ashley I; Delgado-García, José María; Hidalgo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most commonly diagnosed dementia, where signs of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are prominent. In this study we intend to further characterize the roles of the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and heavy metal binding protein, metallothionein-1 (MT-1), by crossing Mt1 overexpressing mice with a well-known mouse model of AD, Tg2576 mice, which express the human amyloid-β protein precursor (hAβPP) with the Swedish K670N/M671L mutations. Mt1 overexpression increased overall perinatal survival, but did not affect significantly hAβPP-induced mortality and weight loss in adult mice. Amyloid plaque burden in ∼14-month-old mice was increased by Mt1 overexpression in the hippocampus but not the cortex. Despite full length hAβPP levels and amyloid plaques being increased by Mt1 overexpression in the hippocampus of both sexes, oligomeric and monomeric forms of Aβ, which may contribute more to toxicity, were decreased in the hippocampus of females and increased in males. Several behavioral traits such as exploration, anxiety, and learning were altered in Tg2576 mice to various degrees depending on the age and the sex. Mt1 overexpression ameliorated the effects of hAβPP on exploration in young females, and potentiated those on anxiety in old males, and seemed to improve the rate of spatial learning (Morris water maze) and the learning elicited by a classical conditioning procedure (eye-blink test). These results clearly suggest that MT-1 may be involved in AD pathogenesis. PMID:26836194

  6. Phenotypic characterization of rare interstitial deletion of chromosome 4

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Samira; Helmy, Nivine A.; Mahmoud, Wael M.; El-Ruby, Mona O.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 4 is rare. Patients with interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 4 differ from those with terminal deletions. Phenotypes may be variable, depending upon the specific length and location of the deleted portion. Here, we report on a boy exhibiting most of the congenital malformations encountered in terminal 4q syndrome. The conventional karyotyping and Fluorescence in-situ hybridization revealed a de novo interstitial del (4)(q31q32). The current report is a further document highlighting that deletion of segment q31 could be contributing to the expression of most of the phenotype of 4q deletion syndrome. Using array comparative genome hybridization methodology is recommended for investigating further cases with similar segmental interstitial deletions to support and delineate findings and to define genes implicated in the pathogenesis of the disorder.

  7. Isolation, culture and characterization of primary mouse RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Garland, Donita L; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Mouse models are powerful tools for the study of ocular diseases. Alterations in the morphology and function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are common features shared by many ocular disorders. We report a detailed protocol to collect, seed, culture and characterize RPE cells from mice. We describe a reproducible method that we previously developed to collect and culture murine RPE cells on Transwells as functional polarized monolayers. The collection of RPE cells takes ∼3 h, and the cultures mimic in vivo RPE cell features within 1 week. This protocol also describes methods to characterize the cells on Transwells within 1-2 weeks by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively), immunostaining of vibratome sections and flat mounts, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance. The RPE cell cultures are suitable to study the biology of the RPE from wild-type and genetically modified strains of mice between the ages of 10 d and 12 months. The RPE cells can also be manipulated to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the RPE pathology in the numerous mouse models of ocular disorders. Furthermore, modeling the RPE pathology in vitro represents a new approach to testing drugs that will help accelerate the development of therapies for vision-threatening disorders such as macular degeneration (MD). PMID:27281648

  8. Behavioral and neurochemical characterization of new mouse model of hyperphenylalaninemia.

    PubMed

    Pascucci, Tiziana; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Andolina, Diego; Accoto, Alessandra; Fiori, Elena; Ventura, Rossella; Orsini, Cristina; Conversi, David; Carducci, Claudia; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) refers to all clinical conditions characterized by increased amounts of phenylalanine (PHE) in blood and other tissues. According to their blood PHE concentrations under a free diet, hyperphenylalaninemic patients are commonly classified into phenotypic subtypes: classical phenylketonuria (PKU) (PHE > 1200 µM/L), mild PKU (PHE 600-1200 µM/L) and persistent HPA (PHE 120-600 µM/L) (normal blood PHE < 120 µM/L). The current treatment for hyperphenylalaninemic patients is aimed to keep blood PHE levels within the safe range of 120-360 µM/L through a PHE-restricted diet, difficult to achieve. If untreated, classical PKU presents variable neurological and mental impairment. However, even mildly elevated blood PHE levels, due to a bad compliance to dietary treatment, produce cognitive deficits involving the prefrontal cortical areas, extremely sensible to PHE-induced disturbances. The development of animal models of different degrees of HPA is a useful tool for identifying the metabolic mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits induced by PHE. In this paper we analyzed the behavioral and biochemical phenotypes of different forms of HPA (control, mild-HPA, mild-PKU and classic-PKU), developed on the base of plasma PHE concentrations. Our results demonstrated that mice with different forms of HPA present different phenotypes, characterized by increasing severity of behavioral symptoms and brain aminergic deficits moving from mild HPA to classical PKU forms. In addition, our data identify preFrontal cortex and amygdala as the most affected brain areas and confirm the highest susceptibility of brain serotonin metabolism to mildly elevated blood PHE.

  9. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python).

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Kristopher J L; Rutllant, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism's genome (such as the mouse genome) in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism's genome (such as the Burmese python). We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1) production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2) enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3) novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value. PMID:27200191

  10. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python).

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Kristopher J L; Rutllant, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism's genome (such as the mouse genome) in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism's genome (such as the Burmese python). We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1) production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2) enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3) novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value.

  11. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python)

    PubMed Central

    Rutllant, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism's genome (such as the mouse genome) in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism's genome (such as the Burmese python). We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1) production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2) enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3) novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value. PMID:27200191

  12. Androgen deprivation induces phenotypic plasticity and promotes resistance to molecular targeted therapy in a PTEN-deficient mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Tanaka, Motoyoshi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Yuji; Koike, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Kazuto; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2014-09-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable heterogeneous disease that is characterized by a complex multistep process involving different cellular and biochemical changes brought on by genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes lead to the activation or overexpression of key survival pathways that also serve as potential therapeutic targets. Despite promising preclinical results, molecular targeted therapies aimed at such signaling pathways have so far been dismal. In the present study, we used a PTEN-deficient mouse model of prostate cancer to show that plasticity in castration-resistant tumors promotes therapeutic escape. Unlike castration-naïve tumors which depend on androgen receptor and PI3K/AKT signal activation for growth and survival, castration-resistant tumors undergo phenotypic plasticity leading to increased intratumoral heterogeneity. These tumors attain highly heterogeneous phenotypes that are characterized by cancer cells relying on alternate signal transduction pathways for growth and survival, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase and janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, and losing their dependence on PI3K signaling. These features thus enabled castration-resistant tumors to become insensitive to the therapeutic effects of PI3K/AKT targeted therapy. Overall, our findings provide evidence that androgen deprivation drives phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer cells and implicate it as a crucial contributor to therapeutic resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Therefore, incorporating intratumoral heterogeneity in a dynamic tumor model as a part of preclinical efficacy determination could improve prediction for response and provide better rationale for the development of more effective therapies. PMID:24986896

  13. Reciprocal Effects on Neurocognitive and Metabolic Phenotypes in Mouse Models of 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Thomas; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Chevalier, Claire; Kopanitsa, Maksym; Afinowi, Nurudeen; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Cowling, Belinda S; Birling, Marie-Christine; Champy, Marie-France; Reymond, Alexandre; Herault, Yann

    2016-02-01

    The 16p11.2 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication syndromes have been associated with developmental delay; autism spectrum disorders; and reciprocal effects on the body mass index, head circumference and brain volumes. Here, we explored these relationships using novel engineered mouse models carrying a deletion (Del/+) or a duplication (Dup/+) of the Sult1a1-Spn region homologous to the human 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus. On a C57BL/6N inbred genetic background, Del/+ mice exhibited reduced weight and impaired adipogenesis, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, and recognition memory deficits. In contrast, Dup/+ mice showed largely opposite phenotypes. On a F1 C57BL/6N × C3B hybrid genetic background, we also observed alterations in social interaction in the Del/+ and the Dup/+ animals, with other robust phenotypes affecting recognition memory and weight. To explore the dosage effect of the 16p11.2 genes on metabolism, Del/+ and Dup/+ models were challenged with high fat and high sugar diet, which revealed opposite energy imbalance. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of the genes located in the Sult1a1-Spn region were sensitive to dosage with a major effect on several pathways associated with neurocognitive and metabolic phenotypes. Whereas the behavioral consequence of the 16p11 region genetic dosage was similar in mice and humans with activity and memory alterations, the metabolic defects were opposite: adult Del/+ mice are lean in comparison to the human obese phenotype and the Dup/+ mice are overweight in comparison to the human underweight phenotype. Together, these data indicate that the dosage imbalance at the 16p11.2 locus perturbs the expression of modifiers outside the CNV that can modulate the penetrance, expressivity and direction of effects in both humans and mice. PMID:26872257

  14. Reciprocal Effects on Neurocognitive and Metabolic Phenotypes in Mouse Models of 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Thomas; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Chevalier, Claire; Kopanitsa, Maksym; Afinowi, Nurudeen; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Cowling, Belinda S.; Birling, Marie-Christine; Champy, Marie-France; Reymond, Alexandre; Herault, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The 16p11.2 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication syndromes have been associated with developmental delay; autism spectrum disorders; and reciprocal effects on the body mass index, head circumference and brain volumes. Here, we explored these relationships using novel engineered mouse models carrying a deletion (Del/+) or a duplication (Dup/+) of the Sult1a1-Spn region homologous to the human 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus. On a C57BL/6N inbred genetic background, Del/+ mice exhibited reduced weight and impaired adipogenesis, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, and recognition memory deficits. In contrast, Dup/+ mice showed largely opposite phenotypes. On a F1 C57BL/6N × C3B hybrid genetic background, we also observed alterations in social interaction in the Del/+ and the Dup/+ animals, with other robust phenotypes affecting recognition memory and weight. To explore the dosage effect of the 16p11.2 genes on metabolism, Del/+ and Dup/+ models were challenged with high fat and high sugar diet, which revealed opposite energy imbalance. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of the genes located in the Sult1a1-Spn region were sensitive to dosage with a major effect on several pathways associated with neurocognitive and metabolic phenotypes. Whereas the behavioral consequence of the 16p11 region genetic dosage was similar in mice and humans with activity and memory alterations, the metabolic defects were opposite: adult Del/+ mice are lean in comparison to the human obese phenotype and the Dup/+ mice are overweight in comparison to the human underweight phenotype. Together, these data indicate that the dosage imbalance at the 16p11.2 locus perturbs the expression of modifiers outside the CNV that can modulate the penetrance, expressivity and direction of effects in both humans and mice. PMID:26872257

  15. Microfluidic bioassay to characterize parasitic nematode phenotype and anthelmintic resistance

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, BAOZHEN; DEUTMEYER, ALEX; CARR, JOHN; ROBERTSON, ALAN P.; MARTIN, RICHARD J.; PANDEY, SANTOSH

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY With increasing resistance to anti-parasitic drugs, it has become more important to detect and recognize phenotypes of resistant isolates. Molecular methods of detecting resistant isolates are limited at present. Here, we introduce a microfluidic bioassay to measure phenotype using parameters of nematode locomotion. We illustrate the technique on larvae of an animal parasite Oesophagostomum dentatum. Parameters of sinusoidal motion such as propagation velocity, wavelength, wave amplitude, and oscillation frequency depended on the levamisole-sensitivity of the isolate of parasitic nematode. The levamisole-sensitive isolate (SENS) had a mean wave amplitude of 135 μm, which was larger than 123 μm of the levamisole-resistant isolate (LEVR). SENS had a mean wavelength of 373 μm, which was less than 393 μm of LEVR. The mean propagation velocity of SENS, 149 μm s−1, was similar to LEVR, 143 μm s−1. The propagation velocity of the isolates was inhibited by levamisole in a concentration-dependent manner above 0.5 μM. The EC50 for SENS was 3 μM and the EC50 for LEVR was 10 μM. This microfluidic technology advances present-day nematode migration assays and provides a better quantification and increased drug sensitivity. It is anticipated that the bioassay will facilitate study of resistance to other anthelmintic drugs that affect locomotion. PMID:20663251

  16. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of foodborne Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Durand, Loïc; Planchon, Stella; Guinebretiere, Marie-Hélène; Carlin, Frédéric; Remize, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus is the main thermophilic spore former involved in flat sour spoilage of canned foods. Three typing methods were tested and applied to differentiate strains at intra-species level: panC sequence analysis, REP-PCR and M13-PCR. panC gene was highly conserved within the studied strains, suggesting a low intra-specific diversity. This was supported by REP-PCR primary assays and M13-PCR results. M13-PCR profile analysis succeeded in differentiating six closely related groups (at 79% threshold similarity) among 127 strains from a range of spoiled canned food products and from different canneries. Phenotypic traits were investigated among 20 selected strains representing groups and origins. Ranges of growth under different temperatures (from 40 °C to 70 °C), pH (from 5.0 to 6.5), NaCl concentrations (from 1 to 5%) and sporulation conditions poorly differed between strains, but wet heat resistance of spores showed a 20-fold variation between strains. Furthermore, in this study, strains that belonged to the same M13-PCR genetic group did not share phenotypic characteristics or common origin. The work emphasizes a low diversity within the G. stearothermophilus species but data from this study may contribute to a better control of G. stearothermophilus spoilage in canned food. PMID:25481066

  17. The fetal brain transcriptome and neonatal behavioral phenotype in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Ferres, Millie A; Graham, Leah C; Wick, Heather C; Miczek, Klaus A; Slonim, Donna K; Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-09-01

    Human fetuses with Down syndrome demonstrate abnormal brain growth and reduced neurogenesis. Despite the prenatal onset of the phenotype, most therapeutic trials have been conducted in adults. Here, we present evidence for fetal brain molecular and neonatal behavioral alterations in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome. Embryonic day 15.5 brain hemisphere RNA from Ts1Cje embryos (n = 5) and wild type littermates (n = 5) was processed and hybridized to mouse gene 1.0 ST arrays. Bioinformatic analyses were implemented to identify differential gene and pathway regulation during Ts1Cje fetal brain development. In separate experiments, the Fox scale, ultrasonic vocalization and homing tests were used to investigate behavioral deficits in Ts1Cje pups (n = 29) versus WT littermates (n = 64) at postnatal days 3-21. Ts1Cje fetal brains displayed more differentially regulated genes (n = 71) than adult (n = 31) when compared to their age-matched euploid brains. Ts1Cje embryonic brains showed up-regulation of cell cycle markers and down-regulation of the solute-carrier amino acid transporters. Several cellular processes were dysregulated at both stages, including apoptosis, inflammation, Jak/Stat signaling, G-protein signaling, and oxidoreductase activity. In addition, early behavioral deficits in surface righting, cliff aversion, negative geotaxis, forelimb grasp, ultrasonic vocalization, and the homing tests were observed. The Ts1Cje mouse model exhibits abnormal gene expression during fetal brain development, and significant neonatal behavioral deficits in the pre-weaning period. In combination with human studies, this suggests that the Down syndrome phenotype manifests prenatally and provides a rationale for prenatal therapy to improve perinatal brain development and postnatal neurocognition.

  18. Fully-Automated μMRI Morphometric Phenotyping of the Tc1 Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Ma, Da; Holmes, Holly E.; Yu, Yichao; O’Callaghan, James; Cleary, Jon O.; Sinclair, Ben; Wiseman, Frances K.; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    We describe a fully automated pipeline for the morphometric phenotyping of mouse brains from μMRI data, and show its application to the Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome, to identify new morphological phenotypes in the brain of this first transchromosomic animal carrying human chromosome 21. We incorporate an accessible approach for simultaneously scanning multiple ex vivo brains, requiring only a 3D-printed brain holder, and novel image processing steps for their separation and orientation. We employ clinically established multi-atlas techniques–superior to single-atlas methods–together with publicly-available atlas databases for automatic skull-stripping and tissue segmentation, providing high-quality, subject-specific tissue maps. We follow these steps with group-wise registration, structural parcellation and both Voxel- and Tensor-Based Morphometry–advantageous for their ability to highlight morphological differences without the laborious delineation of regions of interest. We show the application of freely available open-source software developed for clinical MRI analysis to mouse brain data: NiftySeg for segmentation and NiftyReg for registration, and discuss atlases and parameters suitable for the preclinical paradigm. We used this pipeline to compare 29 Tc1 brains with 26 wild-type littermate controls, imaged ex vivo at 9.4T. We show an unexpected increase in Tc1 total intracranial volume and, controlling for this, local volume and grey matter density reductions in the Tc1 brain compared to the wild-types, most prominently in the cerebellum, in agreement with human DS and previous histological findings. PMID:27658297

  19. The fetal brain transcriptome and neonatal behavioral phenotype in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Ferres, Millie A; Graham, Leah C; Wick, Heather C; Miczek, Klaus A; Slonim, Donna K; Bianchi, Diana W

    2015-09-01

    Human fetuses with Down syndrome demonstrate abnormal brain growth and reduced neurogenesis. Despite the prenatal onset of the phenotype, most therapeutic trials have been conducted in adults. Here, we present evidence for fetal brain molecular and neonatal behavioral alterations in the Ts1Cje mouse model of Down syndrome. Embryonic day 15.5 brain hemisphere RNA from Ts1Cje embryos (n = 5) and wild type littermates (n = 5) was processed and hybridized to mouse gene 1.0 ST arrays. Bioinformatic analyses were implemented to identify differential gene and pathway regulation during Ts1Cje fetal brain development. In separate experiments, the Fox scale, ultrasonic vocalization and homing tests were used to investigate behavioral deficits in Ts1Cje pups (n = 29) versus WT littermates (n = 64) at postnatal days 3-21. Ts1Cje fetal brains displayed more differentially regulated genes (n = 71) than adult (n = 31) when compared to their age-matched euploid brains. Ts1Cje embryonic brains showed up-regulation of cell cycle markers and down-regulation of the solute-carrier amino acid transporters. Several cellular processes were dysregulated at both stages, including apoptosis, inflammation, Jak/Stat signaling, G-protein signaling, and oxidoreductase activity. In addition, early behavioral deficits in surface righting, cliff aversion, negative geotaxis, forelimb grasp, ultrasonic vocalization, and the homing tests were observed. The Ts1Cje mouse model exhibits abnormal gene expression during fetal brain development, and significant neonatal behavioral deficits in the pre-weaning period. In combination with human studies, this suggests that the Down syndrome phenotype manifests prenatally and provides a rationale for prenatal therapy to improve perinatal brain development and postnatal neurocognition. PMID:25975229

  20. Sildenafil citrate increases fetal weight in a mouse model of fetal growth restriction with a normal vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Dilworth, Mark Robert; Andersson, Irene; Renshall, Lewis James; Cowley, Elizabeth; Baker, Philip; Greenwood, Susan; Sibley, Colin Peter; Wareing, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is defined as the inability of a fetus to achieve its genetic growth potential and is associated with a significantly increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Clinically, FGR is diagnosed as a fetus falling below the 5(th) centile of customised growth charts. Sildenafil citrate (SC, Viagra™), a potent and selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, corrects ex vivo placental vascular dysfunction in FGR, demonstrating potential as a therapy for this condition. However, many FGR cases present without an abnormal vascular phenotype, as assessed by Doppler measures of uterine/umbilical artery blood flow velocity. Thus, we hypothesized that SC would not increase fetal growth in a mouse model of FGR, the placental-specific Igf2 knockout mouse, which has altered placental exchange capacity but normal placental blood flow. Fetal weights were increased (by 8%) in P0 mice following maternal SC treatment (0.4 mg/ml) via drinking water. There was also a trend towards increased placental weight in treated P0 mice (P = 0.056). Additionally, 75% of the P0 fetal weights were below the 5(th) centile, the criterion used to define human FGR, of the non-treated WT fetal weights; this was reduced to 51% when dams were treated with SC. Umbilical artery and vein blood flow velocity measures confirmed the lack of an abnormal vascular phenotype in the P0 mouse; and were unaffected by SC treatment. (14)C-methylaminoisobutyric acid transfer (measured to assess effects on placental nutrient transporter activity) per g placenta was unaffected by SC, versus untreated, though total transfer was increased, commensurate with the trend towards larger placentas in this group. These data suggest that SC may improve fetal growth even in the absence of an abnormal placental blood flow, potentially affording use in multiple sub-populations of individuals presenting with FGR.

  1. A Phenotype-Driven Approach to Generate Mouse Models with Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations Causing Mitochondrial Disease.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Johanna H K; Baines, Holly L; Bratic, Ana; Simard, Marie-Lune; Freyer, Christoph; Mourier, Arnaud; Stamp, Craig; Filograna, Roberta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Greaves, Laura C; Stewart, James B

    2016-09-13

    Mutations of mtDNA are an important cause of human disease, but few animal models exist. Because mammalian mitochondria cannot be transfected, the development of mice with pathogenic mtDNA mutations has been challenging, and the main strategy has therefore been to introduce mutations found in cell lines into mouse embryos. Here, we describe a phenotype-driven strategy that is based on detecting clonal expansion of pathogenic mtDNA mutations in colonic crypts of founder mice derived from heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice. As proof of concept, we report the generation of a mouse line transmitting a heteroplasmic pathogenic mutation in the alanine tRNA gene of mtDNA displaying typical characteristics of classic mitochondrial disease. In summary, we describe a straightforward and technically simple strategy based on mouse breeding and histology to generate animal models of mtDNA-mutation disease, which will be of great importance for studies of disease pathophysiology and preclinical treatment trials. PMID:27626666

  2. Detailed characterization of the substrate specificity of mouse wax synthase.

    PubMed

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Kawiński, Adam; Banaś, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Wax synthases are membrane-associated enzymes catalysing the esterification reaction between fatty acyl-CoA and a long chain fatty alcohol. In living organisms, wax esters function as storage materials or provide protection against harmful environmental influences. In industry, they are used as ingredients for the production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Currently the biological sources of wax esters are limited to jojoba oil. In order to establish a large-scale production of desired wax esters in transgenic high-yielding oilseed plants, enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis from different biological resources should be characterized in detail taking into consideration their substrate specificity. Therefore, this study aims at determining the substrate specificity of one of such enzymes -- the mouse wax synthase. The gene encoding this enzyme was expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the in vitro assays (using microsomal fraction from transgenic yeast), we evaluated the preferences of mouse wax synthase towards a set of combinations of 11 acyl-CoAs with 17 fatty alcohols. The highest activity was observed for 14:0-CoA, 12:0-CoA, and 16:0-CoA in combination with medium chain alcohols (up to 5.2, 3.4, and 3.3 nmol wax esters/min/mg microsomal protein, respectively). Unsaturated alcohols longer than 18°C were better utilized by the enzyme in comparison to the saturated ones. Combinations of all tested alcohols with 20:0-CoA, 22:1-CoA, or Ric-CoA were poorly utilized by the enzyme, and conjugated acyl-CoAs were not utilized at all. Apart from the wax synthase activity, mouse wax synthase also exhibited a very low acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity. However, it displayed neither acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase, nor acyl-CoA:sterol acyltransferase activity.

  3. Mouse Behavioral Tasks Relevant to Autism: Phenotypes of Ten Inbred Strains

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Sheryl S.; Nadler, Jessica J.; Young, Nancy B.; Perez, Antonio; Holloway, L. Paige; Barbaro, Ryan P.; Barbaro, Justin R.; West, Lindsay M.; Threadgill, David W.; Lauder, Jean M.; Magnuson, Terry R.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2007-01-01

    Three defining clinical symptoms of autism are aberrant reciprocal social interactions, deficits in social communication, and repetitive behaviors, including motor stereotypies and insistence on sameness. We developed a set of behavioral tasks designed to model components of these core symptoms in mice. Male mice from ten inbred strains were characterized in assays for sociability, preference for social novelty, and reversal of the spatial location of the reinforcer in T-maze and Morris water maze tasks. Six strains, C57BL/6J, C57L/J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, C3H/HeJ, and AKR/J, showed significant levels of sociability, while A/J, BALB/cByJ, BTBR T+tf/J, and 129S1/SvImJ mice did not. C57BL/6J, C57L/J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR T+tf/J showed significant preference for social novelty, while C3H/HeJ, AKR/J, A/J, and 129S1/SvImJ did not. Normal scores on relevant control measures confirmed general health and physical abilities in all strains, ruling out artifactual explanations for social deficits. Elevated plus maze scores confirmed high anxiety-like behaviors in A/J, BALB/cByJ, and 129S1/SvImJ, which could underlie components of their low social approach. Strains that showed high levels of performance on acquisition of a T-maze task were also able to reach criterion for reversal learning. On the Morris water maze task, DBA/2J, AKR/J, BTBR T+tf/J, and 129S1/SvImJ failed to show significant quadrant preference during the reversal probe trial. These results highlight a dissociation between social task performance and reversal learning. BTBR T+tf/J is a particularly interesting strain, displaying both low social approach and resistance to change in routine on the water maze, consistent with an autism-like phenotype. Our multitask strategy for modeling symptoms of autism will be useful for investigating targeted and random gene mutations, QTLs, and microarray analyses. PMID:16971002

  4. Lung dendritic cells undergo maturation and polarization towards a T helper type 2-stimulating phenotype in a mouse model of asthma: Role of nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    QIN, QINGWU; WANG, ZHAN; PAN, PINHUA; CAO, ZU; XIA, QING; TAN, HONGYI; HU, CHENGPING

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and dendritic cells (DCs) have been hypothesized to modulate T cell responses in a mouse model of asthma. However, whether NGF plays a role in regulating the maturation and polarization of lung DCs remains unclear. In the present study, the effect of NGF inhibition on the maturation and phenotype of lung DCs was investigated in a mouse model of asthma. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA), and subsequently received anti-NGF treatment. At 24 h following the last challenge, airway responsiveness and inflammation were examined. The concentrations of NGF, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 were analyzed. In addition, maturation and CD103 expression in the lung DCs were investigated. Anti-NGF treatment was found to significantly reduce airway hyperreactivity and inflammation in asthmatic mice. In addition, a subdued T helper 2 (Th2) response was observed, characterized by the downregulation of IL-4 and the upregulation of IFN-γ. Furthermore, the expression of the DC surface molecules, CD80, CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class II, as well as the proportion of lung CD103+ DCs, decreased in the OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The proportion of lung CD103+ DCs also exhibited a positive correlation with the levels of plasma NGF in the mice. These results may provide an explanation for the role of NGF in amplifying the Th2 response in allergic diseases. Therefore, NGF may promote the maturation and polarization towards a Th2-stimulating phenotype of activated DCs, contributing to an amplification of the Th2 response in asthma. PMID:25289030

  5. Characterization of Deoxynivalenol-Induced Anorexia using Mouse Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Brenna M.; Wu, Wenda; Pestka, James J.

    2011-01-01

    A short-term mouse model was devised to investigate induction of food refusal by the common foodborne trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON). DON dose-dependently induced anorexia within 2 h of exposure when administered either by intraperitoneal (ip.) injection or by oral gavage. The no observed adverse effect and lowest observed adverse effect levels in this assay were 0.5 mg/kg bw and 1 mg/kg bw for ip. exposure and 1 mg/kg bw and 2.5 mg/kg bw for oral exposure, respectively. DON’s effects on food intake were transient, lasting up to 3 h at 1 mg/kg bw and up to 6 h at 5 mg/kg bw. Interestingly, a dose-dependent orexigenic response was observed in the 14 h following the initial 2 h food intake measurement. Toxin-treated mice exhibited partial resistance to feed refusal when exposed to DON subsequently after 2 d, but not after 7 d suggesting that this modest tolerance was reversible. The short-term mouse bioassay described here was useful in characterizing DON-induced anorexia and should be applicable to elucidating mechanisms underlying this adverse nutritional effect. PMID:21575669

  6. Characterization of skeletal muscle in the synemin knock-out mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Muriel, Joaquin; Lovering, Richard M.; Lund, Linda; Bond, Meredith; Bloch, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Diseases linked to intermediate filament (IF) proteins are associated with defects in the organization of the contractile apparatus of skeletal and cardiac muscle and its links to costameres, which connect the sarcomeres to the cell membrane. Synemin is a large IF protein that associates with dystrobrevin, vinculin, and talin at costameres of the cell membrane of striated muscle, as well as with α-actinin and desmin at the Z disks. Synemin can be expressed in either 210 kDa α- or 180 kDa β- alternatively spliced forms. We generated mice null for synemin by homologous recombination to study synemin's function in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle in the knock out (syn KO) mouse does not make synemin mRNA or protein. Preliminary characterization of the syn KO mouse suggests that it has a mild skeletal muscle phenotype. The organization of costameres appears to be normal. Treadmill running uphill test results was not significantly affected when compared to controls at any age. More notably, the biomechanical properties of the cell membrane are different in the syn KO, though they are less affected than by the absence of desmin or dystrophin. These results suggest that the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane-costamere-myofibril complex are significantly influenced by synemin.

  7. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Erkan Y.; Miller, Madeline R.; Robbins, Kate L.; Lombardi, Abby M.; Atkinson, Arleigh K.; Brehm, Amanda J.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1MO-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection in the relatively severe mouse model of SMA (SMNΔ7 mouse model) elicited a robust induction of SMN protein, and mean life span was extended from an average survival of 13 to 54 days following a single dose, consistent with large weight gains and a correction of the neuronal pathology. Additionally, E1MO-ASO treatment in an intermediate SMA mouse (SMNRT mouse model) significantly extended life span by ∼700% and weight gain was comparable with the unaffected animals. While a number of experimental therapeutics have targeted the ISS-N1 element of SMN2 pre-mRNA, the development of E1 ASOs provides a new molecular target for SMA therapeutics that dramatically extends survival in two important pre-clinical models of disease. PMID:24781211

  8. Hypertrophy and dietary tyrosine ameliorate the phenotypes of a mouse model of severe nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai-Anh T; Joya, Josephine E; Kee, Anthony J; Domazetovska, Ana; Yang, Nan; Hook, Jeff W; Lemckert, Frances A; Kettle, Emma; Valova, Valentina A; Robinson, Philip J; North, Kathryn N; Gunning, Peter W; Mitchell, Christina A; Hardeman, Edna C

    2011-12-01

    Nemaline myopathy, the most common congenital myopathy, is caused by mutations in genes encoding thin filament and thin filament-associated proteins in skeletal muscles. Severely affected patients fail to survive beyond the first year of life due to severe muscle weakness. There are no specific therapies to combat this muscle weakness. We have generated the first knock-in mouse model for severe nemaline myopathy by replacing a normal allele of the α-skeletal actin gene with a mutated form (H40Y), which causes severe nemaline myopathy in humans. The Acta1(H40Y) mouse has severe muscle weakness manifested as shortened lifespan, significant forearm and isolated muscle weakness and decreased mobility. Muscle pathologies present in the human patients (e.g. nemaline rods, fibre atrophy and increase in slow fibres) were detected in the Acta1(H40Y) mouse, indicating that it is an excellent model for severe nemaline myopathy. Mating of the Acta1(H40Y) mouse with hypertrophic four and a half LIM domains protein 1 and insulin-like growth factor-1 transgenic mice models increased forearm strength and mobility, and decreased nemaline pathologies. Dietary L-tyrosine supplements also alleviated the mobility deficit and decreased the chronic repair and nemaline rod pathologies. These results suggest that L-tyrosine may be an effective treatment for muscle weakness and immobility in nemaline myopathy. PMID:22067542

  9. Mouse lysozyme M gene: isolation, characterization, and expression studies.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, M; Mangelsdorf, I; Wedel, A; Renkawitz, R

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized both cDNA and genomic DNA of the mouse lysozyme M gene. Derivation of the amino acid sequence from the nucleotide sequences revealed six positions in the carboxyl terminus that differ from partial sequences previously published. The differential detection of specific mRNAs from the closely related lysozyme M and P genes has revealed different but overlapping tissue specificities of expression. The M gene is expressed weakly in myeloblasts, moderately in immature macrophages, and strongly in both mature macrophages and macrophage-rich tissues, while high levels of P transcripts are present only in small intestine. Sites of protein accumulation, rather than gene expression, have been identified by comparative quantitation of mRNA and enzyme levels. Images PMID:3413093

  10. Functional characterization of Prickle2 and BBS7 identify overlapping phenotypes yet distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xue; Westfall, Trudi A.; Zhang, Qihong; Sheffield, Val C.; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Slusarski, Diane C.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders that are caused by dysfunctional cilia and affect multiple organs. One type of ciliopathy, Bardet-Biedl Syndrome, is a rare disorder characterized by obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, mental retardation and susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. The Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) has been associated with cilia function and ciliogenesis in directing the orientation of cilia and basal bodies. Yet the exact relationship between PCP and ciliopathy is not well understood. Here, we examine interactions between a core PCP component, Prickle2 (Pk2), and a central BBS gene, Bbs7, using gene knockdown in the zebrafish. pk2 and bbs7 knockdown both disrupt the formation of a ciliated organ, the Kupffer’s Vesicle (KV), but do not display a synergistic interaction. By measuring cell polarity in the neural tube, we find that bbs7 activity is not required for Pk asymmetric localization. Moreover, BBS protein complex formation is preserved in the Pk2-deficient (Pk2−/−) mouse. Previously we reported an intracellular melanosome transport delay as a cardinal feature of reduced bbs gene activity. We find that pk2 knockdown suppresses bbs7-related retrograde transport delay. Similarly, knockdown of ift22, an anterograde intraflagellar transport component, also suppresses the bbs7-related retrograde delay. Notably, we find that pk2 knockdown larvae show a delay in anterograde transport. These data suggest a novel role for Pk2 in directional intracellular transport and our analyses show that PCP and BBS function independently, yet result in overlapping phenotypes when knocked down in zebrafish. PMID:24938409

  11. Identification and Characterization of PERK Activators by Phenotypic Screening and Their Effects on NRF2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wensheng; Pariollaud, Marie; Wixted, William E.; Chitnis, Nilesh; Fornwald, James; Truong, Maggie; Pao, Christina; Liu, Yan; Ames, Robert S.; Callahan, James; Solari, Roberto; Sanchez, Yolanda; Diehl, Alan; Li, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays a critical role to restore the homeostasis of protein production in eukaryotic cells. This vital process is hence involved in many types of diseases including COPD. PERK, one branch in the ER stress signaling pathways, has been reported to activate NRF2 signaling pathway, a known protective response to COPD. Based on this scientific rationale, we aimed to identify PERK activators as a mechanism to achieve NRF2 activation. In this report, we describe a phenotypic screening assay to identify PERK activators. This assay measures phosphorylation of GFP-tagged eIF2α upon PERK activation via a cell-based LanthaScreen technology. To obtain a robust assay with sufficient signal to background and low variation, multiple parameters were optimized including GFP-tagged eIF2α BacMam concentration, cell density and serum concentration. The assay was validated by a tool compound, Thapsigargin, which induces phosphorylation of eIF2α. In our assay, this compound showed maximal signal window of approximately 2.5-fold with a pEC50 of 8.0, consistent with literature reports. To identify novel PERK activators through phosphorylation of eIF2α, a focused set of 8,400 compounds was screened in this assay at 10 µM. A number of hits were identified and validated. The molecular mechanisms for several selected hits were further characterized in terms of PERK activation and effects on PERK downstream components. Specificity of these compounds in activating PERK was demonstrated with a PERK specific inhibitor and in PERK knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. In addition, these hits showed NRF2-dependent anti-oxidant gene induction. In summary, our phenotypic screening assay is demonstrated to be able to identify PERK specific activators. The identified PERK activators could potentially be used as chemical probes to further investigate this pathway as well as the link between PERK activation and NRF2 pathway activation. PMID:25780921

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Paenibacillus larvae isolates.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, K; Piccini, C; Castro-Sowinski, S; Rosado, A S; Seldin, L; Zunino, P

    2007-09-20

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American Foulbrood (AFB), a severe disease of honeybees (Apis melifera). The aim of this work was to develop a strategy for the subtyping and the epidemiological analysis of P. larvae. Phenotypic characterisation, susceptibility to several antibiotics, electrophoresis of whole bacterial proteins, rep-PCR, ribotyping and DGGE were assessed using a collection of P. larvae isolates from different Uruguayan and Argentinean locations. Results indicated that there are two P. larvae genotypes circulating in Uruguay ERIC I-BOX A (worldwide distributed) and ERIC I-BOX C (exclusively detected in Argentina until this study). These results suggest that P. larvae isolates had moved between Argentina and Uruguay, probably through the Uruguay River. Patterns of whole bacterial proteins, DGGE and ribotyping did not improve the P. larvae intraspecific discrimination. Antibiotic susceptibility assays showed that 100% isolates were OTC-sensitive and 22% (belonging to ERIC I-BOX A group) were sulfisoxazole-resistant. This work may contribute to the elucidation of basic aspects related to the epidemiology of AFB in Uruguay and in the region.

  13. Endocrine parameters and phenotypes of the growth hormone receptor gene disrupted (GHR-/-) mouse.

    PubMed

    List, Edward O; Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Berryman, Darlene E; Funk, Kevin; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S; Okada, Shigeru; Ding, Juan; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Kopchick, John J

    2011-06-01

    Disruption of the GH receptor (GHR) gene eliminates GH-induced intracellular signaling and, thus, its biological actions. Therefore, the GHR gene disrupted mouse (GHR-/-) has been and is a valuable tool for helping to define various parameters of GH physiology. Since its creation in 1995, this mouse strain has been used by our laboratory and others for numerous studies ranging from growth to aging. Some of the most notable discoveries are their extreme insulin sensitivity in the presence of obesity. Also, the animals have an extended lifespan, which has generated a large number of investigations into the roles of GH and IGF-I in the aging process. This review summarizes the many results derived from the GHR-/- mice. We have attempted to present the findings in the context of current knowledge regarding GH action and, where applicable, to discuss how these mice compare to GH insensitivity syndrome in humans. PMID:21123740

  14. Endocrine Parameters and Phenotypes of the Growth Hormone Receptor Gene Disrupted (GHR−/−) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    List, Edward O.; Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Berryman, Darlene E.; Funk, Kevin; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S.; Okada, Shigeru; Ding, Juan; Cruz-Topete, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the GH receptor (GHR) gene eliminates GH-induced intracellular signaling and, thus, its biological actions. Therefore, the GHR gene disrupted mouse (GHR−/−) has been and is a valuable tool for helping to define various parameters of GH physiology. Since its creation in 1995, this mouse strain has been used by our laboratory and others for numerous studies ranging from growth to aging. Some of the most notable discoveries are their extreme insulin sensitivity in the presence of obesity. Also, the animals have an extended lifespan, which has generated a large number of investigations into the roles of GH and IGF-I in the aging process. This review summarizes the many results derived from the GHR−/− mice. We have attempted to present the findings in the context of current knowledge regarding GH action and, where applicable, to discuss how these mice compare to GH insensitivity syndrome in humans. PMID:21123740

  15. Morphologic and phenotypic analysis of an outcross line of blotchy mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ranga, V.; Grahn, D.; Journey, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Blotchy is an X-linked recessive mutation at the Mottled locus in the mouse. The affected blotchy male (Blo/Y) mouse from an inbred genetic background demonstrates morphologic and physiologic abnormalities consistent with emphysema in adult life. Breeding of Blo/Y mice has been difficult because the inbred Blo/Y males are sterile. We report the successful development of a line of outbred Blo/Y male and Blo/Blo female mice by the controlled outcross mating of the inbred heterozygous Blo/ + female with the Argonne hybrid B6CF/sub 1/ male mouse. The subsequent outcross Blo/Y progeny breed vigorously with outcrossed Blo/ + female. The lungs of the outbred Blo/Blo female and inbred Blo/Y male mice demonstrate mild to moderate panacinar emphysema with a significant decrease in internal surface area (p < 0.005) and an increase in mean linear intercept (p < 0.005). In contrast, the lungs of the outbred Blo/Y is structurally normal. Despite the absence of emphysema-like changes in the outbred Blo/Y males, there were penotypic features that suggest inherited abnormalities in connective tissue proteins including (1) high incidence of aortitis leading to premature death from aneurysmal rupture, and (2) significant decrease in the morphometrically determined parenchymal elastic fiber length in the lung (p < 0.01). The outbred blotchy strain may be a useful experimental animal model in determining the pathogenesis of emphysema. 21 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  16. Reversible behavioral phenotypes in a conditional mouse model of TDP-43 proteinopathies.

    PubMed

    Alfieri, Julio A; Pino, Natalia S; Igaz, Lionel M

    2014-11-12

    Transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) mislocalization and aggregation are hallmark features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We have previously shown in mice that inducible overexpression of a cytoplasmically localized form of TDP-43 (TDP-43-ΔNLS) in forebrain neurons evokes neuropathological changes that recapitulate several features of TDP-43 proteinopathies. Detailed behavioral phenotyping could provide further validation for its usage as a model for FTD. In the present study, we performed a battery of behavioral tests to evaluate motor, cognitive, and social phenotypes in this model. We found that transgene (Tg) induction by doxycycline removal at weaning led to motor abnormalities including hyperlocomotion in the open field test, impaired coordination and balance in the rotarod test, and increased spasticity as shown by a clasping phenotype. Cognitive assessment demonstrated impaired recognition and spatial memory, measured by novel object recognition and Y-maze tests. Remarkably, TDP-43-ΔNLS mice displayed deficits in social behavior, mimicking a key aspect of FTD. To determine whether these symptoms were reversible, we suppressed Tg expression for 14 d in 1.5-month-old mice showing an established behavioral phenotype but modest neurodegeneration and found that motor and cognitive deficits were ameliorated; however, social performance remained altered. When Tg expression was suppressed in 6.5-month-old mice showing overt neurodegeneration, motor deficits were irreversible. These results indicate that TDP-43-ΔNLS mice display several core behavioral features of FTD with motor neuron disease, possibly due to functional changes in surviving neurons, and might serve as a valuable tool to unveil the underlying mechanisms of this and other TDP-43 proteinopathies.

  17. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L.; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W.; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148). PMID:26025364

  18. Establishing biomechanical mechanisms in mouse models: practical guidelines for systematically evaluating phenotypic changes in the diaphyses of long bones.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karl J; Silva, Matthew J; Vashishth, Deepak; Guo, X Edward; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2015-06-01

    Mice are widely used in studies of skeletal biology, and assessment of their bones by mechanical testing is a critical step when evaluating the functional effects of an experimental perturbation. For example, a gene knockout may target a pathway important in bone formation and result in a "low bone mass" phenotype. But how well does the skeleton bear functional loads; eg, how much do bones deform during loading and how resistant are bones to fracture? By systematic evaluation of bone morphological, densitometric, and mechanical properties, investigators can establish the "biomechanical mechanisms" whereby an experimental perturbation alters whole-bone mechanical function. The goal of this review is to clarify these biomechanical mechanisms and to make recommendations for systematically evaluating phenotypic changes in mouse bones, with a focus on long-bone diaphyses and cortical bone. Further, minimum reportable standards for testing conditions and outcome variables are suggested that will improve the comparison of data across studies. Basic biomechanical principles are reviewed, followed by a description of the cross-sectional morphological properties that best inform the net cellular effects of a given experimental perturbation and are most relevant to biomechanical function. Although morphology is critical, whole-bone mechanical properties can only be determined accurately by a mechanical test. The functional importance of stiffness, maximum load, postyield displacement, and work-to-fracture are reviewed. Because bone and body size are often strongly related, strategies to adjust whole-bone properties for body mass are detailed. Finally, a comprehensive framework is presented using real data, and several examples from the literature are reviewed to illustrate how to synthesize morphological, tissue-level, and whole-bone mechanical properties of mouse long bones. PMID:25917136

  19. Beneficial Renal and Pancreatic Phenotypes in a Mouse Deficient in FXYD2 Regulatory Subunit of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Arystarkhova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental role of Na,K-ATPase in eukaryotic cells calls for complex and efficient regulation of its activity. Besides alterations in gene expression and trafficking, kinetic properties of the pump are modulated by reversible association with single span membrane proteins, the FXYDs. Seven members of the family are expressed in a tissue-specific manner, affecting pump kinetics in all possible permutations. This mini-review focuses on functional properties of FXYD2 studied in transfected cells, and on noteworthy and unexpected phenotypes discovered in a Fxyd2−∕− mouse. FXYD2, the gamma subunit, reduces activity of Na,K-ATPase either by decreasing affinity for Na+, or reducing Vmax. FXYD2 mRNA splicing and editing provide another layer for regulation of Na,K-ATPase. In kidney of knockouts, there was elevated activity for Na,K-ATPase and for NCC and NKCC2 apical sodium transporters. That should lead to sodium retention and hypertension, however, the mice were in sodium balance and normotensive. Adult Fxyd2−∕− mice also exhibited a mild pancreatic phenotype with enhanced glucose tolerance, elevation of circulating insulin, but no insulin resistance. There was an increase in beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass that correlated with activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway. The Fxyd2−∕− mice are thus in a highly desirable state: the animals are resistant to Na+ retention, and showed improved glucose control, i.e., they display favorable metabolic adaptations to protect against development of salt-sensitive hypertension and diabetes. Investigation of the mechanisms of these adaptations in the mouse has the potential to unveil a novel therapeutic FXYD2-dependent strategy. PMID:27014088

  20. Establishing Biomechanical Mechanisms in Mouse Models: Practical Guidelines for Systematically Evaluating Phenotypic Changes in the Diaphyses of Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Karl J; Silva, Matthew J; Vashishth, Deepak; Guo, X Edward; van der Meulen, Marjolein CH

    2016-01-01

    Mice are widely used in studies of skeletal biology, and assessment of their bones by mechanical testing is a critical step when evaluating the functional effects of an experimental perturbation. For example, a gene knockout may target a pathway important in bone formation and result in a “low bone mass” phenotype. But how well does the skeleton bear functional loads; eg, how much do bones deform during loading and how resistant are bones to fracture? By systematic evaluation of bone morphological, densitometric, and mechanical properties, investigators can establish the “biomechanical mechanisms” whereby an experimental perturbation alters whole-bone mechanical function. The goal of this review is to clarify these biomechanical mechanisms and to make recommendations for systematically evaluating phenotypic changes in mouse bones, with a focus on long-bone diaphyses and cortical bone. Further, minimum reportable standards for testing conditions and outcome variables are suggested that will improve the comparison of data across studies. Basic biomechanical principles are reviewed, followed by a description of the cross-sectional morphological properties that best inform the net cellular effects of a given experimental perturbation and are most relevant to biomechanical function. Although morphology is critical, whole-bone mechanical properties can only be determined accurately by a mechanical test. The functional importance of stiffness, maximum load, postyield displacement, and work-to-fracture are reviewed. Because bone and body size are often strongly related, strategies to adjust whole-bone properties for body mass are detailed. Finally, a comprehensive framework is presented using real data, and several examples from the literature are reviewed to illustrate how to synthesize morphological, tissue-level, and whole-bone mechanical properties of mouse long bones. PMID:25917136

  1. Placental phenotype and resource allocation to fetal growth are modified by the timing and degree of hypoxia during mouse pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, J. S.; Vaughan, O. R.; Fernandez de Liger, E.; Fowden, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Key points Hypoxia is a major cause of fetal growth restriction, particularly at high altitude, although little is known about its effects on placental phenotype and resource allocation to fetal growth.In the present study, maternal hypoxia induced morphological and functional changes in the mouse placenta, which depended on the timing and severity of hypoxia, as well as the degree of maternal hypophagia.Hypoxia at 13% inspired oxygen induced beneficial changes in placental morphology, nutrient transport and metabolic signalling pathways associated with little or no change in fetal growth, irrespective of gestational age.Hypoxia at 10% inspired oxygen adversely affected placental phenotype and resulted in severe fetal growth restriction, which was due partly to maternal hypophagia.There is a threshold between 13% and 10% inspired oxygen, corresponding to altitudes of ∼3700 m and 5800 m, respectively, at which the mouse placenta no longer adapts to support fetal resource allocation. This has implications for high altitude human pregnancies. Abstract The placenta adapts its transport capacity to nutritional cues developmentally, although relatively little is known about placental transport phenotype in response to hypoxia, a major cause of fetal growth restriction. The present study determined the effects of both moderate hypoxia (13% inspired O2) between days (D)11 and D16 or D14 and D19 of pregnancy and severe hypoxia (10% inspired O2) from D14 to D19 on placental morphology, transport capacity and fetal growth on D16 and D19 (term∼D20.5), relative to normoxic mice in 21% O2. Placental morphology adapted beneficially to 13% O2; fetal capillary volume increased at both ages, exchange area increased at D16 and exchange barrier thickness reduced at D19. Exposure to 13% O2 had no effect on placental nutrient transport on D16 but increased placental uptake and clearance of 3H‐methyl‐d‐glucose at D19. By contrast, 10% O2 impaired fetal vascularity

  2. Reversible phenotype in a mouse model of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sagelius, H; Rosengardten, Y; Schmidt, E; Sonnabend, C; Rozell, B; Eriksson, M

    2008-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare progeroid syndrome caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. Currently there is no treatment available for HGPS, but promising results from several studies using farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs) on cells and animal models of HGPS have been published and a clinical trial using FTIs has been started in patients with HGPS. However, the published data from animal models treated with FTIs come from studies where the treatment was started before pronounced disease development. This study used an inducible transgenic animal model of HGPS with abnormalities of the skin and teeth. After phenotype development, the transgenic expression was turned off and a rapid improvement of the phenotype was noted, within 4 weeks of transgenic suppression. After 13 weeks, the skin was almost indistinguishable from wild-type skin. This study shows that in these tissues, expression of the progeria mutation does not cause irreversible damage and that reversal of disease phenotype is possible, which gives promise for a treatment for this disease.

  3. Interleukin-1 receptors in mouse brain: Characterization and neuronal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, T.; Tracey, D.E.; Mitchell, W.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has a variety of effects in brain, including induction of fever, alteration of slow wave sleep, and alteration of neuroendocrine activity. To examine the potential sites of action of IL-1 in brain, we used iodine-125-labeled recombinant human interleukin-1 (( 125I)IL-1) to identify and characterize IL-1 receptors in crude membrane preparations of mouse (C57BL/6) hippocampus and to study the distribution of IL-1-binding sites in brain using autoradiography. In preliminary homogenate binding and autoradiographic studies, (125I)IL-1 alpha showed significantly higher specific binding than (125I)IL-1 beta. Thus, (125I)IL-1 alpha was used in all subsequent assays. The binding of (125I)IL-1 alpha was linear over a broad range of membrane protein concentrations, saturable, reversible, and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant value of 114 +/- 35 pM and a maximum number of binding sites of 2.5 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, recombinant human IL-1 alpha, recombinant human IL-1 beta, and a weak IL-1 beta analog. IL-1 beta +, inhibited (125I)IL-1 alpha binding to mouse hippocampus in parallel with their relative bioactivities in the T-cell comitogenesis assay, with inhibitory binding affinity constants of 55 +/- 18, 76 +/- 20, and 2940 +/- 742 pM, respectively; rat/human CRF and human tumor necrosis factor showed no effect on (125I)IL-1 alpha binding. Autoradiographic localization studies revealed very low densities of (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites throughout the brain, with highest densities present in the molecular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the choroid plexus. Quinolinic acid lesion studies demonstrated that the (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites in the hippocampus were localized to intrinsic neurons.

  4. Characterization of a Mouse-Adapted Staphylococcus aureus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Holtfreter, Silva; Radcliff, Fiona J.; Grumann, Dorothee; Read, Hannah; Johnson, Sarah; Monecke, Stefan; Ritchie, Stephen; Clow, Fiona; Goerke, Christiane; Bröker, Barbara M.; Fraser, John D.; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2013-01-01

    More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the ‘superbug’ Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain (JSNZ) which caused a severe outbreak of preputial gland abscesses among male C57BL/6J mice. We aimed to extensively characterize this strain on a genomic level and determine its virulence potential in murine colonization and infection models. JSNZ belongs to the MLST type ST88, rare among human isolates, and lacks an hlb-converting phage encoding human-specific immune evasion factors. Naive mice were found to be more susceptible to nasal and gastrointestinal colonization with JSNZ than with the human-derived Newman strain. Furthermore, naïve mice required antibiotic pre-treatment to become colonized with Newman. In contrast, JSNZ was able to colonize mice in the absence of antibiotic treatment suggesting that this strain can compete with the natural flora for space and nutrients. In a renal abscess model, JSNZ caused more severe disease than Newman with greater weight loss and bacterial burden. In contrast to most other clinical isolates, JSNZ can also be readily genetically modified by phage transduction and electroporation. In conclusion, the mouse-adapted strain JSNZ may represent a valuable tool for studying aspects of mucosal colonization and for screening novel vaccines and therapies directed at preventing colonization. PMID:24023720

  5. The alpha(2) integrin subunit-deficient mouse: a multifaceted phenotype including defects of branching morphogenesis and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianchun; Diacovo, Thomas G; Grenache, David G; Santoro, Samuel A; Zutter, Mary M

    2002-07-01

    The alpha(2)beta(1) integrin is a collagen/laminin receptor expressed on platelets, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and epithelial cells. To define the role of the alpha(2)beta(1) integrin in vivo, we created a genetically engineered mouse in which expression of the alpha(2)beta(1) integrin was completely eliminated. Mice deficient in the alpha(2)beta(1) integrin are viable, fertile, and develop normally with no excess lethality of homozygotes. Both alpha(2)beta(1)-integrin protein and alpha(2) mRNA were undetectable in the alpha(2)-null mice. Gross and histological evaluation of the heart, lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, skin, and reproductive tracts revealed no abnormalities. However, quantitative analysis of mammary gland branching morphogenesis demonstrated that branching complexity is markedly diminished in the alpha(2)-deficient animals. Studies in the alpha(2)-deficient animals do not support the proposed roles for the alpha(2)beta(1) integrin on fibroblasts and keratinocytes in wound healing. When compared to platelets from wild-type littermates, platelets from alpha(2)-null mice failed to adhere to type I collagen under either static or shear-stress conditions. Although platelets from alpha(2)-deficient animals aggregated in response to collagen, they did so with prolonged lag time and lessened intensity. The alpha(2)beta(1) integrin-null mouse thus exhibits diverse, sometimes subtle, phenotypes consistent with the widespread pattern of alpha(2)beta(1) integrin expression. PMID:12107118

  6. Differences in protein quality control correlate with phenotype variability in 2 mouse models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marino, Marianna; Papa, Simonetta; Crippa, Valeria; Nardo, Giovanni; Peviani, Marco; Cheroni, Cristina; Trolese, Maria Chiara; Lauranzano, Eliana; Bonetto, Valentina; Poletti, Angelo; DeBiasi, Silvia; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Shaw, Pamela J; Bendotti, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease of variable severity in terms of speed of progression of the disease course. We found a similar variability in disease onset and progression of 2 familial ALS mouse strains, despite the fact that they carry the same transgene copy number and express the same amount of mutant SOD1G93A messenger RNA and protein in the central nervous system. Comparative analysis of 2 SOD1G93A mouse strains highlights differences associated with the disease severity that are unrelated to the degree of motor neuron loss but that appear to promote early dysfunction of these cells linked to protein aggregation. Features of fast progressing phenotype are (1) abundant protein aggregates containing mutant SOD1 and multiple chaperones; (2) low basal expression of the chaperone alpha-B-crystallin (CRYAB) and β5 subunits of proteasome; and (3) downregulation of proteasome subunit expression at disease onset. In contrast, high levels of functional chaperones such as cyclophillin-A and CRYAB, combined with delayed alteration of expression of proteasome subunits and the sequestration of TDP43 into aggregates, are features associated with a more slowly progressing pathology. These data support the hypothesis that impairment of protein homeostasis caused by low-soluble chaperone levels, together with malfunction of the proteasome degradation machinery, contributes to accelerate motor neuron dysfunction and progression of disease symptoms. Therefore, modulating the activity of these systems could represent a rational therapeutic strategy for slowing down disease progression in SOD1-related ALS.

  7. Targeted deletion of Vglut2 expression in the embryonal telencephalon promotes an anxiolytic phenotype of the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nordenankar, Karin; Bergfors, Assar

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety is a natural emotion experienced by all individuals. However, when anxiety becomes excessive, it contributes to the substantial group of anxiety disorders that affect one in three people and thus are among the most common psychiatric disorders. Anxiolysis, the reduction of anxiety, is mediated via several large groups of therapeutical compounds, but the relief is often only temporary, and increased knowledge of the neurobiology underlying anxiety is needed in order to improve future therapies. Aim We previously demonstrated that mice lacking forebrain expression of the Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (Vglut2) from adolescence showed a strong anxiolytic behaviour as adults. In the current study, we wished to analyse if removal of Vglut2 expression already from mid-gestation of the mouse embryo would give rise to similar anxiolysis in the adult mouse. Methods We produced transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 from mid-gestation and analysed their affective behaviour, including anxiety, when they had reached adulthood. Results The transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 expression from mid-gestation showed certain signs of anxiolytic behaviour, but this phenotype was not as prominent as when Vglut2 was removed during adolescence. Conclusion Our results suggest that both embryonal and adolescent forebrain expression of Vglut2 normally contributes to balancing the level of anxiety. As the neurobiological basis for anxiety is similar across species, our results in mice may help improve the current understanding of the neurocircuitry of anxiety, and hence anxiolysis, also in humans. PMID:25857802

  8. Ultra-high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy and high throughput cardiovascular phenotyping in a large scale mouse mutagenesis screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Francis, Richard; Tobita, Kimimasa; Kim, Andy; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is ideally suited for phenotyping fetal mice for congenital heart disease (CHD), as imaging can be carried out noninvasively to provide both hemodynamic and structural information essential for CHD diagnosis. Using the UBM (Vevo 2100; 40Hz) in conjunction with the clinical ultrasound system (Acuson Sequioa C512; 15Hz), we developed a two-step screening protocol to scan thousands fetuses derived from ENU mutagenized pedigrees. A wide spectrum of CHD was detected by the UBM, which were subsequently confirmed with follow-up necropsy and histopathology examination with episcopic fluorescence image capture. CHD observed included outflow anomalies, left/right heart obstructive lesions, septal/valvular defects and cardiac situs anomalies. Meanwhile, various extracardiac defects were found, such as polydactyly, craniofacial defects, exencephaly, omphalocele-cleft palate, most of which were associated with cardiac defects. Our analyses showed the UBM was better at assessing cardiac structure and blood flow profiles, while conventional ultrasound allowed higher throughput low-resolution screening. Our study showed the integration of conventional clinical ultrasound imaging with the UBM for fetal mouse cardiovascular phenotyping can maximize the detection and recovery of CHD mutants.

  9. Oral curcumin mitigates the clinical and neuropathologic phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse: a potential therapy for inherited neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Shiga, Kensuke; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; He, Feng; Shaw, Chad A; Yan, Jiong; Wensel, Theodore G; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in myelin genes cause inherited peripheral neuropathies that range in severity from adult-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 to childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Many myelin gene mutants that cause severe disease, such as those in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ) and the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), appear to make aberrant proteins that accumulate primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in Schwann cell death by apoptosis and, subsequently, peripheral neuropathy. We previously showed that curcumin supplementation could abrogate ER retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing MPZ mutants. We now show reduced apoptosis after curcumin treatment of cells in tissue culture that express PMP22 mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oral administration of curcumin partially mitigates the severe neuropathy phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse model in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of curcumin significantly decreases the percentage of apoptotic Schwann cells and results in increased number and size of myelinated axons in sciatic nerves, leading to improved motor performance. Our findings indicate that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and improves the neuropathologic phenotype in an animal model of human neuropathy, suggesting a potential therapeutic role in selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:17701891

  10. Adeno-Associated Viral-Mediated LARGE Gene Therapy Rescues the Muscular Dystrophic Phenotype in Mouse Models of Dystroglycanopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Miao; He, Yonglin; Wang, Kejian; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Shengle

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Dystroglycanopathies are a group of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) often caused by mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases that lead to hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) and reduce its extracellular matrix-binding activity. Overexpressing LARGE (formerly known as like-glycosyltransferase) generates an extracellular matrix-binding carbohydrate epitope in cells with CMD-causing mutations in not only LARGE but also other glycosyltransferases, including POMT1, POMGnT1, and fukutin, creating the possibilities of a one-for-all gene therapy. To determine the feasibility of LARGE gene therapy, a serotype 9 adeno-associated viral vector for overexpressing LARGE (AAV9-LARGE) was injected intracardially into newborns of two mouse models of CMD: the natural LARGE mutant Largemyd mice and protein O-mannose N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGnT1) knockout mice. AAV9-LARGE virus treatment yielded partial restoration of α-DG glycosylation and ligand-binding activity. The muscular dystrophy phenotype in skeletal muscles was ameliorated as revealed by significantly reduced fibrosis, necrosis, and numbers of centrally located nuclei with improved motor function. These results indicate that LARGE overexpression in vivo by AAV9-mediated gene therapy is effective at restoring functional glycosylation of α-DG and rescuing the muscular dystrophy phenotype in deficiency of not only LARGE but also POMGnT1, providing evidence that in vivo LARGE gene therapy may be broadly useful in dystroglycanopathies. PMID:23379513

  11. Phenotype-dependent alteration of pathways and networks reveals a pure synergistic mechanism for compounds treating mouse cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng-qian; Li, Bing; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ying-ying; Yu, Ya-nan; Zhang, Xiao-xu; Yuan, Ye; Guo, Zhi-li; Wu, Hong-li; Li, Hai-xia; Dang, Hai-xia; Guo, Shan-shan; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Our previous studies have showed that ursodeoxycholic acid (UA) and jasminoidin (JA) effectively reduce cerebral infarct volume in mice. In this study we explored the pure synergistic mechanism of these compounds in treatment of mouse cerebral ischemia, which was defined as synergistic actions specific for phenotype variations after excluding interference from ineffective compounds. Methods: Mice with focal cerebral ischemia were treated with UA, JA or a combination JA and UA (JU). Concha margaritifera (CM) was taken as ineffective compound. Cerebral infarct volume of the mice was determined, and the hippocampi were taken for microarray analysis. Particular signaling pathways and biological functions were enriched based on differentially expressed genes, and corresponding networks were constructed through Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results: In phenotype analysis, UA, JA, and JU significantly reduced the ischemic infarct volume with JU being superior to UA or JA alone, while CM was ineffective. As a result, 4 pathways enriched in CM were excluded. Core pathways in the phenotype-positive groups (UA or JA) were involved in neuronal homeostasis and neuropathology. JU-contributing pathways included all UA-contributing and the majority (71.7%) of JA-contributing pathways, and 10 new core pathways whose effects included inflammatory immunity, apoptosis and nervous system development. The functions of JU group included all functions of JA group, the majority (93.1%) of UA-contributing functions, and 3 new core functions, which focused on physiological system development and function. Conclusion: The pure synergism between UA and JA underlies 10 new core pathways and 3 new core functions, which are involved in inflammation, immune responses, apoptosis and nervous system development. PMID:25960134

  12. Lithium prevents parkinsonian behavioral and striatal phenotypes in an aged parkin mutant transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lieu, Christopher A; Dewey, Colleen M; Chinta, Shankar J; Rane, Anand; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Batir, Sean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-12-01

    Lithium has long been used as a treatment for the psychiatric disease bipolar disorder. However, previous studies suggest that lithium provides neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. The exact mechanism by which lithium exerts these effects still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose lithium treatment in an aged mouse model expressing a parkin mutation within dopaminergic neurons. We found that low-dose lithium treatment prevented motor impairment as demonstrated by the open field test, pole test, and rearing behavior. Furthermore, lithium prevented dopaminergic striatal degeneration in parkin animals. We also found that parkin-induced striatal astrogliosis and microglial activation were prevented by lithium treatment. Our results further corroborate the use of this parkin mutant transgenic mouse line as a model for PD for testing novel therapeutics. The findings of the present study also provide further validation that lithium could be re-purposed as a therapy for PD and suggest that anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to its neuroprotective mechanisms.

  13. Behavioral phenotyping of Nestin-Cre mice: implications for genetic mouse models of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Sebastian A; Vercelli, Claudia A; Vogl, Annette M; Kolarz, Adam W; Pino, Natalia S; Deussing, Jan M; Refojo, Damian

    2014-08-01

    Genetic mouse models based on the Cre-loxP system have been extensively used to explore the influence of specific gene deletions on different aspects of behavioral neurobiology. However, the interpretation of the effects attributed to the gene deletion might be obscured by potential side effects secondary to the Cre recombinase transgene insertion or Cre activity, usually neither controlled nor reported. Here, we performed a comprehensive behavioral analysis of endophenotypes of neuropsychiatric disorders in the extensively used Nestin(Cre) mouse line, commonly employed to restrict genetic modifications to the CNS. We observed no alterations in locomotion, general exploratory activity, learning and memory, sociability, startle response and sensorimotor gating. Although the overall response to stimuli triggering anxiety-like behaviors remained unaltered in Nestin(Cre) mice, a strong impairment in the acquisition of both contextual- and cued-conditioned fear was observed. These results underline the importance of adequately controlling the behavioral performance of the employed Cre-lines per-se in pre-clinical neurobehavioral research.

  14. The organoid-initiating cells in mouse pancreas and liver are phenotypically and functionally similar

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Craig; Tarlow, Branden; Wang, Yuhan; Canaday, Pamela S; Haft, Annelise; Schug, Jonathan; Streeter, Philip R; Finegold, Milton J; Shenje, Lincoln T; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grompe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic Lgr5 expression has been associated with organoid-forming epithelial progenitor populations but the identity of the organoid-initiating epithelial cell subpopulation has remained elusive. Injury causes the emergence of an Lgr5+ organoid-forming epithelial progenitor population in the adult mouse liver and pancreas. Here, we define the origin of organoid-initiating cells from mouse pancreas and liver prior to Lgr5 activation. This clonogenic population was defined as MIC1-1C3+/CD133+/CD26− in both tissues and the frequency of organoid initiation within this population was approximately 5% in each case. The transcriptomes of these populations overlapped extensively and showed enrichment of epithelial progenitor-associated regulatory genes such as Sox9 and FoxJ1. Surprisingly, pancreatic organoid cells also had the capacity to generate hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation to Fah-/- mice, indicating a differentiation capacity similar to hepatic organoids. Although spontaneous endocrine differentiation of pancreatic progenitors was not observed in culture, adenoviral delivery of fate-specifying factors Pdx1, Neurog3 and MafA induced insulin expression without glucagon or somatostatin. Pancreatic organoid cultures therefore preserve many key attributes of progenitor cells while allowing unlimited expansion, facilitating the study of fate determination. PMID:25151611

  15. Survival benefit and phenotypic improvement by hamartin gene therapy in a tuberous sclerosis mouse brain model

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Shilpa; Zhang, Xuan; Goto, June; Han, Sangyeul; Lai, Charles; Bronson, Roderick; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Ramesh, Vijaya; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the potential benefit of gene therapy in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in which there is embryonic loss of Tsc1 (hamartin) in brain neurons. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (serotype rh8) expressing a tagged form of hamartin was injected into the cerebral ventricles of newborn pups with the genotype Tsc1cc (homozygous for a conditional floxed Tsc1 allele) SynI-cre+, in which Tsc1 is lost selectively in neurons starting at embryonic day 12. Vector-treated Tsc1ccSynIcre+ mice showed a marked improvement in survival from a mean of 22 days in non-injected mice to 52 days in AAV hamartin vector-injected mice, with improved weight gain and motor behavior in the latter. Pathologic studies showed normalization of neuron size and a decrease in markers of mTOR activation in treated as compared to untreated mutant littermates. Hence, we show that gene replacement in the brain is an effective therapeutic approach in this mouse model of TSC1. Our strategy for gene therapy has the advantages that therapy can be achieved from a single application, as compared to repeated treatment with drugs, and that AAV vectors have been found to have minimal to no toxicity in clinical trials for other neurologic conditions. Although there are many additional issues to be addressed, our studies support gene therapy as a useful approach in TSC patients. PMID:26019056

  16. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like phenotypes in the d-galactose-induced aging mouse model.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hun; Choi, Tae-Saeng

    2012-11-01

    The D-galactose (D-gal)-induced animal model, which is established by consecutive subcutaneous d-gal injections for approximately 6weeks, has been frequently used for aging research. This animal model has been shown to accelerate aging of the brain, kidneys, liver, and blood cells. However, aging of the female reproductive organs in this animal model has not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the ovary in the d-gal-induced aging mouse model. First, we evaluated anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) as a marker of ovarian aging in blood plasma. We speculated there would be lower AMH levels in d-gal-treated mice because ovarian aging would be induced by d-gal, as reported for other tissues. However, the results showed that AMH levels in d-gal-treated mice were approximately four-fold higher than control mice. Abnormally high AMH levels are detected in ovarian cancer and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients. Therefore, we examined PCOS-related markers in this mouse model. Total testosterone levels were high and abnormal estrous cycles were induced in d-gal-treated mice. These changes, including AMH levels, in d-gal-treated mice were inhibited by aminoguanidine treatment, an advanced glycation end product reducer. In addition, ovarian cysts were observed in some d-gal-treated mice. These results indicate that with respect to female reproduction, d-gal-treated mice are suitable for PCOS studies, rather than aging studies.

  17. Chromosomal rearrangements, phenotypic variation and modularity: a case study from a contact zone between house mouse Robertsonian races in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Paolo; Colangelo, Paolo; Meyer, Axel; Fruciano, Carmelo

    2016-03-01

    The Western European house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, is well-known for the high frequency of Robertsonian fusions that have rapidly produced more than 50 karyotipic races, making it an ideal model for studying the mechanisms of chromosomal speciation. The mouse mandible is one of the traits studied most intensively to investigate the effect of Robertsonian fusions on phenotypic variation within and between populations. This complex bone structure has also been widely used to study the level of integration between different morphogenetic units. Here, with the aim of testing the effect of different karyotypic assets on the morphology of the mouse mandible and on its level of modularity, we performed morphometric analyses of mice from a contact area between two highly metacentric races in Central Italy. We found no difference in size, while the mandible shape was found to be different between the two Robertsonian races, even after accounting for the genetic relationships among individuals and geographic proximity. Our results support the existence of two modules that indicate a certain degree of evolutionary independence, but no difference in the strength of modularity between chromosomal races. Moreover, the ascending ramus showed more pronounced interpopulation/race phenotypic differences than the alveolar region, an effect that could be associated to their different polygenic architecture. This study suggests that chromosomal rearrangements play a role in the house mouse phenotypic divergence, and that the two modules of the mouse mandible are differentially affected by environmental factors and genetic makeup.

  18. Presence of rd8 mutation does not alter the ocular phenotype of late-onset retinal degeneration mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Alapati, Akhila; Suk, John; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe; Jablonski, Monica M.; Ayyagari, Radha

    2015-01-01

    -type and Ctrp5+/− mice with the rd8 mutation (Wtrd8/rd8 and Ctrp5+/−;rd8/rd8, respectively) revealed an integrated retinal architecture with well-defined outer segments/inner segments (OS/IS), outer nuclear layer (ONL), outer plexiform layer (OPL), and inner nuclear layer (INL). The presence of pseudorosette structures reported in the rd8 mice between the ONL and the INL in the ventral quadrant of the retina was not observed in all genotypes studied. Further, the external limiting membrane was continuous in the Ctrp5+/−;rd8/rd8 and Wtrd8/rd8 mice. Evaluation of the retinal phenotype revealed that the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt mice developed characteristic L-ORD pathology including age-dependent accumulation of AF spots, development of sub-retinal, sub-RPE, and basal laminar deposits, and Bruch’s membrane abnormalities at older age, while these changes were not observed in the age-matched littermate WTwt/wt mice. Conclusions The Wtrd8/rd8 and Ctrp5+/−;rd8/rd8 mice raised on C57BL/6J did not develop early onset retinal changes that are characteristic of the rd8 phenotype, supporting the hypothesis that manifestation of rd8-associated pathology depends on the genetic background. The retinal pathology observed in mice with the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt genotype is consistent with the L-ORD phenotype observed in patients and with the phenotype we described previously. The lack of rd8-associated retinal pathology in the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt mouse model raised on the C57BL/6J background and the development of the L-ORD phenotype in these mice in the presence and absence of the rd8 mutation suggests that the pathology observed in the Ctrp5+/−;wt/wt mice is primarily associated with the S163R mutation in the Ctrp5 gene. PMID:25814825

  19. Selection and phenotypic characterization of nonhemagglutinating mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Chandad, F; Mayrand, D; Grenier, D; Hinode, D; Mouton, C

    1996-01-01

    To further investigate the relationship between fimbriae and the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2 of Porphyromonas gingivalis, three spontaneous mutants of the type strain ATCC 33277 were selected by a hemadsorption procedure. They were characterized for hemagglutination, trypsin-like and lectin-binding activities, and hydrophobicity and for the presence of fimbriae. The presence of the 42-kDa (the fimbrilin subunit) and the 43- and 49-kDa (the HA-Ag2 components) polypeptides was investigated by immunoblotting using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed to fimbriae and to the hemagglutinating adhesin HA-Ag2. Cells from two of the three mutants (M1 and M2) exhibited no or little hemagglutination activity and very low trypsin-like activity and did not show the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides. Abnormal fimbriation in M1 was deduced from the following observations of cells grown for 18 h: absence of the 42-kDa polypeptide and of a 14-kDa polypeptide and no fimbriae visible on electron micrographs. While the cells of mutant M2, irrespective of the age of the culture, were found to lack the 43- and 49-kDa polypeptides and hemagglutination activity, the supernatants of cultures grown for 72 h had high hemagglutination and trypsin-like activities and revealed the presence of the 42-, 43-, and 49-kDa polypeptides. This suggests that M2 may be missing some molecules which anchor the components to the cell surface. Mutant M3 showed levels of activities similar to those of the parental strain but lacked the 43-kDa polypeptide. Other pleiotropic effects observed for the mutants included loss of dark pigmentation and lower hydrophobicity. The data from this study fuel an emerging consensus whereby fimbriation, hemagglutination, and proteolytic activities, as well as other functions in P. gingivalis, are intricate. PMID:8641806

  20. Enhanced detection and comprehensive in situ phenotypic characterization of circulating and disseminated heteroploid epithelial and glioma tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daisy Dandan; Li, Linda; Lin, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    Conventional strategy of anti-EpCAM capture and immunostaining of cytokeratins (CKs) to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by highly heterogeneous and dynamic expression or absence of EpCAM and/or CKs in CTCs. In this study, a novel integrated cellular and molecular approach of subtraction enrichment (SE) and immunostaining-FISH (iFISH) was successfully developed. Both large or small size CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) in various biofluid samples including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cancer patients and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) mouse models were efficiently enriched and comprehensively identified and characterized by SE-iFISH. Non-hematopoietic CTCs with heteroploid chromosome 8 were detected in 87–92% of lung, esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Characterization of CTCs performed by CK18-iFISH showed that CK18, the dual epithelial marker and tumor biomarker, was strong positive in only 14% of lung and 24% of esophageal CTCs, respectively. Unlike conventional methodologies restricted only to the large and/or both EpCAM and CK positive CTCs, SE-iFISH enables efficient enrichment and performing in situ phenotypic and karyotypic identification and characterization of the highly heterogeneous CTC subtypes classified by both chromosome ploidy and the expression of various tumor biomarkers. Each CTC subtype may possess distinct clinical significance relative to tumor metastasis, relapse, therapeutic drug sensitivity or resistance, etc. PMID:26267323

  1. In vitro Functional Characterization of Mouse Colorectal Afferent Endings

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Gebhart, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    This video demonstrates in detail an in vitro single-fiber electrophysiological recording protocol using a mouse colorectum-nerve preparation. The approach allows unbiased identification and functional characterization of individual colorectal afferents. Extracellular recordings of propagated action potentials (APs) that originate from one or a few afferent (i.e., single-fiber) receptive fields (RFs) in the colorectum are made from teased nerve fiber fascicles. The colorectum is removed with either the pelvic (PN) or lumbar splanchnic (LSN) nerve attached and opened longitudinally. The tissue is placed in a recording chamber, pinned flat and perfused with oxygenated Krebs solution. Focal electrical stimulation is used to locate the colorectal afferent endings, which are further tested by three distinct mechanical stimuli (blunt probing, mucosal stroking and circumferential stretch) to functionally categorize the afferents into five mechanosensitive classes. Endings responding to none of these mechanical stimuli are categorized as mechanically-insensitive afferents (MIAs). Both mechanosensitive and MIAs can be assessed for sensitization (i.e., enhanced response, reduced threshold, and/or acquisition of mechanosensitivity) by localized exposure of RFs to chemicals (e.g., inflammatory soup (IS), capsaicin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)). We describe the equipment and colorectum–nerve recording preparation, harvest of colorectum with attached PN or LSN, identification of RFs in the colorectum, single-fiber recording from nerve fascicles, and localized application of chemicals to the RF. In addition, challenges of the preparation and application of standardized mechanical stimulation are also discussed. PMID:25651300

  2. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of isogenic doubled haploid exotic introgression lines in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We characterized the genotypic and phenotypic variation for cell wall digestibility (CWD) and other agronomic traits of 50 backcross 1 generation doubled haploids (BC1DH) lines developed from the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project. These lines consisted of 31 exotic, unadapted maize race...

  3. Adrenal and Ovarian Phenotype of a Tissue-Specific Urocortin 2-Overexpressing Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Spyroglou, Ariadni; Riester, Anna; Mueller-Peltzer, Katharina; Lu, Ailing; Rohde, Juliane; Hantel, Constanze; Kuehne, Claudia; Kulle, Alexandra; Riepe, Felix; Deussing, Jan M; Beuschlein, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Urocortin 2 (UCN2) is a neuropeptide of the CRH family, involved in homeostatic mechanisms, the stress response, and control of anxiety. To elucidate the effects of UCN2 on steroidogenesis, we developed a mouse model that allows a Cre recombinase-determined conditional overexpression of UCN2 (UCN2-COE). In these mice SF1-Cre-driven overexpression of UCN2 was restricted to the adrenal glands, gonads, and parts of the hypothalamus. UCN2-COE animals of both sexes revealed significantly higher plasma UCN2 levels and significantly higher UCN2 expression levels in the adrenals and ovaries. In contrast, the baseline expression of UCN2 was already high in the testes of control mice with no further increase achievable in UCN2-COE animals. Adrenal steroidogenesis of UCN2-COE animals was investigated under baseline conditions, upon an ACTH stimulation test, and following a restraint stress test. A tendency toward lower expression of steroidogenic enzymes was detectable in UCN2-COE animals of both sexes with slight differences between males and females. A similar reduction in the expression levels of the final steps of ovarian steroidogenesis, accompanied by reduced plasma estradiol levels, was observed in female UCN2-COE animals. Thus, adrenal UCN2 overexpression resulted in down-regulation of adrenal steroidogenesis, suggesting a reduction in the stress response in the mouse (stress coping behavior). Similarly, UCN2 overexpression in the ovaries caused a decrease in steroidogenesis and reduction of follicles that had undergone ovulation. Nevertheless, this finding was not associated with reduced fertility. PMID:25942073

  4. Characterizing social behavior in genetically targeted mouse models of brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Emma L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the leading inherited cause of mental retardation and autism spectrum disorders worldwide, is caused by a tandem repeat expansion in the FMR1 (fragile X mental retardation 1) gene. It presents with a distinct behavioral phenotype which overlaps significantly with that of autism. Emerging evidence suggests that tandem repeat polymorphisms (TRPs) might also play a key role in modulating disease susceptibility for a range of common polygenic disorders, including the broader autism spectrum of disorders (ASD) and other forms of psychiatric illness such as schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder [1]. In order to understand how TRPs and associated gene mutations mediate pathogenesis, various mouse models have been generated. A crucial step in such functional genomics is high-quality behavioral and cognitive phenotyping. This chapter presents a basic behavioral battery for standardized tests for assaying social phenotypes in mouse models of brain disorders, with a focus on aggression.

  5. Genetic ablation of NMDA receptor subunit NR3B in mouse reveals motoneuronal and nonmotoneuronal phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Stephan; Kanki, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Takao, Keizo; Fukaya, Masahiro; Hynynen, Meri N; Churchill, Michael J; Shefner, Jeremy M; Bronson, Roderick T; Brown, Robert H; Watanabe, Masahiko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2007-09-01

    NR3B is a modulatory subunit of the NMDA receptor, abundantly expressed in both cranial and spinal somatic motoneurons and at lower levels in other regions of the brain as well. Recently, we found the human NR3B gene (GRIN3B) to be highly genetically heterogeneous, and that approximately 10% of the normal European-American population lacks NR3B due to homozygous occurrence of a null allele in the gene. Therefore, it is especially important to understand the phenotypic consequences of the genetic loss of NR3B in both humans and animal models. We here provide results of behavioral analysis of mice genetically lacking NR3B, which is an ideal animal model due to homogeneity in genetic and environmental background. The NR3B(-/-) mice are viable and fertile. Consistent with the expression of NR3B in somatic motoneurons, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a moderate but significant impairment in motor learning or coordination, and decreased activity in their home cages. Remarkably, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a highly increased social interaction with their familiar cage mates in their home cage but moderately increased anxiety-like behaviour and decreased social interaction in a novel environment, consistent with the inhibitory role of NR3B on the functions of NMDA receptors. This work is the first reporting of the functional significance of NR3B in vivo and may give insight into the contribution of genetic variability of NR3B in the phenotypic heterogeneity among human population.

  6. Thermoregulatory phenotype of the Trpv1 knockout mouse: thermoeffector dysbalance with hyperkinesis.

    PubMed

    Garami, Andras; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L; Steiner, Alexandre A; Wanner, Samuel P; Almeida, M Camila; Lesnikov, Vladimir A; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-02-01

    This study aimed at determining the thermoregulatory phenotype of mice lacking transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels. We used Trpv1 knockout (KO) mice and their genetically unaltered littermates to study diurnal variations in deep body temperature (T(b)) and thermoeffector activities under basal conditions, as well as thermoregulatory responses to severe heat and cold. Only subtle alterations were found in the basal T(b) of Trpv1 KO mice or in their T(b) responses to thermal challenges. The main thermoregulatory abnormality of Trpv1 KO mice was a different pattern of thermoeffectors used to regulate T(b). On the autonomic side, Trpv1 KO mice were hypometabolic (had a lower oxygen consumption) and hypervasoconstricted (had a lower tail skin temperature). In agreement with the enhanced skin vasoconstriction, Trpv1 KO mice had a higher thermoneutral zone. On the behavioral side, Trpv1 KO mice preferred a lower ambient temperature and expressed a higher locomotor activity. Experiments with pharmacological TRPV1 agonists (resiniferatoxin and anandamide) and a TRPV1 antagonist (AMG0347) confirmed that TRPV1 channels located outside the brain tonically inhibit locomotor activity. With age (observed for up to 14 months), the body mass of Trpv1 KO mice exceeded that of controls, sometimes approaching 60 g. In summary, Trpv1 KO mice possess a distinct thermoregulatory phenotype, which is coupled with a predisposition to age-associated overweight and includes hypometabolism, enhanced skin vasoconstriction, decreased thermopreferendum, and hyperkinesis. The latter may be one of the primary deficiencies in Trpv1 KO mice. We propose that TRPV1-mediated signals from the periphery tonically suppress the general locomotor activity.

  7. Mouse and human BAC transgenes recapitulate tissue-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor in mice and rescue the VDR-null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Min; Bishop, Kathleen A; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-06-01

    The biological actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in numerous target tissues in a cell type-selective manner. Recent studies using genomic analyses and recombineered bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) have defined the specific features of mouse and human VDR gene loci in vitro. In the current study, we introduced recombineered mouse and human VDR BACs as transgenes into mice and explored their expression capabilities in vivo. Individual transgenic mouse strains selectively expressed BAC-derived mouse or human VDR proteins in appropriate vitamin D target tissues, thereby recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of endogenous mouse VDR. The mouse VDR transgene was also regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and dibutyryl-cAMP. When crossed into a VDR-null mouse background, both transgenes restored wild-type basal as well as 1,25(OH)2D3-inducible gene expression patterns in the appropriate tissues. This maneuver resulted in the complete rescue of the aberrant phenotype noted in the VDR-null mouse, including systemic features associated with altered calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and disrupted production of parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, and abnormalities associated with the skeleton, kidney, parathyroid gland, and the skin. This study suggests that both mouse and human VDR transgenes are capable of recapitulating basal and regulated expression of the VDR in the appropriate mouse tissues and restore 1,25(OH)2D3 function. These results provide a baseline for further dissection of mechanisms integral to mouse and human VDR gene expression and offer the potential to explore the consequence of selective mutations in VDR proteins in vivo.

  8. Mouse-human experimental epigenetic analysis unmasks dietary targets and genetic liability for diabetic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Multhaup, Michael L.; Seldin, Marcus; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Lei, Xia; Kirchner, Henriette; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Rodriguez, Varenka; Drong, Alexander; Hussain, Mehboob; Lindgren, Cecilia; McCarthy, Mark; Näslund, Erik; Zierath, Juleen R.; Wong, G. William; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a functional approach to investigate the epigenetics of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), we combine three lines of evidence – diet-induced epigenetic dysregulation in mouse, epigenetic conservation in humans, and T2D clinical risk evidence – to identify genes implicated in T2D pathogenesis through epigenetic mechanisms related to obesity. Beginning with dietary manipulation of genetically homogeneous mice, we identify differentially DNA-methylated genomic regions. We then replicate these results in adipose samples from lean and obese patients pre- and post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, identifying regions where both the location and direction of methylation change is conserved. These regions overlap with 27 genetic T2D risk loci, only one of which was deemed significant by GWAS alone. Functional analysis of genes associated with these regions revealed four genes with roles in insulin resistance, demonstrating the potential general utility of this approach for complementing conventional human genetic studies by integrating cross-species epigenomics and clinical genetic risk. PMID:25565211

  9. Novel Mouse Models of Methylmalonic Aciduria Recapitulate Phenotypic Traits with a Genetic Dosage Effect.

    PubMed

    Forny, Patrick; Schumann, Anke; Mustedanagic, Merima; Mathis, Déborah; Wulf, Marie-Angela; Nägele, Nadine; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Zhakupova, Assem; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger; Fingerhut, Ralph; Peters, Heidi L; Hornemann, Thorsten; Thony, Beat; Kölker, Stefan; Burda, Patricie; Froese, D Sean; Devuyst, Olivier; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-09-23

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMAuria), caused by deficiency of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT), usually presents in the newborn period with failure to thrive and metabolic crisis leading to coma or even death. Survivors remain at risk of metabolic decompensations and severe long term complications, notably renal failure and neurological impairment. We generated clinically relevant mouse models of MMAuria using a constitutive Mut knock-in (KI) allele based on the p.Met700Lys patient mutation, used homozygously (KI/KI) or combined with a knockout allele (KO/KI), to study biochemical and clinical MMAuria disease aspects. Transgenic Mut(ki/ki) and Mut(ko/ki) mice survive post-weaning, show failure to thrive, and show increased methylmalonic acid, propionylcarnitine, odd chain fatty acids, and sphingoid bases, a new potential biomarker of MMAuria. Consistent with genetic dosage, Mut(ko/ki) mice have lower Mut activity, are smaller, and show higher metabolite levels than Mut(ki/ki) mice. Further, Mut(ko/ki) mice exhibit manifestations of kidney and brain damage, including increased plasma urea, impaired diuresis, elevated biomarkers, and changes in brain weight. On a high protein diet, mutant mice display disease exacerbation, including elevated blood ammonia, and catastrophic weight loss, which, in Mut(ki/ki) mice, is rescued by hydroxocobalamin treatment. This study expands knowledge of MMAuria, introduces the discovery of new biomarkers, and constitutes the first in vivo proof of principle of cobalamin treatment in mut-type MMAuria.

  10. Novel Mouse Models of Methylmalonic Aciduria Recapitulate Phenotypic Traits with a Genetic Dosage Effect.

    PubMed

    Forny, Patrick; Schumann, Anke; Mustedanagic, Merima; Mathis, Déborah; Wulf, Marie-Angela; Nägele, Nadine; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Zhakupova, Assem; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger; Fingerhut, Ralph; Peters, Heidi L; Hornemann, Thorsten; Thony, Beat; Kölker, Stefan; Burda, Patricie; Froese, D Sean; Devuyst, Olivier; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-09-23

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMAuria), caused by deficiency of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT), usually presents in the newborn period with failure to thrive and metabolic crisis leading to coma or even death. Survivors remain at risk of metabolic decompensations and severe long term complications, notably renal failure and neurological impairment. We generated clinically relevant mouse models of MMAuria using a constitutive Mut knock-in (KI) allele based on the p.Met700Lys patient mutation, used homozygously (KI/KI) or combined with a knockout allele (KO/KI), to study biochemical and clinical MMAuria disease aspects. Transgenic Mut(ki/ki) and Mut(ko/ki) mice survive post-weaning, show failure to thrive, and show increased methylmalonic acid, propionylcarnitine, odd chain fatty acids, and sphingoid bases, a new potential biomarker of MMAuria. Consistent with genetic dosage, Mut(ko/ki) mice have lower Mut activity, are smaller, and show higher metabolite levels than Mut(ki/ki) mice. Further, Mut(ko/ki) mice exhibit manifestations of kidney and brain damage, including increased plasma urea, impaired diuresis, elevated biomarkers, and changes in brain weight. On a high protein diet, mutant mice display disease exacerbation, including elevated blood ammonia, and catastrophic weight loss, which, in Mut(ki/ki) mice, is rescued by hydroxocobalamin treatment. This study expands knowledge of MMAuria, introduces the discovery of new biomarkers, and constitutes the first in vivo proof of principle of cobalamin treatment in mut-type MMAuria. PMID:27519416

  11. Phenotypic correction of a mouse model for primary hyperoxaluria with adeno-associated virus gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Salido, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Pena, Marisol; Santana, Alfredo; Beattie, Stuart G; Petry, Harald; Torres, Armando

    2011-05-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of the hepatic enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGXT or AGT) which leads to overproduction of oxalate by the liver and subsequent urolithiasis and renal failure. The current therapy largely depends on liver transplantation, which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To explore an alternative treatment, we used somatic gene transfer in a mouse genetic model for PH1 (Agxt1KO). Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors containing the human AGXT complementary DNA (cDNA) were pseudotyped with capsids from either serotype 8 or 5, and delivered to the livers of Agxt1KO mice via the tail vein. Both AAV8-AGXT and AAV5-AGXT vectors were able to reduce oxaluria to normal levels. In addition, treated mice showed blunted increase of oxaluria after challenge with ethylene glycol (EG), a glyoxylate precursor. In mice, AGT enzyme activity in whole liver extracts were restored to normal without hepatic toxicity nor immunogenicity for the 50 day follow-up. In summary, this study demonstrates the correction of primary hyperoxaluria in mice treated with either AAV5 or AAV8 vectors. PMID:21119625

  12. Prolonged high fat diet ingestion, obesity, and type 2 diabetes symptoms correlate with phenotypic plasticity in myenteric neurons and nerve damage in the mouse duodenum.

    PubMed

    Stenkamp-Strahm, Chloe M; Nyavor, Yvonne E A; Kappmeyer, Adam J; Horton, Sarah; Gericke, Martin; Balemba, Onesmo B

    2015-08-01

    Symptoms of diabetic gastrointestinal dysmotility indicate neuropathy of the enteric nervous system. Long-standing diabetic enteric neuropathy has not been fully characterized, however. We used prolonged high fat diet ingestion (20 weeks) in a mouse model to mimic human obese and type 2 diabetic conditions, and analyzed changes seen in neurons of the duodenal myenteric plexus. Ganglionic and neuronal size, number of neurons per ganglionic area, density indices of neuronal phenotypes (immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and varicosities per ganglion or tissue area) and nerve injury were measured. Findings were compared with results previously seen in mice fed the same diet for 8 weeks. Compared to mice fed standard chow, those on a prolonged high fat diet had smaller ganglionic and cell soma areas. Myenteric VIP- and ChAT-immunoreactive density indices were also reduced. Myenteric nerve fibers were markedly swollen and cytoskeletal protein networks were disrupted. The number of nNOS nerve cell bodies per ganglia was increased, contrary to the reduction previously seen after 8 weeks, but the density index of nNOS varicosities was reduced. Mice fed high fat and standard chow diets experienced an age-related reduction in total neurons, with bias towards neurons of sensory phenotype. Meanwhile, ageing was associated with an increase in excitatory neuronal markers. Collectively, these results support a notion that nerve damage underlies diabetic symptoms of dysmotility, and reveals adaptive ENS responses to the prolonged ingestion of a high fat diet. This highlights a need to mechanistically study long-term diet-induced nerve damage and age-related impacts on the ENS.

  13. Human-mouse hybrids with an embryonal carcinoma phenotype continue to transcribe HLA-A,B,C.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, F J; Quintero, M A; Goodfellow, P N

    1983-01-01

    We previously constructed a hybrid cell line, MCP6, which contains an X/6 translocation chromosome as its sole human genetic component in a mouse embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell background. This chromosome, which carries the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) originated from a human B cell which expresses class I and class II MHC antigens. EC cells do not express class I or class II antigens on their cell surface. Northern blot analysis has now shown that in the MCP6 hybrid, human class I genes, i.e., HLA-A,B,C, continued to be transcribed, and cellular levels of the transcripts were similar to, or only slightly lower than, levels in hybrids with a non-EC phenotype. However, very low levels of mRNA species recognised by a mouse class I gene (H-2) probe were also detected in EC cells and EC hybrids. Comparison of the relative levels of H-2 and HLA class I gene transcripts in the EC hybrids and non-EC hybrids indicated that the introduced HLA-A,B,C genes were not appropriately regulated in the EC cell but were subject at least in part to cis control. In contrast to the class I genes, no class II gene (i.e. HLA-DR alpha) transcripts were detected in MCP6. Hybrid EC lines thus provide a system to investigate the different levels of control of MHC gene expression during development and may help to elucidate mechanisms whereby the embryonic genome programs expression of differentiated cell functions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6641706

  14. Prolonged treatment with pimelic o-aminobenzamide HDAC inhibitors ameliorates the disease phenotype of a Friedreich ataxia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Ezzatizadeh, Vahid; Barnes, Glenn; Jones, Steve; Rusche, James R.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Pook, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA repeat expansion within the FXN gene, leading to epigenetic changes and heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing that result in a frataxin protein deficit. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, including pimelic o-aminobenzamide compounds 106, 109 and 136, have previously been shown to reverse FXN gene silencing in short-term studies of FRDA patient cells and a knock-in mouse model, but the functional consequences of such therapeutic intervention have thus far not been described. We have now investigated the long-term therapeutic effects of 106, 109 and 136 in our GAA repeat expansion mutation-containing YG8R FRDA mouse model. We show that there is no overt toxicity up to 5 months of treatment and there is amelioration of the FRDA-like disease phenotype. Thus, while the neurological deficits of this model are mild, 109 and 106 both produced an improvement of motor coordination, whereas 109 and 136 produced increased locomotor activity. All three compounds increased global histone H3 and H4 acetylation of brain tissue, but only 109 significantly increased acetylation of specific histone residues at the FXN locus. Effects on FXN mRNA expression in CNS tissues were modest, but 109 significantly increased frataxin protein expression in brain tissue. 109 also produced significant increases in brain aconitase enzyme activity, together with reduction of neuronal pathology of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Overall, these results support further assessment of HDAC inhibitors for treatment of Friedreich ataxia. PMID:21397024

  15. Long-term treatment with naproxcinod significantly improves skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Phadke, Aditi; Miller, Brittany K; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Ongini, Ennio; Miglietta, Daniela; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mouse model of DMD, mdx, dystrophin deficiency causes a decrease and mislocalization of muscle-specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), leading to functional impairments. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) donation associated with anti-inflammatory action has beneficial effects in dystrophic mouse models. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of naproxcinod, an NO-donating naproxen derivative, on the skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in mdx mice. Four-week-old mdx and C57BL/10 mice were treated with four different concentrations (0, 10, 21 and 41 mg/kg) of naproxcinod and 0.9 mg/kg of prednisolone in their food for 9 months. All mice were subjected to twice-weekly treadmill sessions, and functional and behavioral parameters were measured at 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment. In addition, we evaluated in vitro force contraction, optical imaging of inflammation, echocardiography and blood pressure (BP) at the 9-month endpoint prior to sacrifice. We found that naproxcinod treatment at 21 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement in hindlimb grip strength and a 30% decrease in inflammation in the fore- and hindlimbs of mdx mice. Furthermore, we found significant improvement in heart function, as evidenced by improved fraction shortening, ejection fraction and systolic BP. In addition, the long-term detrimental effects of prednisolone typically seen in mdx skeletal and heart function were not observed at the effective dose of naproxcinod. In conclusion, our results indicate that naproxcinod has significant potential as a safe therapeutic option for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. PMID:24463621

  16. Glut1 deficiency (G1D): Epilepsy and metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of the most common human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Duarte, Joao; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Sinton, Christopher M.; Heilig, Charles W.; Pascual, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain glucose supplies most of the carbon required for acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) generation (an important step for myelin synthesis) and for neurotransmitter production via further metabolism of acetyl-CoA in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. However, it is not known whether reduced brain glucose transporter type I (GLUT-1) activity, the hallmark of the GLUT-1 deficiency (G1D) syndrome, leads to acetyl-CoA, TCA or neurotransmitter depletion. This question is relevant because, in its most common form in man, G1D is associated with cerebral hypomyelination (manifested as microcephaly) and epilepsy, suggestive of acetyl-CoA depletion and neurotransmitter dysfunction, respectively. Yet, brain metabolism in G1D remains underexplored both theoretically and experimentally, partly because computational models of limited brain glucose transport are subordinate to metabolic assumptions and partly because current hemizygous G1D mouse models manifest a mild phenotype not easily amenable to investigation. In contrast, adult antisense G1D mice replicate the human phenotype of spontaneous epilepsy associated with robust thalamocortical electrical oscillations. Additionally, and in consonance with human metabolic imaging observations, thalamus and cerebral cortex display the lowest GLUT-1 expression and glucose uptake in the mutant mouse. This depletion of brain glucose is associated with diminished plasma fatty acids and elevated ketone body levels, and with decreased brain acetyl-CoA and fatty acid contents, consistent with brain ketone body consumption and with stimulation of brain beta-oxidation and/or diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. In contrast with other epilepsies, astrocyte glutamine synthetase expression, cerebral TCA cycle intermediates, amino acid and amine neurotransmitter contents are also intact in G1D. The data suggest that the TCA cycle is preserved in G1D because reduced glycolysis and acetyl-CoA formation can be balanced by enhanced ketone body

  17. Sustained Phenotypic Correction in a Mouse Model of Hypoalphalipoproteinemia with a Helper-Dependent Adenovirus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Kazuhiro; Belalcazar, L. Maria; Dieker, Carrie; Nour, Elie A.; Nuno-Gonzalez, Patricia; Paul, Antoni; Cormier, Shelley; Shin, Jae-Kyung; Finegold, Milton; Chan, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    We examined the efficacy and host response to the adenovirus (Ad)-mediated delivery of human apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) gene to the liver of APOA1−/− mice. Administration of a first generation vector (FGAd-AI) resulted in a transient appearance of APOA1 in plasma and induced an anti-APOA1 antibody titer while treatment with a helper-dependent vector (HDAd-AI) resulted in sustained APOA1 expression without inducing an antibody titer. With these results, we studied the effects of FGAd vectors on APOAI expression by HDAd-AI vector. Co-treatment with a FGAd vector inhibited HDAd-AI-mediated APOA1 expression independent of transgene cassettes, but only FGAd-AI induced a humoral response. Furthermore, APOA1 mRNA levels in mice co-treated with FGAd vectors were much lower than those expected from the vector copy number, suggesting that DNA of FGAd vectors interferes with the HDAd-AI vector's APOA1 promoter. A single treatment with an HDAd-AI vector produced a supraphysiological plasma APOA1 level that gradually declined to about half the normal human level over the course of 2 years, associated with a plasma cholesterol level that is persistently higher than that in controls. This investigation provides the proof of principle that liver-directed HDAd gene delivery is effective for the long-term phenotypic correction of monogenic hypoalphalipoproteinemia. PMID:16957769

  18. The metaplastic effects of estrogen on mouse prostate epithelium: proliferation of cells with basal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Risbridger, G P; Wang, H; Frydenberg, M; Cunha, G

    2001-06-01

    The exogenous administration of estrogens to male mice alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and reduces androgen levels, leading to a regression of the prostatic epithelium. As well, a specific direct response to estrogens is the induction of epithelial squamous metaplasia. The aims of this study were to identify the process by which the prostatic epithelium is transformed in intact adult male mice using the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol. A comparison of the effects of diethylstilbestrol in the three lobes revealed a hierarchy of response, with the anterior lobe being the most responsive, the dorsolateral lobe less responsive, and the ventral lobe the least responsive. The effect of castration was used to distinguish between the epithelial responses to estrogen administration and androgen deprivation. The results demonstrate that transformation of the epithelium involved proliferation of cells with a basal cell phenotype, the onset of cytokeratin 10 expression, up-regulation of progesterone receptor expression, and loss of the cell cycle inhibitor, p27(Kip1) expression; none of these changes was observed after castration. Mice lacking functional estrogen receptor alpha failed to respond, demonstrating a requirement for estrogen receptor alpha in the epithelium and/or stroma to mediate the proliferative response to estrogen in the prostate gland.

  19. Thermal conditions experienced during differentiation affect metabolic and contractile phenotypes of mouse myotubes.

    PubMed

    Little, Alex G; Seebacher, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Central pathways regulate metabolic responses to cold in endotherms to maintain relatively stable internal core body temperatures. However, peripheral muscles routinely experience temperatures lower than core body temperature, so that it would be advantageous for peripheral tissues to respond to temperature changes independently from core body temperature regulation. Early developmental conditions can influence offspring phenotypes, and here we tested whether developing muscle can compensate locally for the effects of cold exposure independently from central regulation. Muscle myotubes originate from undifferentiated myoblasts that are laid down during embryogenesis. We show that in a murine myoblast cell line (C2C12), cold exposure (32°C) increased myoblast metabolic flux compared with 37°C control conditions. Importantly, myotubes that differentiated at 32°C compensated for the thermodynamic effects of low temperature by increasing metabolic rates, ATP production, and glycolytic flux. Myotube responses were also modulated by the temperatures experienced by "parent" myoblasts. Myotubes that differentiated under cold exposure increased activity of the AMP-stimulated protein kinase (AMPK), which may mediate metabolic changes in response cold exposure. Moreover, cold exposure shifted myosin heavy chains from slow to fast, presumably to overcome slower contractile speeds resulting from low temperatures. Adjusting thermal sensitivities locally in peripheral tissues complements central thermoregulation and permits animals to maintain function in cold environments. Muscle also plays a major metabolic role in adults, so that developmental responses to cold are likely to influence energy expenditure later in life. PMID:27385733

  20. Excessive nest building is a unique behavioural phenotype in the deer mouse model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolmarans, De Wet; Stein, Dan J; Harvey, Brian H

    2016-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous condition characterised by time-consuming intrusive thoughts and/or compulsions. Irrespective of the symptom type diagnosed, the severity of OCD is characterised by heterogeneity in symptom presentation that complicates diagnosis and treatment. Heterogeneity of symptoms would be invaluable in an animal model. Nest building behaviour forms part of the normal behavioural repertoire of rodents and demonstrates profound between-species differences. However, it has been proposed that within-species differences in nest building behaviour (i.e. aberrant vs. normal nest building) may resemble obsessive-compulsive-like symptoms. In an attempt to investigate whether other obsessive-compulsive-like behaviours are present in an animal model of OCD, or if aberrant nest building behaviour may represent a unique obsessive-compulsive phenotype in such a model, the current study assessed nest building behaviour in high (H, viz obsessive-compulsive) and non (N, viz normal) stereotypical deer mice. Subsequently, 12 N and H animals, respectively, were provided with an excess of cotton wool daily for one week prior to and following four weeks of high-dose oral escitalopram treatment (50 mg/kg/day). Data from the current investigation demonstrate daily nesting activity to be highly variable in deer mice, with stereotypy and nest building being independent behaviours. However, we identified unique aberrant large nest building behaviour in 30% of animals from both cohorts that was attenuated by escitalopram to pre-treatment nesting scores of the larger group. In summary, behavioural and drug-treatment evidence confirms that deer mouse behaviour does indeed resemble symptom heterogeneity related to OCD, and as such expands its face and predictive validity for the disorder. PMID:27154874

  1. Excessive nest building is a unique behavioural phenotype in the deer mouse model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wolmarans, De Wet; Stein, Dan J; Harvey, Brian H

    2016-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous condition characterised by time-consuming intrusive thoughts and/or compulsions. Irrespective of the symptom type diagnosed, the severity of OCD is characterised by heterogeneity in symptom presentation that complicates diagnosis and treatment. Heterogeneity of symptoms would be invaluable in an animal model. Nest building behaviour forms part of the normal behavioural repertoire of rodents and demonstrates profound between-species differences. However, it has been proposed that within-species differences in nest building behaviour (i.e. aberrant vs. normal nest building) may resemble obsessive-compulsive-like symptoms. In an attempt to investigate whether other obsessive-compulsive-like behaviours are present in an animal model of OCD, or if aberrant nest building behaviour may represent a unique obsessive-compulsive phenotype in such a model, the current study assessed nest building behaviour in high (H, viz obsessive-compulsive) and non (N, viz normal) stereotypical deer mice. Subsequently, 12 N and H animals, respectively, were provided with an excess of cotton wool daily for one week prior to and following four weeks of high-dose oral escitalopram treatment (50 mg/kg/day). Data from the current investigation demonstrate daily nesting activity to be highly variable in deer mice, with stereotypy and nest building being independent behaviours. However, we identified unique aberrant large nest building behaviour in 30% of animals from both cohorts that was attenuated by escitalopram to pre-treatment nesting scores of the larger group. In summary, behavioural and drug-treatment evidence confirms that deer mouse behaviour does indeed resemble symptom heterogeneity related to OCD, and as such expands its face and predictive validity for the disorder.

  2. The phenotype of a knockout mouse identifies flavin-containing monooxygenase 5 (FMO5) as a regulator of metabolic ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez Malagon, Sandra G.; Melidoni, Anna N.; Hernandez, Diana; Omar, Bilal A.; Houseman, Lyndsey; Veeravalli, Sunil; Scott, Flora; Varshavi, Dorsa; Everett, Jeremy; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Timms, John F.; Phillips, Ian R.; Shephard, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the production and metabolic phenotype of a mouse line in which the Fmo5 gene is disrupted. In comparison with wild-type (WT) mice, Fmo5−/− mice exhibit a lean phenotype, which is age-related, becoming apparent after 20 weeks of age. Despite greater food intake, Fmo5−/− mice weigh less, store less fat in white adipose tissue (WAT), have lower plasma glucose and cholesterol concentrations and enhanced whole-body energy expenditure, due mostly to increased resting energy expenditure, with no increase in physical activity. An increase in respiratory exchange ratio during the dark phase, the period in which the mice are active, indicates a switch from fat to carbohydrate oxidation. In comparison with WT mice, the rate of fatty acid oxidation in Fmo5−/− mice is higher in WAT, which would contribute to depletion of lipid stores in this tissue, and lower in skeletal muscle. Five proteins were down regulated in the liver of Fmo5−/− mice: aldolase B, ketohexokinase and cytosolic glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) are involved in glucose or fructose metabolism and GPD1 also in production of glycerol 3-phosphate, a precursor of triglyceride biosynthesis; HMG-CoA synthase 1 is involved in cholesterol biosynthesis; and malic enzyme 1 catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate, in the process producing NADPH for use in lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Down regulation of these proteins provides a potential explanation for the reduced fat deposits and lower plasma cholesterol characteristic of Fmo5−/− mice. Our results indicate that disruption of the Fmo5 gene slows metabolic ageing via pleiotropic effects. PMID:26049045

  3. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  4. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  5. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis.

  6. Neural stem cells transplanted in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease differentiate to neuronal phenotypes and reduce rotational deficit.

    PubMed

    Ziavra, Despina; Makri, Georgia; Giompres, Panagiotis; Taraviras, Stavros; Thomaidou, Dimitra; Matsas, Rebecca; Mitsacos, Ada; Kouvelas, Elias D

    2012-11-01

    The most prominent pathological feature in Parkinson's disease (PD) is the progressive and selective loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal tract. The present study was conducted in order to investigate whether naive and or genetically modified neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) can survive, differentiate and functionally integrate in the lesioned striatum. To this end, stereotaxic injections of 6-OHDA in the right ascending nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway of mice and subsequent NPC transplantations were performed, followed by apomorphine-induced rotations and double-immunofluorescence experiments. Our results demonstrate that transplanted embryonic NPCs derived from the cortical ventricular zone of E14.5 transgenic mouse embryos expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the beta-actin promoter and cultured as neurospheres can survive in the host striatum for at least three weeks after transplantation. The percentage of surviving GFP-positive cells in the host striatum ranges from 0.2% to 0.6% of the total transplanted NPCs. Grafted cells functionally integrate in the striatum, as indicated by the statistically significant decrease of contralateral rotations after apomorphine treatment. Furthermore, we show that within the striatal environment GFP-positive cells differentiate into beta-III tubulin-expressing neurons, but not glial cells. Most importantly, GFP-positive cells further differentiate to dopaminergic (TH-positive) and medium size spiny (DARPP-32- positive) neuronal phenotypes. Over-expression of the cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation protein Cend1 in NPCs enhances the generation of GABAergic, but not dopaminergic, neuronal phenotypes after grafting in the lesioned striatum. Our results encourage the development of strategies involving NPC transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Characterization of isolated mouse cerebellar cell populations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, J; Schachner, M

    1981-12-01

    Cells from early postnatal mouse cerebellar cortex were isolated by discontinuous BSA gradient centrifugation. Three cellular fractions were obtained and called A (interface at 0-10% BSA), B ( 10-15%) and C (15-25%). These fractions were characterized after maintenance in vitro for 3 days by indirect immunofluorescence labeling with several cell type-specific probes: Tetanus toxin was used as a neuronal marker.Under the described culture conditions Thy-1.2 antibodies served as additional markers for mature neurons and NS-4 antiserum for neurons and oligodendroglial cells. Glial fibrillary acidic (GFA) protein was used as a marker for differentiated astroglia, and fibronectin as a marker for fibroblasts. Monoclonal antibodies to 04 antigen and antiserum to corpus callosum served to distinguish oligodendroglia. Fraction C contains most of the cellular debris and cells with large cell bodies (about 20 micrometers in diameter) which are positive for Thy-1, NS-4, and tetanus toxin. By birthdate labeling with [3H]thymidine these cells can be identified as Purkinje cells and/or Golgi type II cells. Fraction B is relatively heterogeneous. It contains predominantly GFA protien-positive astroglial cells (about 50% of all cells) which can be classified into 3 morphologically distinct cell types, flat epithelioid cells and star-shaped cells with thick or very thin cellular processes. Fraction B is enriched also in 04 antigen-positive oligodendrocytes, fibronectin-positive fibroblasts and Thy-1 negative, but NS-4 and tetanus toxin positive cells with small cell bodies and many fine processes. These small neurons, putative stellate and basket cells, have many fine processes and are morphologically different from th bipolar putative granule cells, some of which are also present in this fraction. Fraction C contains predominantly small neurons, mostly putative granule cell (more than 0% of all cells) which are positive for NS-4 and tetanus toxin, but negative for Thy-1.

  8. Improvement of the Rett Syndrome Phenotype in a Mecp2 Mouse Model Upon Treatment with Levodopa and a Dopa-Decarboxylase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Szczesna, Karolina; de la Caridad, Olga; Petazzi, Paolo; Soler, Marta; Roa, Laura; Saez, Mauricio A; Fourcade, Stéphane; Pujol, Aurora; Artuch-Iriberri, Rafael; Molero-Luis, Marta; Vidal, August; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental autism spectrum disorder caused by mutations in the gene coding for methyl CpG-binding protein (MeCP2). The disease is characterized by abnormal motor, respiratory, cognitive impairment, and autistic-like behaviors. No effective treatment of the disorder is available. Mecp2 knockout mice have a range of physiological and neurological abnormalities that resemble the human syndrome and can be used as a model to interrogate new therapies. Herein, we show that the combined administration of Levodopa and a Dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor in RTT mouse models is well tolerated, diminishes RTT-associated symptoms, and increases life span. The amelioration of RTT symptomatology is particularly significant in those features controlled by the dopaminergic pathway in the nigrostratium, such as mobility, tremor, and breathing. Most important, the improvement of the RTT phenotype upon use of the combined treatment is reflected at the cellular level by the development of neuronal dendritic growth. However, much work is required to extend the duration of the benefit of the described preclinical treatment. PMID:24917201

  9. Characterizing associations and dissociations between anxiety, social, and cognitive phenotypes of Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Rowena; Järvinen, Anna; Bellugi, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic disorder known for its “hypersocial” phenotype and a complex profile of anxieties. The anxieties are poorly understood specifically in relation to the social-emotional and cognitive profiles. To address this gap, we employed a Wechsler intelligence test, the Brief Symptom Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Salk Institute Sociability Questionnaire, to (1) examine how anxiety symptoms distinguish individuals with WS from typically developing (TD) individuals; and (2) assess the associations between three key phenotypic features of WS: intellectual impairment, social-emotional functioning, and anxiety. The results highlighted intensified neurophysiological symptoms and subjective experiences of anxiety in WS. Moreover, whereas higher cognitive ability was positively associated with anxiety in WS, the opposite pattern characterized the TD individuals. This study provides novel insight into how the three core phenotypic features associate/dissociate in WS, specifically in terms of the contribution of cognitive and emotional functioning to anxiety symptoms. PMID:24973548

  10. Igf2 ligand dependency of Pten(+/-) developmental and tumour phenotypes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Church, D N; Phillips, B R; Stuckey, D J; Barnes, D J; Buffa, F M; Manek, S; Clarke, K; Harris, A L; Carter, E J; Hassan, A B

    2012-08-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN is a key negative regulator of the PI3K-Akt pathway, and is frequently either reduced or lost in human tumours. Murine genetic studies have confirmed that reduction of Pten promotes tumourigenesis in multiple organs, and demonstrated dependency of tumour development on the activation of downstream components such as Akt. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) act via IGF1R to activate the PI3K-Akt pathway, and are commonly upregulated in cancer. A context-dependent interplay between IGFs and PTEN exists in normal tissue and tumours; increased IGF2 ligand supply induces Pten expression creating an autoregulatory negative feedback loop, whereas complete loss of PTEN may either cooperate with IGF overexpression in tumour promotion, or result in desensitisation to IGF ligand. However, it remains unknown whether neoplasia associated with Pten loss is dependent on upstream IGF ligand supply in vivo. We evaluated this by generation of Pten(+/-) mice with differing allelic dosage of Igf2, an imprinted gene encoding the potent embryonic and tumour growth factor Igf2. We show that biallelic Igf2 supply potentiates a previously unreported Pten(+/-) placental phenotype and results in strain-dependent cardiac hyperplasia and neonatal lethality. Importantly, we also show that the effects of Pten loss in vivo are modified by Igf2 supply, as lack of Igf2 results in extended survival and delayed tumour development while biallelic supply is associated with reduced lifespan and accelerated neoplasia in females. Furthermore, we demonstrate that reduction of PTEN protein to heterozygote levels in human MCF7 cells is associated with increased proliferation in response to IGF2, and does not result in desensitisation to IGF2 signalling. These data indicate that the effects of Pten loss at heterozygote levels commonly observed in human tumours are modified by Igf2 ligand, and emphasise the importance of the evaluation of upstream pathways in tumours with Pten loss

  11. p53 suppression partially rescues the mutant phenotype in mouse models of DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Cinzia; Baldini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    T-box 1 (Tbx1), a gene encoding a T-box transcription factor, is required for embryonic development in humans and mice. Half dosage of this gene in humans causes most of the features of the DiGeorge or Velocardiofacial syndrome phenotypes, including aortic arch and cardiac outflow tract abnormalities. Here we found a strong genetic interaction between Tbx1 and transformation related protein 53 (Trp53). Indeed, genetic ablation of Trp53, or pharmacological inhibition of its protein product p53, rescues significantly the cardiovascular defects of Tbx1 heterozygous and hypomorphic mutants. We found that the Tbx1 and p53 proteins do not interact directly but both occupy a genetic element of Gbx2, which is required for aortic arch and cardiac outflow tract development, and is a known genetic interactor of Tbx1. We found that Gbx2 expression is down-regulated in Tbx1+/− embryos and is restored to normal levels in Tbx1+/−;Trp53+/− embryos. In addition, we found that the genetic element that binds both Tbx1 and p53 is highly enriched in H3K27 trimethylation, and upon p53 suppression H3K27me3 levels are reduced, along with Ezh2 enrichment. This finding suggests that the rescue of Gbx2 expression in Tbx1+/−;Trp53+/− embryos is due to reduction of repressive chromatin marks. Overall our data identify unexpected genetic interactions between Tbx1 and Trp53 and provide a proof of principle that developmental defects associated with reduced dosage of Tbx1 can be rescued pharmacologically. PMID:25197075

  12. Regional Fluctuation in the Functional Consequence of LINE-1 Insertion in the Mitf Gene: The Black Spotting Phenotype Arisen from the Mitfmi-bw Mouse Lacking Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is a key regulator for differentiation of melanoblasts, precursors to melanocytes. The mouse homozygous for the black-eyed white (Mitfmi-bw) allele is characterized by the white-coat color and deafness with black eyes due to the lack of melanocytes. The Mitfmi-bw allele carries LINE-1, a retrotransposable element, which results in the Mitf deficiency. Here, we have established the black spotting mouse that was spontaneously arisen from the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse lacking melanocytes. The black spotting mouse shows multiple black patches on the white coat, with age-related graying. Importantly, each black patch also contains hair follicles lacking melanocytes, whereas the white-coat area completely lacks melanocytes. RT-PCR analyses of the pigmented patches confirmed that the LINE-1 insertion is retained in the Mitf gene of the black spotting mouse, thereby excluding the possibility of the somatic reversion of the Mitfmi-bw allele. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the staining intensity for beta-catenin was noticeably lower in hair follicles lacking melanocytes of the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse and the black spotting mouse, compared to the control mouse. In contrast, the staining intensity for beta-catenin and cyclin D1 was higher in keratinocytes of the black spotting mouse, compared to keratinocytes of the control mouse and the Mitfmi-bw mouse. Moreover, the keratinocyte layer appears thicker in the Mitfmi-bw mouse, with the overexpression of Ki-67, a marker for cell proliferation. We also show that the presumptive black spots are formed by embryonic day 15.5. Thus, the black spotting mouse provides the unique model to explore the molecular basis for the survival and death of developing melanoblasts and melanocyte stem cells in the epidermis. These results indicate that follicular melanocytes are responsible for maintaining the epidermal homeostasis; namely, the present study has provided

  13. Regional Fluctuation in the Functional Consequence of LINE-1 Insertion in the Mitf Gene: The Black Spotting Phenotype Arisen from the Mitfmi-bw Mouse Lacking Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuhisa; Hozumi, Hiroki; Ohba, Koji; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is a key regulator for differentiation of melanoblasts, precursors to melanocytes. The mouse homozygous for the black-eyed white (Mitfmi-bw) allele is characterized by the white-coat color and deafness with black eyes due to the lack of melanocytes. The Mitfmi-bw allele carries LINE-1, a retrotransposable element, which results in the Mitf deficiency. Here, we have established the black spotting mouse that was spontaneously arisen from the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse lacking melanocytes. The black spotting mouse shows multiple black patches on the white coat, with age-related graying. Importantly, each black patch also contains hair follicles lacking melanocytes, whereas the white-coat area completely lacks melanocytes. RT-PCR analyses of the pigmented patches confirmed that the LINE-1 insertion is retained in the Mitf gene of the black spotting mouse, thereby excluding the possibility of the somatic reversion of the Mitfmi-bw allele. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the staining intensity for beta-catenin was noticeably lower in hair follicles lacking melanocytes of the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse and the black spotting mouse, compared to the control mouse. In contrast, the staining intensity for beta-catenin and cyclin D1 was higher in keratinocytes of the black spotting mouse, compared to keratinocytes of the control mouse and the Mitfmi-bw mouse. Moreover, the keratinocyte layer appears thicker in the Mitfmi-bw mouse, with the overexpression of Ki-67, a marker for cell proliferation. We also show that the presumptive black spots are formed by embryonic day 15.5. Thus, the black spotting mouse provides the unique model to explore the molecular basis for the survival and death of developing melanoblasts and melanocyte stem cells in the epidermis. These results indicate that follicular melanocytes are responsible for maintaining the epidermal homeostasis; namely, the present study has provided

  14. Regional Fluctuation in the Functional Consequence of LINE-1 Insertion in the Mitf Gene: The Black Spotting Phenotype Arisen from the Mitfmi-bw Mouse Lacking Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuhisa; Hozumi, Hiroki; Ohba, Koji; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is a key regulator for differentiation of melanoblasts, precursors to melanocytes. The mouse homozygous for the black-eyed white (Mitfmi-bw) allele is characterized by the white-coat color and deafness with black eyes due to the lack of melanocytes. The Mitfmi-bw allele carries LINE-1, a retrotransposable element, which results in the Mitf deficiency. Here, we have established the black spotting mouse that was spontaneously arisen from the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse lacking melanocytes. The black spotting mouse shows multiple black patches on the white coat, with age-related graying. Importantly, each black patch also contains hair follicles lacking melanocytes, whereas the white-coat area completely lacks melanocytes. RT-PCR analyses of the pigmented patches confirmed that the LINE-1 insertion is retained in the Mitf gene of the black spotting mouse, thereby excluding the possibility of the somatic reversion of the Mitfmi-bw allele. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the staining intensity for beta-catenin was noticeably lower in hair follicles lacking melanocytes of the homozygous Mitfmi-bw mouse and the black spotting mouse, compared to the control mouse. In contrast, the staining intensity for beta-catenin and cyclin D1 was higher in keratinocytes of the black spotting mouse, compared to keratinocytes of the control mouse and the Mitfmi-bw mouse. Moreover, the keratinocyte layer appears thicker in the Mitfmi-bw mouse, with the overexpression of Ki-67, a marker for cell proliferation. We also show that the presumptive black spots are formed by embryonic day 15.5. Thus, the black spotting mouse provides the unique model to explore the molecular basis for the survival and death of developing melanoblasts and melanocyte stem cells in the epidermis. These results indicate that follicular melanocytes are responsible for maintaining the epidermal homeostasis; namely, the present study has provided

  15. Transgenic mouse model of hemifacial microsomia: Cloning and characterization of insertional mutation region on chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Osamu

    1994-10-01

    The 643 transgenic mouse line carries an autosomal dominant insertional mutation that results in hemifacial microsomia (HFM), including microtia and/or abnormal biting. In this paper, we characterize the transgene integration site in transgenic mice and preintegration site of wildtype mice. The locus, designated Hfm (hemifacial microsomia-associated locus), was mapped to chromosome 10, B1-3, by chromosome in situ hybridization. We cloned the transgene insertion site from the transgenic DNA library. By using the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences, the preintegration region was isolated. The analysis of these regions showed that a deletion of at least 23 kb DNA occurred in association with the transgene integration. Evolutionarily conserved regions were detected within and beside the deleted region. The result of mating between hemizygotes suggests that the phenotype of the homozygote is lethality in the prenatal period. These results suggests that the Hfm locus is necessary for prenatal development and that this strain is a useful animal model for investigating the genetic predisposition to HFM in humans.

  16. Phenotypic Characterization of Retinoic Acid Differentiated SH-SY5Y Cells by Transcriptional Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Korecka, Joanna A.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Blaas, Eva; Spitzer, Sonia O.; Kamstra, Jorke H.; Smit, August B.; Swaab, Dick F.; Verhaagen, Joost; Bossers, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Multiple genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development and progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The main neuropathological hallmark of PD is the degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. To study genetic and molecular contributors to the disease process, there is a great need for readily accessible cells with prominent DAergic features that can be used for reproducible in vitro cellular screening. Here, we investigated the molecular phenotype of retinoic acid (RA) differentiated SH-SY5Y cells using genome wide transcriptional profiling combined with gene ontology, transcription factor and molecular pathway analysis. We demonstrated that RA induces a general neuronal differentiation program in SH-SY5Y cells and that these cells develop a predominantly mature DAergic-like neurotransmitter phenotype. This phenotype is characterized by increased dopamine levels together with a substantial suppression of other neurotransmitter phenotypes, such as those for noradrenaline, acetylcholine, glutamate, serotonin and histamine. In addition, we show that RA differentiated SH-SY5Y cells express the dopamine and noradrenalin neurotransmitter transporters that are responsible for uptake of MPP(+), a well known DAergic cell toxicant. MPP(+) treatment alters mitochondrial activity according to its proposed cytotoxic effect in DAergic neurons. Taken together, RA differentiated SH-SY5Y cells have a DAergic-like phenotype, and provide a good cellular screening tool to find novel genes or compounds that affect cytotoxic processes that are associated with PD. PMID:23724009

  17. Expression of chicken vinculin complements the adhesion-defective phenotype of a mutant mouse F9 embryonal carcinoma cell

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A mutant cell line, derived from the mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line F9, is defective in cell-cell adhesion (compaction) and in cell- substrate adhesion. We have previously shown that neither uvomorulin (E- cadherin) nor integrins are responsible for the mutant phenotype (Calogero, A., M. Samuels, T. Darland, S. A. Edwards, R. Kemler, and E. D. Adamson. 1991. Dev. Biol. 146:499-508). Several cytoskeleton proteins were assayed and only vinculin was found to be absent in mutant (5.51) cells. A chicken vinculin expression vector was transfected into the 5.51 cells together with a neomycin-resistance vector. Clones that were adherent to the substrate were selected in medium containing G418. Two clones, 5.51Vin3 and Vin4, were analyzed by Nomarski differential interference contrast and laser confocal microscopy as well as by biochemical and molecular biological techniques. Both clones adhered well to substrates and both exhibited F- actin stress fibers with vinculin localized at stress fiber tips in focal contacts. This was in marked contrast to 5.51 parental cells, which had no stress fibers and no vinculin. The mutant and complemented F9 cell lines will be useful models for examining the complex interactions between cytoskeletal and cell adhesion proteins. PMID:8491782

  18. Isolation and Molecular Profiling of Primary Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells: Comparison of Phenotypes from Healthy and Glaucomatous Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Chintalapudi, Sumana R.; Djenderedjian, Levon; Stiemke, Andrew B.; Steinle, Jena J.; Jablonski, Monica M.; Morales-Tirado, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of functional retinal ganglion cells (RGC) is an element of retinal degeneration that is poorly understood. This is in part due to the lack of a reliable and validated protocol for the isolation of primary RGCs. Here we optimize a feasible, reproducible, standardized flow cytometry-based protocol for the isolation and enrichment of homogeneous RGC with the Thy1.2hiCD48negCD15negCD57neg surface phenotype. A three-step validation process was performed by: (1) genomic profiling of 25-genes associated with retinal cells; (2) intracellular labeling of homogeneous sorted cells for the intracellular RGC-markers SNCG, brain-specific homeobox/POU domain protein 3A (BRN3A), TUJ1, and RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS); and (3) by applying the methodology on RGC from a mouse model with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and optic nerve damage. Use of primary RGC cultures will allow for future careful assessment of important cell specific pathways in RGC to provide mechanistic insights into the declining of visual acuity in aged populations and those suffering from retinal neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27242509

  19. The atherogenic Scarb1 null mouse model shows a high bone mass phenotype.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Corine; Martin-Falstrault, Louise; Brissette, Louise; Moreau, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), the Scarb1 gene product, is a receptor associated with cholesteryl ester uptake from high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which drives cholesterol movement from peripheral tissues toward the liver for excretion, and, consequently, Scarb1 null mice are prone to atherosclerosis. Because studies have linked atherosclerosis incidence with osteoporosis, we characterized the bone metabolism in these mice. Bone morphometry was assessed through microcomputed tomography and histology. Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) were used to characterize influence of endogenous SR-BI in cell functions. Total and HDL-associated cholesterol in null mice were increased by 32-60%, correlating with its role in lipoprotein metabolism. Distal metaphyses from 2- and 4-mo-old null mice showed correspondingly 46 and 37% higher bone volume fraction associated with a higher number of trabeculae. Histomorphometric analyses in 2-mo-old null male mice revealed 1.42-fold greater osteoblast surface, 1.37-fold higher percent mineralizing surface, and 1.69-fold enhanced bone formation rate. In vitro assays for MSCs from null mice revealed 37% higher proliferation rate, 48% more alkaline phosphatase activity, 70% greater mineralization potential and a 2-fold osterix (Sp7) expression, yet a 0.5-fold decrease in caveolin-1 (Cav1) expression. Selective uptake levels of HDL-associated cholesteryl oleate and estradiol were similar between MSC from wild-type and Scarb1 null mice, suggesting that its contribution to this process is not its main role in these cells. However, Scarb1 knockout stunted the HDL-dependent regulation of Cav1 genic expression. Scarb1 null mice are not prone to osteoporosis but show higher bone mass associated with enhanced bone formation.

  20. Kinetic Characterization of a Cocaine Hydrolase Engineered from Mouse Butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiabin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Geng, Liyi; Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Zheng, Xirong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mouse butyrylcholinesterase (mBChE) and an mBChE-based cocaine hydrolase (mCocH, i.e. the A199S/S227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant) have been characterized for their catalytic activities against cocaine, i.e. naturally occurring (−)-cocaine, in comparison with the corresponding human BChE (hBChE) and an hBChE-based cocaine hydrolase (hCocH, i.e. the A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant). It has been demonstrated that mCocH and hCocH have improved the catalytic efficiency of mBChE and hBChE against (−)-cocaine by ~8- and ~2000-fold, respectively, although the catalytic efficiencies of mCocH and hCocH against other substrates, including acetylcholine (ACh) and butyrylthiocholine (BTC), are close to those of the corresponding wild-type enzymes mBChE and hBChE. According to the kinetic data, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of mBChE against (−)-cocaine is comparable to that of hBChE, but the catalytic efficiency of mCocH against (−)-cocaine is remarkably lower than that of hCocH by ~250-fold. The remarkable difference in the catalytic activity between mCocH and hCocH is consistent with the difference between the enzyme-(−)-cocaine binding modes obtained from molecular modeling. Further, both mBChE and hBChE demonstrated substrate activation for all of the examined substrates ((−)-cocaine, ACh, and BTC) at high concentrations, whereas both mCocH and hCocH showed substrate inhibition for all three substrates at high concentrations. The amino-acid mutations have remarkably converted substrate activation of the enzymes into substrate inhibition, implying that the rate-determining step of the reaction in mCocH and hCocH might be different from that in mBChE and hBChE. PMID:25486543

  1. Mouse models of mantle cell lymphoma, complex changes in gene expression and phenotype of engrafted MCL cells: implications for preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Klanova, Magdalena; Soukup, Tomas; Jaksa, Radek; Molinsky, Jan; Lateckova, Lucie; Maswabi, Bokang C L; Prukova, Dana; Brezinova, Jana; Michalova, Kyra; Vockova, Petra; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Kulvait, Vojtech; Zivny, Jan; Vokurka, Martin; Necas, Emanuel; Trneny, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) associated with poor prognosis. Animal models of MCL are scarce. We established and characterized various in vivo models of metastatic human MCL by tail vein injection of either primary cells isolated from patients with MCL or established MCL cell lines (Jeko-1, Mino, Rec-1, Hbl-2, and Granta-519) into immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. MCL infiltration was assessed with immunohistochemistry (tissues) and flow cytometry (peripheral blood). Engraftment of primary MCL cells was observed in 7 out of 12 patient samples. The pattern of engraftment of primary MCL cells varied from isolated involvement of the spleen to multiorgan infiltration. On the other hand, tumor engraftment was achieved in all five MCL cell lines used and lymphoma involvement of murine bone marrow, spleen, liver, and brain was observed. Overall survival of xenografted mice ranged from 22 ± 1 to 54 ± 3 days depending on the cell line used. Subsequently, we compared the gene expression profile (GEP) and phenotype of the engrafted MCL cells compared with the original in vitro growing cell lines (controls). We demonstrated that engrafted MCL cells displayed complex changes of GEP, protein expression, and sensitivity to cytotoxic agents when compared with controls. We further demonstrated that our MCL mouse models could be used to test the therapeutic activity of systemic chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, or angiogenesis inhibitors. The characterization of MCL murine models is likely to aid in improving our knowledge in the disease biology and to assist scientists in the preclinical and clinical development of novel agents in relapsed/refractory MCL patients.

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of two Toxoplasma gondii isolates in free-range chickens from Uberlândia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C S; Franco, P S; Silva, N M; Silva, D A O; Ferro, E A V; Pena, H F J; Soares, R M; Gennari, S M; Mineo, J R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in free-range chickens from Uberlândia, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, and characterize the genotypic and phenotypic features of two isolates of this parasite, considering the importance of these hosts in the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis. Serum samples from 108 free-range chickens were obtained from ten different districts, and submitted to the modified agglutination test (MAT) for the presence of anti-T. gondii antibodies, and brain and heart tissue samples from infected chickens were processed for mouse bioassay. An overall seroprevalence of 71·3% was found and antibody titres ranged from 16 to 4096. After confirmation of seropositivity by mouse bioassay, the determination of the T. gondii genotypes of two isolates was performed by PCR-RFLP, using primers for the following markers: SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, new SAG2, Apico and CS3. These T. gondii isolates, designated TgChBrUD1and TgChBrUD2, were obtained from heart samples of free-range chickens. The TgChBrUD1 isolate belonged to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype 11 and the TgChBrUD2 isolate belonged to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype 6. Both isolates demonstrated high virulence in a rodent model, with the TgChBrUD1 isolate able to induce brain cysts, in accord with its pattern of multiplication rates in human fibroblast culture. Taken together, these results reveal high prevalence of T. gondii infection in free-range chickens throughout Uberlândia, indicating an important degree of oocyst environmental contamination and the existence of considerable risk for T. gondii transmission to humans by consumption of free-range chicken as a food source.

  3. Variable phenotypic expressivity in inbred retinal degeneration mouse lines: A comparative study of C3H/HeOu and FVB/N rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    van Wyk, Michiel; Schneider, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent advances in optogenetics and gene therapy have led to promising new treatment strategies for blindness caused by retinal photoreceptor loss. Preclinical studies often rely on the retinal degeneration 1 (rd1 or Pde6brd1) retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mouse model. The rd1 founder mutation is present in more than 100 actively used mouse lines. Since secondary genetic traits are well-known to modify the phenotypic progression of photoreceptor degeneration in animal models and human patients with RP, negligence of the genetic background in the rd1 mouse model is unwarranted. Moreover, the success of various potential therapies, including optogenetic gene therapy and prosthetic implants, depends on the progress of retinal degeneration, which might differ between rd1 mice. To examine the prospect of phenotypic expressivity in the rd1 mouse model, we compared the progress of retinal degeneration in two common rd1 lines, C3H/HeOu and FVB/N. Methods We followed retinal degeneration over 24 weeks in FVB/N, C3H/HeOu, and congenic Pde6b+ seeing mouse lines, using a range of experimental techniques including extracellular recordings from retinal ganglion cells, PCR quantification of cone opsin and Pde6b transcripts, in vivo flash electroretinogram (ERG), and behavioral optokinetic reflex (OKR) recordings. Results We demonstrated a substantial difference in the speed of retinal degeneration and accompanying loss of visual function between the two rd1 lines. Photoreceptor degeneration and loss of vision were faster with an earlier onset in the FVB/N mice compared to C3H/HeOu mice, whereas the performance of the Pde6b+ mice did not differ significantly in any of the tests. By postnatal week 4, the FVB/N mice expressed significantly less cone opsin and Pde6b mRNA and had neither ERG nor OKR responses. At 12 weeks of age, the retinal ganglion cells of the FVB/N mice had lost all light responses. In contrast, 4-week-old C3H/HeOu mice still had ERG and OKR responses, and we

  4. Phenotypic characterization of Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2, a lipopolysaccharide-based homogeneous O serogroup within Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed Central

    Biosca, E G; Oliver, J D; Amaro, C

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we have reevaluated the taxonomic position of biotype 2 of Vibrio vulnificus. For this purpose, we have biochemically and serologically characterized 83 biotype 2 strains from diseased eels, comparing them with 17 biotype 1 strains from different sources. Selected strains were also molecularly analyzed and tested for eel and mouse pathogenicity. Results have shown that biotype 2 (i) is biochemically homogeneous, indole production being the main trait that distinguishes it from biotype 1, (ii) presents small variations in DNA restriction profiles and outer membrane protein patterns, some proteins being immunologically related to outer membrane proteins from biotype 1, (iii) expresses a common lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profile, which is immunologically identical among strains and distinct from that of LPS of tested biotype 1 strains, and (iv) contains at least two high-Mr plasmids. Regarding host range, we have confirmed that both biotypes are pathogenic for mice but only biotype 2 is pathogenic for eels. On the basis of these data, we propose that biotype 2 of V. vulnificus constitutes an LPS-based O serogroup which is phenotypically homogeneous and pathogenic for eels. In this article, the serogroup is designated serogroup E (for eels). PMID:8975619

  5. Microparticles in the blood of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): phenotypic characterization and clinical associations

    PubMed Central

    Mobarrez, Fariborz; Vikerfors, Anna; Gustafsson, Johanna T.; Gunnarsson, Iva; Zickert, Agneta; Larsson, Anders; Pisetsky, David S.; Wallén, Håkan; Svenungsson, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by circulating autoantibodies and the formation of immune complexes. In these responses, the selecting self-antigens likely derive from the remains of dead and dying cells, as well as from disturbances in clearance. During cell death/activation, microparticles (MPs) can be released to the circulation. Previous MP studies in SLE have been limited in size and differ regarding numbers and phenotypes. Therefore, to characterize MPs more completely, we investigated 280 SLE patients and 280 individually matched controls. MPs were measured with flow cytometry and phenotyped according to phosphatidylserine expression (PS+/PS−), cellular origin and inflammatory markers. MPs, regardless of phenotype, are 2–10 times more abundant in SLE blood compared to controls. PS− MPs predominated in SLE, but not in controls (66% vs. 42%). Selectively in SLE, PS− MPs were more numerous in females and smokers. MP numbers decreased with declining renal function, but no clear association with disease activity was observed. The striking abundance of MPs, especially PS− MPs, suggests a generalized disturbance in SLE. MPs may be regarded as “liquid biopsies” to assess the production and clearance of dead, dying and activated cells, i.e. pivotal events for SLE pathogenesis. PMID:27777414

  6. Characterization of Bovine NANOG5′-flanking Region during Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hye-Jeong; Park, Hwan Hee; Linh, Tran Thi Thuy; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used as a powerful tool for research including gene manipulated animal models and the study of developmental gene regulation. Among the critical regulatory factors that maintain the pluripotency and self-renewal of undifferentiated ESCs, NANOG plays a very important role. Nevertheless, because pluripotency maintaining factors and specific markers for livestock ESCs have not yet been probed, few studies of the NANOG gene from domestic animals including bovine have been reported. Therefore, we chose mouse ESCs in order to understand and compare NANOG expression between bovine, human, and mouse during ESCs differentiation. We cloned a 600 bp (−420/+181) bovine NANOG 5′-flanking region, and tagged it with humanized recombinant green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) as a tracing reporter. Very high GFP expression for bovine NANOG promoter was observed in the mouse ESC line. GFP expression was monitored upon ESC differentiation and was gradually reduced along with differentiation toward neurons and adipocyte cells. Activity of bovine NANOG (−420/+181) promoter was compared with already known mouse and human NANOG promoters in mouse ESC and they were likely to show a similar pattern of regulation. In conclusion, bovine NANOG 5-flanking region functions in mouse ES cells and has characteristics similar to those of mouse and human. These results suggest that bovine gene function studied in mouse ES cells should be evaluated and extrapolated for application to characterization of bovine ES cells. PMID:26580439

  7. The Lipid Phenotype of Breast Cancer Cells Characterized by Raman Microspectroscopy: Towards a Stratification of Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Santana-Codina, Naiara; Rao, Satish; Petrov, Dmitri; Sierra, Angels

    2012-01-01

    Although molecular classification brings interesting insights into breast cancer taxonomy, its implementation in daily clinical care is questionable because of its expense and the information supplied in a single sample allocation is not sufficiently reliable. New approaches, based on a panel of small molecules derived from the global or targeted analysis of metabolic profiles of cells, have found a correlation between activation of de novo lipogenesis and poorer prognosis and shorter disease-free survival for many tumors. We hypothesized that the lipid content of breast cancer cells might be a useful indirect measure of a variety of functions coupled to breast cancer progression. Raman microspectroscopy was used to characterize metabolism of breast cancer cells with different degrees of malignancy. Raman spectra from MDA-MB-435, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, SKBR3, MCF7 and MCF10A cells were acquired with an InVia Raman microscope (Renishaw) with a backscattered configuration. We used Principal Component Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analyses to assess the different profiling of the lipid composition of breast cancer cells. Characteristic bands related to lipid content were found at 3014, 2935, 2890 and 2845 cm−1, and related to lipid and protein content at 2940 cm−1. A classificatory model was generated which segregated metastatic cells and non-metastatic cells without basal-like phenotype with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 82.1%. Moreover, expression of SREBP-1c and ABCA1 genes validated the assignation of the lipid phenotype of breast cancer cells. Indeed, changes in fatty acid unsaturation were related with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype. Raman microspectroscopy is a promising technique for characterizing and classifying the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells on the basis of their lipid profiling. The algorithm for the discrimination of metastatic ability is a first step towards stratifying breast cancer

  8. The heritability of oxycodone reward and concomitant phenotypes in a LG/J × SM/J mouse advanced intercross line.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Camron D; Guido, Michael A; Kole, Loren A; Cheng, Riyan

    2014-07-01

    The rewarding property of opioids likely contributes to their abuse potential. Therefore, determining the genetic basis of opioid reward could aid in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of opioid addiction, provided that it is a heritable trait. Here, we characterized the rewarding property of the widely abused prescription opioid oxycodone (OXY) in the conditioned place preference (CPP) assay using LG/J and SM/J parental inbred mouse strains and 17 parent-offspring families of a LG/J × SM/J F47 /F48 advanced intercross line (AIL). Following OXY training (5 mg/kg, i.p.), SM/J mice and AIL mice, but not LG/J mice, showed an increase in preference for the OXY-paired side, suggesting a genetic basis for OXY-CPP. SM/J mice showed greater locomotor activity than LG/J mice in response to both saline and OXY. LG/J, SM/J, and AIL mice all exhibited robust OXY-induced locomotor sensitization. Narrow-sense heritability (h(2) ) estimates of the phenotypes using linear regression and maximum likelihood estimation showed good agreement (r = 0.91). OXY-CPP was clearly not a heritable trait whereas drug-free- and OXY-induced locomotor activity and sensitization were significantly and sometimes highly heritable (h(2)  = 0.30-0.84). Interestingly, the number of transitions between the saline- and OXY-paired sides emerged as a reliably heritable trait following OXY training (h(2)  = 0.46-0.66) and could represent a genetic component of drug-seeking behavior. Thus, although OXY-CPP does not appear to be amenable to genome-wide quantitative trait locus mapping, this protocol will be useful for mapping other traits potentially relevant to opioid abuse.

  9. Detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases in Klebsiella pneumoniae: comparison of phenotypic characterization methods

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Hasan; ul-Haq, Ikram; Mahmood, Saqib; Zafar, Aizza; Mohsin Javed, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing K. pneumoniae is a serious threat to the patients. This manuscript shows the comparison of phenotypic characterization methods used for ESBL K. pneumoniae and frequency distribution of these isolates in various clinical samples. Methodology: Eleven different types of pathological samples collected on various time intervals were analyzed. K. pneumoniae were identified with API 20E system (bioMerieux) and initial screening of ESBL K. pneumoniae was performed using the ceftazidime antimicrobial disc. Double-disc synergy test (DDST) and CLSI confirmatory test were compared for the phenotypic detection of ESBL K. pneumoniae. Results: A total number of 214 ESBL producing K. pneumoniae were isolated from various clinical samples. Frequency distribution of ESBL producing K. pneumoniae was found to be highest among blood 117 (54.7%) and urine 46 (21.5%) samples. Data regarding the use of various interventions among these patients showed most common presence of intravenous line 209 (97.7%) and urinary catheters 46 (21.5%). Comparison of DDST and CLSI confirmatory test showed that the DDST detected 145 (67.8%) isolates while 213 (99.5%) ESBL K. pneumoniae were characterized by CLSI confirmatory test. Conclusion: The use of CLSI confirmatory test is very efficient in the early detection of ESBL K. pneumoniae especially when the facilities for molecular characterization are not available. PMID:24353625

  10. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  11. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone.

  12. Identification and characterization of a second mouse Nramp gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenheid, S.; Cellier, M.; Vidal, S.

    1995-01-20

    Nramp gene was isolated as a candidate for the host resistance locus Bcg/Ity/Lsh, which controls natural resistance of mice to several types of infections. We have isolated by cross-hybridization cDNA clones corresponding to a second mouse Nramp gene, which we designate Nramp2. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence analyses of full-length cDNA clones for Nramp2 indicate that this novel Nramp protein is closely homologous to the previously described Nramp and that the two genes form part of a small gene family. The two Nramp proteins encode integral membrane proteins that share 63% identical residues and an overall homology of 78%. They share very similar secondary structure, including identical hydropathy profiles and predicted membrane organization, with a minimum of 10 and most probably 12 transmembrane domains, a cluster of predicted N-linked glycosylation sites, and a consensus transport motif. Analysis of the distribution of Nramp2 mRNA transcripts in normal mouse tissues by Northern blotting revealed that the Nramp2 gene produces several mRNAs, including prominent 3.3- and 2.3-kb species generated by the use of alternative polyadenylation signals. In contrast to the previously described macrophage-specific Nramp gene, Nramp2 mRNAs were found to be expressed at low levels in all tissues tested. Using a polymorphic (GT)26 dinucleotide repeat identified in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the mRNA, we have mapped the Nramp2 gene to the distal part of mouse chromosome 15 between markers D15Mit41 and D15Mit15, with the gene order and intergene distance (in cM): centromere-56.1-D15Mit41-(1{+-}1)-Nramp2-(5{+-}2)-D15Mit15. 59 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Characterization of broadly pleiotropic phenotypes caused by an hfq insertion mutation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Tsui, H C; Leung, H C; Winkler, M E

    1994-07-01

    The region immediately downstream from the miaA tRNA modification gene at 94.8 min contains the hfq gene and the hflA region, which are important in the bacteriophage Q beta and lambda life cycles. The roles of these genes in bacteria remain largely unknown. We report here the characterization of two chromosomal hfq insertion mutations. An omega (omega) cassette insertion near the end of hfq resulted in phenotypes only slightly different from the parent, although transcript mapping demonstrated that the insertion was completely polar on hflX expression. In contrast, an equally polar omega cassette insertion near the beginning of hfq caused pronounced pleiotropic phenotypes, including decreased growth rates and yields, decreased negative supercoiling of plasmids in stationary phase, increased cell size, osmosensitivity, increased oxidation of carbon sources, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light, and suppression of bgl activation by hns mutations. hfq::omega mutant phenotypes were distinct from those caused by omega insertions early in the miaA tRNA modification gene. On the other hand, both hfq insertions interfered with lambda phage plaque formation, probably by means of polarity at the hflA region. Together, these results show that hfq function plays a fundamental role in Escherichia coli physiology and that hfq and the hflA-region are in the amiB-mutL-miaA-hfq-hflX superoperon. PMID:7984093

  14. Characterizing the in vitro biofilm phenotype of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Hotterbeekx, An; Lanckacker, Ellen; Moons, Pieter; Lammens, Christine; Kerstens, Monique; Ieven, Margareta; Delputte, Peter; Jorens, Philippe G; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Goossens, Herman; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC)-related infections are commonly caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis that is able to form a biofilm on the catheter surface. Many studies involving biofilm formation by Staphylococcus have been published each adopting an own in vitro model. Since the capacity to form a biofilm depends on multiple environmental factors, direct comparison of results obtained in different studies remains challenging. This study characterized the phenotype (strong versus weak biofilm-producers) of S. epidermidis from CVCs in four different in vitro biofilm models, covering differences in material type (glass versus polymer) and nutrient presentation (static versus continuous flow). A good correlation in phenotype was obtained between glass and polymeric surfaces independent of nutrient flow, with 85% correspondence under static growth conditions and 80% under dynamic conditions. A 80% correspondence between static and dynamic conditions on polymeric surfaces could be demonstrated as well. Incubation time had a significant influence on the biofilm phenotype with only 55% correspondence between the dynamic models at different incubation times (48h versus 17h). Screening for the presence of biofilm-related genes only revealed that ica A was correlated with biofilm formation under static but not under dynamic conditions. In conclusion, this study highlights that a high level of standardization is necessary to interpret and compare results of different in vitro biofilm models.

  15. Characterizing the in vitro biofilm phenotype of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Hotterbeekx, An; Lanckacker, Ellen; Moons, Pieter; Lammens, Christine; Kerstens, Monique; Ieven, Margareta; Delputte, Peter; Jorens, Philippe G; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Goossens, Herman; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC)-related infections are commonly caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis that is able to form a biofilm on the catheter surface. Many studies involving biofilm formation by Staphylococcus have been published each adopting an own in vitro model. Since the capacity to form a biofilm depends on multiple environmental factors, direct comparison of results obtained in different studies remains challenging. This study characterized the phenotype (strong versus weak biofilm-producers) of S. epidermidis from CVCs in four different in vitro biofilm models, covering differences in material type (glass versus polymer) and nutrient presentation (static versus continuous flow). A good correlation in phenotype was obtained between glass and polymeric surfaces independent of nutrient flow, with 85% correspondence under static growth conditions and 80% under dynamic conditions. A 80% correspondence between static and dynamic conditions on polymeric surfaces could be demonstrated as well. Incubation time had a significant influence on the biofilm phenotype with only 55% correspondence between the dynamic models at different incubation times (48h versus 17h). Screening for the presence of biofilm-related genes only revealed that ica A was correlated with biofilm formation under static but not under dynamic conditions. In conclusion, this study highlights that a high level of standardization is necessary to interpret and compare results of different in vitro biofilm models. PMID:27196636

  16. Selection and phenotypic characterization of a core collection of Brachypodium distachyon inbred lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The model grass Brachypodium distachyon is increasingly used to study various aspects of grass biology. A large and genotypically diverse collection of B. distachyon germplasm has been assembled by the research community. The natural variation in this collection can serve as a powerful experimental tool for many areas of inquiry, including investigating biomass traits. Results We surveyed the phenotypic diversity in a large collection of inbred lines and then selected a core collection of lines for more detailed analysis with an emphasis on traits relevant to the use of grasses as biofuel and grain crops. Phenotypic characters examined included plant height, growth habit, stem density, flowering time, and seed weight. We also surveyed differences in cell wall composition using near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP). In all cases, we observed extensive natural variation including a two-fold variation in stem density, four-fold variation in ferulic acid bound to hemicellulose, and 1.7-fold variation in seed mass. Conclusion These characterizations can provide the criteria for selecting diverse lines for future investigations of the genetic basis of the observed phenotypic variation. PMID:24423101

  17. Molecular cytogenetic and phenotypic characterization of ring chromosome 13 in three unrelated patients.

    PubMed

    Abdallah-Bouhjar, Inesse B; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Gmidène, Abir; Labalme, Audrey; Soyah, Najla; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2013-09-01

    We report on the cytogenetic and molecular investigations of constitutional de-novo ring chromosome 13s in three unrelated patients for better understanding and delineation of the phenotypic variability characterizing this genomic rearrangement. The patient's karyotypes were as follows: 46,XY,r(13)(p11q34) dn for patients 1 and 2 and 46,XY,r(13)(p11q14) dn for patient 3, as a result of the deletion in the telomeric regions of chromosome 13. The patients were, therefore, monosomic for the segment 13q34 → 13qter; in addition, for patient 3, the deletion was larger, encompassing the segment 13q14 → 13qter. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed these rearrangement and array CGH technique showed the loss of at least 2.9 Mb on the short arm and 4.7 Mb on the long arm of the chromosome 13 in patient 2. Ring chromosome 13 (r(13)) is associated with several phenotypic features like intellectual disability, marked short stature, brain and heart defects, microcephaly and genital malformations in males, including undescended testes and hypospadias. However, the hearing loss and speech delay that were found in our three patients have rarely been reported with ring chromosome 13. Although little is known about its etiology, there is interesting evidence for a genetic cause for the ring chromosome 13. We thus performed a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis to ascertain the contribution of ring chromosome 13 to the clinical features of our three cases. PMID:27625853

  18. Expression Atlas of the Deubiquitinating Enzymes in the Adult Mouse Retina, Their Evolutionary Diversification and Phenotypic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Esquerdo, Mariona; Grau-Bové, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Toulis, Vasileios; Garcia-Monclús, Sílvia; Millo, Erica; López-Iniesta, Ma José; Abad-Morales, Víctor; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Marfany, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a relevant cell regulatory mechanism to determine protein fate and function. Most data has focused on the role of ubiquitin as a tag molecule to target substrates to proteasome degradation, and on its impact in the control of cell cycle, protein homeostasis and cancer. Only recently, systematic assays have pointed to the relevance of the ubiquitin pathway in the development and differentiation of tissues and organs, and its implication in hereditary diseases. Moreover, although the activity and composition of ubiquitin ligases has been largely addressed, the role of the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) in specific tissues, such as the retina, remains mainly unknown. In this work, we undertook a systematic analysis of the transcriptional levels of DUB genes in the adult mouse retina by RT-qPCR and analyzed the expression pattern by in situ hybridization and fluorescent immunohistochemistry, thus providing a unique spatial reference map of retinal DUB expression. We also performed a systematic phylogenetic analysis to understand the origin and the presence/absence of DUB genes in the genomes of diverse animal taxa that represent most of the known animal diversity. The expression landscape obtained supports the potential subfunctionalization of paralogs in those families that expanded in vertebrates. Overall, our results constitute a reference framework for further characterization of the DUB roles in the retina and suggest new candidates for inherited retinal disorders. PMID:26934049

  19. Phenotype of Cardiomyopathy in Cardiac-specific Heat Shock Protein B8 K141N Transgenic Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Sanbe, Atsushi; Marunouchi, Tetsuro; Abe, Tsutomu; Tezuka, Yu; Okada, Mizuki; Aoki, Sayuri; Tsumura, Hideki; Yamauchi, Junji; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Nishigori, Hideo; Tanoue, Akito

    2013-01-01

    A K141N missense mutation in heat shock protein (HSP) B8, which belongs to the small HSP family, causes distal hereditary motor neuropathy, which is characterized by the formation of inclusion bodies in cells. Although the HSPB8 gene causes hereditary motor neuropathy, obvious expression of HSPB8 is also observed in other tissues, such as the heart. The effects of a single mutation in HSPB8 upon the heart were analyzed using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Expression of HSPB8 K141N by adenoviral infection resulted in increased HSPB8-positive aggregates around nuclei, whereas no aggregates were observed in myocytes expressing wild-type HSPB8. HSPB8-positive aggresomes contained amyloid oligomer intermediates that were detected by a specific anti-oligomer antibody (A11). Expression of HSPB8 K141N induced slight cellular toxicity. Recombinant HSPB8 K141N protein showed reactivity against the anti-oligomer antibody, and reactivity of the mutant HSPB8 protein was much higher than that of wild-type HSPB8 protein. To extend our in vitro study, cardiac-specific HSPB8 K141N transgenic (TG) mice were generated. Echocardiography revealed that the HSPB8 K141N TG mice exhibited mild hypertrophy and apical fibrosis as well as slightly reduced cardiac function, although no phenotype was detected in wild-type HSPB8 TG mice. A single point mutation of HSPB8, such as K141N, can cause cardiac disease. PMID:23389032

  20. Subjects with Low Plasma HDL Cholesterol Levels Are Characterized by an Inflammatory and Oxidative Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Holven, Kirsten B.; Retterstøl, Kjetil; Ueland, Thor; Ulven, Stine M.; Nenseter, Marit S.; Sandvik, Marit; Narverud, Ingunn; Berge, Knut E.; Ose, Leiv; Aukrust, Pål; Halvorsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the mechanisms for the possible atheroprotective effects of HDL cholesterol have still not been fully clarified, in particular in relation to clinical studies. Objective To examine the inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic phenotype of subjects with low plasma HDL cholesterol levels. Methods and Results Fifteen subjects with low HDL cholesterol levels (eleven males and four females) and 19 subjects with high HDL (three males and 16 females) were recruited. Low HDL cholesterol was defined as ≤10th age/sex specific percentile and high HDL-C was defined as ≥90 age/sex specific percentile. Inflammatory markers in circulation and PBMC gene expression of cholesterol efflux mediators were measured. Our main findings were: (i) subjects with low plasma HDL cholesterol levels were characterized by increased plasma levels of CRP, MMP-9, neopterin, CXCL16 and ICAM-1 as well as low plasma levels of adiponectin, suggesting an inflammatory phenotype; (ii) these individuals also had reduced paraoxonase (PON)1 activity in plasma and PON2 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) accompanied by increased plasma levels of oxidized LDL suggesting decreased anti-oxidative capacity; and (iii) PBMC from low HDL subjects also had decreased mRNA levels of ABCA1 and ABCG1, suggesting impaired reverse cholesterol transport. Conclusion Subjects with low plasma HDL cholesterol levels are characterized by an inflammatory and oxidative phenotype that could contribute to the increased risk of atherosclerotic disorders in these subjects with low HDL levels. PMID:24244297

  1. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Leptospira interrogans Isolated from Canis familiaris in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Sérgio; Monte, Leonardo G; De Oliveira, Natasha R; Collares, Thais F; Roloff, Bárbara C; Gomes, Charles K; Hartwig, Daiane D; Dellagostin, Odir A; Hartleben, Cláudia P

    2015-10-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic spirochetes from the genus Leptospira, which includes 20 species and more than 300 serovars. Canines are important hosts of pathogenic leptospires and can transmit the pathogen to humans via infected urine. Here, we report the phenotypic and molecular characterization of Leptospira interrogans isolated from Canis familiaris in Southern Brazil. The isolated strain was characterized by variable-number tandem-repeats analysis as L. interrogans, serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae. In addition, the isolate was recognized by antibodies from human and canine serum samples previously tested by microscopic agglutination test. Ultimately, the expression of membrane-associated antigens (LipL32 and leptospiral immunoglobulin-like proteins) from pathogenic leptospires using monoclonal antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay. In conclusion, identification of new strains of Leptospira can help in the diagnosis and control of leptospirosis. PMID:26100241

  2. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Malassezia japonica isolated from psoriasis vulgaris patients.

    PubMed

    Honnavar, Prasanna; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M

    2015-03-01

    Malassezia species, which are skin colonizers, are being debated as to their pathogenic role in various cutaneous diseases. Species identification of Malassezia is important as particular species have been implicated in or associated with specific diseases. Malassezia japonica, a relatively newly described species, has not been completely characterized owing to the rarity of its isolation. In the present study we describe phenotypic and molecular characterization of six M. japonica strains isolated from patients with psoriasis vulgaris. In contrast to the physiological and biochemical properties of the M. japonica type strain, CBS9348, all our isolates assimilated Tween 20 and showed positive β-glucosidase activity, and the Cremophor EL utilization test was negative. However, the sequences of the D1/D2 region of rDNA, ITS2 and IGS1 regions of all our isolates clustered with the type strain of M. japonica. PMID:25587082

  3. Phenotypic characterization of nanshi oral liquid alters metabolic signatures during disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aihua; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhou, Xiaohang; Sun, Hui; Nan, Yang; Zou, Shiyu; Ma, Chung Wah; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    This paper was designed to investigate the phenotypic characterization of Nanshi Oral Liquid (NOL) alters metabolic signatures of the ‘Kidney Yang Deficiency syndrome’ (KYDS). Urine metabolites were profiled by UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-HDMS. The significantly changed metabolites such as xanthurenic acid, 4,8-dihydroxyquinoline, 3-methyldioxyindole, 4,6-dihydroxyquinoline, kynurenic acid, hippuric acid, taurine, tyramine, and 3-metanephrine, had been identified, and were related to the disturbance in tyrosine metabolism, steroid hormone biosynthesis, taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, phenylalanine metabolism and lysine degradation, which were helpful to further understanding the KYDS and intervention mechanism of NOL. The biochemical result showed that NOL can alleviate the kidney impairment induced by KYDS. Metabolomics results indicated the significantly changed metabolites were found to be reasonable in explaining the action mechanism of NOL. Interestingly, the effectiveness of NOL against KYDS was proved using the established metabolomics method and regulated the biomarkers as well as adjusted the metabolic disorder pathways. NOL had potentially pharmacological effect through regulating multiple perturbed pathways to normal state. This work showed that the metabolomics method was a powerful approach for studying the phenotypic characterization of disease’s syndrome during disease prevention and its intervention mechanism. PMID:26785698

  4. Characterization of primary afferent spinal innervation of mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Herweijer, Geraldine; Kyloh, Melinda; Beckett, Elizabeth A H; Dodds, Kelsi N; Spencer, Nick J

    2014-01-01

    The primary afferent innervation of the uterus is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the location and characteristics of primary afferent neurons that innervate the uterine horn of mice and correlate the different morphological types of putative primary afferent nerve endings, immunoreactive to the sensory marker, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Using retrograde tracing, injection of 5-10 μL of 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) into discrete single sites in each uterine horn revealed a biomodal distribution of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) with peak labeling occurring between T13-L3 and a second smaller peak between L6-S1. The mean cross sectional area of labeled cells was 463 μm(2) ± s.e.m. A significantly greater proportion of labeled neurons consisted of small cell bodies (<300 μm(2)) in the sacral spinal cord (S2) compared with peak labeling at the lumbar (L2) region. In both sections and whole mount preparations, immunohistochemical staining for CGRP revealed substantial innervation of the uterus by CGRP-positive nerve fibers located primarily at the border between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers (N = 4). The nerve endings were classified into three distinct types: "single," "branching," or "complex," that often aligned preferentially in either the circular or longitudinal axis of the smooth muscles. Complex endings were often associated with mesenteric vessels. We have identified that the cell bodies of primary afferent neurons innervating the mouse uterus lie primarily in DRG at L2 and S1 spinal levels. Also, the greatest density of CGRP immunoreactivity lies within the myometrium, with at least three different morphological types of nerve endings identified. These findings will facilitate further investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory transduction in mouse uterus. PMID:25120416

  5. Three deaf mice: mouse models for TECTA-based human hereditary deafness reveal domain-specific structural phenotypes in the tectorial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Legan, P. Kevin; Goodyear, Richard J.; Morín, Matías; Mencia, Angeles; Pollard, Hilary; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Korchagina, Julia; Modamio-Hoybjor, Silvia; Mayo, Fernando; Moreno, Felipe; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel-Angel; Richardson, Guy P.

    2014-01-01

    Tecta is a modular, non-collagenous protein of the tectorial membrane (TM), an extracellular matrix of the cochlea essential for normal hearing. Missense mutations in Tecta cause dominant forms of non-syndromic deafness and a genotype–phenotype correlation has been reported in humans, with mutations in different Tecta domains causing mid- or high-frequency hearing impairments that are either stable or progressive. Three mutant mice were created as models for human Tecta mutations; the TectaL1820F,G1824D/+ mouse for zona pellucida (ZP) domain mutations causing stable mid-frequency hearing loss in a Belgian family, the TectaC1837G/+ mouse for a ZP-domain mutation underlying progressive mid-frequency hearing loss in a Spanish family and the TectaC1619S/+ mouse for a zonadhesin-like (ZA) domain mutation responsible for progressive, high-frequency hearing loss in a French family. Mutations in the ZP and ZA domains generate distinctly different changes in the structure of the TM. Auditory brainstem response thresholds in the 8–40 kHz range are elevated by 30–40 dB in the ZP-domain mutants, whilst those in the ZA-domain mutant are elevated by 20–30 dB. The phenotypes are stable and no evidence has been found for a progressive deterioration in TM structure or auditory function. Despite elevated auditory thresholds, the Tecta mutant mice all exhibit an enhanced tendency to have audiogenic seizures in response to white noise stimuli at low sound pressure levels (≤84 dB SPL), revealing a previously unrecognised consequence of Tecta mutations. These results, together with those from previous studies, establish an allelic series for Tecta unequivocally demonstrating an association between genotype and phenotype. PMID:24363064

  6. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  7. Phenotypic characterization of bovine memory cells responding to mycobacteria in IFNγ enzyme linked immunospot assays.

    PubMed

    Blunt, Laura; Hogarth, Philip J; Kaveh, Daryan A; Webb, Paul; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Vordermeier, Hans Martin

    2015-12-16

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a globally significant veterinary health problem. Defining correlates of protection can accelerate the development of novel vaccines against TB. As the cultured IFNγ ELISPOT (cELISPOT) assay has been shown to predict protection and duration of immunity in vaccinated cattle, we sought to characterize the phenotype of the responding T-cells. Using expression of CD45RO and CD62L we purified by cytometric cell sorting four distinct CD4(+) populations: CD45RO(+)CD62L(hi), CD45RO(+)CD62L(lo), CD45RO(-)CD62L(hi) and CD45RO(-)CD62L(lo) (although due to low and inconsistent cell recovery, this population was not considered further in this study), in BCG vaccinated and Mycobacterium bovis infected cattle. These populations were then tested in the cELISPOT assay. The main populations contributing to production of IFNγ in the cELISPOT were of the CD45RO(+)CD62L(hi) and CD45RO(+)CD62L(lo) phenotypes. These cell populations have been described in other species as central and effector memory cells, respectively. Following in vitro culture and flow cytometry we observed plasticity within the bovine CD4(+) T-cell phenotype. Populations switched phenotype, increasing or decreasing expression of CD45RO and CD62L within 24h of in vitro stimulation. After 14 days all IFNγ producing CD4(+) T cells expressed CD45RO regardless of the original phenotype of the sorted population. No differences were detected in behavior of cells derived from BCG-vaccinated animals compared to cells derived from naturally infected animals. In conclusion, although multiple populations of CD4(+) T memory cells from both BCG vaccinated and M. bovis infected animals contributed to cELISPOT responses, the dominant contributing population consists of central-memory-like T cells (CD45RO(+)CD62L(hi)).

  8. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse with a functional human TSPY.

    PubMed

    Schubert, S; Skawran, B; Dechend, F; Nayernia, K; Meinhardt, A; Nanda, I; Schmid, M; Engel, W; Schmidtke, J

    2003-09-01

    To generate an animal model that is suitable for the analysis of regulation and expression of human testis-specific protein, Y-encoded TSPY, a transgenic mouse line, TgTSPY9, harboring a complete structural human TSPY gene was generated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and Southern analyses show that approximately 50 copies of the human TSPY transgene are integrated at a single chromosomal site that maps to the distal long arm of the Y chromosome. The transgene is correctly transcribed and spliced according to the human pattern and is mainly expressed in testicular tissue, with spermatogonia and early primary spermatocytes (leptotene and zygotene) as expressing germ cells. TSPY transgenic mice are phenotypically normal, and spermatogenesis is neither impaired nor enhanced by the human transgene. The present study shows that a human TSPY gene integrated into the mouse genome follows the human expression pattern although murine tspy had lost its function in rodent evolution millions of years ago. PMID:12773407

  9. Immortalization and characterization of mouse floxed Bmp2/4 osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Li-An; Yuan, Guohua; Yang, Guobin; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Iris; Yang, Wuchen; Cui, Yong; MacDougall, Mary; Harris, Stephen; Chen, Shuo

    2009-08-14

    Generation of a floxed Bmp2/4 osteoblast cell line is a valuable tool for studying the modulatory effects of Bmp2 and Bmp4 on osteoblast differentiation as well as relevant molecular events. In this study, primary floxed Bmp2/4 mouse osteoblasts were cultured and transfected with simian virus 40 large T-antigen. Transfection was verified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. To examine the characteristics of the transfected cells, morphology, proliferation and mineralization were analyzed, expression of cell-specific genes including Runx2, ATF4, Dlx3, Osx, dentin matrix protein 1, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, osteocalcin, osteonectin and collagen type I was detected. These results show that transfected floxed Bmp2/4 osteoblasts bypassed senescence with a higher proliferation rate, but retain the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics similar to the primary cells. Thus, we for the first time demonstrate the establishment of an immortalized mouse floxed Bmp2/4 osteoblast cell line.

  10. Development and Characterization of Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Chicken CD83

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was carried out to develop and characterize mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against chicken CD83 (chCD83), a membrane-bound glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily that is primarily expressed on mature dendritic cells (DCs). A recombinant chCD83/IgG4 fusion protein con...

  11. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for chicken interleukin 18

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which are specific for chicken interleukin 18 (chIL18) were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and neutralization assays. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chIL18 identified a ...

  12. Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H.; Cai, T.; Tagle, D. A.; Li, J.

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian mAspAT (mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase) is recently reported to have KAT (kynurenine aminotransferase) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of KYNA (kynurenic acid) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen oxo acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and 14 of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor-binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate-binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our results provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Cai, Tao; Tagle, Danilo A.; Li, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Mammalian mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (mAspAT) is recently reported to have kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of kynurenic acid (KYNA) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen keto acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and fourteen of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our data provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain. PMID:20977429

  14. A reduction in Ptprq associated with specific features of the deafness phenotype of the miR-96 mutant mouse diminuendo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Johnson, Stuart L; Lewis, Morag A; Hilton, Jennifer M; Huma, Andreea; Marcotti, Walter; Steel, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    miR-96 is a microRNA, a non-coding RNA gene which regulates a wide array of downstream genes. The miR-96 mouse mutant diminuendo exhibits deafness and arrested hair cell functional and morphological differentiation. We have previously shown that several genes are markedly downregulated in the diminuendo organ of Corti; one of these is Ptprq, a gene known to be important for maturation and maintenance of hair cells. In order to study the contribution that downregulation of Ptprq makes to the diminuendo phenotype, we carried out microarrays, scanning electron microscopy and single hair cell electrophysiology to compare diminuendo mutants (heterozygous and homozygous) with mice homozygous for a functional null allele of Ptprq. In terms of both morphology and electrophysiology, the auditory phenotype of mice lacking Ptprq resembles that of diminuendo heterozygotes, while diminuendo homozygotes are more severely affected. A comparison of transcriptomes indicates there is a broad similarity between diminuendo homozygotes and Ptprq-null mice. The reduction in Ptprq observed in diminuendo mice appears to be a major contributor to the morphological, transcriptional and electrophysiological phenotype, but does not account for the complete diminuendo phenotype. PMID:24446963

  15. A novel method for multiparameter physiological phenotype characterization at the single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Ashili, Shashanka; Houkal, Jeff; Smith, Dean; Mohammadreza, Aida; Lee, Kristen; Kumar, Ashok; Anis, Yasser; Paulson, Tom; Youngbull, Cody; Tian, Yanqing; Johnson, Roger; Holl, Mark; Meldrum, Deirdre

    2011-02-01

    Non-genetic intercellular heterogeneity has been increasingly recognized as one of the key factors in a variety of core cellular processes including proliferation, stimulus response, carcinogenesis and drug resistance. Many diseases, including cancer, originate in a single or a few cells. Early detection and characterization of these abnormal cells can provide new insights into the pathogenesis and serve as a tool for better disease diagnosis and treatment. We report on a novel technology for multiparameter physiological phenotype characterization at the single-cell level. It is based on real-time measurements of concentrations of several metabolites by means of extracellular optical sensors in microchambers of sub-nL volume containing single cells. In its current configuration, the measurement platform features the capability to detect oxygen consumption rate and pH changes under normoxic and hypoxic conditions at the single-cell level. We have conceived, designed and developed a semi-automated method for single-cell manipulation and loading into microwells utilizing custom, high-precision fluid handling at the nanoliter scale. We present the results of a series of measurements of oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of single human metaplastic esophageal epithelial cells. In addition, to assess the effects of cell-to-cell interactions, we have measured OCRs of two and three cells placed in a single well. The major advantages of the approach are a) multiplexed characterization of cell phenotype at the single-cell level, b) minimal invasiveness due to the distant positioning of sensors, and c) flexibility in terms of accommodating measurements of other metabolites or biomolecules of interest.

  16. Purification, characterization and immunocytochemical localization of mouse kidney carnosinase.

    PubMed

    Margolis, F L; Grillo, M; Grannot-Reisfeld, N; Farbman, A I

    1983-05-18

    Mouse kidney carnosinase (aminoacyl-L-histidine hydrolase, EC 3.4.13.3) has been isolated, the amino acid composition determined and antiserum prepared against it. The apparent subunit molecular weight is 58 000, which increases to 112 000 on crosslinking. Carnosinase is sensitive to chelating agents and is 50% inhibited by 0.3 microM EDTA, 35 microM o-phenanthroline, or 35 microM 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid. The Km for carnosine is 60 microM. Anserine is a poor substrate and homocarnosine a non-substrate, with Ki values of 37 and 17 microM, respectively. Mn2+ shifts the Km for carnosine to approx. 2 mM and increases the Vmax about 50%. The specific antiserum discriminates between this carnosinase and a second carnosinase activity which is absolutely dependent on Mn2+ for activity (Margolis, F.L., Grillo, M., Brown, C.E., Williams, T.H., Pitcher, R.G. and Elgar, G.J. (1979) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 570, 311-323). Immunocytochemistry with this antiserum has demonstrated carnosinase to be localized in proximal tubules of kidney, glandular cells of uterus and nasal olfactory mucosa and in vomeronasal and certain other nerve pathways.

  17. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of mucosal nasal lymphocytes by direct ex vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Christin; Rasche, Claudia; Audring, Heike; Wahls, Michael; Worm, Margitta

    2009-05-01

    Cellular inflammation of the nasal mucosa demonstrates a local immune response which plays an important role in allergic rhinitis. The aim of the present study was to characterize nasal mucosal lymphocytes regarding their activation and differentiation state by direct ex vivo flowcytometric analysis. Lymphocytes from the inferior turbinates were isolated by a mechanical method of preparation and, for comparison, from peripheral blood by Ficoll gradient centrifugation. Patients suffering from rhinitis or difficulty in nasal breathing were divided into an allergic (pollen-allergy, n = 13) and non-allergic group (n = 24). Expression of different T- and B-cell markers was determined by flowcytometric analysis. CD4+ T-cells from the nasal mucosa exhibited a memory phenotype (CD45RO+, 97%), were highly activated (CD69+, 43-73%), and showed low expression of the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA+, 5%). Nasal CD20+ B-lymphocytes expressed significantly higher levels of mIgE and lower levels of CD23 and CD80 than peripheral B-cells. Subsets of CD80+ (4%) and CD86+ (6%) CD20+ B-lymphocytes were identified in the nasal mucosa. No significant differences between allergic and non-allergic individuals were determined. As expected, the data show profound phenotypical differences between circulating peripheral blood and nasal mucosal lymphocytes. Activated memory lymphocytes are present in the nasal mucosa from allergic, but also non-allergic patients and may indicate to a significant role of a local inflammatory state without systemic criteria for allergy. In our study, we show that direct ex vivo isolation of lymphocytes is practicable method and offers a new technique to examine the local nasal allergic immune response using a multiparametric phenotypical analysis. PMID:18766360

  18. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  19. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Group B Streptococcal Isolates in Southern Brazil ▿

    PubMed Central

    Palmeiro, Jussara K.; Dalla-Costa, Libera M.; Fracalanzza, Sérgio E. L.; Botelho, Ana C. N.; da Silva Nogueira, Keite; Scheffer, Mara C.; de Almeida Torres, Rosângela S. L.; de Carvalho, Newton Sérgio; Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Madeira, Humberto M. F.

    2010-01-01

    One-hundred sixty-eight group B streptococcal (GBS) isolates from a Brazilian hospital were phenotypically and genotypically characterized. Isolates were recovered from human sources from April 2006 to May 2008 and classified as either invasive, noninvasive, or colonizing isolates. Classical methods for serotyping and antibiotic resistance profiling were employed. Clonal groups were also defined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results showed that susceptibility to beta-lactam antimicrobials was predominant among the isolates. Only 4.7% were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. The erm(B) gene was widely detected in our GBS isolates, according to our phenotypic results (constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [cMLSB] resistance phenotype), and the erm(A) gene was also detected in some isolates. MLSB resistance was restricted to strains isolated from patients with noninvasive infections and carriers. Serotype Ia was predominant (38.1%), serotype IV isolates were found at a high frequency (13.1%), and few isolates of serotype III were identified (3%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results revealed a variety of types, reflecting the substantial genetic diversity among GBS strains, although a great number of isolates could be clustered into two major groups with a high degree of genetic relatedness. Three main PFGE clonal groups were found, and isolates sharing the same PFGE type were grouped into different serotypes. Furthermore, in a few cases, isolates from the same patients and possessing the same PFGE type were of different serotypes. These findings could be related to the occurrence of capsular switching by horizontal transfer of capsular genes. PMID:20881175

  20. Molecular and Phenotypic Characterization of Aerococcus viridans Associated with Subclinical Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tariq; Ferreri, Miro; Gao, Jian; Chen, Wei; Yin, Jinhua; Su, Jingliang; Fanning, Séamus; Han, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Aerococcus viridans is a wide spread bacterium in the environment and clinically this organism is associated with different diseases in animals and humans. However, the geno- and phenotypic characterization of A. viridans associated with bovine mastitis has not yet been reported. The objectives of this study were to investigate the genetic and phenotypic diversity of A. viridans isolates using three different molecular methods including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) along with biochemical tests, including antimicrobial susceptibility test. In total, 60 A. viridans strains were cultured from dairy herds presenting with subclinical mastitis. The results of biochemical tests revealed that most of the isolates (75.0%) were accurately identified by API Rapid 20 Strep system and the majority of A. viridans strains (96.7%) were found to be catalase negative, while two (3.3%) isolates were weakly positive. All isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, followed by streptomycin (96.7%), tetracycline (65.0%) and clindamycin (56.7%) by minimum inhibition concentration-determining broth microdilution technique. As compared to the sequence of 16S rRNA gene, both PFGE and RAPD showed their capacities to discriminate the intra-species diversity of A. viridans. Furthermore, most of the isolates obtained from the same herd or region belonged to the same major RAPD group, which indicated that RAPD is an appropriate assay for tracking the origins of isolates and epidemiological studies of A. viridans. This is a novel approach to use three molecular techniques and to compare their efficiency regarding the genetic diversity of A. viridans. The data suggest that A. viridans associated with subclinical mastitis has a considerable phenotypic and genotypic diversity. PMID:25919289

  1. Molecular cytogenetic and phenotypic characterization of ring chromosome 13 in three unrelated patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah-Bouhjar, Inesse B.; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Hannachi, Hanene; Gmidène, Abir; Labalme, Audrey; Soyah, Najla; Sanlaville, Damien; Saad, Ali; Elghezal, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    We report on the cytogenetic and molecular investigations of constitutional de-novo ring chromosome 13s in three unrelated patients for better understanding and delineation of the phenotypic variability characterizing this genomic rearrangement. The patient’s karyotypes were as follows: 46,XY,r(13)(p11q34) dn for patients 1 and 2 and 46,XY,r(13)(p11q14) dn for patient 3, as a result of the deletion in the telomeric regions of chromosome 13. The patients were, therefore, monosomic for the segment 13q34 → 13qter; in addition, for patient 3, the deletion was larger, encompassing the segment 13q14 → 13qter. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed these rearrangement and array CGH technique showed the loss of at least 2.9 Mb on the short arm and 4.7 Mb on the long arm of the chromosome 13 in patient 2. Ring chromosome 13 (r(13)) is associated with several phenotypic features like intellectual disability, marked short stature, brain and heart defects, microcephaly and genital malformations in males, including undescended testes and hypospadias. However, the hearing loss and speech delay that were found in our three patients have rarely been reported with ring chromosome 13. Although little is known about its etiology, there is interesting evidence for a genetic cause for the ring chromosome 13. We thus performed a genotype-phenotype correlation analysis to ascertain the contribution of ring chromosome 13 to the clinical features of our three cases. PMID:27625853

  2. Principal component and cluster analysis of morphological variables reveals multiple discrete sub-phenotypes in weaver mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Serra, Roger; Valero, Oliver; Molina, Vanessa; Hervás, José P; Villegas, Sandra

    2013-06-01

    The present study evaluates the usefulness of the principal component analysis-based cluster analysis in the categorization of several sub-phenotypes in the weaver mutant by using several morphological parameters from the cerebellar cortex of control, heterozygous (+/wv) and homozygous (wv/wv) weaver mice. The quantified parameters were length of the cerebellar cortex, area of the external granular layer, area of the molecular layer, number of the external granular layer cells (EGL), and number of Purkinje cells (PCs). The analysis indicated that at postnatal day 8, the genotype +/wv presented three sub-phenotypes tagged as +/wv (0), +/wv (1) and +/wv (2), whereas two sub-phenotypes designated as wv (0)/wv (1) and wv (0)/wv (2) were identified in the genotype wv/wv. The number of PCs for the genotype +/wv and the number of EGL cells for the genotype wv/wv were the variables that discriminated the best among sub-phenotypes. Each one of the sub-phenotypes showed specific abnormalities in the cytoarchitecture of the cerebellar cortex as well as in the foliar pattern. In particular, the wv (0)/wv (1) and wv (0)/wv (2) sub-phenotypes had the most altered cytoarchitectonics, followed by the +/wv (2) sub-phenotype and then by the +/wv (1) one. The sub-phenotype +/wv (0) was the less affected one. Apart from reporting for the first time the coexistence of several sub-phenotypes in the weaver mutant, our approach provides a new statistical tool that can be used to assess cerebellar morphology.

  3. Phenotypic characterization of Trichophyton rubrum isolates from two geographic locations in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, J I; Vicente, E J; Paula, C R; Gambale, W

    2001-01-01

    To characterize possible Trichophyton rubrum phenotypes, which circulate in two Brazilian localities, we tested 53 isolates of this dermatophyte for their ability to assimilate several carbon sources, for keratinase, proteinase, phospholipase, lipase and desoxiribonuclease (DNase) secretions, and for their susceptibility to the antifungals fluconazole, ketoconazole and itraconazole. For each method, the isolates were submitted to similarity analysis and the methods were evaluated for their discriminatory indexes. None of the isolates were capable of assimilating arabinose, dulcitol, lactose, melibiose, ribose and xylose, while all of the isolates assimilated maltose, sucrose and sorbitol. However, adonitol, cellobiose, dextrin, erythritol, fructose, galactose, inulin, mannitol, mannose, raffinose, rhamnose and trehalose were assimilated by some isolates but not by others. All isolates secreted keratinase and DNase, while none secreted phospholipase. Proteinase and lipase were secreted only by some isolates. All but four isolates were resistant to fluconazole, most of them were sensitive to ketoconazole and all were sensitive to itraconazole. Carbohydrate assimilation was the method that presented the highest discriminatory index, and also the method that displayed the largest number of biotypes. Taken together, these data suggest that significant phenotypic variations exist among T. rubrum isolates. They seem to occur independently from their geographic origins.

  4. Indigenous sheep breeds of North Ethiopia: characterization of their phenotype and major production system.

    PubMed

    Gebretsadik, Zelealem Tesfay; Anal, Anil Kumar

    2014-02-01

    A study was conducted in Tigrai, Northern Ethiopia to describe the sheep breeds and their production system. The survey was done in selected districts known for their high sheep population density. The phenotype characterization identified distinct features for each breed. The breeds are Aberegelle, Ille, Begait, and the common Tigrai highland sheep. The strong discriminating phenotypes are face profile, tail type, and compactness; accounting for 83.48, 17.95, and 2.93% respectively of the total variability among breeds. The flock structure are affected by the market demand; requirements of breeding females and feed availability. Farmers tend to keep more female sheep for longer (culling age of 5.9 ± 0.4 and 1.9 ± 0.5 for females and males, respectively) for the reasons of feed shortage and need to maximize number of breeding female. The ratio of male to overall female is large (1:6) and thus a single ram gets maximum contact time with ewes and ewe lambs. The overall average age at puberty for females is 9-14 months. However, the presence of very young lamb rams and uncontrolled mating system lead to early breeding of females which results in low conception rate, low birth weight, poor survival rates, and in extreme cases causing inbreeding. It was also possible to identify the critical control points such as breed, age of animals, nutrition, and feeding systems affecting the provision of live animals for good meat quality. PMID:24233461

  5. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Vagococcus fluvialis, including strains isolated from human sources.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, L M; Carvalho, M G; Merquior, V L; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Facklam, R R

    1997-01-01

    This study presents phenotypic and genotypic data for seven isolates of Vagococcus fluvialis, including four strains recovered from human clinical sources, one strain isolated from an environmental source, and two strains isolated from pigs. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, most isolates were initially classified as "unidentified enterococci," because they resembled atypical arginine-negative enterococcal species. All seven strains as well as the type strain of V. fluvialis reacted with the AccuProbe Enterococcus genetic probe. The seven isolates had virtually indistinguishable whole-cell protein profiles that were similar to that of the V. fluvialis type strain and distinct from those of Enterococcus and Lactococcus species. DNA-DNA reassociation experiments confirmed that the strains were V. fluvialis. They were 71% or more related to the V. fluvialis type strain under optimum and stringent conditions, with 2.5% or less divergence within related sequences. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin and were resistant to clindamycin, lomefloxacin, and ofloxacin. Strain-to-strain variation was observed in relation to susceptibilities to 18 other antimicrobial agents. Chromosomal DNA was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digestion with SmaI. Distinctive PFGE patterns were generated, suggesting the nonclonal nature of V. fluvialis strains. Although the number of strains was small, this report provides molecular characterization of V. fluvialis and the first evidence of a possible connection of this species with human infections. PMID:9350732

  7. Characterization of Virulence-Related Phenotypes in Candida Species of the CUG Clade.

    PubMed

    Priest, Shelby J; Lorenz, Michael C

    2015-09-01

    Candida species cause a variety of mucosal and invasive infections and are, collectively, the most important human fungal pathogens in the developed world. The majority of these infections result from a few related species within the "CUG clade," so named because they use a nonstandard translation for that codon. Some members of the CUG clade, such as Candida albicans, present significant clinical problems, whereas others, such as Candida (Meyerozyma) guilliermondii, are uncommon in patients. The differences in incidence rates are imperfectly correlated with virulence in animal models of infection, but comparative analyses that might provide an explanation for why some species are effective pathogens and others are not have been rare or incomplete. To better understand the phenotypic basis for these differences, we characterized eight CUG clade species--C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, Clavispora lusitaniae, M. guilliermondii, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Lodderomyces elongisporus--for host-relevant phenotypes, including nutrient utilization, stress tolerance, morphogenesis, interactions with phagocytes, and biofilm formation. Two species deviated from expectations based on animal studies and human incidence. C. dubliniensis was quite robust, grouping in nearly all assays with the most virulent species, C. albicans and C. tropicalis, whereas C. parapsilosis was substantially less fit than might be expected from its clinical importance. These findings confirm the utility of in vitro measures of virulence and provide insight into the evolution of virulence in the CUG clade. PMID:26150417

  8. Characterization of single potassium channels in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Single K(+)-selective channels with a conductance of about 48 pS (pipette, 145 mM KCl; bath, 140 mM NaCl + 4.7 mM KCl) were recorded in the patch-clamp whole-cell configuration in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Neither application of the secretagogues acetylcholine (second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) or secretin (second messenger, cAMP), nor addition of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A to the pipette solution changed the activity of the 48 pS K+ channel. 3. Intracellular acidification with sodium propionate (20 mM) diminished activity of the 48 pS channel, whereas channel open probability was increased by cytosolic alkalization with 20 mM NH4Cl. 4. BaCl2 (5 mM), TEA (10 mM) or apamin (1 microM) added to the bath solution had no obvious effect on the kinetics of the 48 pS channel. Similarly, glibenclamide and diazoxide failed to influence the channel activity. 5. When extracellular NaCl was replaced by KCl, whole-cell recordings revealed an inwardly rectifying K+ current carried by a 17 pS K+ channel. 6. The inwardly rectifying K+ current was not pH dependent and could largely be blocked by Ba2+ but not by TEA. 7. Since the 48 pS K+ channel is neither Ca2+ nor cAMP regulated, we suggest that this channel could play a role in the maintenance of the negative cell resting potential. PMID:7623283

  9. Embryonic phenotype, β-carotene and retinoid metabolism upon maternal supplementation of β-carotene in a mouse model of severe vitamin A deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, L.; Spiegler, E.; Quadro, L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of β-carotene (bC) supplementation during pregnancy in a mouse model of severe vitamin A deficiency, i.e. Lrat−/−Rbp−/− dams maintained on a vitamin A-deficient diet during gestation. bC, a provitamin A carotenoid, can be enzymatically cleaved to form vitamin A for use by the developing embryo. We found that an acute supplementation (13.5 days post coitum, dpc) of bC to Lrat−/−Rbp−/− dams on a vitamin A-deficient diet activated transcriptional mechanisms in the developing tissues to maximize the utilization of bC provided to the dams. Nevertheless, these regulatory mechanisms are inefficient under this regimen, as the embryonic phenotype was not improved. We further investigated the effect of a repeated supplementation of bC during a crucial developmental period (6.5–9.5 dpc) on the above-mentioned mouse model. This treatment improved the embryonic abnormalities, as 40% of the embryos showed a normal phenotype. In addition, analysis of retinoic acid-responsive genes, such as Cyp26a1 in these embryos suggests that bC cleavage results in the production of retinoic acid which then can be used by the embryo. Taken together, these in vivo studies show that bC can be used as a source of vitamin A for severely vitamin A-deficient mammalian embryos. PMID:23871845

  10. Otoferlin Deficiency in Zebrafish Results in Defects in Balance and Hearing: Rescue of the Balance and Hearing Phenotype with Full-Length and Truncated Forms of Mouse Otoferlin

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Paroma; Padmanarayana, Murugesh; Abdullah, Nazish; Holman, Chelsea L.; LaDu, Jane; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells convert mechanical motion into chemical signals. Otoferlin, a six-C2 domain transmembrane protein linked to deafness in humans, is hypothesized to play a role in exocytosis at hair cell ribbon synapses. To date, however, otoferlin has been studied almost exclusively in mouse models, and no rescue experiments have been reported. Here we describe the phenotype associated with morpholino-induced otoferlin knockdown in zebrafish and report the results of rescue experiments conducted with full-length and truncated forms of otoferlin. We found that expression of otoferlin occurs early in development and is restricted to hair cells and the midbrain. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed localization to both apical and basolateral regions of hair cells. Knockdown of otoferlin resulted in hearing and balance defects, as well as locomotion deficiencies. Further, otoferlin morphants had uninflated swim bladders. Rescue experiments conducted with mouse otoferlin restored hearing, balance, and inflation of the swim bladder. Remarkably, truncated forms of otoferlin retaining the C-terminal C2F domain also rescued the otoferlin knockdown phenotype, while the individual N-terminal C2A domain did not. We conclude that otoferlin plays an evolutionarily conserved role in vertebrate hearing and that truncated forms of otoferlin can rescue hearing and balance. PMID:25582200

  11. Mouse Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cell Lines retain their phenotypic characteristics after transfection with Human Papilloma Virus: A new tool to further the study of RPE biology

    PubMed Central

    Catanuto, Paola; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Sanchez, Patricia; Salas, Pedro; Hernandez, Eleut; Cousins, Scott W.; Elliot, Sharon J.

    2009-01-01

    Development of immortalized mouse retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) lines that retain many of their in vivo phenotypic characteristics, would aid in studies of ocular diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). RPE cells were isolated from 16 month old (estrogen receptor knockout) ERKOα and ERKOβ mice and their C57Bl/6 wild type littermates. RPE65 and cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) expression, in vivo markers of RPE cells, were detected by real-time RT-PCR and western analysis. We confirmed the presence of epithelial cell markers, ZO1, cytokeratin 8 and 18 by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, we confirmed the distribution of actin filaments and the expression of ezrin. To develop cell lines, RPE cells were isolated, propagated and immortalized using human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 (E6/E7). RPE-specific markers and morphology were assessed before and after immortalization. In wildtype littermate controls, there was no evidence of any alterations in the parameters that we examined including MMP-2, TIMP-2, collagen type IV, and estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ protein expression and ER copy number ratio. Therefore, immortalized mouse RPE cell lines that retain their in vivo phenotype can be isolated from either pharmacologically or genetically manipulated mice, and may be used to study RPE cell biology. PMID:19013153

  12. SWEAT GLAND INNERVATION IS PIONEERED BY SYMPATHETIC NEURONS EXPRESSING A CHOLINERGIC/NORADRENERGIC CO-PHENOTYPE IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    SCHÜTZ, B.; VON ENGELHARDT, J.; GÖRDES, M.; SCHÄFER, M. K.-H.; EIDEN, L. E.; MONYER, H.; WEIHE, E.

    2009-01-01

    Classic neurotransmitter phenotypes are generally predetermined and develop as a consequence of target-independent lineage decisions. A unique mode of target-dependent phenotype instruction is the acquisition of the cholinergic phenotype in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. A body of work suggests that the sweat gland plays an important role to determine the cholinergic phenotype at this target site. A key issue is whether neurons destined to innervate the sweat glands express cholinergic markers before or only after their terminals make target contact. We employed cholinergic-specific over-expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in transgenic mice to overcome sensitivity limits in the detection of initial cholinergic sweat gland innervation. We found that VAChT immunoreactive nerve terminals were present around the sweat gland anlage already from the earliest postnatal stages on, coincident selectively at this sympathetic target with tyrosine hydroxylase–positive fibers. Our results provide a new mechanistic model for sympathetic neuron–target interaction during development, with initial selection by the target of pioneering nerve terminals expressing a cholinergic phenotype, and subsequent stabilization of this phenotype during development. PMID:18722510

  13. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto; Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina; Thellung, Stefano; Daga, Antonio; Cilli, Michele; Ferrari, Angelo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  14. Evidence of infectious asthma phenotype: Chlamydia-induced allergy and pathogen-specific IgE in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Katir K; Webley, Wilmore C

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease whose etiology is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that early-life respiratory infections with atypical bacteria may play an important role in the induction or exacerbation of chronic respiratory disease. The current study utilized a neonatal mouse ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization model of asthma to determine the course of early-life respiratory tract infection by Chlamydia. Neonatal (day 1) and adult (6 wks) BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with Chlamydia (MoPn) and 7 weeks later were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Allergic airway disease was characterized by examination of serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) cellularity, cytokine production and antibody response. The presence of Chlamydia was determined by PCR and culture. Ova-specific IgE was quantified by ELISA and Chlamydia-specific IgE was determined via Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection in neonatal mice induced increased production of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, 5, 10, and 13) in both BAL and serum, while infected adult mice produced increased Th1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ). The BAL from infected neonates contained significantly elevated levels of eosinophils compared to infected adult mice. Although adult mice cleared the infection ∼30 days post infection (pi), neonates were still infected 66 days after initial infection. Chlamydia-specific IgE was detected in both the BAL and serum of neonatal mice beginning 28 days post infection, however, infected adult mice did not produce Chlamydia-specific IgE antibodies over the course of the study. When allergic airway was induced using Ova, infected neonatal mice increased their production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by >2 fold compared to uninfected controls and infected adult groups. Our findings demonstrate that early-life Chlamydia infection induces a Th2-dominant cytokine response in the airways of neonatal mice, leading to chronic infection. More significantly, early life respiratory

  15. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  16. Phenotypic characterization of xpr, a global regulator of extracellular virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, M. S.; Hart, M. E.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We recently described a Tn551 insertion in the chromosome of Staphylococcus aureus S6C that resulted in drastically reduced expression of extracellular lipase (M. S. Smeltzer, S. R. Gill, and J. J. Iandolo, J. Bacteriol. 174:4000-4006, 1992). The insertion was localized to a chromosomal site (designated omega 1058) distinct from the lipase structural gene (geh) and the accessory gene regulator (agr), both of which were structurally intact in the lipase-negative (Lip-) mutants. In this report, we describe a phenotypic comparison between strains S6C, a hyperproducer of enterotoxin B; KSI9051, a derivative of S6C carrying the Tn551 insertion at omega 1058; ISP546, an 8325-4 strain that carries a Tn551 insertion in the agr locus; and ISP479C, the parent strain of ISP546 cured of the Tn551 delivery plasmid pI258repA36. Compared with their respective parent strains, ISP546 and KSI9051 produced greatly reduced amounts of lipase, alpha-toxin, delta-toxin, protease, and nuclease. KSI9051 also produced reduced amounts of staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Coagulase production was increased in ISP546 but not in KSI9051. Using a mouse model, we also demonstrated that ISP546 and KSI9051 were far less virulent than ISP479C and S6C. We have designated the genetic element defined by the Tn551 insertion at omega 1058 xpr to denote its role as a regulator of extracellular protein synthesis. We conclude that xpr and agr are similar and possibly interactive regulatory genes that play an important role in pathogenesis of staphylococcal disease.

  17. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Oral Potassium Cyanide Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Patrick J; Kobs, Christina L; Gibbs, Seth T; Hong, Peter; Matthews, Claire M; Patton, Kristen M; Sabourin, Carol L; Wakayama, Edgar J

    2016-09-01

    Potassium cyanide (KCN) is an inhibitor of cytochrome C oxidase causing rapid death due to hypoxia. A well-characterized model of oral KCN intoxication is needed to test new therapeutics under the Food and Drug Administration Animal Rule. Clinical signs, plasma pH and lactate concentrations, biomarkers, histopathology, and cyanide and thiocyanate toxicokinetics were used to characterize the pathology of KCN intoxication in adult and juvenile mice. The acute oral LD50s were determined to be 11.8, 11.0, 10.9, and 9.9 mg/kg in water for adult male, adult female, juvenile male, and juvenile female mice, respectively. The time to death was rapid and dose dependent; juvenile mice had a shorter mean time to death. Juvenile mice displayed a more rapid onset and higher incidence of seizures. The time to observance of respiratory signs and prostration was rapid, but mice surviving beyond 2 hours generally recovered fully within 8 hours. At doses up to the LD50, there were no gross necropsy or microscopic findings clearly attributed to administration of KCN in juvenile or adult CD-1 mice from 24 hours to 28 days post-KCN challenge. Toxicokinetic analysis indicated rapid uptake, metabolism, and clearance of plasma cyanide. Potassium cyanide caused a rapid, dose-related decrease in blood pH and increase in serum lactate concentration. An increase in fatty acid-binding protein 3 was observed at 11.5 mg/kg KCN in adult but not in juvenile mice. These studies provide a characterization of KCN intoxication in adult and juvenile mice that can be used to screen or conduct preclinical efficacy studies of potential countermeasures.

  18. Characterization of a novel mouse model with genetic deletion of CD177.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing; Klesney-Tait, Julia; Keck, Kathy; Parlet, Corey; Borcherding, Nicholas; Kolb, Ryan; Li, Wei; Tygrett, Lorraine; Waldschmidt, Thomas; Olivier, Alicia; Chen, Songhai; Liu, Guang-Hui; Li, Xiangrui; Zhang, Weizhou

    2015-02-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to infection. Neutrophils migrate from the vasculature into the tissue in response to infection. Recently, a neutrophil cell surface receptor, CD177, was shown to help mediate neutrophil migration across the endothelium through interactions with PECAM1. We examined a publicly available gene array dataset of CD177 expression from human neutrophils following pulmonary endotoxin instillation. Among all 22,214 genes examined, CD177 mRNA was the most upregulated following endotoxin exposure. The high level of CD177 expression is also maintained in airspace neutrophils, suggesting a potential involvement of CD177 in neutrophil infiltration under infectious diseases. To determine the role of CD177 in neutrophils in vivo, we constructed a CD177-genetic knockout mouse model. The mice with homozygous deletion of CD177 have no discernible phenotype and no significant change in immune cells, other than decreased neutrophil counts in peripheral blood. We examined the role of CD177 in neutrophil accumulation using a skin infection model with Staphylococcus aureus. CD177 deletion reduced neutrophil counts in inflammatory skin caused by S. aureus. Mechanistically we found that CD177 deletion in mouse neutrophils has no significant impact in CXCL1/KC- or fMLP-induced migration, but led to significant cell death. Herein we established a novel genetic mouse model to study the role of CD177 and found that CD177 plays an important role in neutrophils.

  19. Physiological characterization of formyl peptide receptor expressing cells in the mouse vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Ackels, Tobias; von der Weid, Benoît; Rodriguez, Ivan; Spehr, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Based on largely monogenic expression of either type 1 or 2 vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs/V2Rs) or members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium harbors at least three neuronal subpopulations. While various neurophysiological properties of both V1R- and V2R-expressing neurons have been described using genetically engineered mouse models, the basic biophysical characteristics of the more recently identified FPR-expressing vomeronasal neurons have not been studied. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse strain that coexpresses an enhanced variant of yellow fluorescent protein together with FPR-rs3 allowing to identify and analyze FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in acute VNO tissue slices. Single neuron electrophysiological recordings allow comparative characterization of the biophysical properties inherent to a prototypical member of the FPR-expressing subpopulation of VNO neurons. In this study, we provide an in-depth analysis of both passive and active membrane properties, including detailed characterization of several types of voltage-activated conductances and action potential discharge patterns, in fluorescently labeled vs. unmarked vomeronasal neurons. Our results reveal striking similarities in the basic (electro) physiological architecture of both transgene-expressing and non-expressing neurons, confirming the suitability of this genetically engineered mouse model for future studies addressing more specialized issues in vomeronasal FPR neurobiology. PMID:25484858

  20. Elastic and viscoelastic characterization of mouse oocytes using micropipette indentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Shi, Jiayi; Zong, Zong; Wan, Kai-Tak; Sun, Yu

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the first quantitative comparison study of elastic and viscoelastic properties of oocytes from young and aged mice. A force measurement technique, including a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) cell holding device and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm, is utilized for measuring forces applied to an oocyte and resultant cell deformations in real time during oocyte manipulation. To characterize elastic and viscoelastic properties of the oocytes, a stress-relaxation indentation test is performed. A two-step, large-deformation mechanical model is developed to extract the mechanical properties of the oocytes from the measured force-deformation data. The experimental results demonstrate that the aged oocytes are significantly softer (instantaneous modulus: 2.2 vs. 5.2 kPa in young oocytes) but more viscous (relaxation time: 4.1 vs. 2.3 s in young oocytes) than the young oocytes.

  1. Elastic and viscoelastic characterization of mouse oocytes using micropipette indentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Shi, Jiayi; Zong, Zong; Wan, Kai-Tak; Sun, Yu

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the first quantitative comparison study of elastic and viscoelastic properties of oocytes from young and aged mice. A force measurement technique, including a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) cell holding device and a sub-pixel computer vision tracking algorithm, is utilized for measuring forces applied to an oocyte and resultant cell deformations in real time during oocyte manipulation. To characterize elastic and viscoelastic properties of the oocytes, a stress-relaxation indentation test is performed. A two-step, large-deformation mechanical model is developed to extract the mechanical properties of the oocytes from the measured force-deformation data. The experimental results demonstrate that the aged oocytes are significantly softer (instantaneous modulus: 2.2 vs. 5.2 kPa in young oocytes) but more viscous (relaxation time: 4.1 vs. 2.3 s in young oocytes) than the young oocytes. PMID:22644532

  2. Phenotypical characterization of the rat striatal neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Le Moine, C; Normand, E; Bloch, B

    1991-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed in rat brain sections from normal and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in order to map and identify the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene in the striatum and the substantia nigra. Procedures of combined in situ hybridization, allowing the simultaneous detection of two mRNAs in the same section or in adjacent sections, were used to characterize the phenotypes of the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene. D1 receptor mRNA was found in neurons all over the caudate-putamen, the accumbens nucleus, and the olfactory tubercle but not in the substantia nigra. In the caudate-putamen and accumbens nucleus, most of the neurons containing D1 receptor mRNA were characterized as medium-sized substance P neurons and distinct from those containing D2 receptor mRNA. Nevertheless, 15-20% of the substance P neurons did not contain D1 receptor mRNA. The neurons containing preproenkephalin A mRNA did not contain D1 receptor mRNA but contained D2 receptor mRNA. A small number of cholinergic and somatostatinergic neurons exhibited a weak reaction for D1 receptor mRNA. These results demonstrate that dopamine acts on efferent striatal neurons through expression of distinct receptors--namely, D1 and D2 in separate cell populations (substance P and preproenkephalin A neurons, respectively)--and can also act on nonprojecting neurons through D1 receptor expression. Images PMID:1827915

  3. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts. PMID:27660743

  4. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts.

  5. Phenotypic and genomic characterization of human coxsackievirus A16 strains with distinct virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-Feng; Yu, Nan; Pan, Yu-Xian; He, Si-Jie; Xu, Li-Juan; Cao, Rui-Yuan; Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Zhang, Yu; Qin, E-De; Che, Xiao-Yan; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-01-22

    Human coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) infection results in hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) along with other severe neurological diseases in children and poses an important public health threat in Asian countries. During an HFMD epidemic in 2009 in Guangdong, China, two CA16 strains (GD09/119 and GD09/24) were isolated and characterized. Although both strains were similar in plaque morphology and growth properties in vitro, the two isolates exhibited distinct pathogenicity in neonatal mice upon intraperitoneal or intracranial injection. Complete genome sequences of both CA16 strains were determined, and the possible virulence determinants were analyzed and predicted. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these CA16 isolates from Guangdong belonged to the B1b genotype and were closely related to other recent CA16 strains isolated in mainland China. Similarity and bootscanning analyses of these CA16 strains detected homologous recombination with the EV71 prototype strain BrCr in the non-structural gene regions and the 3'-untranslated regions. Together, the phenotypic and genomic characterizations of the two clinical CA16 isolates circulating in China were compared in detail, and the potential amino acid residues responsible for CA16 virulence in mice were predicted. These findings will help explain the evolutionary relationship of the CA16 strains circulating in China, warranting future studies investigating enterovirus virulence.

  6. Physical Characterization of Genetic Rearrangements at the Mouse Renin Loci

    PubMed Central

    Abel, K. J.; Gross, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    Many inbred strains of mice have a single locus encoding renin, Ren-1, whereas other inbred strains have two tandemly linked loci, Ren-1 and Ren-2. Each of these renin genes in inbred mice exhibits a unique pattern of tissue-specific expression. As a prerequisite to understanding the structural basis for the expression differences, we have physically characterized the sequence organization of this chromosomal region in both types of strains. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was initially used to compare the long-range structure of this region in C57BL/6 (Ren-1) and DBA/2 (Ren-1+Ren-2) mice. The structure in both inbred strains is extremely similar, except for an additional 30 kb containing Ren-2 in DBA/2 mice. The boundaries of the extra 30-kb segment were sequenced and compared to homologous sequences flanking the Ren-1 alleles. This analysis identified the precise recombination site, and also the presence of a large insertion, between the renin loci in DBA/2. The renin gene duplication apparently resulted from recombination between sequences sharing little homology, suggesting that nonhomologous chromosomal breakage and rejoining may have been involved mechanistically in the event. PMID:2157628

  7. Characterization of spatio-temporal epidural event-related potentials for mouse models of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Pinto-Duarte, António; Behrens, M Margarita; Zhou, Xianjin; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features in sensory event-related potentials (ERPs) are endophenotypic biomarkers of psychiatric disorders, widely studied using electroencephalographic (EEG) methods in humans and model animals. Despite the popularity and unique significance of the mouse as a model species in basic research, existing EEG methods applicable to mice are far less powerful than those available for humans and large animals. We developed a new method for multi-channel epidural ERP characterization in behaving mice with high precision, reliability and convenience and report an application to time-domain ERP feature characterization of the Sp4 hypomorphic mouse model for schizophrenia. Compared to previous methods, our spatio-temporal ERP measurement robustly improved the resolving power of key signatures characteristic of the disease model. The high performance and low cost of this technique makes it suitable for high-throughput behavioral and pharmacological studies. PMID:26459883

  8. Characterization of spatio-temporal epidural event-related potentials for mouse models of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Pinto-Duarte, António; Margarita Behrens, M.; Zhou, Xianjin; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Distinctive features in sensory event-related potentials (ERPs) are endophenotypic biomarkers of psychiatric disorders, widely studied using electroencephalographic (EEG) methods in humans and model animals. Despite the popularity and unique significance of the mouse as a model species in basic research, existing EEG methods applicable to mice are far less powerful than those available for humans and large animals. We developed a new method for multi-channel epidural ERP characterization in behaving mice with high precision, reliability and convenience and report an application to time-domain ERP feature characterization of the Sp4 hypomorphic mouse model for schizophrenia. Compared to previous methods, our spatio-temporal ERP measurement robustly improved the resolving power of key signatures characteristic of the disease model. The high performance and low cost of this technique makes it suitable for high-throughput behavioral and pharmacological studies. PMID:26459883

  9. Functional and phenotypic characterization of distinct porcine dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Paillot, R; Laval, F; Audonnet, J-C; Andreoni, C; Juillard, V

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that have an exquisite capacity to interact with T cells and modulate their responses. Little is known about porcine DCs despite the fact that they represent an important target in strategies that are aimed at modulating resistance to infection in pigs and may be of major importance in transplantation biology. We generated immature monocyte-derived porcine dendritic cells (MoDCs) directly from adherent peripheral blood cells treated with porcine granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The cells were observed via electron microscopy and their phenotype was characterized using monoclonal antibodies. The functionality of the porcine MoDCs was demonstrated showing that the cells were capable of different specialized functions relevant to antigen capture and were potent stimulators in a primary allo-mixed leucocyte reaction. Treatment of the MoDCs with porcine cell line-derived necrotic factors resulted in the phenotypic and functional maturation of MoDCs. We confirmed also that monocyte-derived DCs were differentially regulated by cytokines, showing that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is able to redirect monocytic precursors into the differentiation pathway of Langerhans' cells presenting typical Birbeck granules. Interestingly, and in contrast to the human and murine model, we showed that the monocyte-derived porcine Langerhans'-type cells (MoLCs) were much more potent activators of allogeneic T cells than MoDCs obtained without TGF-β1. PMID:11328373

  10. Development and characterization of a mouse model for Marburg hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Kelly L; Bradfute, Steven B; Wells, Jay; Lofts, Loreen; Cooper, Meagan T; Alves, D Anthony; Reed, Daniel K; VanTongeren, Sean A; Mech, Christine A; Bavari, Sina

    2009-07-01

    The lack of a mouse model has hampered an understanding of the pathogenesis and immunity of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), the disease caused by marburgvirus (MARV), and has created a bottleneck in the development of antiviral therapeutics. Primary isolates of the filoviruses, i.e., ebolavirus (EBOV) and MARV, are not lethal to immunocompetent adult mice. Previously, pathological, virologic, and immunologic evaluation of a mouse-adapted EBOV, developed by sequential passages in suckling mice, identified many similarities between this model and EBOV infections in nonhuman primates. We recently demonstrated that serially passaging virus recovered from the liver homogenates of MARV-infected immunodeficient (SCID) mice was highly successful in reducing the time to death in these mice from 50 to 70 days to 7 to 10 days after challenge with the isolate MARV-Ci67, -Musoke, or -Ravn. In this study, we extended our findings to show that further sequential passages of MARV-Ravn in immunocompetent mice caused the MARV to kill BALB/c mice. Serial sampling studies to characterize the pathology of mouse-adapted MARV-Ravn revealed that this model is similar to the guinea pig and nonhuman primate MHF models. Infection of BALB/c mice with mouse-adapted MARV-Ravn caused uncontrolled viremia and high viral titers in the liver, spleen, lymph node, and other organs; profound lymphopenia; destruction of lymphocytes within the spleen and lymph nodes; and marked liver damage and thrombocytopenia. Sequencing the mouse-adapted MARV-Ravn strain revealed differences in 16 predicted amino acids from the progenitor virus, although the exact changes required for adaptation are unclear at this time. This mouse-adapted MARV strain can now be used to develop and evaluate novel vaccines and therapeutics and may also help to provide a better understanding of the virulence factors associated with MARV.

  11. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of Dunaliella (Chlorophyta) from Indian salinas and their diversity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Dunaliella (Class – Chlorophyceae) is widely studied for its tolerance to extreme habitat conditions, physiological aspects and many biotechnological applications, such as a source of carotenoids and many other bioactive compounds. Biochemical and molecular characterization is very much essential to fully explore the properties and possibilities of the new isolates of Dunaliella. In India, hyper saline lakes and salt pans were reported to bloom with Dunaliella spp. However, except for the economically important D. salina, other species are rarely characterized taxonomically from India. Present study was conducted to describe Dunaliella strains from Indian salinas using a combined morphological, physiological and molecular approach with an aim to have a better understanding on the taxonomy and diversity of this genus from India. Results Comparative phenotypic and genetic studies revealed high level of diversity within the Indian Dunaliella isolates. Species level identification using morphological characteristics clearly delineated two strains of D. salina with considerable β-carotene content (>20 pg/cell). The variation in 18S rRNA gene size, amplified with MA1-MA2 primers, ranged between ~1800 and ~2650 base pairs, and together with the phylogeny based on ITS gene sequence provided a pattern, forming five different groups within Indian Dunaliella isolates. Superficial congruency was observed between ITS and rbcL gene phylogenetic trees with consistent formation of major clades separating Indian isolates into two distinct clusters, one with D. salina and allied strains, and another one with D. viridis and allied strains. Further in both the trees, few isolates showed high level of genetic divergence than reported previously for Dunaliella spp. This indicates the scope of more numbers of clearly defined/unidentified species/sub-species within Indian Dunaliella isolates. Conclusion Present work illustrates Indian Dunaliella strains

  12. Characterization of neurophysiological and behavioral changes, MRI brain volumetry and 1H MRS in zQ175 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Taneli; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; Vartiainen, Nina; Puoliväli, Jukka; Hendricks, Susan J; Glaser, Jack R; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Wadel, Kristian; Touller, Chrystelle; Kontkanen, Outi; Yrjänheikki, Juha M; Buisson, Bruno; Howland, David; Beaumont, Vahri; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Park, Larry C

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by severe behavioral, cognitive, and motor deficits. Since the discovery of the huntingtin gene (HTT) mutation that causes the disease, several mouse lines have been developed using different gene constructs of Htt. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI) mouse, was developed (see description by Menalled et al, [1]) in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. Here we confirm the behavioral phenotypes reported by Menalled et al [1], and extend the characterization to include brain volumetry, striatal metabolite concentration, and early neurophysiological changes. The overall reproducibility of the behavioral phenotype across the two independent laboratories demonstrates the utility of this new model. Further, important features reminiscent of human HD pathology are observed in zQ175 mice: compared to wild-type neurons, electrophysiological recordings from acute brain slices reveal that medium spiny neurons from zQ175 mice display a progressive hyperexcitability; glutamatergic transmission in the striatum is severely attenuated; decreased striatal and cortical volumes from 3 and 4 months of age in homo- and heterozygous mice, respectively, with whole brain volumes only decreased in homozygotes. MR spectroscopy reveals decreased concentrations of N-acetylaspartate and increased concentrations of glutamine, taurine and creatine + phosphocreatine in the striatum of 12-month old homozygotes, the latter also measured in 12-month-old heterozygotes. Motor, behavioral, and cognitive deficits in homozygotes occur concurrently with the structural and metabolic changes observed. In sum, the zQ175 KI model has robust behavioral, electrophysiological, and histopathological features that may be valuable in both furthering our understanding of HD-like pathophyisology and the evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies to

  13. Phenotypic changes in mouse pancreatic stellate cell Ca2+ signaling events following activation in culture and in a disease model of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hak; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoan; Logsdon, Craig D; Yule, David I

    2011-02-01

    The specific characteristics of intracellular Ca 2+ signaling and the downstream consequences of these events were investigated in mouse pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in culture and in situ using multiphoton microscopy in pancreatic lobules. PSC undergo a phenotypic transformation from a quiescent state to a myofibroblast-like phenotype in culture. This is believed to parallel the induction of an activated state observed in pancreatic disease such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. By day 7 in culture, the complement of cell surface receptors coupled to intracellular Ca 2+ signaling was shown to be markedly altered. Specifically, protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and 2, responsive to thrombin and trypsin, respectively, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors were expressed only in activated PSC (aPSC). PAR-1, ATP, and PDGF receptor activation resulted in prominent nuclear Ca 2+ signals. Nuclear Ca 2+ signals and aPSC proliferation were abolished by expression of parvalbumin targeted to the nucleus. In pancreatic lobules, PSC responded to agonists consistent with the presence of only quiescent PSC. aPSC were observed following induction of experimental pancreatitis. In contrast, in a mouse model of pancreatic disease harboring elevated K-Ras activity in acinar cells, aPSC were present under control conditions and their number greatly increased following induction of pancreatitis. These data are consistent with nuclear Ca 2+ signaling generated by agents such as trypsin and thrombin, likely present in the pancreas in disease states, resulting in proliferation of "primed" aPSC to contribute to the severity of pancreatic disease.

  14. Loss of Interleukin Receptor Associated Kinase 4 Signaling Suppresses Amyloid Pathology and Alters Microglial Phenotype in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Brent; Tse, Wayne; Lamb, Raza; Li, Xiaoxia; Lamb, Bruce T.; Landreth, Gary E.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) typified the deposition of amyloid in the brain which elicits a robust microglial-mediated inflammatory response that is associated with disease exacerbation and accelerated progression. Microglia are the principal immune effector cells in the brain and interact with fibrillar forms of Aβ (fAβ) through a receptor complex that includes Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) 2/4/6 and their coreceptors. Interleukin receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) are essential intracellular signaling molecules for transduction of TLR signals. Studies of mouse models of AD in which the individual TLRs are knocked out have produced conflicting results on roles of TLR signaling in amyloid homeostasis. Therefore, we disrupted a common downstream TLR signaling element, IRAK4. We report that microglial IRAK4 is necessary in vitro for fAβ to activate the canonical proinflammatory signaling pathways leading to activation of p38, JNK, and ERK MAP kinases and to generate reactive oxygen species. In vivo the loss of IRAK4 function results in decreased Aβ levels in a murine model of AD. This was associated with diminished microgliosis and astrogliosis in aged mice. Analysis of microglia isolated from the adult mouse brain revealed an altered pattern of gene expression associated with changes in microglial phenotype that were associated with expression of IRF transcription factors that govern microglial phenotype. Further, loss of IRAK4 function also promoted amyloid clearance mechanisms, including elevated expression of insulin degrading enzyme. Finally, blocking IRAK function restored olfactory behavior. These data demonstrate that IRAK4 activation acts normally to regulate microglial activation status and influence amyloid homeostasis in the brain. PMID:23100432

  15. The phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Bacillus anthracis isolates from Iran.

    PubMed

    Jula, Gholamreza Moazeni; Sattari, Morteza; Banihashemi, Reza; Razzaz, Hossein; Sanchouli, Alireza; Tadayon, Keyvan

    2011-03-01

    To understand epidemiology of Bacillus anthracis in Iran, the morphological, biochemical, and virulence specifications of 32 B. anthracis isolates, collected from human, sheep, cattle, goat, and environmental specimens obtained from throughout Iran were examined by conventional and molecular approaches. B. anthracis isolates were characterized in multiple ways: (1) capsule formation both on bicarbonate agar and in defibrinated horse blood, (2) motility of vegetative forms, (3) hemolysis on 5% sheep blood agar, (4) penicillin G susceptibility, (5) lecithinase production on egg yolk agar, (6) gelatin hydrolysis, (7) ability to develop "string of pearls" on tryptose agar, and (8) capability to develop mucoid colonies in presence of CO(2) were assessed. In addition, biochemical properties such as indole, methyl red, catalase, citrate utilization, and finally nitrate reduction tests were used. All the tested isolates produced identical morphological and biochemical patterns with those of the vaccine strain B. anthracis 34F2 Sterne. In order to assess potential virulence of isolates at genomic level, PCR protocols assaying for the pXO1 and pXO2 loci were employed. The intriguing high level of phenotypic similarity between Iranian isolates of B. anthracis and the 34F2 Sterne strain deserves further studies at genomic level. PMID:21116715

  16. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  17. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  18. Phenotypic characterization of potato late blight resistance mediated by the broad-spectrum resistance gene RB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Halterman, Dennis A

    2011-02-01

    The potato gene RB, cloned from the wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers partial resistance to late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In order to better characterize this partial resistance phenotype, we have compared host resistance responses mediated by RB with those mediated by the S. demissum-derived R gene R9, which confers immunity to P. infestans carrying the corresponding avirulence gene avrR9. We found that both RB and R9 genes were capable of eliciting a hypersensitive cell death response (HR). However, in RB plants, the pathogen escaped HR lesions and continued to grow beyond the inoculation sites. We also found that callose deposition was negatively correlated with resistance levels in tested plants. Transcription patterns of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-1 basic, PR-2 acidic, and PR-5 indicated that P. infestans inoculation induced transcription of these defense-related genes regardless of the host genotype; however, transcription was reduced in both the susceptible and partially resistant plants later in the infection process but remained elevated in the immune host. Most interestingly, transcription of the HR-associated gene Hin1 was suppressed in both Katahdin and RB-transgenic Katahdin but not in R9 4 days after inoculation. Together, this suggests that suppression of certain defense-related genes may allow P. infestans to spread beyond the site of infection in the partially resistant host despite elicitation of hypersensitive cell death.

  19. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins in Enterobacter spp].

    PubMed

    Bertona, E; Radice, M; Rodríguez, C H; Barberis, C; Vay, C; Famiglietti, A; Gutkind, G

    2005-01-01

    Enterobacter spp. are becoming increasingly frequent nosocomial pathogens with multiple resistance mechanism to beta-lactam antibiotics. We carried out the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of beta-lactamases in 27 Enterobacter spp. (25 Enterobacter cloacae y 2 Enterobacter aerogenes), as well as the ability of different extended spectrum-lactamase (ESBL) screening methods. Resistance to third generation cephalosporins was observed in 15/27 (63%) isolates. Twelve resistant isolates produced high level chromosomal encoded AmpC beta-lactamase; 6 of them were also producers of PER-2. Resistance to third generation cephalosporins in the remaining 3 isolates was due to the presence of ESBLs, PER-2 in 2 cases, and CTX-M-2 in the other. Only CTX-M-2 production was detected with all tested cephalosporins using difusion synergy tests, while cefepime improved ESBLs detection in 7/8 PER-2 producers, 4/8 in the inhibitor approximation test and 7/8 with double disk test using cefepime containing disk with and without clavulanic acid. Dilution method, including cephalosporins with and without the inhibitor detected 1/9 ESBLs producers.

  20. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed. PMID:21874277

  1. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of Saccharomyces spp. strains isolated in distillery plants.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Juan F; Chacón-Ocaña, Maria; Díaz-Hellín, Patricia; Ramírez-Pérez, Hector; Briones, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the biodiversity and some interesting phenotypic properties of Saccharomyces wild yeasts isolated in distilleries, at least 100 years old, located in La Mancha (Spain), were determined. Strains were genetically characterized by RFLP-mtDNA, which confirmed a great genetic biodiversity with 73% of strains with different mtDNA profiles, highlighting the large variability found in sweet and fermented piquette substrata. The predominant species identified was S. cerevisiae, followed by S. paradoxus and S. bayanus Due to the residual sugar-alcohol extraction process using warm water, a great number of thermophilic Saccharomyces strains with a great cell vitality were found to have potential use as starters in distillery plants. Interesting technological properties such as cell vitality and growth rate at different temperatures were studied. The thermal washing process for the extraction of alcohol and reducing sugars of some raw materials contributes to the presence of Saccharomyces strains with technologically interesting properties, especially in terms of vitality and resistance to high temperatures. Due to the fact that fermentation is spontaneous, the yeast biota of these environments, Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces, is very varied so these ecological niches are microbial reserves of undoubted biotechnological interest.

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Bordetella bronchiseptica strains isolated from pigs in Poland.

    PubMed

    Stepniewska, K; Urbaniak, K; Markowska-Daniel, I

    2014-01-01

    A total of 209 Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bbr) strains isolated from pigs were examined. Phenotypic study included: biochemical characterization (motility, catalase, oxidase, urease activity, nitrate reduction and growth on MacConkey agar) and antimicrobial susceptibility (disc diffusion method). Genotypic studies based on detection of three genes encoded virulence factors, such as: flagella (fla), dermonecrotoxin (dnt), and exogenous ferric siderophore receptor (bfrZ), using PCR. Most of the Bbr strains tested had a homogeneous biochemical profile. 97.6% of them provided suitable results in biochemical tests. All Bbr isolates tested showed high resistance to penicillin (100%), linco-spectin (100%) and ceftiofur (97.9%). Over 57% and 43% of Bbr strains were resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin, respectively. All Bbr isolates showed high sensitivity to most chemotherapeutics used such as enrofloxacin (97.9%), tetracycline (97.9%), oxytetracycline (97.9%), amoxicillin with clavulonic acid (95.8%), florfenicol (90.4%), and gentamicine (77.6%). Over of 94% of Bbr strains were moderately susceptible to norfloxacine. Molecular analysis confirmed that almost all evaluated Bbr strains (94.7%) possessed the fla gene. A lower percentage of isolates had the dnt gene (72.7%) and the lowest percentage of strains (51.7%), had the bfrZ gene. PMID:24724472

  3. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of Saccharomyces spp. strains isolated in distillery plants.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Juan F; Chacón-Ocaña, Maria; Díaz-Hellín, Patricia; Ramírez-Pérez, Hector; Briones, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the biodiversity and some interesting phenotypic properties of Saccharomyces wild yeasts isolated in distilleries, at least 100 years old, located in La Mancha (Spain), were determined. Strains were genetically characterized by RFLP-mtDNA, which confirmed a great genetic biodiversity with 73% of strains with different mtDNA profiles, highlighting the large variability found in sweet and fermented piquette substrata. The predominant species identified was S. cerevisiae, followed by S. paradoxus and S. bayanus Due to the residual sugar-alcohol extraction process using warm water, a great number of thermophilic Saccharomyces strains with a great cell vitality were found to have potential use as starters in distillery plants. Interesting technological properties such as cell vitality and growth rate at different temperatures were studied. The thermal washing process for the extraction of alcohol and reducing sugars of some raw materials contributes to the presence of Saccharomyces strains with technologically interesting properties, especially in terms of vitality and resistance to high temperatures. Due to the fact that fermentation is spontaneous, the yeast biota of these environments, Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces, is very varied so these ecological niches are microbial reserves of undoubted biotechnological interest. PMID:27189361

  4. Characterization of G6PD Genotypes and Phenotypes on the Northwestern Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Parker, Daniel M.; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, François H.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene result in red blood cells with increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. Significant haemolysis can be caused by primaquine and other 8-aminoquinoline antimalarials used for the radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria. The distribution and phenotypes of mutations causing G6PD deficiency in the male population of migrants and refugees in a malaria endemic region on the Thailand-Myanmar border were characterized. Blood samples for G6PD fluorescent spot test (FST), G6PD genotyping, and malaria testing were taken from 504 unrelated males of Karen and Burman ethnicities presenting to the outpatient clinics. The overall frequency of G6PD deficiency by the FST was 13.7%. Among the deficient subjects, almost 90% had the Mahidol variant (487G>A) genotype. The remaining subjects had Chinese-4 (392G>T), Viangchan (871G>A), Açores (595A>G), Seattle (844G>C) and Mediterranean (563C>T) variants. Quantification of G6PD activity was performed using a modification of the standard spectrophotometric assay on a subset of 24 samples with Mahidol, Viangchan, Seattle and Chinese-4 mutations; all samples showed a residual enzymatic activity below 10% of normal and were diagnosed correctly by the FST. Further studies are needed to characterise the haemolytic risk of using 8-aminoquinolines in patients with these genotypes. PMID:25536053

  5. PHENOTYPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF BREAST INVASIVE CARCINOMA VIA TRANSFERABLE TISSUE MORPHOMETRIC PATTERNS LEARNED FROM GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Wang, Yunfu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Chang, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of whole slide images (WSIs) in a large cohort may provide predictive models of clinical outcome. However, the performance of the existing techniques is hindered as a result of large technical variations (e.g., fixation, staining) and biological heterogeneities (e.g., cell type, cell state) that are always present in a large cohort. Although unsupervised feature learning provides a promising way in learning pertinent features without human intervention, its capability can be greatly limited due to the lack of well-curated examples. In this paper, we explored the transferability of knowledge acquired from a well-curated Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) dataset through its application to the representation and characterization of tissue histology from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Breast Invasive Carcinoma (BRCA) cohort. Our experimental results reveals two major phenotypic subtypes with statistically significantly different survival curves. Further differential expression analysis of these two subtypes indicates enrichment of genes regulated by NF-kB in response to TNF and genes up-regulated in response to IFNG. PMID:27390615

  6. Linkage of frontotemporal dementia to chromosome 17: clinical and neuropathological characterization of phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, L. H.; Welsh-Bohmer, K. A.; Hulette, C. M.; Gaskell, P. C.; Murray, M.; Rimmler, J. L.; Helms, B. R.; Guerra, M.; Roses, A. D.; Schmechel, D. E.; Pericak-Vance, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a behavioral disorder of insidious onset and variable progression. Clinically, its early features reflect frontal lobe dysfunction characterized by personality change, deterioration in memory and executive functions, and stereotypical and perseverative behaviors. Pathologically, there is degeneration of the neocortex and subcortical nuclei, without distinctive features such as plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, or Pick or Lewy bodies. Within-family variation in neuropathology and clinical phenotype is observed. In cases where family aggregation is observed, it is inherited as an autosomal dominant, age-dependent disorder. Family studies recently have identified two dementia loci: chromosome 17 for disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophic complex and pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration and chromosome 3 for familial nonspecific dementia. We describe a family (DUK1684) with clinically and neuropathologically confirmed, autosomal dominant, non-Alzheimer disease dementia. Linkage analysis of this family showed evidence for linkage to chromosome 17q21, with a multipoint location score (log10) of 5.52. A comparison of the clinical and pathological features in DUK1684 with those of the other chromosome 17-linked families, together with the linkage data, suggests that these families are allelic. These studies emphasize that genetic linkage analysis remains a useful tool for differentiating disease loci in clinically complex traits. PMID:8940276

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Bordetella bronchiseptica strains isolated from pigs in Poland.

    PubMed

    Stepniewska, K; Urbaniak, K; Markowska-Daniel, I

    2014-01-01

    A total of 209 Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bbr) strains isolated from pigs were examined. Phenotypic study included: biochemical characterization (motility, catalase, oxidase, urease activity, nitrate reduction and growth on MacConkey agar) and antimicrobial susceptibility (disc diffusion method). Genotypic studies based on detection of three genes encoded virulence factors, such as: flagella (fla), dermonecrotoxin (dnt), and exogenous ferric siderophore receptor (bfrZ), using PCR. Most of the Bbr strains tested had a homogeneous biochemical profile. 97.6% of them provided suitable results in biochemical tests. All Bbr isolates tested showed high resistance to penicillin (100%), linco-spectin (100%) and ceftiofur (97.9%). Over 57% and 43% of Bbr strains were resistant to ampicillin and amoxicillin, respectively. All Bbr isolates showed high sensitivity to most chemotherapeutics used such as enrofloxacin (97.9%), tetracycline (97.9%), oxytetracycline (97.9%), amoxicillin with clavulonic acid (95.8%), florfenicol (90.4%), and gentamicine (77.6%). Over of 94% of Bbr strains were moderately susceptible to norfloxacine. Molecular analysis confirmed that almost all evaluated Bbr strains (94.7%) possessed the fla gene. A lower percentage of isolates had the dnt gene (72.7%) and the lowest percentage of strains (51.7%), had the bfrZ gene.

  8. Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris: A Contribution to Species Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pietropaolo, Valeria; Ciuffreda, Emanuela; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is the main cause of most spoilage problems in fruit juices and acidic products. Since soil borne species often contaminate fruit juices and do not need strict extreme requirements for survival, it is a great concern to investigate whether and how soil species could evolve from their ecological niches in microbial community to new environments as fruit juices. In this study, 23 isolates of thermo-acidophilic, spore-forming bacteria from soil were characterized by cultural and molecular methods. In addition, 2 strains isolated from a spoilage incident in pear juice were typed. Strains phenotyping showed that they could be grouped into 3 different clusters, and some isolates showed identical or quite similar patterns. Analyzing pH and temperature ranges for growth, the majority of strains were able to grow at values described for many species of Alicyclobacillus. Qualitative utilization of lysine, arginine and indole production from tryptophan revealed, for the first time, deamination of lysine and decarboxylation of arginine. Resistance to 5% NaCl as well as the ability to hydrolyze starch and gelatin, nitrate reduction, catalase and oxidase activities confirmed literature evidences. Examining of 16S rRNA, showed that isolates were divided into three blocks represented by effectively soil species and strains that are moving from soil to other possible growing source characterized by parameters that could strongly influence bacterial survival. RAPD PCR technique evidenced a great variability in banding patterns and, although it was not possible to obtain genotypically well-distinguished groups, it was feasible to appreciate genetic similarity between some strains. In conclusion, the investigation of a microbial community entails a combination of metagenomic and classic culture-dependent approaches to expand our knowledge about Alicyclobacillus and to look for new subspecies. PMID:26484547

  9. Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris: A Contribution to Species Characterization.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Mischitelli, Monica; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Ciuffreda, Emanuela; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is the main cause of most spoilage problems in fruit juices and acidic products. Since soil borne species often contaminate fruit juices and do not need strict extreme requirements for survival, it is a great concern to investigate whether and how soil species could evolve from their ecological niches in microbial community to new environments as fruit juices. In this study, 23 isolates of thermo-acidophilic, spore-forming bacteria from soil were characterized by cultural and molecular methods. In addition, 2 strains isolated from a spoilage incident in pear juice were typed. Strains phenotyping showed that they could be grouped into 3 different clusters, and some isolates showed identical or quite similar patterns. Analyzing pH and temperature ranges for growth, the majority of strains were able to grow at values described for many species of Alicyclobacillus. Qualitative utilization of lysine, arginine and indole production from tryptophan revealed, for the first time, deamination of lysine and decarboxylation of arginine. Resistance to 5% NaCl as well as the ability to hydrolyze starch and gelatin, nitrate reduction, catalase and oxidase activities confirmed literature evidences. Examining of 16S rRNA, showed that isolates were divided into three blocks represented by effectively soil species and strains that are moving from soil to other possible growing source characterized by parameters that could strongly influence bacterial survival. RAPD PCR technique evidenced a great variability in banding patterns and, although it was not possible to obtain genotypically well-distinguished groups, it was feasible to appreciate genetic similarity between some strains. In conclusion, the investigation of a microbial community entails a combination of metagenomic and classic culture-dependent approaches to expand our knowledge about Alicyclobacillus and to look for new subspecies. PMID:26484547

  10. Isolated Anxa5{sup +}/Sca-1{sup +} perivascular cells from mouse meningeal vasculature retain their perivascular phenotype in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Brachvogel, Bent . E-mail: bent.brachvogel@uni-koeln.de; Pausch, Friederike; Farlie, Peter; Gaipl, Udo; Etich, Julia; Zhou, Zhigang; Cameron, Trevor; Mark, Klaus von der; Bateman, John F.; Poeschl, Ernst . E-mail: e.poschl@uea.ac.uk

    2007-07-15

    Pericytes are closely associated with endothelial cells, contribute to vascular stability and represent a potential source of mesenchymal progenitor cells. Using the specifically expressed annexin A5-LacZ fusion gene (Anxa5-LacZ), it became possible to isolate perivascular cells (PVC) from mouse tissues. These cells proliferate and can be cultured without undergoing senescence for multiple passages. PVC display phenotypic characteristics of pericytes, as they express pericyte-specific markers (NG2-proteoglycan, desmin, {alpha}SMA, PDGFR-{beta}). They also express stem cell marker Sca-1, whereas endothelial (PECAM), hematopoietic (CD45) or myeloid (F4/80, CD11b) lineage markers are not detectable. These characteristics are in common with the pericyte-like cell line 10T1/2. PVC also display a phagocytoic activity higher than 10T1/2 cells. During coculture with endothelial cells both cell types stimulate angiogenic processes indicated by an increased expression of PECAM in endothelial cells and specific deposition of basement membrane proteins. PVC show a significantly increased induction of endothelial specific PECAM expression compared to 10T1/2 cells. Accordingly, in vivo grafts of PVC aggregates onto chorioallantoic membranes of quail embryos recruit endothelial cells, get highly vascularized and deposit basement membrane components. These data demonstrate that isolated Anxa5-LacZ{sup +} PVC from mouse meninges retain their capacity for differentiation to pericyte-like cells and contribute to angiogenic processes.

  11. Actin nemaline myopathy mouse reproduces disease, suggests other actin disease phenotypes and provides cautionary note on muscle transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Jackaman, Connie; Sewry, Caroline A; McNamara, Elyshia; Squire, Sarah E; Potter, Allyson C; Papadimitriou, John; Griffiths, Lisa M; Bakker, Anthony J; Davies, Kay E; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) cause congenital myopathies including nemaline myopathy, actin aggregate myopathy and rod-core disease. The majority of patients with ACTA1 mutations have severe hypotonia and do not survive beyond the age of one. A transgenic mouse model was generated expressing an autosomal dominant mutant (D286G) of ACTA1 (identified in a severe nemaline myopathy patient) fused with EGFP. Nemaline bodies were observed in multiple skeletal muscles, with serial sections showing these correlated to aggregates of the mutant skeletal muscle α-actin-EGFP. Isolated extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were significantly weaker than wild-type (WT) muscle at 4 weeks of age, coinciding with the peak in structural lesions. These 4 week-old mice were ~30% less active on voluntary running wheels than WT mice. The α-actin-EGFP protein clearly demonstrated that the transgene was expressed equally in all myosin heavy chain (MHC) fibre types during the early postnatal period, but subsequently became largely confined to MHCIIB fibres. Ringbinden fibres, internal nuclei and myofibrillar myopathy pathologies, not typical features in nemaline myopathy or patients with ACTA1 mutations, were frequently observed. Ringbinden were found in fast fibre predominant muscles of adult mice and were exclusively MHCIIB-positive fibres. Thus, this mouse model presents a reliable model for the investigation of the pathobiology of nemaline body formation and muscle weakness and for evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. The occurrence of core-like regions, internal nuclei and ringbinden will allow analysis of the mechanisms underlying these lesions. The occurrence of ringbinden and features of myofibrillar myopathy in this mouse model of ACTA1 disease suggests that patients with these pathologies and no genetic explanation should be screened for ACTA1 mutations. PMID:22174871

  12. Phenotypic plasticity, QTL mapping and genomic characterization of bud set in black poplar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic control of important adaptive traits, such as bud set, is still poorly understood in most forest trees species. Poplar is an ideal model tree to study bud set because of its indeterminate shoot growth. Thus, a full-sib family derived from an intraspecific cross of P. nigra with 162 clonally replicated progeny was used to assess the phenotypic plasticity and genetic variation of bud set in two sites of contrasting environmental conditions. Results Six crucial phenological stages of bud set were scored. Night length appeared to be the most important signal triggering the onset of growth cessation. Nevertheless, the effect of other environmental factors, such as temperature, increased during the process. Moreover, a considerable role of genotype × environment (G × E) interaction was found in all phenological stages with the lowest temperature appearing to influence the sensitivity of the most plastic genotypes. Descriptors of growth cessation and bud onset explained the largest part of phenotypic variation of the entire process. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for these traits were detected. For the four selected traits (the onset of growth cessation (date2.5), the transition from shoot to bud (date1.5), the duration of bud formation (subproc1) and bud maturation (subproc2)) eight and sixteen QTL were mapped on the maternal and paternal map, respectively. The identified QTL, each one characterized by small or modest effect, highlighted the complex nature of traits involved in bud set process. Comparison between map location of QTL and P. trichocarpa genome sequence allowed the identification of 13 gene models, 67 bud set-related expressional and six functional candidate genes (CGs). These CGs are functionally related to relevant biological processes, environmental sensing, signaling, and cell growth and development. Some strong QTL had no obvious CGs, and hold great promise to identify unknown genes that affect bud set. Conclusions This study

  13. Reversal of dendritic phenotypes in 16p11.2 microduplication mouse model neurons by pharmacological targeting of a network hub.

    PubMed

    Blizinsky, Katherine D; Diaz-Castro, Blanca; Forrest, Marc P; Schürmann, Britta; Bach, Anthony P; Martin-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Wang, Lei; Csernansky, John G; Duan, Jubao; Penzes, Peter

    2016-07-26

    The architecture of dendritic arbors contributes to neuronal connectivity in the brain. Conversely, abnormalities in dendrites have been reported in multiple mental disorders and are thought to contribute to pathogenesis. Rare copy number variations (CNVs) are genetic alterations that are associated with a wide range of mental disorders and are highly penetrant. The 16p11.2 microduplication is one of the CNVs most strongly associated with schizophrenia and autism, spanning multiple genes possibly involved in synaptic neurotransmission. However, disease-relevant cellular phenotypes of 16p11.2 microduplication and the driver gene(s) remain to be identified. We found increased dendritic arborization in isolated cortical pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of 16p11.2 duplication (dp/+). Network analysis identified MAPK3, which encodes ERK1 MAP kinase, as the most topologically important hub in protein-protein interaction networks within the 16p11.2 region and broader gene networks of schizophrenia-associated CNVs. Pharmacological targeting of ERK reversed dendritic alterations associated with dp/+ neurons, outlining a strategy for the analysis and reversal of cellular phenotypes in CNV-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27402753

  14. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  15. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD.

  16. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study.

    PubMed

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  17. A new digital enumeration method to collect phenotypic data for characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consistent data across animal populations are required to inform genomic science aimed at finding important adaptive genetic variations. The ADAPTMap Digital Phenotype Collection Method is a new procedure to provide consistent phenotypic data by digital enumeration of categorical and continuous valu...

  18. Co-expression of GAD67 and choline acetyltransferase reveals a novel neuronal phenotype in the mouse medulla oblongata

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Jittima; Atkinson, Lucy; Edwards, Ian J.; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Susan A.; Deuchars, Jim

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic and cholinergic systems play an important part in autonomic pathways. To determine the distribution of the enzymes responsible for the production of GABA and acetylcholine in areas involved in autonomic control in the mouse brainstem, we used a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) neurones, combined with choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) and GAD67-GFP containing neurones were observed throughout the brainstem. A small number of cells contained both ChAT-IR and GAD67-GFP. Such double labelled cells were observed in the NTS (predominantly in the intermediate and central subnuclei), the area postrema, reticular formation and lateral paragigantocellular nucleus. All ChAT-IR neurones in the area postrema contained GAD67-GFP. Double labelled neurones were not observed in the dorsal vagal motor nucleus, nucleus ambiguus or hypoglossal nucleus. Double labelled ChAT-IR/GAD67-GFP cells in the NTS did not contain neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity, whereas those in the reticular formation and lateral paragigantocellular nucleus did. The function of these small populations of double labelled cells is currently unknown, however their location suggests a potential role in integrating signals involved in oromotor behaviours. PMID:26015156

  19. Characterization and chromosomal mapping of a mouse ortholog of the late-infantile ceroid-lipofuscinosis gene CLN2.

    PubMed

    Katz, M L; Liu, P C; Grob-Nunn, S E; Shibuya, H; Johnson, G S

    1999-11-01

    Late-infantile ceroid-lipofuscinosis (CLN2) is an autosomal recessively inherited, neurodegenerative disease in humans. The CLN2 locus has been mapped to Chromosome (Chr) 11p15, and its sequence and genomic organization have recently been reported. In the present study, the cDNA sequence, exon/intron organization, and chromosomal localization of a mouse ortholog of the CLN2 gene are described. The mouse cDNA contains an open reading frame that predicts a protein product of 562 amino acids. The mouse and human coding regions are 86% and 88% identical at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels, respectively. One less codon appears in the mouse cDNA when compared with the human ortholog. The mouse gene (Cln2) spans more than 6 kb and consists of 13 exons separated by introns ranging in size from 111 to 1259 bp. Length polymorphism in an (AC)(n) microsatellite in intron 3 of the mouse Cln2 gene was used to perform segregation analysis with The Jackson Laboratory DNA Panel Mapping Resource. On the basis of this analysis, the Cln2 gene was localized to a region of mouse Chr 7 that corresponds to human Chr 11p15. Characterization of the mouse Cln2 gene will facilitate generation of a mouse model for late-infantile ceroid-lipofuscinosis by gene targeting and identification of functionally important regions of the Cln2 protein.

  20. Analysis of compound heterozygotes reveals that the mouse floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) allele produces abnormal eye phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dorà, Natalie J; Crookshanks, Aaron J F; Leung, Karen K Y; Simpson, T Ian; Mason, John O; Price, David J; West, John D

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of abnormal phenotypes produced by different types of mutations has been crucial for our understanding of gene function. Some floxed alleles that retain a neomycin-resistance selection cassette (neo cassette) are not equivalent to wild-type alleles and provide useful experimental resources. Pax6 is an important developmental gene and the aim of this study was to determine whether the floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) (Pax6 (fl) ) allele, which has a retained neo cassette, produced any abnormal eye phenotypes that would imply that it differs from the wild-type allele. Homozygous Pax6 (fl/fl) and heterozygous Pax6 (fl/+) mice had no overt qualitative eye abnormalities but morphometric analysis showed that Pax6 (fl/fl) corneas tended be thicker and smaller in diameter. To aid identification of weak effects, we produced compound heterozygotes with the Pax6 (Sey-Neu) (Pax6 (-)) null allele. Pax6 (fl/-) compound heterozygotes had more severe eye abnormalities than Pax6 (+/-) heterozygotes, implying that Pax6 (fl) differs from the wild-type Pax6 (+) allele. Immunohistochemistry showed that the Pax6 (fl/-) corneal epithelium was positive for keratin 19 and negative for keratin 12, indicating that it was abnormally differentiated. This Pax6 (fl) allele provides a useful addition to the existing Pax6 allelic series and this study demonstrates the utility of using compound heterozygotes with null alleles to unmask cryptic effects of floxed alleles.

  1. Highly upregulated Lhx2 in the Foxn1-/- nude mouse phenotype reflects a dysregulated and expanded epidermal stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J; Vasko, Radovan; Shen, Keyue; Huang, Guofeng; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Hair cycling is a prime example of stem cell dependent tissue regeneration and replenishment, and its regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a blockage in terminal keratinocytic lineage differentiation in the Foxn1(-/-) nude phenotype on the epithelial progeny. Most notably we found a constitutive upregulation of LIM homeobox protein 2 (Lhx2), a marker gene of epithelial stem cellness indispensible for hair cycle progression. However, histological evidence along with an erratic, acyclic rise of otherwise suppressed CyclinD1 levels along with several key markers of keratinocyte lineage differentiation indicate a frustrated expansion of epithelial stem cell niches in skin. In addition, CD49f/CD34/CD200-based profiling demonstrated highly significant shifts in subpopulations of epithelial progeny. Intriguingly this appeared to include the expansion of Oct4+ stem cells in dermal fractions of skin isolates in the Foxn1 knock-out opposed to wild type. Overall our findings indicate that the Foxn1(-/-) phenotype has a strong impact on epithelial progeny and thus offers a promising model to study maintenance and regulation of stem cell niches within skin not feasible in other in vitro or in vivo models.

  2. Analysis of compound heterozygotes reveals that the mouse floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) allele produces abnormal eye phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dorà, Natalie J; Crookshanks, Aaron J F; Leung, Karen K Y; Simpson, T Ian; Mason, John O; Price, David J; West, John D

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of abnormal phenotypes produced by different types of mutations has been crucial for our understanding of gene function. Some floxed alleles that retain a neomycin-resistance selection cassette (neo cassette) are not equivalent to wild-type alleles and provide useful experimental resources. Pax6 is an important developmental gene and the aim of this study was to determine whether the floxed Pax6 (tm1Ued) (Pax6 (fl) ) allele, which has a retained neo cassette, produced any abnormal eye phenotypes that would imply that it differs from the wild-type allele. Homozygous Pax6 (fl/fl) and heterozygous Pax6 (fl/+) mice had no overt qualitative eye abnormalities but morphometric analysis showed that Pax6 (fl/fl) corneas tended be thicker and smaller in diameter. To aid identification of weak effects, we produced compound heterozygotes with the Pax6 (Sey-Neu) (Pax6 (-)) null allele. Pax6 (fl/-) compound heterozygotes had more severe eye abnormalities than Pax6 (+/-) heterozygotes, implying that Pax6 (fl) differs from the wild-type Pax6 (+) allele. Immunohistochemistry showed that the Pax6 (fl/-) corneal epithelium was positive for keratin 19 and negative for keratin 12, indicating that it was abnormally differentiated. This Pax6 (fl) allele provides a useful addition to the existing Pax6 allelic series and this study demonstrates the utility of using compound heterozygotes with null alleles to unmask cryptic effects of floxed alleles. PMID:27240603

  3. Isolation of prostrate turfgrass mutants via screening of dwarf phenotype and characterization of a perennial ryegrass prostrate mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junmei; Thammina, Chandra; Li, Wei; Yu, Hao; Yer, Huseyin; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Marron, Manon; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Chen, Yongqin; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J; Guillard, Karl; Zhang, Xian; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Prostrate turf varieties are desirable because of their increased low mowing tolerance, heat resistance, traffic resistance and ground coverage compared with upright varieties. Mutation breeding may provide a powerful tool to create prostrate varieties, but there are no simple, straightforward methods to screen for such mutants. Elucidation of the molecular basis of the major 'green revolution' traits, dwarfism and semi-dwarfism, guided us to design a simple strategy for isolating dwarf mutants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). We have shown that gamma-ray-mediated dominant dwarf mutants can be easily screened for at the three-leaf stage. About 10% of dwarf mutant lines also displayed a prostrate phenotype at mature stages (>10 tillers). One prostrate line, Lowboy I, has been characterized in detail. Lowboy I had significantly shorter canopy, leaf blade and internode lengths compared with wild type. Lowboy I also exhibited greater tolerance to low mowing stress than wild type. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA) restored Lowboy I to a wild-type phenotype, indicating that the dwarf and prostrate phenotypes were both due to GA deficiency. We further showed that phenotypes of Lowboy I were dominant and stably inherited through sexual reproduction. Prostrate turfgrass mutants are difficult to screen for because the phenotype is not observed at young seedling stages, therefore our method represents a simple strategy for easily isolating prostrate mutants. Furthermore, Lowboy I may provide an outstanding germplasm for breeding novel prostrate perennial ryegrass cultivars. PMID:26955481

  4. Isolation of prostrate turfgrass mutants via screening of dwarf phenotype and characterization of a perennial ryegrass prostrate mutant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junmei; Thammina, Chandra; Li, Wei; Yu, Hao; Yer, Huseyin; El-Tanbouly, Rania; Marron, Manon; Katin-Grazzini, Lorenzo; Chen, Yongqin; Inguagiato, John; McAvoy, Richard J.; Guillard, Karl; Zhang, Xian; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Prostrate turf varieties are desirable because of their increased low mowing tolerance, heat resistance, traffic resistance and ground coverage compared with upright varieties. Mutation breeding may provide a powerful tool to create prostrate varieties, but there are no simple, straightforward methods to screen for such mutants. Elucidation of the molecular basis of the major ‘green revolution’ traits, dwarfism and semi-dwarfism, guided us to design a simple strategy for isolating dwarf mutants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). We have shown that gamma-ray-mediated dominant dwarf mutants can be easily screened for at the three-leaf stage. About 10% of dwarf mutant lines also displayed a prostrate phenotype at mature stages (>10 tillers). One prostrate line, Lowboy I, has been characterized in detail. Lowboy I had significantly shorter canopy, leaf blade and internode lengths compared with wild type. Lowboy I also exhibited greater tolerance to low mowing stress than wild type. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA) restored Lowboy I to a wild-type phenotype, indicating that the dwarf and prostrate phenotypes were both due to GA deficiency. We further showed that phenotypes of Lowboy I were dominant and stably inherited through sexual reproduction. Prostrate turfgrass mutants are difficult to screen for because the phenotype is not observed at young seedling stages, therefore our method represents a simple strategy for easily isolating prostrate mutants. Furthermore, Lowboy I may provide an outstanding germplasm for breeding novel prostrate perennial ryegrass cultivars. PMID:26955481

  5. Does Virulence Assessment of Vibrio anguillarum Using Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Larvae Correspond with Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization?

    PubMed Central

    Frans, Ingeborg; Dierckens, Kristof; Crauwels, Sam; Van Assche, Ado; Leisner, Jørgen; Larsen, Marianne H.; Michiels, Chris W.; Willems, Kris A.; Lievens, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Background Vibriosis is one of the most ubiquitous fish diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Vibrio such as Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum. Despite a lot of research efforts, the virulence factors and mechanism of V. anguillarum are still insufficiently known, in part because of the lack of standardized virulence assays. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated and compared the virulence of 15 V. anguillarum strains obtained from different hosts or non-host niches using a standardized gnotobiotic bioassay with European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) larvae as model hosts. In addition, to assess potential relationships between virulence and genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strains were characterized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) analyses, as well as by phenotypic analyses using Biolog’s Phenotype MicroArray™ technology and some virulence factor assays. Conclusions/Significance Virulence testing revealed ten virulent and five avirulent strains. While some relation could be established between serotype, genotype and phenotype, no relation was found between virulence and genotypic or phenotypic characteristics, illustrating the complexity of V. anguillarum virulence. Moreover, the standardized gnotobiotic system used in this study has proven its strength as a model to assess and compare the virulence of different V. anguillarum strains in vivo. In this way, the bioassay contributes to the study of mechanisms underlying virulence in V. anguillarum. PMID:23936439

  6. Simultaneous Characterization of Metabolic, Cardiac, Vascular and Renal Phenotypes of Lean and Obese SHHF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Youcef, Gina; Olivier, Arnaud; L'Huillier, Clément P. J.; Labat, Carlos; Fay, Renaud; Tabcheh, Lina; Toupance, Simon; Rodriguez-Guéant, Rosa-Maria; Bergerot, Damien; Jaisser, Frédéric; Lacolley, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Laurent Vallar; Pizard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are prone to develop heart failure (HF). However, the deleterious effects of MetS on the continuum of events leading to cardiac remodeling and subsequently to HF are not fully understood. This study characterized simultaneously MetS and cardiac, vascular and renal phenotypes in aging Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure lean (SHHF+/? regrouping +/+ and +/cp rats) and obese (SHHFcp/cp, “cp” defective mutant allele of the leptin receptor gene) rats. We aimed to refine the milestones and their onset during the progression from MetS to HF in this experimental model. We found that SHHFcp/cp but not SHHF+/? rats developed dyslipidemia, as early as 1.5 months of age. This early alteration in the lipidic profile was detectable concomitantly to impaired renal function (polyuria, proteinuria but no glycosuria) and reduced carotid distensibility as compared to SHHF+/? rats. By 3 months of age SHHFcp/cp animals developed severe obesity associated with dislipidemia and hypertension defining the onset of MetS. From 6 months of age, SHHF+/? rats developed concentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) while SHHFcp/cp rats developed eccentric LVH apparent from progressive dilation of the LV dimensions. By 14 months of age only SHHFcp/cp rats showed significantly higher central systolic blood pressure and a reduced ejection fraction resulting in systolic dysfunction as compared to SHHF+/?. In summary, the metabolic and hemodynamic mechanisms participating in the faster decline of cardiac functions in SHHFcp/cp rats are established long before their physiological consequences are detectable. Our results suggest that the molecular mechanisms triggered within the first three months after birth of SHHFcp/cp rats should be targeted preferentially by therapeutic interventions in order to mitigate the later HF development. PMID:24831821

  7. A molecular model for the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the mouse lethal yellow (A{sup y}) mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E.J.; Klebig, M.L.; Stubbs, L.J.; Russell, L.B.; Woychik, R.P.; Bultman, S.J. |; Vugt, M.J. van |

    1994-03-29

    Lethal yellow (A{sup y}) is a mutation at the mouse agouti locus in chromosome 2 that causes a number of dominant pleiotropic effects, including a completely yellow coat color, obesity, an insulin-resistant type II diabetic condition, and an increased propensity to develop a variety of spontaneous and induced tumors. Additionally, homozygosity for A{sup y} results in preimplantation lethality, which terminates development by the blastocyst stage. The A{sup y} mutation is the result of a 170-kb deletion that removes all but the promoter and noncoding first exon of another gene called Raly, which lies in the same transcriptional orientation as agouti and maps 280 kb proximal to the 3{prime} end of the agouti gene. The authors present a model for the structure of the A{sub y} allele that can explain the dominant pleiotropic effects associated with this mutation, as well as the recessive lethality, which is unrelated to the agouti gene.

  8. Proteomics, ultrastructure, and physiology of hippocampal synapses in a fragile X syndrome mouse model reveal presynaptic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Klemmer, Patricia; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Holmgren, Carl D; Klychnikov, Oleg I; Stahl-Zeng, Jianru; Loos, Maarten; van der Schors, Roel C; Wortel, Joke; de Wit, Heidi; Spijker, Sabine; Rotaru, Diana C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Li, Ka Wan

    2011-07-22

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of hereditary mental retardation, is caused by a loss-of-function mutation of the Fmr1 gene, which encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP affects dendritic protein synthesis, thereby causing synaptic abnormalities. Here, we used a quantitative proteomics approach in an FXS mouse model to reveal changes in levels of hippocampal synapse proteins. Sixteen independent pools of Fmr1 knock-out mice and wild type mice were analyzed using two sets of 8-plex iTRAQ experiments. Of 205 proteins quantified with at least three distinct peptides in both iTRAQ series, the abundance of 23 proteins differed between Fmr1 knock-out and wild type synapses with a false discovery rate (q-value) <5%. Significant differences were confirmed by quantitative immunoblotting. A group of proteins that are known to be involved in cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth was regulated; they included Basp1 and Gap43, known PKC substrates, and Cend1. Basp1 and Gap43 are predominantly expressed in growth cones and presynaptic terminals. In line with this, ultrastructural analysis in developing hippocampal FXS synapses revealed smaller active zones with corresponding postsynaptic densities and smaller pools of clustered vesicles, indicative of immature presynaptic maturation. A second group of proteins involved in synaptic vesicle release was up-regulated in the FXS mouse model. In accordance, paired-pulse and short-term facilitation were significantly affected in these hippocampal synapses. Together, the altered regulation of presynaptically expressed proteins, immature synaptic ultrastructure, and compromised short-term plasticity points to presynaptic changes underlying glutamatergic transmission in FXS at this stage of development.

  9. Characterization of a panel of somatic cell hybrids for regional mapping of the mouse X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Avner, P.; Arnaud, D.; Amar, L.; Cambrou, J.; Winking, H.; Russell, L.B.

    1987-08-01

    A panel of five hybrid cell lines containing mouse X chromosomes with various deletions has been obtained by fusing splenocytes from male mice carrying one of a series of reciprocal X-autosome translocations with the azaguanine-resistant Chinese hamster cell line CH3g. These hybrids have been extensively characterized by using the allozymes hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (encoded by the Hprt locus) and ..cap alpha..-galactosidase (Ags) and a series of 11 X-chromosome-specific DNA probes whose localization had been previously established by linkage studies. Such studies have established the genetic breakpoints of the T(X;12)13R1 and T(X;2)14R1 X-autosome translocations on the X chromosome and provided additional information as to the X-chromosome genetic breakpoints of the T(X;16)16H, T(X;4)7R1, and T(X;7)6R1 translocations. The data establish clearly that both the T(X;7)5RI and T(X;12)13R1 X-chromosome breakpoints are proximal to Hprt, the breakpoint of the former being more centromeric, lying as it does in the 9-centimorgan interval between the ornithine transcarbamoylase (Otc) and DXPas7 (M2C) loci. These five hybrid cell lines provide, with the previously characterized EBS4 hybrid cell line, a nested series of seven mapping intervals distributed along the length of the mouse X chromosome. Their characterization not only allows further correlation of the genetic and cytological X-chromosome maps but also should permit the rapid identification of DNA probes specific for particular regions of the mouse X chromosome.

  10. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. Results We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility) of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88–95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. Conclusions It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses exhibiting a diversity of

  11. Characterization of the collagen phenotype of rabbit proximal tubule cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, S R; Goins, R A; Belvin, E L; Dimari, S J; Merriam, A P; Bowling-Brown, S; Harris, R C; Haralson, M A

    1999-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the collagen phenotype of cultured rabbit proximal tubule (RPT) epithelial cells grown on plastic and on the reconstituted basement membrane preparation, Matrigel. When grown on a plastic substratum, RPT cells display a cobblestone appearance characteristic of glomerular epithelial cells. While initially forming an interlocking network of cells after subculture on Matrigel, this pattern of culture morphology rapidly develops into one characterized by isolated, organized groups of cells. Notwithstanding the effects of Matrigel on culture morphology, total cellular proliferation was reduced only 25% when RPT cells were grown on this substrate. Greater than 90% of the collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on plastic was secreted into the culture medium. Qualitative analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed components exhibiting electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to the chains present in type IV and type I collagens. Quantitative analysis by CM-Trisacryl chromatography established that approximately 2/3 of the total collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on plastic was type IV and approximately 1/3 type I. Quantitative analysis of the collagens produced by RPT cells grown on Matrigel again indicated the synthesis of only type IV and type I molecules but in a slightly more equal ratio of both collagen types and in the ratio of secreted to cell-associated molecules. However, the total amount of collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on Matrigel was reduced to approximately 1% of the level synthesized by the cells grown on plastic. On plastic, approximately 3/4 of the type I collagen produced was recovered as the type I homotrimer, but on Matrigel type I homotrimers represented only approximately 55% of the total type I collagen synthesized. On Matrigel, the majority of the type IV collagen was recovered as heterotrimers containing alpha1(IV) and alpha2(IV) chains. In contrast, RTP cells grown on plastic predominantly produced type IV

  12. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Tracey D; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K; Griggs, Robert C; Bundy, Brian N; Jen, Joanna C; Baloh, Robert W; Hanna, Michael G

    2014-04-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15-65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0-40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0-14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean=50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1 phenocopies

  13. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Tracey D.; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F.; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K.; Griggs, Robert C.; Bundy, Brian N.; Jen, Joanna C.; Baloh, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15–65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0–40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0–14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean = 50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1

  14. Involvement of the agmatinergic system in the depressive-like phenotype of the Crtc1 knockout mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Meylan, E M; Breuillaud, L; Seredenina, T; Magistretti, P J; Halfon, O; Luthi-Carter, R; Cardinaux, J-R

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies implicate the arginine-decarboxylation product agmatine in mood regulation. Agmatine has antidepressant properties in rodent models of depression, and agmatinase (Agmat), the agmatine-degrading enzyme, is upregulated in the brains of mood disorder patients. We have previously shown that mice lacking CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) associate behavioral and molecular depressive-like endophenotypes, as well as blunted responses to classical antidepressants. Here, the molecular basis of the behavioral phenotype of Crtc1(-/-) mice was further examined using microarray gene expression profiling that revealed an upregulation of Agmat in the cortex of Crtc1(-/-) mice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses confirmed Agmat upregulation in the Crtc1(-/-) prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus, which were further demonstrated by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy to comprise an increased number of Agmat-expressing cells, notably parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons. Acute agmatine and ketamine treatments comparably improved the depressive-like behavior of male and female Crtc1(-/-) mice in the forced swim test, suggesting that exogenous agmatine has a rapid antidepressant effect through the compensation of agmatine deficit because of upregulated Agmat. Agmatine rapidly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels only in the PFC of wild-type (WT) females, and decreased eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) phosphorylation in the PFC of male and female WT mice, indicating that agmatine might be a fast-acting antidepressant with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist properties. Collectively, these findings implicate Agmat in the depressive-like phenotype of Crtc1(-/-) mice, refine current understanding of the agmatinergic system in the brain and highlight its putative role in major depression. PMID:27404284

  15. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): mouse biology and model systems.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A

    2008-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database, (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org/), integrates genetic, genomic and phenotypic information about the laboratory mouse, a primary animal model for studying human biology and disease. MGD data content includes comprehensive characterization of genes and their functions, standardized descriptions of mouse phenotypes, extensive integration of DNA and protein sequence data, normalized representation of genome and genome variant information including comparative data on mammalian genes. Data within MGD are obtained from diverse sources including manual curation of the biomedical literature, direct contributions from individual investigator's laboratories and major informatics resource centers such as Ensembl, UniProt and NCBI. MGD collaborates with the bioinformatics community on the development of data and semantic standards such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) Ontology. MGD provides a data-mining platform that enables the development of translational research hypotheses based on comparative genotype, phenotype and functional analyses. Both web-based querying and computational access to data are provided. Recent improvements in MGD described here include the association of gene trap data with mouse genes and a new batch query capability for customized data access and retrieval.

  16. A characterization of the elements comprising the promoter of the mouse ribosomal protein gene RPS16.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, N; Perry, R P

    1989-07-11

    The elements comprising the mouse rpS16 promoter were characterized by transfection experiments with mutant genes in which various portions of the 5' flanking region and exon I were removed or substituted with extraneous DNA sequence. These experiments were carried out with otherwise intact rpS16 genes transfected into monkey kidney (COS) cells and also with chimeric rpS16-CAT gene constructs transfected into mouse plasmacytoma cells and COS cells. The locations of the functionally important elements were generally correlated with the locations of binding sites for specific nuclear factors, which were identified by gel-mobility shift analyses and methylation interference footprints. The most upstream element, which is located approximately 165 bp from the cap site, binds the Sp1 transcription factor and augments the promoter activity by 2 to 2.5-fold. In addition, there is a complex bipartite element in the -83 to -59 region, an element in the -37 to -12 region and an element in the +9 to +29 region of exon I, all of which are essential for rpS16 expression. The rpS16 promoter has a general architecture that resembles other mouse rp promoters; however, it also possesses some distinctive characteristics. PMID:2762128

  17. Characterization of the Inflammatory and Fibrotic Response in a Mouse Model of Cardiac Pressure Overload

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xia; Lee, Keunsang; Li, Na; Corbett, Daniel; Mendoza, Leonardo; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2009-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is an integral component of most cardiac pathologic conditions and contributes to the development of both systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Because of the availability of genetically manipulated animals, mouse models are essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Accordingly, we characterized the inflammatory and fibrotic response in a mouse model of cardiac pressure overload due to transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Following TAC, mouse hearts exhibited induction of chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines, associated with macrophage, but not neutrophil, infiltration. Induction of inflammatory cytokines was followed by a late upregulation of Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β isoforms, activation of the Smad2/3 and Smad1/5 pathways, induction of matricellular proteins, and deposition of collagen. Inflammatory activity decreased after 28 days of TAC; at this timepoint established fibrosis was noted, accompanied by ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction. Late induction of inhibitory mediators, such as TGF-β may play an essential role in the transition from inflammation to fibrosis by suppressing inflammatory gene synthesis while inducing matrix deposition. Our findings identify molecular mediators and pathways with a potential role in cardiac fibrosis laying the foundations for studies exploring the pathogenesis of fibrotic cardiac remodeling using genetically targeted mice. PMID:19030868

  18. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Silvia; Amoroso, Ana M; Famiglietti, Angela; de Mier, Carmen; Vay, Carlos; Gutkind, Gabriel O

    2004-01-01

    Five hundred and seventy-eight strains of group A streptococci (GAS) isolated mostly from paediatric pharyngeal swabs were tested to evaluate their susceptibility to erythromycin. Resistant strains were then tested for their MICs to erythromycin and clindamycin, their phenotype of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin (MLS(B)) and for the presence of macrolide resistance genes. The rate of resistance to erythromycin was 8.2%. Constitutive, inducible and M phenotypes of resistance were detected in 2.1, 2.1 and 95.8% of resistant strains, respectively. All M phenotypes harboured the mefA gene, whereas constitutive and inducible phenotypes had ermB and ermTR genes, respectively.

  19. Development, validation and characterization of a novel mouse model of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD).

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-11-01

    The etiology of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD) is poorly understood but the hallmark of ABD is a lack of bone turnover. ABD occurs in renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and is suspected to occur in elderly patients on long-term anti-resorptive therapy. A major clinical concern of ABD is diminished bone quality and an increased fracture risk. To our knowledge, experimental animal models for ABD other than ROD-ABD have not been developed or studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a mouse model of ABD without the complications of renal ablation, and to characterize changes in bone quality in ABD relative to controls. To re-create the adynamic bone condition, 4-month old female Col2.3Δtk mice were treated with ganciclovir to specifically ablate osteoblasts, and pamidronate was used to inhibit osteoclastic resorption. Four groups of animals were used to characterize bone quality in ABD: Normal bone controls, No Formation controls, No Resorption controls, and an Adynamic group. After a 6-week treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and the bones were harvested for analyses. Bone quality assessments were conducted using established techniques including bone histology, quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and biomechanical testing. Histomorphometry confirmed osteoblast-related hallmarks of ABD in our mouse model. Bone formation was near complete suppression in the No Formation and Adynamic specimens. Inhibition of bone resorption in the Adynamic group was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain. Normal bone mineral density and architecture were maintained in the Adynamic group, whereas the No Formation group showed a reduction in bone mineral content and trabecular thickness relative to the Adynamic group. As expected, the No Formation group had a more hypomineralized profile and the Adynamic group had a higher mean mineralization profile that is

  20. Development, validation and characterization of a novel mouse model of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD).

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-11-01

    The etiology of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD) is poorly understood but the hallmark of ABD is a lack of bone turnover. ABD occurs in renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and is suspected to occur in elderly patients on long-term anti-resorptive therapy. A major clinical concern of ABD is diminished bone quality and an increased fracture risk. To our knowledge, experimental animal models for ABD other than ROD-ABD have not been developed or studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a mouse model of ABD without the complications of renal ablation, and to characterize changes in bone quality in ABD relative to controls. To re-create the adynamic bone condition, 4-month old female Col2.3Δtk mice were treated with ganciclovir to specifically ablate osteoblasts, and pamidronate was used to inhibit osteoclastic resorption. Four groups of animals were used to characterize bone quality in ABD: Normal bone controls, No Formation controls, No Resorption controls, and an Adynamic group. After a 6-week treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and the bones were harvested for analyses. Bone quality assessments were conducted using established techniques including bone histology, quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and biomechanical testing. Histomorphometry confirmed osteoblast-related hallmarks of ABD in our mouse model. Bone formation was near complete suppression in the No Formation and Adynamic specimens. Inhibition of bone resorption in the Adynamic group was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain. Normal bone mineral density and architecture were maintained in the Adynamic group, whereas the No Formation group showed a reduction in bone mineral content and trabecular thickness relative to the Adynamic group. As expected, the No Formation group had a more hypomineralized profile and the Adynamic group had a higher mean mineralization profile that is

  1. Comprehensive Behavioral and Molecular Characterization of a New Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease: zQ175

    PubMed Central

    Menalled, Liliana B.; Kudwa, Andrea E.; Miller, Sam; Fitzpatrick, Jon; Watson-Johnson, Judy; Keating, Nicole; Ruiz, Melinda; Mushlin, Richard; Alosio, William; McConnell, Kristi; Connor, David; Murphy, Carol; Oakeshott, Steve; Kwan, Mei; Beltran, Jose; Ghavami, Afshin; Brunner, Dani; Park, Larry C.; Ramboz, Sylvie; Howland, David

    2012-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive and psychiatric manifestations. Since the mutation responsible for the disease was identified as an unstable expansion of CAG repeats in the gene encoding the huntingtin protein in 1993, numerous mouse models of HD have been generated to study disease pathogenesis and evaluate potential therapeutic approaches. Of these, knock-in models best mimic the human condition from a genetic perspective since they express the mutation in the appropriate genetic and protein context. Behaviorally, however, while some abnormal phenotypes have been detected in knock-in mouse models, a model with an earlier and more robust phenotype than the existing models is required. We describe here for the first time a new mouse line, the zQ175 knock-in mouse, derived from a spontaneous expansion of the CAG copy number in our CAG 140 knock-in colony [1]. Given the inverse relationship typically observed between age of HD onset and length of CAG repeat, since this new mouse line carries a significantly higher CAG repeat length it was expected to be more significantly impaired than the parent line. Using a battery of behavioral tests we evaluated both heterozygous and homozygous zQ175 mice. Homozygous mice showed motor and grip strength abnormalities with an early onset (8 and 4 weeks of age, respectively), which were followed by deficits in rotarod and climbing activity at 30 weeks of age and by cognitive deficits at around 1 year of age. Of particular interest for translational work, we also found clear behavioral deficits in heterozygous mice from around 4.5 months of age, especially in the dark phase of the diurnal cycle. Decreased body weight was observed in both heterozygotes and homozygotes, along with significantly reduced survival in the homozygotes. In addition, we detected an early and significant decrease of striatal gene markers from 12 weeks of age. These data suggest

  2. Structural characterization and chromosomal location of the mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene and pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, M.; Gerard, C.; Kolakowski, L.F. Jr.

    1995-06-10

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF, is a cytokine released by T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and the pituitary gland that serves to integrate peripheral and central inflammatory responses. Ubiquitous expression and developmental regulation suggest that MIF may have additional roles outside of the immune system. Here we report the structure and chromosomal location of the mouse Mif gene and the partial characterization of five Mif pseudogenes. The mouse Mif gene spans less than 0.7 kb of chromosomal DNA and is composed of three exons. A comparison between the mouse and the human genes shows a similar gene structure and common regulatory elements in both promoter regions. The mouse Mif gene maps to the middle region of chromosome 10, between Bcr and S100b, which have been mapped to human chromosomes 22q11 and 21q22.3, respectively. The entire sequence of two pseudogenes demonstrates the absence of introns, the presence of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the cDNA, a 3{prime} poly(A) tail, and the lack of sequence similarity with untranscribed regions of the gene. The five pseudogenes are highly homologous to the cDNA, but contain a variable number of mutations that would produce mutated or truncated MIF-like proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of MIF genes and pseudogenes indicate several independent genetic events that can account for multiple genomic integrations. Three of the Mif pseudogenes were also mapped by interspecific backcross to chromosomes 1, 9, and 17. These results suggest that Mif pseudogenes originated by retrotransposition. 46 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Characterization of Differential Cocaine Metabolism in Mouse and Rat through Metabolomics-Guided Metabolite Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Dan; Shi, Xiaolei; Wang, Lei; Gosnell, Blake A.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent animal models have been widely used for studying neurologic and toxicological events associated with cocaine abuse. It is known that the mouse is more susceptible to cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity (CIH) than the rat. However, the causes behind this species-dependent sensitivity to cocaine have not been elucidated. In this study, cocaine metabolism in the mouse and rat was characterized through LC-MS-based metabolomic analysis of urine samples and were further compared through calculating the relative abundance of individual cocaine metabolites. The results showed that the levels of benzoylecgonine, a major cocaine metabolite from ester hydrolysis, were comparable in the urine from the mice and rats treated with the same dose of cocaine. However, the levels of the cocaine metabolites from oxidative metabolism, such as N-hydroxybenzoylnorecgonine and hydroxybenzoylecgonine, differed dramatically between the two species, indicating species-dependent cocaine metabolism. Subsequent structural analysis through accurate mass analysis and LC-MS/MS fragmentation revealed that N-oxidation reactions, including N-demethylation and N-hydroxylation, are preferred metabolic routes in the mouse, while extensive aryl hydroxylation reactions occur in the rat. Through stable isotope tracing and in vitro enzyme reactions, a mouse-specific α-glucoside of N-hydroxybenzoylnorecgonine and a group of aryl hydroxy glucuronides high in the rat were identified and structurally elucidated. The differences in the in vivo oxidative metabolism of cocaine between the two rodent species were confirmed by the in vitro microsomal incubations. Chemical inhibition of P450 enzymes further revealed that different P450-mediated oxidative reactions in the ecgonine and benzoic acid moieties of cocaine contribute to the species-dependent biotransformation of cocaine. PMID:23034697

  4. Generation and Characterization of a Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Shannon; Salphati, Laurent; Gomez-Zepeda, David; Wanek, Thomas; Chen, Liangfu; Chu, Xiaoyan; Kunta, Jeevan; Mezler, Mario; Menet, Marie-Claude; Chasseigneaux, Stephanie; Declèves, Xavier; Langer, Oliver; Pierre, Esaie; DiLoreto, Karen; Hoft, Carolin; Laplanche, Loic; Pang, Jodie; Pereira, Tony; Andonian, Clara; Simic, Damir; Rode, Anja; Yabut, Jocelyn; Zhang, Xiaolin; Scheer, Nico

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is expressed in various tissues, such as the gut, liver, kidney and blood brain barrier (BBB), where it mediates the unidirectional transport of substrates to the apical/luminal side of polarized cells. Thereby BCRP acts as an efflux pump, mediating the elimination or restricting the entry of endogenous compounds or xenobiotics into tissues and it plays important roles in drug disposition, efficacy and safety. Bcrp knockout mice (Bcrp(-/-)) have been used widely to study the role of this transporter in limiting intestinal absorption and brain penetration of substrate compounds. Here we describe the first generation and characterization of a mouse line humanized for BCRP (hBCRP), in which the mouse coding sequence from the start to stop codon was replaced with the corresponding human genomic region, such that the human transporter is expressed under control of the murineBcrppromoter. We demonstrate robust human and loss of mouse BCRP/Bcrp mRNA and protein expression in the hBCRP mice and the absence of major compensatory changes in the expression of other genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition. Pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies with several BCRP probe substrates confirmed the functional activity of the human transporter in these mice. Furthermore, we provide practical examples for the use of hBCRP mice to study drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The hBCRP mouse is a promising model to study the in vivo role of human BCRP in limiting absorption and BBB penetration of substrate compounds and to investigate clinically relevant DDIs involving BCRP.

  5. Expression of the Bgp gene and characterization of mouse colon biliary glycoprotein isoforms.

    PubMed

    McCuaig, K; Rosenberg, M; Nédellec, P; Turbide, C; Beauchemin, N

    1993-05-30

    The biliary glycoprotein (BGP)-encoding gene is a member of the human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family. We have now cloned several mouse Bgp cDNAs from an outbred CDR-1 mouse colon cDNA library, as well as by reverse transcription-PCR amplification of colon RNA. The distinguishing features of the deduced Bgp protein isoforms are found in the two divergent N-terminal domains, the highly conserved internal C2-set immunoglobulin domains, and an intracytoplasmic domain of either 10 or 73 amino acids (aa). The cDNA structures suggest that these mRNAs are produced through alternative splicing of a Bgp gene and the usage of multiple transcriptional terminators. The Bgp deduced aa sequences are highly homologous to several well characterized rat hepatocyte proteins such as the cell CAM105/ecto-ATPase/pp120/HA4 proteins. Oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes representing the various cDNA isoform domains revealed predominant transcripts of 1.8, 3.1 and 4.0 kb on Northern analyses of mouse colon RNA; some of these bands are actually composed of several co-migrating transcripts. The transcripts encoding the long intracytoplasmic-tailed Bgp proteins are expressed at one-tenth the relative abundance of the shorter-tailed species. We have previously demonstrated that several mouse Bgp cDNAs, when transfected into eukaryotic cells, express BGP proteins at the cell surface and function in vitro as cell adhesion molecules, much like their human and rat counterparts. The expression of the many Bgp isoforms at the surface of epithelial cells, such as colon, suggests that these proteins play a determinant role, through self- or heterologous contact, in renewal and/or differentiation of their epithelia.

  6. Characterization of the mouse DAX-1 gene reveals evolutionary conservation of a unique amino-terminal motif and widespread expression in mouse tissue.

    PubMed

    Bae, D S; Schaefer, M L; Partan, B W; Muglia, L

    1996-09-01

    The human genetic disorder adrenal hypoplasia congenita with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism results from mutations in the recently isolated DAX-1 gene, a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. To study the role of DAX-1 in adrenal development and activation of the hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, animal model systems will be essential. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the mouse DAX-1 gene and its tissue-specific pattern of expression. The mouse DAX-1 gene codes for a 472-amino acid protein, with 75% overall nucleotide sequence homology to its human homolog. The 3.5 amino-terminal repeats of a unique motif with probable DNA-binding activity have been conserved between mouse and human, although highest conservation in the DAX-1 peptide exists in the carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain. The DAX-1 gene remains X-linked in the mouse, consistent with its potential role in sex determination. We have developed a sensitive reverse transcription-PCR assay that detects DAX-1 messenger RNA in the central nervous system, pituitary, lung, heart, spleen, kidney, and thymus in addition to the adrenal and testis DAX-1 expression noted for the human DAX-1 gene. Future studies using mouse models of altered DAX-1 expression will be critical in defining the role of this factor in tissue- and development-specific gene regulation.

  7. Characterization of a knock-in mouse model of the homozygous p.V37I variant in Gjb2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Hu, Lingxiang; Wang, Xueling; Sun, Changling; Lin, Xin; li, Lei; Mei, Ling; Huang, Zhiwu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous p.V37I variant in GJB2 is prevalent in East and Southeast Asians and may lead to mild-to-moderate hearing loss with reduced penetrance. To investigate the pathogenic mechanism underlying this variant, we generated a knock-in mouse model of homozygous p.V37I by an embryonic stem cell gene targeting method. Auditory brainstem response test showed that the knock-in mice developed progressive, mild-to-moderate hearing loss over the first 4–9 months. Overall no significant developmental and morphological abnormality was observed in the knock-in mouse cochlea, while confocal immunostaining and electron microscopic scanning revealed minor loss of the outer hair cells. Gene expression microarray analysis identified 105 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated genes in P5 knock-in mouse cochleae (P < 0.05 adjusted by the Benjamini & Hochberg method), among which four top candidate genes with the highest fold-changes or implication to deafness Fcer1g, Nnmt and Lars2 and Cuedc1 were verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that the homozygous p.V37I knock-in mouse modeled the hearing phenotype of the human patients and can serve as a useful animal model for further studies. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study may shed new insights into the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism and the phenotypic modification of homozygous p.V37I. PMID:27623246

  8. Characterization of a knock-in mouse model of the homozygous p.V37I variant in Gjb2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Hu, Lingxiang; Wang, Xueling; Sun, Changling; Lin, Xin; Li, Lei; Mei, Ling; Huang, Zhiwu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous p.V37I variant in GJB2 is prevalent in East and Southeast Asians and may lead to mild-to-moderate hearing loss with reduced penetrance. To investigate the pathogenic mechanism underlying this variant, we generated a knock-in mouse model of homozygous p.V37I by an embryonic stem cell gene targeting method. Auditory brainstem response test showed that the knock-in mice developed progressive, mild-to-moderate hearing loss over the first 4-9 months. Overall no significant developmental and morphological abnormality was observed in the knock-in mouse cochlea, while confocal immunostaining and electron microscopic scanning revealed minor loss of the outer hair cells. Gene expression microarray analysis identified 105 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated genes in P5 knock-in mouse cochleae (P < 0.05 adjusted by the Benjamini &Hochberg method), among which four top candidate genes with the highest fold-changes or implication to deafness Fcer1g, Nnmt and Lars2 and Cuedc1 were verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that the homozygous p.V37I knock-in mouse modeled the hearing phenotype of the human patients and can serve as a useful animal model for further studies. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study may shed new insights into the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism and the phenotypic modification of homozygous p.V37I. PMID:27623246

  9. Novel Strategy for Phenotypic Characterization of Human B Lymphocytes from Precursors to Effector Cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Vettier, Claire; Laurin, David; Pernollet, Martine; Raskovalova, Tatiana; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Jacob, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    A precise identification and phenotypic characterization of human B-cell subsets is of crucial importance in both basic research and medicine. In the literature, flow cytometry studies for the phenotypic characterization of B-lymphocytes are mainly focused on the description of a particular cell stage, or of specific cell stages observed in a single type of sample. In the present work, we propose a backbone of 6 antibodies (CD38, CD27, CD10, CD19, CD5 and CD45) and an efficient gating strategy to identify, in a single analysis tube, a large number of B-cell subsets covering the whole B-cell differentiation from precursors to memory and plasma cells. Furthermore, by adding two antibodies in an 8-color combination, our approach allows the analysis of the modulation of any cell surface marker of interest along B-cell differentiation. We thus developed a panel of seven 8-colour antibody combinations to phenotypically characterize B-cell subpopulations in bone marrow, peripheral blood, lymph node and cord blood samples. Beyond qualitative information provided by biparametric representations, we also quantified antigen expression on each of the identified B-cell subsets and we proposed a series of informative curves showing the modulation of seventeen cell surface markers along B-cell differentiation. Our approach by flow cytometry provides an efficient tool to obtain quantitative data on B-cell surface markers expression with a relative easy-to-handle technique that can be applied in routine explorations. PMID:27657694

  10. Gene-environment and protein-degradation signatures characterize genomic and phenotypic diversity in wild Caenorhabditis elegans populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Analyzing and understanding the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes is at the heart of genetics. Research on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been instrumental for unraveling genotype-phenotype relations, and has important implications for understanding the biology of mammals, but almost all studies, including forward and reverse genetic screens, are limited by investigations in only one canonical genotype. This hampers the detection and functional analysis of allelic variants, which play a key role in controlling many complex traits. It is therefore essential to explore the full potential of the natural genetic variation and evolutionary context of the genotype-phenotype map in wild C. elegans populations. Results We used multiple wild C. elegans populations freshly isolated from local sites to investigate gene sequence polymorphisms and a multitude of phenotypes including the transcriptome, fitness, and behavioral traits. The genotype, transcriptome, and a number of fitness traits showed a direct link with the original site of the strains. The separation between the isolation sites was prevalent on all chromosomes, but chromosome V was the largest contributor to this variation. These results were supported by a differential food preference of the wild isolates for naturally co-existing bacterial species. Comparing polymorphic genes between the populations with a set of genes extracted from 19 different studies on gene expression in C. elegans exposed to biotic and abiotic factors, such as bacteria, osmotic pressure, and temperature, revealed a significant enrichment for genes involved in gene-environment interactions and protein degradation. Conclusions We found that wild C. elegans populations are characterized by gene-environment signatures, and we have unlocked a wealth of genotype-phenotype relations for the first time. Studying natural isolates provides a treasure trove of evidence compared with that unearthed by the current

  11. PTPROt-mediated regulation of p53/Foxm1 suppresses leukemic phenotype in a CLL mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Motiwala, Tasneem; Kutay, Huban; Zanesi, Nicola; Frissora, Frank W.; Mo, Xiaokui; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Jacob, Samson T.

    2014-01-01

    The gene encoding PTPROt is methylated and suppressed in Chronic Lymphocytc Leukemia. PTPROt exhibits in vitro tumor suppressor characteristics through the regulation of B-cell receptor signaling. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice with B-cell specific expression of PTPROt. While lymphocyte development is normal in these mice, crossing them with TCL1 Tg mouse model of CLL results in a survival advantage compared to the TCL1 Tg mice. Gene expression profiling of splenic B-lymphocytes before detectable signs of CLL followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that the most prominently regulated functions in TCL1 Tg vs non-transgenic (NTg) and TCL1 Tg vs PTPROt/TCL1 double Tg are the same and also biologically relevant to this study. Further, enhanced expression of the chemokine Ccl3, the oncogenic transcription factor Foxm1 and its targets in TCL1 Tg mice were significantly suppressed in the double Tg mice suggesting a protective function of PTPROt against leukemogenesis. This study also showed that PTPROt mediated regulation of Foxm1 involves activation of p53, a transcriptional repressor of Foxm1, which is facilitated through suppression of B-cell receptor signaling. These results establish the in vivo tumor suppressive function of PTPROt, and identify p53/Foxm1 axis as a key downstream effect of PTPROt-mediated suppression of BCR signaling. PMID:25482129

  12. Generalized alopecic and cystic dermatosis in a cat: a counterpart to the hairless mouse phenotype or a unique congenital dermatosis?

    PubMed

    Neuber, Ariane E; Van Den Broek, Adri H M; Rhind, Susan M; Hill, Peter B; Thoday, Keith L

    2006-02-01

    A 2-year-old, male neutered, domestic semi-long-haired cat was presented with a 1.5-year history of progressive, initially nonpruritic alopecia and malodorous greasy exudate affecting the distal extremities, trunk and neck but sparing the head and tail. The extensive alopecia and 'seborrhoea' were associated with severe thickening of the skin and fold formation on the dorsal head and distal extremities as well as the lateral thorax and abdomen. The hair was easily epilated, numerous milia were seen on the ventral abdomen and the caudal and lateral thighs, and mild paronychia was present. Histopathological examination of skin biopsies revealed marked cystic dilation of hair follicles and sebaceous glands with follicular hypoplasia, infundibular hyperkeratosis and variable associated inflammation. Systemic glucocorticoid therapy in combination with topical washes with chlorhexidine and miconazole resulted in a marked improvement and some hair regrowth, but the cat was subsequently lost to follow-up. The dermatosis resembles a number of conditions in other species, but it is not clear whether it is a counterpart to the hairless mutant mouse or is a unique dermatosis.

  13. Osteoblast-specific expression of the fibrous dysplasia (FD)-causing mutation Gsα(R201C) produces a high bone mass phenotype but does not reproduce FD in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Remoli, Cristina; Michienzi, Stefano; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Consiglio, Alberto Di; Cersosimo, Stefania; Spica, Emanuela; Robey, Pamela G; Holmbeck, Kenn; Cumano, Ana; Boyde, Alan; Davis, Graham; Saggio, Isabella; Riminucci, Mara; Bianco, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    We recently reported the generation and initial characterization of the first direct model of human fibrous dysplasia (FD; OMIM #174800), obtained through the constitutive systemic expression of one of the disease-causing mutations, Gsα(R201C) , in the mouse. To define the specific pathogenetic role(s) of individual cell types within the stromal/osteogenic system in FD, we generated mice expressing Gsα(R201C) selectively in mature osteoblasts using the 2.3kb Col1a1 promoter. We show here that this results in a striking high bone mass phenotype but not in a mimicry of human FD. The high bone mass phenotype involves specifically a deforming excess of cortical bone and prolonged and ectopic cortical bone remodeling. Expression of genes characteristic of late stages of bone cell differentiation/maturation is profoundly altered as a result of expression of Gsα(R201C) in osteoblasts, and expression of the Wnt inhibitor Sost is reduced. Although high bone mass is, in fact, a feature of some types/stages of FD lesions in humans, it is marrow fibrosis, localized loss of adipocytes and hematopoietic tissue, osteomalacia, and osteolytic changes that together represent the characteristic pathological profile of FD, as well as the sources of specific morbidity. None of these features are reproduced in mice with osteoblast-specific expression of Gsα(R201C) . We further show that hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells, as well as more mature cell compartments, and adipocyte development are normal in these mice. These data demonstrate that effects of Gsα mutations underpinning FD-defining tissue changes and morbidity do not reflect the effects of the mutations on osteoblasts proper.

  14. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of novel mouse cell line (NIH/3T3)-adapted human enterovirus 71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv).

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2014-01-01

    Since its identification in 1969, Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has been causing periodic outbreaks of infection in children worldwide and most prominently in the Asia-Pacific Region. Understanding the pathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is hampered by the virus's inability to infect small animals and replicate in their derived in vitro cultured cells. This manuscript describes the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of two selected EV71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv), which have been adapted to replicate in mouse-derived NIH/3T3 cells, in contrast to the original parental virus which is only able to replicate in primate cell lines. The EV71:TLLm strain exhibited productive infection in all primate and rodent cell lines tested, while EV71:TLLmv exhibited greater preference for mouse cell lines. EV71:TLLmv displayed higher degree of adaptation and temperature adaptability in NIH/3T3 cells than in Vero cells, suggesting much higher fitness in NIH/3T3 cells. In comparison with the parental EV71:BS strain, the adapted strains accumulated multiple adaptive mutations in the genome resulting in amino acid substitutions, most notably in the capsid-encoding region (P1) and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3D). Two mutations, E167D and L169F, were mapped to the VP1 canyon that binds the SCARB2 receptor on host cells. Another two mutations, S135T and K140I, were located in the VP2 neutralization epitope spanning amino acids 136-150. This is the first report of human EV71 with the ability to productively infect rodent cell lines in vitro.

  15. Effects of Deletion of Mutant Huntingtin in Steroidogenic Factor 1 Neurons on the Psychiatric and Metabolic Phenotype in the BACHD Mouse Model of Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Petersén, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric and metabolic features appear several years before motor disturbances in the neurodegenerative Huntington’s disease (HD), caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Although the mechanisms leading to these aspects are unknown, dysfunction in the hypothalamus, a brain region controlling emotion and metabolism, has been suggested. A direct link between the expression of the disease causing protein, huntingtin (HTT), in the hypothalamus and the development of metabolic and psychiatric-like features have been shown in the BACHD mouse model of HD. However, precisely which circuitry in the hypothalamus is critical for these features is not known. We hypothesized that expression of mutant HTT in the ventromedial hypothalamus, an area involved in the regulation of metabolism and emotion would be important for the development of these non-motor aspects. Therefore, we inactivated mutant HTT in a specific neuronal population of the ventromedial hypothalamus expressing the transcription factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) in the BACHD mouse using cross-breeding based on a Cre-loxP system. Effects on anxiety-like behavior were assessed using the elevated plus maze and novelty-induced suppressed feeding test. Depressive-like behavior was assessed using the Porsolt forced swim test. Effects on the metabolic phenotype were analyzed using measurements of body weight and body fat, as well as serum insulin and leptin levels. Interestingly, the inactivation of mutant HTT in SF1-expressing neurons exerted a partial positive effect on the depressive-like behavior in female BACHD mice at 4 months of age. In this cohort of mice, no anxiety-like behavior was detected. The deletion of mutant HTT in SF1 neurons did not have any effect on the development of metabolic features in BACHD mice. Taken together, our results indicate that mutant HTT regulates metabolic networks by affecting hypothalamic circuitries that do not involve the SF1 neurons of the

  16. Brain and behaviour phenotyping of a mouse model of neurofibromatosis type-1: an MRI/DTI study on social cognition.

    PubMed

    Petrella, L I; Cai, Y; Sereno, J V; Gonçalves, S I; Silva, A J; Castelo-Branco, M

    2016-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) is a common neurogenetic disorder and an important cause of intellectual disability. Brain-behaviour associations can be examined in vivo using morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to study brain structure. Here, we studied structural and behavioural phenotypes in heterozygous Nf1 mice (Nf1(+/-) ) using T2-weighted imaging MRI and DTI, with a focus on social recognition deficits. We found that Nf1(+/-) mice have larger volumes than wild-type (WT) mice in regions of interest involved in social cognition, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the caudate-putamen (CPu). Higher diffusivity was found across a distributed network of cortical and subcortical brain regions, within and beyond these regions. Significant differences were observed for the social recognition test. Most importantly, significant structure-function correlations were identified concerning social recognition performance and PFC volumes in Nf1(+/-) mice. Analyses of spatial learning corroborated the previously known deficits in the mutant mice, as corroborated by platform crossings, training quadrant time and average proximity measures. Moreover, linear discriminant analysis of spatial performance identified 2 separate sub-groups in Nf1(+/-) mice. A significant correlation between quadrant time and CPu volumes was found specifically for the sub-group of Nf1(+/-) mice with lower spatial learning performance, suggesting additional evidence for reorganization of this region. We found strong evidence that social and spatial cognition deficits can be associated with PFC/CPu structural changes and reorganization in NF1. PMID:27283753

  17. Postsymptomatic restoration of SMN rescues the disease phenotype in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Cathleen M.; Kariya, Shingo; Patruni, Sunita; Osborne, Melissa A.; Liu, Don; Henderson, Christopher E.; Li, Darrick K.; Pellizzoni, Livio; Rojas, José; Valenzuela, David M.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Winberg, Margaret L.; Monani, Umrao R.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common neuromuscular disorder in humans. In fact, it is the most frequently inherited cause of infant mortality, being the result of mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene that reduce levels of SMN protein. Restoring levels of SMN protein in individuals with SMA is perceived to be a viable therapeutic option, but the efficacy of such a strategy once symptoms are apparent has not been determined. We have generated mice harboring an inducible Smn rescue allele and used them in a model of SMA to investigate the effects of turning on SMN expression at different time points during the course of the disease. Restoring SMN protein even after disease onset was sufficient to reverse neuromuscular pathology and effect robust rescue of the SMA phenotype. Importantly, our findings also indicated that there was a therapeutic window of opportunity from P4 through P8 defined by the extent of neuromuscular synapse pathology and the ability of motor neurons to respond to SMN induction, following which restoration of the protein to the organism failed to produce therapeutic benefit. Nevertheless, our results suggest that even in severe SMA, timely reinstatement of the SMN protein may halt the progression of the disease and serve as an effective postsymptomatic treatment. PMID:21785219

  18. Disease Phenotypes in a Mouse Model of RNA Toxicity Are Independent of Protein Kinase Cα and Protein Kinase Cβ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun K.; Yadava, Ramesh S.; Mandal, Mahua; Mahadevan, Karunasai; Yu, Qing; Leitges, Michael; Mahadevan, Mani S.

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1(DM1) is the prototype for diseases caused by RNA toxicity. RNAs from the mutant allele contain an expanded (CUG)n tract within the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. The toxic RNAs affect the function of RNA binding proteins leading to sequestration of muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins and increased levels of CELF1 (CUGBP, Elav-like family member 1). The mechanism for increased CELF1 is not very clear. One favored proposition is hyper-phosphorylation of CELF1 by Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) leading to increased CELF1 stability. However, most of the evidence supporting a role for PKC-α relies on pharmacological inhibition of PKC. To further investigate the role of PKCs in the pathogenesis of RNA toxicity, we generated transgenic mice with RNA toxicity that lacked both the PKCα and PKCβ isoforms. We find that these mice show similar disease progression as mice wildtype for the PKC isoforms. Additionally, the expression of CELF1 is also not affected by deficiency of PKCα and PKCβ in these RNA toxicity mice. These data suggest that disease phenotypes of these RNA toxicity mice are independent of PKCα and PKCβ. PMID:27657532

  19. Molecular characterization and phenotypical study of β-thalassemia in Tucumán, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lazarte, Sandra S; Mónaco, María E; Haro, Ana C; Jiménez, Cecilia L; Ledesma Achem, Myriam E; Issé, Blanca A

    2014-01-01

    The main hereditary hemoglobin (Hb) disorder in Argentina is β-thalassemia (β-thal). Molecular studies performed in the center of the country exhibited a marked prevalence of the codon 39 (C > T) and IVS-I-110 (G > A) mutations. The northwest region of Argentina has a different demographic history characterized by an important Spanish influx. Seventy-one β-thal carriers attending the Instituto de Bioquímica Aplicada, Tucumán, Argentina, were investigated for β-globin gene mutations by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). To examine the genotype-phenotype relationship, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular Hb (MCH) and Hb A2 were measured. In order to recognize β-thal, Mentzer Index, Shine & Lal and Red Cell Distribution Width Index (RDWI), were calculated. The ethnic background of subjects revealed that 82.0% of the population was of Italian, Spanish and Arab origin. Seven mutations were detected: codon 39 (45.0%), IVS-I-1 (G > A) (22.5%), IVS-I-110 (16.3%), IVS-II-1 (G > A) (4.1%), IVS-I-1 (G > T) (2.0%), IVS-I-6 (T > C) (2.0%) and IVS-II-745 (G > C) (2.0%). In three families (6.1%), β-thal mutations were not determined. These results differed from other Argentinian studies because at present codon 39 and IVS-I-1 are the most prevalent; MCV, MCH and Hb A2 did not correlate with the type of mutation (β(0)/β(+)). Values of MCV (67.0 fL) and Hb A2 (4.85%) were unable to discriminate between them. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in MCV, MCH and Shine & Lal were observed between the undetermined group and the three most common mutations. These data show different patterns of β-thal mutations in the center and northwest regions of Argentina. Differences might represent the influence of Spanish immigration.

  20. Isolation, Identification and Phenotypic Characterization of Microcystin-Degrading Bacteria from Lake Erie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, A.; Mou, X. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Erie, the smallest and warmest lake among the Laurentian Great Lakes, is known for its problem of eutrophication and frequent occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs). One major harmful effect of CyanoHABs is the production of cyanotoxins, especially microcystins. Microcystins (MC) are a group of hepatotoxins and the predominant variant of them is MC-LR. Field measurements and lab experiments indicate that MC degradation in Lake Erie is mainly carried out by indigenous bacteria. However, our knowledge on taxa involved in this process is very limited. This study aimed to fill this knowledge gap using a culture-dependent approach. Water and surface sediment samples were collected from Lake Erie in 2014 and 2015 and enriched with MC-LR. Cells were plated on a number of culturing media. The obtained pure bacterial cultures were screened for MC degrading abilities by MT2 BIO-LOG assays and by growing cells in liquid media containing MC-LR as the sole carbon source. In the latter experiment, MC concentrations were measured using HPLC. Isolates showing positive MC degradation activities in the screening steps were designated MC+ bacteria and characterized based on their phenotypic properties, including colony pigmentation, elevation, opacity, margin, gram nature and motility. The taxonomic identity of MC+ bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene full-length DNA sequencing. The presence of mlrA, a gene encoding MC cleavage pathway, was detected by PCR. Our culturing efforts obtained 520 pure cultures; 44 of them were identified as MC+. These MC+ isolates showed diversity in taxonomic identities and differed in their morphology, gram nature, colony characteristics and motility. PCR amplification of mlrA gene yield negative results for all MC+ isolates, indicating that the primers that were used may not be ubiquitous enough to cover the heterogeneity of mlrA genes or, more likely, alternative degradative genes/pathways were employed by Lake Erie bacteria

  1. Characterizing the Phenotype and Genotype of a Family With Occult Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Connie J.; Scholl, Hendrik P. N.; Miller, Neil R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Iwata, Takeshi; Birch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the phenotype of a white patient with occult macular dystrophy (OMD) and her clinically unaffected family members and to determine whether similar mutations were present in the RP1L1 gene in this family. Occult macular dystrophy is a rare macular dystrophy with central cone dysfunction hidden behind a normal fundus appearance that has been attributed to a mutation in the retinitis pigmentosa 1–like 1 (RP1L1) gene in 4 Japanese families. Methods In this observational cross-sectional study of 1 white family with OMD, patients meeting the clinical criteria for OMD and their family members were evaluated by use of multifocal electroretinography, the Farnsworth D-15 color vision test, automated perimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence, and fundus photography. Fluorescein angiography was performed only on the proband. Members of this family were screened for genetic mutations in the RP1L1 gene. Results In the family studied, the clinically affected proband was noted to have loss of the foveal outer segments and absence of bowing of the inner segment/outer segment junction on SD-OCT scans. In addition, 1 clinically unaffected family member also demonstrated loss of the foveal photoreceptor outer segments and, therefore, decreased bowing of the inner segment/outer segment junction on SD-OCT scans. The fundus autofluorescence images of the eyes of the proband and her family members were normal. Although mutations in the RP1L1 gene have been identified in sporadic and autosomal dominant OMD pedigrees, no mutations in the RP1L1 gene were found in any of the participants. Conclusions Loss of the outer segments of foveal photoreceptors can be detected and quantified by use of SD-OCT in patients with OMD. Similar findings are present in some clinically unaffected family members and may represent subclinical manifestations of the disease. Although mutations in the RP1L1 gene have been described in

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Phenotypically Characterized Cryptococcus laurentii Isolates Reveals High Frequency of Cryptic Species

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Paim, Kennio; Ferreira, Thatiana Bragine; Andrade-Silva, Leonardo; Mora, Delio Jose; Springer, Deborah J.; Heitman, Joseph; Fonseca, Fernanda Machado; Matos, Dulcilena; Melhem, Márcia Souza Carvalho; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Cryptococcus laurentii has been considered saprophytic and its taxonomy is still being described, several cases of human infections have already reported. This study aimed to evaluate molecular aspects of C. laurentii isolates from Brazil, Botswana, Canada, and the United States. Methods In this study, 100 phenotypically identified C. laurentii isolates were evaluated by sequencing the 18S nuclear ribosomal small subunit rRNA gene (18S-SSU), D1/D2 region of 28S nuclear ribosomal large subunit rRNA gene (28S-LSU), and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal region. Results BLAST searches using 550-bp, 650-bp, and 550-bp sequenced amplicons obtained from the 18S-SSU, 28S-LSU, and the ITS region led to the identification of 75 C. laurentii strains that shared 99–100% identity with C. laurentii CBS 139. A total of nine isolates shared 99% identity with both Bullera sp. VY-68 and C. laurentii RY1. One isolate shared 99% identity with Cryptococcus rajasthanensis CBS 10406, and eight isolates shared 100% identity with Cryptococcus sp. APSS 862 according to the 28S-LSU and ITS regions and designated as Cryptococcus aspenensis sp. nov. (CBS 13867). While 16 isolates shared 99% identity with Cryptococcus flavescens CBS 942 according to the 18S-SSU sequence, only six were confirmed using the 28S-LSU and ITS region sequences. The remaining 10 shared 99% identity with Cryptococcus terrestris CBS 10810, which was recently described in Brazil. Through concatenated sequence analyses, seven sequence types in C. laurentii, three in C. flavescens, one in C. terrestris, and one in the C. aspenensis sp. nov. were identified. Conclusions Sequencing permitted the characterization of 75% of the environmental C. laurentii isolates from different geographical areas and the identification of seven haplotypes of this species. Among sequenced regions, the increased variability of the ITS region in comparison to the 18S-SSU and 28S-LSU regions reinforces its

  3. Opposite Phenotypes of Muscle Strength and Locomotor Function in Mouse Models of Partial Trisomy and Monosomy 21 for the Proximal Hspa13-App Region

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Véronique; Duchon, Arnaud; Romestaing, Caroline; Sahun, Ignasi; Pothion, Stéphanie; Karout, Mona; Borel, Christelle; Dembele, Doulaye; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Messaddeq, Nadia; Sharp, Andrew J.; Roussel, Damien; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Dierssen, Mara; Hérault, Yann

    2015-01-01

    The trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), which causes Down syndrome (DS), is the most common viable human aneuploidy. In contrast to trisomy, the complete monosomy (M21) of Hsa21 is lethal, and only partial monosomy or mosaic monosomy of Hsa21 is seen. Both conditions lead to variable physiological abnormalities with constant intellectual disability, locomotor deficits, and altered muscle tone. To search for dosage-sensitive genes involved in DS and M21 phenotypes, we created two new mouse models: the Ts3Yah carrying a tandem duplication and the Ms3Yah carrying a deletion of the Hspa13-App interval syntenic with 21q11.2-q21.3. Here we report that the trisomy and the monosomy of this region alter locomotion, muscle strength, mass, and energetic balance. The expression profiling of skeletal muscles revealed global changes in the regulation of genes implicated in energetic metabolism, mitochondrial activity, and biogenesis. These genes are downregulated in Ts3Yah mice and upregulated in Ms3Yah mice. The shift in skeletal muscle metabolism correlates with a change in mitochondrial proliferation without an alteration in the respiratory function. However, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from mitochondrial complex I decreased in Ms3Yah mice, while the membrane permeability of Ts3Yah mitochondria slightly increased. Thus, we demonstrated how the Hspa13-App interval controls metabolic and mitochondrial phenotypes in muscles certainly as a consequence of change in dose of Gabpa, Nrip1, and Atp5j. Our results indicate that the copy number variation in the Hspa13-App region has a peripheral impact on locomotor activity by altering muscle function. PMID:25803843

  4. GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse modulate neurochemical, electrographic, and behavioral phenotypes of wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Flint, RaShonda R; Chang, Theresa; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-09-15

    Drugs that potentiate transmission at GABA(A) receptors are widely used to enhance sleep and to cause general anesthesia. The mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO) of mouse modulate five phenotypes of arousal: sleep and wakefulness, cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO, breathing, and recovery time from general anesthesia. Microinjections into the PnO of saline (vehicle control), the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, muscimol with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, and bicuculline alone were performed in male C57BL/6J mice (n = 33) implanted with EEG recording electrodes. Muscimol caused a significant increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. These effects were reversed by coadministration of bicuculline. Bicuculline administered alone caused a significant decrease in wakefulness and increase in NREM sleep and REM sleep. Muscimol significantly increased EEG power in the delta range (0.5-4 Hz) during wakefulness and in the theta range (4-9 Hz) during REM sleep. Dialysis delivery of bicuculline to the PnO of male mice (n = 18) anesthetized with isoflurane significantly increased ACh release in the PnO, decreased breathing rate, and increased anesthesia recovery time. All drug effects were concentration dependent. The effects on phenotypes of arousal support the conclusion that GABA(A) receptors in the PnO promote wakefulness and suggest that increasing GABAergic transmission in the PnO may be one mechanism underlying the phenomenon of paradoxical behavioral activation by some benzodiazepines.

  5. Opposite phenotypes of muscle strength and locomotor function in mouse models of partial trisomy and monosomy 21 for the proximal Hspa13-App region.

    PubMed

    Brault, Véronique; Duchon, Arnaud; Romestaing, Caroline; Sahun, Ignasi; Pothion, Stéphanie; Karout, Mona; Borel, Christelle; Dembele, Doulaye; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Messaddeq, Nadia; Sharp, Andrew J; Roussel, Damien; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Dierssen, Mara; Hérault, Yann

    2015-03-01

    The trisomy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21), which causes Down syndrome (DS), is the most common viable human aneuploidy. In contrast to trisomy, the complete monosomy (M21) of Hsa21 is lethal, and only partial monosomy or mosaic monosomy of Hsa21 is seen. Both conditions lead to variable physiological abnormalities with constant intellectual disability, locomotor deficits, and altered muscle tone. To search for dosage-sensitive genes involved in DS and M21 phenotypes, we created two new mouse models: the Ts3Yah carrying a tandem duplication and the Ms3Yah carrying a deletion of the Hspa13-App interval syntenic with 21q11.2-q21.3. Here we report that the trisomy and the monosomy of this region alter locomotion, muscle strength, mass, and energetic balance. The expression profiling of skeletal muscles revealed global changes in the regulation of genes implicated in energetic metabolism, mitochondrial activity, and biogenesis. These genes are downregulated in Ts3Yah mice and upregulated in Ms3Yah mice. The shift in skeletal muscle metabolism correlates with a change in mitochondrial proliferation without an alteration in the respiratory function. However, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from mitochondrial complex I decreased in Ms3Yah mice, while the membrane permeability of Ts3Yah mitochondria slightly increased. Thus, we demonstrated how the Hspa13-App interval controls metabolic and mitochondrial phenotypes in muscles certainly as a consequence of change in dose of Gabpa, Nrip1, and Atp5j. Our results indicate that the copy number variation in the Hspa13-App region has a peripheral impact on locomotor activity by altering muscle function.

  6. Glucocorticoid Steroid and Alendronate Treatment Alleviates Dystrophic Phenotype with Enhanced Functional Glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan in Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy with FKRPP448L Mutation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Richardson, Stephanie M; Bollinger, Lauren E; Blaeser, Anthony; Madden, Kyle L; Sun, Yubo; Luckie, Taylor M; Cox, Michael D; Sparks, Susan; Harper, Amy D; Lu, Qi Long

    2016-06-01

    Fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy is characterized by defects in glycosylation of α-dystroglycan with variable clinical phenotypes, most commonly as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. There is no effective therapy available. Glucocorticoid steroids have become the standard treatment for Duchenne and other muscular dystrophies with serious adverse effects, including excessive weight gain, immune suppression, and bone loss. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy for prevention of osteoporosis. Herein, we evaluated prednisolone and alendronate for their therapeutic potential in the FKRPP448L-mutant mouse representing moderate limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. Mice were treated with prednisolone, alendronate, and both in combination for up to 6 months. Prednisolone improved muscle pathology with significant reduction in muscle degeneration, but had no effect on serum creatine kinase levels and muscle strength. Alendronate treatment did not ameliorate muscle degeneration, but demonstrated a limited enhancement on muscle function test. Combined treatment of prednisolone and alendronate provided best improvement in muscle pathology with normalized fiber size distribution and significantly reduced serum creatine kinase levels, but had limited effect on muscle force generation. The use of alendronate significantly mitigated the bone loss. Prednisolone alone and in combination with alendronate enhance functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan. These results, for the first time, demonstrate the efficacy and feasibility of this alliance treatment of the two drugs for fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy.

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Streptococcus agalactiae in pregnant women. First study in a province of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Oviedo, P; Pegels, E; Laczeski, M; Quiroga, M; Vergara, M

    2013-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal infections. Our purpose was to characterize GBS colonization in pregnant women, current serotypes, resistance phenotypes and genes associated with virulence. In Misiones, Argentina, there are no previous data on this topic. Vaginal-rectal swabs from 3125 pregnant women were studied between 2004 and 2010. GBS strains were identified by conventional and serological methods (Phadebact Strep B Test, ETC International, Bactus AB, Sweden). Serotypes were detected using Strep-B Latex (Statens Serum Institut, Denmark). Resistance phenotypes were determined by the double-disk test. Genes were studied by PCR. Maternal colonization was 9.38%. Resistance to erythromycin was 11.6%, and the constitutive phenotype was the predominant one. Serotype Ia was the most frequent, whereas serotypes IV, VI, VII and VIII were not detected. The lmb, bca and hylB genes were detected in more than 79% of the strains. In this study, the colonization rate with GBS and the serotype distribution were compared with studies reported in other areas of the country. The high resistance to erythromycin in Misiones justifies performing antibiotic susceptibility testing. The serotype distribution, the genes encoding putative virulence factors, and the patterns of resistance phenotypes of GBS may vary in different areas. They thus need to be evaluated in each place to devise strategies for prevention. PMID:24159312

  8. Multi-parameter phenotypic profiling: using cellular effects to characterize small-molecule compounds.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Mitchison, Timothy J; Bender, Andreas; Young, Daniel W; Tallarico, John A

    2009-07-01

    Multi-parameter phenotypic profiling of small molecules provides important insights into their mechanisms of action, as well as a systems level understanding of biological pathways and their responses to small molecule treatments. It therefore deserves more attention at an early step in the drug discovery pipeline. Here, we summarize the technologies that are currently in use for phenotypic profiling--including mRNA-, protein- and imaging-based multi-parameter profiling--in the drug discovery context. We think that an earlier integration of phenotypic profiling technologies, combined with effective experimental and in silico target identification approaches, can improve success rates of lead selection and optimization in the drug discovery process.

  9. The Developmental Evolution of the Seizure Phenotype and Cortical Inhibition in Mouse Models of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Fazal; Zhou, Chengwen; Ding, Li; Zaidi, Sahar; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1 subunit mutation, A322D, causes autosomal dominant juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Previous in vitro studies demonstrated that A322D elicits α1(A322D) protein degradation and that the residual mutant protein causes a dominant-negative effect on wild type GABAARs. Here, we determined the effects of heterozygous A322D knockin (Hetα1AD) and deletion (Hetα1KO) on seizures, GABAAR expression, and motor cortex (M1) miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) at two developmental time-points, P35 and P120. Both Hetα1AD and Hetα1KO mice experience absence seizures at P35 that persist at P120, but have substantially more frequent spontaneous and evoked polyspike wave discharges and myoclonic seizures at P120. Both mutant mice have increased total and synaptic α3 subunit expression at both time-points and decreased α1 subunit expression at P35, but not P120. There are proportional reductions in α3, β2, and γ2 subunit expression between P35 and P120 in wild type and mutant mice. In M1, mutants have decreased mIPSC peak amplitudes and prolonged decay constants compared with wild type, and the Hetα1AD mice have reduced mIPSC frequency and smaller amplitudes than Hetα1KO mice. Wild type and mutants exhibit proportional increases in mIPSC amplitudes between P35 and P120. We conclude that Hetα1KO and Hetα1AD mice model the JME subsyndrome, childhood absence epilepsy persisting and evolving into JME. Both mutants alter GABAAR composition and motor cortex physiology in a manner expected to increase neuronal synchrony and excitability to produce seizures. However, developmental changes in M1 GABAARs do not explain the worsened phenotype at P120 in mutant mice. PMID:26054439

  10. Construction of minicircle DNA vectors capable of correcting familial hypercholesterolemia phenotype in a LDLR-deficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hou, X; Jiao, R; Guo, X; Wang, T; Chen, P; Wang, D; Chen, Y; He, C-Y; Chen, Z-Y

    2016-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) caused by defect in low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is a life-threatening disease with poor response to conventional treatments. Earlier gene therapy studies have generated promising results, but further development is hampered because the cells harboring the viral vectors were eliminated by host immune system soon after delivery, whereas the nonviral vectors were too bulky to be delivered to target cells. To overcome these problems, we constructed multiple minicircle (MC) DNA vectors to express the therapeutic LDLR. MC is an optimized nonviral vector that is capable of expressing high level of transgene product persistently. We found that among the seven MCs tested, the best is MC5 with multiple advanced features. First, the LDLr gene was placed under the control of sterol regulatory element (SRE) using LDLr gene promoter or apoprotein E (ApoE) promoter, allowing the transcription of the LDLr gene to be regulated by serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as its functional gene counterpart. Second, a hepatic control region (HCR) was placed upstream of the promoter that serves as a controller to ensure liver-specific expression. Third, the modified Kozak sequence was placed in front of the LDLr gene start codon to enhance its translation efficiency. MC5 was 5.23 kb in size, and was capable of tight physiological control in intracellular LDL cholesterol level even when challenged with high dose of sterols in vitro. Importantly, it was able to correct the phenotype of LDLR-deficient mice C57BL/6 LDLR(-/-) for more than 105 days without detectable toxicity. Therefore, this MC has the clinical application potential for treating FH. PMID:27092942

  11. Phenotype MicroArrays as a complementary tool to next generation sequencing for characterization of tree endophytes.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, Kathrin; Macaya-Sanz, David; Martín, Juan A; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Witzell, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to calibrate microbial community profiles obtained through next generation sequencing (NGS) with relevant taxonomic identities of the microbes, and to further associate these identities with phenotypic attributes. Phenotype MicroArray (PM) techniques provide a semi-high throughput assay for characterization and monitoring the microbial cellular phenotypes. Here, we present detailed descriptions of two different PM protocols used in our recent studies on fungal endophytes of forest trees, and highlight the benefits and limitations of this technique. We found that the PM approach enables effective screening of substrate utilization by endophytes. However, the technical limitations are multifaceted and the interpretation of the PM data challenging. For the best result, we recommend that the growth conditions for the fungi are carefully standardized. In addition, rigorous replication and control strategies should be employed whether using pre-configured, commercial microwell-plates or in-house designed PM plates for targeted substrate analyses. With these precautions, the PM technique is a valuable tool to characterize the metabolic capabilities of individual endophyte isolates, or successional endophyte communities identified by NGS, allowing a functional interpretation of the taxonomic data. Thus, PM approaches can provide valuable complementary information for NGS studies of fungal endophytes in forest trees.

  12. Phenotype MicroArrays as a complementary tool to next generation sequencing for characterization of tree endophytes

    PubMed Central

    Blumenstein, Kathrin; Macaya-Sanz, David; Martín, Juan A.; Albrectsen, Benedicte R.; Witzell, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to calibrate microbial community profiles obtained through next generation sequencing (NGS) with relevant taxonomic identities of the microbes, and to further associate these identities with phenotypic attributes. Phenotype MicroArray (PM) techniques provide a semi-high throughput assay for characterization and monitoring the microbial cellular phenotypes. Here, we present detailed descriptions of two different PM protocols used in our recent studies on fungal endophytes of forest trees, and highlight the benefits and limitations of this technique. We found that the PM approach enables effective screening of substrate utilization by endophytes. However, the technical limitations are multifaceted and the interpretation of the PM data challenging. For the best result, we recommend that the growth conditions for the fungi are carefully standardized. In addition, rigorous replication and control strategies should be employed whether using pre-configured, commercial microwell-plates or in-house designed PM plates for targeted substrate analyses. With these precautions, the PM technique is a valuable tool to characterize the metabolic capabilities of individual endophyte isolates, or successional endophyte communities identified by NGS, allowing a functional interpretation of the taxonomic data. Thus, PM approaches can provide valuable complementary information for NGS studies of fungal endophytes in forest trees. PMID:26441951

  13. Phenotype MicroArrays as a complementary tool to next generation sequencing for characterization of tree endophytes.

    PubMed

    Blumenstein, Kathrin; Macaya-Sanz, David; Martín, Juan A; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Witzell, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to calibrate microbial community profiles obtained through next generation sequencing (NGS) with relevant taxonomic identities of the microbes, and to further associate these identities with phenotypic attributes. Phenotype MicroArray (PM) techniques provide a semi-high throughput assay for characterization and monitoring the microbial cellular phenotypes. Here, we present detailed descriptions of two different PM protocols used in our recent studies on fungal endophytes of forest trees, and highlight the benefits and limitations of this technique. We found that the PM approach enables effective screening of substrate utilization by endophytes. However, the technical limitations are multifaceted and the interpretation of the PM data challenging. For the best result, we recommend that the growth conditions for the fungi are carefully standardized. In addition, rigorous replication and control strategies should be employed whether using pre-configured, commercial microwell-plates or in-house designed PM plates for targeted substrate analyses. With these precautions, the PM technique is a valuable tool to characterize the metabolic capabilities of individual endophyte isolates, or successional endophyte communities identified by NGS, allowing a functional interpretation of the taxonomic data. Thus, PM approaches can provide valuable complementary information for NGS studies of fungal endophytes in forest trees. PMID:26441951

  14. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  15. A Quick Phenotypic Neurological Scoring System for Evaluating Disease Progression in the SOD1-G93A Mouse Model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Hatzipetros, Theo; Kidd, Joshua D; Moreno, Andy J; Thompson, Kenneth; Gill, Alan; Vieira, Fernando G

    2015-01-01

    The SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse is the most widely used animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At ALS TDI we developed a phenotypic screening protocol, demonstrated in video herein, which reliably assesses the neuromuscular function of SOD1-G93A mice in a quick manner. This protocol encompasses a simple neurological scoring system (NeuroScore) designed to assess hindlimb function. NeuroScore is focused on hindlimb function because hindlimb deficits are the earliest reported neurological sign of disease in SOD1-G93A mice. The protocol developed by ALS TDI provides an unbiased assessment of onset of paresis (slight or partial paralysis), progression and severity of paralysis and it is sensitive enough to identify drug-induced changes in disease progression. In this report, the combination of a detailed manuscript with video minimizes scoring ambiguities and inter-experimenter variability thus allowing for the protocol to be adopted by other laboratories and enabling comparisons between studies taking place at different settings. We believe that this video protocol can serve as an excellent training tool for present and future ALS researchers. PMID:26485052

  16. Characterization of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current, I (Kr), in HL-1 mouse atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Futoshi; Ding, Wei-Guang; Zankov, Dimitar P; Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Isono, Takahiro; Horie, Minoru; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    HL-1 is the adult murine cardiac cell line that can be passaged repeatedly in vitro without losing differentiated phenotype. The present study was designed to characterize the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current, I (Kr), endogenously expressed in HL-1 cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. In the presence of nisoldipine, depolarizing voltage steps applied from a holding potential of -50 mV evoked the time-dependent outward current, followed by slowly decaying outward tail current upon return to the holding potential. The amplitude of the current increased with depolarizations up to 0 mV but then progressively decreased with further depolarizations. The time-dependent outward current as well as the tail current were highly sensitive to block by E-4031 and dofetilide (IC(50) of 21.1 and 15.1 nM, respectively) and almost totally abolished by micromolar concentrations of each drug, suggesting that most of the outward current in HL-1 cells was attributable to I (Kr). The magnitude of I (Kr) available from HL-1 cells (18.1 +/- 1.5 pA pF(-1)) was sufficient for reliable measurements of various gating parameters. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed the expression of alternatively spliced forms of mouse ether-a-go-go-related genes (mERG1), the full-length mERG1a and the N-terminally truncated mERG1b isoforms. Knockdown of mERG1 transcripts with small interfering RNA (siRNA) dramatically reduced I (Kr) amplitude, confirming the molecular link of mERG1 and I (Kr) in HL-1 cells. These findings demonstrate that HL-1 cells possess I (Kr) with properties comparable to those in native cardiac I (Kr) and provide an experimental model suitable for studies of I (Kr) channels.

  17. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of Salmonella Heidelberg and Kentucky isolates recovered from broiler chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens are constantly adapting to circumvent intervention strategies. The ability to detect and overcome these adaptations is critical to ensure a safe food supply. We determined genotypic and/or phenotypic differences between Salmonella recovered from broiler chicks after comingling wi...

  18. Characterization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA gene: the Les- phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Kokjohn, T.A.; Miller, R.V.

    1988-02-01

    The Les- phenotype (lysogeny establishment deficient) is a pleiotropic effect of the lesB908 mutation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. lesB908-containing strains are also (i) deficient in general recombination, (ii) sensitive to UV irradiation, and (iii) deficient in UV-stimulated induction of prophages. The P. aeruginosa recA-containing plasmid pKML3001 complemented each of these pleiotropic characteristics of the lesB908 mutation, supporting the hypothesis that lesB908 is an allele of the P. aeruginosa recA gene. The phenotypic effects of the lesB908 mutation may be best explained by the hypothesis that the lesB908 gene product is altered in such a way that it has lost synaptase activity but possesses intrinsic protease activity in the absence of DNA damage. The Les- phenotype is a result of the rapid destruction of newly synthesized phage repressor, resulting in lytic growth of the infecting virus. This hypothesis is consistent with the observations that increasing the number of copies of the phage repressor gene by increasing the multiplicity of infection (i.e., average number of phage genomes per cell) or by introducing the cloned phage repressor gene into a lesB908 mutant will also suppress the Les- phenotype in a phage-specific fashion.

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Klebsiella pneumonia recovered from nonhuman primates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a zoonotic, Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is the causative agent of nosocomial septicemic, pneumonic, and urinary tract infections. Recently, pathogenic strains of K. pneumoniae sharing a hypermucoviscosity (HMV) phenotype have been attributed to ...

  20. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  1. Natural killer cells phenotypic characterization as an outcome predictor of HCV-linked HCC after curative treatments.

    PubMed

    Cariani, Elisabetta; Pilli, Massimo; Barili, Valeria; Porro, Emanuela; Biasini, Elisabetta; Olivani, Andrea; Dalla Valle, Raffaele; Trenti, Tommaso; Ferrari, Carlo; Missale, Gabriele

    2016-08-01

    NK-cell number and function have been associated with cancer progression. A detailed analysis of phenotypic and functional characteristics of NK-cells in HCC is still lacking. NK-cell function is regulated by activating and inhibitory receptors determined by genetic factors and engagement with cognate ligands on transformed or infected cells. We evaluated phenotypic and functional characteristic of NK-cells in HCC patients undergoing curative treatment in relation to clinical outcome. NK-cells from 70 HCC patients undergoing resection or ablative treatment, 18 healthy volunteers and 12 cirrhotic patients with HCV-infection (controls) were phenotypically characterized. Unsupervised clustering based on the frequency of cells expressing different phenotypic NK-cell markers segregated HCC patients into different cohorts that were compared for outcome. NK-cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity were compared between cohorts with different overall survival (OS) and time to disease recurrence (TTR). By multivariate analysis, age, Child-Pugh class and NK-cell phenotypic clustering could independently identify patients with significantly different OS. NK-cells from patients with better outcome expressed higher levels of cytotoxic granules and CD3ζ and lower levels of natural cytotoxic receptors (NCRs) that were co-expressed with the inhibitory receptor NKG2A known to negatively regulate NCR function. Cytotoxic function and IFNγ production were significantly lower in the cohort of patients with worse outcome compared to controls (p < 0.05). Our results show a role for NK-cells in the control of HCC progression and survival providing the basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies to potentiate NK-cell response. PMID:27622055

  2. Natural killer cells phenotypic characterization as an outcome predictor of HCV-linked HCC after curative treatments.

    PubMed

    Cariani, Elisabetta; Pilli, Massimo; Barili, Valeria; Porro, Emanuela; Biasini, Elisabetta; Olivani, Andrea; Dalla Valle, Raffaele; Trenti, Tommaso; Ferrari, Carlo; Missale, Gabriele

    2016-08-01

    NK-cell number and function have been associated with cancer progression. A detailed analysis of phenotypic and functional characteristics of NK-cells in HCC is still lacking. NK-cell function is regulated by activating and inhibitory receptors determined by genetic factors and engagement with cognate ligands on transformed or infected cells. We evaluated phenotypic and functional characteristic of NK-cells in HCC patients undergoing curative treatment in relation to clinical outcome. NK-cells from 70 HCC patients undergoing resection or ablative treatment, 18 healthy volunteers and 12 cirrhotic patients with HCV-infection (controls) were phenotypically characterized. Unsupervised clustering based on the frequency of cells expressing different phenotypic NK-cell markers segregated HCC patients into different cohorts that were compared for outcome. NK-cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity were compared between cohorts with different overall survival (OS) and time to disease recurrence (TTR). By multivariate analysis, age, Child-Pugh class and NK-cell phenotypic clustering could independently identify patients with significantly different OS. NK-cells from patients with better outcome expressed higher levels of cytotoxic granules and CD3ζ and lower levels of natural cytotoxic receptors (NCRs) that were co-expressed with the inhibitory receptor NKG2A known to negatively regulate NCR function. Cytotoxic function and IFNγ production were significantly lower in the cohort of patients with worse outcome compared to controls (p < 0.05). Our results show a role for NK-cells in the control of HCC progression and survival providing the basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies to potentiate NK-cell response.

  3. A non-destructive method for characterizing phenotypes and growth of a Bacillus subtilis biofilm using fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Stephan; Wang, Xiaoling; Wilking, James; Weitz, Dave

    2015-11-01

    We develop an imaging technique for characterizing growth of biofilms using a triple fluorescent labeled strain for the three main phenotypes of a Bacillus subtilis biofilm on an agar substrate. We find that the biofilm does not flow across the substrate and thus growth is due to colonization at the periphery and thickening of the interior regions. We obtain local height and its composition of the three main phenotypes, which are motile, matrix-producing and sporulating, as well as the non-fluorescent material, which can be spores, dormant or dead cells or extracellular matrix. This technique is suitable for the study of biofilm growth and inhibition for different conditions such as biocides or bioremediation.

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of dengue virus isolates differentiates dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever from dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tuiskunen, Anne; Monteil, Vanessa; Plumet, Sébastien; Boubis, Laetitia; Wahlström, Maria; Duong, Veasna; Buchy, Philippe; Lundkvist, Ake; Tolou, Hugues; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including 500,000 reported cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Viral factors have been proposed to influence the severity of the disease, but markers of virulence have never been identified on DENV. Three DENV serotype-1 isolates from the 2007 epidemic in Cambodia that are derived from patients experiencing the various clinical forms of dengue were characterized both phenotypically and genetically. Phenotypic characteristics in vitro, based on replication kinetics in different cell lines and apoptosis response, grouped isolates from DF and DHF patients together, whereas the virus isolate from a DSS patient showed unique features: a lower level of replication in mammalian cells and extensive apoptosis in mosquito cells. Genomic comparison of viruses revealed six unique amino acid residues in the membrane, envelope, and in non-structural genes in the virus isolated from the DSS patient.

  5. Towards high-throughput phenotyping of complex patterned behaviors in rodents: focus on mouse self-grooming and its sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Roth, Andrew; Green, Jeremy; Pham, Mimi; Stewart, Adam; Liang, Yiqing; Kobla, Vikrant; Kalueff, Allan V

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly recognized in biological psychiatry, rodent self-grooming is a complex patterned behavior with evolutionarily conserved cephalo-caudal progression. While grooming is traditionally assessed by the latency, frequency and duration, its sequencing represents another important domain sensitive to various experimental manipulations. Such behavioral complexity requires novel objective approaches to quantify rodent grooming, in addition to time-consuming and highly variable manual observation. The present study combined modern behavior-recognition video-tracking technologies (CleverSys, Inc.) with manual observation to characterize in-depth spontaneous (novelty-induced) and artificial (water-induced) self-grooming in adult male C57BL/6J mice. We specifically focused on individual episodes of grooming (paw licking, head washing, body/leg washing, and tail/genital grooming), their duration and transitions between episodes. Overall, the frequency, duration and transitions detected using the automated approach significantly correlated with manual observations (R=0.51-0.7, p<0.001-0.05). This data validates the software-based detection of grooming, also indicating that behavior-recognition tools can be applied to characterize both the amount and sequential organization (patterning) of rodent grooming. Together with further refinement and methodological advancement, this approach will foster high-throughput neurophenotyping of grooming, with multiple applications in drug screening and testing of genetically modified animals.

  6. Molecular genetic characterization of the deaf Snell`s waltzer mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Avraham, K.B.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1994-09-01

    Many mutations in the mouse affect hearing. Their study may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying sensorineural hearing impairment in humans. One such mutation is Snell`s waltzer (sv), which exhibits deafness and circling behavior. The abnormalities of the inner ear consist of post-natal degeneration of the entire neuroepithelium. The sv locus maps 2 cM distal to the dilute and short ear loci on chromosome 9. A number of radiation-induced mutations have previously been isolated that affect one or more genes in this region. One of these mutations, se{sup sv}, products a viable, short eared, Snell`s waltzer phenotype when homozygous. Molecular probes from the short ear region detect altered restriction fragments in DNA from mice carrying the se{sup sv} mutation. We have cloned the altered restriction fragments, sequenced the changes, and shown that the mutation consists of a chromosome inversion, with one end near the short ear gene and the other end in or near the sv gene. Attempts are currently underway to identify the sv gene by methods such as exon trapping and cDNA screening. The cloning of this gene is a prerequisite for a complete analysis of the abnormalities of sv/sv mice, and will aid in understanding the normal process of inner ear growth and morphogenesis.

  7. Characterization of the bombesin receptor on mouse pancreatic acini by chemical cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.C.; Yu, D.H.; Wank, S.A.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T. )

    1990-11-01

    Bombesin (BN), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and GRP(18-27) (neuromedin C) were equipotent and 30-fold more potent than neuromedin B (NMB) in inhibiting binding of {sup 125}I-GRP to and in stimulating amylase release from mouse pancreatic acini. In the present study we used {sup 125}I-GRP and chemical cross-linking techniques to characterize the mouse pancreatic BN receptor. After binding of {sup 125}I-GRP to membranes, and incubation with various chemical cross-linking agents, cross-linked radioactivity was analyzed by SDS-PAG electrophoresis and autoradiography. With each of 4 different chemical cross-linking agents, there was a single broad polypeptide band of Mr 80,000. Cross-linking did not occur in the absence of the cross-linking agent. Cross-linking was inhibited only by peptides that interact with the BN receptor such as GRP, NMB, GRP(18-27) or BN. Dose-inhibition curves for the ability of BN or NMB to inhibit binding of {sup 125}I-GRP to membranes or cross-linking to the 80,000 polypeptide demonstrated for both that BN was 15-fold more potent than NMB. The apparent molecular weight of the cross-linked polypeptide was unchanged by adding dithiothreitol. N-Glycanase treatment reduced the molecular weight of the cross-linked peptide to 40,000. The present results indicate that the BN receptor on mouse pancreatic acinar cell membranes resembles that recently described on various tumor cells in being a single glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 76,000. Because dithiothreitol had no effect, this glycoprotein is not a subunit of a larger disulfide-linked structure.

  8. The db/db mouse, a model for diabetic dyslipidemia: molecular characterization and effects of Western diet feeding.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Forte, T M; Taniguchi, S; Ishida, B Y; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2000-01-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia is a major factor contributing to the accelerated atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although several mouse models are available, the plasma lipoproteins in response to diet have not been fully characterized in these animals. In this study, we have characterized the plasma lipoproteins and related apolipoproteins, as well as the vascular lipases, in diabetes (db/db) mice and their nondiabetic controls (+/?) in the C57BL/KsJ strain. Within 6 weeks of age, db/db mice developed significant obesity, fasting hyperglycemia, and hyperinsulinemia. By FPLC analysis, db/db mice showed a prominent peak in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) range that was absent in +/? mice, although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) was the predominant species in both groups of animals. Postheparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in db/db mice was 28% of the level in +/? mice. Upon feeding a human-like 0.15% (wt/wt) cholesterol and 21% (wt/wt) fat "Western" diet, db/db mice developed elevated plasma cholesterol, accompanied by an exaggerated apolipoprotein E (apoE) response compared with +/? mice. FPLC analysis showed that the marked hypercholesterolemic response in db/db mice was the result of a massive increase in the LDL region, which overshadowed a moderate increase in HDL. We next isolated lipoproteins by ultracentrifugation and characterized them by nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. With regular chow, db/db mice had almost exclusively small dense LDL with a peak size at 21.4 nm, as compared with 26.6 nm in nondiabetic controls. On the Western diet, the small dense LDLs persisted but larger particles also appeared in db/db mice, whereas the size distribution in +/? mice was unchanged by the diet. Our results suggest that db/db mice fed a Western diet have a plasma lipoprotein phenotype that shows some similarities to that in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and that db/db mice are a useful model to study the pathogenesis and treatment of

  9. Characterization of cerebral malaria in the outbred Swiss Webster mouse infected by Plasmodium berghei ANKA.

    PubMed

    Martins, Yuri Chaves; Smith, Mary Jane; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Lenzi, Henrique Leonel; Daniel-Ribeiro, Claudio Tadeu; Carvalho, Leonardo José de Moura

    2009-04-01

    Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection in susceptible inbred mouse strains is the most commonly used experimental model to study pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM). Indeed, many concepts on mechanisms related to this complication have arisen from works using this model. Although inbred strains present several advantages and are indicated for most studies, the use of outbred models can show unique usefulness in a number of approaches such as fine post-quantitative trait loci mapping and discovery of genes relevant to CM susceptibility or resistance, as well as pharmacological and vaccine studies. Here we describe the features of PbA infection and CM incidence, and characterize the associated multiorgan pathology in the outbred Swiss Webster mouse. This model showed a sizeable (62.7%) and reproducible incidence of CM demonstrated by clinical signs and histopathological changes in brain (microhaemorrhages, oedema and vessel plugging by mononuclear cells). Major pathological changes were also observed in lungs, liver, thymus and spleen, analogous to those observed in inbred strains. Parasitaemia levels were associated with the risk of CM development, the risk being significantly higher in mice showing higher values of parasitaemia on days 6-7 of infection. This outbred CM model is then suitable for genetic, vaccine and drug studies targeting this malaria complication.

  10. Isolation and characterization of two mouse Pi-class glutathione S-transferase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bammler, T K; Smith, C A; Wolf, C R

    1994-01-01

    Pi-class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in the detoxification of chemical toxins and mutagens and are implicated in neoplastic development and drug resistance. In all species characterized to date, only one functional Pi-class GST gene has been described. In this report we have identified two actively transcribed murine Pi-class GST genes, Gst p-1 and Gst p-2. The coding regions of Gst p-1 and the mouse Pi-class GST cDNA (GST-II) reported by Hatayama, Satoh and Satoh (1990) (Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 4606) are identical, whereas Gst p-2 encodes a protein that has not been described pre