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Sample records for mouse skin tumor

  1. Jute batching oil: a tumor promoter on mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, N.K.; Kumar, S.; Agarwal, R.; Antony, M.

    1987-02-01

    A mineral oil essentially used in the jute industry for the batching of jute fibers, and earlier reported to be nontumorigenic on mouse skin, has been found to be a tumor promoter following a two-stage mouse-skin bioassay protocol. The types of tumors developed after initiation with a single dose of urethane or 3-methylcholanthrene (subcutaneously), followed by repeated skin painting with jute batching oil (JBO) included benign papillomas, keratoacanthomas, and fibrosarcomas. Chemical analysis of this oil indicated the total aromatic content was 11.71% and the amount of fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and triphenylene was in the range of 192.54 to 227.79 mg/kg in the test sample. The underlying biochemical mechanism for the tumor-promoting effect of JBO seemed to operate through a different pathway rather than involving the induction of cytochrome-dependent monoxygenase and N-demethylase activities in the tissue.

  2. Jute batching oil: a tumor promoter on mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, N K; Kumar, S; Agarwal, R; Antony, M

    1987-02-01

    A mineral oil essentially used in the jute industry for the "batching" of jute fibers, and earlier reported to be nontumorigenic on mouse skin, has been found to be a tumor promoter following a two-stage mouse-skin bioassay protocol. The types of tumors developed after initiation with a single dose of urethane or 3-methylcholanthrene (subcutaneously), followed by repeated skin painting with jute batching oil (JBO) included benign papillomas, keratoacanthomas, and fibrosarcomas. Chemical analysis of this oil indicated the total aromatic content was 11.71% and the amount of fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and triphenylene was in the range of 192.54 to 227.79 mg/kg in the test sample. The underlying biochemical mechanisms for the tumor-promoting effect of JBO seemed to operate through a different pathway rather than involving the induction of cytochrome-dependent monoxygenase and N-demethylase activities in the tissue.

  3. Alterations in cell cycle regulation in mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, S; Ahmad, N; Jeedigunta, S; Mukhtar, H

    1998-02-24

    The connection between cell cycle and cancer has become obvious in as much as it is considered that dysregulated cellular proliferation is a hallmark of cancer. In many studies, the dysregulation of the cyclin-cdk-cki network has been reported in experimental animal and human tumors, but to our knowledge a complete profile of alterations in regulatory molecules in any tumor model system is lacking. In this study, we assessed the expression of various cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases, and cyclin kinase inhibitors in chemically induced squamous papillomas in SENCAR mouse skin. Western blot analysis data showed a significant upregulation of cyclins (31, 6, 19, and 12 folds elevation for cyclin-D1, D2, E, and A, respectively) in tumors compared to the normal skin. The protein expression of the cdk (1, 2, and 4) was also found to be elevated in tumors compared to normal skin (33 fold for cdk1, 14 fold for cdk2, and 9 fold for cdk4). In tumors, compared to the normal skin, a significant increase in the level of protein expression of p27 and p57 (4 and 3 fold, respectively) was evident. In normal skin, p16 and p21 were not detectable but significant expression of these proteins was detected in tumors. Taken together, these data provide evidence that cell cycle deregulation in G1-phase is a critical event during the course of two stage skin carcinogenesis. This may have relevance to epithelial cancers in general.

  4. Identification of glycoproteins from mouse skin tumors and plasma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Zhang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Plasma has been the focus of testing different proteomic technologies for the identification of biomarkers due to its ready accessibility. However, it is not clear if direct proteomic analysis of plasma can be used to discover new marker proteins from tumor that are associated with tumor progression. Here, we reported that such proteins can be detected in plasma in a chemical induced skin cancer mouse model. We analyzed glycoproteins from both benign papillomas and malignant carcinomas from mice using our recently developed platform, solid-phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG) and mass spectrometry, and identified 463 unique N-linked glycosites from 318 unique glycoproteins. These include most known extracellular proteins that have been reported to play roles in skin cancer development such as thrombospondin, cathepsins, epidermal growth factor receptor, cell adhesion molecules, cadherins, integrins, tuberin, fibulin, TGFβ receptor, etc. We further investigated whether these tumor proteins could be detected in plasma from tumor bearing mice using isotope labeling and 2D-LC-MALDI-MS/MS. Two tumor glycoproteins, Tenascin-C and Arylsulfatase B, were identified and quantified successfully in plasma from tumor bearing mice. This result indicates that analysis of tumor associated proteins in tumors and plasma by method using glycopeptide capture, isotopic labeling, and mass spectrometry can be used as a discovery tool to identify candidate tumor proteins that may be detected in plasma. PMID:21072318

  5. Induction of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by inflammatory agents and tumor promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Dessypris, E.N.; Koury, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The production of megakaryocytic colony-stimulating activity (MEG-CSA) was assayed in acetic acid extracts of skin from mice topically treated with inflammatory and tumor-promoting agents. A rapid induction of MEG-CSA was found in skin treated both with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a strong tumor promoter, and with mezerein, a weak tumor promoter, but no induction was found in untreated skin. The time course of induction of MEG-CSA following treatment of skin with PMA or mezerein was very similar to that previously demonstrated for the induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating activity in mouse skin by these agents. The induced MEG-CSA was found in both the epidermis and the dermis. Pretreatment of the skin with US -methasone abrogated the MEG-CSA induction. The cell number response curve suggests that the MEG-CSA acts directly on the progenitor cells of the megakaryocyte colonies. That topical administration of diterpene esters results in the rapid, local induction of MEG-CSA which can be blocked by US -methasone pretreatment suggests a mechanism for the thrombocytosis associated with some inflammatory states. The indirect action in which diterpene esters induce in certain cells the production or release of growth regulatory factors for other cell types may also aid in understanding their carcinogenic properties.

  6. Continuous imaging of the blood vessels in tumor mouse dorsal skin window chamber model by using SD-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiao; Yang, Shaozhuang; Yu, Bin; Wang, Qi; Lin, Danying; Gao, Jian; Zhang, Peiqi; Ma, Yiqun; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has been widely applied into microstructure imaging of tissues or blood vessels with a series of advantages, including non-destructiveness, real-time imaging, high resolution and high sensitivity. In this study, a Spectral Domain OCT (SD-OCT) system with higher sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was built up, which was used to observe the blood vessel distribution and blood flow in the dorsal skin window chamber of the nude mouse tumor model. In order to obtain comparable data, the distribution images of blood vessels were collected from the same mouse before and after tumor injection. In conclusion, in vivo blood vessel distribution images of the tumor mouse model have been continuously obtained during around two weeks.

  7. Cholera toxin, a potent inducer of epidermal hyperplasia but with no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, T.; Chida, K.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, Y.

    1986-05-29

    Intracutaneous injection of cholera toxin into mice induced epidermal hyperplasia to a greater extent than 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate. It also induced adenylate cyclase and through weakly, ornithine decarboxylase of the epidermis. Cholera toxin, however, showed no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis. In the single stage promotion, cholera toxin (50 ng) was injected once a week for 10 weeks into the skin of SENCAR mice initiated with 25 ..mu..g 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene, but no tumors developed. In the two-stage promotion test, cholera toxin (10-100 ng) was injected for one or two weeks into the initiated skin and then mezerein (4 ..mu..g) was applied twice a week for 18 weeks, but the toxin did not increase incidence or numbers of papillomas.

  8. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis.

  9. CDK2 Activation in Mouse Epidermis Induces Keratinocyte Proliferation but Does Not Affect Skin Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J.; Senderowicz, Adrian M.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2008-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1. Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4D158N mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4D158N, but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21Cip1 in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4D158N, epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21Cip1 response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:18599613

  10. ERBB3 is required for tumor promotion in a mouse model of skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Maik; Schäfer, Matthias; Muzumdar, Sukalp; Rose, Christian; Schneider, Marlon R

    2015-11-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a key role in skin inflammation, wound healing, and carcinogenesis. Less is known about the functions of the structurally related receptor ERBB3 (HER3) in the skin. We assessed the requirement of ERBB3 for skin homeostasis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis by crossing mice carrying a conditional Erbb3 allele with animals expressing cre under the control of the keratin 5 promoter. Erbb3(del) mice, lacking ERBB3 specifically in keratinocytes, showed no obvious abnormalities. The EGFR was upregulated in Erbb3(del) skin, possibly compensating the loss of ERBB3. Nonetheless, healing of full-thickness excisional wounds was negatively affected by ERBB3 deficiency. To analyze the function of ERBB3 during tumorigenesis, we employed the established DMBA/TPA multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Erbb3(del) mice remained free of papillomas for a longer time and had significantly reduced tumor burden compared to control littermates. Tumor cell proliferation was considerably reduced in Erbb3(del) mice, and loss of ERBB3 also impaired keratinocyte proliferation after a single application of TPA. In human skin tumor samples, upregulated ERBB3 expression was observed in squamous cell carcinoma, condyloma, and malignant melanoma. Thus, we conclude that ERBB3, while dispensable for the development and the homeostasis of the epidermis and its appendages, is required for proper wound healing and for the progression of skin tumors during multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mice. ERBB3 may also be important for human skin cancer progression. The latter effects most probably reflect a key role for ERBB3 in increasing cell proliferation after stimuli as wounding or carcinogenesis.

  11. Resveratrol and Black Tea Polyphenol Combination Synergistically Suppress Mouse Skin Tumors Growth by Inhibition of Activated MAPKs and p53

    PubMed Central

    George, Jasmine; Singh, Madhulika; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Chaturvedi, Pranav Kumar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2011-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention by natural dietary agents has received considerable importance because of their cost-effectiveness and wide safety margin. However, single agent intervention has failed to bring the expected outcome in clinical trials; therefore, combinations of chemopreventive agents are gaining increasing popularity. The present study aims to evaluate the combinatorial chemopreventive effects of resveratrol and black tea polyphenol (BTP) in suppressing two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA and TPA. Resveratrol/BTP alone treatment decreased tumor incidence by ∼67% and ∼75%, while combination of both at low doses synergistically decreased tumor incidence even more significantly by ∼89% (p<0.01). This combination also significantly regressed tumor volume and number (p<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that this combinatorial inhibition was associated with decreased expression of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase family proteins: extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, p38 and increased in total p53 and phospho p53 (Ser 15) in skin tissue/tumor. Treatment with combinations of resveratrol and BTP also decreased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in mouse skin tissues/tumors than their solitary treatments as determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, histological and cell death analysis also confirmed that resveratrol and BTP treatment together inhibits cellular proliferation and markedly induces apoptosis. Taken together, our results for the first time lucidly illustrate that resveratrol and BTP in combination impart better suppressive activity than either of these agents alone and accentuate that development of novel combination therapies/chemoprevention using dietary agents will be more beneficial against cancer. This promising combination should be examined in therapeutic trials of skin and possibly other cancers. PMID:21887248

  12. Inhibitory effect of topical application of a green tea polyphenol fraction on tumor initiation and promotion in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Huang, M T; Ho, C T; Wang, Z Y; Ferraro, T; Finnegan-Olive, T; Lou, Y R; Mitchell, J M; Laskin, J D; Newmark, H; Yang, C S

    1992-06-01

    A green tea polyphenol fraction was evaluated for its ability to inhibit tumor initiation by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and tumor promotion by a phorbol ester in the skin of CD-1 mice. Topical application of the green tea polyphenol fraction inhibited benzo[a]pyrene- and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]-anthracene-induced tumor initiation as well as 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced tumor promotion. Topical application of the green tea polyphenol fraction also inhibited TPA-induced inflammation, ornithine decarboxylase activity, hyperplasia and hydrogen peroxide formation. Studies with individual polyphenolic compounds in green tea indicated that topical application of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin and (-)-epicatechin gallate inhibited TPA-induced inflammation in mouse epidermis.

  13. Combined effect of cyclin D3 expression and abrogation of cyclin D1 prevent mouse skin tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Kim, Yongbaek

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ras-mediated skin tumorigenesis depends on signaling pathways that act preferentially through cyclin D1 and D2. Interestingly, the expression of cyclin D3 inhibits skin tumor development, an observation that conflicts with the oncogenic role of D-type cyclins in the mouse epidermis. Here, we show that simultaneous up and downregulation of particular members of the D-type cyclin family is a valuable approach to reduce skin tumorigenesis. We developed the K5D3/cyclin D1−/− compound mouse, which overexpresses cyclin D3 but lacks expression of cyclin D1 in the skin. Similar to K5D3 transgenic mice, keratinocytes from K5D3/cyclin D1−/− compound mice show a significant reduction of cyclin D2 levels. Therefore, this model allows us to determine the effect of cyclin D3 expression when combined with reduced or absent expression of the remaining two members of the D-type cyclin family in mouse epidermis. Our data show that induced expression of cyclin D3 compensates for the reduced level of cyclin D1 and D2, resulting in normal keratinocyte proliferation. However, simultaneous ablation of cyclin D1 and downregulation of cyclin D2 via cyclin D3 expression resulted in a robust reduction in ras-mediated skin tumorigenesis. We conclude that modulation of the levels of particular members of the D-type cyclin family could be useful to inhibit tumor development and, in particular, ras-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:22214766

  14. Nonrandom duplication of the chromosome bearing a mutated Ha-ras-1 allele in mouse skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, A.B.; Aldaz, C.M.; Conti, C.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors analyzed the normal/mutated allelic ratio of the Ha-ras-1 gene in mouse skin squamous cell carcinomas induced by initation with dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and promotion with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. DNA for these studies was obtained from short-term tumor cultures (24-72 hr) to eliminate the contribution of stromal and inflammatory cells to the sample. The alelotypic analysis was performed in 25 squamous cell carcinomas by quantitative radio-analysis of the Xba I restriction fragment length polymorphism as detected by BS9, a v-Ha-ras probe, and rehybridization of the Southern blots with probes for chromosomes 7 and 9. Approximately 85% of the tumors presented overrepresentation of the mutated allele in the form of 1 normal/2 mutated (12 tumors), 0 normal/3 mutated (4 tumors), 0 normal/2 mutated (3 tumors), and gene amplification (3 tumors). No tumor was found with a 2 normal/1 mutated allelic ratio. These results support their previous cytogenetic studies, indicating that trisomy of chromosome 7 is present in themajority of these tumors show that nonrandom duplication of the chromosome carrying the mutated Ha-ras-1 allel appears to be a major mechanism by which the mutated gene is overrepresented.

  15. Deoxynivalenol induced mouse skin tumor initiation: Elucidation of molecular mechanisms in human HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sakshi; Tewari, Prachi; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Pandey, Haushila P; Das, Mukul

    2016-11-01

    Among food contaminants, mycotoxins are toxic to both human and animal health. Our prior studies suggest that Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, behaves as a tumor promoter by inducing edema, hyperplasia, ODC activity and activation of MAPK's in mouse skin. In this study, topical application of DON, 336 and 672 nmol significantly enhanced ROS levels, DNA damage and apoptosis with concomitant downregulation of Ki-67, cyclin D, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK2) thereby resulting in tumor initiation in mouse skin. Further, the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of tumor initiation by DON (0.42-3.37 nmol/ml) in HaCaT keratinocytes, revealed (i) enhanced ROS generation with cell cycle phase arrest in G0/G1 phase, (ii) increase in levels of 8-OxoG (6-24 hr) and γH2AX protein, (iii) significant enhancement in oxidative stress marker enzymes LPO, GSH, GR with concomitant decrease in antioxidant enzymes catalase, GPx, GST, SOD and mitochondrial membrane potential after DON (1.68 nmol) treatment, (iv) suppression of Nrf2 translocation to nucleus, enhanced phosphorylation with subsequent activation ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPK's following DON (1.68 nmol) treatment, (v) overexpression of c-jun, c-fos proteins, upregulation of Bax along with downregulation of Bcl-2 proteins, (vi) increase in cytochrome-c, caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase levels leads to apoptosis. Pretreatment of superoxide dismutase, mannitol and ethanol to HaCaT cells resulted in significant reduction in ROS levels and apoptosis indicating the role of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals in DON induced apoptosis as an early event and skin tumor initiation as a late event. PMID:27389473

  16. Deoxynivalenol induced mouse skin tumor initiation: Elucidation of molecular mechanisms in human HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sakshi; Tewari, Prachi; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Pandey, Haushila P; Das, Mukul

    2016-11-01

    Among food contaminants, mycotoxins are toxic to both human and animal health. Our prior studies suggest that Deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, behaves as a tumor promoter by inducing edema, hyperplasia, ODC activity and activation of MAPK's in mouse skin. In this study, topical application of DON, 336 and 672 nmol significantly enhanced ROS levels, DNA damage and apoptosis with concomitant downregulation of Ki-67, cyclin D, cyclin E, cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK2) thereby resulting in tumor initiation in mouse skin. Further, the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of tumor initiation by DON (0.42-3.37 nmol/ml) in HaCaT keratinocytes, revealed (i) enhanced ROS generation with cell cycle phase arrest in G0/G1 phase, (ii) increase in levels of 8-OxoG (6-24 hr) and γH2AX protein, (iii) significant enhancement in oxidative stress marker enzymes LPO, GSH, GR with concomitant decrease in antioxidant enzymes catalase, GPx, GST, SOD and mitochondrial membrane potential after DON (1.68 nmol) treatment, (iv) suppression of Nrf2 translocation to nucleus, enhanced phosphorylation with subsequent activation ERK1/2, p38 and JNK MAPK's following DON (1.68 nmol) treatment, (v) overexpression of c-jun, c-fos proteins, upregulation of Bax along with downregulation of Bcl-2 proteins, (vi) increase in cytochrome-c, caspase-9, caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase levels leads to apoptosis. Pretreatment of superoxide dismutase, mannitol and ethanol to HaCaT cells resulted in significant reduction in ROS levels and apoptosis indicating the role of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals in DON induced apoptosis as an early event and skin tumor initiation as a late event.

  17. Study of protein modifications induced by phorbol ester tumor promoters in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.G.

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced any specific changes in mouse epidermal proteins using the high resolution technique of two-dimensional electrophoresis. To accomplish this goal of determining the specificity and possibly the stage in promotion with which these protein changes were associated, epidermal proteins were analyzed (1) after treatment of adult mouse epidermis with several weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents, (2) following treatment with TPA in combination with various inhibitors of tumor promotion, (3) in basal kerotinocytes isolated from adult epidermis following treatment with TPA or several weakly promoting agents, and (4) during an initiation-promotion experiment. Evidence was found which indicated that the potent tumor promoter TPA as well as the weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents, mezerein, ethylphenylpropiolate (EPP), and mechanical abrasion, induced similar modifications of epidermal proteins, particularly among the keratins. These keratin modifications progressed with time following treatment resulting in a keratin pattern which resembled that of newborn epidermis.

  18. Alterations in the expression of uvomorulin and Na+,K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase during mouse skin tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, B.; Caamano, J.; Slaga, T. J.; Conti, C. J.; Nelson, W. J.; Klein-Szanto, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Uvomorulin (E-cadherin), a cell adhesion molecule, and Na+,K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), a marker protein of the basal-lateral cell membrane domains of polarized epithelial cells, were investigated in a group of mouse skin tumors induced by a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol and in cell lines derived from mouse skin papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Although these two markers were present in benign tumors and in nontumorigenic cell lines, the Na+,K(+)-ATPase showed an altered pattern of distribution that included the presence of enzyme not only in the basolateral domain but also on the apical domain of the cell membrane of basal and spinous cells in well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). In higher grade SCC, a loss of Na+,K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity was simultaneously detected with a marginal or absent expression of uvomorulin. The more differentiated SCC and papillomas expressed less uvomorulin immunoreactivity than normal epidermal cells. Both markers were seen in tumor cell lines that produced well-differentiated SCC after subcutaneous inoculation into nude mice. Neither Na+,K(+)-ATPase nor uvomorulin could be detected in cell lines that produced high grade, poorly differentiated SCC. Northern blots confirmed the absence of uvomorulin mRNA in these highly malignant cell lines. These data indicate that progression from premalignant papilloma to low-grade SCC and subsequently to high-grade SCC is accompanied by loss of epithelial cell polarity as detected by changes in Na+,K(+)-ATPase and by decreased or absent expression of uvomorulin in tumors and cell lines characterized by an advanced malignant phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1316085

  19. Increased Skin Tumor Incidence and Keratinocyte Hyper-Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Annan; Currier, Duane; Poitras, Jennifer L; Reeves, Roger H

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). People with DS display multiple clinical traits as a result of the dosage imbalance of several hundred genes. While many outcomes of trisomy are deleterious, epidemiological studies have shown a significant risk reduction for most solid tumors in DS. Reduced tumor incidence has also been demonstrated in functional studies using trisomic DS mouse models. Therefore, it was interesting to find that Ts1Rhr trisomic mice developed more papillomas than did their euploid littermates in a DMBA-TPA chemical carcinogenesis paradigm. Papillomas in Ts1Rhr mice also proliferated faster. The increased proliferation was likely caused by a stronger response of trisomy to TPA induction. Treatment with TPA caused hyperkeratosis to a greater degree in Ts1Rhr mice than in euploid, reminiscent of hyperkeratosis seen in people with DS. Cultured trisomic keratinocytes also showed increased TPA-induced proliferation compared to euploid controls. These outcomes suggest that altered gene expression in trisomy could elevate a proliferation signalling pathway. Gene expression analysis of cultured keratinocytes revealed upregulation of several trisomic and disomic genes may contribute to this hyperproliferation. The contributions of these genes to hyper-proliferation were further validated in a siRNA knockdown experiment. The unexpected findings reported here add a new aspect to our understanding of tumorigenesis with clinical implications for DS and demonstrates the complexity of the tumor repression phenotype in this frequent condition. PMID:26752700

  20. Increased Skin Tumor Incidence and Keratinocyte Hyper-Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Annan; Currier, Duane; Poitras, Jennifer L; Reeves, Roger H

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). People with DS display multiple clinical traits as a result of the dosage imbalance of several hundred genes. While many outcomes of trisomy are deleterious, epidemiological studies have shown a significant risk reduction for most solid tumors in DS. Reduced tumor incidence has also been demonstrated in functional studies using trisomic DS mouse models. Therefore, it was interesting to find that Ts1Rhr trisomic mice developed more papillomas than did their euploid littermates in a DMBA-TPA chemical carcinogenesis paradigm. Papillomas in Ts1Rhr mice also proliferated faster. The increased proliferation was likely caused by a stronger response of trisomy to TPA induction. Treatment with TPA caused hyperkeratosis to a greater degree in Ts1Rhr mice than in euploid, reminiscent of hyperkeratosis seen in people with DS. Cultured trisomic keratinocytes also showed increased TPA-induced proliferation compared to euploid controls. These outcomes suggest that altered gene expression in trisomy could elevate a proliferation signalling pathway. Gene expression analysis of cultured keratinocytes revealed upregulation of several trisomic and disomic genes may contribute to this hyperproliferation. The contributions of these genes to hyper-proliferation were further validated in a siRNA knockdown experiment. The unexpected findings reported here add a new aspect to our understanding of tumorigenesis with clinical implications for DS and demonstrates the complexity of the tumor repression phenotype in this frequent condition.

  1. Increased Skin Tumor Incidence and Keratinocyte Hyper-Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Annan; Currier, Duane; Poitras, Jennifer L.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21). People with DS display multiple clinical traits as a result of the dosage imbalance of several hundred genes. While many outcomes of trisomy are deleterious, epidemiological studies have shown a significant risk reduction for most solid tumors in DS. Reduced tumor incidence has also been demonstrated in functional studies using trisomic DS mouse models. Therefore, it was interesting to find that Ts1Rhr trisomic mice developed more papillomas than did their euploid littermates in a DMBA-TPA chemical carcinogenesis paradigm. Papillomas in Ts1Rhr mice also proliferated faster. The increased proliferation was likely caused by a stronger response of trisomy to TPA induction. Treatment with TPA caused hyperkeratosis to a greater degree in Ts1Rhr mice than in euploid, reminiscent of hyperkeratosis seen in people with DS. Cultured trisomic keratinocytes also showed increased TPA-induced proliferation compared to euploid controls. These outcomes suggest that altered gene expression in trisomy could elevate a proliferation signalling pathway. Gene expression analysis of cultured keratinocytes revealed upregulation of several trisomic and disomic genes may contribute to this hyperproliferation. The contributions of these genes to hyper-proliferation were further validated in a siRNA knockdown experiment. The unexpected findings reported here add a new aspect to our understanding of tumorigenesis with clinical implications for DS and demonstrates the complexity of the tumor repression phenotype in this frequent condition. PMID:26752700

  2. Effects of type and amount of dietary fat on mouse skin tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Lo, H H; Locniskar, M F; Bechtel, D; Fischer, S M

    1994-01-01

    In a previous study (Cancer Res 51, 907, 1991) in which we found an inverse relationship between quantity of dietary corn oil and saturated fat, in a constant 15% fat diet, on the tumor promotion stage of skin carcinogenesis, it was not clear whether one or both types of fat played a modulatory role. The purpose of the present study therefore was to compare the effect of 1) increasing corn oil in corn oil-only diets and 2) increasing saturated fat, with a constant level of 5% corn oil, on tumor promotion. In the first study, the effects of five levels of dietary corn oil (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%) on the incidence and rat of papilloma and carcinoma development were determined in female Sencar mice fed these diets one week after initiation with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and three weeks before the start of promotion with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. A papilloma incidence of 100% was reached first in the 5% corn oil group, at 10 weeks, followed by the 10% group at 13 weeks and the 15% and 20% group at 16 weeks. The highest corn oil group achieved a 90% incidence. There were marked differences in latency of carcinoma development among the diet groups. At Week 29, the cumulative carcinoma incidence was 56% and 32%, respectively, in the 5% and 10% corn oil groups, whereas the incidence in the two highest corn oil (20% and 25%) groups was only 8% and 4%, respectively. In the second study, the effects of diets containing 5% corn oil and increasing levels of coconut oil (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) on the incidence and rat of papilloma and carcinoma development were determined, as described above. No significant difference in latency or incidence of papillomas or carcinomas was noted among these saturated fat diet groups. It thus appears that higher levels of dietary corn oil are associated with a reduced cancer incidence in this model system.

  3. Malignant conversion and metastasis of mouse skin tumors: a comparison of SENCAR and CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hennings, H.; Spangler, E.F.; Shores, R.; Mitchell, P.; Devor, D.; Shamsuddin, A.K.M.; Elgjo, K.M.; Yuspa, S.H.

    1986-09-01

    The progression of papillomas to squamous cell carcinomas (malignant conversion) was studied in the skin of SENCAR and Charles River CD-1 mice, using a three-stage treatment protocol. After initiation with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) (stage I) and limited promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (stage II), papilloma-bearing mice were treated (stage III) with either tumor initiators, such as urethane, N-methyl-N'nitro-N nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or 4-nitroquinoline-n-oxide (R-NQO), the promoter TPA, or solvent (acetone). Similar final carcinoma yields were found in the mice treated in stage III with TPA or acetone, although carcinomas developed earlier in the TPA-treated mice. In contrast, treatment with tumor initiators in stage III increased both the rate of appearance and the final yield of carcinomas. Similar results were obtained in both SENCAR and CD-1 mice. A papilloma stage appears to be necessary for carcinoma development since elimination of TPA treatment in stage II greatly reduced the incidence of both papillomas and carcinomas in both stocks of mice. The heterogeneity of papillomas with regard to progression to carcinomas is demonstrated by the low rate of conversion of TPA-dependent papillomas and the high rate of conversion of persistent papillomas in CD-1 mice. The carcinomas that develop using the three-stage regimen vary in metastatic potential. In CD-1 mice, the frequency of metastases to lymph nodes were similar in groups treated in stage III with MNNG, urethane, 4-NQO, TPA, or acetone, but treatment with urethane substantially increased metastases to the lung. In SENCAR mice, this effect of urethane was not observed, but lymph node and lung metastases appeared too be increased by stage III treatment with MNNG.

  4. Fractionation of a tumor-initiating UV dose introduces DNA damage-retaining cells in hairless mouse skin and renders subsequent TPA-promoted tumors non-regressing.

    PubMed

    van de Glind, Gerline; Rebel, Heggert; van Kempen, Marika; Tensen, Kees; de Gruijl, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Sunburns and especially sub-sunburn chronic UV exposure are associated with increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we focus on a possible difference in tumor initiation from a single severe-sunburn dose (on day 1, 21 hairless mice) and from an equal dose fractionated into very low sub-sunburn doses not causing any (growth-promoting) epidermal hyperplasia (40 days daily exposure, n=20). From day 47 all mice received 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applications (2x/wk) for 20 weeks to promote tumor development within the lifetime of the animals. After the sub-sunburn regimen sparse DNA damage-retaining basal cells (quiescent stem cells, QSCs) remained in the non-hyperplastic epidermis. These cells were forced to divide by TPA. After discontinuation of TPA tumors regressed and disappeared in the 'sunburn group' but persisted and grew in the 'sub-sunburn group' (0.06 vs 2.50 SCCs and precursors ≥4 mm/mouse after 280 days, p=0.03). As the tumors carried no mutations in p53, H/K/N-Ras and Notch1/2, these 'usual suspects' were not involved in the UV-driven tumor initiation. Although we could not selectively eliminate QSCs (unknown phenotype) to establish causality, our data suggest that forcing specifically DNA damage-retaining QSCs to divide--with high mutagenic risk--gives rise to persisting (mainly 'in situ') skin carcinomas. PMID:26797757

  5. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate, a superoxide anion generation inhibitor, potently inhibits tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in ICR mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Ohura, S; Nakamura, Y; Koshimizu, K; Ohigashi, H

    1996-01-01

    The anti-tumor-promoting activity of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) was examined in a two-stage carcinogenesis experiment in ICR mouse skin using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (0.19 mumol) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 1.6 nmol). Topical application of ACA (160 nmol) markedly reduced the average number of tumors per mouse and the ratio of tumor-bearing mice: inhibition ratios 90% (p < 0.001) and 42% (p < 0.005), respectively. ACA even at a dose equimolar to TPA (1.6 nmol) significantly reduced the average number of tumors per mouse: inhibitory ratio 44% (p < 0.05). ACA potently inhibited TPA-induced superoxide (O2-) generation in differentiated HL-60 cells (IC50 = 4.3 microM) and suppressed the lipid hydroperoxide formation by 42% (p < 0.001) in the ethyl linoleate autoxidation test.

  6. Mouse skin tumor-initiating activity of 5-, 7-, and 12-methyl- and fluorine-substituted benz(a)anthracenes

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.W.; Levin, W.; Chang, R.L.; Conney, A.H.; Slaga, T.J.; O'Malley, R.F.; Newman, M.S.; Buhler, D.R.; Jerina, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Eleven methyl- and/or fluorine-substitued benz(a)anthracenes were evaluated for tumor-initating activity on mouse skin. Outbred CD-1 and outbred Sencar mice received a single topical application of the hydrocarbons followed by twice weekly application of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate for 16-26 weeks. 7, 12-DMBA was almost two orders of magnitude more active as a tumor-initator than 7- and 12-methylbenz(a)anthracene. Methyl substitution at the 7- and 7,12-positions of benz(a)anthracence was significantly more effective in the enhancement of tumorigenic activity than fluorine substitution at these positions. Although 7-fluorobenz(a)anthracene, 12-fluorobenz(a)anthracene, and 7,12-difluorobenz(a)anthracene had only 0.15, 0.26, and less than 0.005 times the tumor-initiating activity of their respective methyl-substituted derivatives, they were severalfold more active than benz(a)anthracene. 7-Fluorobenz(a)anthracene was slightly less active than 12-fluorobenz(a)anthracene, whereas 7-methylbenz(a)anthracene was about twofold more active than 12-methylbenz(a)anthracene. For 7,12-disubstituted benz(a)anthracenes, 7-methyl-12-fluorobenz(a)anthracene was more than twice as tumorigenic as 7-fluoro-12-methylbenz(a)anthracene, but each was individually more active than 7-methylbenz(a)anthracene and 12-methylbenz(a)anthracene, respectively. Both fluorinated compounds were much less active than 7,12-DMBA. Substitution of fluorine or methyl at the 5-position of 7-methylbenz(a)anthracene and substition of fluorine at the 5-position of 12-methylbenz(a)anthracene dramatically reduced their tumorigenic activity.

  7. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  8. Inhibition by ajoene of skin-tumor promotion in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Tomoaki; Yamada, Norihiko; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Fujino, Tsuchiyoshi

    2002-10-01

    Ajoene, a major compound containing sulfur in oil-macerated garlic products, inhibited in a two-stage carcinogenesis test on mouse skin. Treatment with ajoene suppressed skin tumor formation, depending on the amount. In particular, the group treated with 250 microg of ajoene had only 4.9% the number of tumors per mouse compared with the control group at 18 weeks.

  9. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  10. Selective inhibition of JNK with a peptide inhibitor attenuates pain hypersensitivity and tumor growth in a mouse skin cancer pain model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Jing; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Zeng, Qing; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Decosterd, Isabelle; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2009-09-01

    Cancer pain significantly affects the quality of cancer patients, and current treatments for this pain are limited. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been implicated in tumor growth and neuropathic pain sensitization. We investigated the role of JNK in cancer pain and tumor growth in a skin cancer pain model. Injection of luciferase-transfected B16-Fluc melanoma cells into a hindpaw of mouse induced robust tumor growth, as indicated by increase in paw volume and fluorescence intensity. Pain hypersensitivity in this model developed rapidly (<5 days) and reached a peak in 2 weeks, and was characterized by mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. Tumor growth was associated with JNK activation in tumor mass, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and spinal cord and a peripheral neuropathy, such as loss of nerve fibers in the hindpaw skin and induction of ATF-3 expression in DRG neurons. Repeated systemic injections of D-JNKI-1 (6 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective and cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of JNK, produced an accumulative inhibition of mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia. A bolus spinal injection of D-JNKI-1 also inhibited mechanical allodynia. Further, JNK inhibition suppressed tumor growth in vivo and melanoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, repeated injections of morphine (5 mg/kg), a commonly used analgesic for terminal cancer, produced analgesic tolerance after 1 day and did not inhibit tumor growth. Our data reveal a marked peripheral neuropathy in this skin cancer model and important roles of the JNK pathway in cancer pain development and tumor growth. JNK inhibitors such as D-JNKI-1 may be used to treat cancer pain. PMID:19445931

  11. Identification of an mtDNA mutation hot spot in UV-induced mouse skin tumors producing altered cellular biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Jandova, Jana; Eshaghian, Alex; Shi, Mingjian; Li, Meiling; King, Lloyd E; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role of mtDNA alterations in the development of cancer, as mtDNA point mutations are found at high frequency in a variety of human tumors. To determine the biological effects of mtDNA mutations in UV-induced skin tumors, hairless mice were irradiated to produce tumors, and the tumor mtDNAs were screened for single-nucleotide changes using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE), followed by direct sequencing. A mutation hot spot (9821insA) in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA arginine (mt-Tr) locus (tRNA(Arg)) was discovered in approximately one-third of premalignant and malignant skin tumors. To determine the functional relevance of this particular mutation in vitro, cybrid cell lines containing different mt-Tr (tRNA(Arg)) alleles were generated. The resulting cybrid cell lines contained the same nuclear genotype and differed only in their mtDNAs. The biochemical analysis of the cybrids revealed that the mutant haplotype is associated with diminished levels of complex I protein (CI), resulting in lower levels of baseline oxygen consumption and lower cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. We hypothesize that this specific mtDNA mutation alters cellular biochemistry, supporting the development of keratinocyte neoplasia.

  12. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid from Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Mitigates 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of Tumor Promotion Cascade in Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shakilur; Ansari, Rizwan Ahmed; Rehman, Hasibur; Parvez, Suhel; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2011-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a phenolic antioxidant found in the leaves and twigs of the evergreen desert shrub, Larrea tridentata (Sesse and Moc. ex DC) Coville (creosote bush). It has a long history of traditional medicinal use by the Native Americans and Mexicans. The modulatory effects of topically applied NDGA was studied on acute inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in mouse skin induced by stage I tumor promoting agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Double TPA treatment adversely altered many of the marker responses of stage I skin tumor promotion cascade. Pretreatment of NDGA in TPA-treated mice mitigated cutaneous lipid peroxidation and inhibited production of hydrogen peroxide. NDGA treatment also restored reduced glutathione level and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Elevated activities of myeloperoxidase, xanthine oxidase and skin edema formation in TPA-treated mice were also lowered by NDGA indicating a restrained inflammatory response. Furthermore, results of histological study demonstrated inhibitory effect of NDGA on cellular inflammatory responses. This study provides a direct evidence of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of NDGA against TPA-induced cutaneous inflammation and oxidative stress corroborating its chemopreventive potential against skin cancer. PMID:19861506

  13. The expression of endothelin-1 and its binding sites in mouse skin increased after ultraviolet B irradiation or local injection of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Ahn, G Y; Butt, K I; Jindo, T; Yaguchi, H; Tsuboi, R; Ogawa, H

    1998-02-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 is a 21-amino acid peptide which has vasoconstrictor and growth regulatory activity. Recently, cultured keratinocytes have been reported to express ET-1 and its receptor when irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) B. In order to further understand the role of ET-1 in vivo during UVB-induced inflammation, we examined the localization, intensity and time course of the expression levels of ET-1 and its binding sites in UVB-exposed BALB/c mouse skin. Frozen and paraffin sections prepared from mouse skin 48 h after treatment with UVB irradiation (0.36 or 0.72 J/cm2) or after injection with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (1.0 microgram) or interleukin (IL)-1 alpha (0.05 microgram) were incubated with monoclonal anti-ET-1 IgG and then visualized by peroxidase staining. In normal skin, faint ET-1 immunoreactivity was observed in the epidermis, pilosebaceous structures and blood vessels. Upon exposure to UVB irradiation or administration of TNF-alpha injection or IL-1 alpha injection, such immunoreactivity was found to be significantly enhanced. Subsequently, the frozen sections were incubated with 125I ET-1 for 30 min, and visualized by autoradiographic technique. In normal skin, ET-1 weakly bound to the skin, while UVB irradiation and TNF-alpha injection significantly enhanced ET-1 binding in the epidermis, pilosebaceous structures and blood vessels. Time course experiments (1, 2, 4 and 7 days) indicated that ET-1 immunoreactivity and ET-1 binding peaked 1 or 2 days after UVB irradiation or TNF-alpha injection. These results suggest that the up-regulated expression of ET-1 and its binding sites in the epidermis and pilosebaceous structures may act as an autocrine/paracrine factor during UVB-induced inflammation.

  14. Mouse skin tumor initiation-promotion and complete carcinogenesis bioassays: mechanisms and biological activities of emission samples.

    PubMed Central

    Nesnow, S; Triplett, L L; Slaga, T J

    1983-01-01

    Extracts of soots obtained from various sources were applied to the skin of mice in an effort to identify carcinogens in these mixtures and to link these materials to the etiology of human cancer. Samples of coal chimney soot, coke oven materials, industrial carbon black, oil shale soot, and gasoline vehicle exhaust materials have been examined by this method. The studies reported here have been constructed to compare the carcinogenic and tumorigenic potency of extracts from various particulate emissions: coke ovens, diesel and gasoline vehicles and a roofing tar pot. Automobile emission samples were obtained by collecting the diluted and cooled exhaust on Teflon-coated glass fiber filters. Coke oven and roofing tar samples were particulate emission samples collected by impaction and filtration. The organic components associated with each of the particles were extracted with dichloromethane and dermally applied to SENCAR mice. All agents were applied as tumor initiators by using a five-dose protocol. Selected extracts were also applied as complete carcinogens and as tumor promotors. Statistical analyses of the resulting tumor data were performed by using nonlinear Poisson and probit models. The results from these experiments provide a suitable data base for comparative potency estimation of complex mixtures. PMID:6825618

  15. I. Embryonal vasculature formation recapitulated in transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted pseudo-orthotopicly into mouse dorsal skin fold: the organoblasts concept

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate understanding of cancer biology is a problem. This work focused on cellular mechanisms of tumor vascularization. According to earlier studies, the tumor vasculature derives from host endothelial cells (angiogenesis) or their precursors of bone marrow origin circulating in the blood (neo-vasculogenesis) unlike in embryos. In this study, we observed the neo-vasculature form in multiple ways from local precursor cells. Recapitulation of primitive as well as advanced embryonal stages of vasculature formation followed co-implantation of avascular ( in vitro cultured) N202 breast tumor spheroids and homologous tissue grafts into mouse dorsal skin chambers. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical analysis of tissue sections exposed the interactions between the tumor and the graft tissue stem cells. It revealed details of vasculature morphogenesis not seen before in either tumors or embryos. A gradual increase in complexity of the vascular morphogenesis at the tumor site reflected a range of steps in ontogenic evolution of the differentiating cells. Malignant- and surgical injury repair-related tissue growth prompted local cells to initiate extramedullar erythropoiesis and vascular patterning. The new findings included: interdependence between the extramedullar hematopoiesis and assembly of new vessels (both from the locally differentiating precursors); nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion (karyolysis) as the mechanism of erythroblast enucleation; the role of megakaryocytes and platelets in vascular pattern formation before emergence of endothelial cells; lineage relationships between hematopoietic and endothelial cells; the role of extracellular calmyrin in tissue morphogenesis; and calmyrite, a new ultrastructural entity associated with anaerobic energy metabolism. The central role of the extramedullar erythropoiesis in the formation of new vasculature (blood and vessels) emerged here as part of the tissue building process including the lymphatic system and nerves

  16. Transgenic mouse model of cutaneous adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kito, Yusuke; Saigo, Chiemi; Atsushi, Kurabayashi; Mutsuo, Furihata; Tamotsu, Takeuchi

    2014-01-01

    TMEM207 was first characterized as being an important molecule for the invasion activity of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma cells. In order to unravel the pathological properties of TMEM207, we generated several transgenic mouse lines, designated C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207), in which murine TMEM207 was ectopically expressed under a truncated (by ~200 bp) proximal promoter of the murine intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene (also known as Tff3). Unexpectedly, a C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse line exhibited a high incidence of spontaneous intradermal tumors with histopathological features that resembled those of various human cutaneous adnexal tumors. These tumors were found in ~14% female and 13% of male 6- to 12-month-old mice. TMEM207 immunoreactivity was found in hair follicle bulge cells in non-tumorous skin, as well as in cutaneous adnexal tumors of the transgenic mouse. The ITF-TMEM207 construct in this line appeared to be inserted to a major satellite repeat sequence at chromosome 2, in which no definite coding molecule was found. In addition, we also observed cutaneous adnexal tumors in three other C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) transgenic mouse lines. We believe that the C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse might be a useful model to understand human cutaneous adnexal tumors. PMID:25305140

  17. Inhibition of phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-caused inflammatory responses in SENCAR mouse skin by black tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Mukhtar, H

    1997-10-01

    Over the past 10 years many studies from several laboratories defined anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of tea, a widely consumed beverage by the human population. Much of such work has been conducted with green tea or its polyphenolic constituents. Regarding black tea, studies have shown that its water extract affords protection against tumor promotion caused by chemical carcinogens or ultraviolet B radiation in murine skin carcinogenesis models. Several studies have shown that topical application of chemical tumor promoters to murine skin results in the induction of epidermal edema, hyperplasia and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and cyclo-oxygenase activities, and interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha) and ODC mRNA expression. In this study, we assessed whether topical application of polyphenols isolated from black tea leaves (hereafter referred to as BTP) mainly consisting of theaflavine gallates and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, inhibits phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-caused induction of these markers of inflammatory responses in murine skin. Topical application of BTP (6 mg in 0.2 ml acetone/animal) 30 min prior to TPA application on to the mouse skin resulted in significant inhibition against TPA-caused induction of epidermal edema (40%, P < 0.01), hyperplasia (57%, P < 0.005), leukocytes infiltration (50%), and induction of epidermal ODC (57%) and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1alpha mRNA expression (69%). Pre-application of BTP to that of TPA also resulted in significant inhibition of TPA-caused induction of epidermal ODC (23-73%, P < 0.005-0.0001), and cyclo-oxygenase, in terms of prostaglandins metabolites formation (38-65%, P < 0.01-0.0005), enzyme activities. Our data indicate that the inhibition of TPA-caused changes in these markers of inflammatory responses in murine skin by BTP may be one of the possible mechanisms of chemopreventive effects associated with black tea against tumorigenesis. The results

  18. Multistage skin tumor promotion: involvement of a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mamrack, M.; Slaga, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current information suggests that chemical carcinogenesis is a multistep process with one of the best studied models in this regard being the two-stage carcinogenesis system using mouse skin. The effects of several carcinogens and tumor promoters in various sequences of application were studied to examine the nature of the process. The actions of several tumor inhibitors were compared. (ACR)

  19. Modulation of miR-203 and its regulators as a function of time during the development of 7, 12 dimethylbenz [a] anthracene induced mouse skin tumors in presence or absence of the antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prakash; Gupta, Krishna P

    2014-07-15

    We investigated the chemopreventive effects of naturally occurring compounds like butyric acid (BA), nicotinamide (NA) and calcium glucarate (CAG) individually or in combination in 7, 12-dimethylbenz [a] anthracene (DMBA) treated mouse skin at 4 and 16 weeks, the time before and after the tumor development. DMBA application did not show any skin tumors at 4 weeks but well defined tumors appeared at 16 weeks. BA, NA or CAG prevented the tumor development significantly but the protection was highly enhanced when all these compounds were given together. In order to see the molecular changes progressing with tumors, we showed the downregulation of tumor suppressor miR-203 at 16 weeks and upregulation of histone deacetylases (HDAC), DNA methyltransferase, promoter methylation of miR-203 at 4 or 16 weeks. Regulators of micro RNA biogenesis such as DICER1 and Ago2 were also deregulated by DMBA. Proto-oncogene c-myc and BMI1 were upregulated and tumor suppressor gene p16 was downregulated by DMBA as a function of time. Effects of BA, NA or CAG were more pronounced after 16 weeks as compared to 4 weeks in preventing the tumor development and altered gene expression. Concomitant administration of BA, NA and CAG tried to prevent these alterations more effectively than that of individual compound possibly by regulating miR-203 status through epigenetic or biogenetic modulations before and after the tumor development. Study provides a rationale for chemoprevention by combination of different compounds targeting miR-203. PMID:24792773

  20. Suppression of tumor promoter-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in mouse skin by a superoxide generation inhibitor 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Murakami, A; Ohto, Y; Torikai, K; Tanaka, T; Ohigashi, H

    1998-11-01

    Double applications of phorbol esters trigger excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mouse skin. Previously reported data suggest that the two applications induce distinguishable biochemical events, namely, priming and activation. The former is characterized as a recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils, by chemotactic factors to inflammatory regions and edema formation. The latter is responsible for ROS generation. Thus, inhibitory effects of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), previously reported to be a superoxide generation inhibitor in vitro, on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in mouse skin model were examined using a double application of ACA. We demonstrated that two pretreatments and pretreatment with ACA (810 nmol) in the activation phase suppressed double TPA application-induced H2O2 formation in mouse skin. ACA exhibited no inhibitory effects on edema formation and the enhancement of myeloperoxidase activity during the first TPA treatment, whereas the anti-inflammatory agent genistein administered at the same dose inhibited both biomarkers. No inhibitory potential of ACA for TPA-induced H2O2 formation in the priming phase was confirmed. On the other hand, in the in vitro study, ACA inhibited ROS generation in differentiated HL-60 cells more strongly than did 1'-hydroxychavicol, which showed no inhibition by pretreatment in the activation phase. In addition, allopurinol did not inhibit double TPA application-induced H2O2 formation in mouse skin. These findings suggest that the NADPH oxidase system of neutrophils rather than the epithelial xanthine oxidase system is dominant for the O2--generating potential in double TPA-treated mouse skin. ACA significantly inhibited mouse epidermis thiobarbituric acid-reacting substance formation, known as an overall oxidative damage biomarker. Moreover, histological studies demonstrated that ACA inhibited double TPA treatment

  1. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  2. Induction of inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis in normal mouse skin by the combined treatment of tumor necrosis factor and lithium chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Beyaert, R.; De Potter, C.; Vanhaesebroeck, B.; Van Roy, F.; Fiers, W.

    1991-01-01

    Previously we reported that lithium chloride (LiCl) potentiates tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Here, using a murine normal skin model, it is shown that a subcutaneous injection of TNF plus LiCl induces acute dermal and subcutaneous inflammation and necrosis. Histology showed a marked initial dermal and subcutaneous neutrophil infiltrate by approximately 2 hours, followed by a predominantly mononuclear infiltrate by 24 hours, which remained present for several days. Tumor necrosis factor or LiCl alone induced negligible inflammation, disappearing after 6 hours; furthermore there was never necrosis or ulceration of the overlying skin in case of single-agent application. In vitro studies showed that the combination of TNF and LiCl, but not either agent alone, was directly cytotoxic to fibroblastic cells of murine skin. No inflammatory infiltration was visible in tumors treated intratumorally or perilesionally with TNF plus LiCl, although the latter treatment resulted in a perilesional leukocyte infiltration. Furthermore the combination of TNF and LiCl had no effect on macrophage cytotoxicity to L929 tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:1848044

  3. Modulation of miR-203 and its regulators as a function of time during the development of 7, 12 dimethylbenz [a] anthracene induced mouse skin tumors in presence or absence of the antitumor agents

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Prakash; Gupta, Krishna P.

    2014-07-15

    We investigated the chemopreventive effects of naturally occurring compounds like butyric acid (BA), nicotinamide (NA) and calcium glucarate (CAG) individually or in combination in 7, 12-dimethylbenz [a] anthracene (DMBA) treated mouse skin at 4 and 16 weeks, the time before and after the tumor development. DMBA application did not show any skin tumors at 4 weeks but well defined tumors appeared at 16 weeks. BA, NA or CAG prevented the tumor development significantly but the protection was highly enhanced when all these compounds were given together. In order to see the molecular changes progressing with tumors, we showed the downregulation of tumor suppressor miR-203 at 16 weeks and upregulation of histone deacetylases (HDAC), DNA methyltransferase, promoter methylation of miR-203 at 4 or 16 weeks. Regulators of micro RNA biogenesis such as DICER1 and Ago2 were also deregulated by DMBA. Proto-oncogene c-myc and BMI1 were upregulated and tumor suppressor gene p16 was downregulated by DMBA as a function of time. Effects of BA, NA or CAG were more pronounced after 16 weeks as compared to 4 weeks in preventing the tumor development and altered gene expression. Concomitant administration of BA, NA and CAG tried to prevent these alterations more effectively than that of individual compound possibly by regulating miR-203 status through epigenetic or biogenetic modulations before and after the tumor development. Study provides a rationale for chemoprevention by combination of different compounds targeting miR-203. - Highlights: • DMBA modulates miR-203 and its regulator before and after the onset of tumors. • Suppression of miR-203 and p16 could be the result of gene promoter methylation. • BA, NA or CAG prevents the effects of DMBA. • Combination of BA, NA or CAG is more effective in preventing the DMBA modulations.

  4. Effect of treatment in fractionated schedules with the combination of x-irradiation and six cytotoxic drugs on the RIF-1 tumor and normal mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lelieveld, P.; Scoles, M.A.; Brown, J.M.; Phil, D.; Kallman, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    RIF-1 tumors, implanted syngeneically in the gastrocnemius muscles of the right hind legs of C3H/Km mice, were treated either with X ray alone, drug alone, or drug and X ray combined. The drugs tested were bleomycin, BCNU, cis-diamminedichloro platinum, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and actinomycin-D. All drugs were administered either in the maximum tolerated dose or a dose that causes minimal tumor growth delay. Both drugs and X rays were administered either as a single dose or in five daily fractions. In addition to the single modality controls, seven different schedules of combined modalities were tested. Tumors were measured periodically after treatment in order that the day at which each tumor reached 4 times its initial cross-sectional area, i.e., its size at the time of treatment, could be determined. The effect of treatment on tumors was based upon excess growth delay (GD), i.e., T400% (treated)-T400% (untreated control). Treatment effects for the same combined modality schedules were also determined for normal skin, using the early skin reaction as an endpoint. Dose effect factors (DEF) were computed for all combined modality schedules and were based upon calculated radiation dose equivalents. We also calculated supra-additivity ratios, SR/sub I/ and SR/sub II/, therapeutic gain factors and adjusted therapeutic gain factors. The only drugs to produce significant supra-additivity with X rays were cis-Pt and cyclo.

  5. Mouse Prkar1a haploinsufficiency leads to an increase in tumors in the Trp53+/- or Rb1+/- backgrounds and chemically induced skin papillomas by dysregulation of the cell cycle and Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Madson Q; Muchow, Michael; Boikos, Sosipatros; Bauer, Andrew J; Griffin, Kurt J; Tsang, Kit Man; Cheadle, Chris; Watkins, Tonya; Wen, Feng; Starost, Matthew F; Bossis, Ioannis; Nesterova, Maria; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-04-15

    PRKAR1A inactivation leads to dysregulated cAMP signaling and Carney complex (CNC) in humans, a syndrome associated with skin, endocrine and other tumors. The CNC phenotype is not easily explained by the ubiquitous cAMP signaling defect; furthermore, Prkar1a(+/-) mice did not develop skin and other CNC tumors. To identify whether a Prkar1a defect is truly a generic but weak tumorigenic signal that depends on tissue-specific or other factors, we investigated Prkar1a(+/-) mice when bred within the Rb1(+/-) or Trp53(+/-) backgrounds, or treated with a two-step skin carcinogenesis protocol. Prkar1a(+/-) Trp53(+/-) mice developed more sarcomas than Trp53(+/-) mice (P < 0.05) and Prkar1a(+/-) Rb1(+/-) mice grew more (and larger) pituitary and thyroid tumors than Rb1(+/-) mice. All mice with double heterozygosity had significantly reduced life-spans compared with their single-heterozygous counterparts. Prkar1a(+/-) mice also developed more papillomas than wild-type animals. A whole-genome transcriptome profiling of tumors produced by all three models identified Wnt signaling as the main pathway activated by abnormal cAMP signaling, along with cell cycle abnormalities; all changes were confirmed by qRT-PCR array and immunohistochemistry. siRNA down-regulation of Ctnnb1, E2f1 or Cdk4 inhibited proliferation of human adrenal cells bearing a PRKAR1A-inactivating mutation and Prkar1a(+/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and arrested both cell lines at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. In conclusion, Prkar1a haploinsufficiency is a relatively weak tumorigenic signal that can act synergistically with other tumor suppressor gene defects or chemicals to induce tumors, mostly through Wnt-signaling activation and cell cycle dysregulation, consistent with studies in human neoplasms carrying PRKAR1A defects.

  6. Keratinocyte p38δ loss inhibits Ras-induced tumor formation, while systemic p38δ loss enhances skin inflammation in the early phase of chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Alexi; Koppel, Aaron C; Anders, Joanna; Cataisson, Christophe; Yuspa, Stuart H; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Efimova, Tatiana

    2016-05-01

    p38δ expression and/or activity are increased in human cutaneous malignancies, including invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and head and neck SCC, but the role of p38δ in cutaneous carcinogenesis has not been well-defined. We have reported that mice with germline loss of p38δ exhibited a reduced susceptibility to skin tumor development compared with wild-type mice in the two-stage 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) chemical skin carcinogenesis model. Here, we report that p38δ gene ablation inhibited the growth of tumors generated from v-ras(Ha) -transformed keratinocytes in skin orthografts to nude mice, indicating that keratinocyte-intrinsic p38δ is required for Ras-induced tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of v-ras(Ha) -transformed p38δ-null keratinocytes revealed transcriptional changes associated with cellular responses linked to tumor suppression, such as reduced proliferation and increased differentiation, cell adhesion, and cell communications. Notably, a short-term DMBA/TPA challenge, modeling the initial stages of chemical skin carcinogenesis treatment, elicited an enhanced inflammation in p38δ-null skin compared with skin of wild-type mice, as assessed by measuring the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and TNFα. Additionally, p38δ-null skin and p38δ-null keratinocytes exhibited increased p38α activation and signaling in response to acute inflammatory challenges, suggesting a role for p38α in stimulating the elevated inflammatory response in p38δ-null skin during the initial phases of the DMBA/TPA treatment compared with similarly treated p38δ(+/+) skin. Altogether, our results indicate that p38δ signaling regulates skin carcinogenesis not only by keratinocyte cell-autonomous mechanisms, but also by influencing the interaction between between the epithelial compartment of the developing skin tumor and its stromal microenvironment.

  7. Enhancement of tumor responsiveness to aminolevulinate-photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) using differentiation-promoting agents in mouse models of skin carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Honari, Golara; Paliwal, Akshat; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) is an emerging treatment for cancers. ALA, given as a prodrug, selectively accumulates and is metabolized in cancer cells to form protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Targeted local irradiation with light induces cell death. Since the efficacy of ALA-PDT for large or deep tumors is currently limited, we are developing a new approach that combines differentiation-inducing agents with ALA-PDT to improve the clinical response. Here, we tested this new combination paradigm in the following two models of skin carcinoma in mice: 1) tumors generated by topical application of chemical carcinogens (DMBA-TPA); 2) human SCC cells (A431) implanted subcutaneously. To achieve a differentiated state of the tumors, pretreatment with a low concentration of methotrexate (MTX) or Vitamin D (Vit D) was administered for 72 h prior to exposure to ALA. Confocal images of histological sections were captured and digitally analyzed to determine relative PpIX levels. PpIX in the tumors was also monitored by real-time in vivo fluorescence dosimetry. In both models, a significant increase in levels of PpIX was observed following pretreatment with MTX or Vit D, as compared to no-pretreatment controls. This enhancing effect was observed at very low, non-cytotoxic concentrations, and was highly specific to cancer cells as compared to normal cells. These results suggest that use of differentiating agents such as MTX or Vit D, as a short-term combination therapy given prior to ALA-PDT, can increase the production of PpIX photosensitizer and enhance the therapeutic response of skin cancers.

  8. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Giardullo, Paola; Pasquali, Emanuela; Tanori, Mirella; De Stefano, Ilaria; Casciati, Arianna; Naus, Christian C.; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1{sup +/−}) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1{sup +/−} and Cx43{sup +/−} mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1{sup +/−} mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases.

  9. Classification of infrared spectra from skin tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Laura M.; Mansfield, James R.; Crowson, A. Neil; Toole, John W. P.; Mantsch, Henry H.; Jackson, Michael

    2000-05-01

    The clinical differential diagnosis of skin tumors is an often-challenging task, to which the probing of skin with mid- and near-infrared (IR) light may be contributory. The development of objective methods for the analysis of IR spectra remains a major hurdle to developing clinically useful applications. The authors highlight different processing methods for IR spectra from skin biopsies and in-vivo skin tumors. Spectroscopic maps of biopsies of basal cell, squamous cell and melanocytic neoplasms were objectively grouped into distinct clusters that corresponded with tumor, epidermis, dermis, follicle and fat. Normal and abnormal skin components were located within maps using a search engine based upon linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In all instances, areas of tumor were distinct from normal tissue in biopsies. In-vivo, near-IR spectroscopy and LDA allowed discrimination between benign and malignant skin lesions with a high degree of accuracy. We conclude that IR spectroscopy has significant diagnostic promise in the skin cancer arena. The analytical methods described can now be used to create a powerful classification scheme in which to detect skin tumor cells within biopsied and living skin.

  10. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  11. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  12. Mouse mammary tumor biology: a short history.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology, and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration, in 1984, that the mouse mammary gland could be molecularly targeted and used to test the oncogenicity of candidate human genes. Now, very few scientists can avoid using a mouse model to test the biology of their favorite gene. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skills to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this short history of mouse mammary tumor biology is to provide a historical perspective for the benefit of the newcomers. If Einstein was correct in that "we stand on the shoulders of giants," the neophytes should meet their giants.

  13. Allele-Specific Deletions in Mouse Tumors Identify Fbxw7 as Germline Modifier of Tumor Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Losada, Jesus; Wu, Di; DelRosario, Reyno; Balmain, Allan; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in finding associations between specific genetic variants and cancer susceptibility in human populations. These studies have identified a range of highly statistically significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and susceptibility to development of a range of human tumors. However, the effect of each SNP in isolation is very small, and all of the SNPs combined only account for a relatively minor proportion of the total genetic risk (5–10%). There is therefore a major requirement for alternative routes to the discovery of genetic risk factors for cancer. We have previously shown using mouse models that chromosomal regions harboring susceptibility genes identified by linkage analysis frequently exhibit allele-specific genetic alterations in tumors. We demonstrate here that the Fbxw7 gene, a commonly mutated gene in a wide range of mouse and human cancers, shows allele-specific deletions in mouse lymphomas and skin tumors. Lymphomas from three different F1 hybrids show 100% allele-specificity in the patterns of allelic loss. Parental alleles from 129/Sv or Spretus/Gla mice are lost in tumors from F1 hybrids with C57BL/6 animals, due to the presence of a specific non-synonymous coding sequence polymorphism at the N-terminal portion of the gene. A specific genetic test of association between this SNP and lymphoma susceptibility in interspecific backcross mice showed a significant linkage (p = 0.001), but only in animals with a functional p53 gene. These data therefore identify Fbxw7 as a p53-dependent tumor susceptibility gene. Increased p53-dependent tumor susceptibility and allele-specific losses were also seen in a mouse skin model of skin tumor development. We propose that analysis of preferential allelic imbalances in tumors may provide an efficient means of uncovering genetic variants that affect mouse and human tumor susceptibility. PMID:22348067

  14. Mouse Prkar1a haploinsufficiency leads to an increase in tumors in the Trp53+/− or Rb1+/− backgrounds and chemically induced skin papillomas by dysregulation of the cell cycle and Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Madson Q.; Muchow, Michael; Boikos, Sosipatros; Bauer, Andrew J.; Griffin, Kurt J.; Tsang, Kit Man; Cheadle, Chris; Watkins, Tonya; Wen, Feng; Starost, Matthew F.; Bossis, Ioannis; Nesterova, Maria; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2010-01-01

    PRKAR1A inactivation leads to dysregulated cAMP signaling and Carney complex (CNC) in humans, a syndrome associated with skin, endocrine and other tumors. The CNC phenotype is not easily explained by the ubiquitous cAMP signaling defect; furthermore, Prkar1a+/− mice did not develop skin and other CNC tumors. To identify whether a Prkar1a defect is truly a generic but weak tumorigenic signal that depends on tissue-specific or other factors, we investigated Prkar1a+/− mice when bred within the Rb1+/− or Trp53+/− backgrounds, or treated with a two-step skin carcinogenesis protocol. Prkar1a+/− Trp53+/− mice developed more sarcomas than Trp53+/− mice (P < 0.05) and Prkar1a+/− Rb1+/− mice grew more (and larger) pituitary and thyroid tumors than Rb1+/− mice. All mice with double heterozygosity had significantly reduced life-spans compared with their single-heterozygous counterparts. Prkar1a+/− mice also developed more papillomas than wild-type animals. A whole-genome transcriptome profiling of tumors produced by all three models identified Wnt signaling as the main pathway activated by abnormal cAMP signaling, along with cell cycle abnormalities; all changes were confirmed by qRT–PCR array and immunohistochemistry. siRNA down-regulation of Ctnnb1, E2f1 or Cdk4 inhibited proliferation of human adrenal cells bearing a PRKAR1A-inactivating mutation and Prkar1a+/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts and arrested both cell lines at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. In conclusion, Prkar1a haploinsufficiency is a relatively weak tumorigenic signal that can act synergistically with other tumor suppressor gene defects or chemicals to induce tumors, mostly through Wnt-signaling activation and cell cycle dysregulation, consistent with studies in human neoplasms carrying PRKAR1A defects. PMID:20080939

  15. Skin manifestations of endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jonathan S; Braverman, Irwin M

    2016-06-01

    The skin signs of benign and malignant endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors are manifold and early identification of these dermatologic features is crucial in initiating timely diagnosis and management. This article reviews the salient cutaneous features of these tumors that arise in the classic endocrine glands, lung and gastrointestinal tract either as individual neoplasms or as part of a syndrome.

  16. [Skin tumors in facial plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Heppt, W

    2009-04-01

    As the incidence of facial skin tumors is rising, otorhinolaryngologists are becoming more and more involved in the field of facial plastic surgery. The most common tumor locations on the head are the sun-exposed areas such as the nose, forehead, cheek, and auricle. The most common histologic findings are actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. In planning tumor resection and defect repair, many factors, including histology, size, and localization of the tumor as well as conditions of the adjacent skin, must be considered. The key to defect repair after tumor resection is to choose the most appropriate technique from a range of possibilities. Because of skin laxity, most small and midsize facial defects can be closed directly or with high-tension sutures under skin expansion. More extensive defects and those located in critical areas require pedicled flaps or free grafts transferring skin from adjacent or distant areas. In patients with recurrent or deeply infiltrative tumors, reconstructive procedures of the facial nerve, parotid duct, and lacrimal duct might be needed. This is also true for reconstruction of the anatomic framework of the eyelids, the nose, and the pinna. PMID:19347378

  17. Solitary fibrous tumor of the skin.

    PubMed

    Hardisson, David; Cuevas-Santos, Jesús; Contreras, Félix

    2002-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an uncommon tumor initially reported in the pleura but recently described in other sites of the body. We report a SFT of the skin that presented as painless nodule located in the right cheek in a 56-year-old woman. Histologically, the tumor was composed of spindle-shaped cells arranged in a patternless pattern of short and narrow fascicles with interspersed bundles of thick collagen, and numerous blood vessels with a focally hemangiopericytoma-like appearance. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells strongly expressed vimentin, CD34 and bcl-2. The lesion was excised and the patient remains well at 16-month follow-up. This case presented some diagnostic difficulty because of its unusual location, and had to be distinguished from other superficial soft tissue tumors. Recognition of SFT in the skin is important to avoid possible confusion with a variety of spindle cell neoplasms with different biologic potential.

  18. Solitary fibrous tumor of the skin.

    PubMed

    Cowper, S E; Kilpatrick, T; Proper, S; Morgan, M B

    1999-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an uncommon mesenchymal tumor that typically arises in the pleural cavity. Comprised of spindled cells characteristically arranged in diverse architectural patterns, SFT histologically simulates a variety of benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors. The diagnosis of SFT has been refined by the availability of newer immunohistochemical markers such as CD-34 and factor XIIIa, facilitating the identification of SFTs arising in multiple extrapleural sites, including the skin. We describe three cases of primary cutaneous SFT, review the literature, and discuss the histologic and immunohistochemical differential of other cutaneous tumors that SFT can mimic.

  19. The skin tumor: a reconstructive challenge.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, L K

    1993-10-01

    The type of reconstruction performed following skin tumor surgery is directly related to the type, extent, and site of the skin tumor. The skin tumors with which the plastic surgeon is most often confronted are the basal and squamous cell cancers and melanoma. It is well documented that the incidence of these tumors are increasing at an alarming rate. This is believed to be primarily due to excessive sun exposure and the thinning of the protective ozone layer. Under these circumstances, the plastic surgeon today must be well equipped to not only treat these tumors, as well as other rarer diseases, but also to reconstruct the sometimes challenging resulting defects. The guiding reconstructive principle is as Ralph Millard admonished: Replace lost tissue with like tissue. A skin graft at the tip of the nose can be very distracting due to its patch-like, depressed appearance. In contrast, a full-thickness skin flap would allow the reconstructive "material" to blend in with its surroundings for a more impressive result. The plastic surgeon has several items in his armamentarium to assist in the execution of this principle. Some of the techniques are based on age-old ideas, while others represent very recent, almost revolutionary advances. These advances include: 1. The introduction of the tissue expander: This concept has allowed the plastic surgeon to reconstruct defects that would would have normally required disfiguring skin grafts or free tissue transfers. 2. The elucidation of the vascular supply to the skin and underlying muscles and fascia: This knowledge has endowed the plastic surgeon with a tremendous pallet of reliable flaps to reconstruct a particular defect.

  20. Skin tumors in aging Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Adeleh; Loya, Theresa; Lee, Jeffrey L

    2002-06-01

    We report 25 cases of skin neoplasm observed among 30 Long Evans rats serving as controls in a psychosocial behavioral study conducted in the Vivarium at Charles R. Drew University, Los Angeles, CA. The animals were 10 weeks old at the beginning of the study. All the skin tumors developed at 18 to 26 months of age and slowly enlarged over a period of 9 months. Multiple nodules occurred in 8 males and 6 females. None of the tumors regressed. The tumors were located around the hind leg and dorso-medial area and measured 1 to 2 cm. Physical examination revealed firm well demarcated dermal masses. Most of the tumor nodules were intradermal, and some had a central ulcerated or keratin-filled core. Microscopic examination performed on some of the tumors showed findings of classic Keratoacanthoma, whereas others showed histologic features suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma. These findings indicate a high rate (83%) of spontaneous skin neoplasms among aging Long Evans rats. To our knowledge, such a high rate of skin neoplasms in aged rodents has not been described in the literature. Furthermore, further studies should be undertaken to confirm these findings and to assess whether these rodents might serve as a model for studying the alterations in the immune system with aging.

  1. Conflicting effects of DMSO on mouse skin tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, W.T.; Weiss, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    A number of solvents, including dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), when substituted for acetone as the vehicle for the potent promoter phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) in the two-stage mouse skin cancer model, tend to inhibit tumorigenesis. DMSO was investigated further because the literature is ambiguous concerning its effect in both single and multi-stage carcinogenesis. As solvent for the complete carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene (BaP, 125 mg in 40 ..mu..l 2x/wk), tumor yield increased an avg of 245% (3 trials in C3H mice) compared to acetone/BaP. However, in the two-stage model (CD-1 mice initiated with 50-100 ..mu..g DMBA) DMSO as the vehicle for PMA (5 ..mu..g in 40 ..mu..l 2x/wk) reduced tumor yield to 34% of the PMA/acetone controls. To test whether the inhibition was an in vitro effect, 40 ..mu..l DMSO was applied at the initiation site, the back, up to one hr before PMA/acetone. In three trials tumor yield averaged 23% of controls. To determine whether the DMSO effect was directly on initiated cells or indirectly via the systemic circulation, 40 ..mu..l DMSO was applied prior to promotion at a site distant from initiation/promotion, the abdomen. In three trials, DMSO enhanced tumor yield by 194%. DMSO itself had no initiating or promotion effects. Thus, it appears that DMSO may either inhibit or enhance mouse skin tumorigenesis depending on its method of application.

  2. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cano, David A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Animal models constitute valuable tools for investigating the pathogenesis of cancer as well as for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics approaches. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of pituitary-tumor formation remain poorly understood, particularly in sporadic adenomas, thus, making it a challenge to model pituitary tumors in mice. Nevertheless, genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of pituitary tumors have provided important insight into pituitary tumor biology. In this paper, we review various GEMMs of pituitary tumors, highlighting their contributions and limitations, and discuss opportunities for research in the field. PMID:25136513

  3. SENCAR mouse skin tumorigenesis model versus other strains and stocks of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.

    1986-09-01

    The SENCAR mouse stock was selectively bred for eight generations for sensitivity to skin tumor induction by the two-stage tumorigenesis protocol using 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as the initiator and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as the promoter. The SENCAR mouse was derived by crossing Charles River CD-1 mice with skin-tumor-sensitive mice (STS). The SENCAR mice are much more sensitive to both DMBA tumor initiation and TPA tumor promotion than CD-1, BALB/c, and DBA/2 mice. An even greater difference in the sensitivity to two-stage skin tumorigenesis is apparent between SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice when using DMBA-TPA treatment. However, the SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice have a similar tumor response to DMBA-benzoyl peroxide treatment, suggesting that TPA is not an effective promoter in C57BL/6 mice. The DBA/2 mice respond in a similar manner to the SENCAR mice when using N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-TPA treatment. The SENCAR mouse model provides a good dose-response relationship for many carcinogens used as tumor initiators and for many compounds used as tumor promoter. When compared to other stocks and strains of mice, the SENCAR mouse has one of the largest data bases for carcinogens and promoters.

  4. The vitamin D receptor: a tumor suppressor in skin.

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel David

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supporting a major chemopreventive role for vitamin D in various malignancies is strong. Likewise the use of the active metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), and its analogs to prevent and/or treat a wide variety of malignancies in animals is well established. The evidence has been less compelling for epidermal carcinogenesis perhaps because the same agent that produces vitamin D in the skin, UVB radiation (UVR), is also the same agent that results in most epidermal malignancies. However, recent studies indicate that the role of vitamin D and its receptor (VDR) in protecting against the development of epidermal tumors deserves a closer look. One such study found mice lacking the VDR were quite sensitive to epidermal tumor formation following the administration of the carcinogen DMBA. A more recent study showed that these mice were similarly more sensitive to tumor formation following UVR, results we have confirmed. The epidermis of the VDR null mouse is hyperproliferative with gross distortion of hair follicles, structures that may provide the origin for the tumors found in the skin following such treatment. Two interacting pathways critical for epidermal and hair follicle function, beta-catenin and hedgehog (Hh), result in epidermal tumors when they are activated abnormally. Thus, we considered the possibility that loss of VDR predisposes to epidermal tumor formation by activation of either or both beta-catenin and Hh signaling. We determined that all elements of the Hh signaling pathway are upregulated in the epidermis and utricles of the VDR null mouse, and that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) suppresses the expression of these elements in normal mouse skin. In addition we observed that the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin was increased in keratinocytes lacking the VDR. These results lead us to the hypothesis that the VDR with its ligand 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) functions as a tumor suppressor with respect to epidermal tumor formation in response to

  5. Photoeffects of near ultraviolet light upon a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposed to mouse skin microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Peirano, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    Near ultraviolet (UV) light has been reported to both enhance and inhibit the tumor incidence in mice dermally exposed to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures. Near UV light interacts with PAHs producing a variety of oxygenated products such as phenols, endoperoxides and quinones. However, little is known about BaP products formed from near UV irradiation of BaP-exposed mouse skin. Therefore, [sup 14]C-BaP was incubated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) induced C[sub 3]H/HeJ and DBA/2J mouse skin microsomes with or without a 365 nm light source. The results indicated that the concurrent 365 nm light irradiation of induced mouse skin microsomes and BaP greatly enhanced the total conversion of BaP to its products, approximately 3-fold for the C[sub 3]H/HeJ and approximately 7-fold for the DBA/2J mouse microsomes, compared to the induced mouse skin microsomes and BaP alone. HPLC analyses of organic extracts indicated a more than additive enhancement of the formation of most of the individual cochromatographed BaP metabolites due to the combined interaction of 365 nm light with BaP and skin microsomes. Similar interactions were observed using benz(a)anthracene (BaA) in this system. These data show that near UV light alters the metabolic profile of PAHs produced by mouse skin microsomes.

  6. Solitary fibrous tumor of the skin.

    PubMed

    Okamura, J M; Barr, R J; Battifora, H

    1997-10-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the pleura, but is increasingly more often observed in extrapleural locations. A 37-year-old woman presented with an SFT involving the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the scalp. Histologically, SFT is well circumscribed and composed of uniform spindle cells arranged in interlacing fascicles. It exhibits alternating hypercellular and hypocellular areas with abundant thick, often keloid-like, hyalinized collagen. Hemangiopericytoma-like areas are frequently prominent. Immunohistochemical markers for smooth muscle, neural, and epithelial differentiation are negative, but generalized positivity for CD-34 is characteristic. Because of the expanding spectrum of anatomic involvement of SFT, it is not surprising that on rare occasions this tumor may involve the skin.

  7. Transgenic mouse model of malignant skin melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, B; Silvers, W K

    1993-01-01

    Tyr-SV40E transgenic mice are specifically susceptible to melanoma due to expression of the oncogene in pigment cells. Mice of the more susceptible lines die young of early-onset eye melanomas, when skin melanomas are still infrequent and benign. To surmount this obstacle, skin from donors of two high-susceptibility lines was grafted to Tyr-SV40E hosts of a low-susceptibility line of the same inbred strain, thereby enabling the skin to outlive the donors and continue to grow in immunocompetent but tolerant hosts. Unexpectedly, donor pigment cells in all the grafts soon selectively proliferated close to areas of greatest wound healing, forming a dense black tracery, especially at the outer rim of the grafts. These lesions slowly grew radially within the grafts, producing irregular greyish patches. Local vertical thickenings then appeared and developed into small melanomas, which soon ulcerated through the epidermis. The tumors rapidly enlarged and became deeply invasive. Discrete black nevi also arose, with many becoming larger and distinctly blue, but those not near areas of pronounced wound healing did not progress to malignancy. In this first series, malignant melanoma resulted in all the grafts from the more susceptible of two donor lines and in some grafts from the other line. Distant metastases occurred in some cases from each line. Most tumors were hypomelanotic and heterogeneous, with lobes or areas differing in melanization. The results strongly suggest that growth factors and cytokines--known to be produced in wound repair--are triggering the growth and malignant conversion of these genetically susceptible melanocytes and that in the graft situation we are merely witnessing a caricature--a usefully exaggerated manifestation of the true events underlying the genesis of melanomas. The striking resemblance to the human malignancy, the genetic uniformity and different susceptibilities of the transgenic lines, and the experimental possibilities in the grafted

  8. Reduction in squamous cell carcinomas in mouse skin by dietary zinc supplementation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Shen, Rulong; Schrock, Morgan S; Liu, James; Pan, Xueliang; Quimby, Donald; Zanesi, Nicola; Druck, Teresa; Fong, Louise Y; Huebner, Kay

    2016-08-01

    Inadequate dietary Zn consumption increases susceptibility to esophageal and other cancers in humans and model organisms. Since Zn supplementation can prevent cancers in rodent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) models, we were interested in determining if it could have a preventive effect in a rodent skin cancer model, as a preclinical basis for considering a role for Zn in prevention of human nonmelanoma skin cancers, the most frequent cancers in humans. We used the 7,12-dimethyl benzanthracene carcinogen/phorbol myristate acetate tumor promoter treatment method to induce skin tumors in Zn-sufficient wild-type and Fhit (human or mouse protein) knockout mice. Fhit protein expression is lost in >50% of human cancers, including skin SCCs, and Fhit-deficient mice show increased sensitivity to carcinogen induction of tumors. We hypothesized that: (1) the skin cancer burdens would be reduced by Zn supplementation; (2) Fhit(-/-) (Fhit, murine fragile histidine triad gene) mice would show increased susceptibility to skin tumor induction versus wild-type mice. 30 weeks after initiating treatment, the tumor burden was increased ~2-fold in Fhit(-/-) versus wild-type mice (16.2 versus 7.6 tumors, P < 0.001); Zn supplementation significantly reduced tumor burdens in Fhit(-/-) mice (males and females combined, 16.2 unsupplemented versus 10.3 supplemented, P = 0.001). Most importantly, the SCC burden was reduced after Zn supplementation in both strains and genders of mice, most significantly in the wild-type males (P = 0.035). Although the mechanism(s) of action of Zn supplementation in skin tumor prevention is not known in detail, the Zn-supplemented tumors showed evidence of reduced DNA damage and some cohorts showed reduced inflammation scores. The results suggest that mild Zn supplementation should be tested for prevention of skin cancer in high-risk human cohorts. PMID:27185213

  9. Cooperative Nanoparticle System for Photothermal Tumor Treatment without Skin Damage.

    PubMed

    Piao, Ji-Gang; Liu, Dong; Hu, Kan; Wang, Limin; Gao, Feng; Xiong, Yujie; Yang, Lihua

    2016-02-01

    How to ablate tumors without using skin-harmful high laser irradiance remains an ongoing challenge for photothermal therapy. Here, we achieve this with a cooperative nanosystem consisting of gold nanocage (AuNC) "activator" and a cationic mammalian-membrane-disruptive peptide, cTL, as photothermal antenna and anticancer agent, respectively. Specifically, this nanosystem is prepared by grafting cTL onto AuNC via a Au-S bond, followed by attachment of thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG) for stealth effects. Upon NIR irradiation at skin-permissible dosage, the resulting cTL/PEG-AuNC nanoparticle effectively ablates both irradiated and nonirradiated cancer cells, likely owing to cTL being responsively unleashed by intracellular thiols exposed to cTL/PEG-AuNC via membrane damage initiated by AuNC's photothermal effects and deteriorated by the as-released cTL. When administered systematically in a mouse model, cTL/PEG-AuNC populates tumors through their porous vessels and effectively destroys them without damaging skin. PMID:26794418

  10. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors.

  12. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors. PMID:11593034

  13. Characterization of skin tumors in dermatoscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serruys, Camille; Brahmi, Djamel; Giron, Alain; Vilain, Joseph; Triller, Raoul; Fertil, Bernard

    1999-05-01

    Purpose: The prognosis of melanoma, an invasive and malignant skin tumor, strongly relies on early detection. Unfortunately differentiating early melanomas from other less dangerous pigmented lesions is a difficult task even for trained observers since they may have near physical characteristics. Dermatoscopy, a new non-invasive technique which makes subsurface structures of skin accessible to in vivo examination provides standardized images of black tumors that seem convenient for numerical analysis. The objective of this project is to develop a computer-based diagnostic system which takes advantage of dermatoscopic images to characterize black tumors and help to detect melanoma. Methods: Dermatologists ground their diagnosis on the observation of some characteristic features in images of black tumors. Similarly, our approach consists in classifying parts of images of skin tumors (called windows thereafter) by a two-stage procedure. First, a contextual coding of widows is achieved by GHA network (Generalized Hebbian Algorithm). The second stage involves a classical feedforward network (a multilayer perceptron) which performs a classification of coded windows. Both stages rely on learning to achieve their task. The GHA network operates a Principal Component-like analysis of windows. During that phase, sets of primitive images fitted to various contexts are constituted, each set being appropriate for the description of some aspects of the windows (contrast, texture, border, color, ...). Windows can subsequently be coded by projection on these bases. Finally, a supervised learning is carried out to build up the classifier, using parts of characterized images with respect to the features under consideration. Results: Most of the interesting features detectable in black tumors can be observed in 16*16 pixel windows, providing resolution is properly chosen. The analysis of such windows by our system shows that classification is properly achieved when 20 primitive

  14. Skin manifestations of hormone-secreting tumors.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Serge A

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine and metabolic diseases, besides affecting other organs, can result in changes in cutaneous function and morphology and can lead to a complex symptomatology. Dermatologists may see some of these skin lesions first, either before the endocrinologist, or even after the internist or specialist has missed the right diagnosis. Because some skin lesions might reflect a life-threatening endocrine or metabolic disorder, identifying the underlying disorder is very important, so that patients can receive corrective rather than symptomatic treatment. In this issue, we will review various hormone-secreting tumors, including pituitary disorders (Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly), hyperthyroidism, glucagonoma, carcinoid syndrome, mastocytosis, and hyperandrogenism. We will focus on clinical manifestations, mainly cutaneous, followed by a brief discussion on how to make the diagnosis of each condition in addition to treatment options. PMID:21054708

  15. Hyperelastic Material Properties of Mouse Skin under Compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L; Baba, Yoshichika; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2013-01-01

    The skin is a dynamic organ whose complex material properties are capable of withstanding continuous mechanical stress while accommodating insults and organism growth. Moreover, synchronized hair cycles, comprising waves of hair growth, regression and rest, are accompanied by dramatic fluctuations in skin thickness in mice. Whether such structural changes alter skin mechanics is unknown. Mouse models are extensively used to study skin biology and pathophysiology, including aging, UV-induced skin damage and somatosensory signaling. As the skin serves a pivotal role in the transfer function from sensory stimuli to neuronal signaling, we sought to define the mechanical properties of mouse skin over a range of normal physiological states. Skin thickness, stiffness and modulus were quantitatively surveyed in adult, female mice (Mus musculus). These measures were analyzed under uniaxial compression, which is relevant for touch reception and compression injuries, rather than tension, which is typically used to analyze skin mechanics. Compression tests were performed with 105 full-thickness, freshly isolated specimens from the hairy skin of the hind limb. Physiological variables included body weight, hair-cycle stage, maturity level, skin site and individual animal differences. Skin thickness and stiffness were dominated by hair-cycle stage at young (6-10 weeks) and intermediate (13-19 weeks) adult ages but by body weight in mature mice (26-34 weeks). Interestingly, stiffness varied inversely with thickness so that hyperelastic modulus was consistent across hair-cycle stages and body weights. By contrast, the mechanics of hairy skin differs markedly with anatomical location. In particular, skin containing fascial structures such as nerves and blood vessels showed significantly greater modulus than adjacent sites. Collectively, this systematic survey indicates that, although its structure changes dramatically throughout adult life, mouse skin at a given location maintains a

  16. The effect of various dietary fats on skin tumor initiation.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-01-01

    The type of dietary fat has been shown to modulate the initiation stage of mammary tumorigenesis, with saturated fat fed before and/or during carcinogen treatment resulting in increased tumor incidence. This study was designed to determine whether different types of dietary fat alter the initiation stage of skin carcinogenesis by use of the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model. Sencar mice were divided into three groups and maintained on one of the experimental diets. The AIN-76-based diets consisted of 10% total fat with various types of fat: 8.5% menhaden oil plus 1.5% corn oil, 8.5% coconut oil plus 1.5% corn oil, and 10% corn oil. After three weeks mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Two weeks later, all mice were switched to a diet containing 5% corn oil. Promotion began four weeks after initiation with twice-weekly application of 1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and continued for 12 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kilocalories of food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma incidence, yield, and size were not significantly different among the diet groups. In a parallel study, [3H]DMBA binding to epidermal DNA showed no dietary differences. Unlike the mammary carcinogenesis model, these data suggest that the type of fat fed during DMBA initiation had minimal effects on this stage of skin carcinogenesis.

  17. The effect of various dietary fats on skin tumor initiation.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-01-01

    The type of dietary fat has been shown to modulate the initiation stage of mammary tumorigenesis, with saturated fat fed before and/or during carcinogen treatment resulting in increased tumor incidence. This study was designed to determine whether different types of dietary fat alter the initiation stage of skin carcinogenesis by use of the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model. Sencar mice were divided into three groups and maintained on one of the experimental diets. The AIN-76-based diets consisted of 10% total fat with various types of fat: 8.5% menhaden oil plus 1.5% corn oil, 8.5% coconut oil plus 1.5% corn oil, and 10% corn oil. After three weeks mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Two weeks later, all mice were switched to a diet containing 5% corn oil. Promotion began four weeks after initiation with twice-weekly application of 1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and continued for 12 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kilocalories of food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma incidence, yield, and size were not significantly different among the diet groups. In a parallel study, [3H]DMBA binding to epidermal DNA showed no dietary differences. Unlike the mammary carcinogenesis model, these data suggest that the type of fat fed during DMBA initiation had minimal effects on this stage of skin carcinogenesis. PMID:1670290

  18. Cdk4 deficiency inhibits skin tumor development but does not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J

    2002-08-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue.

  19. cdk4 Deficiency Inhibits Skin Tumor Development but Does Not Affect Normal Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S.; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J.

    2002-01-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue. PMID:12163365

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. RESULTS Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. Material/Methods FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. Results Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. Conclusions Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  2. Modeling cytomegalovirus infection in mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Price, Richard Lee; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that cytomegalovirus (CMV) modulates cancer is evolving. Originally discovered in glioblastoma in 2002, the number of cancers, where intratumoral CMV antigen is detected, has increased in recent years suggesting that CMV actively affects the pathobiology of certain tumors. These findings are controversial as several groups have also reported inability to replicate these results. Regardless, several clinical trials for glioblastoma are underway or have been completed that target intratumoral CMV with anti-viral drugs or immunotherapy. Therefore, a better understanding of the possible pathobiology of CMV in cancer needs to be ascertained. We have developed genetic, syngeneic, and orthotopic malignant glioma mouse models to study the role of CMV in cancer development and progression. These models recapitulate for the most part intratumoral CMV expression as seen in human tumors. Additionally, we discovered that CMV infection in Trp53(-/+) mice promotes pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcomas. These mouse models are not only a vehicle for studying pathobiology of the viral-tumor interaction but also a platform for developing and testing cancer therapeutics. PMID:25853089

  3. Multiple skin tumors of indeterminate cells in an adult.

    PubMed

    Kolde, G; Bröcker, E B

    1986-10-01

    An adult patient with multiple unusual histiocytic tumors of the skin is described. As shown by immunohistologic study, electron microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy, the tumors represent circumscribed proliferations of the Langerhans cell-related indeterminate dendritic cells of the skin. This distinct cutaneous histiocytosis may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  4. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Kung, Andrew L

    2015-01-05

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has become an essential technique for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapeutics and provides sensitive and quantitative measurements of tumor burden in experimental cancer models. For light generation, a vector encoding firefly luciferase is introduced into human cancer cells that are grown as tumor xenografts in immunocompromised hosts, and the enzyme substrate luciferin is injected into the host. Alternatively, the reporter gene can be expressed in genetically engineered mouse models to determine the onset and progression of disease. In addition to expression of an ectopic luciferase enzyme, bioluminescence requires oxygen and ATP, thus only viable luciferase-expressing cells or tissues are capable of producing bioluminescence signals. Here, we summarize a BLI protocol that takes advantage of advances in hardware, especially the cooled charge-coupled device camera, to enable detection of bioluminescence in living animals with high sensitivity and a large dynamic range.

  5. Loss of Snail2 favors skin tumor progression by promoting the recruitment of myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Villarejo, Ana; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia; Montenegro, Yenny; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Gridley, Tom; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna A.; Peinado, Héctor; Portillo, Francisco; Calés, Carmela; Cano, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Snail2 is a zinc finger transcription factor involved in driving epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Snail2 null mice are viable, but display defects in melanogenesis, gametogenesis and hematopoiesis, and are markedly radiosensitive. Here, using mouse genetics, we have studied the contributions of Snail2 to epidermal homeostasis and skin carcinogenesis. Snail2 −/− mice presented a defective epidermal terminal differentiation and, unexpectedly, an increase in number, size and malignancy of tumor lesions when subjected to the two-stage mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis protocol, compared with controls. Additionally, tumor lesions from Snail2 −/− mice presented a high inflammatory component with an elevated percentage of myeloid precursors in tumor lesions that was further increased in the presence of the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone. In vitro studies in Snail2 null keratinocytes showed that loss of Snail2 leads to a decrease in proliferation indicating a non-cell autonomous role for Snail2 in the skin carcinogenic response observed in vivo. Bone marrow (BM) cross-reconstitution assays between Snail2 wild-type and null mice showed that Snail2 absence in the hematopoietic system fully reproduces the tumor behavior of the Snail2 null mice and triggers the accumulation of myeloid precursors in the BM, blood and tumor lesions. These results indicate a new role for Snail2 in preventing myeloid precursors recruitment impairing skin chemical carcinogenesis progression. PMID:25784375

  6. The circadian clock controls sunburn apoptosis and erythema in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Gaddameedhi, Shobhan; Selby, Christopher P; Kemp, Michael G; Ye, Rui; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies of humans and experimental studies with mouse models suggest that sunburn resulting from exposure to excessive UV light and damage to DNA confers an increased risk for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Previous reports have shown that both nucleotide excision repair, which is the sole pathway in humans for removing UV photoproducts, and DNA replication are regulated by the circadian clock in mouse skin. Furthermore, the timing of UV exposure during the circadian cycle has been shown to affect skin carcinogenesis in mice. Because sunburn and skin cancer are causally related, we investigated UV-induced sunburn apoptosis and erythema in mouse skin as a function of circadian time. Interestingly, we observed that sunburn apoptosis, inflammatory cytokine induction, and erythema were maximal following an acute early-morning exposure to UV and minimal following an afternoon exposure. Early-morning exposure to UV also produced maximal activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (Atr)-mediated DNA damage checkpoint signaling, including activation of the tumor suppressor p53, which is known to control the process of sunburn apoptosis. These data provide early evidence that the circadian clock has an important role in the erythemal response in UV-irradiated skin. The early morning is when DNA repair is at a minimum, and thus the acute responses likely are associated with unrepaired DNA damage. The prior report that mice are more susceptible to skin cancer induction following chronic irradiation in the AM, when p53 levels are maximally induced, is discussed in terms of the mutational inactivation of p53 during chronic irradiation.

  7. Multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin: Fundamentals and applications

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Erika L.; Angel, Joe M; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2011-01-01

    For more than 60 years, the chemical induction of tumors in mouse skin has been used to study mechanisms of epithelial carcinogenesis and evaluate modifying factors. In the traditional two-stage skin carcinogenesis model, initiation is accomplished by the application of a subcarcinogenic dose of a carcinogen. Subsequently, tumor development is elicited by repeated treatment with a tumor promoting agent. The initiation protocol can be completed within 1–3 hours depending on the number of mice used, while the promotion phase requires twice weekly treatments (1–2 hours) and once weekly tumor palpation (1–2 hours) for the duration of the study. A highly reproducible papilloma burden is expected within 10–20 weeks with progression of a portion of the tumors to squamous cell carcinomas within 20–50 weeks. In contrast to complete skin carcinogenesis, the two-stage model allows for greater yield of premalignant lesions as well as separation of the initiation and promotion phases. PMID:19713956

  8. Fusion algorithm for poultry skin tumor detection using hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakariyakul, Songyot; Casasent, David

    2007-01-01

    We consider a feature selection method to detect skin tumors on chicken carcasses using hyperspectral (HS) reflectance data. Detection of chicken tumors is difficult because the tumors vary in size and shape; some tumors are small, early-stage tumor spots. We make use of the fact that a chicken skin tumor consists of a lesion region surrounded by a region of thickened skin and that the spectral responses of the lesion and the thickened-skin regions of tumors are considerably different and train our feature selection algorithm to separately detect lesion regions and thickened-skin regions; we then fuse the two HS detection results to reduce false alarms. To the best of our knowledge, these techniques are new. Our forward selection and modified branch and bound algorithm is used to select a small number of λ spectral features that are useful for discrimination. Initial results show that our method offers promise for a good tumor detection rate and a low false alarm rate.

  9. Tumors of the skin and soft tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    The majority of the body surface is covered by the skin. Many internal disorders are reflected in the condition of the skin. One of the major functions of the skin is protection of the other organ systems from a variety of environmental insults. In this role, the skin itself is exposed to factors that can ultimately cause chronic diseases and cancer. Since it is relatively easy to recognize skin abnormalities, most skin cancers are brought to professional attention sooner than other types of cancer. However, due to the close resemblance between many skin neoplasms and noncancerous dermatologic disorders, these neoplasms may be mistreated for months or even years. In veterinary oncology, as in human medicine, most cancers can be effectively treated or cured following an accurate diagnosis. Once diagnosed, skin neoplasms should be aggressively treated. If causal factors are known, exposure to these factors should be limited through removal of the agent (for chemical carcinogens) or limiting exposure to the agent (for other carcinogens such as sunlight). 10 tabs. (MHB)

  10. Foot Pad Skin Biopsy in Mouse Models of Hereditary Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dacci, Patrizia; Dina, Giorgia; Cerri, Federica; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Lauria, Giuseppe; Feltri, Maria Laura; Bolino, Alessandra; Comi, Giancarlo; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Quattrini, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Numerous transgenic and knockout mouse models of human hereditary neuropathies have become available over the past decade. We describe a simple, reproducible, and safe biopsy of mouse skin for histopathological evaluation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in models of hereditary neuropathies. We compared the diagnostic outcome between sciatic nerve and dermal nerves found in skin biopsy (SB) from the hind foot. A total of five animal models of different Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies, and one model of congenital muscular dystrophy associated neuropathy were examined. In wild type mice, dermal nerve fibers were readily identified by immunohistochemistry, light, and electron microscopy and they appeared similar to myelinated fibers in sciatic nerve. In mutant mice, SB manifested myelin abnormalities similar to those observed in sciatic nerves, including hypomyelination, onion bulbs, myelin outfolding, redundant loops, and tomacula. In many strains, however, SB showed additional abnormalities—fiber loss, dense neurofilament packing with lower phosphorylation status, and axonal degeneration—undetected in sciatic nerve, possibly because SB samples distal nerves. SB, a reliable technique to investigate peripheral neuropathies in human beings, is also useful to investigate animal models of hereditary neuropathies. Our data indicate that SB may reveal distal axonal pathology in mouse models and permits sequential follow-up of the neuropathy in an individual mouse, thereby reducing the number of mice necessary to document pathology of the PNS. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20878767

  11. Indication guidelines for Mohs micrographic surgery in skin tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Selma Schuartz; Gontijo, Gabriel; Pimentel, Eugenio Raul de Almeida; Tarlé, Roberto Gomes; Tassara, Glaysson; Ferreira, Juliana Areas de Souza Lima Beltrame; Fernandes, Victor Miguel Coutinho; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques

    2016-01-01

    Mohs micrographic surgery is a technique used to excise skin tumors based on comprehensive surgical mapping, in which the surgeon removes the tumor, followed by a complete histological evaluation of the tumor's margins. The correlation of the presence of a tumor in histological examinations and its precise location on the surgical map result in a complete removal of the tumor with maximum normal tissue preservation. The present article seeks to provide general practitioners and healthcare specialists with guidelines regarding recommendations for Mohs micrographic surgery to treat skin tumors, based on the most reliable evidence available in medical literature on the subject. This bibliographic review of scientific articles in this line of research was conducted based on data collected from MEDLINE/PubMed. The search strategy used in this study was based on structured questions in the Patient, Intervention, Control, and Outcome (PICO) format. MeSH terms were used as descriptors. The indications of this technique are related to recurrence, histology, size, definition of tumor margins, and location of tumors. These guidelines attempt to establish the indications of Mohs surgery for different types of skin tumors.

  12. Curcumin Stimulates the Antioxidant Mechanisms in Mouse Skin Exposed to Fractionated γ-Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Rajanikant, Golgod Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Fractionated irradiation is one of the important radiotherapy regimens to treat different types of neoplasia. Despite of the immense therapeutic gains accrued by delivering fractionated irradiation to tumors, the radiation burden on skin increases significantly. Low doses of irradiation to skin adversely affect its molecular and metabolic status. The use of antioxidant/s may help to alleviate the radiation-induced changes in the skin and allow delivering a higher dose of radiation to attain better therapeutic gains. Curcumin is an antioxidant and a free radical scavenging dietary supplement, commonly used as a flavoring agent in curries. Therefore, the effect of 100 mg/kg body weight curcumin was studied on the antioxidant status of mice skin exposed to a total dose of 10, 20 and 40 Gy γ-radiation below the rib cage delivered as a single fraction of 2 Gy per day for 5, 10 or 20 days. Skin biopsies from both the curcumin treated or untreated irradiated groups were collected for the biochemical estimations at various post-irradiation times. The irradiation of animals caused a dose dependent decline in the glutathione concentration, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities and increased the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated skin. Curcumin treatment before irradiation resulted in a significant rise in the glutathione concentration and activities of both the glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in mouse skin, whereas lipid peroxidation declined significantly. The present study indicates that curcumin treatment increased the antioxidant status of mouse exposed to different doses of fractionated γ-radiation. PMID:26785336

  13. Finding mouse models of human lymphomas and leukemia's using the Jackson laboratory mouse tumor biology database.

    PubMed

    Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Krupke, Debra M; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Morse, Herbert C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2015-12-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  14. Working formulation of neuroendocrine tumors of the skin and breast.

    PubMed

    Asioli, Sofia; Foschini, Maria Pia; Masetti, Riccardo; Eusebi, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    In the skin and breast, endocrine tumors are composed of a heterogeneous mixture of endocrine and exocrine cells. The definition of "pure" endocrine carcinomas is a matter for debate, and as a consequence, there is lack of uniform diagnostic criteria. There are no significant clinical differences in either overall or disease-free survival between matched neoplasms with endocrine and without endocrine differentiation nor between the degree of endocrine differentiation and tumor size, stage, or prevalence of vascular invasion for both sites (skin and breast). Here, endocrine tumors of the skin and breast are grouped respectively into three categories that include most of the neuroendocrine tumors of the skin and breast as seen in routine practice. It was felt that the number of different types of neuroendocrine tumors is so conspicuous that it is impossible to organize them in an orderly classification. It has been proposed therefore, for practical diagnostic routine purposes, to arrange these neoplasms into a working formulation. The latter includes heterogeneous lesions respectively of the skin and breast within the same group that have clinical features in common. PMID:24729037

  15. Indocyanine green enhanced near infrared laser treatment of SCK tumors in a mouse model pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Friedman, Ran; Hennings, Leah; Webber, Jessica; Suen, James; Griffin, Robert J.

    2011-03-01

    Background and Purpose. Determine the efficacy of indocyanine green (ICG) dye in enhancing near infrared (NIR) laser ablation of tumors in a mouse model. Methods. Mammary carcinoma cells of A/J mice were injected subcutaneously in the lower back of female A/J mice (n=6). Five to seven days post inoculation the tumors (7-9 mm) were treated with 755-nm laser using 70 J/cm2 radiant exposures and 3-ms pulse time. Epidermal cooling was accomplished by cryogen spray cooling. Two minutes prior to laser irradiation mice were injected, intravenously, with 4 mg/kg body weight of ICG solution. Results. Complete tumor ablation was observed in the tumor region and minor damage was seen in the healthy skin. No major skin damage was observed post treatment. Substantial damage (up to 100% coagulative necrosis) was observed in tissue collected from tumors that were treated with laser/ICG. Conclusions. Intravenous administration of 4 mg/kg ICG significantly enhanced thermal ablation of tumors during NIR laser irradiation while sparing healthy skin.

  16. An inducible mouse model for skin cancer reveals distinct roles for gain- and loss-of-function p53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Caulin, Carlos; Nguyen, Thao; Lang, Gene A.; Goepfert, Thea M.; Brinkley, Bill R.; Cai, Wei-Wen; Lozano, Guillermina; Roop, Dennis R.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in ras and p53 are the most prevalent mutations found in human nonmelanoma skin cancers. Although some p53 mutations cause a loss of function, most result in expression of altered forms of p53, which may exhibit gain-of-function properties. Therefore, understanding the consequences of acquiring p53 gain-of-function versus loss-of-function mutations is critical for the generation of effective therapies for tumors harboring p53 mutations. Here we describe an inducible mouse model in which skin tumor formation is initiated by activation of an endogenous K-rasG12D allele. Using this model we compared the consequences of activating the p53 gain-of-function mutation p53R172H and of deleting the p53 gene. Activation of the p53R172H allele resulted in increased skin tumor formation, accelerated tumor progression, and induction of metastasis compared with deletion of p53. Consistent with these observations, the p53R172H tumors exhibited aneuploidy associated with centrosome amplification, which may underlie the mechanism by which p53R172H exerts its oncogenic properties. These results clearly demonstrate that p53 gain-of-function mutations confer poorer prognosis than loss of p53 during skin carcinogenesis and have important implications for the future design of therapies for tumors that exhibit p53 gain-of-function mutations. PMID:17607363

  17. Evaluation of seven sunscreens on hairless mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of seven sunscreens to protect against ultraviolet (UV)--induced inhibition of epidermal DNA synthesis was evaluated in vivo using a hairless mouse model. There were statistically significant differences among sunscreens in their ability to prevent UV-B (290 to 320 nm) inhibition of DNA synthesis. The protective factor (PF) of a sunscreen was arbitrarily defined as the ratio of the dose required to inhibit DNA synthesis by 50% with and without a sunscreen. The following PF values were determined: Coppertone 4, 4.4; Sundown Extra Protection, 8.4; Supershade 15, 21.0; Eclipse 15, 22.2; Blockout 15, 22.4; and Bain de Soleil 15, 27.6. Zinc oxide ointment protected against any significant suppression of DNA synthesis at all UV-B doses used. There was a relatively good correlation between the PF and the sun protection factor (SPF) claimed for each sunscreen by the manufacturer. However, the PF values determined in mouse skin were generally higher than the SPF values measured in human skin. Further studies are needed to determine if sunscreen substantivity (resistance to removal by water) can be evaluated by this technique.

  18. Sunlight and sunburn in human skin cancer: p53, apoptosis, and tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Brash, D E; Ziegler, A; Jonason, A S; Simon, J A; Kunala, S; Leffell, D J

    1996-04-01

    Sunlight is a carcinogen to which everyone is exposed. Epidemiology indicates that most carcinogenic sunlight exposure takes place several decades before the tumor arises. Some of the early events have been identified by searching for genes having ultraviolet (UV)-specific mutations. Over 90% of squamous cell carcinomas and more than 50% of basal cell carcinomas from New England patients contain UV-like mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. From the mutation pattern, it can be concluded that the carcinogenic DNA lesions were pyrimidine-cytosine photoproducts caused by the UVB portion of sunlight. Particular codons of the p53 gene are most susceptible, apparently because of slower DNA repair at specific sites. Sunlight is sufficiently mutagenic often to mutate both p53 alleles. These mutations are also found in the precancer for squamous cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, implying an early role. The function of p53 in normal skin is indicated by the observation that inactivating p53 in mouse skin reduces the appearance of sunburn cells, apoptotic keratinocytes generated by UV overexposure. Skin thus appears to possess a p53-dependent "cellular proofreading" response to DNA damage in which precancerous cells self-destruct. If this response is reduced in a single cell by a prior p53 mutation, sunburn can thereafter select for clonal expansion of the p53-mutated cell into an actinic keratosis. Sunlight appears to act twice: as tumor initiator and as tumor promoter.

  19. Metformin Inhibits Skin Tumor Promotion in Overweight and Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Checkley, L. Allyson; Rho, Okkyung; Angel, Joe M.; Cho, Jiyoon; Blando, Jorge; Beltran, Linda; Hursting, Stephen D.; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the ability of metformin to inhibit skin tumor promotion by 12-O- tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was analyzed in mice maintained on either an overweight control diet or an obesity inducing diet. Rapamycin was included for comparison, and a combination of metformin and rapamycin was also evaluated. Metformin (given in the drinking water) and rapamycin (given topically) inhibited development of both papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas in overweight and obese mice in a dose-dependent manner. A low dose combination of these two compounds displayed an additive inhibitory effect on tumor development. Metformin treatment also reduced the size of papillomas. Interestingly, all treatments appeared to be at least as effective for inhibiting tumor formation in obese mice and both metformin and rapamycin were more effective at reducing tumor size in obese mice compared to overweight control mice. The effect of metformin on skin tumor development was associated with a significant reduction in TPA-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Furthermore, treatment with metformin led to activation of epidermal AMPK and attenuated signaling through mTORC1 and p70S6K. Combinations of metformin and rapamycin were more effective at blocking epidermal mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA consistent with the greater inhibitory effect on skin tumor promotion. Collectively, the current data demonstrate that metformin given in the drinking water effectively inhibited skin tumor promotion in both overweight and obese mice and that the mechanism involves activation of epidermal AMPK and attenuated signaling downstream of mTORC1. PMID:24196830

  20. Slit2 promotes tumor growth and invasion in chemically induced skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cuiling; Lan, Haimei; Ye, Jie; Li, Weidong; Wei, Ping; Yang, Yang; Guo, Simei; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiangchao; Zhang, Qianqian; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing

    2014-07-01

    Slit, a neuronal guidance cue, binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors to modulate neuronal, leukocytic, and endothelial migration. Slit has been reported to have an important effect on tumor growth and metastasis. In the current study, we evaluated the role of Slit2 in skin tumor growth and invasion in mice using a two-step chemical carcinogenesis protocol. We found that Slit2 expression correlated with the loss of basement membrane in the samples of human skin squamous cell carcinoma at different stages of disease progression. Slit2-Tg mice developed significantly more skin tumors than wild-type mice. Furthermore, the skin tumors that occurred in Slit2-Tg mice were significantly larger than those in the wild-type mice 10 weeks after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene initiation until the end of the experiment. We also found that pathological development of the wild-type mice was delayed compared with that of Slit2-Tg mice. To further investigate the mechanism of increasing tumors in Slit2-Tg mice, we analyzed the expression of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in mouse skin lesions and found that the number of BrdU-positive cells and microvessel density in skin lesions were significantly higher in Slit2-Tg mice than in wild-type mice. Histological staining of PAS and type IV collagen and the colocalization of Slit2 and type IV collagen demonstrated varying degrees of loss of the basement membrane in the skin lesions from Slit2-Tg mice that were at the stage of carcinoma in situ. However, the basement membrane was well defined in the wild-type mice. In addition, MMP2, but not MMP9, was upregulated in the skin tissue of Slit2-Tg mice. Interruption of Slit2-Robo1 signaling by the antibody R5 significantly repressed the invasive capability of the squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. Taken together, our findings reveal that Slit2 promotes DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis by increasing cell proliferation, microvessel density, and invasive behavior of cutaneous squamous

  1. Radiation effect in mouse skin: Dose fractionation and wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Gorodetsky, R.; Mou, X.D.; Fisher, D.R.; Taylor, J.M.; Withers, H.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Radiation induced dermal injury was measured by the gain in the physical strength of healing wounds in mouse skin. A sigmoid dose response for the inhibition of wound healing 14 days after surgery was found for single doses of X rays. The sparing of dermal damage from fractionation of the X-ray dose was quantified in terms of the alpha/beta ratio in the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, at a wide range of doses per fraction reaching as low as about 1 Gy. The fit and the appropriateness of the LQ model for the skin wound healing assay was examined with the use of the Fe-plot in which inverse total dose is plotted versus dose per fraction for wound strength isoeffects. The alpha/beta ratio of the skin was about 2.5 Gy (95% confidence of less than +/- 1 Gy) and was appropriate over a dose range of 1 Gy to about 8 Gy. The low alpha/beta value is typical for a late responding tissue. This assay, therefore, has the advantage of measuring and forecasting late radiation responses of the dermis within a short time after irradiation.

  2. Skin cancer treatment by albumin/5-Fu loaded magnetic nanocomposite spheres in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Misak, H; Zacharias, N; Song, Z; Hwang, S; Man, K-P; Asmatulu, R; Yang, S-Y

    2013-03-10

    Albumin/drug loaded magnetic nanocomposite spheres were fabricated using an oil-in-oil emulsion/solvent evaporation method, and tested on a mouse model (experimental squamous cell carcinoma) to determine the efficacy of the drug delivery system (DDS) on skin cancer. This novel DDS consists of human serum albumin, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), magnetic nanoparticles (10 nm) and fluorescent labeling molecule (diphenylhexatriene). One of the major purposes of using albumin is that it likely provides internal binding to and retention by the inflammatory tissues to reduce the amount of magnetic nanoparticles needed in the drug loaded microspheres (750–1100 nm). This study is aimed at reducing many negative side effects of conventionally used chemotherapy drugs by localizing the chemotherapy drug, controlling the release of the therapeutic agent and encouraging uptake of the DDS into cancerous cells. A group of mice treated with (1) the magnetic targeted DDS were compared to the other three groups, including, (2) DDS without a magnet, (3) 5-Fu local injection, and (4) untreated groups. The fluorescent tracer was ubiquitously identified inside the tumor tissue, and the DDS/tumor tissue boundary presented a leaky interface. The test results clearly showed that the magnetic targeted DDS exhibited significantly superior therapeutic effects in treating the skin cancer, with the increased efficacy to halt the tumor growth. PMID:23395619

  3. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both "omics" and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  4. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both “omics” and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  5. Overlapping loss of heterozygosity by mitotic recombination on mouse chromosome 7F1-ter in skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, A B; Navone, N M; Aldaz, C M; Conti, C J

    1991-01-01

    A significant role for mouse chromosome 7 abnormalities during chemically induced skin carcinogenesis has been advanced based on previous cytogenetic and molecular studies. To determine the frequency of allelic losses at different loci of chromosome 7 in skin tumors induced in the outbred SENCAR mouse stock by a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, we compared the constitutional and tumor genotypes of premalignant papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas for loss of heterozygosity at different informative loci. In a previous study, these tumors had been analyzed for their allelic composition at the Harvey ras-1 (Ha-ras-1) locus and it was found that 39% of squamous cell carcinomas had lost the normal Ha-ras-1 allele exhibiting 3 or 2 copies of the mutated counterpart or gene amplification. In the present study, by combining Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction fragment length polymorphism analyses, we detected complete loss of heterozygosity at the beta-globin (Hbb) locus, distal to Ha-ras-1, in 15 of 20 (75%) skin carcinomas. In addition, 5 of 5 informative cases attained homozygosity at the int-2 locus, 27 centimorgans distal to Hbb. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA extracted from papillomas devoid of stromal contamination by fluorescence-activated sorting of single cell dispersions immunolabeled with anti-keratin 13 antibody revealed loss of heterozygosity at the Hbb locus, demonstrating that this event occurs during premalignant stages of tumor development. Interestingly, loss of heterozygosity was only detected in late-stage lesions exhibiting a high degree of dysplasia and areas of microinvasion. Analysis of allelic ratios by densitometric scanning of tumors that had become homozygous at Hbb but retained heterozygosis at Ha-ras-1 indicated mitotic recombination as the mechanism underlying loss of heterozygosity on mouse chromosome 7 during chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. These findings are consistent with the presence of a putative

  6. Deoxynivalenol induced mouse skin cell proliferation and inflammation via MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sakshi; Tripathi, Anurag; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Dwivedi, Premendra D.; Pandey, Haushila P.; Das, Mukul

    2014-09-01

    Several toxicological manifestations of deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, are well documented; however, dermal toxicity is not yet explored. The effect of topical application of DON to mice was studied using markers of skin proliferation, inflammation and tumor promotion. Single topical application of DON (84–672 nmol/mouse) significantly enhanced dermal hyperplasia and skin edema. DON (336 and 672 nmol) caused significant enhancement in [{sup 3}H]-thymidine uptake in DNA along with increased myeloperoxidase and ornithine decarboxylase activities, suggesting tissue inflammation and cell proliferation. Furthermore, DON (168 nmol) caused enhanced expression of RAS, and phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 MAPKs. DON exposure also showed activation of transcription factors, c-fos, c-jun and NF-κB along with phosphorylation of IkBα. Enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB by DON caused over expression of target proteins, COX-2, cyclin D1 and iNOS in skin. Though a single topical application of DMBA followed by twice weekly application of DON (84 and 168 nmol) showed no tumorigenesis after 24 weeks, however, histopathological studies suggested hyperplasia of the epidermis and hypertrophy of hair follicles. Interestingly, intestine was also found to be affected as enlarged Peyer's patches were observed, suggesting inflammatory effects which were supported by elevation of inflammatory cytokines after 24 weeks of topical application of DON. These results suggest that DON induced cell proliferation in mouse skin is through the activation of MAPK signaling pathway involving transcription factors NFκB and AP-1, further leading to transcriptional activation of downstream target proteins c-fos, c-jun, cyclin D1, iNOS and COX-2 which might be responsible for its inflammatory potential. - Highlights: • Topical application of DON enhanced epidermal inflammation and cell proliferation. • DON follows PI3K/Akt/MAPK signaling cascade, with activation of AP-1 and NF

  7. Preventive effect of antihistaminics on mouse skin photosensitization with hematoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Nai-wu; Yan, Li-xue

    1993-03-01

    Beta-carotene 100 mg/kg per day or vitamin C 50 mg/kg per day was administered orally for two days and did not prevent mouse skin photosensitization caused by hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD). However, (beta) -carotene 100 mg/kg per day administered intramuscularly for two days prevented mouse skin reaction. Cimetidine and benadryl 10 mg/kg per day, P.O.X 2, effectively prevented mouse skin reaction. This suggests histamine may be involved in skin photoreaction induced by HpD.

  8. Inhibitory effect of flavonoid derivatives on Epstein-Barr virus activation and two-stage carcinogenesis of skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Y; Takemura, Y; Ju-ichi, M; Mukainaka, T; Ichiishi, E; Ito, C; Furukawa, H; Yano, M; Tokuda, H; Nishino, H

    2001-11-28

    To search for possible anti-tumor promoters, ten flavonoid derivatives (1-10) synthesized from morin and quercetin were examined for their inhibitory effects on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation by a short-term in vitro assay. Of these compounds, pentaallyl ethers (9, 10) showed significant inhibitory effects on EBV-EA activation induced by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. Further, quercetin pentaallyl ether (10) exhibited remarkable inhibitory effects on mouse skin tumor promotion in an in vivo two-stage carcinogenesis test.

  9. Penetration of oligonucleotides into mouse organism through mucosa and skin.

    PubMed

    Vlassov, V V; Karamyshev, V N; Yakubov, L A

    1993-08-01

    Benzylamide 5'-32P-oligonucleotide derivatives were shown to penetrate into mice organism when administered by various routes; intranasally, per os, intravaginally and per rectum. In all cases, the compounds are rapidly accumulated in blood and guts. Analysis of the radioactive material from blood and pancreas revealed intact oligonucleotides. Although concentrations of oligonucleotides in tissues differ considerably by the various methods of administration, the efficiency of delivery is sufficient to consider all the routes as being of therapeutic value. Dose effect on the efficiency of oligonucleotide penetration into mice suggests the transport to be a saturable process. Application of an oligonucleotide lotion on mice ear helices results in reproducible accumulation of radioactivity in the animal tissues. Effectiveness of oligonucleotide delivery into mouse through skin can be improved by using electrophoretic procedure.

  10. Deoxynivalenol induced mouse skin cell proliferation and inflammation via MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sakshi; Tripathi, Anurag; Chaudhari, Bhushan P; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Pandey, Haushila P; Das, Mukul

    2014-09-01

    Several toxicological manifestations of deoxynivalenol (DON), a mycotoxin, are well documented; however, dermal toxicity is not yet explored. The effect of topical application of DON to mice was studied using markers of skin proliferation, inflammation and tumor promotion. Single topical application of DON (84-672nmol/mouse) significantly enhanced dermal hyperplasia and skin edema. DON (336 and 672nmol) caused significant enhancement in [(3)H]-thymidine uptake in DNA along with increased myeloperoxidase and ornithine decarboxylase activities, suggesting tissue inflammation and cell proliferation. Furthermore, DON (168nmol) caused enhanced expression of RAS, and phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 MAPKs. DON exposure also showed activation of transcription factors, c-fos, c-jun and NF-κB along with phosphorylation of IkBα. Enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB by DON caused over expression of target proteins, COX-2, cyclin D1 and iNOS in skin. Though a single topical application of DMBA followed by twice weekly application of DON (84 and 168nmol) showed no tumorigenesis after 24weeks, however, histopathological studies suggested hyperplasia of the epidermis and hypertrophy of hair follicles. Interestingly, intestine was also found to be affected as enlarged Peyer's patches were observed, suggesting inflammatory effects which were supported by elevation of inflammatory cytokines after 24weeks of topical application of DON. These results suggest that DON induced cell proliferation in mouse skin is through the activation of MAPK signaling pathway involving transcription factors NFκB and AP-1, further leading to transcriptional activation of downstream target proteins c-fos, c-jun, cyclin D1, iNOS and COX-2 which might be responsible for its inflammatory potential. PMID:24937323

  11. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17. PMID:26271098

  12. Effect of Combined Treatment with Ursolic Acid and Resveratrol on Skin Tumor Promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jiyoon; Rho, Okkyung; Junco, Jacob; Carbajal1, Steve; Siegel, Dionicio; Slaga, Thomas J.; DiGiovanni, John

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of combining ursolic acid (UA) + resveratrol (Res), for possible combined inhibitory effects on skin tumor promotion were evaluated. UA, Res and the combination of UA + Res were applied topically prior to TPA treatment on mouse skin to examine their effect on TPA-induced signaling pathways, epidermal hyperproliferation, skin inflammation, inflammatory gene expression and skin tumor promotion. The combination of UA + Res produced a greater inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. The combination of UA + Res inhibited TPA-induced signaling pathways, including EGFR, STAT3, Src, Akt, Cox-2, Fas, NF-κB, p38 MAPK, c-Jun, and JNK1/2 while increasing levels of tumor suppressors such as p21 and PDCD4 to a greater extent compared to the groups treated with the individual compounds. UA + Res also induced a dramatic increase of p-AMPK-αThr172. Combined treatment with UA + Res resulted in a greater inhibition of expression of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-22. Furthermore, NF-κB, Egr-1, and AP-1 DNA binding activities after TPA treatment were dramatically decreased by the combination of UA + Res. Treatment with UA + Res during skin tumor promotion with TPA produced greater inhibition of tumor multiplicity and tumor size than with either agent alone. Collectively, the greater ability of the combination of UA + Res to inhibit skin tumor promotion was due to the greater inhibitory effects on growth factor and inflammatory signaling, skin inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation induced by TPA treatment. PMID:26100520

  13. Amplification of mouse mammary tumor virus genomes in non-mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Racevskis, J; Beyer, H

    1989-01-01

    Extra proviral copies of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) are known to be present in the genomes of certain T-cell lymphomas of mice. Analysis of additional non-mammary tumor cell types known to express MMTV transcripts and antigens revealed the presence of extra acquired MMTV proviruses in a pituitary tumor cell line, a macrophage line, and Leydig testicular tumor cells. The nature of the amplified MMTV proviruses in these various tumor cell types differed with regard to copy number and presence of alterations in the long terminal repeat region. Images PMID:2535749

  14. The vitamin D receptor: a tumor suppressor in skin.

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous malignancies including melanomas and non melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common types of cancer, occurring at a rate of over 1 million per year in the United States. The major cell in the epidermis, the keratinocyte, not only produces vitamin D but contains the enzymatic machinery to metabolize vitamin D to its active metabolite, 1,25(OH)2D, and expresses the receptor for this metabolite, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), allowing the cell to respond to the 1,25(OH)2D that it produces. In vitro, 1,25(OH)2D stimulates the differentiation and inhibits the proliferation of these cells and so would be expected to be tumor suppressive. However, epidemiologic evidence demonstrating a negative relationship between circulating levels of the substrate for CYP27B1, 25OHD, and the incidence of these malignancies is mixed, raising the question whether vitamin D is protective in the in vivo setting. UV radiation (UV), both UVB and UVA, as occurs with sunlight exposure is generally regarded as causal for these malignancies, but UVB is also required for vitamin D synthesis in the skin. This complicates conclusions reached from epidemiologic studies in that UVB is associated with higher 25OHD levels as well as increased incidence of cutaneous malignancies. Based on our own data and that reported in the literature we hypothesize that vitamin D signaling in the skin suppresses UVR induced epidermal tumor formation. In this chapter we will first discuss recent data regarding potential mechanisms by which vitamin D signaling suppresses tumor formation, then focus on three general mechanisms that mediate tumor suppression by VDR in the skin: inhibition of proliferation and stimulation of differentiation, immune regulation, and stimulation of DNA damage repair (DDR). PMID:25207372

  15. The vitamin D receptor: a tumor suppressor in skin.

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous malignancies including melanomas and non melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common types of cancer, occurring at a rate of over 1 million per year in the United States. The major cell in the epidermis, the keratinocyte, not only produces vitamin D but contains the enzymatic machinery to metabolize vitamin D to its active metabolite, 1,25(OH)2D, and expresses the receptor for this metabolite, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), allowing the cell to respond to the 1,25(OH)2D that it produces. In vitro, 1,25(OH)2D stimulates the differentiation and inhibits the proliferation of these cells and so would be expected to be tumor suppressive. However, epidemiologic evidence demonstrating a negative relationship between circulating levels of the substrate for CYP27B1, 25OHD, and the incidence of these malignancies is mixed, raising the question whether vitamin D is protective in the in vivo setting. UV radiation (UV), both UVB and UVA, as occurs with sunlight exposure is generally regarded as causal for these malignancies, but UVB is also required for vitamin D synthesis in the skin. This complicates conclusions reached from epidemiologic studies in that UVB is associated with higher 25OHD levels as well as increased incidence of cutaneous malignancies. Based on our own data and that reported in the literature we hypothesize that vitamin D signaling in the skin suppresses UVR induced epidermal tumor formation. In this chapter we will first discuss recent data regarding potential mechanisms by which vitamin D signaling suppresses tumor formation, then focus on three general mechanisms that mediate tumor suppression by VDR in the skin: inhibition of proliferation and stimulation of differentiation, immune regulation, and stimulation of DNA damage repair (DDR).

  16. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely "functional," i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn's syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  17. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  18. Tumors involving the skin of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Fleegler, E J

    1987-05-01

    This review can only introduce the subject of tumors found involving the skin of the upper extremity. Many benign masses as well as some malignant tumors have to be considered when a patient calls to the physician's attention a lump, firm area, color change, ulcer, or other alteration in the skin. In response, the physician must have a high index of suspicion, take a careful history, and carry out a thorough examination in order to develop a safe approach. Thought has to be given to the complex anatomy of this area. Understanding of the pathophysiology of tumors and of possible later additional therapy is needed to plan an appropriate biopsy. In the brief discussions of treatment, the difficulty in choosing margins of resection and assessing the efficacy of lymph node dissection is mentioned. An open mind and assessment of future reports of studies in progress may be helpful. Whatever treatment is applied to the malignant tumors under consideration, it is my opinion that one must persist in this until one obtains tumor-free margins. The surgeon undertaking this responsibility must apply the same tumor techniques including operating room discipline that would be applied to any serious malignancy. Consultation and careful work with colleagues that are able to assess the potential for response to chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and/or radiotherapy, should be sought. Subtle hazards in our environment, such as changing risk of sun exposure, industrial chemicals, and irradiation should be pointed out to our patients. These are a challenge to the student of this subject, just as tobacco products are to those involved with malignancies of the head and neck, respiratory, and other systems. All of the previously mentioned methods must be used in the anatomically complex upper extremity to preserve function while ridding the patient of the burden of a disfiguring or painful benign process, or even a life-threatening malignancy. PMID:3034925

  19. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-01

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  20. High frequency ultrasound study of skin tumors in dermatological and aesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Bezugly, Artur

    2015-12-01

    The accurate measurement of skin tumors and the precise delimitation of its borders are important tools for tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this paper we summarized our practical experience in `the examination of different skin tumors using high frequency ultrasound (HFU). High-frequency transducers 22 MHz and 75 MHz with resolution of 72 and 21 μm were used for the examination. HFU characteristics of the most important non-melanoma skin tumors are depicted. PMID:26649352

  1. Sunscreens for delay of ultraviolet induction of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, H.C.; Poulsen, T.; Brodthagen, H.; Hou-Jensen, K.

    1982-08-01

    Sunscreens with different sun protection factors (SPFs) have been tested for their capability of delaying or preventing actinic damage and skin cancer development in groups of hairless, pigmented mice exposed to artificial ultraviolet (UV) light of increasing intensity. The dose delivered was less than or equal to 1 minimal erythema dose (MED) in the group of untreated mice, so that the mice to which sunscreens were applied never obtained a sunburn after UV exposure. The quality of UV light was similar to bright midday sun at a latitude of 56 degrees (city of Copenhagen). Tumorigenesis was demonstrated to be delayed corresponding to the SPF claimed by the manufacturer, but almost all of the UV-irradiated mice developed skin tumors. Histologic examination revealed actinic degeneration and tumors of squamous cell type with marked variation in differentiation. Metastases to lymph nodes and lungs were found in only 10%. Toxic reactions, such as eczematous-like skin reactions, dark coloring, and amyloidosis, were observed predominantly in the group treated with the sunscreen of highest SPF value. Long-term investigations seem to be necessary to unveil these problems--in particular, the specific SPF value, in sunscreens, that should be recommended to the public for prevention or delay of actinic damage and/or cancer development.

  2. Keratin-dependent regulation of Aire and gene expression in skin tumor keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Ryan P; DePianto, Daryle J; Jacob, Justin T; Han, Minerva C; Chung, Byung-Min; Batazzi, Adriana S; Poll, Brian G; Guo, Yajuan; Han, Jingnan; Ong, SuFey; Zheng, Wenxin; Taube, Janis M; Čiháková, Daniela; Wan, Fengyi; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of the intermediate filament protein keratin 17 (K17) is robustly upregulated in inflammatory skin diseases and in many tumors originating in stratified and pseudostratified epithelia. We report that autoimmune regulator (Aire), a transcriptional regulator, is inducibly expressed in human and mouse tumor keratinocytes in a K17-dependent manner and is required for timely onset of Gli2-induced skin tumorigenesis in mice. The induction of Aire mRNA in keratinocytes depends on a functional interaction between K17 and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNP K. Further, K17 colocalizes with Aire protein in the nucleus of tumor-prone keratinocytes, and each factor is bound to a specific promoter region featuring an NF-κB consensus sequence in a relevant subset of K17- and Aire-dependent proinflammatory genes. These findings provide radically new insight into keratin intermediate filament and Aire function, along with a molecular basis for the K17-dependent amplification of inflammatory and immune responses in diseased epithelia.

  3. Vitamin D receptor, a tumor suppressor in skin.

    PubMed

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D and calcium are well-established regulators of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, it was not a great surprise that deletion of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) should predispose the skin to tumor formation, and that the combination of deleting both the VDR and calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) should be especially pro-oncogenic. In this review I have examined 4 mechanisms that appear to underlie the means by which VDR acts as a tumor suppressor in skin. First, DNA damage repair is curtailed in the absence of the VDR, allowing mutations in DNA to accumulate. Second and third involve the increased activation of the hedgehog and β-catenin pathways in the epidermis in the absence of the VDR, leading to poorly regulated proliferation with reduced differentiation. Finally, VDR deletion leads to a shift in the expression of long noncoding RNAs toward a more oncogenic profile. How these different mechanisms interact and their relative importance in the predisposition of the VDR null epidermis to tumor formation remain under active investigation.

  4. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2013-03-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  5. Multimodality pH imaging in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber model

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hui Min; Schafer, Rachel; Pagel, Mark M.; Robey, Ian F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Upregulate levels of expression and activity of membrane H+ ion pumps in cancer cells drives the extracellular pH (pHe,) to values lower than normal. Furthermore, disregulated pH is indicative of the changes in glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells and has been shown to facilitate extracellular tissue remodeling during metastasis Therefore, measurement of pHe could be a useful cancer biomarker for diagnostic and therapy monitoring evaluation. Multimodality in-vivo imaging of pHe in tumorous tissue in a mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFWC) model is described. A custom-made plastic window chamber structure was developed that is compatible with both imaging optical and MR imaging modalities and provides a model system for continuous study of the same tissue microenvironment on multiple imaging platforms over a 3-week period. For optical imaging of pHe, SNARF-1 carboxylic acid is injected intravenously into a SCID mouse with an implanted tumor. A ratiometric measurement of the fluorescence signal captured on a confocal microscope reveals the pHe of the tissue visible within the window chamber. This imaging method was used in a preliminary study to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as a potential drug treatment to reverse tissue acidosis. For MR imaging of pHe the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was used as an alternative way of measuring pHe in a DSFWC model. ULTRAVIST®, a FDA approved x-ray/CT contrast agent has been shown to have a CEST effect that is pH dependent. A ratiometric analysis of water saturation at 5.6 and 4.2 ppm chemical shift provides a means to estimate the local pHe.

  6. Tumorigenesis of diesel exhaust, gasoline exhaust, and related emission extracts on SENCAR mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Nesnow, S; Triplett, L L; Slaga, T J

    1980-01-01

    The tumorigenicity of diesel exhaust particulate emissions was examined using a sensitive mouse skin tumorigenesis model (SENCAR). The tumorigenic potency of particulate emissions from diesel, gasoline, and related emission sources was compared.

  7. Characterization of the serotoninergic system in the C57BL/6 mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Pisarchik, Alexander; Semak, Igor; Sweatman, Trevor; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2003-08-01

    We showed expression of the tryptophan hydroxylase gene and of tryptophan hydroxylase protein immunoreactivity in mouse skin and skin cells. Extracts from skin and melanocyte samples acetylated serotonin to N-acetylserotonin and tryptamine to N-acetyltryptamine. A different enzyme from arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase mediated this reaction, as this gene was defective in the C57BL6 mouse, coding predominantly for a protein without enzymatic activity. Serotonin (but not tryptamine) acetylation varied according to hair cycle phase and anatomic location. Serotonin was also metabolized to 5-hydroxytryptophol and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, probably through stepwise transformation catalyzed by monoamine oxidase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase. Activity of the melatonin-forming enzyme hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase was notably below detectable levels in all samples of mouse corporal skin, although it was detectable at low levels in the ears and in Cloudman melanoma (derived from the DBA/2 J mouse strain). In conclusion, mouse skin has the molecular and biochemical apparatus necessary to produce and metabolize serotonin and N-acetylserotonin, and its activity is determined by topography, physiological status of the skin, cell type and mouse strain. PMID:12899690

  8. Endpoints for Mouse Abdominal Tumor Models: Refinement of Current Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eden V; Villines, Kimberly A; Hickman, Debra L

    2009-01-01

    Accurate, rapid, and noninvasive health assessments are required to establish more appropriate endpoints in mouse cancer models where tumor size is not easily measured. We evaluated potential endpoints in mice with experimentally induced peritoneal lymphoma, an abdominal tumor model, by comparing body weight, body condition, and behavior with those of a control group of mice not developing lymphoma. Our hypothesis was that body weight would increase or plateau, whereas body condition and behavioral scores would decrease, as disease progressed. Results indicated that body weight did not differ significantly between the control and experimental groups, but the experimental group experienced significant decreases in both body condition and behavioral scores. Our results support the use of body condition and behavioral scoring as adjunctive assessment methods for mice involved in abdominal lymphoma tumor studies in which health may decline despite an increase or plateau in body weight. PMID:19619413

  9. Diminution of mouse epidermal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by tumor promotors

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Rana, R.S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters and related compounds on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were examined. The treatment of adult mouse skin with 2 ..mu..g 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in a sustained decrease in the basal levels of both SOD and catalase activities in the epidermis. A decline in SOD activity occurred within 2 h after application and the maximum effect was seen at 16-17 h. The decrease in SOD activity was always accompanied by a similar decline in the epidermal catalase activity. The alterations in both enzymes occurred against a high background of enhanced protein synthesis which indicates that the effect of TPA is selective for SOD and catalase. Other tumor promoters such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and the non-phorbol tumor promoter anthraline also lowered the activities of both the enzymes. Mezerein, a resiniferonol derivative with weak promoting activity but a potent stage-II promoter, appeared to be more potent than TPA in lowering the basal levels. These results indicate that damage which favors neoplastic progression would occur in TPA-treated mouse skin due to the accumulation of free radicals resulting from low levels of SOD and catalase activity. In addition, the TPA-caused decrease in the levels of SOD and catalase was not prevented by either retinoic acid, fluocinolone acetonide, tosyl amino-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, or butylated hydroxytoluene, suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion by these agents is not mediated through alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities which decrease free radical concentrations.

  10. Epidermal CYLD inactivation sensitizes mice to the development of sebaceous and basaloid skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yingai Jane; Wang, Sally; Cho, Joshua; Selim, M. Angelica; Wright, Tim; Mosialos, George; Zhang, Jennifer Y.

    2016-01-01

    The deubiquitinase-encoding gene Cyld displays a dominant genetic linkage to a wide spectrum of skin-appendage tumors, which could be collectively designated as CYLD mutant–syndrome (CYLDm-syndrome). Despite recent advances, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this painful and difficult-to-treat skin disease. Here, we generated a conditional mouse model with epidermis-targeted expression of a catalytically deficient CYLDm through K14-Cre–mediated deletion of exon 9 (hereafter refer to CyldEΔ9/Δ9). CyldEΔ9/Δ9 mice were born alive but developed hair and sebaceous gland abnormalities and dental defects at 100% and 60% penetrance, respectively. Upon topical challenge with DMBA/TPA, these animals primarily developed sebaceous and basaloid tumors resembling human CYLDm-syndrome as opposed to papilloma, which is most commonly induced in WT mice by this treatment. Molecular analysis revealed that TRAF6-K63-Ubiquitination (K63-Ub), c-Myc-K63-Ub, and phospho-c–Myc (S62) were markedly elevated in CyldEΔ9/Δ9 skin. Topical treatment with a pharmacological c-Myc inhibitor induced sebaceous and basal cell apoptosis in CyldEΔ9/Δ9 skin. Consistently, c-Myc activation was readily detected in human cylindroma and sebaceous adenoma. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CyldEΔ9/Δ9 mice represent a disease-relevant animal model and identify TRAF6 and c-Myc as potential therapeutic targets for CYLDm-syndrome. PMID:27478875

  11. Metastatic malignant mixed tumor of the skin. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical characterization, histogenetic considerations and comparison with benign mixed tumors of skin and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Pinto de Moraes, H; Herrera, G A; Mendonca, A M; Estrela, R R

    1986-01-01

    Malignant mixed tumors of the skin (chondroid syringoma) are exceedingly rare. Few reports can be found in the literature and there are only two published cases in which electron microscopy has been performed. The precise histogenesis of this neoplasm is still disputed and the nature and mechanism of secretion of the intercellular substance is unknown as yet. Some authors believe that in mixed tumors of salivary glands this material could be produced by myoepithelial cells. A case is reported in which ultrastructural and immunocytochemical studies were performed in an effort to elucidate the histogenesis of malignant mixed tumors of skin and their relationship to other benign mixed tumors of the skin and salivary glands. The new information that has been obtained is interpreted in light of the findings provided by all published reports of malignant mixed tumors of the skin.

  12. The role of neutralizing antibodies for mouse mammary tumor virus transmission and mammary cancer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Daniela; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) infection establishes chronic germinal centers and a lifelong neutralizing Ab response. We show that removal of the draining lymph node after establishment of the germinal center reaction led to complete loss of neutralizing Abs despite comparable infection levels in peripheral lymphocytes. Importantly, in the absence of neutralization, only the exocrine organs mammary gland, salivary gland, pancreas, and skin showed strikingly increased infection, resulting in accelerated mammary tumor development. Induction of stronger neutralization did not influence chronic infection levels of peripheral lymphoid organs but strongly inhibited mammary gland infection and virus transmission to the next generation. Taken together, we provide evidence that a tight equilibrium in virus neutralization allows limited infection of exocrine organs and controls cancer development in susceptible mouse strains. These experiments show that a strong neutralizing Ab response induced after infection is not able to control lymphoid MMTV infection. Strong neutralization, however, is capable of blocking amplification of mammary gland infection, tumor development, and virus transmission to the next generation. The results also indicate a role of neutralization in natural resistance to MMTV infection.

  13. A novel non-mouse mammary tumor virus activation of the Int-3 gene in a spontaneous mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kordon, E C; Smith, G H; Callahan, R; Gallahan, D

    1995-01-01

    In a mouse mammary tumor model system in which carcinogenic progression can be investigated, we have found a unique mutation of Int-3 associated with progression from premalignant lobular hyperplasia to tumor. Sequence analysis of the rearranged fragment revealed an insertion of an intracisternal type A particle (IAP) within the Int-3 gene. Int-3 is mutated frequently in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors by insertion of MMTV proviral DNA into this intragenic region. In these mutations, the insertion produces a chimeric Int-3 transcript encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the Int-3 protein driven by the MMTV long terminal repeat promoter. In this case, the IAP DNA was inserted in the opposite transcriptional orientation relative to Int-3; nevertheless, a similar chimeric RNA transcript driven by a cryptic promoter in the oppositely oriented 5' IAP long terminal repeat was generated. This is the first demonstration that an insertional mutation unrelated to MMTV activates an Int gene commonly associated with mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:7494323

  14. Genetic mapping of tumor susceptibility genes involved in mouse plasmacytomagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.A.; Krall, M.M.; Dosik, J.K. )

    1993-10-15

    Plasmacytomas (PCTs) were induced in 47% of BALB/cAnPt mice by the intraperitoneal injection of pristane, in 2% of (BALB/c [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1], and in 11% of 773 BALB/cAnPt [times] (BALB/cAnPt [times] DBA/2N)F[sub 1]N[sub 2] backcross mice. This result indicates a multigenic mode of inheritance for PCT susceptibility. To locate genes controlling this complex genetic trait, tumor susceptibility in backcross progeny generated from BALB/c and DBA/2N (resistant) mice was correlated with alleles of 83 marker loci. The genotypes of the PCT-susceptible progeny displayed an excess homozygosity for BALB/c alleles with a 32-centimorgan stretch of mouse chromosome 4 (>95% probability of linkage) with minimal recombination (12%) near Gt10. Another susceptibility gene on mouse chromosome 1 may be linked to Fcgr2 (90% probability of linkage); there were excess heterozygotes for Fcgr2 among the susceptible progeny and excess homozygotes among the resistant progeny. Regions of mouse chromosomes 4 and 1 that are correlated with PCT susceptibility share extensive linkage homology with regions of human chromosome 1 that have been associated with cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma and lymphoid, breast, and endocrine tumors. 68 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A transgenic red fluorescent protein-expressing nude mouse for color-coded imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Reynoso, Jose; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2009-02-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical for tumor growth and progression. We have previously developed color-coded imaging of the TME using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic nude mouse as a host. However, most donor sources of cell types appropriate for study in the TME are from mice expressing GFP. Therefore, a nude mouse expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) would be an appropriate host for transplantation of GFP-expressing stromal cells as well as double-labeled cancer cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, thereby creating a three-color imaging model of the TME. The RFP nude mouse was obtained by crossing non-transgenic nude mice with the transgenic C57/B6 mouse in which the beta-actin promoter drives RFP (DsRed2) expression in essentially all tissues. In crosses between nu/nu RFP male mice and nu/+ RFP female mice, the embryos fluoresced red. Approximately 50% of the offspring of these mice were RFP nude mice. In the RFP nude mouse, the organs all brightly expressed RFP, including the heart, lungs, spleen, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, the male and female reproductive systems; brain and spinal cord; and the circulatory system, including the heart, and major arteries and veins. The skinned skeleton highly expressed RFP. The bone marrow and spleen cells were also RFP positive. GFP-expressing human cancer cell lines, including HCT-116-GFP colon cancer and MDA-MB-435-GFP breast cancer were orthotopically transplanted to the transgenic RFP nude mice. These human tumors grew extensively in the transgenic RFP nude mouse. Dual-color fluorescence imaging enabled visualization of human tumor-host interaction. The RFP nude mouse model should greatly expand our knowledge of the TME. PMID:19097136

  16. P16 UV mutations in human skin epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Soufir, N; Molès, J P; Vilmer, C; Moch, C; Verola, O; Rivet, J; Tesniere, A; Dubertret, L; Basset-Seguin, N

    1999-09-23

    The p16 gene expresses two alternative transcripts (p16alpha and p16beta) involved in tumor suppression via the retinoblastoma (Rb) or p53 pathways. Disruption of these pathways can occur through inactivation of p16 or p53, or activating mutations of cyclin dependant kinase 4 gene (Cdk4). We searched for p16, Cdk4 and p53 gene mutations in 20 squamous cell carcinomas (SSCs), 1 actinic keratosis (AK), and 28 basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), using PCR-SSCP. A deletion and methylation analysis of p16 was also performed. Six different mutations (12%) were detected in exon 2 of p16 (common to p16alpha and p16beta), in five out of 21 squamous lesions (24%) (one AK and four SCCs) and one out of 28 BCCs (3.5%). These included four (66%) ultraviolet (UV)-type mutations (two tandems CC : GG to TT : AA transitions and two C : G to T : A transitions at dipyrimidic site) and two transversions. P53 mutations were present in 18 samples (37%), mostly of UV type. Of these, only two (one BCC and one AK) harboured simultaneously mutations of p16, but with no consequence on p16beta transcript. Our data demonstrate for the first time the presence of p16 UV induced mutations in non melanoma skin cancer, particularly in the most aggressive SCC type, and support that p16 and p53 are involved in two independent pathways in skin carcinogenesis.

  17. Optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of ex vivo transgenic mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eunjoo; Ahn, YoonJoon; Ahn, Jinhyo; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Changhwan; Choi, Sanghoon; Boutilier, Richard Martin; Lee, Yongjoong; Kim, Pilhan; Lee, Ho

    2015-10-01

    We examined the optical clearing assisted confocal microscopy of the transgenic mouse skin. The pinna and dorsal skin were imaged with a confocal microscope after the application of glycerol and FocusClear. In case of the glycerol-treated pinna, the clearing was minimal due to the inefficient permeability. However, the imaging depth was improved when the pinna was treated with FocusClear. In case of dorsal skin, we were able to image deeply to the subcutaneous connective tissue with both agents. Various skin structures such as the vessel, epithelium cells, cartilage, dermal cells, and hair follicles were clearly imaged.

  18. Protection against induction of mouse skin papillomas with low and high risk of conversion to malignancy by green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Mohan, R R; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1997-03-01

    We earlier showed that a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) affords protection against tumor promotion and tumor progression in SENCAR mouse skin. The present study was designed to further evaluate the protective effect of GTP against the induction and subsequent progression of papillomas to squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in experimental protocols where papillomas were developed with a low or high probability of their malignant conversion. Topical application of GTP (6 mg/animal) 30 min prior to that of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either once a week for 5 weeks (high risk TPA protocol) or once a week for 20 weeks (low risk TPA protocol) or mezerein (MEZ) twice a week for 20 weeks (high risk MEZ protocol) in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated mouse skin resulted in significant protection against skin tumor promotion in terms of tumor incidence (32-60%), multiplicity (49-63%) and tumor volume/mouse (73-90%) at the termination of the experiment at 20 weeks. In three separate malignant progression experiments when papilloma yield in DMBA-initiated and TPA or MEZ promoted low and high risk protocols was stabilized at 20 weeks, animals were divided into two subgroups. These animals were either topically treated twice weekly with acetone (0.2 ml/animal, spontaneous malignant conversion group) or with GTP (6 mg/animal in 0.2 ml acetone) for an additional period of 31 weeks. During these treatment regimens, all suspected carcinomas were recorded and each one was verified histopathologically either at the time when tumor-bearing mouse died/moribund or at the termination of the experiment at 51 weeks. GTP resulted in significant protection against the malignant conversion of papillomas to SCC in all the protocols employed. At the termination of the experiment at 51 weeks, these protective effects were evident in terms of mice with carcinomas (35-41%), carcinomas per mouse (47-55%) and percent malignant conversion of papillomas to

  19. In vitro infectivity assay for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Vacquier, J P; Cardiff, R D

    1979-08-01

    Studies of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have been impeded by the lack of an in vitro infectivity assay. We have developed a rapid, quantitative in vitro assay for MMTV infectivity based on the detection of positively staining foci by immunoperoxidase. This assay and a 50% end-point titration of MMTV infectivity gave identical virus titers. Infection of a rat hepatoma cell line, a feline kidney cell line, and a normal murine mammary gland cell line by virus from the mouse mammary tumor GR3A cell line was linear with respect to virus concentration. The infectious titers obtained in both homologous and heterologous cell lines were not significantly different, demonstrating a lack of host range specificity. Virus infectivity was inactivated by heating at 55 degrees C and by ultraviolet irradiation. Rabbit anti-MMTV serum neutralized the infectivity with a 50% neutralization end point of 1:5000. Applications of this assay to the study of the immunological, biological, and biochemical characteristics of MMTV are discussed.

  20. Effects of the co-carcinogen catechol on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism and DNA adduct formation in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Melikian, A.A.; Leszczynska, J.M.; Hecht, S.S.; Hoffmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the co-carcinogen catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) on the metabolic activation of (/sup 3/H) benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in mouse skin, in vivo and on the binding of BaP metabolites to DNA and protein at intervals from 0.5-24 h. Upon topical application of 0.015 mg (/sup 3/H)BaP and 0.25 or 0.5 mg catechol per mouse, catechol had little effect on the total amount of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolized in mouse skin, but it affected the relative proportions of (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites. Catechol (0.5 mg/mouse) decreased the proportion of water-soluble (/sup 3/H)BaP metabolites, ethyl acetate-soluble polar metabolites and quinones, but doubled the levels of unconjugated 3-hydroxy-BaP at all measured intervals after treatment. Catechol also caused a small increase in the levels of trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydroBaP and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroBaP 0.5 h after treatment. Two hours after treatment, the levels of these metabolites subsided to those of the controls. Catechol did not affect the levels of glutathione conjugates of BaP. However, it caused a decrease in glucuronide and sulphate conjugate formation from BaP. Catechol caused an approximately 2-fold increase in the formation of anti-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydroBaP (BPDE) DNA adducts and elevated the ratio of anti-syn-BPDE-DNA adducts 1.6 to 2.9-fold. Catechol treatment increased the radioactivity associated with epidermal proteins after (/sup 3/H)BaP application. Because catechol increased levels of 3-hydroxyBaP, we considered the possibility that 3-hydroxyBaP might enhance the tumor initiating activities of BaP or BPDE in mouse skin; a bioassay demonstrated that this was not the case. The results of this study indicate that one important effect of catechol related to its co-carcinogenicity is its ability to enhance formation of anti-BPDE-DNA adducts in mouse skin.

  1. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  2. DOSE-RESPONSE STUDIES OF SODIUM ARSENITE IN THE SKIN OF K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has previously been observed that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic and/or its metabolites increase(s) tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice. To identify potential biomarkers and modes of action for this skin tumorigenicity, gene expression profiles w...

  3. Incidence of malignant skin tumors in 14,140 patients after grenz-ray treatment for benign skin disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeloef, B.E.; Eklund, G.

    1986-12-01

    During the years 1949 to 1975, 14,237 patients received therapeutic doses of grenz rays for the treatment of benign skin disorders such as chronic eczema, psoriasis, and warts. The records of 14,140 of these patients (99.3%) formed the basis for an epidemiologic study of the incidence of skin malignancies in this population. Information about the patients, diagnoses, doses, and sites of treatment was obtained from separate records. The follow-up time was 15 years on the average. We searched the Swedish Cancer Registry, Stockholm, for records reporting the incidence of malignant skin tumors in the study population (incidences of basal cell carcinoma are not registered). The expected number of malignancies was calculated on the basis of age- and sex-standardized incidence data from the Swedish Cancer Registry. In 58 patients, a malignant skin tumor was diagnosed more than five years after grenz-ray therapy had first been administered. Nineteen patients had malignant melanomas, and 39 patients had other malignant skin tumors. The expected number of melanomas was 17.8, and that of other malignant skin tumors was 26.9. None of the patients with melanomas, and only eight of the patients with other malignant skin tumors, had received grenz-ray therapy at the site of the tumor. Six of these eight patients had also been exposed to other known carcinogens. Four hundred eighty-one patients had received an accumulated high dose of grenz rays (greater than or equal to 10 000 rad (greater than or equal to 100 Gy)) on one and the same area. No malignancies were found on those areas. Although we cannot exclude grenz-ray therapy as a risk factor in the development of nonmelanoma skin malignancies, this risk, if any, is small, if recommendations for therapy are followed.

  4. Inhibitory effects of [6]-gingerol on PMA-induced COX-2 expression and activation of NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Ok; Chun, Kyung-Soo; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Surh, Young-Joon

    2004-01-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a major pungent ingredient of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae), has a wide array of pharmacologic effects. Previous studies have demonstrated that [6]-gingerol inhibits mouse skin tumor promotion and anchorage-independent growth of cultured mouse epidermal cells stimulated with epidermal growth factor. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key enzyme in the prostaglandin biosynthesis, has been recognized as a molecular target for many anti-inflammatory as well as chemopreventive agents. Topical application of [6]-gingerol inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate -induced COX-2 expression. One of the essential transcription factors responsible for COX-2 induction is NF-kappaB. [6]-Gingerol suppressed NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in mouse skin. In addition, [6]-gingerol inhibited the phoshorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase which may account for its inactivation of NF-kappaB and suppression of COX-2 expression. PMID:15630166

  5. Elevated VEGF-D Modulates Tumor Inflammation and Reduces the Growth of Carcinogen-Induced Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Hanne-Kaisa; Izzi, Valerio; Petäistö, Tiina; Holopainen, Tanja; Harjunen, Vanessa; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Alitalo, Kari; Heljasvaara, Ritva

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor D (VEGF-D) promotes the lymph node metastasis of cancer by inducing the growth of lymphatic vasculature, but its specific roles in tumorigenesis have not been elucidated. We monitored the effects of VEGF-D in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) by subjecting transgenic mice overexpressing VEGF-D in the skin (K14-mVEGF-D) and VEGF-D knockout mice to a chemical skin carcinogenesis protocol involving 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatments. In K14-mVEGF-D mice, tumor lymphangiogenesis was significantly increased and the frequency of lymph node metastasis was elevated in comparison with controls. Most notably, the papillomas regressed more often in K14-mVEGF-D mice than in littermate controls, resulting in a delay in tumor incidence and a remarkable reduction in the total tumor number. Skin tumor growth and metastasis were not obviously affected in the absence of VEGF-D; however, the knockout mice showed a trend for reduced lymphangiogenesis in skin tumors and in the untreated skin. Interestingly, K14-mVEGF-D mice showed an altered immune response in skin tumors. This consisted of the reduced accumulation of macrophages, mast cells, and CD4(+) T-cells and an increase of cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cells. Cytokine profiling by flow cytometry and quantitative real time PCR revealed that elevated VEGF-D expression results in an attenuated Th2 response and promotes M1/Th1 and Th17 polarization in the early stage of skin carcinogenesis, leading to an anti-tumoral immune environment and the regression of primary tumors. Our data suggest that VEGF-D may be beneficial in early-stage tumors since it suppresses the pro-tumorigenic inflammation, while at later stages VEGF-D-induced tumor lymphatics provide a route for metastasis. PMID:27435926

  6. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  7. Intake of high-fat diet stimulates the risk of ultraviolet radiation-induced skin tumors and malignant progression of papillomas to carcinoma in SKH-1 hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Vaid, Mudit; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that administration of a high-fat diet (HF-diet) to C57BL/6 mice exacerbates their response to short-term UVB radiation-induced inflammation in the skin. To explore the effects of an HF-diet on UVB-induced tumorigenesis, we have used the SKH-1 hairless mouse model in which the mice are exposed to UVB radiation (180 mJ/cm{sup 2}) three times a week for 24 weeks. The development of UVB-induced skin tumors was rapid and the tumor multiplicity and tumor size were significantly higher (P < 0.01–0.005) in the mice fed an HF-diet than the mice fed a control-diet (C-diet). Moreover, the malignant progression of UVB-induced papillomas to carcinomas was higher in HF-diet-fed mice. On analysis of tumors and tumor-uninvolved skin samples from the tumor-bearing mice, we found that administration of an HF-diet significantly enhanced the levels of UVB-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (P < 0.01), and PGE{sub 2} receptors, and activation of NF-κB in the UVB-exposed skin as well as in tumors. In addition the HF-diet enhanced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (P < 0.01), interleukin (IL)-1β (P < 0.01) and IL-6 (P < 0.05) in the UVB-exposed skin as well as in tumors. Western blot analysis revealed that HF-diet enhanced the levels of epidermal cell proliferation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and phosphorylation of Akt at Ser{sup 473} in UVB-exposed skin and skin tumors. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the regular consumption of an HF-diet increases the risk of photocarcinogenesis in mice and that this is associated with enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators in the UVB-exposed skin and tumors. - Highlights: • Consumption of high-fat diet increases UVB-induced skin tumor development in mice. • Intake of high-fat diet stimulates progression of UV-induced papilloma to carcinoma. • Intake of high-fat diet enhances inflammation in UV-exposed skin • Regular

  8. Topical calcitriol prior to photodynamic therapy enhances treatment efficacy in non-melanoma skin cancer mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollakanti, Kishore; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.

    2015-03-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common form of human cancer worldwide, and their incidence is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), mediated by topically applied aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and subsequent exposure to light (either a laser or a noncoherent source), is being increasingly used for the treatment of dermatological disorders, including BCC and SCC. However, therapeutic responses of NMSCs to ALA-PDT are currently not superior to standard therapies, although the latter have undesirable side effects including scarring. In this study, we report that preconditioning of skin tumors with calcitriol (active form of Vitamin D; Vit D) prior to ALA-PDT, significantly improves the treatment outcome. In BCC and UVB-induced SCC mouse models, we identified an increase in tumor-specific accumulation of ALA induced photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX, PpIX) due to Vit D preconditioning, of up to 6- fold in vivo. In addition, increased expression of differentiation (145 fold, p < 0.02) and proliferation (42 fold, p <0.005) markers were identified in BCC tumors, all leading to increased tumor destruction (18.3 fold, p < 0.03) with the combination approach, as compared to ALA-PDT alone. Histomorphological changes identified using hematoxylin and eosin staining, and results of TUNEL staining, together documented a beneficial effect of Vit D pretreatment upon tumor cell death. We conclude that this new combination approach with Vit D and ALA-PDT has great potential to achieve complete remission of NMSC tumors, with excellent cosmetic results and an overall beneficial impact upon patient care.

  9. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immune response in mouse models: the role of regulatory Tcells, anti-tumor antibodies, and immune attacks on brain metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatansever, Fatma; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Chung, Hoon; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown that photodynamic therapy mediated by a vascular regimen of benzoporphyrin derivative and 690nm light is capable of inducing a robust immune response in the mouse CT26.CL25 tumor model that contains a tumor-rejection antigen, beta-galactosidase (β-gal). For the first time we show that PDT can stimulate the production of serum IgG antibodies against the β-gal antigen. It is known that a common cause of death from cancer, particularly lung cancer, is brain metastases; especially the inoperable ones that do not respond to traditional cytotoxic therapies either. We asked whether PDT of a primary tumor could stimulate immune response that could attack the distant brain metastases. We have developed a mouse model of generating brain metastases by injecting CT26.CL25 tumor cells into the brain as well as injecting the same cancer cells under the skin at the same time. When the subcutaneous tumor was treated with PDT, we observed a survival advantage compared to mice that had untreated brain metastases alone.

  10. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  11. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  12. Insights into granulosa cell tumors using spontaneous or genetically engineered mouse models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that have been studied for decades. However, their infrequency has delayed efforts to research their etiology. Recently, mutations in human GCTs have been discovered, which has led to further research aimed at determining the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Mouse models have been important tools for studying GCTs, and have provided means to develop and improve diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus far, several genetically modified mouse models, along with one spontaneous mouse model, have been reported. This review summarizes the phenotypes of these mouse models and their applicability in elucidating the mechanisms of granulosa cell tumor development. PMID:27104151

  13. Compression-induced HIF-1 enhances thrombosis and PAI-1 expression in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Maki; Minematsu, Takeo; Yoshida, Mikako; Nishijima, Yoshimi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yasunori; Nakagami, Gojiro; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-09-01

    Pressure ulcers result from tissue hypoxia caused by external forces. Thrombosis due to external forces is considered important, and hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master regulator of pressure ulcer development. To date, however, their causal relationship has not been determined. This study therefore investigated the mutual relationship between thrombosis and HIF-1 activation in compressed mouse skin, based on a hypothesis that HIF-1 regulation by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) enhances thrombosis. Compression of mouse skin significantly increased the numbers of thrombi and HIF-1α-positive cells compared with control skin. A thrombosis inhibitor significantly reduced the numbers of HIF-1α-positive cells and an HIF-1 inhibitor significantly inhibited thrombosis in compressed skin tissue, suggesting a mutual relationship between thrombosis and HIF-1 activation. Compression of mouse skin also enhanced the level of Pai-1 messenger RNA expression, but this increase was significantly reduced by treatment with an HIF-1 inhibitor, whereas a thrombosis inhibitor had no effect. These results suggested the involvement of PAI-1 in HIF-1-enhanced thrombosis and that an additional factor participates in regulating Pai-1 expression in compressed skin. These findings may suggest new strategies in pressure ulcer management.

  14. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  15. Depletion of Mouse Cells from Human Tumor Xenografts Significantly Improves Downstream Analysis of Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Agorku, David J; Tomiuk, Stefan; Klingner, Kerstin; Wild, Stefan; Rüberg, Silvia; Zatrieb, Lisa; Bosio, Andreas; Schueler, Julia; Hardt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The use of in vitro cell line models for cancer research has been a useful tool. However, it has been shown that these models fail to reliably mimic patient tumors in different assays(1). Human tumor xenografts represent the gold standard with respect to tumor biology, drug discovery, and metastasis research (2-4). Tumor xenografts can be derived from different types of material like tumor cell lines, tumor tissue from primary patient tumors(4) or serially transplanted tumors. When propagated in vivo, xenografted tissue is infiltrated and vascularized by cells of mouse origin. Multiple factors such as the tumor entity, the origin of xenografted material, growth rate and region of transplantation influence the composition and the amount of mouse cells present in tumor xenografts. However, even when these factors are kept constant, the degree of mouse cell contamination is highly variable. Contaminating mouse cells significantly impair downstream analyses of human tumor xenografts. As mouse fibroblasts show high plating efficacies and proliferation rates, they tend to overgrow cultures of human tumor cells, especially slowly proliferating subpopulations. Mouse cell derived DNA, mRNA, and protein components can bias downstream gene expression analysis, next-generation sequencing, as well as proteome analysis (5). To overcome these limitations, we have developed a fast and easy method to isolate untouched human tumor cells from xenografted tumor tissue. This procedure is based on the comprehensive depletion of cells of mouse origin by combining automated tissue dissociation with the benchtop tissue dissociator and magnetic cell sorting. Here, we demonstrate that human target cells can be can be obtained with purities higher than 96% within less than 20 min independent of the tumor type. PMID:27501218

  16. The optical properties of mouse skin in the visible and near infrared spectral regions.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Caetano P; Deana, Alessandro M; Yoshimura, Tania M; da Silva, Daniela F T; França, Cristiane M; Hamblin, Michael R; Ribeiro, Martha S

    2016-07-01

    Visible and near-infrared radiation is now widely employed in health science and technology. Pre-clinical trials are still essential to allow appropriate translation of optical methods into clinical practice. Our results stress the importance of considering the mouse strain and gender when planning pre-clinical experiments that depend on light-skin interactions. Here, we evaluated the optical properties of depilated albino and pigmented mouse skin using reproducible methods to determine parameters that have wide applicability in biomedical optics. Light penetration depth (δ), absorption (μa), reduced scattering (μ's) and reduced attenuation (μ't) coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model of photon transport and spectrophotometric measurements. Within a broad wavelength coverage (400-1400nm), the main optical tissue interactions of visible and near infrared radiation could be inferred. Histological analysis was performed to correlate the findings with tissue composition and structure. Disperse melanin granules present in depilated pigmented mouse skin were shown to be irrelevant for light absorption. Gender mostly affected optical properties in the visible range due to variations in blood and abundance of dense connective tissue. On the other hand, mouse strains could produce more variations in the hydration level of skin, leading to changes in absorption in the infrared spectral region. A spectral region of minimal light attenuation, commonly referred as the "optical window", was observed between 600 and 1350nm. PMID:27101274

  17. Protective effects of black rice bran against chemically-induced inflammation of mouse skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of black rice (cv. LK1-3-6-12-1-1) bran against 12-O-tetradecanolylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin edema and 2,4-dinitroflurobenzene (DNFB)-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in inflammatory mouse models. We also determined the effects of the bran...

  18. The optical properties of mouse skin in the visible and near infrared spectral regions.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Caetano P; Deana, Alessandro M; Yoshimura, Tania M; da Silva, Daniela F T; França, Cristiane M; Hamblin, Michael R; Ribeiro, Martha S

    2016-07-01

    Visible and near-infrared radiation is now widely employed in health science and technology. Pre-clinical trials are still essential to allow appropriate translation of optical methods into clinical practice. Our results stress the importance of considering the mouse strain and gender when planning pre-clinical experiments that depend on light-skin interactions. Here, we evaluated the optical properties of depilated albino and pigmented mouse skin using reproducible methods to determine parameters that have wide applicability in biomedical optics. Light penetration depth (δ), absorption (μa), reduced scattering (μ's) and reduced attenuation (μ't) coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model of photon transport and spectrophotometric measurements. Within a broad wavelength coverage (400-1400nm), the main optical tissue interactions of visible and near infrared radiation could be inferred. Histological analysis was performed to correlate the findings with tissue composition and structure. Disperse melanin granules present in depilated pigmented mouse skin were shown to be irrelevant for light absorption. Gender mostly affected optical properties in the visible range due to variations in blood and abundance of dense connective tissue. On the other hand, mouse strains could produce more variations in the hydration level of skin, leading to changes in absorption in the infrared spectral region. A spectral region of minimal light attenuation, commonly referred as the "optical window", was observed between 600 and 1350nm.

  19. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  20. Ex vivo Culture of Mouse Embryonic Skin and Live-imaging of Melanoblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Richard L.; Keighren, Margaret; Hay, Leonard; Jackson, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoblasts are the neural crest derived precursors of melanocytes; the cells responsible for producing the pigment in skin and hair. Melanoblasts migrate through the epidermis of the embryo where they subsequently colonize the developing hair follicles1,2. Neural crest cell migration is extensively studied in vitro but in vivo methods are still not well developed, especially in mammalian systems. One alternative is to use ex vivo organotypic culture3-6. Culture of mouse embryonic skin requires the maintenance of an air-liquid interface (ALI) across the surface of the tissue3,6. High resolution live-imaging of mouse embryonic skin has been hampered by the lack of a good method that not only maintains this ALI but also allows the culture to be inverted and therefore compatible with short working distance objective lenses and most confocal microscopes. This article describes recent improvements to a method that uses a gas permeable membrane to overcome these problems and allow high-resolution confocal imaging of embryonic skin in ex vivo culture6. By using a melanoblast specific Cre-recombinase expressing mouse line combined with the R26YFPR reporter line we are able to fluorescently label the melanoblast population within these skin cultures. The technique allows live-imaging of melanoblasts and observation of their behavior and interactions with the tissue in which they develop. Representative results are included to demonstrate the capability to live-image 6 cultures in parallel. PMID:24894489

  1. Development of a Bioengineered Skin-Humanized Mouse Model for Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; García, Marta; Murillas, Rodolfo; Retamosa, Luisa; Illera, Nuria; Duarte, Blanca; Holguín, Almudena; Puig, Susana; Hernández, Maria Isabel; Meana, Alvaro; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; Carretero, Marta; Del Río, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, whole skin xenotransplantation models that mimic different aspects of psoriasis have become available. However, these models are strongly constrained by the lack of skin donor availability and homogeneity. We present in this study a bioengineering-based skin-humanized mouse model for psoriasis, either in an autologous version using samples derived from psoriatic patients or, more importantly, in an allogeneic context, starting from skin biopsies and blood samples from unrelated healthy donors. After engraftment, the regenerated human skin presents the typical architecture of normal human skin but, in both cases, immunological reconstitution through intradermal injection in the regenerated skin using in vitro-differentiated T1 subpopulations as well as recombinant IL-17 and IL-22 Th17 cytokines, together with removal of the stratum corneum barrier by a mild abrasive treatment, leads to the rapid conversion of the skin into a bona fide psoriatic phenotype. Major hallmarks of psoriasis were confirmed by the evaluation of specific epidermal differentiation and proliferation markers as well as the mesenchymal milieu, including angiogenesis and infiltrate. Our bioengineered skin-based system represents a robust platform to reliably assess the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interdependence between epidermal cells and the immune system. The system may also prove suitable to assess preclinical studies that test the efficacy of novel therapeutic treatments and to predict individual patient response to therapy. PMID:20971736

  2. Orthotopic mouse models of tumor metastasis expressing fluorescent reporters produce imageable circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are of high importance, since they are potential metastatic precursors and are readily available for prognostic analysis and treatment testing. In this review, we demonstrate the great power that green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeling and orthotopic mouse models of cancer confer to the study of CTCs for isolation and characterization, including metastatic testing in mice and the chick embryo as well as drug response testing in vitro. We also describe a facile method to label patient CTCs ex vivo using a telomerase-expressing GFP-containing adenovirus that will allow the CTC studies described in this review to be translated clinically.

  3. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  4. FATAL KERATOMAS DUE TO DEEP HOMOGRAFTS OF THE BENIGN PAPILLOMAS OF TARRED MOUSE SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Allen, Raymond A.

    1958-01-01

    enlarging, fluid-filled cyst forms, with walls that are bare except where a stalked or cauliflower papilloma exists, projecting inwards. At last the cyst ruptures and a second dissecting cyst forms, also devoid of papilloma tissue; or else the overlying skin undergoes pressure necrosis, the cyst fluid escapes through a rent, and fatal infection ensues. All gradations exist between Type A and Type C. The cancers derivative from both exhibit a marked disability,—though invasive they are almost or quite unable to extend along bare connective tissue. The papillomas that are possessed of this faculty spread beyond them along the cyst wall, and kill the host through their unceasing activity. In collateral work a papilloma was transplanted that was found protruding from the external auditory canal of a mouse which had received an intramuscular injection of methylcholanthrene many months previously. The tumor is now in its 5th generation, after 15 months. The growths it forms are of Type A. All of the papillomas are functioning tumors, with their own cells as the functioning product. Their papilliferous shape, when on the skin, is due solely to inability of their cells to gain space in other ways. Intrinsically they are keratomas. The papillomas do well after transfer to deep situations because the growth of their cells is indirectly promoted, through favoring local conditions. No direct promotion takes place like that when the cells of prostatic and mammary tumors are stimulated to multiply by hormones. Doubtless many agents act in both ways, that is to say by dual promotion. PMID:13481256

  5. Delayed tail loss during the invasion of mouse skin by cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Fang, Zheng-Ming; Lei, Jia-Hui; Guan, Fei; Liu, Wen-Qi; Bartlett, Ann; Whitfield, Phil; Li, Yong-Long

    2012-02-01

    A traditional assumption is that schistosome cercariae lose their tails at the onset of penetration. It has, however, recently been demonstrated that, for Schistosoma mansoni, cercarial tails were not invariably being shed as penetration took place and a high proportion of tails entered human skin under experimental conditions. This phenomenon was termed delayed tail loss (DTL). In this paper, we report that DTL also happens with S. japonicum cercariae during penetration of mouse skin. It occurred at all cercarial densities tested, from as few as 10 cercariae/2·25 cm(2) of mouse skin up to 200 cercariae. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that there was a density-dependent increase in DTL as cercarial densities increased. No such density-dependent enhancement was shown for percentage attachment over the same cercarial density range.

  6. Topical Application of Oleuropein Induces Anagen Hair Growth in Telogen Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tao; Kim, Nahyun; Park, Taesun

    2015-01-01

    We observed that oleuropein, the main constituent of the leaves and unprocessed olive drupes of Olea europaea, protected mice from high-fat diet-induced adiposity by up-regulation of genes involved in Wnt10b-mediated signaling in adipose tissue. The activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway is also well established to positively regulate the anagen phase of hair growth cycle in mice skin. Methodology and Principal Findings Oleuropein promoted cultured human follicle dermal papilla cell proliferation and induced LEF1 and Cyc-D1 mRNA expression and β-catenin protein expression in dermal papilla cells. Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in dermal papilla cells was observed after oleuropein treatment. Topical application of oleuropein (0.4 mg/mouse/day) to C57BL/6N mice accelerated the hair-growth induction and increased the size of hair follicles in telogenic mouse skin. The oleuropein-treated mouse skin showed substantial upregulation of Wnt10b, FZDR1, LRP5, LEF1, Cyc-D1, IGF-1, KGF, HGF, and VEGF mRNA expression and β-catenin protein expression. Conclusions and Significance These results demonstrate that topical oleuroepin administration induced anagenic hair growth in telogenic C57BL/6N mouse skin. The hair-growth promoting effect of oleuropein in mice appeared to be associated with the stimulation of the Wnt10b/β-catenin signaling pathway and the upregulation of IGF-1, KGF, HGF, and VEGF gene expression in mouse skin tissue. PMID:26060936

  7. The biodisposition and hypertrichotic effects of bimatoprost in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Woodward, David F; Tang, Elaine S-H; Attar, Mayssa; Wang, Jenny W

    2013-02-01

    Studies on bimatoprost were performed with two objectives: (i) to determine whether bimatoprost possesses hair growth-stimulating properties beyond eyelash hypertrichosis and (ii) to investigate the biodisposition of bimatoprost in skin for the first time. Bimatoprost, at the dose used clinically for eyelash growth (0.03%) and given once daily for 14 days, increased pelage hair growth in C57/black 6 mice. This occurred as a much earlier onset of new hair growth in shaved mice and the time taken to achieve complete hair regrowth, according to photographic documentation and visual assessment. Bimatoprost biodisposition in the skin was determined at three concentrations: 0.01%, 0.03% and 0.06%. Dose-dependent C(max) values were obtained (3.41, 6.74, 12.3 μg/g tissue), and cutaneous bimatoprost was well maintained for 24 h following a single dose. Bimatoprost was recovered from the skin only as the intact molecule, with no detectable levels of metabolites. Thus, bimatoprost produces hypertrichosis as the intact molecule.

  8. [6]-Gingerol inhibits COX-2 expression by blocking the activation of p38 MAP kinase and NF-kappaB in phorbol ester-stimulated mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Ok; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Shin, Young Kee; Park, Jin-Hong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Tae-Yoon; Surh, Young-Joon

    2005-04-01

    [6]-Gingerol, a pungent ingredient of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Zingiberaceae), has a wide array of pharmacologic effects. The present study was aimed at unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying previously reported antitumor promoting effects of [6]-gingerol in mouse skin in vivo. One of the well-recognized molecular targets for chemoprevention is cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) that is abnormally upregulated in many premalignant and malignant tissues and cells. In our present study, topical application of [6]-gingerol inhibited COX-2 expression in mouse skin stimulated with a prototype tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Since the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is known to regulate COX-2 induction, we attempted to determine the effect of [6]-gingerol on TPA-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Pretreatment with [6]-gingerol resulted in a decrease in both TPA-induced DNA binding and transcriptional activities of NF-kappaB through suppression of IkappaBalpha degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. Phosphorylation of both IkappaBalpha and p65 was substantially blocked by [6]-gingerol. In addition, [6]-gingerol inhibited TPA-stimulated interaction of phospho-p65-(Ser-536) with cAMP response element binding protein-binding protein, a transcriptional coactivator of NF-kappaB. Moreover, [6]-gingerol prevented TPA-induced phosphorylation and catalytic activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase that regulates COX-2 expression in mouse skin. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated NF-kappaB activation and subsequent COX-2 induction in TPA-treated mouse skin. Taken together, our data suggest that [6]-gingerol inhibits TPA-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin in vivo by blocking the p38 MAP kinase-NF-kappaB signaling pathway. PMID:15735738

  9. Gene Expression Architecture of Mouse Dorsal and Tail Skin Reveals Functional Differences in Inflammation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Quigley, David A; Kandyba, Eve; Huang, Phillips; Halliwill, Kyle D; Sjölund, Jonas; Pelorosso, Facundo; Wong, Christine E; Hirst, Gillian L; Wu, Di; Delrosario, Reyno; Kumar, Atul; Balmain, Allan

    2016-07-26

    Inherited germline polymorphisms can cause gene expression levels in normal tissues to differ substantially between individuals. We present an analysis of the genetic architecture of normal adult skin from 470 genetically unique mice, demonstrating the effect of germline variants, skin tissue location, and perturbation by exogenous inflammation or tumorigenesis on gene signaling pathways. Gene networks related to specific cell types and signaling pathways, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), Wnt, Lgr family stem cell markers, and keratins, differed at these tissue sites, suggesting mechanisms for the differential susceptibility of dorsal and tail skin to development of skin diseases and tumorigenesis. The Pten tumor suppressor gene network is rewired in premalignant tumors compared to normal tissue, but this response to perturbation is lost during malignant progression. We present a software package for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) network analysis and demonstrate how network analysis of whole tissues provides insights into interactions between cell compartments and signaling molecules. PMID:27425619

  10. Topical gene silencing by iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide-dendrimer nanocomplex: the proof of concept in a skin cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuganti, , Venkata Vamsi K.; Saraswathy, Manju; Dwivedi, Chandradhar; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Perumal, Omathanu P.

    2015-02-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex reduced the tumor volume by 45% and was consistent with the reduction in Bcl-2 protein levels. The iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex caused significant apoptosis in skin tumor. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that dendrimers are promising nanocarriers for developing topical gene silencing approaches for skin diseases.The study was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using a poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer as a carrier for topical iontophoretic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO). Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein implicated in skin cancer, was used as the model target protein to demonstrate the topical gene silencing approach. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies demonstrated that the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex can reach the viable epidermis in porcine skin. In contrast, passively delivered free or dendrimer complexed ASO was mainly localized to the stratum corneum. The cell uptake of ASO was significantly enhanced by the dendrimer complex and the complex suppressed Bcl-2 levels in the cell. In the skin cancer mouse model, the iontophoretically delivered ASO-dendrimer complex

  11. Influence of the hair cycle on the thickness of mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.S.; Coggle, J.E.; Wells, J.; Charles, M.W.

    1984-12-01

    The data on mouse skin thickness reported here was prompted by the need to know the true position of basal cells of the epidermis and hair follicles as these are important cells at risk for a variety of skin reactions including carcinogenesis following exposure to radiation. There is little reliable data in the literature and most previous reports have ignored the shrinkage of skin that occurs because of its natural elasticity. The values determined for mouse flank skin in telogen--the resting phase of the hair cycle for the different skin layers--are epidermis 10 micron, corium 250 micron, adipose layer 150 micron, and hair follicle depth 150 micron. Three days after chemical depilation which triggers the hair follicles into active cycle (anagen) the epidermis doubles in thickness, remains at this value for 7 days, and then gradually returns to telogen values by day 18. The corium and adipose layers also increase significantly to reach approximately 390 micron and approximately 260 micron, respectively, by day 10 and then return to control values from day 15 onward. The change in hair follicles depths are more dramatic with active follicle basal cells reaching approximately 450-550 micron into the adipose layer between days 7 and 15. One important finding is that chemical depilation does not affect the telogen thickness of skin-the teleogen values for the epidermis and dermis immediately prior to and immediately after depilation were similar to those 23 days later at the beginning of the next telogen phase.

  12. Recent Skin Self-Examination and Doctor Visits in Relation to Melanoma Risk and Tumor Depth

    PubMed Central

    Titus, L.J.; Clough-Gorr, K.; Mackenzie, T.A.; Perry, A.; Spencer, S.K.; Weiss, J.; Abrahams-Gessel, S.; Ernstoff, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the potential benefit of skin self-examination for melanoma prevention and early detection. Objectives To determine whether skin self-examination is associated with reduced melanoma risk, self-detection of tumors, and reduced risk of deeper melanomas. Methods We used data from a population-based case-control study (423 cases, 678 controls) to assess recent skin self-examination in relation to self-detection, melanoma risk and tumor depth (<1 mm; ≥1 mm). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for associations of interest. Results Skin self-examination conducted 1–11 times during a recent year was associated with a possible decrease in melanoma risk (OR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.54, 1.02). Melanoma risk was decreased for those who conducted skin self-examination and saw a doctor (OR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.79). Among cases, those who examined their skin were twice as likely to self-detect the melanoma (OR: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.47, 3.38), but self-detection was not associated with shallower tumors. Tumor depth was reduced for those who conducted skin self-examination 1–11 times during a recent year (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.81), but was not influenced by seeing a doctor, or by conducting skin self-examination and seeing a doctor. Conclusions Risk of a deeper tumor and possibly risk of melanoma were reduced by skin self-examination 1–11 times annually. Melanoma risk was markedly reduced by skin self-examination coupled with a doctor visit. We cannot, however, exclude the possibility that our findings reflect bias or confounding. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the potential benefits of skin self-examination for melanoma prevention and early detection. PMID:22897437

  13. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  14. Detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors by visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugmas, Blaž; Plavec, Tanja; Bregar, Maksimilijan; Naglič, Peter; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is the main cause of canine morbidity and mortality. The existing evaluation of tumors requires an experienced veterinarian and usually includes invasive procedures (e.g., fine-needle aspiration) that can be unpleasant for the dog and the owner. We investigate visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) as a noninvasive optical technique for evaluation and detection of canine skin and subcutaneous tumors ex vivo and in vivo. The optical properties of tumors and skin were calculated in a spectrally constrained manner, using a lookup table-based inverse model. The obtained optical properties were analyzed and compared among different tumor groups. The calculated parameters of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were subsequently used for detection of malignant skin and subcutaneous tumors. The detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors ex vivo were 90.0% and 73.5%, respectively, while corresponding detection sensitivity and specificity of malignant tumors in vivo were 88.4% and 54.6%, respectively. The obtained results show that the DRS is a promising noninvasive optical technique for detection and classification of malignant and benign canine skin and subcutaneous tumors. The method should be further investigated on tumors with common origin.

  15. Novel skin phenotypes revealed by a genome-wide mouse reverse genetic screen

    PubMed Central

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Heath, Emma; Smedley, Damian P.; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; DiTommaso, Tia; White, Jacqueline K.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Smyth, Ian; Steel, Karen P.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    Permanent stop-and-shop large-scale mouse mutant resources provide an excellent platform to decipher tissue phenogenomics. Here we analyse skin from 538 knockout mouse mutants generated by the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project. We optimize immunolabelling of tail epidermal wholemounts to allow systematic annotation of hair follicle, sebaceous gland and interfollicular epidermal abnormalities using ontology terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. Of the 50 mutants with an epidermal phenotype, 9 map to human genetic conditions with skin abnormalities. Some mutant genes are expressed in the skin, whereas others are not, indicating systemic effects. One phenotype is affected by diet and several are incompletely penetrant. In-depth analysis of three mutants, Krt76, Myo5a (a model of human Griscelli syndrome) and Mysm1, provides validation of the screen. Our study is the first large-scale genome-wide tissue phenotype screen from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium and provides an open access resource for the scientific community. PMID:24721909

  16. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Sarasin, Alain

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis. PMID:15748637

  17. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits DMBA/croton oil induced skin tumor growth by modulating NF-κB, MMPs, and infiltrating mast cells in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Vimala; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) are implicated as a vital regulator of cancer cell growth and tumor progression. However, the underlying mechanism by which ANP opposes the cancer growth in in-vivo remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of ANP on 7, 12-dimethyl benzanthracence (DMBA)/Croton oil- induced two-step skin carcinogenic mouse model. Skin tumor incidence and tumor volume were recorded during the experimental period of 16 weeks. ANP (1 μg/kg body weight/alternate days for 4 weeks) was injected subcutaneously from the 13th week of DMBA/Croton oil induction. ANP treatment markedly inhibited the skin tumor growth (P<0.001). A significant reduction in the level of NF-κB activation (P<0.001), infiltrating mast cell count (P<0.01) and MMP-2/-9 (P<0.001, respectively) were noticed in the ANP treated mice skin tissue. Further, ANP treatment revert back the altered levels of serum LDH-4, C-reactive protein (CRP), and enzymatic antioxidants (SOD and CAT activities) to near normal level. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that ANP opposes the skin carcinogenesis by suppressing the inflammatory response and MMPs.

  18. Resveratrol inhibits phorbol ester-induced expression of COX-2 and activation of NF-kappaB in mouse skin by blocking IkappaB kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Shin, Young Kee; Kim, Sung Hoon; Surh, Young-Joon

    2006-07-01

    Aberrant expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been implicated in tumor promotion. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in grapes, was reported to inhibit multistage mouse skin carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that topically applied resveratrol significantly inhibited COX-2 expression induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Resveratrol-suppressed phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IkappaBalpha, thereby inhibiting activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in TPA-stimulated mouse skin. Pretreatment with resveratrol also suppressed TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Resveratrol blunted TPA-induced phosphorylation of p65 and its interaction with CBP/p300, rendering NF-kappaB transcriptionally inactive. To get further insights into the molecular basis of NF-kappaB inactivation by resveratrol, we examined the role of IkappaB kinase (IKK) in mediating TPA-induced activation of NF-kappaB and COX-2 expression. TPA treatment led to rapid induction of IKK activity in mouse skin, which was abolished either by resveratrol or an IKK inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Topical application of Bay 11-7082 also abrogated TPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and COX-2 expression, supporting the involvement of IKK in TPA-induced COX-2 expression. Taken together, the above findings suggest that resveratrol targets IKK in blocking TPA-induced NF-kappaB activation and COX-2 expression in mouse skin in vivo.

  19. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J.; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  20. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-08-18

    The changes in cell dynamics after oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the effect of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, initiated tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. This difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase in symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is dependent not only on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  1. The Raman spectrum character of skin tumor induced by UVB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Hu, Liangjun; Wang, Yunxia; Li, Yongzeng

    2016-03-01

    In our study, the skin canceration processes induced by UVB were analyzed from the perspective of tissue spectrum. A home-made Raman spectral system with a millimeter order excitation laser spot size combined with a multivariate statistical analysis for monitoring the skin changed irradiated by UVB was studied and the discrimination were evaluated. Raman scattering signals of the SCC and normal skin were acquired. Spectral differences in Raman spectra were revealed. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on principal component analysis (PCA) were employed to generate diagnostic algorithms for the classification of skin SCC and normal. The results indicated that Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA-LDA demonstrated good potential for improving the diagnosis of skin cancers.

  2. High-power femtosecond-terahertz pulse induces a wound response in mouse skin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Jaehun; Jo, Sung Jin; Jung, Seonghoon; Kwon, Oh Sang; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Gun-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has emerged for biomedical applications such as scanning, molecular spectroscopy, and medical imaging. Although a thorough assessment to predict potential concerns has to precede before practical utilization of THz source, the biological effect of THz radiation is not yet fully understood with scant related investigations. Here, we applied a femtosecond-terahertz (fs-THz) pulse to mouse skin to evaluate non-thermal effects of THz radiation. Analysis of the genome-wide expression profile in fs-THz-irradiated skin indicated that wound responses were predominantly mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. We validated NFκB1- and Smad3/4-mediated transcriptional activation in fs-THz-irradiated skin by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Repeated fs-THz radiation delayed the closure of mouse skin punch wounds due to up-regulation of TGF-β. These findings suggest that fs-THz radiation initiate a wound-like signal in skin with increased expression of TGF-β and activation of its downstream target genes, which perturbs the wound healing process in vivo. PMID:23907528

  3. Adiponectin resides in mouse skin and upregulates hyaluronan synthesis in dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Yumiko; Sayo, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Sato, Takashi; Akimoto, Noriko; Ito, Akira; Inoue, Shintaro

    2011-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a hormonally active tissue that produces adipokines that influence the activity of other tissues. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-specific adipokine involved in systemic metabolism. We detected the expression of adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) mRNA in cultured dermal fibroblasts. The full-length adiponectin (fAd), but not the globular adiponectin (gAd), increased hyaluronan (HA) production and upregulated HA synthase (HAS) 2 mRNA expression. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNAs were also expressed in keratinocytes, though neither fAd nor gAd had any effect on HA synthesis. In mouse skin, we found that adiponectin was present and decreased markedly with aging. The age-dependent pattern of adiponectin decrease in skin, correlated well with that of HA in skin. Our experiments were also the first to identify adiponectin production in cultured mouse sebocytes, a finding that suggests that skin adiponectin may derive not only from plasma and/or subcutaneous adipose tissue, but also from the sebaceous gland. These results indicated that adiponectin plays an important role in the HA metabolism of skin. PMID:21117904

  4. High-power femtosecond-terahertz pulse induces a wound response in mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae; Park, Jaehun; Jo, Sung Jin; Jung, Seonghoon; Kwon, Oh Sang; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Gun-Sik

    2013-08-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has emerged for biomedical applications such as scanning, molecular spectroscopy, and medical imaging. Although a thorough assessment to predict potential concerns has to precede before practical utilization of THz source, the biological effect of THz radiation is not yet fully understood with scant related investigations. Here, we applied a femtosecond-terahertz (fs-THz) pulse to mouse skin to evaluate non-thermal effects of THz radiation. Analysis of the genome-wide expression profile in fs-THz-irradiated skin indicated that wound responses were predominantly mediated by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. We validated NFκB1- and Smad3/4-mediated transcriptional activation in fs-THz-irradiated skin by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Repeated fs-THz radiation delayed the closure of mouse skin punch wounds due to up-regulation of TGF-β. These findings suggest that fs-THz radiation initiate a wound-like signal in skin with increased expression of TGF-β and activation of its downstream target genes, which perturbs the wound healing process in vivo.

  5. CD34 EXPRESSION BY HAIR FOLLICLE STEM CELLS IS REQUIRED FOR SKIN TUMOR DEVELOPMENT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used knockout mice to show that a cell surface protein called CD34 is required for skin tumor formation in mice. Wild type mice treated with 7-12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and a tumor promoter developed papillomas. When we treated CD34 knockout (KO) mice the same way, n...

  6. A study of the penetration of five novel synthetic steroids through hairless mouse skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Michniak-Mikolajczak, B B; Bodor, N

    1985-08-01

    Synopsis The change in the physiochemical properties of topical corticosteroids by addition of one or more chemical substituents is probably one of the most important factors affecting the activity and bioavailability of the steroid. During work on developing new steroids five synthetic steroids were tested for their ability to pass through freshly excised hairless mouse skin placed in diffusion cells at 33 1 degrees C. Analysis of the compounds was made using high performance liquid chromatography. The presence of flourine at carbon 9, in the chemical grouping at carbon 17, or the addition of a pentyl group was found to increase the penetration of the steroid through the skin. PMID:19460025

  7. Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 Regulates UVB-Induced Signaling and Tumorigenesis in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Chastkofsky, Michael I; Bie, Wenjun; Ball-Kell, Susan M; He, Yu-Ying; Tyner, Angela L

    2015-10-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also called BRK) is an intracellular tyrosine kinase expressed in the epithelial linings of the gastrointestinal tract and the skin, where it is expressed in nondividing differentiated cells. We found that PTK6 expression increases in the epidermis following UVB treatment. To evaluate the roles of PTK6 in the skin following UVB-induced damage, we exposed back skin of Ptk6 +/+ and Ptk6 -/- SENCAR mice to incremental doses of UVB for 30 weeks. Wild-type mice were more sensitive to UVB and exhibited increased inflammation and greater activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) than Ptk6-/- mice. Disruption of Ptk6 did not have an impact on proliferation, although PTK6 was expressed and activated in basal epithelial cells in wild-type mice following UVB treatment. However, wild-type mice exhibited shortened tumor latency and increased tumor load compared with Ptk6-/- mice, and STAT3 activation was increased in these tumors. PTK6 activation was detected in UVB-induced tumors, and this correlated with increased activating phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 1 (BCAR1). Activation of PTK6 was also detected in human squamous cell carcinomas of the skin. Although PTK6 has roles in normal differentiation, it also contributes to UVB-induced injury and tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:25938342

  8. Distinct Malignant Behaviors of Mouse Myogenic Tumors Induced by Different Oncogenetic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hettmer, Simone; Bronson, Roderick T.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are heterogeneous cancers with myogenic differentiation features. The cytogenetic and mutational aberrations in RMS are diverse. This study examined differences in the malignant behavior of two genetically distinct and disease-relevant mouse myogenic tumor models. Kras; p1619null myogenic tumors, initiated by expression of oncogenic Kras in p16p19null mouse satellite cells, were metastatic to the lungs of the majority of tumor-bearing animals and repopulated tumors in seven of nine secondary recipients. In contrast, SmoM2 tumors, initiated by ubiquitous expression of a mutant Smoothened allele, did not metastasize and repopulated tumors in 2 of 18 recipients only. In summary, genetically distinct myogenic tumors in mice exhibit marked differences in malignant behavior. PMID:25759794

  9. Metabolic activation of chrysene in mouse skin: evidence for the involvement of a triol-epoxide.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, R M; Weston, A; Grover, P L

    1983-12-01

    All three possible dihydrodiols of chrysene and a chrysene triol, formed from the further metabolism of the chrysene-1,2-diol, were detected when ether extracts of mouse skin that had been treated with 3H-labelled chrysene were examined by h.p.l.c. The major deoxyribonucleoside-hydrocarbon adducts present in hydrolysates of DNA isolated from the mouse skin were examined by chromatography on Sephadex LH20 and by h.p.l.c. on Zorbax ODS. One adduct had chromatographic properties identical to those of the major adduct formed when r-1,t-2-dihydroxy-t-3,4-oxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrochrysene reacts with DNA. A second major adduct was present that had chromatographic properties that were indistinguishable from those of an adduct that was formed when either chrysene-1,2-diol or 3-hydroxychrysene were incubated with DNA in a rat liver microsomal metabolising system. The results provide evidence that this new adduct is formed via the reaction of a 'triol-epoxide', that appears to be 9-hydroxy-chrysene-1,2-diol 3,4-oxide, with DNA in mouse skin.

  10. Isoflavonoid photoprotection in mouse and human skin is dependent on metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Widyarini, Sitarina; Allanson, Munif; Gallagher, Nerida L; Pedley, Julie; Boyle, Glen M; Parsons, Peter G; Whiteman, David C; Walker, Catherine; Reeve, Vivienne E

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies report that selected topical isoflavonoids are immunoprotective in both mice and humans, when applied following UV irradiation. Isoflavonoids have documented antioxidant activity, but their mechanism of immunomodulation remains unclear. This study examines whether photoimmunoprotection by the isoflavonoids might result from their interaction with one cutaneous antioxidant known to modulate UV photodamage, metallothionein (MT). In mice bearing a null mutation for MT-I and -II, we found that immunoprotection by the isoflavonoid 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavane (equol) against solar-simulated UV radiation (SSUV) or exogenous cis-urocanic acid was abrogated. Topical equol did not activate MT expression in normal mouse skin, but markedly enhanced the increase in MT expression in murine epidermis following SSUV irradiation. Normal human skin, unlike murine, expressed MT in the basal epidermis. Following SSUV irradiation, topical application of the related synthetic isoflavonoid NV-07alpha to human skin also markedly enhanced epidermal MT expression. The NV-07alpha has been reported previously to protect humans against the UV suppression of Mantoux reactions. Thus, epidermal MT expression appears to protect against photoimmunosuppression in both human and mouse skin. We speculate that equol and its related derivative NV-07alpha may activate the MT gene synergistically with SSUV, to produce the enhanced immunoprotective effect.

  11. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. PMID:25791923

  12. Squaraine PDT induces oxidative stress in skin tumor of swiss albino mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibin, T. R.; Gayathri, Devi D.; Ramaiah, D.; Abraham, Annie

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using a sensitizing drug is recognized as a promising medical technique for cancer treatment. It is a two step process that requires the administration of a photosensitizer followed by light exposure to treat a disease. Following light exposure the photosensitizer is excited to a higher energy state which generates free radicals and singlet oxygen. The present study was carried out to assess the oxidative damage induced by bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6- trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine in skin tumor tissues of mice with/ without light treatment. Skin tumor was induced using 7, 12-Dimethyl Benz(a)anthracene and croton oil. The tumor bearing mice were given an intraperitoneal injection with the squaraine dye. After 24h, the tumor area of a few animals injected with the dye, were exposed to visible light from a 1000 W halogen lamp and others kept away from light. All the mice were sacrificed one week after the PDT treatment and the oxidative profile was analyzed (TBARS, SOD, catalase, GSH, GPx and GR) in tumor/ skin tissues. The dye induces oxidative stress in the tumor site only on illumination and the oxidative status of the tumor tissue was found to be unaltered in the absence of light. The results of the study clearly shows that the tumor destruction mediated by PDT using bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6-trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine as a photosensitizer is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species, produced by the light induced changes in the dye.

  13. Multiple tumor types appear in a transgenic mouse with the ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, R. D.; Leder, A.; Kuo, A.; Pattengale, P. K.; Leder, P.

    1993-01-01

    A transgenic mouse strain with the zeta-globin promoter and the vHa-ras oncogene develops an array of mesenchymal and epithelial neoplasms described here. The predominate mesenchymal tumors were dermal spindle cell tumors, which resembled malignant fibrous histiocytomas found in humans. They were associated with hepatosplenomegaly and developed beneath squamous papillomas. The hepatosplenomegaly was associated with infiltrates of cells that tended toward myelocytic or monocytic differentiation. Other epithelial tumors included keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Squamous cysts, some with squamous cell carcinomas, of the salivary glands and mammary carcinomas were also found. Odontogenic tumors, which sometimes differentiated into ameloblastomas, were one of the more unusual tumor types observed. Other, less frequent tumors were also noted. The tumors described here are a potentially valuable experimental resource that may lead to an understanding of malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like lesions, odontogenic tumors, and tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8475993

  14. Cutaneous Surgical Denervation: A Method for Testing the Requirement for Nerves in Mouse Models of Skin Disease.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelby C; Brownell, Isaac; Wong, Sunny Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous somatosensory nerves function to detect diverse stimuli that act upon the skin. In addition to their established sensory roles, recent studies have suggested that nerves may also modulate skin disorders including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and cancer. Here, we describe protocols for testing the requirement for nerves in maintaining a cutaneous mechanosensory organ, the touch dome (TD). Specifically, we discuss methods for genetically labeling, harvesting and visualizing TDs by whole-mount staining, and for performing unilateral surgical denervation on mouse dorsal back skin. Together, these approaches can be used to directly compare TD morphology and gene expression in denervated as well as sham-operated skin from the same animal. These methods can also be readily adapted to examine the requirement for nerves in mouse models of skin pathology. Finally, the ability to repeatedly sample the skin provides an opportunity to monitor disease progression at different stages and times after initiation. PMID:27404892

  15. Dose-Dependent Onset of Regenerative Program in Neutron Irradiated Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Artibani, Mara; Kobos, Katarzyna; Colautti, Paolo; Negri, Rodolfo; Amendola, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Tissue response to irradiation is not easily recapitulated by cell culture studies. The objective of this investigation was to characterize, the transcriptional response and the onset of regenerative processes in mouse skin irradiated with different doses of fast neutrons. Methodology/Principal Findings To monitor general response to irradiation and individual animal to animal variation, we performed gene and protein expression analysis with both pooled and individual mouse samples. A high-throughput gene expression analysis, by DNA oligonucleotide microarray was done with three months old C57Bl/6 mice irradiated with 0.2 and 1 Gy of mono-energetic 14 MeV neutron compared to sham irradiated controls. The results on 440 irradiation modulated genes, partially validated by quantitative real time RT-PCR, showed a dose-dependent up-regulation of a sub-class of keratin and keratin associated proteins, and members of the S100 family of Ca2+-binding proteins. Immunohistochemistry confirmed mRNA expression data enabled mapping of protein expression. Interestingly, proteins up-regulated in thickening epidermis: keratin 6 and S100A8 showed the most significant up-regulation and the least mouse-to-mouse variation following 0.2 Gy irradiation, in a concerted effort toward skin tissue regeneration. Conversely, mice irradiated at 1 Gy showed most evidence of apoptosis (Caspase-3 and TUNEL staining) and most 8-oxo-G accumulation at 24 h post-irradiation. Moreover, no cell proliferation accompanied 1 Gy exposure as shown by Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Conclusions/Significance The dose-dependent differential gene expression at the tissue level following in vivo exposure to neutron radiation is reminiscent of the onset of re-epithelialization and wound healing and depends on the proportion of cells carrying multiple chromosomal lesions in the entire tissue. Thus, this study presents in vivo evidence of a skin regenerative program exerted independently from DNA repair

  16. Detection of coding microsatellite frameshift mutations in DNA mismatch repair-deficient mouse intestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Stefan M; Tosti, Elena; Yuan, Yan P; Kloor, Matthias; Bork, Peer; Edelmann, Winfried; Gebert, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Different DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient mouse strains have been developed as models for the inherited cancer predisposing Lynch syndrome. It is completely unresolved, whether coding mononucleotide repeat (cMNR) gene mutations in these mice can contribute to intestinal tumorigenesis and whether MMR-deficient mice are a suitable molecular model of human microsatellite instability (MSI)-associated intestinal tumorigenesis. A proof-of-principle study was performed to identify mouse cMNR-harboring genes affected by insertion/deletion mutations in MSI murine intestinal tumors. Bioinformatic algorithms were developed to establish a database of mouse cMNR-harboring genes. A panel of five mouse noncoding mononucleotide markers was used for MSI classification of intestinal matched normal/tumor tissues from MMR-deficient (Mlh1(-/-) , Msh2(-/-) , Msh2(LoxP/LoxP) ) mice. cMNR frameshift mutations of candidate genes were determined by DNA fragment analysis. Murine MSI intestinal tumors but not normal tissues from MMR-deficient mice showed cMNR frameshift mutations in six candidate genes (Elavl3, Tmem107, Glis2, Sdccag1, Senp6, Rfc3). cMNRs of mouse Rfc3 and Elavl3 are conserved in type and length in their human orthologs that are known to be mutated in human MSI colorectal, endometrial and gastric cancer. We provide evidence for the utility of a mononucleotide marker panel for detection of MSI in murine tumors, the existence of cMNR instability in MSI murine tumors, the utility of mouse subspecies DNA for identification of polymorphic repeats, and repeat conservation among some orthologous human/mouse genes, two of them showing instability in human and mouse MSI intestinal tumors. MMR-deficient mice hence are a useful molecular model system for analyzing MSI intestinal carcinogenesis.

  17. The use of reflectance confocal microscopy for examination of benign and malignant skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wielowieyska-Szybińska, Dorota; Białek-Galas, Kamila; Podolec, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a modern, non-invasive diagnostic method that enables real-time imaging of epidermis and upper layers of the dermis with a nearly histological precision and high contrast. The application of this technology in skin imaging in the last few years has resulted in the progress of dermatological diagnosis, providing virtual access to the living skin erasing the need for conventional histopathology. The RCM has a potential of wide application in the dermatological diagnostic process with a particular reference to benign and malignant skin tumors. This article provides a summary of the latest reports and previous achievements in the field of RCM application in the diagnostic process of skin neoplasms. A range of dermatological indications and general characteristics of confocal images in various types of tumors are presented. PMID:25610353

  18. Oral Supplementation with Cocoa Extract Reduces UVB-Induced Wrinkles in Hairless Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Song, Dasom; Kim, Junil; Choi, Jina; Kim, Jong Rhan; Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Bae, Jung-Soo; Han, Mira; Lee, Sein; Hong, Ji Sun; Song, Dayoung; Kim, Seong-Jin; Son, Myoung-Jin; Choi, Sang-Woon; Chung, Jin Ho; Kim, Tae-Aug; Lee, Ki Won

    2016-05-01

    Cacao beans contain various bioactive phytochemicals that could modify the pathogeneses of certain diseases. Here, we report that oral administration of cacao powder (CP) attenuates UVB-induced skin wrinkling by the regulation of genes involved in dermal matrix production and maintenance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that 788 genes are down- or upregulated in the CP supplemented group, compared with the UVB-irradiated mouse skin controls. Among the differentially expressed genes, cathepsin G and serpin B6c play important roles in UVB-induced skin wrinkle formation. Gene regulatory network analysis also identified several candidate regulators responsible for the protective effects of CP supplementation against UVB-induced skin damage. CP also elicited antiwrinkle effects via inhibition of UVB-induced matrix metalloproteinases-1 expression in both the human skin equivalent model and human dermal fibroblasts. Inhibition of UVB-induced activator protein-1 via CP supplementation is likely to affect the expression of matrix metalloproteinases-1. CP supplementation also downregulates the expression of cathepsin G in human dermal fibroblasts. 5-(3',4'-Dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone, a major in vivo metabolite of CP, showed effects similar to CP supplementation. These results suggest that cacao extract may offer a protective effect against photoaging by inhibiting the breakdown of dermal matrix, which leads to an overall reduction in wrinkle formation. PMID:26854493

  19. Inhibition of akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  20. The effect of dietary lipid on skin tumor promotion by benzoyl peroxide: comparison of fish, coconut and corn oil.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-06-01

    Fish or vegetable oils were fed during the promotion stage of a mouse skin carcinogenesis model in order to investigate the effects of dietary fat on tumor development. Two weeks after initiation with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, SENCAR mice were divided into five groups and maintained on one of the following semipurified diets containing 10% total fat and varying the type of fat: 8.5% coconut oil (CT)/1.5% corn oil (CO); 1% menhaden oil (MO)/7.5% CT/1.5% CO; 4% MO/4.5% CT/1.5% CO; 8.5% MO/1.5% CO; or 10% CO. Promotion with twice-weekly applications of 40 mg benzoyl peroxide was begun 2 weeks later and continued for 52 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kcal food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups. Papilloma latency, incidence and yield differed among the diet groups with the group fed the 8.5% CT/1.5% CO diet having the shortest latency and highest papilloma incidence and number. In addition, carcinoma latency and incidence was assessed and the first carcinoma appeared in the group fed 8.5% CT/1.5% CO after 20 weeks of benzoyl peroxide treatment; this group yielded the highest carcinoma incidence throughout the study. In comparison, the group fed the 10% CO diet had the longest latency period, and among the lowest papilloma and carcinoma incidence and fewest tumors. In parallel studies, ornithine decarboxylase activity, vascular permeability and hyperplasia were elevated in the epidermis of benzoyl peroxide-treated mice but the extent of the response did not correlate with the different rates of tumor formation observed among the diet groups. These data indicate that dietary fat modulates tumor promotion by benzoyl peroxide in this skin carcinogenesis model with the predominantly saturated fat diet producing the highest rates of papilloma and carcinogen formation and the polyunsaturated fat diet the lowest.

  1. The effect of dietary lipid on skin tumor promotion by benzoyl peroxide: comparison of fish, coconut and corn oil.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1991-06-01

    Fish or vegetable oils were fed during the promotion stage of a mouse skin carcinogenesis model in order to investigate the effects of dietary fat on tumor development. Two weeks after initiation with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, SENCAR mice were divided into five groups and maintained on one of the following semipurified diets containing 10% total fat and varying the type of fat: 8.5% coconut oil (CT)/1.5% corn oil (CO); 1% menhaden oil (MO)/7.5% CT/1.5% CO; 4% MO/4.5% CT/1.5% CO; 8.5% MO/1.5% CO; or 10% CO. Promotion with twice-weekly applications of 40 mg benzoyl peroxide was begun 2 weeks later and continued for 52 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kcal food consumed or body weights were observed between diet groups. Papilloma latency, incidence and yield differed among the diet groups with the group fed the 8.5% CT/1.5% CO diet having the shortest latency and highest papilloma incidence and number. In addition, carcinoma latency and incidence was assessed and the first carcinoma appeared in the group fed 8.5% CT/1.5% CO after 20 weeks of benzoyl peroxide treatment; this group yielded the highest carcinoma incidence throughout the study. In comparison, the group fed the 10% CO diet had the longest latency period, and among the lowest papilloma and carcinoma incidence and fewest tumors. In parallel studies, ornithine decarboxylase activity, vascular permeability and hyperplasia were elevated in the epidermis of benzoyl peroxide-treated mice but the extent of the response did not correlate with the different rates of tumor formation observed among the diet groups. These data indicate that dietary fat modulates tumor promotion by benzoyl peroxide in this skin carcinogenesis model with the predominantly saturated fat diet producing the highest rates of papilloma and carcinogen formation and the polyunsaturated fat diet the lowest. PMID:1904320

  2. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001). The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  3. Mdm2-p53 signaling regulates epidermal stem cell senescence and premature aging phenotypes in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Hugh S; Donehower, Lawrence A; Lyle, Stephen; Jones, Stephen N

    2011-05-01

    The p53 transcription factor is activated by various types of cell stress or DNA damage and induces the expression of genes that control cell growth and inhibit tumor formation. Analysis of mice that express mutant forms of p53 suggest that inappropriate p53 activation can alter tissue homeostasis and life span, connecting p53 tumor suppressor functions with accelerated aging. However, other mouse models that display increased levels of wildtype p53 in various tissues fail to corroborate a link between p53 and aging phenotypes, possibly due to the retention of signaling pathways that negatively regulate p53 activity in these models. In this present study, we have generated mice lacking Mdm2 in the epidermis. Deletion of Mdm2, the chief negative regulator of p53, induced an aging phenotype in the skin of mice, including thinning of the epidermis, reduced wound healing, and a progressive loss of fur. These phenotypes arise due to an induction of p53-mediated senescence in epidermal stem cells and a gradual loss of epidermal stem cell function. These results reveal that activation of endogenous p53 by ablation of Mdm2 can induce accelerated aging phenotypes in mice.

  4. Dosimetry of PAH skin carcinogenesis: covalent binding of benzo(a)pyrene to mouse epidermal DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.; Holland, J.M.; Rahn, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is metabolized to the chemically reactive anti and syn isomers of the 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxides of BaP (BPDE) which bind covalently to DNA to form DNA/BPDE complexes. Tetrols liberated from the DNA/BPDE complex by acid hydrolysis are easily quantified by h.p.l.c. using fluorescence detection. This approach allows femtomole amounts of BPDE associated with the DNA isolated from a single mouse to be detected using conventional instrumentation. The usefulness of this technique to estimate the interaction of BaP with DNA of mouse skin, both in the intact animal and in organ culture, was investigated. With mouse skin in organ culture it could be demonstrated that: (1) upon a single topical application of 5 ..mu..g of BaP, binding to DNA occurred via BPDE at a linear rate for up to 65 h, (2) the amount of binding was dose dependent at concentrations of BaP <10 ..mu..g.

  5. Efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vad, Nikhil M; Kudugunti, Shashi K; Wang, Hezhen; Bhat, G Jayarama; Moridani, Majid Y

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show that aspirin can act as a chemopreventive agent and decrease the incidences of various cancers including melanoma. In this work, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as an antimelanoma agent in B16-F0 cells and skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor mouse model. Our findings indicate that the IC50 (48 h) for ASA in B16-F0 melanoma cells was 100 μM and that ASA caused a dose- and time-dependent GSH depletion and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c. with 1 × 10(6) B16-F0 melanoma cells. ASA (80, 100, and 150 mg/kg) was initiated on day 1 or day 7, or day 9 after cell inoculation and continued daily for 13, 7, and 5 days, respectively. Animals were weighed daily and sacrificed on day 13. The tumors were excised and weighed. The animals receiving 13 days of ASA therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 1 ± 12%, 19 ± 22%, and 50 ± 29%, respectively. Animals receiving 7 days of therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 12 ± 14%, 27 ± 14%, and 40 ± 14%, respectively. No significant tumor growth inhibition was observed with 5 days of therapy. ASA at 100 and 150 mg/kg caused significant tumor growth inhibition in C57BL/6 mice when administered for 13 and 7 days, respectively. The results obtained in this study are consistent with the recent epidemiologically based report that aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk in humans.

  6. Combined optical coherence tomography based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and histology of mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Shi, Xianghua

    2010-02-01

    Noninvasive measurement technique to obtain tissue optical properties such as the scattering coefficient μs and the anisotropy factor g using optical coherence tomography (OCT) scattering model which based on the Extended Huygens-Fresnel principle is developed in our paper. Older and younger mouse-skin are as animal model to compare its scattering coefficient μs and the anisotropy factor g, the outcome shows that scattering coefficient μs is increased with the age of mouse-skin. Furthermore, we have made age's mouse-skin into H.E stain slices; the result of its morphology is consistent with the OCT imaging and OCT-EHF principle. All of that have provided the theoretical basis which to the research on photo-aging skin and photo-rejuvenation.

  7. Combined autofluorescence and Raman spectroscopy method for skin tumor detection in visible and near infrared regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Artemyev, D. N.; Myakinin, O. O.; Khristoforova, Y. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The combined application of Raman and autofluorescence spectroscopy in visible and near infrared regions for the analysis of malignant neoplasms of human skin was demonstrated. Ex vivo experiments were performed for 130 skin tissue samples: 28 malignant melanomas, 19 basal cell carcinomas, 15 benign tumors, 9 nevi and 59 normal tissues. Proposed method of Raman spectra analysis allows for malignant melanoma differentiating from other skin tissues with accuracy of 84% (sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 72%). Autofluorescence analysis in near infrared and visible regions helped us to increase the diagnostic accuracy by 5-10%. Registration of autofluorescence in near infrared region is realized in one optical unit with Raman spectroscopy. Thus, the proposed method of combined skin tissues study makes possible simultaneous large skin area study with autofluorescence spectra analysis and precise neoplasm type determination with Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Screening of urocanic acid isomers in human basal and squamous cell carcinoma tumors compared with tumor periphery and healthy skin.

    PubMed

    Decara, Juan Manuel; Aguilera, José; Abdala, Roberto; Sánchez, Purificación; Figueroa, Félix L; Herrera, Enrique

    2008-10-01

    Trans-urocanic acid is a major chromophore for ultraviolet (UV) radiation in human epidermis. The UV induces photoisomerization of trans-urocanic acid (tUCA) form to cis-urocanic acid (cUCA) and has been reported as an important mediator in the immunosuppression induced by UV. This immunomodulation has been recognized as an important factor related to skin cancer development. This is the first time that UCA isomers have been measured in epidermis of skin biopsies from patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and compared with the tumor periphery and biopsies of healthy photoexposed and non-photoexposed skin as controls. The UCA isomers were separated and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. Analysis of UCA in healthy skin showed significant increase in total UCA content in non-photoexposed body sites compared with highly exposed skins. In contrast, the percentage of cUCA was higher in photoexposed body sites. Maximal levels of cUCA were found in cheek, forehead and forearm and lower levels in abdomen and thigh. No differences were found in total UCA concentration between the tumor samples and healthy photoexposed skin. However, differences were found in relation between isomers. Higher levels of cUCA were detected in SCC biopsies (44% of total UCA) compared with samples of BCC and that of healthy photoexposed skin (30%). These results suggest that the UV radiation exposure, a main factor in development of SCC can be mediated, apart from direct effect to cells (DNA damage), by immunosuppression pathways mediated by high production of cUCA. PMID:18312386

  9. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF PLASMA-CELL TUMORS OF THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, D. F.; Darden, E. B.; Lindsley, D. L.; Pratt, Guthrie T.

    1961-01-01

    An electron microscope study was made of a series of transplanted MPC-1 plasma-cell tumors carried by BALB/c mice. Large numbers of particles similar in morphology to virus particles were present inside the endoplasmic reticulum of tumor plasma cells. Very few particles were seen outside the cells or in ultracentrifuged preparations of the plasma or ascites fluid. In very early tumors particles were occasionally seen free in the cytoplasm adjacent to finely granular material. In general, the distribution of these particles inside endoplasmic reticulum is similar in early and late tumors. A few transplanted X5563 tumors of C3H mice were also examined. Large numbers of particles were found in the region of the Golgi apparatus in late X5663 tumors. A newly described cytoplasmic structure of plasma cells, here called a "granular body," appears to be associated with the formation of the particles. Particles present in MPC-1 tumors are exclusively of a doughnut form, whereas some of those in the inclusions of the late X5563 tumors show a dense center. Normal plasma cells, produced by inoculation of a modified Freund adjuvant into BALB/c mice. have been compared morphologically with tumor plasma cells of both tumor lines. PMID:13733008

  10. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  11. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development.

  12. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development. PMID:21224071

  13. Unexpected Reduction of Skin Tumorigenesis on Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 in Mouse Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development. PMID:21224071

  14. Patient-derived xenograft mouse models of pseudomyxoma peritonei recapitulate the human inflammatory tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kuracha, Murali R; Thomas, Peter; Loggie, Brian W; Govindarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a neoplastic syndrome characterized by peritoneal tumor implants with copious mucinous ascites. The standard of care for PMP patients is aggressive cytoreductive surgery performed in conjunction with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Not all patients are candidates for these procedures and a majority of the patients will have recurrent disease. In addition to secreted mucin, inflammation and fibrosis are central to PMP pathogenesis but the molecular processes that regulate tumor-stromal interactions within the peritoneal tumor microenvironment remain largely unknown. This knowledge is critical not only to elucidate PMP pathobiology but also to identify novel targets for therapy. Here, we report the generation of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models for PMP and assess the ability of these models to replicate the inflammatory peritoneal microenvironment of human PMP patients. PDX mouse models of low- and high-grade PMP were generated and were of a similar histopathology as human PMP. Cytokines previously shown to be elevated in human PMP were also elevated in PDX ascites. Significant differences in IL-6 and IL-8/KC/MIP2 were seen between human and PDX ascites. Interestingly, these cytokines were mostly secreted by mouse-derived, tumor-associated stromal cells rather than by human-derived PMP tumor cells. Our data suggest that the PMP PDX mouse models are especially suited to the study of tumor-stromal interactions that regulate the peritoneal inflammatory environment in PMP as the tumor and stromal cells in these mouse models are of human and murine origins, respectively. These mouse models are therefore, likely to be useful in vivo surrogates for testing and developing novel therapeutic treatment interventions for PMP.

  15. Rare Skin Adnexal and Melanocytic Tumors Arising in Ovarian Mature Cystic Teratomas: A Report of 3 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Moulla, Alexandra A; Magdy, Nesreen; Francis, Nicholas; Taube, Janis; Ronnett, Brigitte M; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2016-09-01

    Mature teratoma of the ovary is the most common primary ovarian tumor accounting for 15% (10%-20%) of all ovarian neoplasms. Skin and skin adnexal structures are the most common elements identified in mature teratomas. Benign and malignant skin tumors can arise in ovarian teratomas, the most common being epithelial tumors. Melanocytic and adnexal tumors developing in a teratoma are rare and can be easily overlooked. We report 3 cases and review melanocytic and skin adnexal tumors encountered in ovarian teratomas.

  16. Enalapril and ASS inhibit tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fendrich, V; Lopez, C L; Manoharan, J; Maschuw, K; Wichmann, S; Baier, A; Holler, J P; Ramaswamy, A; Bartsch, D K; Waldmann, J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for angiotensin-converting enzymes involving the angiotensin II-receptor 1 (AT1-R) and the cyclooxygenase pathway in carcinogenesis. The effects of ASS and enalapril were assessed in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs). The effects of enalapril and ASS on proliferation and expression of the AGTR1A and its target gene vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) were assessed in the neuroendocrine cell line BON1. Rip1-Tag2 mice were treated daily with either 0.6 mg/kg bodyweight of enalapril i.p., 20 mg/kg bodyweight of ASS i.p., or a vehicle in a prevention (weeks 5-12) and a survival group (week 5 till death). Tumor surface, weight of pancreatic glands, immunostaining for AT1-R and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB), and mice survival were analyzed. In addition, sections from human specimens of 20 insulinomas, ten gastrinomas, and 12 non-functional pNENs were evaluated for AT1-R and NFKB (NFKB1) expression and grouped according to the current WHO classification. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in BON1 cells, with the combination being the most effective. Treatment with enalapril and ASS led to significant downregulation of known target genes Vegf and Rela at RNA level. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by enalapril and ASS in the prevention group displayed by a reduction of tumor size (84%/67%) and number (30%/45%). Furthermore, daily treatment with enalapril and ASS prolonged the overall median survival compared with vehicle-treated Rip1-Tag2 (107 days) mice by 9 and 17 days (P=0.016 and P=0.013). The AT1-R and the inflammatory transcription factor NFKB were abolished completely upon enalapril and ASS treatment. AT1-R and NFKB expressions were observed in 80% of human pNENs. Enalapril and ASS may provide an approach for chemoprevention and treatment of pNENs.

  17. Transdermal drug targeting and functional imaging of tumor blood vessels in the mouse auricle.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Hannes; Komljenovic, Dorde; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneously growing tumors are widely utilized to study tumor angiogenesis and the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapies in mice. To additionally assess functional and morphologic alterations of the vasculature in the periphery of a growing tumor, we exploited the easily accessible and hierarchically organized vasculature of the mouse auricle. By site-specific subcutaneous implantation of a defined preformed mouse B16/F0 melanoma aggregate, a solid tumor nodule developed within 14 d. Growth of the tumor nodule was accompanied by a 4-fold increase in its perfusion as well as a 2- to 4-fold elevated diameter and perfusion of peripheral blood vessels that had connected to the tumor capillary microvasculature. By transdermal application of the anticancer drug bortezomib, tumor growth was significantly diminished by about 50% without provoking side effects. Moreover, perfusion and tumor microvessel diameter as well as growth and perfusion of arterial or venous blood vessels supplying or draining the tumor microvasculature were decreased under these conditions by up to 80%. Collectively, we observed that the progressive tumor growth is accompanied by the enlargement of supplying and draining extratumoral blood vessels. This process was effectively suppressed by bortezomib, thereby restricting the perfusion capacity of both extra and intratumoral blood vessels. PMID:26546130

  18. Tumorigenesis in athymic nude mouse skin by chemical carcinogens and ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.M.; Rice, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of established skin tumorigenesis protocols were tested for efficacy on athymic nu/nu mice (BALB/c background) and compared on euthymic nu/+ counterparts. Chemical carcinogens and UV light were applied to the ears of 10 mice of each sex and genotype for each group. Treatments were: 0.5 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene ((DMBA) CAS: 57-97-6) to each ear; 0.125 mg DMBA to each ear, followed by 0.1 microgram 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate ((TPA) CAS: 16561-29-8) twice weekly for 56 weeks; 0.2 mg N-nitroso-N-methylurea ((NMU) CAS: 684-93-5; 1% in acetone, 20 microliter) to each ear; 0.1 mg NMU to each ear weekly for 30 weeks; 0.2 mg NMU to each ear, followed by TPA twice weekly for 56 weeks; two ip doses of N-nitroso-N-ethylurea ((NEU) CAS: 759-73-9; 25 mg/kg each), followed by TPA twice weekly topically for 56 weeks; and exposure to sunlamps (250- to 400-nm emission) two or three times per week for 20 weeks, for a total dose of 3.7 X 10(5) J/m2. The chemical treatments caused mainly squamous papillomas and carcinomas, sebaceous adenomas and adenocarcinomas, and basal cell tumors, which appeared both on the skin of the ears and elsewhere. UV light caused squamous tumors, basal cell tumors, and sarcomas. Ear skin of the nu/nu mice developed significantly more squamous tumors than those of nu/+ mice after DMBA-TPA, NMU-TPA, NEU-TPA, repeated NMU, or UV light. Similar results were obtained for the skin of the heads and bodies. Even a single dose of NMU caused a few tumors on the nude, but not the euthymic, mice. A single dose of DMBA caused primarily sebaceous adenomas, distributed at random over the entire bodies. These results show that, contrary to previous reports, nude mice are sensitive to skin tumorigenesis, more so than euthymic nu/+ mice similarly exposed to diverse types of carcinogen and treatment protocols.

  19. Compressive viscoelasticity of freshly excised mouse skin is dependent on specimen thickness, strain level and rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin's mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin's viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s-1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity.

  20. Hexahydro-β-acids potently inhibit 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced skin inflammation and tumor promotion in mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chung-Huei; Ho, Yuan-Soon; Lai, Ching-Shu; Hsieh, Shu-Chen; Chen, Li-Hua; Lin, Edwin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-11-27

    We previously reported that hexahydro-beta-acids (HBAs), reduced derivatives of beta-acids (BA) from hop (Humulus lupulus L.), displayed more potent anti-inflammatory activity than BA in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophages. In this study, we investigated the effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of hexahydro-β-acids (HBAs) on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-stimulated mouse skin inflammation and in the two-stage carcinogenesis model. Female ICR mice pretreated with HBA at 1 and 10 μg significantly reduced ear edema, epidermal hyperplasia, and infiltration of inflammatory cells caused by TPA. Molecular analysis exhibited that HBA suppressed iNOS, COX-2, and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) protein and gene expression through interfering with mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatidylinositiol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling as well as the activation of transcription factor NF-κB. Furthermore, application of HBA (1 and 10 μg) prior to each TPA treatment (17.2 ± 0.9 tumors/mouse) resulted in the significant reduction of tumor multiplicity (5.1 ± 1.2, P < 0.01 and 2.3 ± 1.2, P < 0.001, respectively) in 7,12-dimethyl-benzanthracene (DMBA)-initiated mouse skin. The tumor incidence was significantly lowered to 75% (P < 0.05) and 58.7% (P < 0.01) by HBA pretreatment, respectively, and significantly reduced the tumor weight (0.34 ± 0.14 g, P < 0.01 and 0.09 ± 0.10 g, P < 0.001, respectively) as compared to DMBA/TPA-induced tumors (0.76 ± 0.04 g).

  1. Phenotype diversity in familial cylindromatosis: a frameshift mutation in the tumor suppressor gene CYLD underlies different tumors of skin appendages.

    PubMed

    Poblete Gutiérrez, Pamela; Eggermann, Thomas; Höller, Daniela; Jugert, Frank K; Beermann, Torsten; Grussendorf-Conen, Elke-Ingrid; Zerres, Klaus; Merk, Hans F; Frank, Jorge

    2002-08-01

    Familial cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome; Brooke-Spiegler syndrome) (OMIM numbers 123850, 132700, 313100, and 605041) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited tumor syndrome. The disorder can present with cutaneous adnexal tumors such as cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas, and spiradenomas, and tumors preferably develop in hairy areas of the body such as head and neck. In affected families, mutations have been demonstrated in the CYLD gene located on chromosome 16q12-13 and reveal the characteristic attributes of a tumor suppressor. Here, we studied familial cylindromatosis in a multigeneration family of German origin. Clinically, some individuals only revealed discrete small skin-colored tumors localized in the nasolabial region whereas one family member showed expansion of multiple big tumors on the trunk and in a turban-like fashion on the scalp. Histologically, cylindromas as well as epithelioma adenoides cysticum were found. We detected a frameshift mutation in the CYLD gene, designated 2253delG, underlying the disorder and were able to show that a single mutation can result in distinct clinical and histologic expression in familial cylindromatosis. The reasons for different expression patterns of the same genetic defect in this disease remain elusive, however. Identification of mutations in the CYLD gene enable us to rapidly confirm putative diagnoses on the genetic level and to provide affected families with genetic counseling.

  2. POULTRY SKIN TUMOR DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL REFLECTANCE IMAGES BY COMBINING CLASSIFIERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a new method for detecting poultry skin tumors in hyperspectral reflectance images. We employ the principal component analysis (PCA), discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and kernel discriminant analysis (KDA) to extract the independent feature sets in hyperspectral reflectance imag...

  3. Changes in the spectral index of skin-surface laser Doppler signals of nude mice following the injection of CT26 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsiu, Hsin; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Hung-Chi; Kuo, Chung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated microcirculatory-blood-flow responses in nude mice following the injection of CT26 tumor cells by analyzing the frequency content of skin blood-flow signals recorded on the skin surface. CT26 cells were injected subcutaneously (10^4/100 μl) into the right back flank of each 7-week-old mouse. Three-minute laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals were measured in 60 nude mice. The data sequences were obtained at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after injecting CT26 cells. Mouse tissue samples were cut into sections and examined microscopically to determine the condition of cancer metastasis. Spectral analysis performed after 1 week revealed a significant decrease in the relative energy contribution of the endothelium-related frequency band, and significant increases in those of the myogenic and respiration-related frequency bands of the LDF signals in the metastasis group (n=12). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of evaluating metastasis in animal subjects based on changes in noninvasively measured LDF parameters. Changes in the LDF spectral indexes can be attributed to differences in the microcirculatory regulatory activities. The present measurements performed on the skin surface provide a noninvasive and real-time method for evaluating the microcirculatory responses induced by implanting CT26 tumor cells.

  4. Changes in the spectral index of skin-surface laser Doppler signals of nude mice following the injection of CT26 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsiu, Hsin; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Hung-Chi; Kuo, Chung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated microcirculatory-blood-flow responses in nude mice following the injection of CT26 tumor cells by analyzing the frequency content of skin blood-flow signals recorded on the skin surface. CT26 cells were injected subcutaneously (10^4/100 μl) into the right back flank of each 7-week-old mouse. Three-minute laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals were measured in 60 nude mice. The data sequences were obtained at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after injecting CT26 cells. Mouse tissue samples were cut into sections and examined microscopically to determine the condition of cancer metastasis. Spectral analysis performed after 1 week revealed a significant decrease in the relative energy contribution of the endothelium-related frequency band, and significant increases in those of the myogenic and respiration-related frequency bands of the LDF signals in the metastasis group (n=12). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of evaluating metastasis in animal subjects based on changes in noninvasively measured LDF parameters. Changes in the LDF spectral indexes can be attributed to differences in the microcirculatory regulatory activities. The present measurements performed on the skin surface provide a noninvasive and real-time method for evaluating the microcirculatory responses induced by implanting CT26 tumor cells. PMID:27648367

  5. Changes in the spectral index of skin-surface laser Doppler signals of nude mice following the injection of CT26 tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsiu, Hsin; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Tsai, Hung-Chi; Kuo, Chung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated microcirculatory-blood-flow responses in nude mice following the injection of CT26 tumor cells by analyzing the frequency content of skin blood-flow signals recorded on the skin surface. CT26 cells were injected subcutaneously (10^4/100 μl) into the right back flank of each 7-week-old mouse. Three-minute laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals were measured in 60 nude mice. The data sequences were obtained at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after injecting CT26 cells. Mouse tissue samples were cut into sections and examined microscopically to determine the condition of cancer metastasis. Spectral analysis performed after 1 week revealed a significant decrease in the relative energy contribution of the endothelium-related frequency band, and significant increases in those of the myogenic and respiration-related frequency bands of the LDF signals in the metastasis group (n=12). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of evaluating metastasis in animal subjects based on changes in noninvasively measured LDF parameters. Changes in the LDF spectral indexes can be attributed to differences in the microcirculatory regulatory activities. The present measurements performed on the skin surface provide a noninvasive and real-time method for evaluating the microcirculatory responses induced by implanting CT26 tumor cells. PMID:27648367

  6. Sarcophine-diol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent, inhibits proliferation and stimulates apoptosis in mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Pawel T; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Ahmed, Safwat A; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham

    2012-01-01

    Sarcodiol (SD) is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enhances fragmentation of DNA. We also evaluated the antitumor effect of SD on melanoma cell viability using several biomarkers for cell proliferation and apoptosis. SD inhibits the expression levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription protein (STAT-3) and cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4). SD treatment also enhances cellular level of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and stimulates cleavage of the nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cleaved-PARP). SD also enhances cellular levels of cleaved Caspase-3, -8, -9 and stimulates enzymatic activities of Caspase-3, -8 and -9. These results, in addition to inhibition of cell viability, suggest that SD inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by arresting the cell-division cycle in a Go quiescent phase and activates programmed cell death (apoptosis) via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Finally, these studies demonstrate that SD shows a very promising chemopreventive effect in melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ tumor cells.

  7. Sarcophine-diol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent, inhibits proliferation and stimulates apoptosis in mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Pawel T; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Ahmed, Safwat A; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham

    2012-01-01

    Sarcodiol (SD) is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enhances fragmentation of DNA. We also evaluated the antitumor effect of SD on melanoma cell viability using several biomarkers for cell proliferation and apoptosis. SD inhibits the expression levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription protein (STAT-3) and cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4). SD treatment also enhances cellular level of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and stimulates cleavage of the nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cleaved-PARP). SD also enhances cellular levels of cleaved Caspase-3, -8, -9 and stimulates enzymatic activities of Caspase-3, -8 and -9. These results, in addition to inhibition of cell viability, suggest that SD inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by arresting the cell-division cycle in a Go quiescent phase and activates programmed cell death (apoptosis) via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Finally, these studies demonstrate that SD shows a very promising chemopreventive effect in melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ tumor cells. PMID:22363217

  8. Infiltration by inflammatory cells required for solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation enhancement of skin tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sluyter, R; Halliday, G M

    2001-05-01

    In this study we compared the effects of subinflammatory and inflammatory doses of solar-simulated ultraviolet (UV) radiation on enhancement of skin tumor growth, sensitization to haptens and cellular changes within the epidermis of C3H/HeN mice. Tumors transplanted into mice 3 days after exposure to inflammatory, but not subinflammatory, doses of UV radiation had a higher growth rate than those tumors inoculated into unirradiated control mice. Both doses of UV radiation suppressed the induction of contact hypersensitivity and induced tolerance when hapten was painted onto the skin 3 days after irradiation. Skin exposed to the higher, but not the lower, dose of UV radiation contained significantly increased numbers of CD11b+, CD45+ MHC class II- and CD45+ MHC class II(hi) inflammatory cells 3 days post-irradiation. The immunosuppression correlated with a reduction in Langerhans cells and dendritic epidermal T cells. Collectively, this suggests that suppression to contact sensitizers is due to the UV radiation effects on Langerhans cells and dendritic epidermal T cells. While these effects may also suppress the induction of anti-tumor immunity, at higher doses of UV radiation inflammatory cells may enhance tumor growth by a non-immunological mechanism.

  9. Familial skin cancer syndromes: Increased risk of nonmelanotic skin cancers and extracutaneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Jaju, Prajakta D; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-03-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) represent the most common malignancies worldwide, with reported incidence rising each year. Both cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as other NMSCs, represent complex diseases with a combination of environmental and genetic risk factors. In general, hereditary cancer syndromes that increase the risk of NMSC fall under several broad categories: those associated with immunodeficiencies, those that affect skin pigmentation, and those that perturb key molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of NMSCs. Many of the syndromes are also associated with extracutaneous manifestations, including internal malignancies; therefore, most require a multidisciplinary management approach with a medical geneticist. Finally, dermatologists play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of these conditions, because cutaneous findings are often the presenting manifestations of disease.

  10. Familial skin cancer syndromes: Increased risk of nonmelanotic skin cancers and extracutaneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Jaju, Prajakta D; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Tang, Jean Y; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-03-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) represent the most common malignancies worldwide, with reported incidence rising each year. Both cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as other NMSCs, represent complex diseases with a combination of environmental and genetic risk factors. In general, hereditary cancer syndromes that increase the risk of NMSC fall under several broad categories: those associated with immunodeficiencies, those that affect skin pigmentation, and those that perturb key molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of NMSCs. Many of the syndromes are also associated with extracutaneous manifestations, including internal malignancies; therefore, most require a multidisciplinary management approach with a medical geneticist. Finally, dermatologists play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of these conditions, because cutaneous findings are often the presenting manifestations of disease. PMID:26892653

  11. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  12. Retinoic acid and mouse skin morphogenesis. II. Role of epidermal competence in hair glandular metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Viallet, J P; Dhouailly, D

    1994-11-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) has marked effects on mouse upper-lip skin morphogenesis, leading to the development of glomerular gland instead of hair vibrissa follicle, but does not apparently change the dorsal pelage hair developmental program. In order to test the hypothesis that an up-regulation of the beta retinoic acid nuclear receptor (RAR beta) may be implicated in the alteration of the dermal-epidermal interactions which occur during cutaneous appendage development, RA-treated and untreated skin explants, controls as well as heterotopic recombinants, were made among nasal, upper-lip, and dorsal mouse embryonic tissues. They were analyzed by in situ hybridization with RAR beta 35S-labeled probe after 48 hr of in vitro culture as well as by identification of the morphological phenotype of cutaneous appendages after 6 additional days of culture on the chick chorioallantoic membrane. The results show that only mesenchyme from the facial region can express the RAR beta gene either normally or after RA treatment, depending on its nasal or upper-lip origin. However, the RAR beta up-regulation is unrelated to hair glandular metaplasia, which depends both on a glandular bias of the upper-lip epidermis and on the weakening of hair follicle-inducing dermal properties. The latter occurs in both the upper-lip and dorsal dermis as a consequence of RA treatment.

  13. Bromelain inhibits COX-2 expression by blocking the activation of MAPK regulated NF-kappa B against skin tumor-initiation triggering mitochondrial death pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhui, Kulpreet; Prasad, Sahdeo; George, Jasmine; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-09-18

    Chemoprevention impels the pursuit for either single targeted or cocktail of multi-targeted agents. Bromelain, potential agent in this regard, is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and fruits of pineapple (Ananas cosmosus), endowed with anti-inflammatory, anti-invasive and anti-metastatic properties. Herein, we report the anti tumor-initiating effects of bromelain in 2-stage mouse skin tumorigenesis model. Pre-treatment of bromelain resulted in reduction in cumulative number of tumors (CNT) and average number of tumors per mouse. Preventive effect was also comprehended in terms of reduction in tumor volume up to a tune of approximately 65%. Components of the cell signaling pathways, connecting proteins involved in cell death were targeted. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in Bcl-2. A marked inhibition in cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression and inactivation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) was recorded, as phosphorylation and consequent degradation of I kappa B alpha was blocked by bromelain. Also, bromelain treatment curtailed extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt activity. The basis of anti tumor-initiating activity of bromelain was revealed by its time dependent reduction in DNA nick formation and increase in percentage prevention. Thus, modulation of inappropriate cell signaling cascades driven by bromelain is a coherent approach in achieving chemoprevention.

  14. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    PubMed Central

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  15. Lung tumor promotion by chromium-containing welding particulate matter in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiology suggests that occupational exposure to welding particulate matter (PM) may increase lung cancer risk. However, animal studies are lacking to conclusively link welding with an increased risk. PM derived from stainless steel (SS) welding contains carcinogenic metals such as hexavalent chromium and nickel. We hypothesized that welding PM may act as a tumor promoter and increase lung tumor multiplicity in vivo. Therefore, the capacity of chromium-containing gas metal arc (GMA)-SS welding PM to promote lung tumors was evaluated using a two-stage (initiation-promotion) model in lung tumor susceptible A/J mice. Methods Male mice (n = 28-30/group) were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA;10 μg/g; IP) or vehicle (corn oil) followed by 5 weekly pharyngeal aspirations of GMA-SS (340 or 680 μg/exposure) or PBS. Lung tumors were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. Results MCA initiation followed by GMA-SS welding PM exposure promoted tumor multiplicity in both the low (12.1 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse) and high (14.0 ± 1.8 tumors/mouse) exposure groups significantly above MCA/sham (4.77 ± 0.7 tumors/mouse; p = 0.0001). Multiplicity was also highly significant (p < 0.004) across all individual lung regions of GMA-SS-exposed mice. No exposure effects were found in the corn oil groups at 30 weeks. Histopathology confirmed the gross findings and revealed increased inflammation and a greater number of malignant lesions in the MCA/welding PM-exposed groups. Conclusions GMA-SS welding PM acts as a lung tumor promoter in vivo. Thus, this study provides animal evidence to support the epidemiological data that show welders have an increased lung cancer risk. PMID:24107379

  16. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  17. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  18. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D.; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M. S.; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  19. High Resolution X-Ray Microangiography of 4T1 Tumor in Mouse Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Jianqi; Liu Ping; Gu Xiang; Liu Xiaoxia; Zhao Jun; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-07-23

    Angiogenesis is very important in tumor growth and metastasis. But in clinic, only vessels lager than 200 {mu}m in diameter, can be observed using conventional medical imaging. Synchrotron radiation (SR) phase contrast imaging, whose spatial resolution can reach as high as 1 {mu}m, has great advantages in imaging soft tissue structures, such as blood vessels and tumor tissues. In this paper, the morphology of newly formed micro-vessels in the mouse 4T1 tumor samples was firstly studied with contrast agent. Then, the angiogenesis in nude mice tumor window model was observed without contrast agent using the SR phase contrast imaging at the beamline for X-ray imaging and biomedical applications, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The images of tumors showed dense, irregular and tortuous tumor micro-vessels with the smallest size of 20-30 {mu}m in diameter.

  20. Mouse mammary tumors display Stat3 activation dependent on leukemia inhibitory factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quaglino, Ana; Schere-Levy, Carolina; Romorini, Leonardo; Meiss, Roberto P; Kordon, Edith C

    2007-01-01

    Introduction It has been demonstrated that leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induces epithelium apoptosis through Stat3 activation during mouse mammary gland involution. In contrast, it has been shown that this transcription factor is commonly activated in breast cancer cells, although what causes this effect remains unknown. Here we have tested the hypothesis that locally produced LIF can be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. Methods The studies were performed in different tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary cells. The expression of LIF and LIF receptor was tested by RT-PCR analysis. In tumors, LIF and Stat3 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, whereas Stat3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 expression and phosphorylation were studied by Western blot analysis. A LIF-specific blocking antibody was used to determine whether this cytokine was responsible for Stat3 phosphorylation induced by conditioned medium. Specific pharmacological inhibitors (PD98059 and Stat3ip) that affect ERK1/2 and Stat3 activation were used to study their involvement in LIF-induced effects. To analyze cell survival, assays with crystal violet were performed. Results High levels of LIF expression and activated Stat3 were found in mammary tumors growing in vivo and in their primary cultures. We found a single mouse mammary tumor cell line, LM3, that showed low levels of activated Stat3. Incidentally, these cells also showed very little expression of LIF receptor. This suggested that autocrine/paracrine LIF would be responsible for Stat3 activation in mouse mammary tumors. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of conditioned medium of mammary tumor primary cultures to induce Stat3 phosphorylation, activity that was prevented by pretreatment with LIF-blocking antibody. Besides, we found that LIF increased tumor cell viability. Interestingly, blocking Stat3 activation enhanced this effect in mammary tumor cells. Conclusion LIF is

  1. A Compendium of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Biologist: From the Initial Observations in the House Mouse to the Development of Genetically Engineered Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Kenney, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration in 1984. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skill sets to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this compendium is to extend an “olive branch” while simultaneously deepen the knowledge of the novice mouse mammary tumor biologist as they journey into a field rich in pathology and genetics spanning several centuries. PMID:20961975

  2. A compendium of the mouse mammary tumor biologist: from the initial observations in the house mouse to the development of genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration in 1984. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skill sets to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this compendium is to extend an "olive branch" while simultaneously deepen the knowledge of the novice mouse mammary tumor biologist as they journey into a field rich in pathology and genetics spanning several centuries. PMID:20961975

  3. A compendium of the mouse mammary tumor biologist: from the initial observations in the house mouse to the development of genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration in 1984. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skill sets to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this compendium is to extend an "olive branch" while simultaneously deepen the knowledge of the novice mouse mammary tumor biologist as they journey into a field rich in pathology and genetics spanning several centuries.

  4. The co-application effects of fullerene and ascorbic acid on UV-B irradiated mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinobu; Itoga, Kazuyoshi; Yamato, Masayuki; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Okano, Teruo

    2010-01-12

    The role of fullerene as a pro-oxidant or anti-oxidant in Ultraviolet B ray (UV-B)-induced disorders in mouse skin was investigated. Fullerene gave no photo-toxic effect to UV-B-irradiated mouse skin. Since erythema was concentrated at the pore circumference in a UV-B irradiation experiment in mouse skin, the sebaceous gland pairs was strongly implicated as a site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In a histological evaluation of the skin stained with CH(3)MDFDA (ROS index) and YO-Pro-1 (apoptosis index), the fluorescence intensity of a sebaceous gland significantly increased with UV-B irradiation. With the application of fullerene to UV-irradiated mouse skin, no toxicity was recognized in comparison with the control, and erythema, the ROS index, and the apoptosis index decrease with the application of fullerene. Ascorbyl radical (AA*) increased with the application of ascorbate (AA) to UV-B-irradiated mouse skin, and AA* decreased with the application of fullerene. The co-application of AA and fullerene, which suppressed AA* in vitro, significantly suppressed erythema, and also suppressed both the ROS index and apoptosis index in mouse skin after UV-B irradiation. In both mouse skin at 48 h after UV-B irradiation and in an attempt to reproduce this phenomenon artificially in vitro, a similar high AA* peak (AA*/H*>4) was observed in electron spin resonance (ESR) charts. The binding of fullerene with AA impairs the Fenton reaction between AA and Fe-protein based on the observation of ascorbate-specific UV absorption and a linear equation for the calibration curve. Therefore, fullerene may impair the intercalation of AA to a heme pocket by binding with AA. These results suggest that the co-application of AA and fullerene is effective against oxidative skin damage caused by UV-B irradiation, and the development of an AA* inhibitor such as fullerene should be useful for reducing organ damage associated with Fe-protein oxidation.

  5. Overexpression of Galectin-7 in Mouse Epidermis Leads to Loss of Cell Junctions and Defective Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Tien; Deshayes, Frédérique; Delacour, Delphine; Pichard, Evelyne; Advedissian, Tamara; Sidhu, Sukhvinder S.; Viguier, Mireille; Magnaldo, Thierry; Poirier, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    Background The proteins of the galectin family are implicated in many cellular processes, including cell interactions, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. In human and mouse, galectin-7 is almost exclusively expressed in stratified epithelia, notably in the epidermis. Galectin-7 expression is also altered in several human tumors of epithelial origin. This study aimed at dissecting the consequences of galectin-7 overexpression on epidermis structure and functions in vivo. Methods We established transgenic mice specifically overexpressing galectin-7 in the basal epidermal keratinocytes and analyzed the consequences on untreated skin and after UVB irradiation or mechanical injury. Results The intercellular cohesion of the epidermis is impaired in transgenic animals, with gaps developing between adjacent keratinocytes, associated with loss of adherens junctions. The epidermal architecture is aberrant with perturbations in the multilayered cellular organisation of the tissue, and structural defects in the basement membrane. These transgenic animals displayed a reduced re-epithelialisation potential following superficial wound, due to a defective collective migration of keratinocytes. Finally, a single mild dose of UVB induced an abnormal apoptotic response in the transgenic epidermis. Conclusion These results indicate that an excess of galectin-7 leads to a destabilisation of adherens junctions associated with defects in epidermal repair. As this phenotype shares similarities with that of galectin-7 null mutant mice, we conclude that a critical level of this protein is required for maintaining proper epidermal homeostasis. This study brings new insight into the mode of action of galectins in normal and pathological situations. PMID:25741714

  6. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of p53 and Ki67 Expression in Skin Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Khodaeiani, Effat; Fakhrjou, Ashraf; Amirnia, Mehdi; Babaei-nezhad, Shahla; Taghvamanesh, Farshid; Razzagh-Karimi, Elham; Alikhah, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: The cellular mechanisms responsible for initiating or limiting the tumors including skin types are of great importance. The p53 is a tumor-inhibiting gene which is believed to be defective in many malignant situations. Ki67 is a non-histonic protein which is mainly interfere with the proliferation and has many controlling effects during the cell cycle. Because of their importance in skin tumor cell growth, this study aimed at evaluating the p53 and Ki67 expression in skin epithelial tumors by immunohistochemical method. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive setting, 50 biopsy samples (30 basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), 10 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 8 keratoacanthomas (KAs), and 2 trichoepitheliomas (TEs)) were immunohistochemically evaluated for p53 and Ki67 expression during a 14-month period. The incidence and expression rate of these two variables were separately reported in each group of samples. Results: The expression rate of p53 was 67.77% for the BCCs, 50.20% for the SCCs, and null for the KAs. For both TEs, it was 50%. The expression rate of Ki67 was 57.33% for the BCCs, 47.70% for the SCCs, 37.5% for the KAs, and 0.0% for TEs. The incidence of P53+ cells was 100% and 90% in the BCC and SCC samples, respectively. The both TEs were positive in this regard. The incidence of Ki67+ cells was 100% for the BCC, SCC, and KA samples. The both TEs were negative in this regard. Conclusion: This study showed that the incidence rate of p53- and Ki67-positive cells is very high in skin malignant epithelial tumors. The expression rate of these two variables is comparable with reports in the literature. Further studies with large sample size are recommended to be carried out for KA and TE samples. PMID:23723466

  7. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  8. NTP technical report on the one-year initiation/promotion study of o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol (Cas No. 120-32-1) in Swiss (CD-1 (trade name)) mice (mouse skin study). Technical report series

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Toxicology and carcinogenicity studies were conducted by dermal administration of o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol to groups of 50 Swiss (CD-1) mice of each sex to study its effect as an initiator, promoter, and complete carcinogen. Under the conditions of the 1-year mouse skin initiation/promotion study in Swiss (CD-1) mice, o-benzyl-p-chlorophenolwas a cutaneous irritant and a weak skin tumor promoter relative to strong promoters such as 12-O-tetradecanoylp horbol-12-acetate. o-Benzyl-p-chlorophenol has no activity as an initiator or as a completecarcinogen.

  9. Scintillation Studies of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with ^125I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Amir; Blue, Eric; Bradley, Eric; Majewski, Stan; Mohammed, Shira; Qian, Jianguo; Saha, Margaret; Schworer, Stephen; Sutton, Jonathan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Welsh, Robert

    2007-10-01

    We have applied the techniques of scintillation imaging to studies of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). In these studies, Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) transfers the radioactive ^125I to the mammary glands of lactating mice and in particular to those mammaries with visible tumors. These studies have principally been carried out using pixellated scintillators coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). More recently, we have initiated such studies with a monolithic slab of LaBr3 scintillator coupled to an array of PSPMTs. Several techniques of mapping and measuring the development of such tumors have been employed. These will be discussed in detail and preliminary results will be reported.

  10. Biological and metabolic response in STS-135 space-flown mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mao, X W; Pecaut, M J; Stodieck, L S; Ferguson, V L; Bateman, T A; Bouxsein, M L; Gridley, D S

    2014-08-01

    There is evidence that space flight condition-induced biological damage is associated with increased oxidative stress and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To explore possible mechanisms, changes in gene expression profiles implicated in oxidative stress and in ECM remodeling in mouse skin were examined after space flight. The metabolic effects of space flight in skin tissues were also characterized. Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) was launched at the Kennedy Space Center on a 13-day mission. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the STS-135 using animal enclosure modules (AEMs). Within 3-5 h after landing, the mice were euthanized and skin samples were harvested for gene array analysis and metabolic biochemical assays. Many genes responsible for regulating production and metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly (p < 0.05) altered in the flight group, with fold changes >1.5 compared to AEM control. For ECM profile, several genes encoding matrix and metalloproteinases involved in ECM remodeling were significantly up-/down-regulated following space flight. To characterize the metabolic effects of space flight, global biochemical profiles were evaluated. Of 332 named biochemicals, 19 differed significantly (p < 0.05) between space flight skin samples and AEM ground controls, with 12 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated including altered amino acid, carbohydrate metabolism, cell signaling, and transmethylation pathways. Collectively, the data demonstrated that space flight condition leads to a shift in biological and metabolic homeostasis as the consequence of increased regulation in cellular antioxidants, ROS production, and tissue remodeling. This indicates that astronauts may be at increased risk for pathophysiologic damage or carcinogenesis in cutaneous tissue.

  11. Biological and metabolic response in STS-135 space-flown mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Mao, X W; Pecaut, M J; Stodieck, L S; Ferguson, V L; Bateman, T A; Bouxsein, M L; Gridley, D S

    2014-08-01

    There is evidence that space flight condition-induced biological damage is associated with increased oxidative stress and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. To explore possible mechanisms, changes in gene expression profiles implicated in oxidative stress and in ECM remodeling in mouse skin were examined after space flight. The metabolic effects of space flight in skin tissues were also characterized. Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135) was launched at the Kennedy Space Center on a 13-day mission. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the STS-135 using animal enclosure modules (AEMs). Within 3-5 h after landing, the mice were euthanized and skin samples were harvested for gene array analysis and metabolic biochemical assays. Many genes responsible for regulating production and metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly (p < 0.05) altered in the flight group, with fold changes >1.5 compared to AEM control. For ECM profile, several genes encoding matrix and metalloproteinases involved in ECM remodeling were significantly up-/down-regulated following space flight. To characterize the metabolic effects of space flight, global biochemical profiles were evaluated. Of 332 named biochemicals, 19 differed significantly (p < 0.05) between space flight skin samples and AEM ground controls, with 12 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated including altered amino acid, carbohydrate metabolism, cell signaling, and transmethylation pathways. Collectively, the data demonstrated that space flight condition leads to a shift in biological and metabolic homeostasis as the consequence of increased regulation in cellular antioxidants, ROS production, and tissue remodeling. This indicates that astronauts may be at increased risk for pathophysiologic damage or carcinogenesis in cutaneous tissue. PMID:24796731

  12. Compressive Viscoelasticity of Freshly Excised Mouse Skin Is Dependent on Specimen Thickness, Strain Level and Rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L.; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Gerling, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin’s mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin’s viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s−1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity. PMID:25803703

  13. Polyamines and nonmelanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, Susan K.

    2007-11-01

    Elevated levels of polyamines have long been associated with skin tumorigenesis. Tightly regulated metabolism of polyamines is critical for cell survival and normal skin homeostasis, and these controls are dysregulated in skin tumorigenesis. A key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is upregulated in skin tumors compared to normal skin. Use of transgenic mouse models has demonstrated that polyamines play an essential role in the early promotional phase of skin tumorigenesis. The formation of skin tumors in these transgenic mice is dependent upon polyamine biosynthesis, especially putrescine, since treatment with inhibitors of ODC activity blocks the formation of skin tumors and causes the rapid regression of existing tumors. Although the mechanism by which polyamines promote skin tumorigenesis are not well understood, elevated levels of polyamines have been shown to stimulate epidermal proliferation, alter keratinocyte differentiation status, increase neovascularization, and increase synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins in a manner similar to that seen in wound healing. It is becoming increasingly apparent that elevated polyamine levels activate not only epidermal cells but also underlying stromal cells in the skin to promote the development and progression of skin tumors. The inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis has potential to be an effective chemoprevention strategy for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

  14. Salient Points in Reconstruction of Nasal Skin after Tumor Ablation with Local Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar; Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Azin; Rasouli, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A variety of nasal skin reconstruction methods are available to meet the esthetic patient's needs. In this article, we review some of modifications of these procedures and share our experience in reconstruction of different parts of the nasal skin following skin tumor ablation. Patients and Methods: From January 2010 to January 2014, 171 patients underwent nasal skin reconstruction after excising cancerous lesions of the involved nasal skin. The patient's history, pre- and post-operation photographs, and the surgery data were collected and assessed. Demographic data related to the type of cancer, defect size and location, type of reconstruction were collected. Results: A variety of local flaps were used based on location and defect features. Nearly all flaps healed primarily without postsurgical significant complications. Conclusion: According to the results and the outcomes of the operations, we concluded that a certain flaps are more effective than others in nasal skin reconstruction. Local flap reconstruction of the nose has good esthetic result with low complication rate. PMID:27761088

  15. Riboflavin as adjuvant with cisplatin: study in mouse skin cancer model.

    PubMed

    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin used in treatment of solid tumor induces oxidative stress which leads to hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. New strategies are therefore needed to combat toxicity and optimize its therapeutic potential. Riboflavin (VitaminB2) under photoillumination works as an anti proliferative agent and induces apoptosis. These properties of riboflavin have been exploited to mitigate cisplatin induced toxicities. 9,10-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene /12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate  were used to induce skin tumor in Swiss albino mice. The tumor induced mice were treated with cisplatin, riboflavin as well as their combination under photo illumination. In comparison to tumor control group the cisplatin and riboflavin treated groups showed a compromised level of antioxidant enzymes, functional markers and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. However these parameters tended towards normal in the combination treated group. The results from histopathology indicate that apoptosis was favored mode of cell death and that necrosis was reduced in combination treated groups. Our findings indicate that combination of cisplatin with riboflavin under photo illumination synergizes its anti cancer activity towards cancer cells and attenuates the cisplatin induced toxicities.

  16. Lack of a protective effect of menhaden oil on skin tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1990-09-01

    Fish oil has been shown to have a protective effect in some cancer models. To determine whether fish oil alters skin tumorigenesis, a study was designed using the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model, feeding mice during the promotion stage a constant overall amount of dietary fat (10%) in which the levels of menhaden oil (MO) varied from 0 to 8.5% or corn oil (CO) at 10%. SENCAR mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. Two weeks later mice were divided into five groups and maintained on one of the following AIN-76 based diets consisting of: 8.5% coconut oil (CT)/1.5% CO (diet A); 1% MO/7.5% CT/1.5% CO (diet B); 4% MO/4.5% CT/1.5% CO (diet C); 8.5% MO/1.5% CO (diet D); or 10% CO (diet E). Two weeks later, promotion with twice weekly applications of 1 micrograms 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was begun and continued for 24 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kcal food consumed or body wts were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma and carcinoma incidence was not different among the diet groups. However, differences were seen in the rate of papilloma appearance with the group fed diet E (10% CO) being the slowest and diet B being the most rapid. In a parallel study, ornithine decarboxylase activity, a suggested marker of promotion, was greatly elevated in the epidermis of all TPA-treated mice and the effect of diet tended to reflect the different rates of tumor formation observed among the groups. These data indicate that the diets containing fish oil were not protective in the final incidence of tumor formation and suggest that a better understanding of the complex interactions is warranted before recommendations are made to alter the human diet for cancer prevention.

  17. Lack of a protective effect of menhaden oil on skin tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate.

    PubMed

    Locniskar, M; Belury, M A; Cumberland, A G; Patrick, K E; Fischer, S M

    1990-09-01

    Fish oil has been shown to have a protective effect in some cancer models. To determine whether fish oil alters skin tumorigenesis, a study was designed using the initiation-promotion mouse skin carcinogenesis model, feeding mice during the promotion stage a constant overall amount of dietary fat (10%) in which the levels of menhaden oil (MO) varied from 0 to 8.5% or corn oil (CO) at 10%. SENCAR mice were initiated with 10 nmol dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. Two weeks later mice were divided into five groups and maintained on one of the following AIN-76 based diets consisting of: 8.5% coconut oil (CT)/1.5% CO (diet A); 1% MO/7.5% CT/1.5% CO (diet B); 4% MO/4.5% CT/1.5% CO (diet C); 8.5% MO/1.5% CO (diet D); or 10% CO (diet E). Two weeks later, promotion with twice weekly applications of 1 micrograms 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was begun and continued for 24 weeks. No statistically significant differences in kcal food consumed or body wts were observed between diet groups during the study. The final papilloma and carcinoma incidence was not different among the diet groups. However, differences were seen in the rate of papilloma appearance with the group fed diet E (10% CO) being the slowest and diet B being the most rapid. In a parallel study, ornithine decarboxylase activity, a suggested marker of promotion, was greatly elevated in the epidermis of all TPA-treated mice and the effect of diet tended to reflect the different rates of tumor formation observed among the groups. These data indicate that the diets containing fish oil were not protective in the final incidence of tumor formation and suggest that a better understanding of the complex interactions is warranted before recommendations are made to alter the human diet for cancer prevention. PMID:2401054

  18. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models.

    PubMed

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Flaud, Patrice; Fisson, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies. PMID:27501019

  19. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies. PMID:27501019

  20. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models.

    PubMed

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Flaud, Patrice; Fisson, Sylvain

    2016-07-07

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies.

  1. Salmonella Bacterial Monotherapy Reduces Autochthonous Prostate Tumor Burden in the TRAMP Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Robert A; Gentry, Bettina; Mumm, Tyler; Schatten, Heide; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium injected in the circulatory system of mammals selectively targets tumors. Using weekly intraperitoneal injections of attenuated Salmonella strain CRC2631, we tested for regression and/or inhibition of tumor development in the TRAMP prostate tumor mouse model, which utilizes SV40 early region expression for autochthonous formation of prostate tumors that progress into metastatic, poorly differentiated prostatic carcinomas in an immunocompetent murine model. Thirteen weekly intraperitoneal administrations of 105-107 CFU CRC2631 into 10 week old mice were well tolerated by the TRAMP model. Sacrifice and histological analysis of TRAMP prostates at 22 weeks indicated that Salmonella monotherapy at administrated levels decrease visible tumor size (>29%) but did not significantly inhibit previously described SV40 expression-driven TRAMP tumor progression to undifferentiated carcinomas when histologically examined. In conclusion, this work demonstrates baseline results for CRC2631 Salmonella monotherapy using the immunocompetent TRAMP prostate tumor model in preparation for study of combination therapies that resolve autochthonously generated TRAMP prostate tumors, further reduce tumor size, or inhibit prostate tumor progression. PMID:27504973

  2. Tumor cells disseminate early, but immunosurveillance limits metastatic outgrowth, in a mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Jo; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Wang, Xiaojie; Toh, Benjamin; Prakash, Celine; Hong, Michelle; Tan, Tze Guan; Zheng, Lin; Ong, Lai Chun; Jin, Yi; Kato, Masashi; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Chow, Pierce; Yang, Henry; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Although metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death, it is not clear why some patients with localized cancer develop metastatic disease after complete resection of their primary tumor. Such relapses have been attributed to tumor cells that disseminate early and remain dormant for prolonged periods of time; however, little is known about the control of these disseminated tumor cells. Here, we have used a spontaneous mouse model of melanoma to investigate tumor cell dissemination and immune control of metastatic outgrowth. Tumor cells were found to disseminate throughout the body early in development of the primary tumor, even before it became clinically detectable. The disseminated tumor cells remained dormant for varying periods of time depending on the tissue, resulting in staggered metastatic outgrowth. Dormancy in the lung was associated with reduced proliferation of the disseminated tumor cells relative to the primary tumor. This was mediated, at least in part, by cytostatic CD8+ T cells, since depletion of these cells resulted in faster outgrowth of visceral metastases. Our findings predict that immune responses favoring dormancy of disseminated tumor cells, which we propose to be the seed of subsequent macroscopic metastases, are essential for prolonging the survival of early stage cancer patients and suggest that therapeutic strategies designed to reinforce such immune responses may produce marked benefits in these patients. PMID:20501944

  3. Salmonella Bacterial Monotherapy Reduces Autochthonous Prostate Tumor Burden in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Robert A.; Gentry, Bettina; Mumm, Tyler; Schatten, Heide; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium injected in the circulatory system of mammals selectively targets tumors. Using weekly intraperitoneal injections of attenuated Salmonella strain CRC2631, we tested for regression and/or inhibition of tumor development in the TRAMP prostate tumor mouse model, which utilizes SV40 early region expression for autochthonous formation of prostate tumors that progress into metastatic, poorly differentiated prostatic carcinomas in an immunocompetent murine model. Thirteen weekly intraperitoneal administrations of 105–107 CFU CRC2631 into 10 week old mice were well tolerated by the TRAMP model. Sacrifice and histological analysis of TRAMP prostates at 22 weeks indicated that Salmonella monotherapy at administrated levels decrease visible tumor size (>29%) but did not significantly inhibit previously described SV40 expression-driven TRAMP tumor progression to undifferentiated carcinomas when histologically examined. In conclusion, this work demonstrates baseline results for CRC2631 Salmonella monotherapy using the immunocompetent TRAMP prostate tumor model in preparation for study of combination therapies that resolve autochthonously generated TRAMP prostate tumors, further reduce tumor size, or inhibit prostate tumor progression. PMID:27504973

  4. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  5. HER2/neu DNA vaccination by intradermal gene delivery in a mouse tumor model: Gene gun is superior to jet injector in inducing CTL responses and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Kobelt, Dennis; Hohn, Oliver; Vu, Minh D; Schlag, Peter M; Dörken, Bernd; Norley, Steven; Lipp, Martin; Walther, Wolfgang; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    DNA vaccines are potential tools for the induction of immune responses against both infectious disease and cancer. The dermal application of DNA vaccines is of particular interest since the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin are characterized by an abundance of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of our study was to compare tumor protection as obtained by two different methods of intradermal DNA delivery (gene gun and jet injector) in a well-established HER2/neu mouse tumor model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with a HER2/neu-coding plasmid by gene gun or jet injector. Mice were then subcutaneously challenged with HER2/neu(+) syngeneic D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Protection against subsequent challenges with tumor cells as well as humoral and T-cell immune responses induced by the vaccine were monitored. Gene gun immunization was far superior to jet injector both in terms of tumor protection and induction of HER2/neu-specific immune responses. After gene gun immunization, 60% of the mice remained tumor-free until day 140 as compared with 25% after jet injector immunization. Furthermore, gene gun vaccination was able to induce both a strong T(H)1-polarized T-cell response with detectable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and a humoral immune response against HER2/neu, whereas the jet injector was not. Although the disadvantages that were associated with the use of the jet injector in our model may be overcome with methodological modifications and/or in larger animals, which exhibit a thicker skin and/or subcutaneous muscle tissue, we conclude that gene gun delivery constitutes the method of choice for intradermal DNA delivery in preclinical mouse models and possibly also for the clinical development of DNA-based vaccines.

  6. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-05-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm{sup 2}) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E{sub 2} production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser{sup 473}) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-kappaB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  7. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, E.L.; Boulware, S.; Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L.; DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M.; MacLeod, M.C.

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  8. Analyzing the miRNA-Gene Networks to Mine the Important miRNAs under Skin of Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Husile

    2016-01-01

    Genetic networks provide new mechanistic insights into the diversity of species morphology. In this study, we have integrated the MGI, GEO, and miRNA database to analyze the genetic regulatory networks under morphology difference of integument of humans and mice. We found that the gene expression network in the skin is highly divergent between human and mouse. The GO term of secretion was highly enriched, and this category was specific in human compared to mouse. These secretion genes might be involved in eccrine system evolution in human. In addition, total 62,637 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in human integument genes (IGs), while 26,280 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in mouse IGs. The interactions between miRNAs and IGs in human are more complex than those in mouse. Furthermore, hsa-miR-548, mmu-miR-466, and mmu-miR-467 have an enormous number of targets on IGs, which both have the role of inhibition of host immunity response. The pattern of distribution on the chromosome of these three miRNAs families is very different. The interaction of miRNA/IGs has added the new dimension in traditional gene regulation networks of skin. Our results are generating new insights into the gene networks basis of skin difference between human and mouse.

  9. Analyzing the miRNA-Gene Networks to Mine the Important miRNAs under Skin of Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Husile

    2016-01-01

    Genetic networks provide new mechanistic insights into the diversity of species morphology. In this study, we have integrated the MGI, GEO, and miRNA database to analyze the genetic regulatory networks under morphology difference of integument of humans and mice. We found that the gene expression network in the skin is highly divergent between human and mouse. The GO term of secretion was highly enriched, and this category was specific in human compared to mouse. These secretion genes might be involved in eccrine system evolution in human. In addition, total 62,637 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in human integument genes (IGs), while 26,280 miRNA binding target sites were predicted in mouse IGs. The interactions between miRNAs and IGs in human are more complex than those in mouse. Furthermore, hsa-miR-548, mmu-miR-466, and mmu-miR-467 have an enormous number of targets on IGs, which both have the role of inhibition of host immunity response. The pattern of distribution on the chromosome of these three miRNAs families is very different. The interaction of miRNA/IGs has added the new dimension in traditional gene regulation networks of skin. Our results are generating new insights into the gene networks basis of skin difference between human and mouse. PMID:27689084

  10. Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil in the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay and the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Azuine, Magnus A; Tokuda, Harukuni; Takasaki, Midori; Mukainaka, Teruo; Konoshima, Takao; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-06-01

    Resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil are known natural dietary components with intrinsic cancer chemopreventive potentials. As a part of our study of dietary constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, we have assessed the anti-cancer potentials of these products in the promotion stage of cancer development employing the in vitro Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, we studied the activities of these compounds in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay as well as on the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging bioassay with a view to comparing some of the mechanisms of their anti-cancer activity. Finally, we compared the observed chemoprotective capabilities of the four products in the in vivo 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiated and TPA-promoted mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. All the products tested showed a profound inhibitory effect on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen induction using Raji cells. Comparatively, sesame oil was the most potent followed by sesamol and then resveratrol. Only sesamol and resveratrol showed a remarkable cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assays as well as profound free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH bioassay. In both test systems, sesamol exhibited a more remarkable activity than resveratrol while sesame oil and sunflower oil did not exhibit any appreciable activity even at the highest concentrations tested (4000 microg ml(-1) ). In our in vivo assay at a 50-fold molar ratio to TPA, sesamol offered 50% reduction in mouse skin papillomas at 20 weeks after promotion with TPA. Under an identical molar ratio to TPA, resveratrol offered a 60% reduction in the papillomas in mouse at 20 weeks. Thus sesamol seems to be an almost equally potent chemopreventive agent. Sesame oil and sunflower oil offered 20 and 40% protection, respectively, in the mouse

  11. Chemopreventive effect of resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil in the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay and the mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Azuine, Magnus A; Tokuda, Harukuni; Takasaki, Midori; Mukainaka, Teruo; Konoshima, Takao; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2002-06-01

    Resveratrol, sesamol, sesame oil and sunflower oil are known natural dietary components with intrinsic cancer chemopreventive potentials. As a part of our study of dietary constituents as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, we have assessed the anti-cancer potentials of these products in the promotion stage of cancer development employing the in vitro Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation assay induced by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Further, we studied the activities of these compounds in the brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay as well as on the stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging bioassay with a view to comparing some of the mechanisms of their anti-cancer activity. Finally, we compared the observed chemoprotective capabilities of the four products in the in vivo 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene initiated and TPA-promoted mouse skin two-stage carcinogenesis protocols. All the products tested showed a profound inhibitory effect on the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen induction using Raji cells. Comparatively, sesame oil was the most potent followed by sesamol and then resveratrol. Only sesamol and resveratrol showed a remarkable cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality assays as well as profound free radical scavenging activity in the DPPH bioassay. In both test systems, sesamol exhibited a more remarkable activity than resveratrol while sesame oil and sunflower oil did not exhibit any appreciable activity even at the highest concentrations tested (4000 microg ml(-1) ). In our in vivo assay at a 50-fold molar ratio to TPA, sesamol offered 50% reduction in mouse skin papillomas at 20 weeks after promotion with TPA. Under an identical molar ratio to TPA, resveratrol offered a 60% reduction in the papillomas in mouse at 20 weeks. Thus sesamol seems to be an almost equally potent chemopreventive agent. Sesame oil and sunflower oil offered 20 and 40% protection, respectively, in the mouse

  12. Epidermal hyperplasia in mouse skin following treatment with alternative drinking water disinfectants

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.; Bull, R.J.; Schamer, M.; Long, R.E.

    1986-11-01

    Female SENCAR mice were treated with aqueous solutions of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/), and monochloramine (NH/sub 2/Cl) by whole body exposure (except head) for a 10-min period for 4 days in the first experiment and for 1 day (except NH/sub 2/Cl) in the second experiment. Animals were sacrificed the day following the last treatment (experiment 1) or on day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, and 12 following treatment (experiment 2), and skin thickness was measured by light microscopy. Concentrations of disinfectants were 1, 10, 100, 300, and 1000 mg/L, for experiment 1 and 1000 mg/L for experiment 2. Thickness of the interfollicular epidermis (IFE) for control animals was 15.4 +/- 1.5 ..mu..m. After 4 days of treatment at 1000 mg/L, HOCl and ClO/sub 2/ increased thickness to 30 +/- 7.0 and 40.2 +/- 11.8, and NaOCl increased thickness to 25.2 +/- 6.1 ..mu.. m. The response to HOCl was found to be dose-related. The time-course study following a single treatment of 1000 mg/L HOCl, showed a progression of IFE thickening of from 18.3 +/- 1.4 at 1 day to 30.8 +/- 8.0 at 8 days, decreasing to 19.1 +/- 6.2 ..mu..m at 12 days. ClO/sub 2/ and NaOCl when tested in this manner did not produce increased thickness of IFE with time, but rather gave a persistent level of increase that remained for the 12 days. NH/sub 2/Cl reduced skin thickness to 13.6 +/- 6.1 ..mu..m. Examination of sections of skin treated with HOCl and ClO/sub 2/ indicated an increase in cell numbers. HOCl and ClO/sub 2/ are therefore capable of inducting hyperplastic responses in the mouse skin. The basis for the decrease in skin thickness resulting from NH/sub 2/Cl treatment remains to be established.

  13. A method to visualize transdermal nickel permeation in mouse skin using a nickel allergy patch

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Tomoko; Uo, Motohiro; Wada, Takahiro; Hongo, Toshio; Omagari, Daisuke; Komiyama, Kazuo; Oikawa, Masakazu; Kusama, Mikio; Mori, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Metal patch test is often used in clinical settings when metal-induced contact dermatitis is suspected. However, the transdermal permeation behavior of metal ions from the patch test remains unclear. Current patch tests using high concentrations of metal salt solutions have some side effects, e.g. acute skin reactions to high concentrations of metal salt. To resolve these, estimating metal ion transdermal permeation is wished. In this study, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and micro-focused particle-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) were used to visualize the time-dependent Ni permeation in mouse skin. The cross-sectional diffusion of Ni was visualized in a time-dependent manner. Our results indicate that maximum Ni permeation occurs after 24 h of patch treatment, and the permeated Ni content was high in the epidermis and spread into the dermis beyond the basal layer. This method may be useful to determine the appropriate solution concentration and duration of administration for the patch test. PMID:26484550

  14. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. PMID:20881168

  15. Stimulatory effect of topical application of caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Li, Xiang-Hong; Xie, Jian-Guo; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Conney, Allan H

    2002-01-01

    In an earlier study, we showed that oral administration of green tea or caffeine to SKH-1 mice for 2 weeks prior to a single application of UVB enhanced UVB-induced increases in the number of p53-positive cells, p21(WAF1/CIP1)-positive cells, and apoptotic sunburn cells in the epidermis. In the present study, we found that topical application of caffeine, a major chemopreventive agent in tea, to the dorsal skin of SKH-1 mice immediately after irradiation with UVB (30 mJ/cm2) enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis as measured by the number of morphologically distinct epidermal apoptotic sunburn cells and the number of caspase 3-positive cells. Time course studies indicated that UVB-induced increases in apoptotic sunburn cells were correlated with elevated levels of caspase 3, a key protease that becomes activated during an early stage of apoptosis. Topical application of caffeine immediately after UVB enhanced UVB-induced increases in caspase 3 (active form)-immunoreactive-positive cells and in caspase 3 enzyme activity in the epidermis. Topical application of caffeine had only a small stimulatory effect on UVB-induced increases in the level of wild-type p53 protein and these changes were not related temporally to caffeine-induced increases in apoptotic cells. There was little or no effect of topical applications of caffeine on epidermal cell proliferation as determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into DNA. Topical application of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to the dorsal skin of mice immediately after irradiation with UVB had a small inhibitory effect on UVB-induced increases in BrdU-positive cells in the basal layer of the epidermis, but this treatment had no effect on UVB-induced increases in apoptotic sunburn cells. The results of this study indicate a proapoptotic effect of topical application of caffeine on UVB-irradiated mouse skin.

  16. Inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and other skin tumor-promoter-caused induction of epidermal interleukin-1 alpha mRNA and protein expression in SENCAR mice by green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Rupp, C O; Korman, N J; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1995-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that topical application of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) to murine skin results in increased expression of the highly inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 alpha in the epidermis. This has led to the suggestion that IL-1 alpha directly or indirectly mediates the inflammatory and hyperplastic responses elicited by TPA and possibly by other skin tumor promoters. In the current study, we investigated the effect of skin application of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) to SENCAR mice on skin tumor-promoter-caused induction of cutaneous edema and hyperplasia, and IL-1 alpha mRNA expression. Pretreatment of the skin with GTP 30 min before that of anthralin, benzoyl peroxide, mezerein, and TPA resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of cutaneous edema and epidermal hyperplasia caused by each of these tumor promoters. Northern blot analysis indicated that topical application of TPA, anthralin, mezerein, or benzoyl peroxide to SENCAR mice resulted in an increased expression of epidermal IL-1 alpha mRNA. Pretreatment of the skin with GTP or individual epicatechin derivatives (ECDs) present therein, 30 min before that of TPA, resulted in a significant inhibition of enhanced expression of epidermal IL-1 alpha mRNA caused by skin application of TPA. These inhibitory effects were found to be dependent on the dose of GTP. Among four epicatechin derivatives present in GTP, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate were more effective than (-)-epigallocatechin and (-)-epicatechin in affording this inhibition. Preapplication of GTP was also found to afford inhibition against anthralin-, benzoyl peroxide-, and mezerein-caused increased expression of epidermal IL-1 alpha mRNA and protein. Our study suggests that the inhibition of tumor-promoter-induced IL-1 alpha mRNA and protein expression in mouse epidermis by green tea in combination with other inhibitory effects may be

  17. Circadian Clock in a Mouse Colon Tumor Regulates Intracellular Iron Levels to Promote Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Matsunaga, Naoya; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Hiroki; Hamamura, Kengo; Tsuruta, Akito; Tsurudome, Yuya; Ogino, Takashi; Hara, Yukinori; Suzuki, Takuya; Hyodo, Kenji; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; To, Hideto; Aramaki, Hironori; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-03-25

    Iron is an important biological catalyst and is critical for DNA synthesis during cell proliferation. Cellular iron uptake is enhanced in tumor cells to support increased DNA synthesis. Circadian variations in DNA synthesis and proliferation have been identified in tumor cells, but their relationship with intracellular iron levels is unclear. In this study, we identified a 24-h rhythm in iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) levels in colon-26 tumors implanted in mice. Our findings suggest that IRP2 regulates the 24-h rhythm of transferrin receptor 1 (Tfr1) mRNA expression post-transcriptionally, by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron-response elements. We also found thatIrp2mRNA transcription is promoted by circadian clock genes, including brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (BMAL1) and the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) heterodimer. Moreover, growth in colon-26(Δ19) tumors expressing the clock-mutant protein (CLOCK(Δ19)) was low compared with that in wild-type colon-26 tumor. The time-dependent variation of cellular iron levels, and the proliferation rate in wild-type colon-26 tumor was decreased by CLOCK(Δ19)expression. Our findings suggest that circadian organization contributes to tumor cell proliferation by regulating iron metabolism in the tumor.

  18. Clinical parameters related to optimal tumor localization of indium-111-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody ZME-018

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Lamki, L.; Glenn, H.J.; Krizan, Z.; Hersh, E.M.; Plager, C.E.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Unger, M.W.; Carlo, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Radioimmunolocalization of an /sup 111/In-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, was examined in 21 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma. Each patient received a single. i.v. infusion of MoAb at concentrations ranging from 1 mg to 20 mg, coupled to 5 mCi /sup 111/In by the chelating agent DPTA. No toxicity was observed in any patient. Total-body and regions of interest scans performed at 4, 24, and 72 hr following MoAb administration revealed uptake in 63 out of 105 previously diagnosed metastases for an overall sensitivity of 60%. Uptake was consistently observed in liver/spleen, and less frequently in bowel, testes, axillae and bone. Sensitivity of detection increased significantly at doses of MoAb above 2.5 mg, with 74% of lesions imaging at 20 mg/5 mCi compared with 29% at 2.5 mg/5 mCi (p less than 0.005). A significant correlation was observed between tumor uptake of /sup 111/In-MoAb conjugate and increasing tumor size. Soft-tissue lesions such as skin and lymph node metastases were imaged to a greater extent (76%) than visceral metastases (19%). In five of six patients, biopsies obtained from 3 days to 14 days after MoAb administration showed antibody present on tumor cells as demonstrated by flow cytometry and/or radioimmunoassay. Human anti-murine immunoglobulin responses were observed in seven of 17 patients studied. Mean plasma clearance of ZME-018 was prolonged with a T1/2 of 24.7 hr and increased slightly with increasing MoAb dose. Urinary excretion of /sup 111/In averaged 12.4% of the injected dose over 48 hours. Radioimmunolocalization of melanoma with /sup 111/In-labeled ZME-018 appears feasible. The sensitivity of the technique was related to dose, tumor size, and disease site.

  19. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  20. Selection of early-occurring mutations dictates hormone-independent progression in mouse mammary tumor lines.

    PubMed

    Gattelli, Albana; Zimberlin, María N; Meiss, Roberto P; Castilla, Lucio H; Kordon, Edith C

    2006-11-01

    Mice harboring three mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) variants develop pregnancy-dependent (PD) tumors that progress to pregnancy-independent (PI) behavior through successive passages. Herein, we identified 10 predominant insertions in PI transplants from 8 independent tumor lines. These mutations were also detected in small cell populations in the early PD passages. In addition, we identified a new viral insertion upstream of the gene Rspo3, which is overexpressed in three of the eight independent tumor lines and codes for a protein very similar to the recently described protein encoded by Int7. This study suggests that during progression towards hormone independence, clonal expansion of cells with specific mutations might be more relevant than the occurrence of new MMTV insertions.

  1. Circulating tumor cells exhibit stem cell characteristics in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niemietz, Thomas; Betzler, Alexander M.; Nanduri, Lahiri K.; Bork, Ulrich; Kahlert, Christoph; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Swiersy, Anka; Büchler, Markus W.; Reissfelder, Christoph; Weitz, Jürgen; Rahbari, Nuh N.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is closely linked to the occurrence of distant metastases, which putatively develop from circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed into circulation by the tumor. As far more CTCs are shed than eventually metastases develop, only a small subfraction of CTCs harbor full tumorigenic potential. The aim of this study was to further characterize CRC-derived CTCs to eventually identify the clinically relevant subfraction of CTCs. We established an orthotopic mouse model of CRC which reliably develops metastases and CTCs. We were able to culture the resulting CTCs in vitro, and demonstrated their tumor-forming capacity when re-injected into mice. The CTCs were then subjected to qPCR expression profiling, revealing downregulation of epithelial and proliferation markers. Genes associated with cell-cell adhesion (claudin-7, CD166) were significantly downregulated, indicating a more metastatic phenotype of CTCs compared to bulk tumor cells derived from hepatic metastases. The stem cell markers DLG7 and BMI1 were significantly upregulated in CTC, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype and increased capacity of tumor formation and self-renewal. In concert with their in vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity, these findings indicate stem cell properties of mouse-derived CTCs. In conclusion, we developed an orthotopic mouse model of CRC recapitulating the process of CRC dissemination. CTCs derived from this model exhibit stem-cell like characteristics and are able to form colonies in vitro and tumors in vivo. Our results provide new insight into the biology of CRC-derived CTCs and may provide new therapeutic targets in the metastatic cascade of CRC. PMID:27029058

  2. Development of a circulating miRNA assay to monitor tumor burden: From mouse to man

    PubMed Central

    Greystoke, Alastair; Ayub, Mahmood; Rothwell, Dominic G.; Morris, Dan; Burt, Deborah; Hodgkinson, Cassandra L.; Morrow, Christopher J.; Smith, Nigel; Aung, Kyaw; Valle, Juan; Carter, Louise; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-01-01

    Circulating miRNA stability suggests potential utility of miRNA based biomarkers to monitor tumor burden and/or progression, particularly in cancer types where serial biopsy is impractical. Assessment of miRNA specificity and sensitivity is challenging within the clinical setting. To address this, circulating miRNAs were examined in mice bearing human SCLC tumor xenografts and SCLC patient derived circulating tumor cell explant models (CDX). We identified 49 miRNAs using human TaqMan Low Density Arrays readily detectable in 10 μl tail vein plasma from mice carrying H526 SCLC xenografts that were low or undetectable in non-tumor bearing controls. Circulating miR-95 measured serially in mice bearing CDX was detected with tumor volumes as low as 10 mm3 and faithfully reported subsequent tumor growth. Having established assay sensitivity in mouse models, we identified 26 miRNAs that were elevated in a stage dependent manner in a pilot study of plasma from SCLC patients (n = 16) compared to healthy controls (n = 11) that were also elevated in the mouse models. We selected a smaller panel of 10 previously reported miRNAs (miRs 95, 141, 200a, 200b, 200c, 210, 335#, 375, 429) that were consistently elevated in SCLC, some of which are reported to be elevated in other cancer types. Using a multiplex qPCR assay, elevated levels of miRNAs across the panel were also observed in a further 66 patients with non-small cell lung, colorectal or pancreatic cancers. The utility of this circulating miRNA panel as an early warning of tumor progression across several tumor types merits further evaluation in larger studies. PMID:26654130

  3. In Vivo Assessment of Acute UVB Responses in Normal and Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP-C) Skin-Humanized Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Cuadrado, Natividad; Recasens, Mar; Puig, Susana; Nagore, Eduardo; Illera, Nuria; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In vivo studies of UVB effects on human skin are precluded by ethical and technical arguments on volunteers and inconceivable in cancer-prone patients such as those affected with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP). Establishing reliable models to address mechanistic and therapeutic matters thus remains a challenge. Here we have used the skin-humanized mouse system that circumvents most current model constraints. We assessed the UVB radiation effects including the sequential changes after acute exposure with respect to timing, dosage, and the relationship between dose and degree-sort of epidermal alteration. On Caucasian-derived regenerated skins, UVB irradiation (800 J/m2) induced DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and p53 expression in exposed keratinocytes. Epidermal disorganization was observed at higher doses. In contrast, in African descent–derived regenerated skins, physiological hyperpigmentation prevented tissue alterations and DNA photolesions. The acute UVB effects seen in Caucasian-derived engrafted skins were also blocked by a physical sunscreen, demonstrating the suitability of the system for photoprotection studies. We also report the establishment of a photosensitive model through the transplantation of XP-C patient cells as part of a bioengineered skin. The inability of XP-C engrafted skin to remove DNA damaged cells was confirmed in vivo. Both the normal and XP-C versions of the skin-humanized mice proved proficient models to assess UVB-mediated DNA repair responses and provide a strong platform to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20558577

  4. Antibacterial activity and therapeutic efficacy of Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5, a cationic amphiphilic polyproline helix, in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infection.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Nepal, Manish; Chmielewski, Jean; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activities and therapeutic efficacy of the cationic, unnatural proline-rich peptide Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 were evaluated against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse model of skin infection. Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 showed potent activity against all clinical isolates of S. aureus tested, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA, respectively). Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 was also superior in clearing established in vitro biofilms of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, compared with the established antimicrobials mupirocin and vancomycin. Additionally, topical treatment of an MRSA-infected wound with Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 enhanced wound closure and significantly reduced bacterial load. Finally, 0.5% Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 significantly reduced the levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in wounds induced by MRSA skin infection. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest the potential application of Fl-P(R)P(R)P(L)-5 in the treatment of staphylococcal skin infections.

  5. Antibacterial activity and therapeutic efficacy of Fl-PRPRPL-5, a cationic amphiphilic polyproline helix, in a mouse model of staphylococcal skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Nepal, Manish; Chmielewski, Jean; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activities and therapeutic efficacy of the cationic, unnatural proline-rich peptide Fl-PRPRPL-5 were evaluated against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse model of skin infection. Fl-PRPRPL-5 showed potent activity against all clinical isolates of S. aureus tested, including methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and VRSA, respectively). Fl-PRPRPL-5 was also superior in clearing established in vitro biofilms of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, compared with the established antimicrobials mupirocin and vancomycin. Additionally, topical treatment of an MRSA-infected wound with Fl-PRPRPL-5 enhanced wound closure and significantly reduced bacterial load. Finally, 0.5% Fl-PRPRPL-5 significantly reduced the levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in wounds induced by MRSA skin infection. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest the potential application of Fl-PRPRPL-5 in the treatment of staphylococcal skin infections. PMID:26543355

  6. Primary Indeterminate Dendritic Cell Tumor of Skin Correlated to Mosquito Bite

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Xianglan; Guo, Wenwen; Ye, Hongtao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary indeterminate dendritic cell tumor (IDCT) is an extremely neoplastic dendritic cell disorder. Little is known about its pathogenesis, etiology, and prognostic factors because of its rarity. Herein, we present a case report of a skin IDCT that arose in mosquito bite and discuss the correlation between hypersensitivity to mosquito bites and leukemia/lymphoma. A 28-year old man presented with multiple widespread cutaneous plaques and nodules 8 months after being bitten by a mosquito on his back. Dermatological examination revealed multiple skin-colored, well-demarcated plaques and nodules measuring approximately 0.5 to 1.8 cm in diameter all over the body. A biopsy of the skin lesion was taken. Morphologically, the dermis was effaced by round or polygonal cells with oval nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, arranged in nests and in some areas in a sheet-like pattern. The tumor cells were positive for CD68, CD1a, and S-100, whereas negative for Langerin and lack Birbeck granules ultrastructurally. A diagnosis of IDCT was made. No treatment was given. The patient was alive with spontaneous disease regression after 17 months of follow-up. IDCT is an extremely rare disease and may be associated with mosquito bite. PMID:26313805

  7. Primary Indeterminate Dendritic Cell Tumor of Skin Correlated to Mosquito Bite.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xianglan; Guo, Wenwen; Ye, Hongtao

    2015-08-01

    Primary indeterminate dendritic cell tumor (IDCT) is an extremely neoplastic dendritic cell disorder. Little is known about its pathogenesis, etiology, and prognostic factors because of its rarity. Herein, we present a case report of a skin IDCT that arose in mosquito bite and discuss the correlation between hypersensitivity to mosquito bites and leukemia/lymphoma.A 28-year old man presented with multiple widespread cutaneous plaques and nodules 8 months after being bitten by a mosquito on his back. Dermatological examination revealed multiple skin-colored, well-demarcated plaques and nodules measuring approximately 0.5 to 1.8 cm in diameter all over the body. A biopsy of the skin lesion was taken. Morphologically, the dermis was effaced by round or polygonal cells with oval nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, arranged in nests and in some areas in a sheet-like pattern. The tumor cells were positive for CD68, CD1a, and S-100, whereas negative for Langerin and lack Birbeck granules ultrastructurally. A diagnosis of IDCT was made. No treatment was given. The patient was alive with spontaneous disease regression after 17 months of follow-up.IDCT is an extremely rare disease and may be associated with mosquito bite.

  8. Gonadal development and germ cell tumors in mouse and humans.

    PubMed

    Dolci, Susanna; Campolo, Federica; De Felici, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    In multicellular organisms, proper development of gonads and germ cells is essential for the transmission of genetic information to the next generations and eventually for the survival of the species. For this reason, germline development is finely regulated to control germ cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Disruption of such controls can lead to infertility or germ cell tumors (GCTs). GCTs are particularly hideous pathologies since they occur mainly in neonates, infants, and children, rarely in the adults. They arise primarily in the testes and ovaries, though they can also develop in extragonadal sites along the midline of the body and the brain. Many similarities exist between most types of GCTs of the ovary and testis, including a morphological resemblance (often constituting a caricature of normal embryogenesis) and a similar pattern of chromosomal alterations. Furthermore, families with both ovarian and testicular GCTs have been reported, suggesting a possible common genetic etiology. This review focuses on the cellular processes, differentiation events and molecular mechanisms occurring during gonad development in mice and humans whose disturbance can be implicated in GCT formation.

  9. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  10. Granulomatous slack skin T-cell lymphoma: an important differential diagnosis with giant cell tumor of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Adriano, André Ricardo; Lima, Tiago Silveira; Battistella, Maxime; Bagot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous slack skin is an indolent T-cell lymphoma, considered to be a variant of mycosis fungoides. Clinically it is characterized by areas of redundant skin, wrinkled, inelastic, with variable erythema and infiltration besides a poikilodermic surface. A differential diagnosis unknown to most dermatologists is the giant cell tumor of soft tissue, which is an extremely rare low-grade sarcoma. The authors report a patient who had undergone extensive surgery because of a primary diagnosis of giant cell tumor of soft tissue, but which proved to be granulomatous slack skin after a second interventional procedure with confirmatory histopathology. PMID:26734874

  11. Granulomatous slack skin T-cell lymphoma: an important differential diagnosis with giant cell tumor of soft tissue*

    PubMed Central

    Adriano, André Ricardo; Lima, Tiago Silveira; Battistella, Maxime; Bagot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous slack skin is an indolent T-cell lymphoma, considered to be a variant of mycosis fungoides. Clinically it is characterized by areas of redundant skin, wrinkled, inelastic, with variable erythema and infiltration besides a poikilodermic surface. A differential diagnosis unknown to most dermatologists is the giant cell tumor of soft tissue, which is an extremely rare low-grade sarcoma. The authors report a patient who had undergone extensive surgery because of a primary diagnosis of giant cell tumor of soft tissue, but which proved to be granulomatous slack skin after a second interventional procedure with confirmatory histopathology. PMID:26734874

  12. Spontaneous acute tumor lysis syndrome in a DBA/1J mouse: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Karen; vanGessel, Yvonne; Asher, Ludmila V; Vogel, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous acute tumor lysis syndrome (ATLS) was diagnosed in a 10-month-old female DBA/1J sentinel mouse with leukemic lymphoma. The mouse was unable to maintain balance and died shortly after being observed rolling around in its cage. Disseminated neoplastic disease, including a large cranial mediastinal mass, enlarged lymph nodes and splenomegaly, was present at necropsy. Histopathologic examination revealed widespread massive necrosis of lymphoblastic tumor cells, and widely disseminated microemboli composed of nuclear and cytoplasmic cell debris. Although ATLS is widely recognized as an oncologic emergency in humans, acute lesions of ATLS have not been described. The mechanical obstruction of capillary beds by microemboli originating from disintegrating necrotic tumor cells was the likely cause of clinical signs and death in this mouse. We propose that similar microemboli may contribute to the pathogenesis of the acute renal failure and other clinical signs associated with ATLS in humans. Recognition of spontaneous ATLS in laboratory animals is especially important in studies that assess the efficacy and/or toxicity of anticancer treatments, where early deaths due to ATLS might mistakenly be attributed to a direct test article effect.

  13. Modulations of critical cell cycle regulatory events during chemoprevention of ultraviolet B-mediated responses by resveratrol in SKH-1 hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Reagan-Shaw, Shannon; Afaq, Farrukh; Aziz, Moammir Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2004-07-01

    Multiple exposures to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation cause critical damages that may lead to the development of several cutaneous disorders including skin cancer, the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the USA. Therefore, efforts are needed to: (i) study the mechanism(s) of UV-mediated cutaneous damages, and (ii) design novel approaches for the management of skin cancer. 'Chemoprevention' via plant-based agents may be a useful approach for the management of neoplasia. Here, we evaluated the involvement of cell cycle regulatory molecules during resveratrol-mediated protection from multiple exposures of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2); on alternate days x 7 exposures) radiations in the SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. Resveratrol was topically applied on the skin of SKH-1 hairless mice at a dose of 10 micromol/mouse (in 0.2 ml acetone; 30 min prior to each UVB exposure). Studies were performed at 24 h following the last UVB exposure. Topical application of resveratrol resulted in significant decrease in UVB-induced bi-fold skin thickness, hyperplasia, and infiltration of leukocytes. The data from immunoblot and/or immunohistochemical analyses revealed that multiple exposure to UVB radiations causes significant upregulation in: (i) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a marker of cellular proliferation, and (ii) cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-2, -4 and -6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. Resveratrol treatment resulted in significant downregulation in UV-mediated increases in these critical cell cycle regulatory proteins. An interesting observation of this study was that resveratrol treatment resulted in a further stimulation of UVB-mediated increases in cyclin kinase inhibitor WAF1/p21 and tumor suppressor p53. Further, resveratrol was also found to cause significant decreases in UVB-mediated upregulation of: (i) the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, and (ii) the 42 kDa isotype of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Thus, our data suggested that the antiproliferative

  14. Dosimetry study of PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Haixia; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that there is a large variability between PDT light dose and therapeutic outcomes. An explicit dosimetry model using apparent reacted 1O2 concentration [1O2]rx has been developed as a PDT dosimetric quantity to improve the accuracy of the predicted ability of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, this explicit macroscopic singlet oxygen model was adopted to establish the correlation between calculated reacted [1O2]rx and the tumor growth using Photofrin-mediated PDT in a mouse tumor model. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were injected with Photofrin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. PDT was performed 24h later with different fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) and different fluences (50 and 135 J/cm2) using a collimated light applicator coupled to a 630nm laser. The tumor volume was monitored daily after PDT and correlated with the total light fluence and [1O2]rx. Photophysical parameters as well as the singlet oxygen threshold dose for this sensitizer and the RIF tumor model were determined previously. The result showed that tumor growth rate varied greatly with light fluence for different fluence rates while [1O2]rx had a good correlation with the PDT-induced tumor growth rate. This preliminary study indicated that [1O2]rx could serve as a better dosimetric predictor for predicting PDT outcome than PDT light dose.

  15. Polymorphic Expression of a Human Superficial Bladder Tumor Antigen Defined by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradet, Yves; Islam, Nazrul; Boucher, Lucie; Parent-Vaugeois, Carmen; Tardif, Marc

    1987-10-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up.

  16. New molecular and cellular targets for chemoprevention and treatment of skin tumors by plant polyphenols: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Korkina, L G; Pastore, S; Dellambra, E; De Luca, C

    2013-01-01

    As the incidence of skin tumors has been steadily growing, there is an urgent need for the preventive measures as well as the improved therapeutic approaches. In the last two decades, natural plant derived polyphenols (PPs, resveratrol, silibinin, green tea polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, etc.) have been drawing particular interest as emerging active substances in dermatological/cosmeceutical compositions for the prevention, slowing, or reversion of skin tumorigenesis (chemoprevention). When chronically applied to the skin, they supposedly would not damage normal skin cells or negatively affect their functions while they would suppress tumorigenic cell transformation, inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and activate tumor cell apoptosis. PPs are also reported to synergize with conventional anti-cancer therapies. The major aim of this critical review is to provide recent updates on the molecular and cellular targets for the prevention and therapy of skin tumors with a special focus on the crossroad between inflammation and carcinogenesis as the most promising approach to chemoprevention. Novel therapeutic targets as different as epidermal stem cells, cellular senescence, epigenetic enzymes involved in carcinogenesis, epidermal growth factor and aryl hydrocarbon receptors, and metabolic CYP1 subfamily enzymes are highlighted. The mechanisms of PPs interaction with these molecular and cellular targets are reviewed. The feasibility of PPs to prevent/ cure specific cutaneous toxicity connected to anti-EGFR therapy and to reduce multidrug resistance of skin tumors is also discussed. PMID:23210776

  17. Radiation-induced cell cycle delay measured in two mouse tumors in vivo using bromodeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.D.; Martindale, C.A.; Soranson, J.A.; Bourhis, J.; Carl, U.M.; McNally, N.J. )

    1994-02-01

    The magnitude of the delay of cells in the phases of the cell cycle after irradiation may be related to the radioresponsiveness of tumor cell populations. In this study we have quantified division delay in two mouse tumors in vivo after single and fractionated doses of X rays and single doses of neutrons. The incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine and flow cytometry provided a sensitive and quantitative method to detect cell cycle perturbations after radiation treatment. The more rapidly growing SAF tumor showed less G[sub 2]-phase delay per gray than a more slowly proliferating tumor, the Rh (0.9 vs 1.8 h). In addition, the SAF tumor failed to show any G[sub 1]/S-phase delay while the Rh tumor experienced a longer G[sub 1]-phase delay while the Rh tumor experienced a longer G[sub 1]-phase delay than that measured for G[sub 2] phase (3.1 vs 1.8 h). There was a trend in both tumors for lower doses to be more effective in producing cell cycle delays. Neutrons caused longer G[sub 2]-phase delays on a unit dose basis, 2.5 and 5.4 h for the SAF and Rh tumors, respectively. The RBE for neutrons for division delay was found to be 2.9 and 2.8 for the SAF and Rh tumors, while the RBE for growth delay was 3.4 and 3.5. Fractionation of the X-ray dose caused a reduction in division delay at higher total doses (10 or 12 Gy) but was without effect at the lower dose studied (6 Gy). These studies show the feasibility of measuring cell cycle delays in vivo, and future developments are suggested for a possible predictive test in patients receiving radiotherapy. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. [Treatment options of non-melanoma skin tumors in organ transplant recipients in relation to a case report].

    PubMed

    Gellén, Emese; Péter, Zoltán; Emri, Gabriella; Asztalos, László; Remenyik, Éva

    2016-06-12

    The authors present the case of a 59-year-old male patient, whose first kidney transplantation was in 1983 and the second in 2000. The first squamous cell carcinoma appeared on the skin 2 years after the first transplantation. Since 2003, at least two precancerous lesions or non-melanoma skin tumors have been removed surgically yearly. These cancers appeared predominantly on the sun-exposed skin, and were multiple. As these tumors could behave aggressively and prone to recurrence, complex treatment was applied, which included a switch in immunosuppressive drugs and the application of field therapies. The authors give an overview of these treatment options in relation to the case presentation, emphasizing that not only early detection and active treatment of the precancerous lesions and skin cancers are essential, but education of proper sun-protection methods and dermatology care are also important in order to avoid the development of these tumors. PMID:27263436

  19. 3-D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging of prostate tumor progression in the mouse window chamber

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting their response to treatment. We describe a novel, high-resolution coregistered photoacoustic (PA) and pulse echo (PE) ultrasound system used to image the tumor microenvironment. Compared to traditional optical systems, the platform provides complementary contrast and important depth information. Three mice are implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber and injected with PC-3 prostate tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein. The ensuing tumor invasion is mapped during three weeks or more using simultaneous PA and PE imaging at 25 MHz, combined with optical and fluorescent techniques. Pulse echo imaging provides details of tumor structure and the surrounding environment with 100-μm3 resolution. Tumor size increases dramatically with an average volumetric growth rate of 5.35 mm3∕day, correlating well with 2-D fluorescent imaging (R = 0.97, p < 0.01). Photoacoustic imaging is able to track the underlying vascular network and identify hemorrhaging, while PA spectroscopy helps classify blood vessels according to their optical absorption spectrum, suggesting variation in blood oxygen saturation. Photoacoustic and PE imaging are safe, translational modalities that provide enhanced depth resolution and complementary contrast to track the tumor microenvironment, evaluate new cancer therapies, and develop molecular contrast agents in vivo. PMID:21361696

  20. 3-D photoacoustic and pulse echo imaging of prostate tumor progression in the mouse window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Daniel R.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Montilla, Leonardo G.; Witte, Russell S.

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the tumor microenvironment is critical to characterizing how cancers operate and predicting their response to treatment. We describe a novel, high-resolution coregistered photoacoustic (PA) and pulse echo (PE) ultrasound system used to image the tumor microenvironment. Compared to traditional optical systems, the platform provides complementary contrast and important depth information. Three mice are implanted with a dorsal skin flap window chamber and injected with PC-3 prostate tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein. The ensuing tumor invasion is mapped during three weeks or more using simultaneous PA and PE imaging at 25 MHz, combined with optical and fluorescent techniques. Pulse echo imaging provides details of tumor structure and the surrounding environment with 100-μm3 resolution. Tumor size increases dramatically with an average volumetric growth rate of 5.35 mm3/day, correlating well with 2-D fluorescent imaging (R = 0.97, p < 0.01). Photoacoustic imaging is able to track the underlying vascular network and identify hemorrhaging, while PA spectroscopy helps classify blood vessels according to their optical absorption spectrum, suggesting variation in blood oxygen saturation. Photoacoustic and PE imaging are safe, translational modalities that provide enhanced depth resolution and complementary contrast to track the tumor microenvironment, evaluate new cancer therapies, and develop molecular contrast agents in vivo.

  1. Topical glycerol monooleate/propylene glycol formulations enhance 5-aminolevulinic acid in vitro skin delivery and in vivo protophorphyrin IX accumulation in hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Steluti, Regilene; De Rosa, Fernanda Scarmato; Collett, John; Tedesco, Antônio Cláudio; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a potential therapy for cancer treatment, utilizes exogenously applied or endogenously formed photosensitizers, further activated by light in an appropriate wavelength and dose to induce cell death through free radical formation. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a pro-drug which can be converted to the effective photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). However, the use of 5-ALA in PDT is limited by the low penetration capacity of this highly hydrophilic molecule into appropriate skin layers. In the present study, we propose to increase 5-ALA penetration by using formulations containing glycerol monooleate (GMO), an interesting and useful component of pharmaceutical formulations. Propylene glycol solutions containing different concentrations of GMO significantly increased the in vitro skin permeation/retention of 5-ALA in comparison to control solutions. In vivo studies also showed increased PpIX accumulation in mouse hairless skin, after the use of topical 5-ALA formulations containing GMO in a concentration-dependent manner. The results show that skin 5-ALA penetration and PpIX accumulation, important factors for the success of topical 5-ALA-PDT in skin cancer, are optimized by GMO/propylene glycol formulations.

  2. The effect of vehicle on the diffusion of salicylic acid through hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Sloan, K B; Siver, K G; Koch, S A

    1986-08-01

    The solubilities of salicylic acid in, and the fluxes through, hairless mouse skin from isopropyl myristate, 1-octanol, 1-propanol, propylene glycol, and formamide have been determined experimentally. Values for permeability coefficients (Kp) corresponding to the respective fluxes were determined from: flux/solubility = Kp. These values were then compared with values for the respective partition coefficients (P) which were calculated from the known solubility parameters for the vehicles (delta v), salicylic acid (delta i), and skin (delta s). Two different delta i values were used to calculate theoretical P values, one based on the peak solubility method and the other based on calculation from group contributions (11 and 14.4 (cal/cm3)1/2, respectively). There was good correlation between the values for theoretical log P - 1.42 and experimental log Kp for the delivery of salicylic acid from vehicles exhibiting solubility parameters in the range of delta v = 10-18 (cal/cm3)1/2, when delta i was assumed to be 14.4 (cal/cm3)1/2. There was also a good correlation between the values for theoretical log P - 2.09 and experimental log Kp for vehicles exhibiting solubility parameters in the range of delta v = 7.6-10 (cal/cm3)1/2, when delta i was assumed to be 11 (cal/cm3)1/2. Two different delta i values were used because salicylic acid apparently behaves like a polar molecule in polar vehicles and a nonpolar molecule in nonpolar vehicles. Qualitatively, fluxes and permeability coefficients were found to be inversely dependent on drug solubility in the vehicles, with a minimum that corresponded approximately to the point where delta v = delta i, and the minimum within the theoretical P curve.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. In vivo characterization of early-stage radiation skin injury in a mouse model by two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Hyuk; Shim, Sehwan; Wang, Taejun; Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won-Suk; Myung, Jae Kyung; Park, Sunhoo; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) injury is tissue damage caused by high energy electromagnetic waves such as X-ray and gamma ray. Diagnosis and treatment of IR injury are difficult due to its characteristics of clinically latent post-irradiation periods and the following successive and unpredictable inflammatory bursts. Skin is one of the many sensitive organs to IR and bears local injury upon exposure. Early-stage diagnosis of IR skin injury is essential in order to maximize treatment efficiency and to prevent the aggravation of IR injury. In this study, early-stage changes of the IR injured skin at the cellular level were characterized in an in vivo mouse model by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Various IR doses were applied to the mouse hind limbs and the injured skin regions were imaged daily for 6 days after IR irradiation. Changes in the morphology and distribution of the epidermal cells and damage of the sebaceous glands were observed before clinical symptoms. These results showed that TPM is sensitive to early-stage changes of IR skin injury and may be useful for its diagnosis. PMID:26755422

  4. In vivo characterization of early-stage radiation skin injury in a mouse model by two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Won Hyuk; Shim, Sehwan; Wang, Taejun; Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won-Suk; Myung, Jae Kyung; Park, Sunhoo; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) injury is tissue damage caused by high energy electromagnetic waves such as X-ray and gamma ray. Diagnosis and treatment of IR injury are difficult due to its characteristics of clinically latent post-irradiation periods and the following successive and unpredictable inflammatory bursts. Skin is one of the many sensitive organs to IR and bears local injury upon exposure. Early-stage diagnosis of IR skin injury is essential in order to maximize treatment efficiency and to prevent the aggravation of IR injury. In this study, early-stage changes of the IR injured skin at the cellular level were characterized in an in vivo mouse model by two-photon microscopy (TPM). Various IR doses were applied to the mouse hind limbs and the injured skin regions were imaged daily for 6 days after IR irradiation. Changes in the morphology and distribution of the epidermal cells and damage of the sebaceous glands were observed before clinical symptoms. These results showed that TPM is sensitive to early-stage changes of IR skin injury and may be useful for its diagnosis. PMID:26755422

  5. Mapping tissue shear modulus on Thiel soft-embalmed mouse skin with shear wave optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Joy, Joyce; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative measurement of the mechanical properties of biological tissue is a useful assessment of its physiologic conditions, which may aid medical diagnosis and treatment of, e.g., scleroderma and skin cancer. Traditional elastography techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography and ultrasound elastography have limited scope of application on skin due to insufficient spatial resolution. Recently, dynamic / transient elastography are attracting more applications with the advantage of non-destructive measurements, and revealing the absolute moduli values of tissue mechanical properties. Shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) is a novel transient elastography method, which lays emphasis on the propagation of dynamic mechanical waves. In this study, high speed shear wave imaging technique was applied to a range of soft-embalmed mouse skin, where 3 kHz shear waves were launched with a piezoelectric actuator as an external excitation. The shear wave velocity was estimated from the shear wave images, and used to recover a shear modulus map in the same OCT imaging range. Results revealed significant difference in shear modulus and structure in compliance with gender, and images on fresh mouse skin are also compared. Thiel embalming technique is also proven to present the ability to furthest preserve the mechanical property of biological tissue. The experiment results suggest that SW-OCE is an effective technique for quantitative estimation of skin tissue biomechanical status.

  6. Antiinflammatory and Antiphotodamaging Effects of Ergostatrien-3β-ol, Isolated from Antrodia camphorata, on Hairless Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Tzu-Yu; You, Ya-Jhen; Wen, Kuo-Ching; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Ergostatrien-3β-ol (EK100), isolated from the submerged whole broth of Antrodia camphorata, has antidiabetic, hyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective activities. However, the antiphotodamage activity of EK100 has still not been revealed. Inflammation and collagen degradation contribute to skin photodamage and premature aging. In the present study, in vivo experiments were designed to investigate the antiinflammatory and antiphotodamaging activities of EK100 in hairless mice by physiological and histological analysis of the skin. Results indicated that topical application of EK100 (25 and 100 μM) for 10 weeks efficiently inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced wrinkle formation, erythema, and epidermal thickness in the mice skin. EK100 also restored UVB-induced collagen content reduction in hairless mice skin. In addition, the immunohistochemistry results indicated that EK100 significantly inhibited the UVB-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) in the mouse skin. The expression of these proteins was similar to the Normal group after 100 μM EK100 treatment. EK100 inhibited collagen degradation in the skin through MMP-1 inhibition and antiinflammation. EK100 significantly reduced the transepidermal water loss (TEWL), indicating that EK100 protected skin from UVB-induced damage. Our findings strongly suggest that EK100 has significant beneficial antiinflammatory and antiphotoaging activities and that EK100 can be developed as an antiphotodamaging agent. PMID:27626393

  7. Merkel cell tumor of the skin treated with localized radiotherapy: are widely negative margins required?

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Mark; Packard, Matthew; Velosa, Claudia; Silverman, Jan; Werts, Day; Parda, David

    2011-01-01

    Merkel's cell carcinoma is a rare cutaneous tumor that can affect a wide variety of sites throughout the body. Commonly, it affects the skin alone and the management of limited disease can be confusing since the natural history of the disease involves distant metastasis. Traditional management has required wide local excision with negative margins of resection. We describe a case treated with local therapy alone and review the literature to suggest that complete microscopic excision may not be required if adjuvant radiotherapy is used. PMID:21464874

  8. Merkel cell tumor of the skin treated with localized radiotherapy: are widely negative margins required?

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Mark; Packard, Matthew; Velosa, Claudia; Silverman, Jan; Werts, Day; Parda, David

    2011-03-30

    Merkel's cell carcinoma is a rare cutaneous tumor that can affect a wide variety of sites throughout the body. Commonly, it affects the skin alone and the management of limited disease can be confusing since the natural history of the disease involves distant metastasis. Traditional management has required wide local excision with negative margins of resection. We describe a case treated with local therapy alone and review the literature to suggest that complete microscopic excision may not be required if adjuvant radiotherapy is used.

  9. Topical photodynamic therapy with 5-ALA in the treatment of arsenic-induced skin tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrer, Sigrid; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Landthaler, Michael

    1995-03-01

    A case of a 62-year-old woman suffering from psoriasis who was treated orally with arsenic 25 years ago is reported. The cumulative dose of arsenic trioxide was 800 mg. Since 10 years ago arsenic keratoses, basal cell carcinomas, Bowen's disease and invasive squamous cell carcinomas mainly on her hands and feet have developed, skin changes were clearly a sequence of arsenic therapy. Control of disease was poor, her right little finger had to be amputated. Topical photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolevulinic acid was performed on her right hand. Clinical and histological examinations 6 months after treatment showed an excellent cosmetic result with no signs of tumor residue.

  10. Sunlight suppressing rejection of 280- to 320-nm UV-radiation-induced skin tumors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Morison, W.L.; Kelley, S.P.

    1985-02-01

    Repeated exposure of female C3H/HeNCR- mice to sunlight prevented the normal immunologic rejection of a UV-induced tumor. This systemic immunologic alteration was transferred to syngeneic lethally X-irradiated animals with lymphoid cells from mice exposed to sunlight. The lymphoid cells also were able to suppress the capacity of lymphoid cells from normal animals to reject a UV-induced tumor. The 295- to 320-nm wave band appeared to be responsible for this immunosuppressive effect of sunlight because suppression was prevented by filtration of the radiation through Mylar and by application of a sunscreen containing para-aminobenzoic acid. These observations may have importance in understanding the pathogenesis of sunlight-induced skin cancer in humans.

  11. Passive cigarette smoke exposure inhibits ultraviolet light B-induced skin tumors in SKH-1 hairless mice by blocking the nuclear factor kappa B signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gottipati, Koteswara R; Poulsen, Henrik; Starcher, Barry

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to sunlight [ultraviolet light B (UVB) irradiation] is the most common cause of non-melanoma skin tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of passive cigarette smoke superimposed over UVB irradiation, on tumor development, skin pathology and matrix changes in SKH-1 hairless mice. Groups of mice were exposed to 0.1 J/cm(2) of UVB five times per week for 20 weeks and/or exposure to passive cigarette smoke from 40 cigarettes a day over the same time period. UVB exposure resulted in an average of four large squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 15 smaller papillomas per mouse, whereas exposing the mice to both UVB + passive cigarette smoke completely prevented SCC formation and averaged less than one small papilloma per mouse. Oxidative DNA damage was investigated and there were no significant changes in the levels of urinary DNA adducts between control, smoke, UV and UV + smoke groups with the exception of 8-oxo guanine which was significantly reduced in the presence of passive cigarette smoke. Immunohistochemistry results revealed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNF-R2), glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB)/p65, KI-67 and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were markedly up-regulated in the epithelium by UVB exposure, whereas passive smoke exposure combined with the UVB irradiation completely blocked the expression of these proteins. Our results suggest that passive smoke exposure prevents UVB-induced SCC in mice and dramatically reduces the incidence of non-malignant papillomas by altering the NF-kappaB signalling pathway of tumorigenesis. PMID:18312384

  12. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (ECTO-NOX) of mouse skin responds to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2003-01-01

    NADH oxidases of the external plasma membrane surface (ECTO-NOX proteins) are characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of 24 min. Explants of mouse skin exhibit the oscillatory activity as estimated from the decrease in A(340) suggesting that individual ECTO-NOX molecules must somehow be induced to function synchronously. Transfer of explants of mouse skin from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromol m(-1) s(-1)) resulted in initiation of a new activity maximum (entrainment) with a midpoint 36 min after light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Addition of melatonin resulted in a new maximum 24 min after melatonin addition. The findings suggest that the ECTO-NOX proteins play a central role in the entrainment of the biological clock both by light and by melatonin.

  13. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  14. Transport behavior of hairless mouse skin during constant current DC iontophoresis I: baseline studies.

    PubMed

    Liddell, Mark R; Li, S Kevin; Higuchi, William I

    2011-04-01

    The fluxes of charged and nonionic molecules across hairless mouse skin (HMS) were induced by direct current iontophoresis and used to characterize the transport pathways of the epidermal membrane. Experimental data were used to determine permeability coefficients from which the effective pore radii (Rp) of the transport pathways were calculated. Permeants used in these experiments were nonionic permeants (urea, mannitol, and raffinose), monovalent cationic permeants (sodium, tetraethylammonium, and tetraphenylphosphonium ions), and monovalent anionic permeants (chloride, salicylate, and taurocholate ions). The Rp estimates obtained by the anionic permeant pairs were 49, 22, and 20 Å for the chloride/salicylate (Cl:SA), chloride/taurocholate (Cl:TC), and salicylate/taurocholate (SA:TC) pairs, respectively; with the cationic permeant pairs, the Rp values obtained were 19, 30, and 24 Å for the sodium/tetraethylammonium (Na:TEA), sodium/tetraphenylphosphonium (Na:TPP), and the tetraethylammonium/tetraphenylphosphonium (TEA:TPP) pairs, respectively. Rp estimates for HMS obtained from nonionic permeant experiments ranged from 6.7 to 13.4 Å. When plotted versus their respective diffusion coefficients, all of the permeability coefficients for the cationic permeants were greater than those of the anionic permeants. Additionally, the magnitudes of permeability coefficients determined in the current study with HMS were of the same order of magnitude as those previously determined in our laboratory using human epidermal membrane under similar iontophoresis conditions. PMID:21259234

  15. Carcinogenicity and co-carcinogenicity studies on propoxur in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Y; Baqar, S M; Mehrotra, N K

    1998-12-01

    Propoxur (2-isopropoxyphenyl methylcarbamate) is a widely used broad spectrum carbamate insecticide mainly used to control household pests. Propoxur exposure is reported to inhibit cholinesterase activity in rodents. Apart from other toxic effects, propoxur was found to possess tumorigenic activity in rats after oral administration. Propoxur does not produce tumours in mice or hamsters, or bladder hyperplasia in dogs and monkeys following oral feeding. In this set of investigations the complete carcinogenic, tumour initiating and promoting potential of propoxur was evaluated in male and female Swiss albino mice, since no information was available following dermal exposure of propoxur. The animals were exposed to propoxur through topical painting on the interscapular region at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. The results revealed that propoxur has tumour promoting potential on mouse skin following a two-stage initiation-promotion protocol, but it failed to induce the tumour(s) at a significant level, when tested for tumour initiating and complete carcinogenic property.

  16. Transport behavior of hairless mouse skin during constant current DC iontophoresis I: baseline studies.

    PubMed

    Liddell, Mark R; Li, S Kevin; Higuchi, William I

    2011-04-01

    The fluxes of charged and nonionic molecules across hairless mouse skin (HMS) were induced by direct current iontophoresis and used to characterize the transport pathways of the epidermal membrane. Experimental data were used to determine permeability coefficients from which the effective pore radii (Rp) of the transport pathways were calculated. Permeants used in these experiments were nonionic permeants (urea, mannitol, and raffinose), monovalent cationic permeants (sodium, tetraethylammonium, and tetraphenylphosphonium ions), and monovalent anionic permeants (chloride, salicylate, and taurocholate ions). The Rp estimates obtained by the anionic permeant pairs were 49, 22, and 20 Å for the chloride/salicylate (Cl:SA), chloride/taurocholate (Cl:TC), and salicylate/taurocholate (SA:TC) pairs, respectively; with the cationic permeant pairs, the Rp values obtained were 19, 30, and 24 Å for the sodium/tetraethylammonium (Na:TEA), sodium/tetraphenylphosphonium (Na:TPP), and the tetraethylammonium/tetraphenylphosphonium (TEA:TPP) pairs, respectively. Rp estimates for HMS obtained from nonionic permeant experiments ranged from 6.7 to 13.4 Å. When plotted versus their respective diffusion coefficients, all of the permeability coefficients for the cationic permeants were greater than those of the anionic permeants. Additionally, the magnitudes of permeability coefficients determined in the current study with HMS were of the same order of magnitude as those previously determined in our laboratory using human epidermal membrane under similar iontophoresis conditions.

  17. CCL21 (SLC) improves tumor protection by a DNA vaccine in a Her2/neu mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, T; Baldenhofer, G; Sayed Ahmed, M S; Pham-Duc, M; Vu, M D; Lipp, M; Dörken, B; Pezzutto, A; Westermann, J

    2012-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine (SLC/CCL21) is a CC chemokine that is constitutively expressed in various lymphoid tissues and binds to chemokine receptor CCR7 on mature dendritic cells (DCs) and distinct T-and B-cell sub-populations. In vivo, CCL21 regulates the encounters between DC and T cells and thus is a key regulator of adaptive immune responses. We asked whether CCL21 is able to augment immunogenicity of a DNA-based vaccine against Her2/neu in a Balb/c mouse model with syngeneic Her2/neu+ tumor cells (D2F2/E2). Mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with plasmid DNA (pDNA) on day 1 and boosted on day 15; tumor challenge was performed subcutaneously on day 25. Coexpression of CCL21 and Her-2/neu resulted in induction of a TH1-polarized immune response and substantial improvement of the protective effect of the DNA vaccine. Coexpression of tumor antigen pDNA(Her2/neu) with both pDNA(GM-CSF) and pDNA(CCL21) as adjuvants led to further improvement of protection by the vaccine (70% tumor-free mice on day 35 vs 40% with either adjuvant alone vs 5-10% with tumor antigen alone). Our results show that CCL21 is a potent adjuvant for DNA vaccination, particularly in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Clinical use of a pDNA(Her2/neu/CCL21/GM-CSF) vaccine might be particularly promising in minimal residual Her2/neu+ breast cancer.

  18. Protective effect of alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate against ultraviolet B-induced damage in cultured mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Satomi; Katoh, Eiko M; Tsuzuki, Toshi; Kobayashi, Shizuko

    2003-08-01

    The ability of the novel water-soluble provitamin E, alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate, to protect against ultraviolet B-induced damage in cultured mouse skin was investigated and compared with the protectiveness of alpha-tocopherol acetate in cultured mouse skin. Pretreatment of skin with 0.5% (9.4 mM) alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate in medium for 3 h significantly prevented such photodamage as sunburn cell formation, DNA degradation, and lipid peroxidation, which were induced in control cultured skin by a single dose of ultraviolet B irradiation at 0 to 40 kJ per m2 (290-380 nm, maximum 312 nm). This protection was greater than that seen with alpha-tocopherol acetate, the most common provitamin E that is used in commercial human skin care products. The concentration of alpha-tocopherol in cultured skin pretreated with 0.5% alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate rose to approximately two to three times that found in the control skin and the reduction in cutaneous alpha-tocopherol that was induced by ultraviolet irradiation was significantly inhibited. In the group pretreated with 0.5% alpha-tocopherol acetate, however, conversion of alpha-tocopherol acetate to alpha-tocopherol was not observed, although the level of provitamin incorporated into the cultured skin was the same as that for alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate. These findings indicated that the enhanced ability of alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate to protect against ultraviolet B-induced skin damage compared with alpha-tocopherol acetate may have been due to alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate's conversion to alpha-tocopherol. Moreover, following pretreatment with a 0.5% alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate, alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate was incorporated into the human skin in a three-dimensional model and 5% of the incorporated alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate was converted to alpha-tocopherol. These results suggest that treatment with the novel provitamin E, alpha-tocopherol-6-O-phosphate may be useful in preventing ultraviolet

  19. Covalent binding of benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide to DNA of mouse skin: in vivo persistence of adducts formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.

    1985-01-01

    In the first 9 d after topical application of a single dose of benzo(a)pyrene to the dorsal skin of C/sub 3/H mice, the half-lives of benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide-DNA adducts and of DNA were determined to be approximately 5 d. These data indicate that, in proliferating mouse skin, benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide-DNA lesions are not repaired, but are diluted from the genome at a rate equivalent to DNA turnover (i.e., replication versus degradation). Subsequent to this initial period, benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide-DNA adduct removal continues, but at a much reduced rate. At 30 d posttreatment with benzo(a)pyrene, approximately 15% of the adducts are still detectable; however, their half-lives had increased to 30 d. Similar experiments with a hairless mouse showed that, although the amount of adduct formation was lower initially, the kinetics of aduct disappearance and persistence were essentially the same as found with the C/sub 3/H mouse. The data obtained in this work are consistent with the hypothesis that benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide adducts persist in a subpopulation of skin cells long after their disappearance by DNA turnover would predict.

  20. Moisturizing lotions can increase transdermal absorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxacetic acid across hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Brand, R M; Charron, A R; Sandler, V L; Jendrzejewski, J L

    2007-01-01

    Moisturizing lotions can be an effective treatment for occupationally induced dry skin. These compounds are designed to be hygroscopic and retain water to keep the stratum corneum hydrated, while at the same time enhancing the horny layer to prevent increases in transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Skin hydration levels, however, are known to influence barrier properties. The purpose of this work was to compare skin moisture levels induced by four commercially available moisturizing lotions with their capacity as transdermal penetration enhancers using the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as a model chemical. Further, the effect of moisturizing the skin after washing with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on transdermal absorption was determined. Skin moisture levels were also measured noninvasively and were correlated to penetration enhancement. Hairless mouse skin was pretreated with commercially available moisturizing lotions either with or without SLS washing and in vitro permeability studies were performed with the herbicide 2,4-D. The data demonstrate that pretreatment with three of the four lotions tested increased the transdermal absorption of 2,4-D as evidenced by cumulative penetration or faster lag times (p < 0.05). Skin moisture levels correlated with the penetration enhancement capabilities of the lotion. Washing the skin with 5% SDS increased the transdermal absorption of 2,4-D (p < 0.05) and application of moisturizing lotions increased the absorption further. In summary moisturizing lotions may influence transdermal penetration of the skin, with the more effective moisturizers having a greater effect on 2,4-D absorption.

  1. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  2. Carcinogenicity evaluation: comparison of tumor data from dual control groups in the CD-1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Baldrick, Paul; Reeve, Lesley

    2007-06-01

    Current regulatory thinking allows for the use of single control groups for rodent carcinogenicity testing although there has been a trend until recently to use dual control groups. To date, virtually nothing has been published on whether a shift from dual to single control groups will affect the identification of tumorigenic risk potential in these studies. A recent evaluation of dual control carcinogenicity data in the rat (Baldrick, Toxicol Pathol 2005, 33: 283-291) showed that although no major differences in tumor incidences between the control groups were found, some interstudy variation occurred and in cases were a notable difference was seen, the use of 2 control groups, as well as robust, contemporary background data, allowed an easier interpretation of findings in drug-treated groups. In this paper, the results of 10 mouse carcinogenicity studies, performed between 1991 and 2004, with 2 control groups, are presented. As in the rat, interstudy variation was seen and in some cases, the use of dual control groups assisted in the tumor risk assessment. Thus, the continued use of 2 control groups can have a vital role in mouse carcinogenicity studies. The paper also presents an update on survival, on the range and extent of background spontaneous neoplasms and comments on genetic drift in this commonly used mouse strain.

  3. Impact of Cosmetic Lotions on Nanoparticle Penetration through ex vivo C57BL/6 Hairless Mouse and Human Skin: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Jatana, Samreen; Callahan, Linda M.; Pentland, Alice P.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interactions of nanoparticles (NPs) with skin is important from a consumer and occupational health and safety perspective, as well as for the design of effective NP-based transdermal therapeutics. Despite intense efforts to elucidate the conditions that permit NP penetration, there remains a lack of translatable results from animal models to human skin. The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of common skin lotions on NP penetration and to quantify penetration differences of quantum dot (QD) NPs between freshly excised human and mouse skin. QDs were mixed in 7 different vehicles, including 5 commercial skin lotions. These were topically applied to skin using two exposure methods; a petri dish protocol and a Franz diffusion cell protocol. QD presence in the skin was quantified using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. Results show that the commercial vehicles can significantly impact QD penetration in both mouse and human skin. Lotions that contain alpha hydroxyl acids (AHA) facilitated NP penetration. Lower QD signal was observed in skin studied using a Franz cell. Freshly excised human skin was also studied immediately after the sub-cutaneous fat removal process, then after 24 hours rest ex vivo. Resting human skin 24 hours prior to QD exposure significantly reduced epidermal presence. This study exemplifies how application vehicles, skin processing and the exposure protocol can affect QD penetration results and the conclusions that maybe drawn between skin models. PMID:27453793

  4. Tumor-suppressor Genes, Cell Cycle Regulatory Checkpoints, and the Skin.

    PubMed

    Abreu Velez, Ana Maria; Howard, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    The cell cycle (or cell-division cycle) is a series of events that take place in a cell, leading to its division and duplication. Cell division requires cell cycle checkpoints (CPs) that are used by the cell to both monitor and regulate the progress of the cell cycle. Tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) or antioncogenes are genes that protect the cell from a single event or multiple events leading to cancer. When these genes mutate, the cell can progress to a cancerous state. We aimed to perform a narrative review, based on evaluation of the manuscripts published in MEDLINE-indexed journals using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms "tumor suppressor's genes," "skin," and "cell cycle regulatory checkpoints." We aimed to review the current concepts regarding TSGs, CPs, and their association with selected cutaneous diseases. It is important to take into account that in some cell cycle disorders, multiple genetic abnormalities may occur simultaneously. These abnormalities may include intrachromosomal insertions, unbalanced division products, recombinations, reciprocal deletions, and/or duplication of the inserted segments or genes; thus, these presentations usually involve several genes. Due to their complexity, these disorders require specialized expertise for proper diagnosis, counseling, personal and family support, and genetic studies. Alterations in the TSGs or CP regulators may occur in many benign skin proliferative disorders, neoplastic processes, and genodermatoses.

  5. Tumor-suppressor Genes, Cell Cycle Regulatory Checkpoints, and the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; Howard, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The cell cycle (or cell-division cycle) is a series of events that take place in a cell, leading to its division and duplication. Cell division requires cell cycle checkpoints (CPs) that are used by the cell to both monitor and regulate the progress of the cell cycle. Tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) or antioncogenes are genes that protect the cell from a single event or multiple events leading to cancer. When these genes mutate, the cell can progress to a cancerous state. We aimed to perform a narrative review, based on evaluation of the manuscripts published in MEDLINE-indexed journals using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms “tumor suppressor's genes,” “skin,” and “cell cycle regulatory checkpoints.” We aimed to review the current concepts regarding TSGs, CPs, and their association with selected cutaneous diseases. It is important to take into account that in some cell cycle disorders, multiple genetic abnormalities may occur simultaneously. These abnormalities may include intrachromosomal insertions, unbalanced division products, recombinations, reciprocal deletions, and/or duplication of the inserted segments or genes; thus, these presentations usually involve several genes. Due to their complexity, these disorders require specialized expertise for proper diagnosis, counseling, personal and family support, and genetic studies. Alterations in the TSGs or CP regulators may occur in many benign skin proliferative disorders, neoplastic processes, and genodermatoses. PMID:26110128

  6. Cytochrome P450 1b1 in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced skin carcinogenesis: Tumorigenicity of individual PAHs and coal-tar extract, DNA adduction and expression of select genes in the Cyp1b1 knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Bunde, Kristi L.; Harper, Tod A.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Krueger, Sharon K.; and others

    2015-09-01

    FVB/N mice wild-type, heterozygous or null for Cyp 1b1 were used in a two-stage skin tumor study comparing PAH, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), and coal tar extract (CTE, SRM 1597a). Following 20 weeks of promotion with TPA the Cyp 1b1 null mice, initiated with DBC, exhibited reductions in incidence, multiplicity, and progression. None of these effects were observed with BaP or CTE. The mechanism of Cyp 1b1-dependent alteration of DBC skin carcinogenesis was further investigated by determining expression of select genes in skin from DBC-treated mice 2, 4 and 8 h post-initiation. A significant reduction in levels of Cyp 1a1, Nqo1 at 8 h and Akr 1c14 mRNA was observed in Cyp 1b1 null (but not wt or het) mice, whereas no impact was observed in Gst a1, Nqo 1 at 2 and 4 h or Akr 1c19 at any time point. Cyp 1b1 mRNA was not elevated by DBC. The major covalent DNA adducts, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-(±)-11,12-dihydrodiol-cis and trans-13,14-epoxide-deoxyadenosine (DBCDE-dA) were quantified by UHPLC-MS/MS 8 h post-initiation. Loss of Cyp1 b1 expression reduced DBCDE-dA adducts in the skin but not to a statistically significant degree. The ratio of cis- to trans-DBCDE-dA adducts was higher in the skin than other target tissues such as the spleen, lung and liver (oral dosing). These results document that Cyp 1b1 plays a significant role in bioactivation and carcinogenesis of DBC in a two-stage mouse skin tumor model and that loss of Cyp 1b1 has little impact on tumor response with BaP or CTE as initiators. - Highlights: • Cyp1b1 null mice exhibit lower skin cancer sensitivity to DBC but not BaP or CTE. • Cyp1b1 expression impacts expression of other PAH metabolizing enzymes. • cis/trans-DBCDE-dA ratio significantly higher in the skin than the spleen, lung or liver • Potency of DBC and CTE in mouse skin is higher than predicted by RPFs.

  7. Transcriptional recapitulation and subversion of embryonic colon development by mouse colon tumor models and human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Sergio; Park, Young-Kyu; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Halberg, Richard B; Yu, Ming; Jessen, Walter J; Freudenberg, Johannes; Chen, Xiaodi; Haigis, Kevin; Jegga, Anil G; Kong, Sue; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Xu, Huan; Reichling, Timothy; Azhar, Mohammad; Boivin, Gregory P; Roberts, Reade B; Bissahoyo, Anika C; Gonzales, Fausto; Bloom, Greg C; Eschrich, Steven; Carter, Scott L; Aronow, Jeremy E; Kleimeyer, John; Kleimeyer, Michael; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Settle, Stephen H; Boone, Braden; Levy, Shawn; Graff, Jonathan M; Doetschman, Thomas; Groden, Joanna; Dove, William F; Threadgill, David W; Yeatman, Timothy J; Coffey, Robert J; Aronow, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    Background The expression of carcino-embryonic antigen by colorectal cancer is an example of oncogenic activation of embryonic gene expression. Hypothesizing that oncogenesis-recapitulating-ontogenesis may represent a broad programmatic commitment, we compared gene expression patterns of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) and mouse colon tumor models to those of mouse colon development embryonic days 13.5-18.5. Results We report here that 39 colon tumors from four independent mouse models and 100 human CRCs encompassing all clinical stages shared a striking recapitulation of embryonic colon gene expression. Compared to normal adult colon, all mouse and human tumors over-expressed a large cluster of genes highly enriched for functional association to the control of cell cycle progression, proliferation, and migration, including those encoding MYC, AKT2, PLK1 and SPARC. Mouse tumors positive for nuclear β-catenin shifted the shared embryonic pattern to that of early development. Human and mouse tumors differed from normal embryonic colon by their loss of expression modules enriched for tumor suppressors (EDNRB, HSPE, KIT and LSP1). Human CRC adenocarcinomas lost an additional suppressor module (IGFBP4, MAP4K1, PDGFRA, STAB1 and WNT4). Many human tumor samples also gained expression of a coordinately regulated module associated with advanced malignancy (ABCC1, FOXO3A, LIF, PIK3R1, PRNP, TNC, TIMP3 and VEGF). Conclusion Cross-species, developmental, and multi-model gene expression patterning comparisons provide an integrated and versatile framework for definition of transcriptional programs associated with oncogenesis. This approach also provides a general method for identifying pattern-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets. This delineation and categorization of developmental and non-developmental activator and suppressor gene modules can thus facilitate the formulation of sophisticated hypotheses to evaluate potential synergistic effects of targeting within- and

  8. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  9. ENDOTOXIN AS ADJUVATOR TO THE TRANSPLANTATION OF A MOUSE MAMMARY TUMOR

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, James Stuart

    1968-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor MT 296 was used in a further series of experiments on the implantation of tumor, plated out in vivo, from suspensions of individual cells. Lipopolysaccharide from S. typhosa was shown to exert an adjuvator influence. But this adjuvator, an endotoxin, had no direct effect on the suspended tumor cells, unlike the liver preparations previously reported. Lipopolysaccharide from S. typhosa was shown to act on the host. It made the host's connective tissue expanses more susceptible to successful implantation by the tumor cells. It did this only if present at the time these connective tissue expanses were split. The increased susceptibility, caused by splitting the connective tissue expanses in the presence of lipopolysaccharide, declined quickly after 24 hr. The structural changes wrought upon the connective tissues by splitting them in the presence of lipopolysaccharide are described. They show kinship to a Schwartzman reaction of the local type. Their possible role in the adjuvator effect on the plating of single cell suspensions of this tumor is discussed. PMID:5688080

  10. Impact of mTORC1 inhibition on keratinocyte proliferation during skin tumor promotion in wild-type and BK5.AktWT mice.

    PubMed

    Rho, Okkyung; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Jiang, Guiyu; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mTORC1 signaling during 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion in both wild-type (FVB/N) and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA activated mTORC1 signaling in a time-dependent manner in cultured primary mouse keratinocytes and a mouse keratinocyte cell line. Early activation (15-30 min) of mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA was mediated in part by PKC activation, whereas later activation (2-4 h) was mediated by activation of EGFR and Akt. BK5.Akt(WT) transgenic mice, where Akt1 is overexpressed in basal epidermis, are highly sensitive to TPA-induced epidermal proliferation and two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Targeting mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferation as well as tumor promotion in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. A significant expansion (∼threefold) of the label retaining cell (LRC) population per hair follicle was observed in BK5.Akt(WT) mice compared to FVB/N mice. There was also a significant increase in K15 expressing cells in the hair follicle of transgenic mice that coincided with expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-S6K, and phospho-PRAS40, suggesting an important role of mTORC1 signaling in bulge-region keratinocyte stem cell (KSC) homeostasis. After 2 weeks of TPA treatment, LRCs had moved upward into the interfollicular epidermis from the bulge region of both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA-mediated LRC proliferation and migration was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. Collectively, the current data indicate that signaling through mTORC1 contributes significantly to the process of skin tumor promotion through effects on proliferation of the target cells for tumor development. PMID:24114993

  11. Impact of mTORC1 inhibition on keratinocyte proliferation during skin tumor promotion in wild-type and BK5.AktWT mice.

    PubMed

    Rho, Okkyung; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Jiang, Guiyu; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mTORC1 signaling during 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion in both wild-type (FVB/N) and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA activated mTORC1 signaling in a time-dependent manner in cultured primary mouse keratinocytes and a mouse keratinocyte cell line. Early activation (15-30 min) of mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA was mediated in part by PKC activation, whereas later activation (2-4 h) was mediated by activation of EGFR and Akt. BK5.Akt(WT) transgenic mice, where Akt1 is overexpressed in basal epidermis, are highly sensitive to TPA-induced epidermal proliferation and two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Targeting mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferation as well as tumor promotion in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. A significant expansion (∼threefold) of the label retaining cell (LRC) population per hair follicle was observed in BK5.Akt(WT) mice compared to FVB/N mice. There was also a significant increase in K15 expressing cells in the hair follicle of transgenic mice that coincided with expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-S6K, and phospho-PRAS40, suggesting an important role of mTORC1 signaling in bulge-region keratinocyte stem cell (KSC) homeostasis. After 2 weeks of TPA treatment, LRCs had moved upward into the interfollicular epidermis from the bulge region of both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA-mediated LRC proliferation and migration was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. Collectively, the current data indicate that signaling through mTORC1 contributes significantly to the process of skin tumor promotion through effects on proliferation of the target cells for tumor development.

  12. Carcinogen-induced mutations in the mouse c-Ha-ras gene provide evidence of multiple pathways for tumor progression

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Buchmann, A.; Balmain, A. )

    1990-01-01

    A number of mouse skin tumors initiated by the carcinogens N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), methylnitrosourea (MNU), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA), and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) have been shown to contain activated Ha-ras genes. In each case, the point mutations responsible for activation have been characterized. Results presented demonstrate the carcinogen-specific nature of these ras mutations. For each initiating agent, a distinct spectrum of mutations is observed. Most importantly, the distribution of ras gene mutations is found to differ between benign papillomas and carcinomas, suggesting that molecular events occurring at the time of initiation influence the probability with which papillomas progress to malignancy. This study provides molecular evidence in support of the existence of subsets of papillomas with differing progression frequencies. Thus, the alkylating agents MNNG and MNU induced exclusively G {yields} A transitions at codon 12, with this mutation being found predominantly in papillomas. MCA initiation produced both codon 13 G {yields} T and codon 61 A {yields} T transversions in papillomas; only the G {yields} T mutation, however, was found in carcinomas. These findings provide strong evidence that the mutational activation of Ha-ras occurs as a result of the initiation process and that the nature of the initiating event can affect the probability of progression to malignancy.

  13. Elevated cutaneous Smad activation associates with enhanced skin tumor susceptibility in organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Harradine, Kelly A.; Ridd, Katie; Saunier, Elise F.; Clermont, Frederic F.; Perez-Losada, Jesus; Moore, Dan H.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Bastian, Boris C.; Akhurst, Rosemary J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Non-melanoma skin cancer incidence is enhanced over fifty fold in patients taking anti-rejection drugs (ARDs) following organ transplantation. Pre-clinical studies suggest that ARD treatment increases transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) levels, which contribute to enhanced tumor susceptibility independent of the immune suppressive effects of ARDs. This study investigates whether TGF-β signaling is elevated in transplant patients. Experimental Design Immunohistochemical tissue microarray analysis was used to determine levels of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, TβRII, and activated P-Smad2/3 and P-Smad1/5/8 which are phosphorylated directly by distinct TGF-β/BMP receptor complexes. We analyzed over 200 cutaneous lesions and adjacent non-lesional skin samples from 87 organ transplant recipients, and 184 cutaneous lesions and adjacent skin samples from 184 individuals who had never received ARDs. Results We found significantly higher levels of P-Smad2 in both non-lesional and lesional tissue from transplant recipients compared to those not exposed to ARDs (P ≤ 0.001). In contrast, P-Smad1/5/8, a marker of activation of the bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway, was generally not expressed at higher levels in patients taking ARDs, including analysis of non-lesional skin, actinic keratoses, carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma, but was differentially expressed between keratoacanthoma from transplant recipients compared to those from non-transplant recipients (P ≤0.005). Conclusions Observation of elevated P-Smad2 levels in transplant recipients is consistent with the notion that elevated TGF-β signaling may contribute to malignancy in organ transplant recipients. Disparate P-Smad1/5/8 expression levels between keratoacanthoma from the two patients groups might reflect the distinct BMP-responsive cell of origin for this hair follicle-derived lesion. PMID:19671862

  14. Simulated solar light-induced p53 mutagenesis in SKH-1 mouse skin: a dose-response assessment.

    PubMed

    Verkler, Tracie L; Delongchamp, Robert R; Miller, Barbara J; Webb, Peggy J; Howard, Paul C; Parsons, Barbara L

    2008-08-01

    Sunlight and ultraviolet-induced mutation of the p53 gene is a frequent, possibly obligate step in skin cancer development, making quantitative measurement of p53 mutation an ideal biomarker for sunlight-induced skin carcinogenesis. To understand how the appearance of p53 mutation relates to skin tumor development, SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed 5 d per week to one of four different doses of simulated solar light (SSL; 0, 6.85, 13.70, 20.55 mJ x CIE/cm(2)) previously characterized for their tumorigenic potential. Allele-specific competitive blocker-PCR (ACB-PCR) was used to measure levels of p53 codon 270 CGT to TGT mutation within DNA isolated from dorsal skin of exposed mice. For each dose, p53 mutant fraction (MF) was measured after 4, 16, and 28 wk of exposure. Significant dose- and time-dependent increases in p53 MF were identified. All p53 MF measurements were integrated by relating the observed p53 MF to the cumulative dose of SSL. The increase in the logarithm of p53 MF was described by the linear function: log(10) MF = alpha + 0.0016 x d, where alpha is the spontaneous log(10) MF after a particular time point and d is the dose of SSL in mJ x CIE/cm(2). The p53 MF induced in nontumor bearing skin by 28 wk of exposure at the high dose of SSL was significantly lower than that found in skin tumors induced by approximately 32 wk of exposure to the same dose of SSL. p53 MF showed a strong negative correlation with tumor latency, suggesting this quantitative biomarker has the potential to predict tumorigenicity. PMID:18314877

  15. Green tea and skin--anticarcinogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, H; Katiyar, S K; Agarwal, R

    1994-01-01

    Because of its special aroma, green tea is a popular beverage consumed by some human populations worldwide. In recent years, many laboratory studies have shown that in a variety of animal tumor bioassay systems the administration of green tea, specifically the polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea leaves (green tea polyphenols), affords protection against cancer induction. In mouse skin tumor bioassay systems, topical application of green tea polyphenols to skin has been shown to result in protection against a) 3-methylcholanthrene-induced skin tumorigenicity, b) 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced skin tumor initiation, c) 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and other tumor promoters caused tumor promotion in DMBA-initiated skin, and d) benzoyl peroxide- and 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide caused enhanced malignant progression of nonmalignant lesions. Green tea extract has also been shown to cause partial regression of established skin papillomas in mouse. Similarly, chronic oral feeding of green tea polyphenols or water extract of green tea has also been shown to result in the protection against both chemical carcinogen- and ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin tumorigenicity. Collectively these data suggest that green tea possesses significant chemopreventive effect against each stage of carcinogenesis, and that it may be useful against inflammatory responses associated with the exposure of skin to chemical tumor promoters as well as to solar radiation. Available data regarding the mechanism by which green tea affords these diversified effects is discussed.

  16. Skin-tumor initiation activity of coal liquids with different boiling-point ranges.

    PubMed

    Mahlum, D D

    1983-10-01

    High-boiling coal liquids from the solvent-refined coal-I and -II (SRC-I, -II) processes, respectively, were fractionally distilled. In the case of SRC-I process solvent (PS), 50 degrees F distillation cuts were obtained between 550 and 850 degrees F, while for the SRC-II material, the 50 degrees F cuts were only obtained between 700 and 850 degrees F. These cuts, as well as the parent material, were tested for their ability to initiate skin tumors by applying a single dose (25 mg) to the shaved backs of Charles River female CD-1 mice. After 2 weeks, the mice received twice weekly applications of 5 micrograms of the promoter, phorbol myristate acetate. Only a few tumors were found for SRC-I fractions boiling below 700 degrees F; tumor-initiating activity increased as the boiling point increased. A similar increase in response with increasing boiling point was seen for the SRC-II cuts. The initiating activities for the parent materials were similar to those observed for their respective 800 to 850 degrees F cuts.

  17. Enhancing mitochondrial respiration suppresses tumor promoter TPA-induced PKM2 expression and cell transformation in skin epidermal JB6 cells.

    PubMed

    Wittwer, Jennifer A; Robbins, Delira; Wang, Fei; Codarin, Sarah; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G; Huang, Ting-Ting; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2011-09-01

    Differentiated cells primarily metabolize glucose for energy via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, but cancer cells thrive on a different mechanism to produce energy, characterized as the Warburg effect, which describes the increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), which is responsible for catalyzing the final step of aerobic glycolysis, is highly expressed in cancer cells and may contribute to the Warburg effect. However, whether PKM2 plays a contributing role during early cancer development is unclear. In our studies, we have made an attempt to elucidate the effects of varying mitochondrial respiration substrates on skin cell transformation and expression of PKM2. Tumorigenicity in murine skin epidermal JB6 P+ (promotable) cells was measured in a soft agar assay using 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as a tumor promoter. We observed a significant reduction in cell transformation upon pretreatment with the mitochondrial respiration substrate succinate or malate/pyruvate. We observed that increased expression and activity of PKM2 in TPA-treated JB6 P+ cells and pretreatment with succinate or malate/pyruvate suppressed the effects. In addition, TPA treatment also induced PKM2 whereas PKM1 expression was suppressed in mouse skin epidermal tissues in vivo. In comparison with JB6 P+ cells, the nonpromotable JB6 P- cells showed no increase in PKM2 expression or activity upon TPA treatment. Knockdown of PKM2 using a siRNA approach significantly reduced skin cell transformation. Thus, our results suggest that PKM2 activation could be an early event and play a contributing role in skin tumorigenesis.

  18. Differential Features between Chronic Skin Inflammatory Diseases Revealed in Skin-Humanized Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Marta; Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; Illera, Nuria; Galvez, Victoria; Navarro, Manuel; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquin; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; del Rio, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are chronic and relapsing inflammatory diseases of the skin affecting a large number of patients worldwide. Psoriasis is characterized by a T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 immunological response, whereas acute atopic dermatitis lesions exhibit T helper type 2-dominant inflammation. Current single gene and signaling pathways-based models of inflammatory skin diseases are incomplete. Previous work allowed us to model psoriasis in skin-humanized mice through proper combinations of inflammatory cell components and disruption of barrier function. Herein, we describe and characterize an animal model for atopic dermatitis using similar bioengineered-based approaches, by intradermal injection of human T helper type 2 lymphocytes in regenerated human skin after partial removal of stratum corneum. In this work, we have extensively compared this model with the previous and an improved version of the psoriasis model, in which T helper type 1 and/or T helper type 17 lymphocytes replace exogenous cytokines. Comparative expression analyses revealed marked differences in specific epidermal proliferation and differentiation markers and immune-related molecules, including antimicrobial peptides. Likewise, the composition of the dermal inflammatory infiltrate presented important differences. The availability of accurate and reliable animal models for these diseases will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis and provide valuable tools for drug development and testing. PMID:26763433

  19. Progression of mouse skin carcinogenesis is associated with increased ERα levels and is repressed by a dominant negative form of ERα.

    PubMed

    Logotheti, Stella; Papaevangeliou, Dimitra; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Sideridou, Maria; Tsimaratou, Katerina; Christodoulou, Ioannis; Pyrillou, Katerina; Gorgoulis, Vassilis; Vlahopoulos, Spiros; Zoumpourlis, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER), namely ERα and ERβ, are hormone-activated transcription factors with an important role in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the implication of ERα in skin cancer, using chemically-induced mouse skin tumours, as well as cell lines representing distinct stages of mouse skin oncogenesis. First, using immunohistochemical staining we showed that ERα is markedly increased in aggressive mouse skin tumours in vivo as compared to the papilloma tumours, whereas ERβ levels are low and become even lower in the aggressive spindle tumours of carcinogen-treated mice. Then, using the multistage mouse skin carcinogenesis model, we showed that ERα gradually increases during promotion and progression stages of mouse skin carcinogenesis, peaking at the most aggressive stage, whereas ERβ levels only slightly change throughout skin carcinogenesis. Stable transfection of the aggressive, spindle CarB cells with a dominant negative form of ERα (dnERα) resulted in reduced ERα levels and reduced binding to estrogen responsive elements (ERE)-containing sequences. We characterized two highly conserved EREs on the mouse ERα promoter through which dnERα decreased endogenous ERα levels. The dnERα-transfected CarB cells presented altered protein levels of cytoskeletal and cell adhesion molecules, slower growth rate and impaired anchorage-independent growth in vitro, whereas they gave smaller tumours with extended latency period of tumour onset in vivo. Our findings suggest an implication of ERα in the aggressiveness of spindle mouse skin cancer cells, possibly through regulation of genes affecting cell shape and adhesion, and they also provide hints for the effective targeting of spindle cancer cells by dnERα. PMID:22870269

  20. In vivo formation and persistence of DNA and protein adducts in mouse and rat skin exposed to (+/-)benzo(a)pyrene-4,5-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, M.; Alexandrov, K.

    1986-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare DNA and protein adduct formation of benzo(a)pyrene-4,5-oxide (BPO) in vivo and to determine the persistence of the adducts in both mouse and rat epidermis. (+/-)BPO at a dose of 100 nmol/mouse and 200 nmol/rat was topically applied to male Swiss mice and Wistar rats. Three hours after application, there was 3-fold less binding of BPO to mouse epidermal DNA than to rat epidermal DNA; inversely, the amount of BPO bound to mouse skin protein was 3.6 times higher than in rat skin protein. One and three weeks after application of BPO, persistence of 17-20% of the initial amount of BPO-DNA adducts and 2-4% of initial amount of BPO bound to protein was detected in both mouse and rat skin epidermis. H.p.l.c. analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysates of DNA from mouse and rat epidermis 3 h after application of BPO showed five distinct products: one early-eluting, two BPO-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) (ratio 1.5:1) and two BPO-deoxyadenosine (dAdo) adducts (ratio 2:1). The ratio of the total modified dGuo to the total modified dAdo was 2:1. The amount of total BPO-dGuo and BPO-dAdo adducts was 3.5 times greater in rat than in mouse epidermis. Persistence of the major BPO-dAdo adduct was observed in mouse and rat epidermal DNA, and 1 and 3 weeks after topical application of BPO there was a 6-fold greater amount of the persisting BPO-dAdo adduct in rat skin epidermis than in mouse skin epidermis (4.1 and 0.66 pmol/mg DNA, respectively). Minor amounts of the BPO-dGuo were found to persist in rat skin epidermis DNA.

  1. Comparative cytotoxicity of alkyl gallates on mouse tumor cell lines and isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Frey, Christian; Pavani, Mario; Cordano, Gianni; Muñoz, Sergio; Rivera, Enrique; Medina, Jorge; Morello, Antonio; Diego Maya, Juan; Ferreira, Jorge

    2007-04-01

    Alkyl esters of gallic acid inhibited the respiration rate of mouse sarcoma 786A and mouse mammary adenocarcinoma TA3 cell lines and its multiresistant variant TA3-MTX-R more effectively than gallic acid, both in the absence and in the presence of the uncoupler CCCP. The order of inhibition of the respiration rate by gallates in intact cells was n-octyl- approximately iso-amyl- approximately n-amyl- approximately iso-butyl->n-butyl->iso-propyl->n-propyl-gallate>gallic acid. Sarcoma 786A was significantly more susceptible to all seven esters than the TA3 cell line. Respiration rates of the TA3-MTX-R cell line showed almost the same sensitivity to these esters as the TA3 cell line. However, hepatocytes were significantly less sensitive than all tumor cells tested. These alkyl gallates blocked mitochondrial electron flow, mainly at the NADH-CoQ segment, preventing ATP synthesis, which would lead to cellular death. These esters also inhibited, in the same order of potencies as respiration, the growth of 786A, TA3 and TA3-MTX-R cells in culture. In mice carrying TA3 or TA3-MTX-R tumor cells, an important decrease of the tumor growth rate and an increase of survival were observed when mice were treated with iso-butyl gallate alone or in combination with doxorubicin. These results indicate that alkyl gallates are selectively cytotoxic to tumor cells, which may be due to the mitochondrial dysfunctions of these cells.

  2. Recovery of Aging-Related Size Increase of Skin Epithelial Cells: In vivo Mouse and In vitro Human Study

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20–40% for cells of older passage (6–8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin. PMID:25807526

  3. Immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of Nigella glandulifera freyn and sint seeds on ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Aikemu, Ainiwaer; Xiaerfuding, Xiadiya; Shiwenhui, Chengyufeng; Abudureyimu, Meiliwan; Maimaitiyiming, Dilinuer

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of Nigella glandulifera Freyn and Sint seeds (NGS) on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in a mouse model. Materials and Methods: Kunming mice with transplanted Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAC) were treated with NGS by oral administration. On the 11th day after the EAC implant, mouse thymus, liver, spleen and kidney tumors were removed for histopathological analysis. Blood samples were taken for hematological and biochemical analyses. Results: The results indicate that NGS treatment leads to an increase in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-2 blood serum levels. Absence of viable EAC and presence of necrotic cells were observed in the tumor tissue of the NGS-treated animals. Conclusions: The study results indicated that a water extract of NGS had the highest anti-tumor effect. Moreover, NGS treatment also showed an increase in the immune system activity. PMID:23929999

  4. Evaluation of carcinogenic effect of jute batching oil (JBO-P) fractions following topical application to mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, R; Shukla, Y; Kumar, S; Mehrotra, N K

    1988-01-01

    Jute batching oil (JBO-P), a mineral oil fraction used in the processing of jute fibers, was, as reported in our earlier studies, found to be tumorigenic following repeated topical application to mouse skin. In the present investigation an attempt has been made to identify the carcinogenic constituents of this oil. The JBO was fractionated into (1) PAH free fraction, (2) fraction containing two- and three-ring PAHs and (3) more than three-ring PAH fractions by an enrichment procedure. These three JBO fractions along with unfractionated and reconstituted oil were then subjected to the in vivo assay of complete carcinogenic activity of JBO-P and its fractions following its topical application to mouse skin. The results showed that only unfractionated and reconstituted JBO-P samples per se were able to produce benign skin tumours, while all the other three fractions, i.e. PAH-free fraction, two- and three-ring PAH-containing fraction and more than three-ring PAH-containing fraction failed to produce tumours up to 40 weeks after application. In an extended study, mice belonging to the groups exposed to various fractions of JBO were promoted with 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent skin tumour promoter, for the two stage initiation-promotion protocol for skin carcinogenesis. After 14 weeks of promotion with TPA, all the surviving animals exposed to the fraction having more than three-ring PAHs developed benign tumours on their backs, while the other two fractions failed to do so.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Extract of Vernonia condensata, Inhibits Tumor Progression and Improves Survival of Tumor-allograft Bearing Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Somasagara, Ranganatha R.; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants are considered as one of the ideal sources for cancer therapy due to their bioactive contents and low toxicity to humans. Vernonia genus is one of the common medicinal plants, which has wide spread usage in food and medicine. However, there are limited studies to explore its anticancer properties. In the current study, we have used Vernonia condensata, to explore its anticancer activity using various approaches. Here, we show that extract prepared from Vernonia condensata (VCE) exhibits cytotoxic properties against various cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, when treated with VCE, there was no significant cytotoxicity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that although VCE induced cell death, arrest was not observed. VCE treatment led to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in a concentration dependent manner resulting in activation of apoptosis culminating in cell death. Immunoblotting studies revealed that VCE activated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, VCE treatment resulted in tumor regression leading to significant enhancement in life span in treated mice, without showing any detectable side effects. Therefore, for the first time our study reveals the potential of extract from Vernonia condensata to be used as an anticancer agent. PMID:27009490

  6. Effects of skin-derived precursors on wound healing of denervated skin in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bin; Xie, Ju-Lin; Xu, Ying-Bin; Lai, Wen; Huang, Yong; Mao, Ren-Xiang; Liu, Xu-Sheng; Qi, Shao-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Denervated skin could result in impaired healing of wounds, such as decubitus ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Other studies indicated that cutaneous fiber density is reduced after inner nerve transection and that neuropeptide level depletes after denervation, leading to reduced cell proliferation around the wound and thus wound healing problems. Recent studies have revealed that skin-derived precursors (SKPs), which form a neural crest-related stem cell population in the dermis of skin, participate in cutaneous nerve regeneration. We hypothesized that injecting SKPs into denervated wound promotes healing. A bilateral denervation wound model was established followed by SKP transplantation. The wound healing rate was determined at 7, 14, and 21 d after injury. Cell proliferation activity during wound healing was analyzed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nerve fiber density was measured by S-100 IHC. The contents of nerve growth factor, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The rate of epithelization in the SKP-treated group was faster than that in the control group. Wound cell proliferation and nerve fiber density were obviously higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group. In addition, the content of neuropeptides was higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group during wound healing. In conclusion, SKPs can promote denervated wound healing through cell proliferation and nerve fiber regeneration, and can facilitate the release of neuropeptides.

  7. Effects of skin-derived precursors on wound healing of denervated skin in a nude mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Bin; Xie, Ju-Lin; Xu, Ying-Bin; Lai, Wen; Huang, Yong; Mao, Ren-Xiang; Liu, Xu-Sheng; Qi, Shao-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Denervated skin could result in impaired healing of wounds, such as decubitus ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Other studies indicated that cutaneous fiber density is reduced after inner nerve transection and that neuropeptide level depletes after denervation, leading to reduced cell proliferation around the wound and thus wound healing problems. Recent studies have revealed that skin-derived precursors (SKPs), which form a neural crest-related stem cell population in the dermis of skin, participate in cutaneous nerve regeneration. We hypothesized that injecting SKPs into denervated wound promotes healing. A bilateral denervation wound model was established followed by SKP transplantation. The wound healing rate was determined at 7, 14, and 21 d after injury. Cell proliferation activity during wound healing was analyzed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nerve fiber density was measured by S-100 IHC. The contents of nerve growth factor, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The rate of epithelization in the SKP-treated group was faster than that in the control group. Wound cell proliferation and nerve fiber density were obviously higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group. In addition, the content of neuropeptides was higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group during wound healing. In conclusion, SKPs can promote denervated wound healing through cell proliferation and nerve fiber regeneration, and can facilitate the release of neuropeptides. PMID:26045771

  8. Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and human psoriatic skin chimeras. Validation of a new animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Kunkel, S. L.; Burdick, M.; Strieter, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Research into the cause and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying expression of psoriatric skin lesions has been hampered by lack of an appropriate animal model for this common and enigmatic cutaneous disease. These studies characterize normal skin, pre-psoriatic skin, and psoriatic plaque skin samples transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In this report we document that 1), normal, prepsoriatic, and psoriatic plaque keratome skin samples can be transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice reliably with high rates of graft survival (> 85%) and with reproducible changes consistently observed over prolonged periods of engraftment; 2), after transplantation, by clinical assessment and routine light microscopy, normal skin remained essentially normal whereas pre-psoriatic skin became thicker, and psoriatic plaque skin retained its characteristic plaque-type elevation and scale; 3), by using a panel of antibodies and immunohistochemical analysis, the overall phenotype of human cell types (including immunocytes) that persisted in the transplanted skin was remarkably similar to the immunophenotype of pretransplanted skin samples; 4), clearly recognized interface zones between human and murine skin within the epidermal and dermal compartments could be identified by routine microscopy and immunostaining, with focal areas of chimerism; and 5), elevated interleukin 8 cytokine levels were present in transplanted pre-psoriatic and psoriatic plaque skin samples. We conclude that there are many similarities between pre- and post-transplanted human samples of normal and psoriatic skin that are grafted onto severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Thus, we propose that this new animal model is appropriate for additional mechanistic-type studies designed to reveal the underlying genetic/etiological abnormality, as well as better illuminate the pathophysiological basis, for this important skin disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7887440

  9. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  10. Prevalence of Skin Cancer and Related Skin Tumors in High-Risk Kidney and Liver Transplant Recipients in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Sinnya, Sudipta; Pandeya, Nirmala; Isbel, Nikky; Campbell, Scott; Fawcett, Jonathan; Soyer, Peter H; Ferguson, Lisa; Davis, Marcia; Whiteman, David C; Green, Adèle C

    2016-07-01

    The increased skin cancer incidence in organ transplant recipients is well-known, but the skin cancer burden at any one time is unknown. Our objective was to estimate the period prevalence of untreated skin malignancy and actinic keratoses in high-risk kidney and liver transplant recipients and to assess associated factors. Organ transplant recipients underwent full skin examinations by dermatologically trained physicians. The proportion of examined organ transplant recipients with histopathologically confirmed skin cancer in the 3-month baseline period was estimated. Prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals indicated significant associations. Of 495 high-risk organ transplant recipients (average age = 54 years, time immunosuppressed = 8.9 years), 135 (27%) had basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma or Bowen's disease (intraepidermal carcinoma) present and confirmed in the baseline period, with respective prevalence proportions of 10%, 11%, and 18% in kidney transplant recipients and 10%, 9%, and 13% in liver transplant recipients. Over 80% had actinic keratosis present, with approximately 30% having 5 or more actinic keratoses. Organ transplant recipients with the highest skin cancer burden were Australian born, were fair skinned (prevalence ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = [1.07, 2.43]), reported past skin cancer (prevalence ratio =3.39, 95% confidence interval = [1.93, 5.95]), and were receiving the most frequent skin checks (prevalence ratio = 1.76, 95% confidence interval = [1.15, 2.70]). In conclusion, high-risk organ transplant recipients carry a substantial measurable skin cancer burden at any given time and require frequent review through easily accessible, specialized services.

  11. Imaging of eye tumor in the mouse model of retinoblastoma with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Shuliang; Ruggeri, Marco; Wehbe, Hassan; Gregory, Giovanni; Jockovich, Maria E.; Hackam, Abigail; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive in vivo examination of the rodent retina without sacrificing the animal is the key to being able to perform longitudinal studies. This allows the monitoring of disease progression and the response to therapies through its entire course in individual animal. A high-speed high resolution three-dimensional spectral-domain OCT is built for non-contact in vivo imaging of rodent retina. The system is able to acquire high quality 3D images of the rodent retina in 2.7 seconds (total imaging time is ~5 minutes). The system was tested on mice with normal retina (B6/SJLF2), mouse model for photoreceptor degeneration (Rho -/-), and mouse model for retinoblastoma (LH BETAT AG). For the first time to our knowledge, 3D image of the tumor in retinoblastoma mouse model was successfully imaged in vivo. By segmenting the tumor boundaries in each frame of the OCT image the volume of the tumor was successfully calculated.

  12. Atypical lipomatous tumor/"well-differentiated liposarcoma" of the skin clinically presenting as a skin tag: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular analysis of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Bruno E; Mentzel, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Liposarcomas are extremely rare in the skin. When they involve the skin, it is usually by upward spread from a subcutaneous or deeper seated liposarcoma. Very rarely, liposarcoma metastasize to the skin or arise as a primary dermal lesion. We describe 2 cases of atypical lipomatous tumor "well-differentiated liposarcoma" located in dermis. Both presented clinically as a skin tag. The neoplasms arose in a 56-year-old female and a 69-year-old male patient. Both lesions were treated by excision and reexcision. In addition to classical morphology of atypical lipomatous tumor with evidence of lipoblasts and atypical adipocytes, immunohistochemistry with nuclear murine double-minute type 2 protein and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 expression as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showing an amplification of murine double-minute type 2 protein and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 were helpful to establish the diagnosis. None of the cases recurred after surgical treatment. These 2 cases show the importance of not to misdiagnose lesions which clinically may appear to be benign.

  13. Atypical lipomatous tumor/"well-differentiated liposarcoma" of the skin clinically presenting as a skin tag: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular analysis of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Bruno E; Mentzel, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Liposarcomas are extremely rare in the skin. When they involve the skin, it is usually by upward spread from a subcutaneous or deeper seated liposarcoma. Very rarely, liposarcoma metastasize to the skin or arise as a primary dermal lesion. We describe 2 cases of atypical lipomatous tumor "well-differentiated liposarcoma" located in dermis. Both presented clinically as a skin tag. The neoplasms arose in a 56-year-old female and a 69-year-old male patient. Both lesions were treated by excision and reexcision. In addition to classical morphology of atypical lipomatous tumor with evidence of lipoblasts and atypical adipocytes, immunohistochemistry with nuclear murine double-minute type 2 protein and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 expression as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showing an amplification of murine double-minute type 2 protein and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 were helpful to establish the diagnosis. None of the cases recurred after surgical treatment. These 2 cases show the importance of not to misdiagnose lesions which clinically may appear to be benign. PMID:21358383

  14. Routine Clinical-Pathologic Correlation of Pigmented Skin Tumors Can Influence Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Lallas, Aimilios; Moscarella, Elvira; Lombardi, Mara; Raucci, Margherita; Pellacani, Giovanni; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated the benefit of integrating clinical with pathologic information, to obtain a confident diagnosis for melanocytic tumors. However, all those studies were conducted retrospectively and no data are currently available about the role of a clinical-pathologic correlation approach on a daily basis in clinical practice. Aim of the Study In our study, we evaluated the impact of a routine clinical-pathologic correlation approach for difficult skin tumors seen over 3 years in a tertiary referral center. Results Interestingly, a re-appraisal was requested for 158 out of 2015 (7.7%) excised lesions because clinical-pathologic correlation was missing. Of note, in 0.6% of them (13 out of 2045) the first histologic diagnosis was revised in the light of clinical information that assisted the Pathologist to re-evaluate the histopathologic findings that might be bland or inconspicuous per se. Conclusion In conclusion, our study demonstrated that an integrated approach involving clinicians and pathologists allows improving management of selected patients by shifting from a simply disease-focused management (melanoma versus nevus) to a patient-centered approach. PMID:26325678

  15. Int-6, a highly conserved, widely expressed gene, is mutated by mouse mammary tumor virus in mammary preneoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, A; Buttitta, F; Miyazaki, S; Gallahan, D; Smith, G H; Callahan, R

    1995-01-01

    With a unique mouse mammary tumor model system in which mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) insertional mutations can be detected during progression from preneoplasia to frank malignancy, including metastasis, we have discovered a new common integration site (designated Int-6) for MMTV in mouse mammary tumors. MMTV was integrated into Int-6 in a mammary hyperplastic outgrowth line, its tumors and metastases, and two independent mammary tumors arising in unrelated mice. The Int-6 gene is ubiquitously expressed as a 1.4-kb RNA species in adult tissues and is detected beginning at day 8 of embryonic development. The nucleotide sequence of Int-6 is unrelated to any of the known genes in the GenBank database. MMTV integrates within introns of the gene in the opposite transcriptional orientation. In each tumor tested, this results in the expression of a truncated Int-6/long terminal repeat (LTR) chimeric RNA species which is terminated at a cryptic termination signal in the MMTV LTR. Since the nonrearranged Int-6 alleles in these tumors contain no mutations, we favor the conclusion that truncation of the Int-6 gene product either biologically activates its function or represents a dominant-negative mutation. PMID:7853537

  16. Cyclooxygenases in human and mouse skin and cultured human keratinocytes: association of COX-2 expression with human keratinocyte differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Rakhlin, N.; Habib, A.; Maclouf, J.; Goldyne, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal expression of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H-generating cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) was evaluated both by immunohistochemistry performed on human and mouse skin biopsy sections and by Western blotting of protein extracts from cultured human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes. In normal human skin, COX-1 immunostaining is observed throughout the epidermis whereas COX-2 immunostaining increases in the more differentiated, suprabasilar keratinocytes. Basal cell carcinomas express little if any COX-1 or COX-2 immunostaining whereas both isozymes are strongly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas deriving from a more differentiated layer of the epidermis. In human keratinocyte cultures, raising the extracellular calcium concentration, a recognized stimulus for keratinocyte differentiation, leads to an increased expression of both COX-2 protein and mRNA; expression of COX-1 protein, however, shows no significant alteration in response to calcium. Because of a recent report that failed to show COX-2 in normal mouse epidermis, we also looked for COX-1 and COX-2 immunostaining in sections of normal and acetone-treated mouse skin. In agreement with a previous report, some COX-1, but no COX-2, immunostaining is seen in normal murine epidermis. However, following acetone treatment, there is a marked increase in COX-1 expression as well as the appearance of significant COX-2 immunostaining in the basal layer. These data suggest that in human epidermis as well as in human keratinocyte cultures, the expression of COX-2 occurs as a part of normal keratinocyte differentiation whereas in murine epidermis, its constitutive expression is absent, but inducible as previously published.

  17. Long-term bezafibrate treatment improves skin and spleen phenotypes of the mtDNA mutator mouse.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Lloye M; Hida, Aline; Garcia, Sofia; Prolla, Tomas A; Moraes, Carlos T

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological agents, such as bezafibrate, that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and PPAR γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) pathways have been shown to improve mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mouse is a mouse model of aging that harbors a proofreading-deficient mtDNA polymerase γ. These mice develop many features of premature aging including hair loss, anemia, osteoporosis, sarcopenia and decreased lifespan. They also have increased mtDNA mutations and marked mitochondrial dysfunction. We found that mutator mice treated with bezafibrate for 8-months had delayed hair loss and improved skin and spleen aging-like phenotypes. Although we observed an increase in markers of fatty acid oxidation in these tissues, we did not detect a generalized increase in mitochondrial markers. On the other hand, there were no improvements in muscle function or lifespan of the mutator mouse, which we attributed to the rodent-specific hepatomegaly associated with fibrate treatment. These results showed that despite its secondary effects in rodent's liver, bezafibrate was able to improve some of the aging phenotypes in the mutator mouse. Because the associated hepatomegaly is not observed in primates, long-term bezafibrate treatment in humans could have beneficial effects on tissues undergoing chronic bioenergetic-related degeneration.

  18. Three-dimensional laser-induced photoacoustic tomography of mouse brain with the skin and skull intact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Pang, Yongjiang; Ku, Geng; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-10-01

    Three-dimensional laser-induced photoacoustic tomography, also referred to as optoacoustic tomography, is developed to image animal brain structures noninvasively with the skin and skull intact. This imaging modality combines the advantages of optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution. The distribution of optical absorption in a mouse brain is imaged successfully. The intrinsic optical contrast reveals not only blood vessels but also other detailed brain structures, such as the cerebellum, hippocampus, and ventriculi lateralis. The spatial resolution is primarily diffraction limited by the received photoacoustic waves. Imaged structures of the brain at different depths match the corresponding histological pictures well.

  19. Light Fractionation Significantly Increases the Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy Using BF-200 ALA in Normal Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    de Bruijn, Henriëtte S.; Brooks, Sander; van der Ploeg-van den Heuvel, Angélique; ten Hagen, Timo L. M.; de Haas, Ellen R. M.; Robinson, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Light fractionation significantly increases the efficacy of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based photodynamic therapy (PDT) using the nano-emulsion based gel formulation BF-200. PDT using BF-200 ALA has recently been clinically approved and is under investigation in several phase III trials for the treatment of actinic keratosis. This study is the first to compare BF-200 ALA with ALA in preclinical models. Results In hairless mouse skin there is no difference in the temporal and spatial distribution of protoporphyrin IX determined by superficial imaging and fluorescence microscopy in frozen sections. In the skin-fold chamber model, BF-200 ALA leads to more PpIX fluorescence at depth in the skin compared to ALA suggesting an enhanced penetration of BF-200 ALA. Light fractionated PDT after BF-200 ALA application results in significantly more visual skin damage following PDT compared to a single illumination. Both ALA formulations show the same visual skin damage, rate of photobleaching and change in vascular volume immediately after PDT. Fluorescence immunohistochemical imaging shows loss of VE-cadherin in the vasculature at day 1 post PDT which is greater after BF-200 ALA compared to ALA and more profound after light fractionation compared to a single illumination. Discussion The present study illustrates the clinical potential of light fractionated PDT using BF-200 ALA for enhancing PDT efficacy in (pre-) malignant skin conditions such as basal cell carcinoma and vulval intraepithelial neoplasia and its application in other lesion such as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma where current approaches have limited efficacy. PMID:26872051

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as skin carcinogens: Comparison of benzo[a]pyrene, dibenzo[def,p]chrysene and three environmental mixtures in the FVB/N mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Larkin, Andrew; Krueger, Sharon K.; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pereira, Cliff B.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Arlt, Volker M.; Phillips, David H.; Williams, David E.; and others

    2012-11-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), was compared to dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) and combinations of three environmental PAH mixtures (coal tar, diesel particulate and cigarette smoke condensate) using a two stage, FVB/N mouse skin tumor model. DBC (4 nmol) was most potent, reaching 100% tumor incidence with a shorter latency to tumor formation, less than 20 weeks of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) promotion compared to all other treatments. Multiplicity was 4 times greater than BaP (400 nmol). Both PAHs produced primarily papillomas followed by squamous cell carcinoma and carcinoma in situ. Diesel particulate extract (1 mg SRM 1650b; mix 1) did not differ from toluene controls and failed to elicit a carcinogenic response. Addition of coal tar extract (1 mg SRM 1597a; mix 2) produced a response similar to BaP. Further addition of 2 mg of cigarette smoke condensate (mix 3) did not alter the response with mix 2. PAH-DNA adducts measured in epidermis 12 h post initiation and analyzed by {sup 32}P post‐labeling, did not correlate with tumor incidence. PAH‐dependent alteration in transcriptome of skin 12 h post initiation was assessed by microarray. Principal component analysis (sum of all treatments) of the 922 significantly altered genes (p < 0.05), showed DBC and BaP to cluster distinct from PAH mixtures and each other. BaP and mixtures up-regulated phase 1 and phase 2 metabolizing enzymes while DBC did not. The carcinogenicity with DBC and two of the mixtures was much greater than would be predicted based on published Relative Potency Factors (RPFs). -- Highlights: ► Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), 3 PAH mixtures, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were compared. ► DBC and 2 PAH mixtures were more potent than Relative Potency Factor estimates. ► Transcriptome profiles 12 hours post initiation were analyzed by microarray. ► Principle components analysis of alterations revealed treatment-based clustering. ► DBC gave a unique

  1. Myeloid Cell Isolation from Mouse Skin and Draining Lymph Node Following Intradermal Immunization with Live Attenuated Plasmodium Sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Mac-Daniel, Laura; Buckwalter, Matthew R; Gueirard, Pascale; Ménard, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Malaria infection begins when the sporozoite stage of Plasmodium is inoculated into the skin of a mammalian host through a mosquito bite. The highly motile parasite not only reaches the liver to invade hepatocytes and transform into erythrocyte-infective form. It also migrates into the skin and to the proximal lymph node draining the injection site, where it can be recognized and degraded by resident and/or recruited myeloid cells. Intravital imaging reported the early recruitment of brightly fluorescent Lys-GFP positive leukocytes in the skin and the interactions between sporozoites and CD11c(+) cells in the draining lymph node. We present here an efficient procedure to recover, identify and enumerate the myeloid cell subsets that are recruited to the mouse skin and draining lymph node following intradermal injection of immunizing doses of sporozoites in a murine model. Phenotypic characterization using multi-parametric flow cytometry provides a reliable assay to assess early dynamic cellular changes during inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. PMID:27286053

  2. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  3. Differential reactivation of fetal/neonatal genes in mouse liver tumors induced in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujii, Kiyonaga; Nagahama, Yasuharu; Ooshio, Takako; Xin, Bing; Okada, Yoko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in either chronically injured or seemingly intact livers. To explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying these different conditions, we compared the mRNA expression profiles of mouse hepatocellular tumors induced by the repeated injection of CCl4 or a single diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injection using a cDNA microarray. We identified tumor-associated genes that were expressed differentially in the cirrhotic CCl4 model (H19, Igf2, Cbr3, and Krt20) and the non-cirrhotic DEN model (Tff3, Akr1c18, Gpc3, Afp, and Abcd2) as well as genes that were expressed comparably in both models (Ly6d, Slpi, Spink3, Scd2, and Cpe). The levels and patterns of mRNA expression of these genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Most of these genes were highly expressed in mouse livers during the fetal/neonatal periods. We also examined the mRNA expression of these genes in mouse tumors induced by thioacetamide, another cirrhotic inducer, and those that developed spontaneously in non-cirrhotic livers and found that they shared a similar expression profile as that observed in CCl4 -induced and DEN-induced tumors, respectively. There was a close relationship between the expression levels of Igf2 and H19 mRNA, which were activated in the cirrhotic models. Our results show that mouse liver tumors reactivate fetal/neonatal genes, some of which are specific to cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic modes of pathogenesis.

  4. p53-independent apoptosis in UV-irradiated mouse skin: possible inhibition by 50 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kumlin, Timo; Heikkinen, Päivi; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Alhonen, Leena; Jänne, Juhani; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2002-06-01

    Our recent results suggest that 50 Hz magnetic fields (MF) enhance ultraviolet (UV)-induced tumorigenesis in mouse skin. The aim of the present experiment was to study suppression of apoptosis as a possible mechanism for MF effects on skin tumorigenesis. Another aim was to test the importance of a UV and MF exposure schedule, particularly the role of MF exposure prior to UV irradiation. Female mice were exposed to a UV dose of 2 human MED and to 100 microT MF of 50 Hz, using the following exposure schedules: group 1 sham MF 24 h, UV 1 h, sham MF 24 h; group 2 sham MF 24 h, UV 1 h, MF 24 h; group 3 MF 24 h, UV 1 h, MF 24 h. Lamps emitting simulated solar radiation (SSR) were used for UV irradiation. Skin samples were analysed for apoptosis, expression of the p53 gene, activity of the enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and polyamine concentrations. A significantly (p = 0.017) lower number of apoptotic cells was measured in group 2 compared to group 1. A similar but not statistically significant (p = 0.064) decrease was also detected in group 3. No p53 expression was detected in any sample. The levels of ODC and putrescine did not differ significantly between the UV-only and UV and MF-exposed groups. Spermidine and spermine levels were significantly (p = 0.014 and 0.014, respectively) lower in group 3 than in group 1, but no decrease was observed in group 2. Our findings suggest that SSR induces p53-independent apoptosis in mouse skin and that the apoptotic response may be inhibited by exposure to MF. The exposure schedule did not alter the MF effect. The results do not support a causal role for polyamines in MF effects on apoptosis.

  5. Evaluation of Lung Metastasis in Mouse Mammary Tumor Models by Quantitative Real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Melissa A.; Grek, Christina L.; Ghatnekar, Gautam S.; Yeh, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the spread of malignant tumor cells from the primary cancer site to a distant organ and is the primary cause of cancer associated death 1. Common sites of metastatic spread include lung, lymph node, brain, and bone 2. Mechanisms that drive metastasis are intense areas of cancer research. Consequently, effective assays to measure metastatic burden in distant sites of metastasis are instrumental for cancer research. Evaluation of lung metastases in mammary tumor models is generally performed by gross qualitative observation of lung tissue following dissection. Quantitative methods of evaluating metastasis are currently limited to ex vivo and in vivo imaging based techniques that require user defined parameters. Many of these techniques are at the whole organism level rather than the cellular level 3–6. Although newer imaging methods utilizing multi-photon microscopy are able to evaluate metastasis at the cellular level 7, these highly elegant procedures are more suited to evaluating mechanisms of dissemination rather than quantitative assessment of metastatic burden. Here, a simple in vitro method to quantitatively assess metastasis is presented. Using quantitative Real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), tumor cell specific mRNA can be detected within the mouse lung tissue. PMID:26862835

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  7. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of the metabolic rate of oxygen in a mouse renal tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Lei; Soetikno, Brian; Lu, Zhi Hong; Sohn, Rebecca E.; Maslov, Konstantin; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We propose using noninvasive longitudinal optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (L-ORPAM) to quantify blood flow flux, oxygen saturation (sO2), and thereby the metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2), for a renal tumor model in the same mouse over weeks to months. Experiments showed that the sO2 difference between the artery and vein decreased greatly due to the arteriovenous shunting effect during tumor growth. Moreover, hypermetabolism was exhibited by an increase in MRO2.

  8. PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin potentialization of antitumor efficiency in a nude mouse tumor-xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuang; Liu, Hai-Zhong; Lu, Wei-Dong; Fu, Zhong-Xue

    2011-06-01

    The non-selectivity of chemotherapeutics between normal tissue and pathological sites poses a challenge for the treatment strategy for advanced colorectal carcinoma. To obtain sufficient antitumor activity, optimization of the therapeutic regimen is of great importance. We investigated PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin potentialization of antitumor efficiency in a nude mouse tumor-xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma. A tumor-bearing nude mouse model, intravenous injections of (Dio)-labeled PEG-liposomes via tail vein and fluorescence imaging with in vivo imaging system were employed. Mice were treated with free L-oHP, PEG-liposomal L-oHP via the tail vein, followed by analysis of the accumulation of L-oHP in tumor tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), observation of the tumor volume and the survival rate. Apoptosis and proliferation of tumors were detected by TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 (P17) and Ki-67 were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Fluorescence imaging with in vivo imaging showed PEG-liposome targeting in tumor tissues. After intravenous injections of PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin, tumor tissue maximum accumulation of L-oHP was 9.37 ± 0.79 µg/g at 24 h; The tumor volume was significantly suppressed, and mice showed longer survival, compared with the free oxaliplatin group. Apoptosis increased, but proliferation decreased in tumor tissues. The mRNA expression of Bcl-2 and Ki-67 was down-regulated, while Bax and caspase-3 expression was up-regulated. Protein expression of Bcl-2 was down-regulated, while Bax and P17 expression was up-regulated. The results indicate that PEG-liposomal oxaliplatin can improve antitumor efficiency in a nude mouse tumor-xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma.

  9. INDUCTION OF DNA ADDUCTS, TUMORS, AND KI-RAS ONCOGENE MUTATIONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG BY IP. ADMINISTRATION OF DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of DNA adducts, tumors, and Ki-ras oncogene mutations in strain AlJ mouse lung by ip. administration of dibenz[a,h]anthracene

    Previous studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) induced lung tumors in the strain NJ mouse model system have demonstrated qua...

  10. Anti-tumor properties of orally administered glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine oligomers in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Sachie; Azuma, Kazuo; Kurozumi, Seiji; Kiyose, Masatoshi; Osaki, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Itoh, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Minami, Saburo; Sato, Kimihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-10-13

    The current study evaluated the anti-tumor activities of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine oligomer (NACOS) and glucosamine oligomer (COS) after their oral administration in a tumor (colon 26)-bearing mouse model. Compared to the control group, NACOS and COS groups showed significantly suppressed tumor growth, and apparent, marked apoptosis in tumor tissues. Furthermore, serum interleukin-12p70 and interferon-γ levels significantly increased in the NACOS and COS groups compared to the corresponding levels in the control group. Collectively, the results indicate the oral administration of NACOS and COS could enhance innate immunity. Results of experiments in Myd-88 knockout mice revealed that the apparent effects were related to both Myd-88-dependent and Myd-88-independent pathways. The data indicated that oral administration of NACOS and COS produced anti-tumor effects through the induction of apoptosis and stimulation of the immune system, which suggests that NACOS and COS are candidate anti-tumor functional foods.

  11. SAHA-induced loss of tumor suppressor Pten gene promotes thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuguang; Kim, Dong Wook; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Novel approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic thyroid cancers. FDA approval of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, for the treatment of hematological malignancies led to the clinical trials of vorinostat for advanced thyroid cancer. However, patients were resistant to vorinostat treatment. To understand the molecular basis of resistance, we tested the efficacy of SAHA in two mouse models of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer: Thrb(PV/PV) and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. In both, thyroid cancer is driven by overactivation of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the latter exhibit more aggressive cancer progression due to haplodeficiency of the tumor suppressor, the Pten gene. SAHA had no effects on thyroid cancer progression in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, indicative of resistance to SAHA. Unexpectedly, thyroid cancer progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice with accelerated occurrence of vascular invasion, anaplastic foci, and lung metastasis. Molecular analyses showed further activated PI3K-AKT in thyroid tumors of SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice, resulting in the activated effectors, p-Rb, CDK6, p21(Cip1), p-cSrc, ezrin, and matrix metalloproteinases, to increase proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. Single-molecule DNA analysis indicated that the wild-type allele of the Pten gene was progressively lost, whereas carcinogenesis progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Thus, this study has uncovered a novel mechanism by which SAHA-induced loss of the tumor suppressor Pten gene to promote thyroid cancer progression. Effectors downstream of the Pten loss-induced signaling may be potential targets to overcome resistance of thyroid cancer to SAHA.

  12. STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geng Ling; Shinohara, Eric T.; Kim, Dong; Tan Jiahuai; Osusky, Kate; Shyr, Yu; Hallahan, Dennis E. . E-mail: Dennis.Hallahan@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain neoplasm that is essentially incurable. Although radiation therapy prolongs survival, GBMs progress within areas of irradiation. Recent studies in invertebrates have shown that STI571 (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ) enhances the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effectiveness of STI571 in combination with radiation was studied in mouse models of GBM. Methods and Materials: Murine GL261 and human D54 GBM cell lines formed tumors in brains and hind limbs of C57BL6 and nude mice, respectively. GL261 and D54 cells were treated with 5 {mu}mol/L of STI571 for 1 h and/or irradiated with 3 Gy. Protein was analyzed by Western immunoblots probed with antibodies to caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, phospho-Akt, Akt, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) {alpha} and {beta}. Tumor volumes were assessed in mice bearing GL261 or D54 tumors treated with 21 Gy administered in seven fractionated doses. Histologic sections from STI571-treated mice were stained with phospho-Akt and phospho-PDGFR {beta} antibodies. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to study the response of mice bearing intracranial implants of GL261. Results: STI571 penetrated the blood-brain barrier, which resulted in a reduction in phospho-PDGFR in GBM. STI571-induced apoptosis in GBM was significantly enhanced by irradiation. STI571 combined with irradiation induced caspase 3 cleavage in GBM cells. Glioblastoma multiforme response to therapy correlated with an increase in tumor growth delay and survival when STI571 was administered in conjunction with daily irradiation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that STI571 has the potential to augment radiotherapy and thereby improve median survival.

  13. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M. S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  14. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine. PMID:26426423

  15. Berteroin present in cruciferous vegetables exerts potent anti-inflammatory properties in murine macrophages and mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoo Jin; Jung, Jae In; Cho, Han Jin; Choi, Myung-Sook; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Yu, Rina; Kang, Young-Hee; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2014-11-11

    Berteroin (5-methylthiopentyl isothiocyanate) is a sulforaphane analog present in cruciferous vegetables, including Chinese cabbage, rucola salad leaves, and mustard oil. We examined whether berteroin exerts anti-inflammatory activities using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse skin inflammation models. Berteroin decreased LPS-induced release of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Raw 264.7 macrophages. Berteroin inhibited LPS-induced degradation of inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) and nuclear factor-κB p65 translocation to the nucleus and DNA binding activity. Furthermore, berteroin suppressed degradation of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase and phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1. Berteroin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, and AKT. In the mouse ear, berteroin effectively suppressed TPA-induced edema formation and down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression as well as phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2. These results demonstrate that berteroin exhibits potent anti-inflammatory properties and suggest that berteroin can be developed as a skin anti-inflammatory agent.

  16. Time course of lewisite-induced skin lesions and inflammatory response in the SKH-1 hairless mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nguon, Nina; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Vallet, Virginie; Elbakdouri, Nacéra; Wartelle, Julien; Mouret, Stéphane; Bertoni, Marine; Dorandeu, Frédéric; Boudry, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Data on the toxicity of lewisite (L), a vesicant chemical warfare agent, are scarce and conflicting, and the use of the specific antidote is not without drawbacks. This study was designed to evaluate if the SKH-1 hairless mouse model was suitable to study the L-induced skin injuries. We studied the progression of lesions following exposure to L vapors for 21 days using paraclinical parameters (color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and biomechanical measurements), histological assessments, and biochemical indexes of inflammation. Some data were also obtained over 27 weeks. The development of lesions was similar to that reported in other models. The TEWL parameter appeared to be the most appropriate index to follow their progression. Histological analysis showed inflammatory cell infiltration and microvesications at day 1 and a complete wound closure by day 21. Biochemical studies indicated a deregulation of the levels of several cytokines and receptors involved in inflammation. An increase in the quantity of pro-matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 was shown as observed in other models. This suggests that the SKH-1 mouse model is relevant for the investigation of the physiopathological process of skin lesions induced by L and to screen new treatment candidates. PMID:24635178

  17. Studies on the relationship between epidermal cell turnover kinetics and permeability of hairless mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to develop non-invasive, physical means to quantitatively assess the epidermal turnover kinetics and barrier properties of the skin and relate these to the cutaneous irritation which results from ultraviolet light irradiation and mold thermal burns. After systematically injecting radiolabeled glycine, the appearance of radioactivity at the skin's surface indicated the transit time of radiolabeled cells through the skin. By plotting the data as the cumulative specific activity against time and then fitting them with a third order polynomial equation, it is possible to estimate the turnover time of the stratum corneum. The skin turnover was coordinated with non-invasive transepidermal water loss (TEWL) studies determined with an evaporimeter. In vitro diffusion studies of the permeability of hydrocortisone through UVB irradiated and thermally burned skin were also performed. The studies indicated that irritated skin offers a relatively low diffusional resistance to hydrocortisone. Depending on the severity of the trauma, the increases in hydrocortisone's permeability coefficient through irritated skin ranged from a low of about 2 times normal to a high of about 210 times normal. Trauma-induced changes in hydrocortisone permeability parallel changes in TEWL, proving that the barrier deficient state resulting from rapid epidermal turnover is a general phenomenon.

  18. Transcription factor access is mediated by accurately positioned nucleosomes on the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, T K; Cordingley, M G; Wolford, R G; Hager, G L

    1991-01-01

    A fragment of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter was reconstituted from pure histones into a dinucleosome with uniquely positioned octamer cores. Core boundaries for the in vitro-assembled dinucleosome corresponded to the observed in vivo phasing pattern for long terminal repeat nucleosomes A and B. Nuclear factor 1 (NF1), a constituent of the MMTV transcription initiation complex, was excluded from the assembled dinucleosome, whereas the glucocorticoid receptor was able to bind. During transcription of MMTV in vivo, displacement of nucleosome B was necessary to permit assembly of the initiation complex. These results indicate that the nucleoprotein structure of the promoter can provide differential access to sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins and that active chromatin remodeling can occur during transcription activation. Images PMID:1846670

  19. Leonurus sibiricus induces nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo-Jin; Rim, Hong-Kun; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Suh, Se-Eun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyung; Choi, In-Young; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Il Kwang; Lee, Ju-Young; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2008-10-01

    Using mouse peritoneal macrophages, we have examined the mechanism by which Leonurus sibiricus (LS) regulates nitric oxide (NO) production. When LS was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production; however, LS by itself had no effect on NO production. The increased production of NO from rIFN-gamma plus LS-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappaB. Furthermore, treatment of peritoneal macrophages with rIFN-gamma plus LS caused a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. PDTC also decreased the effect of LS on TNF-alpha production significantly. Because NO and TNF-alpha play an important role in immune function and host defense, LS treatment could modulate several aspects of host defense mechanisms as a result of stimulation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  20. Suppressive Effect of Dietary Fucoidan on Proinflammatory Immune Response and MMP-1 Expression in UVB-Irradiated Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Yoshinaga, Keiko; Nakano, Takahisa

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that ultraviolet B irradiation leads to dermal inflammation. In this study, we found that Mekabu fucoidan suppressed edema, decreased the thickness of the prickle cell layer, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 1 in the skin of mice irradiated with ultraviolet B. Moreover, we found that the mean level of interferon gamma of Mekabu fucoidan-treated, ultraviolet B-irradiated mice (approximately 2.2 ng/mL) was not significantly different from that in normal mice (approximately 2.5 ng/mL). In contrast, a significant decrease in the mean level of interferon gamma (approximately 1.3 ng/mL) in ultraviolet B-irradiated control mice was observed compared with that in Mekabu fucoidan-treated, ultraviolet B-irradiated mice. The mean thickness of the prickle cell layer in the skin of Mekabu fucoidan-treated, ultraviolet B-irradiated mice was less than that in the ultraviolet B-irradiated control mice. Metalloproteinase 1 activity was significantly higher in the skin of ultraviolet B-irradiated mice than in the skin of untreated, nonirradiated normal mice. Metalloproteinase 1 in the skin of ultraviolet B-irradiated, Mekabu fucoidan- or L(+)-ascorbic acid (vitamin C)-treated mice was significantly lower than that in the ultraviolet B-irradiated control mice. Mitigation of the morphological changes in Mekabu fucoidan-treated mice was correlated with a decrease in metalloproteinase 1 levels. These data indicate that Mekabu fucoidan is an effective suppressor of inflammation in an ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse model.

  1. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  2. Tumor necrosis factor: receptor binding and expression of receptors in cultured mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Adamson, G M; Billings, R E

    1994-04-01

    Recombinant murine tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) was labeled with 125I and used to determine the binding characteristics, internalization and intracellular degradation in cultured mouse hepatocytes. [125I]TNF-alpha bound specifically to hepatocytes and Scatchard analysis of the data indicated binding to both a low-affinity (Kd = 20 nM) high capacity (51225 sites/cell) component and high-affinity component (Kd = 4 pM), with low capacity (290 sites/cell). The extent of TNF-alpha binding to hepatocytes correlated closely with its biological activity in hepatocytes, as indexed by depletion of intracellular ATP. At concentrations lower than 0.06 nM there was minimal binding and no effect on cellular ATP, whereas maximal binding at concentrations greater than 45 nM caused 80% depletion (in comparison to controls) of hepatocyte ATP. Incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in rapid uptake, internalization and degradation of [125I]TNF-alpha. This was followed by release of degraded material from hepatocytes. Examination, by reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction technology, of hepatocyte RNA extracted after the 4-hr adherence period revealed that mouse hepatocytes expressed mRNA for both TNF-alpha receptor 1 and TNF-alpha receptor 2, and that the relative abundance of TNF-alpha receptor 1 was approximately 7-fold greater than that for TNF-alpha receptor 2. Because it has been shown that these receptors have different affinities for TNF-alpha, this may explain the high- and low-affinity binding sites present on cultured mouse hepatocytes.

  3. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  4. Adrenal medullary tumors and iris proliferation in a transgenic mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Green, J. E.; Baird, A. M.; Hinrichs, S. H.; Klintworth, G. K.; Jay, G.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) tax gene in transgenic mice has been shown to result in the development of neurofibromas. Further characterization of these transgenic mice has revealed other significant pathologic similarities between this transgenic mouse model and human neurofibromatosis (NF). Pheochromocytomas of the adrenal medulla and hamartomas of the iris are well-recognized manifestations of human NF. Adrenal medullary tumors have been found in 68% of transgenic animals that were studied. They appear, however, not to be pheochromocytomas, but rather composed of undifferentiated spindle cells. Proliferation of fibroblastlike cells in the iris also occurs in one-half of the transgenic animals surviving more than 6 months. Melanocytes, however, have not been found in the transgenic iris lesion, although they are characteristically found in the Lisch nodules of human NF. The similarities between human neurofibromatosis and this transgenic mouse model (in which the overexpression of a single gene results in neoplasia) are discussed. This transgenic system may provide further insights into molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of neurofibromatosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1605307

  5. Oncogene amplification detected by in situ hybridization in radiation induced rat skin tumors. [C-myc:a3

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Jin.

    1991-02-01

    Oncogene activation may play an important role in radiation induced carcinogenesis. C-myc oncogene amplification was detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors, including squamous and basal cell carcinomas. In situ hybridization was performed with a biotinylated human c-myc third exon probe, visualized with an avidin-biotinylated alkaline phosphate detection system. No c-myc oncogene amplification was detected in normal rat skin at very early times after exposure to ionizing radiation, which is consistent with the view that c-myc amplification is more likely to be related to carcinogenesis than to normal cell proliferation. The incorporation of tritiated thymidine into the DNA of rat skin cells showed that the proliferation of epidermal cells reached a peak on the seventh day after exposure to ionizing radiation and then decreased. No connection between the proliferation of epidermal cell and c-myc oncogene amplification in normal or irradiated rat skin was found. The results indicated that c-myc amplification as measured by in situ hybridization was correlated with the Southern bolt results, but only some of the cancer cells were amplified. The c-myc positive cells were distributed randomly within regions of the tumor and exhibited a more uniform nuclear structure in comparison to the more vacuolated c-myc negative cells. No c-myc signal was detected in unirradiated normal skin or in irradiated skin cells near the tumors. C-myc amplification appears to be cell or cell cycle specific within radiation-induced carcinomas. 28 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Repression of malignant tumor progression upon pharmacologic IGF1R blockade in a mouse model of insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zumsteg, Adrian; Caviezel, Christoph; Pisarsky, Laura; Strittmatter, Karin; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Hofmann, Francesco; Christofori, Gerhard

    2012-06-01

    NVP-AEW541, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) tyrosine kinase, has been reported to interfere with tumor growth in various tumor transplantation models. We have assessed the efficacy of NVP-AEW541 in repressing tumor growth and tumor progression in the Rip1Tag2 transgenic mouse model of pancreatic β-cell carcinogenesis. In addition, we have tested NVP-AEW541 in Rip1Tag2;RipIGF1R double-transgenic mice which show accelerated tumor growth and increased tumor malignancy compared with Rip1Tag2 single-transgenic mice. Previously, we have shown that high levels of IGF-2, a high-affinity ligand for IGF1R, are required for Rip1Tag2 tumor cell survival and tumor growth. Unexpectedly, treatment of Rip1Tag2 mice with NVP-AEW541 in prevention and intervention trials neither did affect tumor growth nor tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. Yet, it significantly repressed progression to tumor malignancy, that is, the rate of the transition from differentiated adenoma to invasive carcinoma. Treatment of Rip1Tag2;RipIGF1R double-transgenic mice resulted in moderately reduced tumor volumes and increased rates of tumor cell apoptosis. Sustained expression of IGF-2 and of the IGF-2-binding form of insulin receptor (IR-A) in tumor cells suggests a compensatory role of IR-A upon IGF1R blockade. The results indicate that inhibition of IGF1R alone is not sufficient to efficiently block insulinoma growth and imply an overlapping role of IGF1R and insulin receptor in executing mitogenic and survival stimuli elicited by IGF-2. The reduction of tumor invasion upon IGF1R blockade on the other hand indicates a critical function of IGF1R signaling for the acquisition of a malignant phenotype.

  7. Effect of menthol and related terpenes on the percutaneous absorption of propranolol across excised hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kunta, J R; Goskonda, V R; Brotherton, H O; Khan, M A; Reddy, I K

    1997-12-01

    The potential use of terpenes/terpenoids as penetration enhancers in the transdermal delivery of propranolol hydrochloride (PL) was investigated. PL was chosen for the reasons of its extensive first-pass metabolism and short elimination half-life. The terpenes studied included L-menthol, (+)-limonene, (+/-)-linalool, and carvacrol at 1%, 5%, and 10% w/v concentrations. The diffusion of PL across excised hairless mouse skin was determined using side-by-side diffusion cells. Flux, permeability coefficient (Pm), and lag time (tL) were calculated. PL showed comparable lag times with menthol at all three concentration levels. At a 1% level of carvacrol, PL exhibited a 2.4- and 2.2-fold increase in lag time compared with 5 and 10% levels of enhancer, respectively. In the presence of limonene, PL had shown maximum lag time (between 3.0 and 3.3 h) at all three levels. In the case of linalool, the lag times for PL with 5 and 10% levels of enhancer were 7.0- and 5.2-fold less compared with 1% level. A significant (p < 0.05) concentration effect was observed only with linalool. Hydrogel-based patches were formulated with or without menthol as enhancer. Release profiles from the hydrogel formulations obeyed zero-order kinetics. The permeability of propranolol was significantly higher (p < 0.05) from the test patch than the control (no enhancer) patch across the mouse skin. The mechanism of permeation enhancement of menthol could involve its distribution preferentially into the intercellular spaces of stratum corneum and the possible reversible disruption of the intercellular lipid domain. The results suggest the potential use of menthol as effective penetration enhancer in the delivery of significant amounts of PL through skin. PMID:9423148

  8. A Novel Nude Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Scarring Using Scratched Full Thickness Human Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Alrobaiea, Saad M.; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Tredget, Edward E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hypertrophic scar (HTS) is a dermal form of fibroproliferative disorder that develops following deep skin injury. HTS can cause deformities, functional disabilities, and aesthetic disfigurements. The pathophysiology of HTS is not understood due to, in part, the lack of an ideal animal model. We hypothesize that human skin with deep dermal wounds grafted onto athymic nude mice will develop a scar similar to HTS. Our aim is to develop a representative animal model of human HTS. Approach: Thirty-six nude mice were grafted with full thickness human skin with deep dermal scratch wound before or 2 weeks after grafting or without scratch. The scratch on the human skin grafts was made using a specially designed jig that creates a wound >0.6 mm in depth. The xenografts were morphologically analyzed by digital photography. Mice were euthanized at 1, 2, and 3 months postoperatively for histology and immunohistochemistry analysis. Results: The mice developed raised and firm scars in the scratched xenografts with more contraction, increased infiltration of macrophage, and myofibroblasts compared to the xenografts without deep dermal scratch wound. Scar thickness and collagen bundle orientation and morphology resembled HTS. The fibrotic scars in the wounded human skin were morphologically and histologically similar to HTS, and human skin epithelial cells persisted in the remodeling tissues for 1 year postengraftment. Innovation and Conclusions: Deep dermal injury in human skin retains its profibrotic nature after transplantation, affording a novel model for the assessment of therapies for the treatment of human fibroproliferative disorders of the skin. PMID:27366591

  9. Effects of Intense Pulsed Light on Tissue Vascularity and Wound Healing: A Study with Mouse Island Skin Flap Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao Minh, Trinh; Xuan Hai, Do; Thi Ngoc, Pham

    2015-01-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been used extensively in aesthetic and cosmetic dermatology. To test whether IPL could change the tissue vascularity and improve wound healing, mice were separated into 4 groups. Mice in Group I were not treated with IPL, whereas, dorsal skins of mice in Groups II, III, and IV were treated with 35 J/cm2, 25 J/cm2, and 15 J/cm2 IPL, respectively. After 2 weeks, dorsal island skin flaps were raised, based on the left deep circumflex iliac vessels as pedicles; then, survival rate was assessed. Flaps in Group IV (treated with lowest dose of IPL) have a survival rate significantly higher than other groups. Counting blood vessels did not demonstrate any significant differences; however, vessel dilation was found in this group. The results show that IPL at the therapeutic doses which are usually applied to humans is harmful to mouse dorsal skin and did not enhance wound healing, whereas, IPL at much lower dose could improve wound healing. The possible mechanism is the dilation of tissue vasculature thanks to the electromagnetic character of IPL. Another mechanism could be the heat-shock protein production. PMID:25722887

  10. Effects of intense pulsed light on tissue vascularity and wound healing: a study with mouse island skin flap model.

    PubMed

    Cao Minh, Trinh; Xuan Hai, Do; Thi Ngoc, Pham

    2015-01-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been used extensively in aesthetic and cosmetic dermatology. To test whether IPL could change the tissue vascularity and improve wound healing, mice were separated into 4 groups. Mice in Group I were not treated with IPL, whereas, dorsal skins of mice in Groups II, III, and IV were treated with 35 J/cm(2), 25 J/cm(2), and 15 J/cm(2) IPL, respectively. After 2 weeks, dorsal island skin flaps were raised, based on the left deep circumflex iliac vessels as pedicles; then, survival rate was assessed. Flaps in Group IV (treated with lowest dose of IPL) have a survival rate significantly higher than other groups. Counting blood vessels did not demonstrate any significant differences; however, vessel dilation was found in this group. The results show that IPL at the therapeutic doses which are usually applied to humans is harmful to mouse dorsal skin and did not enhance wound healing, whereas, IPL at much lower dose could improve wound healing. The possible mechanism is the dilation of tissue vasculature thanks to the electromagnetic character of IPL. Another mechanism could be the heat-shock protein production.

  11. Protease-mediated release of chemotherapeutics from mesoporous silica nanoparticles to ex vivo human and mouse lung tumors.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Sabine H; Bölükbas, Deniz A; Argyo, Christian; Datz, Stefan; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Bein, Thomas; Meiners, Silke

    2015-03-24

    Nanoparticles allow for controlled and targeted drug delivery to diseased tissues and therefore bypass systemic side effects. Spatiotemporal control of drug release can be achieved by nanocarriers that respond to elevated levels of disease-specific enzymes. For example, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is overexpressed in tumors, is known to enhance the metastatic potency of malignant cells, and has been associated with poor prognosis of lung cancer. Here, we report the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) tightly capped by avidin molecules via MMP9 sequence-specific linkers to allow for site-selective drug delivery in high-expressing MMP9 tumor areas. We provide proof-of-concept evidence for successful MMP9-triggered drug release from MSNs in human tumor cells and in mouse and human lung tumors using the novel technology of ex vivo 3D lung tissue cultures. This technique allows for translational testing of drug delivery strategies in diseased mouse and human tissue. Using this method we show MMP9-mediated release of cisplatin, which induced apoptotic cell death only in lung tumor regions of Kras mutant mice, without causing toxicity in tumor-free areas or in healthy mice. The MMP9-responsive nanoparticles also allowed for effective combinatorial drug delivery of cisplatin and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which had a synergistic effect on the (therapeutic) efficiency. Importantly, we demonstrate the feasibility of MMP9-controlled drug release in human lung tumors.

  12. Protease-mediated release of chemotherapeutics from mesoporous silica nanoparticles to ex vivo human and mouse lung tumors.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Sabine H; Bölükbas, Deniz A; Argyo, Christian; Datz, Stefan; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Bein, Thomas; Meiners, Silke

    2015-03-24

    Nanoparticles allow for controlled and targeted drug delivery to diseased tissues and therefore bypass systemic side effects. Spatiotemporal control of drug release can be achieved by nanocarriers that respond to elevated levels of disease-specific enzymes. For example, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is overexpressed in tumors, is known to enhance the metastatic potency of malignant cells, and has been associated with poor prognosis of lung cancer. Here, we report the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) tightly capped by avidin molecules via MMP9 sequence-specific linkers to allow for site-selective drug delivery in high-expressing MMP9 tumor areas. We provide proof-of-concept evidence for successful MMP9-triggered drug release from MSNs in human tumor cells and in mouse and human lung tumors using the novel technology of ex vivo 3D lung tissue cultures. This technique allows for translational testing of drug delivery strategies in diseased mouse and human tissue. Using this method we show MMP9-mediated release of cisplatin, which induced apoptotic cell death only in lung tumor regions of Kras mutant mice, without causing toxicity in tumor-free areas or in healthy mice. The MMP9-responsive nanoparticles also allowed for effective combinatorial drug delivery of cisplatin and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which had a synergistic effect on the (therapeutic) efficiency. Importantly, we demonstrate the feasibility of MMP9-controlled drug release in human lung tumors. PMID:25703655

  13. Time-gated and lifetime imaging techniques for the detection of skin tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Valentini, Gianluca; Rinaldi, Fabio; Sorbellini, Elisabetta

    1999-07-01

    Two time-domain fluorescence imaging techniques have been developed and tested for the detection of malignancies after administration of a marker having a fluorescence lifetime longer than that of the tissue natural fluorescence. The first technique, based on the time-gated approach, relies on the acquisition of fluorescence images after a suitable delay with respect to the excitation pulses in order to discriminate the long living exogenous fluorescence from the short living endogenous one. The second technique, called lifetime imaging, measures the spatial map of the fluorescence decay time of the sample, allowing an indirect detection of the regions where the concentration of the marker is higher. The first method is simpler, does not require any image processing, leading to a true real time video, but it works better when a rather strong signal comes from the sample. The second method requires two or more images to be acquired and processed sequentially; therefore, it is slower, but proved to be more sensitive in low signal conditions. The two techniques have been applied for the detection of skin tumors in humans after the topical application of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid ointment, which promotes the accumulation of the endogenous porphyrin Protoporphyrin IX preferentially in proliferative tissues. Preliminary results are encouraging.

  14. Studies on the mechanism of skin tumor promotion: evidence for several stages in promotion. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Nelson, K.; Gleason, G.L.

    1980-06-01

    The effects of nonpromoting and weakly promoting diterpenes on skin tumor promotion by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) were investigated. When phorbol and phorbol 12,13-diacetate (both nonpromoting) were given simultaneously with TPA after 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)-anthracene (DMBA) initiation in female mice, they had no effect on TPA promotion. However, the nonpromoter 4-O-methyl-TPA and the weak promoter mezerein were found to inhibit TPA promotion in a dose-dependent manner when given simultaneously with TPA. Because mezerein was found to be an effective inhibitor of TPA promotion when given simultaneously and because it induces many biological responses similar to those to TPA, the capacity of mezerein to act as an incomplete promoter in a two-stage promotion protocol was also investigated. The results suggest that although mezerein by itself is a weak promotor and mimics TPA in many biochemical and morphological effects it is a potent second-stage promoter in a two-stage promotion regimen.

  15. Students Investigating the Antiproliferative Effects of Synthesized Drugs on Mouse Mammary Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The potential for personalized cancer management has long intrigued experienced researchers as well as the naïve student intern. Personalized cancer treatments based on a tumor's genetic profile are now feasible and can reveal both the cells' susceptibility and resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. In a weeklong laboratory investigation that mirrors current cancer research, undergraduate and advanced high school students determine the efficacy of common pharmacological agents through in vitro testing. Using mouse mammary tumor cell cultures treated with “unknown” drugs historically recommended for breast cancer treatment, students are introduced to common molecular biology techniques from in vitro cell culture to fluorescence microscopy. Student understanding is assessed through laboratory reports and the successful identification of the unknown drug. The sequence of doing the experiment, applying logic, and constructing a hypothesis gives the students time to discover the rationale behind the cellular drug resistance assay. The breast cancer experiment has been field tested during the past 5 yr with more than 200 precollege/undergraduate interns through the Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science program hosted by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. PMID:16220143

  16. A new immunization and treatment strategy for mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) associated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Braitbard, Ori; Roniger, Maayan; Bar-Sinai, Allan; Rajchman, Dana; Gross, Tamar; Abramovitch, Hillel; Ferla, Marco La; Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Chiara M.; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Hochman, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) causes mammary carcinoma or lymphoma in mice. An increasing body of evidence in recent years supports its involvement also in human sporadic breast cancer. It is thus of importance to develop new strategies to impair the development, growth and metastasis of MMTV-associated cancers. The signal peptide of the envelope precursor protein of this virus: MMTV-p14 (p14) is an excellent target for such strategies, due to unique characteristics distinct from its regular endoplasmic reticulum targeting function. These include cell surface expression in: murine cancer cells that harbor the virus, human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells that ectopically express p14, as well as cultured human cells derived from an invasive ductal breast carcinoma positive for MMTV sequences. These findings support its use in signal peptide-based immune targeting. Indeed, priming and boosting mice with p14 elicits a specific anti-signal peptide immune response sufficient for protective vaccination against MMTV-associated tumors. Furthermore, passive immunization using a combination of anti-p14 monoclonal antibodies or the transfer of T-cells from immunized mice (Adoptive Cell Transfer) is also therapeutically effective. With reports demonstrating involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer, we propose the immune-mediated targeting of p14 as a strategy for prevention, treatment and diagnosis of MMTV-associated cancers. PMID:26934560

  17. Comparison of lowering copper levels with tetrathiomolybdate and zinc on mouse tumor and doxorubicin models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guoqing; Dick, Robert; Zeng, Chunhua; Brewer, George J

    2006-12-01

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM), presumably by lowering copper levels and availability, has shown excellent efficacy in animal models of cancer and models of injury that produce fibrotic or inflammatory damage in lung, heart, and liver. Trials in human patients are underway. If the efficacy of TM is indeed through lowering copper levels, other anticopper drugs should be equally efficacious. Zinc is an anticopper drug, with proven efficacy in Wilson's disease, a disease of copper toxicity. In this study, the efficacy of zinc is compared with TM on a mouse tumor model and on the doxorubicin model of heart damage, and it is hypothesized that when copper availability is lowered to an equivalent extent, the 2 drugs would show equivalent efficacy. No effect is found of zinc on inhibiting growth of a tumor that is markedly inhibited by TM, and zinc is found to be less effective than TM in inhibiting cardiac damage from doxorubicin. This study shows that TM's mechanism of action in protecting against doxorubicin toxicity is because of its anticopper effects, as copper supplementation eliminated the protective effect of TM. It is also hypothesized that the differences between TM and zinc may be caused by TM's mechanism of action in which it binds copper already in the body, whereas zinc does not.

  18. Erucin exerts anti-inflammatory properties in murine macrophages and mouse skin: possible mediation through the inhibition of NFκB signaling.

    PubMed

    Cho, Han Jin; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Erucin, an isothiocyanate, is a hydrolysis product of glucoerucin found in arugula and has recently been reported to have anti-cancer properties in various cancer cells. In this study, we assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of erucin and the underlying mechanisms, using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated mouse skin. In RAW 264.7 cells, erucin (2.5, 5 μmol/L) inhibited LPS-induced production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. Erucin inhibited LPS-induced degradation of the inhibitor of κBα and translocation of p65 to the nucleus and, subsequently, reduced LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) DNA binding activities, as well as the transcriptional activity of NFκB, leading to the decreased expression of NFκB-target genes, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, as well as transcriptional activity of iNOS and COX-2. In mice, erucin (100, 300 nmoles) treatment significantly inhibited phorbol ester-induced formation of ear edema and expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that erucin exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory enzymes and cytokines, which may be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of NFκB signaling. PMID:24132147

  19. Erucin Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Properties in Murine Macrophages and Mouse Skin: Possible Mediation through the Inhibition of NFκB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Jin; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Erucin, an isothiocyanate, is a hydrolysis product of glucoerucin found in arugula and has recently been reported to have anti-cancer properties in various cancer cells. In this study, we assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of erucin and the underlying mechanisms, using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-treated mouse skin. In RAW 264.7 cells, erucin (2.5, 5 μmol/L) inhibited LPS-induced production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. Erucin inhibited LPS-induced degradation of the inhibitor of κBα and translocation of p65 to the nucleus and, subsequently, reduced LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NFκB) DNA binding activities, as well as the transcriptional activity of NFκB, leading to the decreased expression of NFκB-target genes, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, as well as transcriptional activity of iNOS and COX-2. In mice, erucin (100, 300 nmoles) treatment significantly inhibited phorbol ester-induced formation of ear edema and expression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that erucin exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory enzymes and cytokines, which may be mediated, at least in part, via the inhibition of NFκB signaling. PMID:24132147

  20. Microdistribution of specific rat monoclonal antibodies to mouse tissues and human tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Falcioni, R.; Wesley, J.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Detailed evaluations of the microdistribution of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to normal tissue antigens were conducted in BALB/c mice. MoAb 273-34A, which binds to a target molecule on the lumenal surface of lung endothelial cells, localizes quickly and efficiently throughout the lung vasculature. MoAb 133-13A, which binds to an antigen on macrophage-like cells expressed in nearly equal amounts in lung, liver, and spleen, localizes most efficiently to spleen and less well to liver and lung. The microdistribution of MoAb 133-13A in liver and spleen is consistent with the antigen distribution in these organs, but in the lung a more diffuse microdistribution is observed, indicating poor access of MoAb to the antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tight endothelium (lung) represents a significant barrier to extravasation of MoAb into tissue while fenestrated (spleen) and sinusoidal (liver) endothelium are more easily penetrated. In human tumor bearing nu/nu mice, the microdistribution of MoAb to the beta 4 and alpha 6 subunits of integrin was studied. These MoAbs do not cross-react with murine integrins and thus are tumor-specific in the nu/nu mouse model. Localization of 125I-labeled MoAb 450-11A, which reacts with an intercellular domain of beta 4 integrin, is very weak and diffuse. All MoAbs to extracellular domains localize well to the tumor. Microdistribution of these MoAbs in the 3 different tumors is nonuniform with heavy distribution near the blood vessels, whereas antigen distribution as determined by immunoperoxidase shows a much more uniform pattern throughout the tumors. In experiments with 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B F(ab')2, the nonuniform pattern of distribution was not changed. Gross and microdistribution of different doses of 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B were studied.

  1. Dissecting the dynamics of dysregulation of cellular processes in mouse mammary gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Elucidating the sequence of molecular events underlying breast cancer formation is of enormous value for understanding this disease and for design of an effective treatment. Gene expression measurements have enabled the study of transcriptome-wide changes involved in tumorigenesis. This usually occurs through identification of differentially expressed genes or pathways. Results We propose a novel approach that is able to delineate new cancer-related cellular processes and the nature of their involvement in tumorigenesis. First, we define modules as densely interconnected and functionally enriched areas of a Protein Interaction Network. Second, 'differential expression' and 'differential co-expression' analyses are applied to the genes in these network modules, allowing for identification of processes that are up- or down-regulated, as well as processes disrupted (low co-expression) or invoked (high co-expression) in different tumor stages. Finally, we propose a strategy to identify regulatory miRNAs potentially responsible for the observed changes in module activities. We demonstrate the potential of this analysis on expression data from a mouse model of mammary gland tumor, monitored over three stages of tumorigenesis. Network modules enriched in adhesion and metabolic processes were found to be inactivated in tumor cells through the combination of dysregulation and down-regulation, whereas the activation of the integrin complex and immune system response modules is achieved through increased co-regulation and up-regulation. Additionally, we confirmed a known miRNA involved in mammary gland tumorigenesis, and present several new candidates for this function. Conclusions Understanding complex diseases requires studying them by integrative approaches that combine data sources and different analysis methods. The integration of methods and data sources proposed here yields a sensitive tool, able to pinpoint new processes with a role in cancer, dissect

  2. Optical coherence tomography enables imaging of tumor initiation in the TAg-RB mouse model of retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Andrea A.; O’Hare, Michael N.; Shadmand, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in children. Although significant advances in treatment have decreased mortality in recent years, morbidity continues to be associated with these therapies, and therefore, there is a pressing need for new therapeutic options. Transgenic mouse models are popular for testing new therapeutics as well as studying the pathophysiology of retinoblastoma. The T-antigen retinoblastoma (TAg-RB) model has close molecular and histological resemblance to human retinoblastoma tumors; these mice inactivate pRB by retinal-specific expression of the Simian Virus 40 T-antigens. Here, we evaluated whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging could be used to document tumor growth in the TAg-RB model from the earliest stages of tumor development. Methods The Micron III rodent imaging system was used to obtain fundus photographs and OCT images of both eyes of TAg-RB mice weekly from 2 to 12 weeks of age and at 16 and 20 weeks of age to document tumor development. Tumor morphology was confirmed with histological analysis. Results Before being visible on funduscopy, hyperreflective masses arising in the inner nuclear layer were evident at 2 weeks of age with OCT imaging. After most of these hyperreflective cell clusters disappeared around 4 weeks of age, the first tumors became visible on OCT and funduscopy by 6 weeks. The masses grew into discrete, discoid tumors, preferentially in the periphery, that developed more irregular morphology over time, eventually merging and displacing the inner retinal layers into the vitreous. Conclusions OCT is a non-invasive imaging modality for tracking early TAg-RB tumor growth in vivo. Using OCT, we characterized TAg-positive cells as early as 2 weeks, corresponding to the earliest stages at which tumors are histologically evident, and well before they are evident with funduscopy. Tracking tumor growth from its earliest stages will allow better analysis of the efficacy of

  3. Early changes produced in mouse skin by the application of three middle distillates.

    PubMed

    Grasso, P; Sharratt, M; Ingram, A J

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported by the American Petroleum Institute (API) that dermal applications of certain middle distillates of mineral oils can result in high incidences of skin tumours in mice. This was unexpected as the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in these were below detection limits. To examine the possible role of tissue injury in the induction of tumours, the skin reactions produced by thrice weekly applications of three middle distillates similar to those tested by the API were examined grossly and histopathologically at intervals up to 6 weeks. Various reference materials and oils were used as controls. Preliminary histological examination showed that severe skin damage was present from week 1 onwards in mice treated with the three middle distillates, two of them producing epidermal loss and ulceration. Marked epidermal hyperplasia was produced by all three middle distillates. These findings support the view that regenerative epidermal hyperplasia due to repeated severe skin damage may have exerted a powerful promotional effect in the production of the skin tumours by middle distillates in the API study. PMID:3180034

  4. Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Help Restore Function to Ovaries in a Premature Ovarian Failure Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Dongmei; Wang, Fangyuan; Dong, Zhangli; Zhang, Qiuwan

    2014-01-01

    Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) can differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers. For this reason, they are considered a powerful tool for therapeutic cloning and offer new possibilities for tissue therapy. Recent studies showed that skin-derived stem cells can differentiate into cells expressing germ-cell specific markers in vitro and form oocytes in vivo. The idea that SMSCs may be suitable for the treatment of intractable diseases or traumatic tissue damage has attracted attention. To determine the ability of SMSCs to reactivate injured ovaries, a mouse model with ovaries damaged by busulfan and cyclophosphamide was developed and is described here. Female skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (F-SMSCs) and male skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (M-SMSCs) from red fluorescence protein (RFP) transgenic adult mice were used to investigate the restorative effects of SMSCs on ovarian function. Significant increases in total body weight and the weight of reproductive organs were observed in the treated animals. Both F-SMSCs and M-SMSCs were shown to be capable of partially restoring fertility in chemotherapy-treated females. Immunostaining with RFP and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) antibodies demonstrated that the grafted SMSCs survived, migrated to the recipient ovaries. After SMSCs were administered to the treated mice, real-time PCR showed that the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFNγ were significantly lower in the ovaries than in the untreated controls. Consistent with this observation, expression of oogenesis marker genes Nobox, Nanos3, and Lhx8 increased in ovaries of SMSCs-treated mice. These findings suggest that SMSCs may play a role within the ovarian follicle microenvironment in restoring the function of damaged ovaries and could be useful in reproductive health. PMID:24879098

  5. Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells help restore function to ovaries in a premature ovarian failure mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lai, Dongmei; Wang, Fangyuan; Dong, Zhangli; Zhang, Qiuwan

    2014-01-01

    Skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) can differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers. For this reason, they are considered a powerful tool for therapeutic cloning and offer new possibilities for tissue therapy. Recent studies showed that skin-derived stem cells can differentiate into cells expressing germ-cell specific markers in vitro and form oocytes in vivo. The idea that SMSCs may be suitable for the treatment of intractable diseases or traumatic tissue damage has attracted attention. To determine the ability of SMSCs to reactivate injured ovaries, a mouse model with ovaries damaged by busulfan and cyclophosphamide was developed and is described here. Female skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (F-SMSCs) and male skin-derived mesenchymal stem cells (M-SMSCs) from red fluorescence protein (RFP) transgenic adult mice were used to investigate the restorative effects of SMSCs on ovarian function. Significant increases in total body weight and the weight of reproductive organs were observed in the treated animals. Both F-SMSCs and M-SMSCs were shown to be capable of partially restoring fertility in chemotherapy-treated females. Immunostaining with RFP and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) antibodies demonstrated that the grafted SMSCs survived, migrated to the recipient ovaries. After SMSCs were administered to the treated mice, real-time PCR showed that the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, and IFNγ were significantly lower in the ovaries than in the untreated controls. Consistent with this observation, expression of oogenesis marker genes Nobox, Nanos3, and Lhx8 increased in ovaries of SMSCs-treated mice. These findings suggest that SMSCs may play a role within the ovarian follicle microenvironment in restoring the function of damaged ovaries and could be useful in reproductive health. PMID:24879098

  6. Before or after: is there a connection between the use of adjunctive nonmelanoma skin cancer treatments and subsequent invasive tumors?

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Emily Stamell; Cohen, Joel L; Friedman, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Although the therapeutic gold standard for basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) is surgical excision, imiquimod, fluorouracil cream, and photodynamic therapy are frequently used. All 3 modalities have been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of superficial BCCs as well as other nonmelanoma skin cancers; however, recent reports have emerged implicating these agents in causing more aggressive recurrent subtypes of BCCs. Here we review this literature as well as offer an alternative explanation for these tumors. PMID:25942661

  7. Bromelain nanoparticles protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya B; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2015-04-01

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy leads to severe side effects, which limits its use. Nanoparticles (NPs) based delivery systems offer an effective alternative. Several evidences highlight the importance of Bromelain (BL), a proteolytic enzyme, as an anti-tumor agent which however has been limited due to the requirement of high doses at the tumor site. Therefore, we illustrate the development of BL loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs that show enhanced anti-tumor effects compared to free BL. The formulated NPs with a mean particle size of 130.4 ± 8.81 nm exhibited sustained release of BL. Subsequent investigation revealed enhanced anti-tumor ability of NPs in 2-stage skin tumorigenesis mice model. Reduction in average number of tumors (∼ 2.3 folds), delay in tumorigenesis (∼ 2 weeks), percent tumorigenesis (∼ 4 folds), and percent mortality rate as well as a reduction in the average tumor volume (∼ 2.5 folds) in mice as compared to free BL were observed. The NPs were found to be superior in exerting chemopreventive effects over chemotherapeutic effects at 10 fold reduced dose than free BL, validated by the enhanced ability of NPs (∼ 1.8 folds) to protect the DNA from induced damage. The effects were also supported by histopathological evaluations. NPs were also capable of modulating the expression of pro-apoptotic (P53, Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) proteins. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that developed NPs formulation could be used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by exerting chemo-preventive effects against induced carcinogenesis at lower dosages. PMID:25619920

  8. Bromelain nanoparticles protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya B; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2015-04-01

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy leads to severe side effects, which limits its use. Nanoparticles (NPs) based delivery systems offer an effective alternative. Several evidences highlight the importance of Bromelain (BL), a proteolytic enzyme, as an anti-tumor agent which however has been limited due to the requirement of high doses at the tumor site. Therefore, we illustrate the development of BL loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs that show enhanced anti-tumor effects compared to free BL. The formulated NPs with a mean particle size of 130.4 ± 8.81 nm exhibited sustained release of BL. Subsequent investigation revealed enhanced anti-tumor ability of NPs in 2-stage skin tumorigenesis mice model. Reduction in average number of tumors (∼ 2.3 folds), delay in tumorigenesis (∼ 2 weeks), percent tumorigenesis (∼ 4 folds), and percent mortality rate as well as a reduction in the average tumor volume (∼ 2.5 folds) in mice as compared to free BL were observed. The NPs were found to be superior in exerting chemopreventive effects over chemotherapeutic effects at 10 fold reduced dose than free BL, validated by the enhanced ability of NPs (∼ 1.8 folds) to protect the DNA from induced damage. The effects were also supported by histopathological evaluations. NPs were also capable of modulating the expression of pro-apoptotic (P53, Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) proteins. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that developed NPs formulation could be used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by exerting chemo-preventive effects against induced carcinogenesis at lower dosages.

  9. Forecasting new development of tumor areas using spatial and temporal distribution profiles of hemoglobin saturation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ossandon, Miguel R.; Phatak, Dhananjay S.; Sorg, Brian S.; Kalpakis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Features of the tumor microenvironment (TME), such as hemoglobin saturation (HbSat), can provide valuable information on early development and progression of tumors. HbSat correlates with high metabolism and precedes the formation of angiogenic tumors; therefore, changes in HbSat profile can be used as a biomarker for early cancer detection. In this project, we develop a methodology to evaluate HbSat for forecasting early tumor development in a mouse model. We built a delta (δ) cumulative feature that includes spatial and temporal distribution of HbSat for classifying tumor/normal areas. Using a two-class (normal and tumor) logistic regression, the δ feature successfully forecasts tumor areas in two window chamber mice (AUC=0.90 and 0.85). To assess the performance of the logistic regression-based classifier utilizing the δ feature of each region, we conduct a 10-fold cross-validation analysis (AUC of the ROC=0.87). These results show that the TME features based on HbSat can be used to evaluate tumor progression and forecast new occurrences of tumor areas. PMID:26158025

  10. CD44 standard and variant isoform expression in human epidermal skin tumors is not correlated with tumor aggressiveness but down-regulated during proliferation and tumor de-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seelentag, W K; Günthert, U; Saremaslani, P; Futo, E; Pfaltz, M; Heitz, P U; Roth, J

    1996-06-21

    CD44 isoforms have been reported to be involved in tumor invasion and metastasis formation. Normal human skin expresses high levels of CD44 isoforms, but little is known about their expression in epidermal skin tumors. Expression of CD44 standard (CD44s) and variant exon (CD44v3, -v4, -v5, -v6, -v9)-encoded gene products has been studied in 74 benign, semi-malignant and malignant human epithelial skin tumors using a panel of well-characterized, variant exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Sensitivity and resolution of the immunohistochemical staining in paraffin sections was substantially improved by using microwave-based antigen retrieval and an optimized streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. Immunostaining was evaluated semi-quantitatively and correlated with tumor type and degree of histological differentiation by non-parametric statistical tests. Furthermore, the relationship between CD44 expression and cellular proliferation rate as defined by the Ki-67 antigen was analyzed in basal cell carcinomas. We found a significant correlation between tumor type and CD44 isoform expression. Basal cell carcinomas exhibited the weakest staining and keratoacanthomas the strongest. Squamous cell carcinomas ranged in between, with a tendency to down-regulate CD44 expression upon de-differentiation. In basal cell carcinomas, an inverse relationship between CD44 expression and proliferation rate was directly demonstrated at the cellular level using double immunolabelling. Our data indicate that qualitative and quantitative changes in CD44 splicevariant expression in human skin tumors do not correlate with invasive and metastatic potential but are rather related to the degree of tumor differentiation. PMID:8682591

  11. Combination therapy using imatinib and vatalanib improves the therapeutic efficiency of paclitaxel towards a mouse melanoma tumor.

    PubMed

    Kłosowska-Wardęga, Agnieszka; Hasumi, Yoko; Åhgren, Aive; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Hellberg, Carina

    2011-02-01

    Melanomas respond poorly to chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the sensitization of B16 mouse melanoma tumors to paclitaxel by a combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors: vatalanib, targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, and imatinib, an inhibitor targeting for example, Abl/BCR-ABL, the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and stem cell factor receptor c-Kit. C57Bl6/J mice carrying B16/PDGF-BB mouse melanoma tumors were treated daily with vatalanib (25 mg/kg), imatinib (100 mg/kg), or a combination of these drugs. Paclitaxel was given subcutaneously twice during the study. The effects of the drugs on tumor cell proliferation in vitro were determined by counting cells. B16/PDGF-BB mouse melanoma tumors were not sensitive to paclitaxel at doses of either 5 or 20 mg/kg. However, the tumor growth was significantly reduced by 58%, in response to paclitaxel (5 mg/kg) when administered with daily doses of both vatalanib and imatinib. Paclitaxel only inhibited the in-vitro growth of B16/PDGF-BB tumor cells when given in combination with imatinib. Imatinib presumably targets c-Kit, as the cells do not express platelet-derived growth factor receptor and as another c-Abl inhibitor was without effect. This was supported by data from three c-Kit-expressing human melanoma cell lines showing varying sensitization to paclitaxel by the kinase inhibitors. In addition, small interfering RNA knockdown of c-Kit sensitized the cells to paclitaxel. These data show that combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib and vatalanib, increases the effects of paclitaxel on B16/PDGF-BB tumors, thus suggesting a novel strategy for the treatment of melanomas expressing c-Kit. PMID:20975605

  12. Epithelioid angiosarcoma of the skin. A malignant tumor mimicking many different neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Santos-Juanes1, Jorge; Vivanco-Allende, Blanca; Galache, Cristina Galache

    2016-01-01

    Epithelioid angiosarcomas are rare malignant mesenchymal tumors. The main problem of these tumors is the complicate clinical and histological diagnosis. We report a case with an immunohistochemical panel. We propose the use of CD31 in the immunohistochemical panel of an undifferenciated tumor with epithelioid features, because it appears to be the only endothelial marker these tumors constantly express. PMID:27617941

  13. Isolation and evaluation of anticancer efficacy of stigmasterol in a mouse model of DMBA-induced skin carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Huma; Dixit, Savita; Ali, Daoud; Alqahtani, Saeed M; Alkahtani, Saad; Alarifi, Saud

    2015-01-01

    Stigmasterol (99.9% pure) was isolated from Azadirachta indica and its chemopreventive effect on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced skin cancer was investigated in Swiss albino mice. Skin tumors were induced by topical application of DMBA and promoted by croton oil. To assess the chemopreventive potential of stigmasterol, it was orally administered at a concentration of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg three times weekly for 16 weeks. Reduction in tumor size and cumulative number of papillomas were seen as a result of treatment with stigmasterol. The average latency period was significantly increased as compared with the carcinogen-treated control. Stigmasterol induced a significant decrease in the activity of serum enzymes, such as aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and bilirubin as compared with the control. Stigmasterol significantly increased glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase as compared with the control. Elevated levels of lipid peroxide and DNA damage in the control group were significantly inhibited by administration of stigmasterol. From the present study, it can be inferred that stigmasterol has chemopreventive activity in an experimental model of cancer. This chemopreventive activity may be linked to the oxidative stress of stigmasterol. The antigenotoxic properties of stigmasterol are also likely to contribute to its chemopreventive action. PMID:26060396

  14. Stabilin-1 is expressed in human breast cancer and supports tumor growth in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Yin, Shuiping; Song, Bin; Avdic, Aida; Schledzewski, Kai; Ovsiy, Ilja; Gratchev, Alexei; Verdiell, Maria Llopis; Sticht, Carsten; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Schönhaber, Hiltrud; Weiss, Christel; Fields, Alan P.; Simon-Keller, Katja; Pfister, Frederick; Berlit, Sebastian; Marx, Alexander; Arnold, Bernd; Goerdt, Sergij; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Stabilin-1 is a multifunctional scavenger receptor expressed on alternatively-activated macrophages. Stabilin-1 mediates phagocytosis of “unwanted-self” components, intracellular sorting, and endocytic clearance of extracellular ligands including SPARC that modulates breast cancer growth. The expression of stabilin-1 was found on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in mouse and human cancers including melanoma, lymphoma, glioblastoma, and pancreatic insulinoma. Despite its tumor-promoting role in mouse models of melanoma and lymphoma the expression and functional role of stabilin-1 in breast cancer was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that stabilin-1 is expressed on TAM in human breast cancer, and its expression is most pronounced on stage I disease. Using stabilin-1 knockout (ko) mice we show that stabilin-1 facilitates growth of mouse TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma. Endocytosis assay on stabilin-1 ko TAM demonstrated impaired clearance of stabilin-1 ligands including SPARC that was capable of inducing cell death in TS/A cells. Affymetrix microarray analysis on purified TAM and reporter assays in stabilin-1 expressing cell lines demonstrated no influence of stabilin-1 expression on intracellular signalling. Our results suggest stabilin-1 mediated silent clearance of extracellular tumor growth-inhibiting factors (e.g. SPARC) as a mechanism of stabilin-1 induced tumor growth. Silent clearance function of stabilin-1 makes it an attractive candidate for delivery of immunomodulatory anti-cancer therapeutic drugs to TAM. PMID:27105498

  15. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  16. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  17. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Guy S.; Banks, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given. PMID:27077818

  18. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Guy S; Banks, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given. PMID:27077818

  19. Differential reactivation of fetal/neonatal genes in mouse liver tumors induced in cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Fujii, Kiyonaga; Nagahama, Yasuharu; Ooshio, Takako; Xin, Bing; Okada, Yoko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in either chronically injured or seemingly intact livers. To explore the tumorigenic mechanisms underlying these different conditions, we compared the mRNA expression profiles of mouse hepatocellular tumors induced by the repeated injection of CCl4 or a single diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injection using a cDNA microarray. We identified tumor-associated genes that were expressed differentially in the cirrhotic CCl4 model (H19, Igf2, Cbr3, and Krt20) and the non-cirrhotic DEN model (Tff3, Akr1c18, Gpc3, Afp, and Abcd2) as well as genes that were expressed comparably in both models (Ly6d, Slpi, Spink3, Scd2, and Cpe). The levels and patterns of mRNA expression of these genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Most of these genes were highly expressed in mouse livers during the fetal/neonatal periods. We also examined the mRNA expression of these genes in mouse tumors induced by thioacetamide, another cirrhotic inducer, and those that developed spontaneously in non-cirrhotic livers and found that they shared a similar expression profile as that observed in CCl4-induced and DEN-induced tumors, respectively. There was a close relationship between the expression levels of Igf2 and H19 mRNA, which were activated in the cirrhotic models. Our results show that mouse liver tumors reactivate fetal/neonatal genes, some of which are specific to cirrhotic or non-cirrhotic modes of pathogenesis. PMID:26011625

  20. Beta-radiation-induced resistance to MNNG initiation of papilloma but not carcinoma formation in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchel, R.E.; Gragtmans, N.J.; Morrison, D.P. )

    1990-02-01

    We have shown previously that the risk of tumor initiation, promotion, and progression in animals initiated with alkylating agents can be drastically altered by hyperthermia treatments. We show here that ionizing radiation can also alter the risk of tumor initiation by alkylating agents. Using a two-step skin tumorigenesis protocol in female SENCAR mice (initiation by MNNG, promotion with TPA), we exposed the dorsal skin of the mice to various doses of 90Sr/90Y beta radiation near the time of initiation. The radiation produced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of papillomas which appeared after TPA promotion, with about a 20% reduction in animals receiving 0.5 Gy surface dose just before initiation, about 50% reduction after 2.5 Gy, and greater than 80% at doses above 5 Gy. A dose of 2.5 Gy in animals initiated with DMBA produced no significant reduction. One skin hyperthermia treatment along with radiation in MNNG-initiated animals partially blocked the protective effect of radiation and increased the papilloma frequency. Radiation (2.5 Gy) given either 6 days before or after MNNG initiation was less effective but still reduced papilloma frequency about 20%. In sharp contrast to the marked reduction in papilloma formation, these same animals showed no change in carcinoma frequency with any of the doses or schedules of beta radiation. MNNG initiation alone produced three types of initiated cells. One type, produced in low yield, was promotion-independent with a high probability of progression to a carcinoma and appeared unaffected by the radiation. A second type, produced in intermediate yield, was promotion-dependent and also had a high progression probability, but was likewise unaffected by the radiation. The third and most abundant type was promotion-dependent with a very low progression probability.

  1. Polyproteins related to the major core protein of mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, C; Atterwill, M

    1978-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MuMTV) contains several low-molecular-weight proteins which, together with the genomic RNA, constitute the core structure of the virion. The most abundant protein in the core is the 27,000-dalton protein (p27), and, by analogy to the type C viruses, this protein probably forms the core shell. In mouse mammary tumor cell lines (GR and Mm5MT) producing MuMTV the major p57 antigenic specificity resides in a large protein, which migrates in polyacrylamide gels as a doublet of 77,000 and 75,000 daltons (p 77/75). A series of lower-molecular-weight proteins, p61, p48, p38, and p34, is also present in small amounts and is probably derived by proteolytic cleavage of the p 77/75. These proteins have been identified by immunoprecipitation with monospecific antiserum, and their sequence relatedness to p27 has been determined by an analysis of the peptides after trypsin digestion. After a 15-min pulse with [35S]-methionine, all of the p27-related proteins in these cell lines were labelled and, during a subsequent chase, progressively disappeared. The p27 was labeled poorly during the pulse, but the amount of label in this protein increased during the chase. A quantitation of these experiments suggested that the majority of the p27-related proteins were quite rapidly turned over in these cell lines. Hence, if p27 is derived by a progressive proteolytic cleavage mechanism, then the process is inefficient in the GR cells and only moderately efficient in the Mm5MT cells. When MuMTV was isolated from the culture medium of these cells harvested at 5-min intervals, the major p27-related protein was p34. The p27 accounted for only 29% of the anti-p27 serum immunoprecipitable proteins compared to 95% in virus isolated from an 18-h harvest. Incubation of the rapid-harvest virus at 37 degrees C for 2 h resulted in some conversion of p34 to p27. These results suggest that some of the p27 in MuMTV is formed in the virions by proteolytic cleavage of p34

  2. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gerecke, Donald R. Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  3. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    PubMed Central

    Gerecke, Donald R.; Chen, Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Yoke-Chen; Tong, Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal–epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors. PMID:18955075

  4. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  5. A potential role for zinc transporter 7 in testosterone synthesis in mouse Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qingqing; Chi, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuemei; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element which is involved in male reproduction. The zinc transporter (ZnT) family, SLC30a, is involved in the maintenance of Zn homeostasis and in mediating intracellular signaling events; however, relatively little is known regarding the effect of ZnTs on testosterone synthesis. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of Zn transporter 7 (ZnT7) on testosterone synthesis in male CD-1 mice and mouse Leydig cells. The findings of the present study revealed that the concentrations of Zn in the testes and Leydig cells were significantly lower in mice fed a Zn-deficient diet compared with the control mice fed a Zn-adequate diet. In addition, ZnT7 was principally expressed and colocalized with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in the Leydig cells of male CD-1 mice. ZnT7 expression was downregulated in the mice fed a Zn-deficient diet, which led to decreases in the expression of the enzymes involved in testosterone synthesis namely cholesterol side‑chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/D5-D4 isomerase (3β-HSD) as well as decreased serum testosterone levels. These results suggested that Znt7 may be involved in testosterone synthesis in the mouse testes. To examine this hypothesis, we used the mouse Leydig tumor cell line (MLTC-1 cell line) in which the ZnT7 gene had been silenced, in order to gauge the impact of changes in ZnT7 expression on testosterone secretion and the enzymes involved in testosterone synthesis. The results demonstrated that ZnT7 gene silencing downregulated the expression of StAR, P450scc and 3β-HSD as well as progesterone concentrations in the human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)-stimulated MLTC-1 cells. Taken together, these findings reveal that ZnT7 may play an important role in the regulation of testosterone synthesis by modulating steroidogenic enzymes, and may represent a therapeutic target in

  6. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy.

  7. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy. PMID:26079374

  8. MT95-4, a fully humanized antibody raised against aminopeptidase N, reduces tumor progression in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Shin; Hattori, Noboru; Masuda, Takeshi; Horimasu, Yasushi; Nakashima, Taku; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Miyake, Masayuki; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) is involved in tumor cell invasion and tumor angiogenesis and is considered a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer. To develop a novel monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy targeting APN/CD13, we established a fully humanized anti-APN/CD13 monoclonal antibody, MT95-4. In vitro, MT95-4 inhibited APN/CD13 enzymatic activity on the tumor cell surface and blocked tumor cell invasion. B16 mouse melanoma cells stably expressing human APN/CD13 were also established and were inoculated s.c. or injected i.v. into nude mice. We found that expression of human APN/CD13 in murine melanoma cells increased the size of subcutaneous tumors, extent of lung metastasis and degree of angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tumors; these tumor-promoting and angiogenesis-promoting characteristics were reduced by the i.p. administration of MT95-4. To further verify the specificity of MT95-4 for neutralization of APN/CD13 activity, MT95-4 was administered into NOD/SCID mice inoculated s.c. with H1299 or PC14 cells, which exhibit high expression of APN/CD13, or with A549 cells, which exhibit weak expression of APN/CD13. MT95-4 reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis in mice bearing H1299-derived and PC14-derived tumors, but not in mice bearing A549-derived tumors. These results suggested that the antitumor and anti-angiogenic effects of MT95-4 were dependent on APN/CD13 expression in tumor cells. Given that MT95-4 is the first fully humanized monoclonal antibody against APN/CD13, MT95-4 should be recognized as a promising candidate for monoclonal antibody therapy against tumors expressing APN/CD13. PMID:25950387

  9. Tumor-specific delivery of BSH-3R for boron neutron capture therapy and positron emission tomography imaging in a mouse brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Yoshiya; Michiue, Hiroyuki; Kitamatsu, Mizuki; Hayashi, Yuri; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Nishiki, Tei-Ichi; Matsui, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma, a malignant brain tumor with poor disease outcomes, is managed in modern medicine by multimodality therapy. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an encouraging treatment under clinical investigation. In malignant cells, BNCT consists of two major factors: neutron radiation and boron uptake. To increase boron uptake in cells, we created a mercapto-closo-undecahydrododecaborate ([B12HnSH](2-)2Na(+), BSH) fused with a short arginine peptide (1R, 2R, 3R) and checked cellular uptake in vitro and in vivo. In a mouse brain tumor model, only BSH with at least three arginine domains could penetrate cell membranes of glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, to monitor the pharmacokinetic properties of these agents in vivo, we fused BSH and BSH-3R with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA); DOTA is a metal chelating agent for labeling positron emission tomography (PET) probe with (64)Cu. We administered BSH-DOTA-(64)Cu and BSH-3R-DOTA-(64)Cu to the tumor model through a mouse tail vein and determined the drugs' pharmacokinetics by PET imaging. BSH-3R showed a high uptake in the tumor area on PET imaging. We concluded that BSH-3R is the ideal boron compound for clinical use during BNCT and that in developing this compound for clinical use, the BSH-3R PET probe is essential for pharmacokinetic imaging. PMID:25934274

  10. Tumor-specific delivery of BSH-3R for boron neutron capture therapy and positron emission tomography imaging in a mouse brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Yoshiya; Michiue, Hiroyuki; Kitamatsu, Mizuki; Hayashi, Yuri; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Nishiki, Tei-Ichi; Matsui, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma, a malignant brain tumor with poor disease outcomes, is managed in modern medicine by multimodality therapy. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an encouraging treatment under clinical investigation. In malignant cells, BNCT consists of two major factors: neutron radiation and boron uptake. To increase boron uptake in cells, we created a mercapto-closo-undecahydrododecaborate ([B12HnSH](2-)2Na(+), BSH) fused with a short arginine peptide (1R, 2R, 3R) and checked cellular uptake in vitro and in vivo. In a mouse brain tumor model, only BSH with at least three arginine domains could penetrate cell membranes of glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, to monitor the pharmacokinetic properties of these agents in vivo, we fused BSH and BSH-3R with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA); DOTA is a metal chelating agent for labeling positron emission tomography (PET) probe with (64)Cu. We administered BSH-DOTA-(64)Cu and BSH-3R-DOTA-(64)Cu to the tumor model through a mouse tail vein and determined the drugs' pharmacokinetics by PET imaging. BSH-3R showed a high uptake in the tumor area on PET imaging. We concluded that BSH-3R is the ideal boron compound for clinical use during BNCT and that in developing this compound for clinical use, the BSH-3R PET probe is essential for pharmacokinetic imaging.

  11. Regulated expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral genes in cells of the B lineage

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of mouse mammary tumor proviral (MMTV) transcripts during B cell ontogeny and compared levels of RNA in B lymphocytes and B cell lines with levels in other cells of the hematopoietic lineage and in a mammary cell line. We demonstrate that MMTV transcripts are expressed as early as the pro-B cell stage in ontogeny and are expressed at basal constitutive levels throughout most of the B cell developmental pathway. The level of MMTV expression in B cells is similar to constitutive levels in mammary tissues and two to three orders of magnitude greater than in activated T cells. Levels of MMTV transcripts in B cells are not solely due to positional effects. Transient transfection assays showed that MMTV upregulation resulted from transcriptional activation of the viral LTR, indicating that there are specific and inducible transcription factors that regulate MMTV expression in B cells. MMTV transcripts could not be upregulated in pre- B cell lines but could be induced in some mature B cell lines. There was a correlation between the ability to stimulate B cells to secrete antibody and the ability to induce upregulated MMTV expression. Evidence is presented that suggests that the principal transcription factors involved in MMTV expression do not include the B cell factors OTF-2 or NF-kappa B, but rather are likely to be novel factors that are induced during differentiation to antibody secretion. A hypothesis for why mammary tumor viruses are well adapted for expression in cells of the B lineage is proposed, and the implications of this for the documented influence of MMTV gene products on the T cell repertoire are discussed. PMID:1660524

  12. The Rac Inhibitor EHop-016 Inhibits Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis in a Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Humphries-Bickley, Tessa; De La Parra, Columba; Forestier-Roman, Ingrid; Martinez-Ferrer, Magaly; Hernandez, Eliud; Vlaar, Cornelis; Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Washington, Anthony V.; Cubano, Luis A.; Rodriguez-Orengo, Jose; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic disease still lacks effective treatments, and remains the primary cause of cancer mortality. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop better strategies to inhibit metastatic cancer. The Rho family GTPase Rac is an ideal target for anti-metastatic cancer therapy, because Rac is a key molecular switch that is activated by a myriad of cell surface receptors to promote cancer cell migration/invasion and survival. Previously, we reported the design and development of EHop-016, a small molecule compound, which inhibits Rac activity of metastatic cancer cells with an IC50 of 1 μM. EHop-016 also inhibits the activity of the Rac downstream effector p21-activated kinase (PAK), lamellipodia extension, and cell migration in metastatic cancer cells. Herein, we tested the efficacy of EHop-016 in a nude mouse model of experimental metastasis, where EHop-016 administration at 25 mg/kg body weight (BW) significantly reduced mammary fat pad tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis. As quantified by UPLC MS/MS, EHop-016 was detectable in the plasma of nude mice at 17 to 23 ng/ml levels at 12 h following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 10 to 25 mg/kg BW EHop-016. The EHop-016 mediated inhibition of angiogenesis In Vivo was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of excised tumors and by In Vitro tube formation assays of endothelial cells. Moreover, EHop-016 affected cell viability by down-regulating Akt and Jun kinase activities and c-Myc and Cyclin D expression, as well as increasing caspase 3/7 activities in metastatic cancer cells. In conclusion, EHop-016 has potential as an anticancer compound to block cancer progression via multiple Rac-directed mechanisms. PMID:25389450

  13. Brain Penetration and Efficacy of Different Mebendazole Polymorphs in a Mouse Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Wanjiku, Teresia; Rudek, Michelle A; Joshi, Avadhut; Gallia, Gary L.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mebendazole (MBZ), first used as an antiparasitic drug, shows preclinical efficacy in models of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. Three different MBZ polymorphs (A, B and C) exist and a detailed assessment of the brain penetration, pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor properties of each individual MBZ polymorph is necessary to improve mebendazole-based brain cancer therapy. Experimental Design and Results In this study, various marketed and custom-formulated MBZ tablets were analyzed for their polymorph content by IR spectroscopy and subsequently tested in orthotopic GL261 mouse glioma model for efficacy and tolerability. The pharmacokinetics and brain concentration of MBZ polymorphs and two main metabolites were analyzed by LC-MS. We found that polymorph B and C both increased survival in a GL261 glioma model, as B exhibited greater toxicity. Polymorph A showed no benefit. Both, polymorph B and C, reached concentrations in the brain that exceeded the IC50 in GL261 cells 29-fold. In addition, polymorph C demonstrated an AUC0-24h brain-to-plasma (B/P) ratio of 0.82, whereas B showed higher plasma AUC and lower B/P ratio. In contrast, polymorph A presented markedly lower levels in the plasma and brain. Furthermore, the combination with elacridar was able to significantly improve the efficacy of polymorph C in GL261 glioma and D425 medulloblastoma models in mice. Conclusion Among MBZ polymorphs, C reaches therapeutically effective concentrations in the brain tissue and tumor with less side effects and is the better choice for brain cancer therapy. Its efficacy can be further enhanced by combination with elacridar. PMID:25862759

  14. Common Integration Sites for MMTV in Viral Induced Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The paradigm of mammary cancer induction by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is used to illustrate the body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells represent targets for oncogenic transformation. It is argued that this is not a special case applicable only to MMTV-induced mammary cancer, because MMTV acts as an environmental mutagen producing random interruptions in the somatic DNA of infected cells by insertion of proviral DNA copies. In addition to disrupting the host genome, the proviral DNA also influences gene expression through its associated enhancer sequences over significant inter-genomic distances. Genes commonly affected by MMTV insertion in multiple individual tumors include, the Wnt, FGF, RSpo gene families as well as eIF3e and Notch4. All of these gene families are known to play essential roles in stem cell maintenance and behavior in a variety of organs. The MMTV-induced mutations accumulate in cells that are long-lived and possess the properties of stem cells, namely, self-renewal and the capacity to produce divergent epithelial progeny through asymmetric division. The evidence shows that epithelial cells with these properties are present in normal mammary glands, may be infected with MMTV, become transformed to produce epithelial hyperplasia through MMTV-induced mutagenesis and progress to frank mammary malignancy. Retroviral marking via MMTV proviral insertion demonstrates that this process progresses from a single mammary epithelial cell that possesses all of the features ascribed to tissue-specific stem cells. PMID:18709449

  15. Inhibition of tumour promotion in mouse skin by extracts of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia), unique South African herbal teas.

    PubMed

    Marnewick, Jeanine; Joubert, Elizabeth; Joseph, Shamiel; Swanevelder, Sonja; Swart, Pieter; Gelderblom, Wentzel

    2005-06-28

    The modulating effect of ethanol/acetone (E/A) soluble fractions, prepared from methanolic extracts of processed and unprocessed rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia) as well as green (Camellia sinensis) teas was established in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis assay. Topical application of the tea fractions prior to the tumour promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), on ICR mouse skin initiated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) suppressed skin tumorigenesis significantly (P<0.001) with the green tea E/A fraction exhibiting a 100% inhibition, unprocessed honeybush 90%, processed honeybush 84.2%, processed rooibos 75% and unprocessed rooibos 60%. The green tea fraction, with the highest flavanol/proanthocyanidin content, also exhibited the highest protective activity (99%) against hepatic microsomal lipid peroxidation, and completely inhibited skin tumour formation. Differences in the flavanol/proanthocyanidin and flavonol/flavone composition and/or non polyphenolic constituents are likely to be important determinants in the inhibition of tumour promotion by the herbal tea E/A fractions in mouse skin.

  16. Staphylococcus δ-toxin promotes mouse allergic skin disease by inducing mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuumi; Oscherwitz, Jon; Cease, Kemp B.; Chan, Susana M.; Muñoz-Planillo, Raul; Hasegawa, Mizuho; Villaruz, Amer E.; Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; McGavin, Martin J.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Otto, Michael; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 15 to 30% of children and ~5% of adults in industrialized countries1. Although the pathogenesis of AD is not fully understood, the disease is mediated by an abnormal immunoglobulin E (IgE) immune response in the setting of skin barrier dysfunction2. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to IgE-mediated allergic disorders including AD3. Upon activation, MCs release their membrane-bound cytosolic granules leading to the release of multiple molecules that are important in the pathogenesis of AD and host defense4. More than 90% of AD patients are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus in the lesional skin whereas most healthy individuals do not harbor the pathogen5. Several Staphylococcal exotoxins (SEs) can act as superantigens and/or antigens in models of AD6. However, the role of these SEs in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we report that culture supernatants of S. aureus contain potent MC degranulation activity. Biochemical analysis identified δ-toxin as the MC degranulation-inducing factor produced by S. aureus. MC degranulation induced by δ-toxin depended on phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and calcium (Ca2+) influx, but unlike that mediated by IgE crosslinking, it did not require the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). In addition, IgE enhanced δ-toxin-induced MC degranulation in the absence of antigen. Furthermore, S. aureus isolates recovered from AD patients produced high levels of δ-toxin. Importantly, skin colonization with S. aureus, but not a mutant deficient in δ-toxin, promoted IgE and IL-4 production, as well as inflammatory skin disease. Furthermore, enhancement of IgE production and dermatitis by δ-toxin was abrogated in KitW-sh/W-sh MC-deficient mice and restored by MC reconstitution. These studies identify δ-toxin as a potent inducer of MC degranulation and suggest a mechanistic link between S. aureus colonization and allergic skin disease. PMID:24172897

  17. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration. PMID:27597871

  18. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration.

  19. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni; Yue, Wang; Kaihong, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration. PMID:27597871

  20. Functional Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes Through an in vivo RNA Interference Screen in a Mouse Lymphoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bric, Anka; Miething, Cornelius; Bialucha, Carl Uli; Scuoppo, Claudio; Zender, Lars; Krasnitz, Alexander; Xuan, Zhenyu; Zuber, Johannes; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James; McCombie, Richard W.; Hemann, Michael T.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Powers, Scott; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) capable of stably suppressing gene function by RNA interference (RNAi) can mimic tumor suppressor gene loss in mice. By selecting for shRNAs capable of accelerating lymphomagenesis in a well-characterized mouse lymphoma model, we identified over ten candidate tumor suppressors, including Sfrp1, Numb, Mek1, and Angiopoietin 2. Several components of the DNA damage response machinery were also identified, including Rad17, which acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that responds to oncogenic stress and whose loss is associated with poor prognosis in human patients. Our results emphasize the utility of in vivo RNAi screens, identify and validate a diverse set of tumor suppressors, and have therapeutic implications. PMID:19800577

  1. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus or a similar virus, MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV), play a role in the etiology of the disease. However, studies looking at the presence of these viruses in breast cancer have produced conflicting results, and this possible association remains controversial. Here, we used polymerase chain reaction assay to screen specific sequences of EBV and MMTV-LV in 86 tumor and 65 adjacent tissues from Mexican women with breast cancer. Neither tumor samples nor adjacent tissue were positive for either virus in a first round PCR and only 4 tumor samples were EBV positive by a more sensitive nested PCR. Considering the study's statistical power, these results do not support the involvement of EBV and MMTV-LV in the etiology of breast cancer.

  2. No association between Epstein-Barr Virus and Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus with Breast Cancer in Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Molina-Muñoz, Tzindilú; Martínez-López, Juan L. E.; Hernández-Sancén, Paulina; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. It has been suggested that infection by Epstein Barr Virus (EB