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Sample records for mouse strain ntl

  1. A Rebuttal of NTL Institute's Learning Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letrud, Kare

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the learning pyramid corroborated by National Training Laboratories Institute. It present and compliment historical and methodological critique against the learning pyramid, and call upon NTL Institute ought to retract their model.

  2. Genealogies of mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Beck, J A; Lloyd, S; Hafezparast, M; Lennon-Pierce, M; Eppig, J T; Festing, M F; Fisher, E M

    2000-01-01

    The mouse is a prime organism of choice for modelling human disease. Over 450 inbred strains of mice have been described, providing a wealth of different genotypes and phenotypes for genetic and other studies. As new strains are generated and others become extinct, it is useful to review periodically what strains are available and how they are related to each other, particularly in the light of available DNA polymorphism data from microsatellite and other markers. We describe the origins and relationships of inbred mouse strains, 90 years after the generation of the first inbred strain. Given the large collection of inbred strains available, and that published information on these strains is incomplete, we propose that all genealogical and genetic data on inbred strains be submitted to a common electronic database to ensure this valuable information resource is preserved and used efficiently.

  3. Development of amnesia in different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sinovyev, D R; Dubrovina, N I; Kulikov, A V

    2009-05-01

    We studied passive avoidance retrieval after amnestic stimulation (arrest in unsafe section of the experimental setup) in C57Bl/6J, BALB/c, CBA/Lac, AKR/J, DBA/2J, C3H/HeJ, and ASC/Icg mice. We demonstrated resistance to amnestic stimulation in mice with high predisposition to freezing reaction (ASC/Icg) and memory deficit in other mouse strains.

  4. Fancy Ideas on Neganov-Trofimov Luke Effect (NTL) or: Is There a Limit to the NTL Amplification?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapellier, M. P.

    2015-02-01

    The limits on the NTL effect are due to parasitic currents from the electrodes entering the semiconductor. An implanted diode is known to have a better surface behaviour and a very high amplification. One can imagine also to separate the electrodes from the semiconductor. An avalanche structure could also be fabricated to multiply the number of electrons produced before using them. Some applications are suggested.

  5. Strain preservation of experimental animals: vitrification of two-cell stage embryos for multiple mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Eto, Tomoo; Takahashi, Riichi; Kamisako, Tsutomu

    2015-04-01

    Strain preservation of experimental animals is crucial for experimental reproducibility. Maintaining complete animal strains, however, is costly and there is a risk for genetic mutations as well as complete loss due to disasters or illness. Therefore, the development of effective vitrification techniques for cryopreservation of multiple experimental animal strains is important. We examined whether a vitrification method using cryoprotectant solutions, P10 and PEPeS, is suitable for preservation of multiple inbred and outbred mouse strains. First, we investigated whether our vitrification method using cryoprotectant solutions was suitable for two-cell stage mouse embryos. In vitro development of embryos exposed to the cryoprotectant solutions was similar to that of fresh controls. Further, the survival rate of the vitrified embryos was extremely high (98.1%). Next, we collected and vitrified two-cell stage embryos of 14 mouse strains. The average number of embryos obtained from one female was 7.3-33.3. The survival rate of vitrified embryos ranged from 92.8% to 99.1%, with no significant differences among mouse strains. In vivo development did not differ significantly between fresh controls and vitrified embryos of each strain. For strain preservation using cryopreserved embryos, two offspring for inbred lines and one offspring for outbred lines must be produced from two-cell stage embryos collected from one female. The expected number of surviving fetuses obtained from embryos collected from one female of either the inbred or outbred strains ranged from 2.9 to 19.5. The findings of the present study indicated that this vitrification method is suitable for strain preservation of multiple mouse strains.

  6. Disparate metabolic response to fructose feeding between different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, M K; Fiveash, C E; Braude, J P; Osborne, B; Brown, S H J; Mitchell, T W; Turner, N

    2015-12-22

    Diets enriched in fructose (FR) increase lipogenesis in the liver, leading to hepatic lipid accumulation and the development of insulin resistance. Previously, we have shown that in contrast to other mouse strains, BALB/c mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced metabolic deterioration, potentially due to a lack of ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver. In this study we have compared the metabolic response of BALB/c and C57BL/6 (BL6) mice to a fructose-enriched diet. Both strains of mice increased adiposity in response to FR-feeding, while only BL6 mice displayed elevated hepatic triglyceride (TAG) accumulation and glucose intolerance. The lack of hepatic TAG accumulation in BALB/c mice appeared to be linked to an altered balance between lipogenic and lipolytic pathways, while the protection from fructose-induced glucose intolerance in this strain was likely related to low levels of ER stress, a slight elevation in insulin levels and an altered profile of diacylglycerol species in the liver. Collectively these findings highlight the multifactorial nature of metabolic defects that develop in response to changes in the intake of specific nutrients and the divergent response of different mouse strains to dietary challenges.

  7. Disparate metabolic response to fructose feeding between different mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, M. K.; Fiveash, C. E.; Braude, J. P.; Osborne, B.; Brown, S. H. J.; Mitchell, T. W.; Turner, N.

    2015-01-01

    Diets enriched in fructose (FR) increase lipogenesis in the liver, leading to hepatic lipid accumulation and the development of insulin resistance. Previously, we have shown that in contrast to other mouse strains, BALB/c mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced metabolic deterioration, potentially due to a lack of ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver. In this study we have compared the metabolic response of BALB/c and C57BL/6 (BL6) mice to a fructose-enriched diet. Both strains of mice increased adiposity in response to FR-feeding, while only BL6 mice displayed elevated hepatic triglyceride (TAG) accumulation and glucose intolerance. The lack of hepatic TAG accumulation in BALB/c mice appeared to be linked to an altered balance between lipogenic and lipolytic pathways, while the protection from fructose-induced glucose intolerance in this strain was likely related to low levels of ER stress, a slight elevation in insulin levels and an altered profile of diacylglycerol species in the liver. Collectively these findings highlight the multifactorial nature of metabolic defects that develop in response to changes in the intake of specific nutrients and the divergent response of different mouse strains to dietary challenges. PMID:26690387

  8. Characterization of a Mouse-Adapted Staphylococcus aureus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Holtfreter, Silva; Radcliff, Fiona J.; Grumann, Dorothee; Read, Hannah; Johnson, Sarah; Monecke, Stefan; Ritchie, Stephen; Clow, Fiona; Goerke, Christiane; Bröker, Barbara M.; Fraser, John D.; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2013-01-01

    More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the ‘superbug’ Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain (JSNZ) which caused a severe outbreak of preputial gland abscesses among male C57BL/6J mice. We aimed to extensively characterize this strain on a genomic level and determine its virulence potential in murine colonization and infection models. JSNZ belongs to the MLST type ST88, rare among human isolates, and lacks an hlb-converting phage encoding human-specific immune evasion factors. Naive mice were found to be more susceptible to nasal and gastrointestinal colonization with JSNZ than with the human-derived Newman strain. Furthermore, naïve mice required antibiotic pre-treatment to become colonized with Newman. In contrast, JSNZ was able to colonize mice in the absence of antibiotic treatment suggesting that this strain can compete with the natural flora for space and nutrients. In a renal abscess model, JSNZ caused more severe disease than Newman with greater weight loss and bacterial burden. In contrast to most other clinical isolates, JSNZ can also be readily genetically modified by phage transduction and electroporation. In conclusion, the mouse-adapted strain JSNZ may represent a valuable tool for studying aspects of mucosal colonization and for screening novel vaccines and therapies directed at preventing colonization. PMID:24023720

  9. Behavioural performance in three substrains of mouse strain 129.

    PubMed

    Montkowski, A; Poettig, M; Mederer, A; Holsboer, F

    1997-07-11

    Recently, the possibility has been raised that the behavioural abnormalities seen in null-mutant mice might be determined by their genetic background rather than by loss of gene function, especially when the 129 mouse strain is used as supplier for embryonic stem (ES) cells. To examine this issue we tested three 129 mouse substrains (129/J, 129/Ola, 129/Sv-ter/+) and C57BL/6 (B6) in the Morris water maze, the open field, the plus maze and two tests assessing motor co-ordination. We identified only for the 129/J substrain substantial behavioural deficits. These mice are albinos and carry the pink-eyed dilution allele and differed in their basal anxiety level as assessed in the open-field test. They were severely impaired in spatial learning and memory (Morris water maze test), in the Porsolt swim test, which also measures learning and in motor co-ordination. However, the 129/J substrain has not been used as ES cell donor in null-mutant mice where behavioural abnormalities were observed. Instead, mice from 129/Ola and 129/Sv-ter/+ substrains have been commonly used as suppliers for ES cells. These performed normally in most of the tests, including Morris water maze test.

  10. 77 FR 72880 - Information Collection Activities: Notice to Lessees and/or Operators (NTL)-Gulf of Mexico OCS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Offshore Drilling Units); Submitted for Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Review; Comment Request... Positioning System) for MODUs (Mobile Offshore Drilling Units). OMB Control Number: 1014-0013. Abstract: The... regulations. The subject of this ICR is an NTL, GPS (Global Positioning System) for MODUs (Mobile...

  11. Influence of groove count on slip resistance using NTL test feet.

    PubMed

    Joganich, Tim; Mc Cuen, Len

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, walkway slip-resistance testing with grooved NTL (Neolite Test Liners) has been the subject of research, as well as used in field investigation practices. Recent research shows that differences between non-grooved and grooved test feet do exist, especially under wet conditions. It is not known how the number of grooves influences the slip resistance. This study investigates the influence of groove count on slip resistance under both wet and dry conditions using the PIAST tribometer. Test feet with 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 grooves and a non-grooved test foot were used. Polished granite and vinyl composition tile were used as test surfaces. Results for both test surfaces show markedly higher slip resistance for increasing groove counts under wet conditions, while under dry conditions, the results show slight increases in slip resistance. Implications of these results are discussed.

  12. Comparison of three methods of calculating strain in the mouse ulna in exogenous loading studies.

    PubMed

    Norman, Stephanie C; Wagner, David W; Beaupre, Gary S; Castillo, Alesha B

    2015-01-01

    Axial compression of mouse limbs is commonly used to induce bone formation in a controlled, non-invasive manner. Determination of peak strains caused by loading is central to interpreting results. Load-strain calibration is typically performed using uniaxial strain gauges attached to the diaphyseal, periosteal surface of a small number of sacrificed animals. Strain is measured as the limb is loaded to a range of physiological loads known to be anabolic to bone. The load-strain relationship determined by this subgroup is then extrapolated to a larger group of experimental mice. This method of strain calculation requires the challenging process of strain gauging very small bones which is subject to variability in placement of the strain gauge. We previously developed a method to estimate animal-specific periosteal strain during axial ulnar loading using an image-based computational approach that does not require strain gauges. The purpose of this study was to compare the relationship between load-induced bone formation rates and periosteal strain at ulnar midshaft using three different methods to estimate strain: (A) Nominal strain values based solely on load-strain calibration; (B) Strains calculated from load-strain calibration, but scaled for differences in mid-shaft cross-sectional geometry among animals; and (C) An alternative image-based computational method for calculating strains based on beam theory and animal-specific bone geometry. Our results show that the alternative method (C) provides comparable correlation between strain and bone formation rates in the mouse ulna relative to the strain gauge-dependent methods (A and B), while avoiding the need to use strain gauges. PMID:25443882

  13. Maltodextrin Acceptance and Preference in Eight Mouse Strains.

    PubMed

    Poole, Rachel L; Aleman, Tiffany R; Ellis, Hillary T; Tordoff, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Rodents are strongly attracted to the taste(s) of maltodextrins. A first step toward discovery of the underlying genes involves identifying phenotypic differences among inbred strains of mice. To do this, we used 5-s brief-access tests and 48-h 2-bottle choice tests to survey the avidity for the maltodextrin, Maltrin M040, of mice from 8 inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, CAST/EiJ, C57BL/6J, NOD/ShiLTJ, NZO/HlLtJ, PWK/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ). In brief-access tests, the CAST and PWK strains licked significantly less maltodextrin than equivalent concentrations of sucrose, whereas the other strains generally licked the 2 carbohydrates equally. Similarly, in 2-bottle choice tests, the CAST and PWK strains drank less 4% maltodextrin than 4% sucrose, whereas the other strains had similar intakes of these 2 solutions; the CAST and PWK strains did not differ from the C57, NOD, or NZO strains in 4% sucrose intake. In sum, we have identified strain variation in maltodextrin perception that is distinct from variation in sucrose perception. The phenotypic variation characterized here will aid in identifying genes responsible for maltodextrin acceptance. Our results identify C57 × PWK mice or NZO × CAST mice as informative crosses to produce segregating hybrids that will expose quantitative trait loci underlying maltodextrin acceptance and preference.

  14. A new inbred strain JF1 established from Japanese fancy mouse carrying the classic piebald allele.

    PubMed

    Koide, T; Moriwaki, K; Uchida, K; Mita, A; Sagai, T; Yonekawa, H; Katoh, H; Miyashita, N; Tsuchiya, K; Nielsen, T J; Shiroishi, T

    1998-01-01

    A new inbred strain JF1 (Japanese Fancy Mouse 1) was established from a strain of fancy mouse. Morphological and genetical analysis indicated that the mouse originated from the Japanese wild mouse, Mus musculus molossinus. JF1 has characteristic coat color, black spots on the white coat, with black eyes. The mutation appeared to be linked to an old mutation piebald (s). Characterization of the causative gene for piebald, endothelin receptor type B (ednrb), demonstrated that the allele in JF1 is same as that of classic piebald allele, suggesting an identical origin of these two mutants. Possibly, classic piebald mutation was introduced from the Japanese tame mouse, which was already reported at the end of the 1700s. We showed that JF1 is a useful strain for mapping of mutant genes on laboratory strains owing to a high level of polymorphisms in microsatellite markers between JF1 and laboratory strains. The clarified genotypes of JF1 for coat color are "aa BB CC DD ss".

  15. Immunological variation between inbred laboratory mouse strains: points to consider in phenotyping genetically immunomodified mice.

    PubMed

    Sellers, R S; Clifford, C B; Treuting, P M; Brayton, C

    2012-01-01

    Inbred laboratory mouse strains are highly divergent in their immune response patterns as a result of genetic mutations and polymorphisms. The generation of genetically engineered mice (GEM) has, in the past, used embryonic stem (ES) cells for gene targeting from various 129 substrains followed by backcrossing into more fecund mouse strains. Although common inbred mice are considered "immune competent," many have variations in their immune system-some of which have been described-that may affect the phenotype. Recognition of these immune variations among commonly used inbred mouse strains is essential for the accurate interpretation of expected phenotypes or those that may arise unexpectedly. In GEM developed to study specific components of the immune system, accurate evaluation of immune responses must take into consideration not only the gene of interest but also how the background strain and microbial milieu contribute to the manifestation of findings in these mice. This article discusses points to consider regarding immunological differences between the common inbred laboratory mouse strains, particularly in their use as background strains in GEM.

  16. Genetic typing of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) strains with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Higuchi, K; Shimizu, M; Matsushita, T; Kogishi, K; Wang, J; Chiba, T; Festing, M F; Hosokawa, M

    1999-03-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains constitute a murine model of accelerated senescence originating from the ancestral AKR/J strains and consist of nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and four senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. The chromosomes (Chrs) of the SAM strains were typed with 581 microsatellite markers amplified by PCR, and the fundamental genetic information of the SAM strains was obtained. One-third of the examined markers displayed polymorphism among the strains, and only two alleles were detected in almost all loci among the SAM and AKR/J strains. However, in 12 loci (5.6% of total 215 polymorphic markers), the third allele was detected among the SAM strains. The genetic typing and developmental history suggested that the SAM strains were related inbred strains developed by the accidental crossing between the AKR/J strain and other unknown strain(s). Comparison of the distribution of the loci in the SAMP and the SAMR series revealed notable differences in the four regions on Chrs 4, 14, 16, and 17. This indicated that some of these chromosomal sites might contain the genes responsible for accelerated senescence in the SAMP series. PMID:10051317

  17. Non-contact strain measurement in the mouse forearm loading model using digital image correlation (DIC).

    PubMed

    Begonia, Mark T; Dallas, Mark; Vizcarra, Bruno; Liu, Ying; Johnson, Mark L; Thiagarajan, Ganesh

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the use of a non-contact method known as digital image correlation (DIC) to measure strains in the mouse forearm during axial compressive loading. A two camera system was adapted to analyze the medial and lateral forearm displacements simultaneously, and the derived DIC strain measurements were compared to strain gage readings from both the ulna and radius. Factors such as region-of-interest (ROI) location, lens magnification, noise, and out-of-plane motion were examined to determine their influence on the DIC strain measurements. We confirmed that our DIC system can differentiate ROI locations since it detected higher average strains in the ulna compared to the radius and detected compressive strains on medial bone surfaces vs. tensile strains on lateral bone surfaces. Interestingly, the DIC method also captured heterogeneity in surface strain fields which are not detectable by strain gage based methods. A separate analysis of the noise intrinsic to the DIC system also revealed that the noise constituted less than 4.5% of all DIC strain measurements. Furthermore, finite element (FE) simulations of the forearm showed that out-of-plane motion was not a significant factor that influenced DIC measurements. Finally, we observed that average DIC strain measurements can be up to 1.5-2 times greater than average strain gage readings on the medial bone surfaces. These findings suggest that strain experienced in the mouse forearm model by loading is better captured through DIC as opposed to strain gages, which as a result of being glued to the bone surface artificially stiffen the bone and lead to an underestimation of the strain response. PMID:26388521

  18. Non-contact strain measurement in the mouse forearm loading model using digital image correlation (DIC).

    PubMed

    Begonia, Mark T; Dallas, Mark; Vizcarra, Bruno; Liu, Ying; Johnson, Mark L; Thiagarajan, Ganesh

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the use of a non-contact method known as digital image correlation (DIC) to measure strains in the mouse forearm during axial compressive loading. A two camera system was adapted to analyze the medial and lateral forearm displacements simultaneously, and the derived DIC strain measurements were compared to strain gage readings from both the ulna and radius. Factors such as region-of-interest (ROI) location, lens magnification, noise, and out-of-plane motion were examined to determine their influence on the DIC strain measurements. We confirmed that our DIC system can differentiate ROI locations since it detected higher average strains in the ulna compared to the radius and detected compressive strains on medial bone surfaces vs. tensile strains on lateral bone surfaces. Interestingly, the DIC method also captured heterogeneity in surface strain fields which are not detectable by strain gage based methods. A separate analysis of the noise intrinsic to the DIC system also revealed that the noise constituted less than 4.5% of all DIC strain measurements. Furthermore, finite element (FE) simulations of the forearm showed that out-of-plane motion was not a significant factor that influenced DIC measurements. Finally, we observed that average DIC strain measurements can be up to 1.5-2 times greater than average strain gage readings on the medial bone surfaces. These findings suggest that strain experienced in the mouse forearm model by loading is better captured through DIC as opposed to strain gages, which as a result of being glued to the bone surface artificially stiffen the bone and lead to an underestimation of the strain response.

  19. A study of gender, strain and age differences in mouse liver glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Egaas, E; Falls, J G; Dauterman, W C

    1995-01-01

    The hepatic cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in four strains of the mouse and one strain of the rat was studied with the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), ethachrynic acid (ETHA), cumene hydroperoxide (CU) and atrazine as the in vitro substrates. In the mouse, significant gender, strain and age-related differences in the GST activity towards CDNB and atrazine were found between adolescent and sexually mature males and females of the CD-1, C57BL/6, DBA/2 and Swiss-Webster strains, and the differences were larger with atrazine as the substrate. With DCNB and CU a similar tendency was observed, however not significant for all strains. The GST activity towards ETHA was also gender and strain specific, but revealed no age-related differences. The herbicide atrazine seems to be a useful substrate in the study of strain and age-related differences in the mouse GST class Pi.

  20. Individual strains of Lactobacillus paracasei differentially inhibit human basophil and mouse mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Garault, Peggy; Cotillard, Aurélie; Chervaux, Christian; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The microbiota controls a variety of biological functions, including immunity, and alterations of the microbiota in early life are associated with a higher risk of developing allergies later in life. Several probiotic bacteria, and particularly lactic acid bacteria, were described to reduce both the induction of allergic responses and allergic manifestations. Although specific probiotic strains were used in these studies, their protective effects on allergic responses also might be common for all lactobacilli. Methods To determine whether allergic effector cells inhibition is a common feature of lactobacilli or whether it varies among lactobacilli strains, we compared the ability of 40 strains of the same Lactobacillus paracasei species to inhibit IgE‐dependent mouse mast cell and human basophil activation. Results We uncovered a marked heterogeneity in the inhibitory properties of the 40 Lactobacillus strains tested. These segregated into three to four clusters depending on the intensity of inhibition. Some strains inhibited both mouse mast cell and human basophil activation, others strains inhibited only one cell type and another group induced no inhibition of activation for either cell type. Conclusions Individual Lactobacillus strains of the same species differentially inhibit IgE‐dependent activation of mouse mast cells and human basophils, two cell types that are critical in the onset of allergic manifestations. Although we failed to identify specific bacterial genes associated with inhibition by gene‐trait matching analysis, our findings demonstrate the complexity of the interactions between the microbiota and the host. These results suggest that some L. paracasei strains might be more beneficial in allergies than others strains and provide the bases for a rational screening of lactic acid bacteria strains as next‐generation probiotics in the field of allergy.

  1. Individual strains of Lactobacillus paracasei differentially inhibit human basophil and mouse mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Garault, Peggy; Cotillard, Aurélie; Chervaux, Christian; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The microbiota controls a variety of biological functions, including immunity, and alterations of the microbiota in early life are associated with a higher risk of developing allergies later in life. Several probiotic bacteria, and particularly lactic acid bacteria, were described to reduce both the induction of allergic responses and allergic manifestations. Although specific probiotic strains were used in these studies, their protective effects on allergic responses also might be common for all lactobacilli. Methods To determine whether allergic effector cells inhibition is a common feature of lactobacilli or whether it varies among lactobacilli strains, we compared the ability of 40 strains of the same Lactobacillus paracasei species to inhibit IgE‐dependent mouse mast cell and human basophil activation. Results We uncovered a marked heterogeneity in the inhibitory properties of the 40 Lactobacillus strains tested. These segregated into three to four clusters depending on the intensity of inhibition. Some strains inhibited both mouse mast cell and human basophil activation, others strains inhibited only one cell type and another group induced no inhibition of activation for either cell type. Conclusions Individual Lactobacillus strains of the same species differentially inhibit IgE‐dependent activation of mouse mast cells and human basophils, two cell types that are critical in the onset of allergic manifestations. Although we failed to identify specific bacterial genes associated with inhibition by gene‐trait matching analysis, our findings demonstrate the complexity of the interactions between the microbiota and the host. These results suggest that some L. paracasei strains might be more beneficial in allergies than others strains and provide the bases for a rational screening of lactic acid bacteria strains as next‐generation probiotics in the field of allergy. PMID:27621812

  2. Murine leukemia virus in organs of senescence-prone and -resistant mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Chung, R; Kozak, C A; Hosokawa, M; Fujisawa, H

    2002-03-31

    A series of inbred strains of mice have been developed that are either prone (SAMP) or resistant (SAMR) to accelerated senescence. All of these strains originated from an inadvertent cross or crosses between the AKR/J mouse strain and an unknown strain(s). The characteristics of the nine senescence-prone lines differ, with all strains showing generalized aspects of accelerated aging but with each line having a specific aging-related change that is emphasized, e.g. learning and memory deficits, osteoporosis and senile amyloidosis. The senescence-resistant strains have normal patterns of aging and do not show the specific aging-related changes seen in SAMP strains. The fact that AKR mice have high levels of endogenous, ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) prompted an examination of the expression levels of MuLV in SAM strains. Analysis of brain, spleen and thymus samples revealed that seven of nine SAMP strains had high levels of MuLV and contained the Emv11 provirus (previously termed Akv1) that encodes the predominant MuLV found in AKR mice. In contrast, none of the SAMR strains had Emv11 or significant amounts of virus. The current findings represent an initial step in determining the role of MuLV in the accelerated senescence seen in SAMP strains. PMID:11850021

  3. Comparative gene expression profiling in two congenic mouse strains following Bordetella pertussis infection

    PubMed Central

    Banus, Sander; Vandebriel, Rob J; Pennings, Jeroen LA; Gremmer, Eric R; Wester, Piet W; van Kranen, Henk J; Breit, Timo M; Demant, Peter; Mooi, Frits R; Hoebee, Barbara; Kimman, Tjeerd G

    2007-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to Bordetella pertussis infection varies widely. These differences can partly be explained by genetic host factors. HcB-28 mice are more resistant to B. pertussis infection than C3H mice, which could partially be ascribed to the B. pertussis susceptibility locus-1 (Bps1) on chromosome 12. The presence of C57BL/10 genome on this locus instead of C3H genome resulted in a decreased number of bacteria in the lung. To further elucidate the role of host genetic factors, in particular in the Bps1 locus, in B. pertussis infection, and to identify candidate genes within in this region, we compared expression profiles in the lungs of the C3H and HcB-28 mouse strains following B. pertussis inoculation. Twelve and a half percent of the genomes of these mice are from a different genetic background. Results Upon B. pertussis inoculation 2,353 genes were differentially expressed in the lungs of both mouse strains. Two hundred and six genes were differentially expressed between the two mouse strains, but, remarkably, none of these were up- or down-regulated upon B. pertussis infection. Of these 206 genes, 17 were located in the Bps1 region. Eight of these genes, which showed a strong difference in gene expression between the two mouse strains, map to the immunoglobulin heavy chain complex (Igh). Conclusion Gene expression changes upon B. pertussis infection are highly identical between the two mouse strains despite the differences in the course of B. pertussis infection. Because the genes that were differentially regulated between the mouse strains only showed differences in expression before infection, it appears likely that such intrinsic differences in gene regulation are involved in determining differences in susceptibility to B. pertussis infection. Alternatively, such genetic differences in susceptibility may be explained by genes that are not differentially regulated between these two mouse strains. Genes in the Igh complex, among which Igh-1a

  4. Mucosal-associated invariant T cell–rich congenic mouse strain allows functional evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yue; Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Mburu, Yvonne K.; Mondot, Stanislas; Le Bourhis, Lionel; Premel, Virginie; Martin, Emmanuel; Kachaner, Alexandra; Duban, Livine; Ingersoll, Molly A.; Rabot, Sylvie; Jaubert, Jean; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Soudais, Claire; Lantz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs) have potent antimicrobial activity and are abundant in humans (5%–10% in blood). Despite strong evolutionary conservation of the invariant TCR-α chain and restricting molecule MR1, this population is rare in laboratory mouse strains (≈0.1% in lymphoid organs), and lack of an appropriate mouse model has hampered the study of MAIT biology. Herein, we show that MAITs are 20 times more frequent in clean wild-derived inbred CAST/EiJ mice than in C57BL/6J mice. Increased MAIT frequency was linked to one CAST genetic trait that mapped to the TCR-α locus and led to higher usage of the distal Vα segments, including Vα19. We generated a MAIThi congenic strain that was then crossed to a transgenic Rorcgt-GFP reporter strain. Using this tool, we characterized polyclonal mouse MAITs as memory (CD44+) CD4–CD8lo/neg T cells with tissue-homing properties (CCR6+CCR7–). Similar to human MAITs, mouse MAITs expressed the cytokine receptors IL-7R, IL-18Rα, and IL-12Rβ and the transcription factors promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) and RAR-related orphan receptor γ (RORγt). Mouse MAITs produced Th1/2/17 cytokines upon TCR stimulation and recognized a bacterial compound in an MR1-dependent manner. During experimental urinary tract infection, MAITs migrated to the bladder and decreased bacterial load. Our study demonstrates that the MAIThi congenic strain allows phenotypic and functional characterization of naturally occurring mouse MAITs in health and disease. PMID:26524590

  5. Mucosal-associated invariant T cell-rich congenic mouse strain allows functional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Franciszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Mburu, Yvonne K; Mondot, Stanislas; Le Bourhis, Lionel; Premel, Virginie; Martin, Emmanuel; Kachaner, Alexandra; Duban, Livine; Ingersoll, Molly A; Rabot, Sylvie; Jaubert, Jean; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Soudais, Claire; Lantz, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs) have potent antimicrobial activity and are abundant in humans (5%-10% in blood). Despite strong evolutionary conservation of the invariant TCR-α chain and restricting molecule MR1, this population is rare in laboratory mouse strains (≈0.1% in lymphoid organs), and lack of an appropriate mouse model has hampered the study of MAIT biology. Herein, we show that MAITs are 20 times more frequent in clean wild-derived inbred CAST/EiJ mice than in C57BL/6J mice. Increased MAIT frequency was linked to one CAST genetic trait that mapped to the TCR-α locus and led to higher usage of the distal Vα segments, including Vα19. We generated a MAIThi congenic strain that was then crossed to a transgenic Rorcgt-GFP reporter strain. Using this tool, we characterized polyclonal mouse MAITs as memory (CD44+) CD4-CD8lo/neg T cells with tissue-homing properties (CCR6+CCR7-). Similar to human MAITs, mouse MAITs expressed the cytokine receptors IL-7R, IL-18Rα, and IL-12Rβ and the transcription factors promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) and RAR-related orphan receptor γ (RORγt). Mouse MAITs produced Th1/2/17 cytokines upon TCR stimulation and recognized a bacterial compound in an MR1-dependent manner. During experimental urinary tract infection, MAITs migrated to the bladder and decreased bacterial load. Our study demonstrates that the MAIThi congenic strain allows phenotypic and functional characterization of naturally occurring mouse MAITs in health and disease.

  6. Genetics of Peripheral Vestibular Dysfunction: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been published about genetic hearing impairment. Fifty to sixty percent of hearing loss is thought to have a genetic cause. Genes may also play a significant role in acquired hearing loss due to aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic medications. Between 1995 and 2012, over 100 causative genes have been identified for syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss (see Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Mouse models have been extremely valuable in facilitating the discovery of hearing loss genes, and in understanding inner ear pathology due to genetic mutations or elucidating fundamental mechanisms of inner ear development. Purpose Whereas much is being learned about hereditary hearing loss and the genetics of cochlear disorders, relatively little is known about the role genes may play in peripheral vestibular impairment. Here we review the literature with regard to genetics of vestibular dysfunction and discuss what we have learned from studies using mutant mouse models and direct measures of peripheral vestibular neural function. Results Several genes are considered that when mutated lead to varying degrees of inner ear vestibular dysfunction due to deficits in otoconia, stereocilia, hair cells, or neurons. Behavior often does not reveal the inner ear deficit. Many of the examples presented are also known to cause human disorders. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the roles of particular genes in the operation of the vestibular sensory apparatus is growing and it is clear that gene products co-expressed in the cochlea and vestibule may play different roles in the respective end organs. The discovery of new genes mediating critical inner ear vestibular function carries the promise of new strategies in diagnosing, treating and managing patients as well as predicting the course and level of morbidity in human vestibular disease. PMID:25032973

  7. A mouse muscle-adapted enterovirus 71 strain with increased virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Duo, Jianying; Liu, Jiangning; Ma, Chunmei; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wei, Qiang; Qin, Chuan

    2011-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections can usually cause epidemic hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), and occasionally lead to aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, and polio-like illness. Skeletal muscles have been thought to be crucial for the pathogenesis of EV71-related diseases. However, little is known about the virulence of mouse muscle-adapted EV71. The EV71 0805 were subjected to four passages in the mouse muscle to generate a mouse-adapted EV71 strain of 0805a. In comparison with the parental EV71 0805, the mouse muscle-adapted EV71 0805a displayed stronger cytotoxicity against Rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells and more efficient replication in RD cells. Furthermore, infection with the EV71 0805a significantly inhibited the gain of body weight, accompanied by increased muscle virus load and multiple tissue distribution in the infected mouse. Histological examinations indicated that infection with the EV71 0805 did not cause obvious pathogenic lesions in mice, while infection with the muscle-adapted 0805a resulted in severe necrotizing myositis in the skeletal and cardio muscles, and intestinitis in mice on day 5 post infection. Further analysis revealed many mutations in different regions of the genome of mouse muscle-adapted virus. Collectively, these data demonstrated the mouse muscle-adapted EV71 0805a with increased virulence in mice.

  8. Successful mouse cloning of an outbred strain by trichostatin A treatment after somatic nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Wakayama, Sayaka; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Van Thuan, Nguyen; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Suetsugu, Rinako; Sata, Tetsutaro; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2007-02-01

    Although the somatic cloning technique has been used for numerous applications and basic research of reprogramming in various species, extremely low success rates have plagued this technique for a decade. Further in mice, the "clonable" strains have been limited to mainly hybrid F1 strains such as B6D2F1. Recently, we established a new efficient cloning technique using trichostatin A (TSA) which leads to a 2-5 fold increase in success rates for mouse cloning of B6D2F1 cumulus cells. To further test the validity of this TSA cloning technique, we tried to clone the adult ICR mouse, an outbred strain, which has never been directly cloned before. Only when TSA was used did we obtain both male and female cloned mice from cumulus and fibroblast cells of adult ICR mice with 4-5% success rates, which is comparable to 5-7% of B6D2F1. Thus, the TSA treatment is the first cloning technique to allow us to successfully clone outbred mice, demonstrating that this technique not only improves the success rates of cloning from hybrid strains, but also enables mouse cloning from normally "unclonable" strains.

  9. Morris Water Maze Test: Optimization for Mouse Strain and Testing Environment.

    PubMed

    Weitzner, Daniel S; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B; Kotilinek, Linda A; Ashe, Karen Hsiao; Reed, Miranda Nicole

    2015-06-22

    The Morris water maze (MWM) is a commonly used task to assess hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory in transgenic mouse models of disease, including neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the background strain of the mouse model used can have a substantial effect on the observed behavioral phenotype, with some strains exhibiting superior learning ability relative to others. To ensure differences between transgene negative and transgene positive mice can be detected, identification of a training procedure sensitive to the background strain is essential. Failure to tailor the MWM protocol to the background strain of the mouse model may lead to under- or over- training, thereby masking group differences in probe trials. Here, a MWM protocol tailored for use with the F1 FVB/N x 129S6 background is described. This is a frequently used background strain to study the age-dependent effects of mutant P301L tau (rTg(TauP301L)4510 mice) on the memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. Also described is a strategy to re-optimize, as dictated by the particular testing environment utilized.

  10. Morris Water Maze Test: Optimization for Mouse Strain and Testing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Weitzner, Daniel S.; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B.; Kotilinek, Linda A.; Ashe, Karen Hsiao; Reed, Miranda Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The Morris water maze (MWM) is a commonly used task to assess hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory in transgenic mouse models of disease, including neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. However, the background strain of the mouse model used can have a substantial effect on the observed behavioral phenotype, with some strains exhibiting superior learning ability relative to others. To ensure differences between transgene negative and transgene positive mice can be detected, identification of a training procedure sensitive to the background strain is essential. Failure to tailor the MWM protocol to the background strain of the mouse model may lead to under- or over- training, thereby masking group differences in probe trials. Here, a MWM protocol tailored for use with the F1 FVB/N x 129S6 background is described. This is a frequently used background strain to study the age-dependent effects of mutant P301L tau (rTg(TauP301L)4510 mice) on the memory deficits associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Also described is a strategy to re-optimize, as dictated by the particular testing environment utilized. PMID:26132096

  11. Comparison of fracture healing among different inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Manigrasso, Michaele B; O'Connor, J Patrick

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative trait locus analysis can be used to identify genes critically involved in biological processes. No such analysis has been applied to identifying genes that control bone fracture healing. To determine the feasibility of such an approach, healing of femur fractures was measured between C57BL/6, DBA/2, and C3H inbred strains of mice. Healing was assessed by radiography and histology and measured by histomorphometry and biomechanical testing. In all strains, radiographic bridging of the fracture was apparent after 3 weeks of healing. Histology showed that healing occurred through endochondral ossification in all strains. Histomorphometric measurements found more bone in the C57BL/6 fracture calluses 7 and 10 days after fracture. In contrast, more cartilage was present after 7 days in the C3H callus, which rapidly declined to levels less than those of C57BL/6 or DBA/2 mice by 14 days after fracture. An endochondral ossification index was calculated by multiplying the callus percent cartilage and bone areas as a measure of endochondral ossification. At 7 and 10 days after fracture, this value was higher in C57BL/6 mice. Using torsional mechanical testing, normalized structural and material properties of the C57BL/6 healing femurs were higher than values from the DBA/2 or C3H mice 4 weeks after fracture. The data indicate that fracture healing proceeds more rapidly in C57BL/6 mice and demonstrate that genetic variability significantly contributes to the process of bone regeneration. Large enough differences exist between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 or C3H mice to permit a quantitative trait locus analysis to identify genes controlling bone regeneration.

  12. Susceptibility to quantum dot induced lung inflammation differs widely among the Collaborative Cross founder mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Scoville, David K; White, Collin C; Botta, Dianne; McConnachie, Lisa A; Zadworny, Megan E; Schmuck, Stefanie C; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; Yu, Jianbo; Dills, Russell L; Sheppard, Lianne; Delaney, Martha A; Griffith, William C; Beyer, Richard P; Zangar, Richard C; Pounds, Joel G; Faustman, Elaine M; Kavanagh, Terrance J

    2015-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered semiconductor nanoparticles with unique physicochemical properties that make them potentially useful in clinical, research and industrial settings. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that like other engineered nanomaterials, QDs have the potential to be respiratory hazards, especially in the context of the manufacture of QDs and products containing them, as well as exposures to consumers using these products. The overall goal of this study was to investigate the role of mouse strain in determining susceptibility to QD-induced pulmonary inflammation and toxicity. Male mice from 8 genetically diverse inbred strains (the Collaborative Cross founder strains) were exposed to CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs stabilized with an amphiphilic polymer. QD treatment resulted in significant increases in the percentage of neutrophils and levels of cytokines present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from NOD/ShiLtJ and NZO/HlLtJ mice relative to their saline (Sal) treated controls. Cadmium measurements in lung tissue indicated strain-dependent differences in disposition of QDs in the lung. Total glutathione levels in lung tissue were significantly correlated with percent neutrophils in BALF as well as with lung tissue Cd levels. Our findings indicate that QD-induced acute lung inflammation is mouse strain dependent, that it is heritable, and that the choice of mouse strain is an important consideration in planning QD toxicity studies. These data also suggest that formal genetic analyses using additional strains or recombinant inbred strains from these mice could be useful for discovering potential QD-induced inflammation susceptibility loci. PMID:26476918

  13. Chromosomal changes in high- and low-invasive mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Linda M. Ensell, Mang X.; Ostvold, Anne-Carine; Baldwin, Kimberly T.; Kashon, Michael L.; Lowry, David T.; Senft, Jamie R.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Li Zhi; Tyson, Frederick L.; Reynolds, Steven H.

    2008-11-15

    The incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lung is increasing in the United States, however, the difficulties in obtaining lung cancer families and representative samples of early to late stages of the disease have lead to the study of mouse models for lung cancer. We used Spectral Karyotyping (SKY), mapping with fluorescently labeled genomic clones (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays, gene expression arrays, Western immunoblot and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze nine pairs of high-invasive and low-invasive tumor cell strains derived from early passage mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells to detect molecular changes associated with tumor invasion. The duplication of chromosomes 1 and 15 and deletion of chromosome 8 were significantly associated with a high-invasive phenotype. The duplication of chromosome 1 at band C4 and E1/2-H1 were the most significant chromosomal changes in the high-invasive cell strains. Mapping with FISH and CGH array further narrowed the minimum region of duplication of chromosome 1 to 71-82 centimorgans (cM). Expression array analysis and confirmation by real time PCR demonstrated increased expression of COX-2, Translin (TB-RBP), DYRK3, NUCKS and Tubulin-{alpha}4 genes in the high-invasive cell strains. Elevated expression and copy number of these genes, which are involved in inflammation, cell movement, proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and telomere elongation, were associated with an invasive phenotype. Similar linkage groups are altered in invasive human lung adenocarcinoma, implying that the mouse is a valid genetic model for the study of the progression of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  14. Autoantibodies against bromelainized mouse erythrocyte: strain distribution of serum idiotype expression and relative peritoneal cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, A; Poncet, P; Bussard, A

    1986-10-15

    Previously, we demonstrated that the naturally occurring mouse autoantibodies directed against bromelainized mouse red blood cells (BrMRBC) comprised a family of structurally related molecules bearing a common idiotypic determinant (CP) based on structural and idiotypic analysis of a series of anti-BrMRBC monoclonal autoantibodies derived from a fusion of peritoneal cells (PerC) with plasmacytomas. In the present studies, we have evaluated the quantitative expression of circulating CP idiotype related to autoantibodies against BrMRBC in relation to specific PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of different strains. The data presented here show no direct relationship between serum CP idiotype expression and PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of all strains tested. However, the circulating CP idiotype content is higher in strains, viz., CBA/J, NZB, C3H, BXSB, and Biozzi high responder (H) mice which exhibit a high perC autoantibody secretory activity against BrMRBC. The strains such as BALB/c, DBA2, SJL/J, CBA/N, and Biozzi low responder (L) express little or no circulating CP idiotype with a corresponding small or no PerC anti-BrMRBC activity. Furthermore, the PerC "auto"-immune phenomenon is markedly expressed in the normal CBA/J strain since these mice show a higher percentage ratio of CP idiotype over serum IgM (2.68%) as well as highest PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity (11,319 +/- 18,029 plaques per million viable cells) compared to other normal and autoimmune strains tested. Nevertheless, the highest circulating serum CP idiotype (49.4 micrograms/ml) is observed in the autoimmune NZB mouse. The immunodeficient CBA/N mice fail to express detectable levels of CP idiotype in their serum. The experiments conducted in genetically selected outbred Biozzi (H and L) strain have revealed remarkable differences in serum CP idiotype expression as well as PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in these two

  15. Initial locomotor sensitivity to cocaine varies widely among inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, T; Ervin, R B; Duan, H; Bogue, M A; Zamboni, W C; Cook, S; Chung, W; Zou, F; Tarantino, L M

    2015-03-01

    Initial sensitivity to psychostimulants can predict subsequent use and abuse in humans. Acute locomotor activation in response to psychostimulants is commonly used as an animal model of initial drug sensitivity and has been shown to have a substantial genetic component. Identifying the specific genetic differences that lead to phenotypic differences in initial drug sensitivity can advance our understanding of the processes that lead to addiction. Phenotyping inbred mouse strain panels are frequently used as a first step for studying the genetic architecture of complex traits. We assessed locomotor activation following a single, acute 20 mg/kg dose of cocaine (COC) in males from 45 inbred mouse strains and observed significant phenotypic variation across strains indicating a substantial genetic component. We also measured levels of COC, the active metabolite, norcocaine and the major inactive metabolite, benzoylecgonine, in plasma and brain in the same set of inbred strains. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and behavioral data were significantly correlated, but at a level that indicates that PK alone does not account for the behavioral differences observed across strains. Phenotypic data from this reference population of inbred strains can be utilized in studies aimed at examining the role of psychostimulant-induced locomotor activation on drug reward and reinforcement and to test theories about addiction processes. Moreover, these data serve as a starting point for identifying genes that alter sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of COC.

  16. Initial locomotor sensitivity to cocaine varies widely among inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Wiltshire, T.; Ervin, R. B.; Duan, H.; Bogue, M. A.; Zamboni, W. C.; Cook, S.; Chung, W.; Zou, F.; Tarantino, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Initial sensitivity to psychostimulants can predict subsequent use and abuse in humans. Acute locomotor activation in response to psychostimulants is commonly used as an animal model of initial drug sensitivity and has been shown to have a substantial genetic component. Identifying the specific genetic differences that lead to phenotypic differences in initial drug sensitivity can advance our understanding of the processes that lead to addiction. Phenotyping inbred mouse strain panels are frequently used as a first step for studying the genetic architecture of complex traits. We assessed locomotor activation following a single, acute 20 mg/kg dose of cocaine (COC) in males from 45 inbred mouse strains and observed significant phenotypic variation across strains indicating a substantial genetic component. We also measured levels of COC, the active metabolite, norcocaine and the major inactive metabolite, benzoylecgonine, in plasma and brain in the same set of inbred strains. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and behavioral data were significantly correlated, but at a level that indicates that PK alone does not account for the behavioral differences observed across strains. Phenotypic data from this reference population of inbred strains can be utilized in studies aimed at examining the role of psychostimulant-induced locomotor activation on drug reward and reinforcement and to test theories about addiction processes. Moreover, these data serve as a starting point for identifying genes that alter sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of COC. PMID:25727211

  17. Control of RFM strain endogenous retrovirus in RFM mouse cells.

    PubMed

    Tennant, R W; Otten, J A; Wang, T W; Liou, R S; Brown, A; Yang, W K

    1983-01-01

    RFM/Un mice express an endogenous type C retrovirus throughout their life span in many tissues; primary or established embryo fibroblast cell cultures do not express a virus but can be induced by exposure to 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. All of our sources yielded a single ecotropic virus (RFV) which appeared to be related more closely to the endogenous N-tropic virus (WN1802N) of BALB/c mice than to Gross leukemia virus on the basis of two-dimensional gel electropherograms of virion proteins. No xenotropic or recombinant viruses were isolated by cocultivation techniques. RFV is N-tropic, and RFM/Un cells possess the Fv-1n allele, as indicated by restriction of B-tropic virus and susceptibility to Gross strain N-tropic virus. However, RFM cells are highly resistant to RFV and other endogenous N-tropic viruses. This resistance is expressed by two-hit titration kinetics and by inhibition of viral linear duplex DNA formation. This is similar to the effects of the Fv-1 locus, but preliminary work has shown no apparent genetic linkage between the two restrictions. The relative strength of the restriction, the presence of a single class of ecotropic virus, and the absence of recombinant viruses suggest that in RFM mice virus is expressed only in cells in which it is induced and not by cell-to-cell transmission.

  18. Ex vivo determination of bone tissue strains for an in vivo mouse tibial loading model

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, Alessandra; Abela, Lisa; Pitsillides, Andrew A.; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies introduced the digital image correlation (DIC) as a viable technique for measuring bone strain during loading. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of a DIC system in determining surface strains in a mouse tibia while loaded in compression through the knee joint. Specifically, we examined the effect of speckle distribution, facet size and overlap, initial vertical alignment of the bone into the loading cups, rotation with respect to cameras, and ex vivo loading configurations on the strain contour maps measured with a DIC system. We loaded tibiae of C57BL/6 mice (12 and 18 weeks old male) up to 12 N at 8 N/min. Images of speckles on the bone surface were recorded at 1 N intervals and DIC was used to compute strains. Results showed that speckles must have the correct size and density with respect to the facet size of choice for the strain distribution to be computed and reproducible. Initial alignment of the bone within the loading cups does not influence the strain distribution measured during peak loading, but bones must be placed in front of the camera with the same orientation in order for strains to be comparable. Finally, the ex vivo loading configurations with the tibia attached to the entire mouse, or to the femur and foot, or only to the foot, showed different strain contour maps. This work provides a better understanding of parameters affecting full field strain measurements from DIC in ex vivo murine tibial loading tests. PMID:24835472

  19. Mouse chromosome 11 harbors genetic determinants of hippocampal strain-specific nicotinic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Scott W; Weis, Janis J; Ma, Ying; Teuscher, Cory; Gahring, Lorise C

    2008-01-01

    Differences between isogenic mouse strains in cellular expression of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subunit alpha 4 (nAChR alpha 4) by the dorsal hippocampus are well known. To investigate further the genetic basis of these variations, expression of the nAChR alpha 4 subunit was measured in congenic mouse lines derived from two strains exhibiting notable divergence in the expression of this subunit: C3H and C57BL/6. Congenic lines carrying reciprocally introgressed regions (quantitative trait loci; QTL) from chromosomes 4, 5, and 12 each retained the phenotype most closely associated with the parental strain. However, in congenic lines harboring the reciprocal transfer of a chromosome 11 QTL, a characteristic difference in the ratio of interneurons versus astrocytes expressing nAChR alpha 4 in the CA1 region is reversed relative to the parental strain. These finding suggest that this chromosomal segment harbors genes that regulate strain distinct hippocampal morphology that is revealed by nAChR alpha 4 expression.

  20. Differences in saccharin preference and genetic alterations of the Tas1r3 gene among senescence-accelerated mouse strains and their parental AKR/J strain.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kimie; Takahashi, Eiki

    2014-05-10

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is used as an animal model of senescence acceleration and age-associated disorders. SAM is derived from unexpected crosses between the AKR/J and unknown mouse strains. There are nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and three senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. Although SAMP strains exhibit strain-specific and age-related pathological changes, the genes responsible for the pathologic changes in SAMP strains have not been comprehensively identified. In the present study, we evaluated sweet taste perception using the two-bottle test. We compared genotypes of the taste related gene, Tas1r3, using SAM strains and the parental AKR/J strain. The two-bottle test revealed that SAMR1 (R1), SAMP6 (P6), SAMP8 (P8), and SAMP10 (P10) mice were saccharin-preferring strains, whereas AKR/J did not prefer saccharin. All genotypes of the R1, P6, P8, and P10 strains at the polymorphic sites in Tas1r3, which is known to influence saccharin preference, were identical to those of C57BL6/J, a well-known saccharin-preferring strain, and were completely different from those of the parental AKR/J strain. These genetic alterations in SAM strains appear to arise from an unknown strain that is thought to have been crossed with AKR/J initially. PMID:24726396

  1. Differences in saccharin preference and genetic alterations of the Tas1r3 gene among senescence-accelerated mouse strains and their parental AKR/J strain.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Kimie; Takahashi, Eiki

    2014-05-10

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is used as an animal model of senescence acceleration and age-associated disorders. SAM is derived from unexpected crosses between the AKR/J and unknown mouse strains. There are nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and three senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. Although SAMP strains exhibit strain-specific and age-related pathological changes, the genes responsible for the pathologic changes in SAMP strains have not been comprehensively identified. In the present study, we evaluated sweet taste perception using the two-bottle test. We compared genotypes of the taste related gene, Tas1r3, using SAM strains and the parental AKR/J strain. The two-bottle test revealed that SAMR1 (R1), SAMP6 (P6), SAMP8 (P8), and SAMP10 (P10) mice were saccharin-preferring strains, whereas AKR/J did not prefer saccharin. All genotypes of the R1, P6, P8, and P10 strains at the polymorphic sites in Tas1r3, which is known to influence saccharin preference, were identical to those of C57BL6/J, a well-known saccharin-preferring strain, and were completely different from those of the parental AKR/J strain. These genetic alterations in SAM strains appear to arise from an unknown strain that is thought to have been crossed with AKR/J initially.

  2. Positioning the Intracellular Salt Potassium Glutamate in the Hofmeister Series by Chemical Unfolding Studies of NTL9.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rituparna; Pantel, Adrian; Cheng, Xian; Shkel, Irina; Peran, Ivan; Stenzoski, Natalie; Raleigh, Daniel P; Record, M Thomas

    2016-04-19

    In vitro, replacing KCl with potassium glutamate (KGlu), the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic salt and osmolyte, stabilizes folded proteins and protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand the chemical basis for these effects and rank Glu- in the Hofmeister anion series for protein unfolding, we quantify and interpret the strong stabilizing effect of KGlu on the ribosomal protein domain NTL9, relative to the effects of other stabilizers (KCl, KF, and K2SO4) and destabilizers (GuHCl and GuHSCN). GuHSCN titrations at 20 ° C, performed as a function of the concentration of KGlu or another salt and monitored by NTL9 fluorescence, are analyzed to obtain R-values quantifying the Hofmeister salt concentration (m3) dependence of the unfolding equilibrium constant K(obs) [r-value = −d ln K(obs)/dm3 = (1/RT) dΔG(obs) ° /dm3 = m-value/RT]. r-Values for both stabilizing K+ salts and destabilizing GuH+ salts are compared with predictions from model compound data. For two-salt mixtures, we find that contributions of stabilizing and destabilizing salts to observed r-values are additive and independent. At 20 ° C, we determine a KGlu r-value of 3.22 m(−1) and K2SO4, KF, KCl, GuHCl, and GuHSCN r-values of 5.38, 1.05, 0.64, −1.38, and −3.00 m(−1), respectively. The KGlu r-value represents a 25-fold (1.9 kcal) stabilization per molal KGlu added. KGlu is much more stabilizing than KF, and the stabilizing effect of KGlu is larger in magnitude than the destabilizing effect of GuHSCN. Interpretation of the data reveals good agreement between predicted and observed relative r-values and indicates the presence of significant residual structure in GuHSCN-unfolded NTL9 at 20 ° C. PMID:27054379

  3. Brain immune cell composition and functional outcome after cerebral ischemia: comparison of two mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Whittle, Stephanie C.; Lee, Seyoung; Chu, Hannah X.; Zhang, Shenpeng R.; Wei, Zihui; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Vinh, Anthony; Drummond, Grant R.; Sobey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to secondary brain injury following cerebral ischemia. The C57Bl/6 mouse strain is known to exhibit a T helper 1-prone, pro-inflammatory type response to injury, whereas the FVB strain is relatively T helper 2-prone, or anti-inflammatory, in its immune response. We tested whether stroke outcome is more severe in C57Bl/6 than FVB mice. Male mice of each strain underwent sham surgery or 1 h occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by 23 h of reperfusion. Despite no difference in infarct size, C57Bl/6 mice displayed markedly greater functional deficits than FVB mice after stroke, as assessed by neurological scoring and hanging wire test. Total numbers of CD45+ leukocytes tended to be larger in the brains of C57Bl/6 than FVB mice after stroke, but there were marked differences in leukocyte composition between the two mouse strains. The inflammatory response in C57Bl/6 mice primarily involved T and B lymphocytes, whereas neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages were more prominent in FVB mice. Our data are consistent with the concept that functional outcome after stroke is dependent on the immune cell composition which develops following ischemic brain injury. PMID:25477780

  4. Purification by expanded bed adsorption and characterization of an alpha-amylases FORILASE NTL from A. niger.

    PubMed

    Toledo, A L; Severo, J B; Souza, R R; Campos, E S; Santana, J C C; Tambourgi, E B

    2007-02-01

    In this work the purification and biochemistry characterization of alpha-amylases from Aspergillus niger (FORILASE NTL) were studied. The effects of expansion degree of resin bed on enzyme purification by expanded bed adsorption (EBA) have also been studied. Residence time distributions (RTD) studies were done to achieve the optimal conditions of the amylases recovery on ion-exchange resin, and glucose solution was used as a new tracer. Results showed that height equivalent of the theoretical plates (HETP), axial dispersion and the Prandt number increased with bed height, bed voidage and linear velocity. The adsorption capacity of alpha-amylases, on the resin, increased with bed height and the best condition was at four-expansion degree. alpha-Amylase characterization showed that this enzyme has high affinity with soluble starch, good hydrolysis potential and molecular weight of 116 kDa.

  5. Comparative evaluation of two vaccine candidates against experimental leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major infection in four inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Benhnini, Fouad; Chenik, Mehdi; Laouini, Dhafer; Louzir, Hechmi; Cazenave, Pierre André; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-11-01

    Experimental leishmaniasis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are the most investigated murine models that were used for the preclinical evaluation of Leishmania vaccine candidates. We have previously described two new inbred mouse strains named PWK and MAI issued from feral founders that also support the development of experimental leishmaniasis due to L. major. In this study, we sought to determine whether different mouse inbred strains generate concordant or discordant results when used to evaluate the potential of Leishmania proteins to protect against experimental leishmaniasis. To this end, two Leishmania proteins, namely, LACK (for Leishmania homolog of receptor for activated C kinase) and LmPDI (for L. major protein disulfide isomerase) were compared for their capacity to protect against experimental leishmaniasis in PWK, MAI, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 inbred mouse strains. Our data show that the capacity of Leishmania proteins to confer protection depends on the mouse strain used, stressing the important role played by the genetic background in shaping the immune response against the pathogen. These results may have important implications for the preclinical evaluation of candidate Leishmania vaccines: rather than using a single mouse strain, a panel of different inbred strains of various genetic backgrounds should be tested in parallel. The antigen that confers protection in the larger range of inbred strains may have better chances to be also protective in outbred human populations and should be selected for clinical trials.

  6. SENCAR mouse skin tumorigenesis model versus other strains and stocks of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Slaga, T.J.

    1986-09-01

    The SENCAR mouse stock was selectively bred for eight generations for sensitivity to skin tumor induction by the two-stage tumorigenesis protocol using 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as the initiator and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as the promoter. The SENCAR mouse was derived by crossing Charles River CD-1 mice with skin-tumor-sensitive mice (STS). The SENCAR mice are much more sensitive to both DMBA tumor initiation and TPA tumor promotion than CD-1, BALB/c, and DBA/2 mice. An even greater difference in the sensitivity to two-stage skin tumorigenesis is apparent between SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice when using DMBA-TPA treatment. However, the SENCAR and C57BL/6 mice have a similar tumor response to DMBA-benzoyl peroxide treatment, suggesting that TPA is not an effective promoter in C57BL/6 mice. The DBA/2 mice respond in a similar manner to the SENCAR mice when using N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-TPA treatment. The SENCAR mouse model provides a good dose-response relationship for many carcinogens used as tumor initiators and for many compounds used as tumor promoter. When compared to other stocks and strains of mice, the SENCAR mouse has one of the largest data bases for carcinogens and promoters.

  7. Differential visual system organization and susceptibility to experimental models of optic neuropathies in three commonly used mouse strains.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Lies; Dekeyster, Eline; Geeraerts, Emiel; Lefevere, Evy; Stalmans, Ingeborg; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Moons, Lieve

    2016-04-01

    Mouse disease models have proven indispensable in glaucoma research, yet the complexity of the vast number of models and mouse strains has also led to confusing findings. In this study, we evaluated baseline intraocular pressure, retinal histology, and retinofugal projections in three mouse strains commonly used in glaucoma research, i.e. C57Bl/6, C57Bl/6-Tyr(c), and CD-1 mice. We found that the mouse strains under study do not only display moderate variations in their intraocular pressure, retinal architecture, and retinal ganglion cell density, also the retinofugal projections to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and the superior colliculus revealed striking differences, potentially underlying diverging optokinetic tracking responses and visual acuity. Next, we reviewed the success rate of three models of (glaucomatous) optic neuropathies (intravitreal N-methyl-d-aspartic acid injection, optic nerve crush, and laser photocoagulation-induced ocular hypertension), looking for differences in disease susceptibility between these mouse strains. Different genetic backgrounds and albinism led to differential susceptibility to experimentally induced retinal ganglion cell death among these three mouse strains. Overall, CD-1 mice appeared to have the highest sensitivity to retinal ganglion cell damage, while the C57Bl/6 background was more resistant in the three models used. PMID:26791081

  8. Transcriptomics and Metabonomics Identify Essential Metabolic Signatures in Calorie Restriction (CR) Regulation across Multiple Mouse Strains.

    PubMed

    Collino, Sebastiano; Martin, François-Pierre J; Montoliu, Ivan; Barger, Jamie L; Da Silva, Laeticia; Prolla, Tomas A; Weindruch, Richard; Kochhar, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has long been used to study lifespan effects and oppose the development of a broad array of age-related biological and pathological changes (increase healthspan). Yet, a comprehensive comparison of the metabolic phenotype across different genetic backgrounds to identify common metabolic markers affected by CR is still lacking. Using a system biology approach comprising metabonomics and liver transcriptomics we revealed the effect of CR across multiple mouse strains (129S1/SvlmJ, C57BL6/J, C3H/HeJ, CBA/J, DBA/2J, JC3F1/J). Oligonucleotide microarrays identified 76 genes as differentially expressed in all six strains confirmed. These genes were subjected to quantitative RT-PCR analysis in the C57BL/6J mouse strain, and a CR-induced change expression was confirmed for 14 genes. To fully depict the metabolic pathways affected by CR and complement the changes observed through differential gene expression, the metabolome of C57BL6/J was further characterized in liver tissues, urine and plasma levels using a combination or targeted mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Overall, our integrated approach commonly confirms that energy metabolism, stress response, lipids regulators and the insulin/IGF-1 are key determinants factors involved in CR regulation. PMID:24958256

  9. Mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B: relation of phenotypic features to background strain.

    PubMed

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Willing, Alison E; Haas, Ken; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Sanberg, Paul R

    2003-12-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B or mucopolysaccharidosis type III B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disorder that is inherited in autosomal recessive manner. It is characterized by systemic heparan sulfate accumulation in lysosomes due to deficiency of the enzyme alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu). Devastating clinical abnormalities with severe central nervous system involvement and somatic disease lead to premature death. A mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B was created by targeted disruption of the gene encoding Naglu, providing a powerful tool for understanding pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. However, the JAX GEMM Strain B6.129S6-Naglutm1Efn mouse, although showing biochemical similarities to humans with Sanfilippo syndrome, exhibits aging and behavioral differences. We observed idiosyncrasies, such as skeletal dysmorphism, hydrocephalus, ocular abnormalities, organomegaly, growth retardation, and anomalies of the integument, in our breeding colony of Naglu mutant mice and determined that several of them were at least partially related to the background strain C57BL/6. These background strain abnormalities, therefore, potentially mimic or overlap signs of the induced syndrome in our mice. Our observations may prove useful in studies of Naglu mutant mice. The necessity for distinguishing background anomalies from signs of the modeled disease is apparent. PMID:14727810

  10. Differential effects of sucrose and fructose on dietary obesity in four mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Glendinnning, John I.; Breinager, Lindsey; Kyrillou, Emily; Lacuna, Kristine; Rocha, Rotsen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We examined sugar-induced obesity in mouse strains polymorphic for Tas1r3, a gene that codes for the T1R3 sugar taste receptor. The T1R3 receptor in the FVB and B6 strains has a higher affinity for sugars than that in the AKR and 129P3 strains. In Experiment 1, mice had 40 days of access to lab chow plus water, sucrose (10 or 34%), or fructose (10 or 34%) solutions. The strains consumed more of the sucrose than isocaloric fructose solutions. The pattern of strain differences in caloric intake from the 10% sugar solutions was FVB > 129P3 = B6 > AKR; and that from the 34% sugar solutions was FVB > 129P3 > B6 ≥ AKR. Despite consuming more sugar calories, the FVB mice resisted obesity altogether. The AKR and 129P3 mice became obese exclusively on the 34% sucrose diet, while the B6 mice did so on the 34% sucrose and 34% fructose diets. In Experiment 2, we compared total caloric intake from diets containing chow versus chow plus 34% sucrose. All strains consumed 15-29% more calories from the sucrose-supplemented diet. In Experiment 3, we compared the oral acceptability of the sucrose and fructose solutions, using lick tests. All strains licked more avidly for the 10% sucrose solutions. The results indicate that in mice (a) Tas1r3 genotype does not predict sugar-induced hyperphagia or obesity; (b) sucrose solutions stimulate higher daily intakes than isocaloric fructose solutions; and (c) susceptibility to sugar-induced obesity varies with strain, sugar concentration and sugar type. PMID:20600198

  11. Differential effects of sucrose and fructose on dietary obesity in four mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, John I; Breinager, Lindsey; Kyrillou, Emily; Lacuna, Kristine; Rocha, Rotsen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2010-10-01

    We examined sugar-induced obesity in mouse strains polymorphic for Tas1r3, a gene that codes for the T1R3 sugar taste receptor. The T1R3 receptor in the FVB and B6 strains has a higher affinity for sugars than that in the AKR and 129P3 strains. In Experiment 1, mice had 40days of access to lab chow plus water, sucrose (10 or 34%), or fructose (10 or 34%) solutions. The strains consumed more of the sucrose than isocaloric fructose solutions. The pattern of strain differences in caloric intake from the 10% sugar solutions was FVB>129P3=B6>AKR; and that from the 34% sugar solutions was FVB>129P3>B6>/=AKR. Despite consuming more sugar calories, the FVB mice resisted obesity altogether. The AKR and 129P3 mice became obese exclusively on the 34% sucrose diet, while the B6 mice did so on the 34% sucrose and 34% fructose diets. In Experiment 2, we compared total caloric intake from diets containing chow versus chow plus 34% sucrose. All strains consumed between 11 and 25% more calories from the sucrose-supplemented diet. In Experiment 3, we compared the oral acceptability of the sucrose and fructose solutions, using lick tests. All strains licked more avidly for the 10% sucrose solutions. The results indicate that in mice (a) Tas1r3 genotype does not predict sugar-induced hyperphagia or obesity; (b) sucrose solutions stimulate higher daily intakes than isocaloric fructose solutions; and (c) susceptibility to sugar-induced obesity varies with strain, sugar concentration and sugar type.

  12. Comparative analysis of the behavioral and biomolecular parameters of four mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Elimelech; Peskov, Vladimir; Rylova, Anna; Raz, Olga; Pinhasov, Albert

    2012-02-01

    The use of mice as experimental models in pharmacological and biochemical research began over 100 years ago, during which time different mice strains with specific features were developed. Numerous studies demonstrate that the pharmacological efficacy of various compounds significantly varies among different animal strains, a factor which must be considered when analyzing experimental data. The Sabra strain, developed more than 35 years ago, is widely used for research in Israel but has an unclear origin and is not characterized as well as other strains. Comparative analyses of the molecular characteristics of Sabra and other strains should help to understand their characteristics and to enhance the validity of their experimental use. Thus, four mouse strains-outbred ICR and Sabra as well as inbred C57Bl/6J and Balb/c were compared. Animals' weight, blood corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels were measured, and animals' behavior was compared using the EPM, open field, FST, and hot plate tests. We found that although Sabra mice are bigger and heavier than other tested lines, this is not reflected in behavior or in biomolecular features, wherein Sabra mice lay within the diapason of other tested animals. Thus, behavioral tests of anxiety-like behavior and locomotor activity revealed that Sabra mice scored close to the mean of all tested lines. Analysis of blood corticosterone levels did not show significant differences among tested strains. We also found a correlation between general and locomotor activity of the tested strains and their hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression. In summary, we may conclude that Sabra mice have traits similar to the better known lines, and therefore they are good subjects for neuroscience research.

  13. Genetic influences on exercise-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis across 12 divergent mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are continuously born in the hippocampus of several mammalian species throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis represents a natural model for understanding how to grow and incorporate new nerve cells into pre-existing circuits in the brain. Finding molecules or biological pathways that increase neurogenesis has broad potential for regenerative medicine. One strategy is to identify mouse strains that display large versus small increases in neurogenesis in response to wheel running so the strains can be contrasted to find common genes or biological pathways associated with enhanced neuron formation. Therefore, mice from 12 different isogenic strains were housed with or without running wheels for 43 days to measure the genetic regulation of exercise-induced neurogenesis. The first 10 days mice received daily injections of BrdU to label dividing cells. Neurogenesis was measured as the total number of BrdU cells co-expressing NeuN mature neuronal marker in the hippocampal granule cell layer by immunohistochemistry. Exercise increased neurogenesis in all strains, but the magnitude significantly depended on genotype. Strain means for distance run on wheels, but not distance traveled in cages without wheels, were significantly correlated with strain mean level of neurogenesis. Further, certain strains displayed greater neurogenesis than others for a fixed level of running. Strain means for neurogenesis under sedentary conditions were not correlated with neurogenesis under runner conditions suggesting that different genes influence baseline versus exercise-induced neurogenesis. Genetic contributions to exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis suggest that it may be possible to identify genes and pathways associated with enhanced neuroplastic responses to exercise. PMID:21223504

  14. CYCLOPENTA-FUSED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG: DNA ADDUCTS, ONCOGENE MUTATIONS, & TUMORIGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclopenta-fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Strain AJJ Mouse Lung: DNA Adducts, Oncogene Mutations, and Tumorigenesis.

    We have examined the relationships between DNA adducts, Ki-ras oncogene mutations, DNA adducts, and adenoma induction in the lungs of strain A/J...

  15. Effect of crossing C57BL/6 and FVB mouse strains on basal cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Szade, Agata; Nowak, Witold N; Szade, Krzysztof; Gese, Anna; Czypicki, Ryszard; Waś, Halina; Dulak, Józef; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    C57BL/6 is the most often used laboratory mouse strain. However, sometimes it is beneficial to cross the transgenic mice on the C57BL/6 background to the other strain, such as FVB. Although this is a common strategy, the influence of crossing these different strains on homeostatic expression of cytokines is not known. Here we have investigated the differences in the expression of selected cytokines between C57BL/6J and C57BL/6JxFVB mice in serum and skeletal muscle. We have found that only few cytokines were altered by crossing of the strains. Concentrations of IL5, IL7, LIF, MIP-2, and IP-10 were higher in serum of C57BL/6J mice than in C57BL/6JxFVB mice, whereas concentration of G-CSF was lower in C57BL/6J. In the skeletal muscle only the concentration of VEGF was higher in C57BL/6J mice than in C57BL/6JxFVB mice. Concluding, the differences in cytokine expression upon crossing C57BL/6 and FVB strain in basal conditions are not profound.

  16. Effect of Crossing C57BL/6 and FVB Mouse Strains on Basal Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Szade, Agata; Nowak, Witold N.; Szade, Krzysztof; Gese, Anna; Czypicki, Ryszard; Waś, Halina; Dulak, Józef; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    C57BL/6 is the most often used laboratory mouse strain. However, sometimes it is beneficial to cross the transgenic mice on the C57BL/6 background to the other strain, such as FVB. Although this is a common strategy, the influence of crossing these different strains on homeostatic expression of cytokines is not known. Here we have investigated the differences in the expression of selected cytokines between C57BL/6J and C57BL/6JxFVB mice in serum and skeletal muscle. We have found that only few cytokines were altered by crossing of the strains. Concentrations of IL5, IL7, LIF, MIP-2, and IP-10 were higher in serum of C57BL/6J mice than in C57BL/6JxFVB mice, whereas concentration of G-CSF was lower in C57BL/6J. In the skeletal muscle only the concentration of VEGF was higher in C57BL/6J mice than in C57BL/6JxFVB mice. Concluding, the differences in cytokine expression upon crossing C57BL/6 and FVB strain in basal conditions are not profound. PMID:25834307

  17. Effect of mouse strain as a background for Alzheimer’s disease models on the clearance of amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Qosa, Hisham; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Novel animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are relentlessly being developed and existing ones are being fine-tuned; however, these models face multiple challenges associated with the complexity of the disease where most of these models do not reproduce the full phenotypical disease spectrum. Moreover, different AD models express different phenotypes that could affect their validity to recapitulate disease pathogenesis and/or response to a drug. One of the most important and understudied differences between AD models is differences in the phenotypic characteristics of the background species. Here, we used the brain clearance index (BCI) method to investigate the effect of strain differences on the clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) from the brains of four mouse strains. These mouse strains, namely C57BL/6, FVB/N, BALB/c and SJL/J, are widely used as a background for the development of AD mouse models. Findings showed that while Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was comparable between the 4 strains, levels of LRP1, an Aβ clearance protein, was significantly lower in SJL/J mice compared to other mouse strains. Furthermore, these mouse strains showed a significantly different response to rifampicin treatment with regard to Aβ clearance and effect on brain level of its clearance-related proteins. Our results provide for the first time an evidence for strain differences that could affect ability of AD mouse models to recapitulate response to a drug, and opens a new research avenue that requires further investigation to successfully develop mouse models that could simulate clinically important phenotypic characteristics of AD. PMID:27478623

  18. Genetically diverse CC-founder mouse strains replicate the human influenza gene expression signature.

    PubMed

    Elbahesh, Husni; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-05-19

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) are zoonotic pathogens that pose a major threat to human and animal health. Influenza virus disease severity is influenced by viral virulence factors as well as individual differences in host response. We analyzed gene expression changes in the blood of infected mice using a previously defined set of signature genes that was derived from changes in the blood transcriptome of IAV-infected human volunteers. We found that the human signature was reproduced well in the founder strains of the Collaborative Cross (CC) mice, thus demonstrating the relevance and importance of mouse experimental model systems for studying human influenza disease.

  19. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  20. Using standard nomenclature to adequately name transgenes, knockout gene alleles and any mutation associated to a genetically modified mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Lluís; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2011-04-01

    Mice provide an unlimited source of animal models to study mammalian gene function and human diseases. The powerful genetic modification toolbox existing for the mouse genome enables the creation of, literally, thousands of genetically modified mouse strains, carrying spontaneous or induced mutations, transgenes or knock-out/knock-in alleles which, in addition, can exist in hundreds of different genetic backgrounds. Such an immense diversity of individuals needs to be adequately annotated, to ensure that the most relevant information is kept associated with the name of each mouse line, and hence, the scientific community can correctly interpret and benefit from the reported animal model. Therefore, rules and guidelines for correctly naming genes, alleles and mouse strains are required. The Mouse Genome Informatics Database is the authoritative source of official names for mouse genes, alleles, and strains. Nomenclature follows the rules and guidelines established by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. Herewith, both from the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) and from the scientific journal Transgenic Research, we would like to encourage all our colleagues to adhere and follow adequately the standard nomenclature rules when describing mouse models. The entire scientific community using genetically modified mice in experiments will benefit.

  1. Immobility responses between mouse strains correlate with distinct hippocampal serotonin transporter protein expression and function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man; He, Tao; Meng, Qing-yan; Broussard, John Isaac; Yao, Lan; Diao, Yao; Sang, Xiu-bo; Liu, Qing-peng; Liao, Ying-jun; Li, Yuge; Zhao, Shulei

    2014-11-01

    Mouse strain differences in immobility and in sensitivity to antidepressants have been observed in the forced swimming test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST). However, the neurotransmitter systems and neural substrates that contribute to these differences remain unknown. To investigate the role of the hippocampal serotonin transporter (5-HTT), we measured baseline immobility and the immobility responses to fluoxetine (FLX) in the FST and the TST in male CD-1, C57BL/6, DBA and BALB/c mice. We observed strain differences in baseline immobility time, with CD-1 mice showing the longest and DBA mice showing the shortest. In contrast, DBA and BALB/c mice showed the highest sensitivity to FLX, whereas CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice showed the lowest sensitivity. Also we found strain differences in both the total 5-HTT protein level and the membrane-bound 5-HTT level (estimated by V max) as follows: DBA>BALB/c>CD-1=C57BL/6. The uptake efficiency of the membrane-bound 5-HTT (estimated by 1/K m) was highest in DBA and BALB/c mice and lowest in CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice. A correlation analysis of subregions within the hippocampus revealed that immobility time was negatively correlated with V max and positively correlated with K m in the hippocampus. Therefore a higher uptake capacity of the membrane-bound 5-HTT in the hippocampus was associated with lower baseline immobility and greater sensitivity to FLX. These results suggest that alterations in hippocampal 5-HTT activity may contribute to mouse strain differences in the FST and the TST.

  2. Strain-dependent Damage in Mouse Lung After Carbon Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moritake, Takashi; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Yanagisawa, Mitsuru; Nakawatari, Miyako; Imadome, Kaori; Nakamura, Etsuko; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine whether inherent factors produce differences in lung morbidity in response to carbon ion (C-ion) irradiation, and to identify the molecules that have a key role in strain-dependent adverse effects in the lung. Methods and Materials: Three strains of female mice (C3H/He Slc, C57BL/6J Jms Slc, and A/J Jms Slc) were locally irradiated in the thorax with either C-ion beams (290 MeV/n, in 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak) or with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays as a reference beam. We performed survival assays and histologic examination of the lung with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, we performed immunohistochemical staining for hyaluronic acid (HA), CD44, and Mac3 and assayed for gene expression. Results: The survival data in mice showed a between-strain variance after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. The median survival time of C3H/He was significantly shortened after C-ion irradiation at the higher dose of 12.5 Gy. Histologic examination revealed early-phase hemorrhagic pneumonitis in C3H/He and late-phase focal fibrotic lesions in C57BL/6J after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. Pleural effusion was apparent in C57BL/6J and A/J mice, 168 days after C-ion irradiation with 10 Gy. Microarray analysis of irradiated lung tissue in the three mouse strains identified differential expression changes in growth differentiation factor 15 (Gdf15), which regulates macrophage function, and hyaluronan synthase 1 (Has1), which plays a role in HA metabolism. Immunohistochemistry showed that the number of CD44-positive cells, a surrogate marker for HA accumulation, and Mac3-positive cells, a marker for macrophage infiltration in irradiated lung, varied significantly among the three mouse strains during the early phase. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a strain-dependent differential response in mice to C-ion thoracic irradiation. Our findings identified candidate molecules that could be implicated in the between-strain variance to early

  3. Optimization of protocols for derivation of mouse embryonic stem cell lines from refractory strains, including the non obese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Davies, Timothy J; Fairchild, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    The derivation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from a variety of genetic backgrounds remains a desirable objective in the generation of mice functionally deficient in genes of interest and the modeling of human disease. Nevertheless, disparity in the ease with which different strains of mice yield ESC lines has long been acknowledged. Indeed, the generation of bona fide ESCs from the non obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, a well-characterized model of human type I diabetes, has historically proved especially difficult to achieve. Here, we report the development of protocols for the derivation of novel ESC lines from C57Bl/6 mice based on the combined use of high concentrations of leukemia inhibitory factor and serum-replacement, which is equally applicable to fresh and cryo-preserved embryos. Further, we demonstrate the success of this approach using Balb/K and CBA/Ca mice, widely considered to be refractory strains. CBA/Ca ESCs contributed to the somatic germ layers of chimeras and displayed a very high competence at germline transmission. Importantly, we were able to use the same protocol for the derivation of ESC lines from nonpermissive NOD mice. These ESCs displayed a normal karyotype that was robustly stable during long-term culture, were capable of forming teratomas in vivo and germline competent chimeras after injection into recipient blastocysts. Further, these novel ESC lines efficiently formed embryoid bodies in vitro and could be directed in their differentiation along the dendritic cell lineage, thus illustrating their potential application to the generation of cell types of relevance to the pathogenesis of type I diabetes. PMID:21933027

  4. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans.

  5. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans. PMID:26779669

  6. Identification of 17 hearing impaired mouse strains in the TMGC ENU-mutagenesis screen

    SciTech Connect

    Kermany, Mohammad; Parker, Lisan; Guo, Yun-Kai; Miller, Darla R; Swanson, Douglas J; Yoo, Tai-June; Goldowitz, Daniel; Zuo, Jian

    2006-01-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) employed an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutagenesis scheme to identify mouse recessive mutants with hearing phenotypes. We employed auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to click and 8, 16, and 32 kHz stimuli and screened 285 pedigrees (1819 mice of 8-11 weeks old in various mixed genetic backgrounds) each bred to carry a homozygous ENU-induced mutation. To define mutant pedigrees, we measured P12 mice per pedigree in P2 generations and used a criterion where the mean ABR threshold per pedigree was two standard deviations above the mean of all offspring from the same parental strain. We thus identified 17 mutant pedigrees (6%), all exhibiting hearing loss at high frequencies (P16 kHz) with an average threshold elevation of 30-35 dB SPL. Interestingly, four mutants showed sex-biased hearing loss and six mutants displayed wide range frequency hearing loss. Temporal bone histology revealed that six of the first nine mutants displayed cochlear morphological defects: degeneration of spiral ganglia, spiral ligament fibrocytes or inner hair cells (but not outer hair cells) mostly in basal turns. In contrast to other ENU-mutagenesis auditory screens, our screen identified high-frequency, mild and sex-biased hearing defects. Further characterization of these 17 mouse models will advance our understanding of presbycusis and noise-induced hearing loss in humans.

  7. Proliferation Potential of Müller Glia after Retinal Damage Varies between Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Akiko; Sadamoto, Kazuyo; Fujii, Momo; Mandai, Michiko; Takahashi, Masayo

    2014-01-01

    Retinal Müller glia can serve as a source for regeneration of damaged retinal neurons in fish, birds and mammals. However, the proliferation rate of Müller glia has been reported to be low in the mammalian retina. To overcome this problem, growth factors and morphogens have been studied as potent promoters of Müller glial proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms that limit the proliferation of Müller glia in the mammalian retina remain unknown. In the present study, we found that the degree of damage-induced Müller glia proliferation varies across mouse strains. In mouse line 129×1/SvJ (129), there was a significantly larger proliferative response compared with that observed in C57BL/6 (B6) after photoreceptor cell death. Treatment with a Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitor enhanced the proliferation of Müller glia in 129 but not in B6 mouse retinas. We therefore focused on the different gene expression patterns during retinal degeneration between B6 and 129. Expression levels of Cyclin D1 and Nestin correlated with the degree of Müller glial proliferation. A comparison of genome-wide gene expression between B6 and 129 showed that distinct sets of genes were upregulated in the retinas after damage, including immune response genes and chromatin remodeling factors. PMID:24747725

  8. Differential resistance/susceptibility patterns to pneumovirus infection among inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Anh, Dao Bui Tran; Faisca, Pedro; Desmecht, Daniel J-M

    2006-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a prominent cause of airway morbidity in children under 1 yr of age. It is assumed that host factors influence the severity of the disease presentation and thus the need for hospitalization. As a first step toward the identification of the underlying genes involved, this study was undertaken to establish whether inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), the murine counterpart of RSV, which has been shown to accurately mimic the RSV disease of children. With this purpose in mind, double-chamber plethysmography and carbon monoxide uptake data were collected daily for 7 days after inoculation of PVM in six inbred strains of mice. In parallel, histological examinations and lung viral titration were carried out from day 5 to day 7 after inoculation. Pulmonary structure/function values reflected the success of viral replication in the lungs and revealed a pattern of continuous variation, with resistant, intermediate, and susceptible strains. The results suggest that SJL (resistant) and 129/Sv (susceptible) strains should be used in crossing experiments aimed at identifying genes controlling pneumovirus replication by the positional cloning approach. Similarly, crossing experiments using BALB/c or C57BL/6 (resistant) and DBA/2 or 129/Sv (susceptible) will allow the identification of the genes involved in the control of pulmonary inflammation during pneumovirus infection.

  9. General and social anxiety in the BTBR T+ tf/J mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Pobbe, Roger L H; Defensor, Erwin B; Pearson, Brandon L; Bolivar, Valerie J; Blanchard, D Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    BTBR T+ tf/J (BTBR) is an inbred mouse strain that shows behavioral traits with analogies to the three diagnostic symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD); deficits in social interaction, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Previous findings reveal that when compared to C57BL/6J (B6) and other inbred strains, BTBR exhibit normal to low anxiety-like traits in paradigms designed to assess anxiety-related behaviors. The current study assessed the generality of these anxiety findings. In experiment 1, B6 and BTBR mice were tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM), mouse defense test battery (MDTB) and elevated zero-maze. BTBR mice exhibited an anxiogenic profile in the EPM, with a reduction in open arm time and an increase in risk assessment behaviors, as compared to B6. In the MDTB, BTBR showed enhanced vocalization to the predator, and significantly less locomotor activity than B6 in the pre-threat situation, but significantly more locomotion than B6 following exposure to a predator threat, suggesting enhanced defensiveness to the predator. In the zero-maze, BTBR mice showed a significantly higher number of entries and time spent in the open segments of the apparatus, when compared to B6. In experiment 2, a three-chambered social preference test was used to evaluate effects of the systemic administration of an anxiolytic compound, diazepam, on B6 and BTBR social approach. Diazepam consistently increased time in the compartment containing the social stimulus, for both B6 and BTBR mice. However, in the vehicle treated groups, B6 mice spent significantly more time while BTBR mice spent significantly less time in the social stimulus compartment; after diazepam administration both B6 and BTBR strains significantly preferred the social stimulus chamber. These results suggest that while the anxiety responses of BTBR mice to novel situations (EPM and zero-maze) are inconsistent, BTBR mice appear to be more defensive to animate threat

  10. Experimenter effects on behavioral test scores of eight inbred mouse strains under the influence of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Martin; Hayes, Erika R; Bohlen, Benjamin; Bailoo, Jeremy D; Crabbe, John C; Wahlsten, Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Eight standard inbred mouse strains were evaluated for ethanol effects on a refined battery of behavioral tests in a study that was originally designed to assess the influence of rat odors in the colony on mouse behaviors. As part of the design of the study, two experimenters conducted the tests, and the study was carefully balanced so that equal numbers of mice in all groups and times of day were tested by each experimenter. A defect in airflow in the facility compromised the odor manipulation, and in fact the different odor exposure groups did not differ in their behaviors. The two experimenters, however, obtained markedly different results for three of the tests. Certain of the experimenter effects arose from the way they judged behaviors that were not automated and had to be rated by the experimenter, such as slips on the balance beam. Others were not evident prior to ethanol injection but had a major influence after the injection. For several measures, the experimenter effects were notably different for different inbred strains. Methods to evaluate and reduce the impact of experimenter effects in future research are discussed.

  11. Acquisition of nonspecific Bartonella strains by the northern grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bai, Y.; Kosoy, M.Y.; Cully, J.F.; Bala, T.; Ray, C.; Collinge, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    Rodent-associated Bartonella species are generally host-specific parasites in North America. Here evidence that Bartonella species can 'jump' between host species is presented. Northern grasshopper mice and other rodents were trapped in the western USA. A study of Bartonella infection in grasshopper mice demonstrated a high prevalence that varied from 25% to 90% by location. Bartonella infection was detected in other rodent species with a high prevalence as well. Sequence analyses of gltA identified 29 Bartonella variants in rodents, 10 of which were obtained from grasshopper mice. Among these 10, only six variants were specific to grasshopper mice, whereas four were identical to variants specific to deer mice or 13-lined ground squirrels. Fourteen of 90 sequenced isolates obtained from grasshopper mice were strains found more commonly in other rodent species and were apparently acquired from these animals. The ecological behavior of grasshopper mice may explain the occurrence of Bartonella strains in occasional hosts. The observed rate at which Bartonella jumps from a donor host species to the grasshopper mouse was directly proportional to a metric of donor host density and to the prevalence of Bartonella in the donor host, and inversely proportional to the same parameters for the grasshopper mouse. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  12. Sperm morphology in two house mouse subspecies: do wild-derived strains and wild mice tell the same story?

    PubMed

    Albrechtová, Jana; Albrecht, Tomáš; Ďureje, Ludovít; Pallazola, Vincent A; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Being subject to intense post-copulatory selection, sperm size is a principal determining component of male fitness. Although previous studies have presented comparative sperm size data at higher taxonomic levels, information on the evolution of sperm size within species is generally lacking. Here, we studied two house mouse subspecies, Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus, which undergo incipient speciation. We measured four sperm dimensions from cauda epididymis smears of 28 wild-caught mice of both subspecies. As inbred mouse strains are frequently used as proxies for exploring evolutionary processes, we further studied four wild-derived inbred strains from each subspecies. The subspecies differed significantly in terms of sperm head length and midpiece length, and these differences were consistent for wild mice and wild-derived strains pooled over genomes. When the inbred strains were analyzed individually, however, their strain-specific values were in some cases significantly shifted from subspecies-specific values derived from wild mice. We conclude that: (1) the size of sperm components differ in the two house mouse subspecies studied, and that (2) wild-derived strains reflect this natural polymorphism, serving as a potential tool to identify the genetic variation driving these evolutionary processes. Nevertheless, we suggest that more strains should be used in future experiments to account for natural variation and to avoid confounding results due to reduced variability and/or founder effect in the individual strains.

  13. 129-Derived Mouse Strains Express an Unstable but Catalytically Active DNA Polymerase Iota Variant.

    PubMed

    Aoufouchi, Said; De Smet, Annie; Delbos, Frédéric; Gelot, Camille; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-09-01

    Mice derived from the 129 strain have a nonsense codon mutation in exon 2 of the polymerase iota (Polι) gene and are therefore considered Polι deficient. When we amplified Polι mRNA from 129/SvJ or 129/Ola testes, only a small fraction of the full-length cDNA contained the nonsense mutation; the major fraction corresponded to a variant Polι isoform lacking exon 2. Polι mRNA lacking exon 2 contains an open reading frame, and the corresponding protein was detected using a polyclonal antibody raised against the C terminus of the murine Polι protein. The identity of the corresponding protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. Although the variant protein was expressed at only 5 to 10% of the level of wild-type Polι, it retained de novo DNA synthesis activity, the capacity to form replication foci following UV irradiation, and the ability to rescue UV light sensitivity in Polι(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts derived from a new, fully deficient Polι knockout (KO) mouse line. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of 129-derived male mice with Velcade, a drug that inhibits proteasome function, stabilized and restored a substantial amount of the variant Polι in these animals, indicating that its turnover is controlled by the proteasome. An analysis of two xeroderma pigmentosum-variant (XPV) cases corresponding to missense mutants of Polη, a related translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase in the same family, similarly showed a destabilization of the catalytically active mutant protein by the proteasome. Collectively, these data challenge the prevailing hypothesis that 129-derived strains of mice are completely deficient in Polι activity. The data also document, both for 129-derived mouse strains and for some XPV patients, new cases of genetic defects corresponding to the destabilization of an otherwise functional protein, the phenotype of which is reversible by proteasome inhibition.

  14. Pulmonary Responses to Stachybotrys chartarum and Its Toxins: Mouse Strain Affects Clearance and Macrophage Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Jamie H. Rosenblum; Molina, Ramon M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Amuzie, Chidozie J.; Pestka, James J.; Coull, Brent A.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated differences in the pulmonary and systemic clearance of Stachybotrys chartarum spores in two strains of mice, BALB/c and C57BL/6J. To evaluate clearance, mice were intratracheally instilled with a suspension of radiolabeled S. chartarum spores or with unlabeled spores. The lungs of C57BL/6J mice showed more rapid spore clearance than the lungs of BALB/c mice, which correlated with increased levels of spore-associated radioactivity in the GI tracts of C57BL/6J as compared with BALB/c mice. To identify mechanisms responsible for mouse strain differences in spore clearance and previously described lung inflammatory responses, we exposed alveolar macrophages (AMs) lavaged from BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice to S. chartarum spores, S. chartarum spore toxin (SST), and satratoxin G (SG) in vitro. The S. chartarum spores were found to be highly toxic with most cells from either mouse strain being killed within 24 h when exposed to a spore:cell ratio of 1:75. The spores were more lethal to AMs from C57BL/6J than those from BALB/c mice. In mice, the SST elicited many of the same inflammatory responses as the spores in vivo, including AM recruitment, pulmonary hemorrhage, and cytokine production. Our data suggest that differences in pulmonary spore clearance may contribute to the differences in pulmonary responses to S. chartarum between BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice. Enhanced AM survival and subsequent macrophage-mediated inflammation may also contribute to the higher susceptibility of BALB/c mice to S. chartarum pulmonary effects. Analogous genetic differences among humans may contribute to reported variable sensitivity to S. chartarum. PMID:20385656

  15. The NASA Tournament Laboratory (NTL): Improving Data Access at PDS while Spreading Joy and Engaging Students through 16 Micro-Contests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMora, Andy; Raugh, A.; Erickson, K.; Grayzeck, E. J.; Knopf, W.; Morgan, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    NASA PDS hosts terabytes of valuable data from hundreds of data sources and spans decades of research. Data is stored on flat-file systems regulated through careful meta dictionaries. PDS's data is available to the public through its website which supports data searches through drill-down navigation. While the system returns data quickly, result sets in response to identical input differ depending on the drill-down path a user follows. To correct this Issue, to allow custom searching, and to improve general accessibility, PDS sought to create a new data structure and API, and to use them to build applications that are a joy to use and showcase the value of the data to students, teachers and citizens. PDS engaged TopCoder and Harvard Business School through the NTL to pursue these objectives in a pilot effort. Scope was limited to Small Bodies Node data. NTL analyzed data, proposed a solution, and implemented it through a series of micro-contests. Contest focused on different segments of the problem; conceptualization, architectural design, implementation, testing, etc. To demonstrate the utility of the completed solution, NTL developed web-based and mobile applications that can compare targets, regardless of mission. To further explore the potential of the solution NTL hosted "Mash-up" challenges that integrated the API with other publically available assets, to produce consumer and teaching applications, including an Augmented Reality iPad tool. Two contests were also posted to middle and high school students via the NoNameSite.com platform, and as a result of these contests, PDS/SBN has initiated a Facebook program. These contests defined and implemented a data warehouse with the necessary migration tools to transform legacy data, produced a public web interface for the new search, developed a public API, and produced four mobile applications that we expect to appeal to users both within and, without the academic community.

  16. Compressive viscoelasticity of freshly excised mouse skin is dependent on specimen thickness, strain level and rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin's mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin's viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s-1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity.

  17. Compressive Viscoelasticity of Freshly Excised Mouse Skin Is Dependent on Specimen Thickness, Strain Level and Rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuxiang; Marshall, Kara L.; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Gerling, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the skin’s mechanical properties are well characterized in tension, little work has been done in compression. Here, the viscoelastic properties of a population of mouse skin specimens (139 samples from 36 mice, aged 5 to 34 weeks) were characterized upon varying specimen thickness, as well as strain level and rate. Over the population, we observed the skin’s viscoelasticity to be quite variable, yet found systematic correlation of residual stress ratio with skin thickness and strain, and of relaxation time constants with strain rates. In particular, as specimen thickness ranged from 211 to 671 μm, we observed significant variation in both quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) parameters, the relaxation time constant (τ1 = 0.19 ± 0.10 s) and steady-state residual stress ratio (G∞ = 0.28 ± 0.13). Moreover, when τ1 was decoupled and fixed, we observed that G∞ positively correlated with skin thickness. Second, as steady-state stretch was increased (λ∞ from 0.22 to 0.81), we observed significant variation in both QLV parameters (τ1 = 0.26 ± 0.14 s, G∞ = 0.47 ± 0.17), and when τ1 was fixed, G∞ positively correlated with stretch level. Third, as strain rate was increased from 0.06 to 22.88 s−1, the median time constant τ1 varied from 1.90 to 0.31 s, and thereby negatively correlated with strain rate. These findings indicate that the natural range of specimen thickness, as well as experimental controls of compression level and rate, significantly influence measurements of skin viscoelasticity. PMID:25803703

  18. NTL9 Folding at Constant pH: The Importance of Electrostatic Interaction and pH Dependence.

    PubMed

    Contessoto, Vinícius G; de Oliveira, Vinícius M; de Carvalho, Sidney J; Oliveira, Leandro C; Leite, Vitor B P

    2016-07-12

    The folding process of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein L9 (NTL9) was investigated at constant-pH computer simulations. Evaluation of the role of electrostatic interaction during folding was carried out by including a Debye-Hückel potential into a Cα structure-based model (SBM). In this study, the charges of the ionizable residues and the electrostatic potential are susceptible to the solution conditions, such as pH and ionic strength, as well as to the presence of charged groups. Simulations were performed under different pHs, and the results were validated by comparing them with experimental values of pKa and with denaturation experiment data. Also, the free energy profiles, Φ-values, and folding routes were calculated for each condition. It was shown how charges vary along the folding under different pH, which is subject to different scenarios. This study reveals how simplified models can capture essential physical features, reproducing experimental results, and presenting the role of electrostatic interactions before, during, and after the transition state. PMID:27327651

  19. Improvements in Markov State Model Construction Reveal Many Non-Native Interactions in the Folding of NTL9

    PubMed Central

    Schwantes, Christian R.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2013-01-01

    Markov State Models (MSMs) provide an automated framework to investigate the dynamical properties of high-dimensional molecular simulations. These models can provide a human-comprehensible picture of the underlying process, and have been successfully used to study protein folding, protein aggregation, protein ligand binding, and other biophysical systems. The MSM requires the construction of a discrete state-space such that two points are in the same state if they can interconvert rapidly. In the following, we suggest an improved method, which utilizes second order Independent Components Analysis (also known as time-structure based Independent Components Analysis, or tICA), to construct the state-space. We apply this method to simulations of NTL9 (provided by Lindorff-Larsen et al. Science 2011), and show that the MSM is an improvement over previously built models using conventional distance metrics. Additionally, the resulting model provides insight into the role of non-native contacts by revealing many slow timescales associated with compact, non-native states. PMID:23750122

  20. The Relationship between PROP and Ethanol Preferences: An Evaluation of 4 Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    White, Theresa L.; Dishaw, Laura V.; Sheehe, Paul R.; Youngentob, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol’s taste attributes undoubtedly contribute to the development of drug preference. Ethanol’s taste is both sweet and bitter. Taster status for bitter 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) has been proposed as a genetic marker for alcoholism; however, human results are conflicting. We collected preference scores for both tastants in 4 mouse strains selected on the basis of previously reported taste preference, with the generally accepted idea that inbred mice show minimal within-strain variation. Eighty-eight male mice (22 per strain) participated. The strains were as follows: C57BL/6J, ethanol preferring; BALB/cJ, ethanol avoiding; SWR/J, PROP avoiding; and C3HeB/FeJ, PROP neutral. Using a brief-access (1-min trials) 2-bottle preference test, we assessed the taste response of each strain to PROP and ethanol on separate days. Although PROP avoiding versus neutral mice could be segregated into significantly different populations, this was not the case for ethanol avoiding versus preferring mice, and all strains showed high variability. On average, only BALB/cJ, SWR/J, and C3HeB/FeJ mice conformed to their literature-reported preferences; nonetheless, there were a substantial number of discordant animals. C57BL/6J did not conform to previous results, indicating that they are ethanol preferring. Finally, we did not observe a significant relationship between PROP and ethanol preferences across strains. The high variability per strain and the number of animals in disagreement with their respective literature-reported preference raise concerns regarding their utility for investigations underlying mechanisms of taste-mediated ingestive responses. Absent postingestive consequences, the brief-access results suggest a possible degree of previously masked polymorphisms in taste preferences or a more recent drift in underlying genetic factors. The absence of a relationship between PROP and ethanol indicates that the bitter quality in ethanol may be more highly related to other

  1. The relationship between nephron number, kidney size and body weight in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Inga J; Maina, Rita W; Gupta, Indra R

    2010-01-01

    While some reports in humans have shown that nephron number is positively correlated with height, body weight or kidney weight, other studies have not reproduced these findings. To understand the impact of genetic and environmental variation on these relationships, we examined whether nephron number correlates with body weight, kidney planar surface area, or kidney weight in two inbred mouse strains with contrasting kidney sizes but no overt renal pathology: C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6J. C3H/HeJ mice had smaller kidneys at birth and larger kidneys by adulthood, however there was no significant difference in nephron number between the two strains. We did observe a correlation between kidney size and body weight at birth and at adulthood for both strains. However, there was no relationship between nephron number and body weight or between nephron number and kidney size. From other studies, it appears that a greater than two-fold variation is required in each of these parameters in order to demonstrate these relationships, suggesting they are highly dependent on scale. Our results are therefore not surprising since there was a less than two-fold variation in each of the parameters examined. In summary, the relationship between nephron number and body or kidney size is most likely to be demonstrated when there is greater phenotypic variation either from genetic and/or environmental factors.

  2. Gliopathy of Demyelinating and Non-Demyelinating Strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Lawrence C.; Biswas, Kaushiki; Shindler, Kenneth S.; Nabar, Manasi; Stout, Marjorie; Hingley, Susan T.; Grinspan, Judith B.; Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Demyelination in the central nervous system induced by neurovirulent strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein, but it is not clear whether the mechanism of this disease pathology involves direct viral infection of oligodendrocytes. Detailed studies of glial cell tropism of MHV are presented, demonstrating that direct MHV infection of oligodendrocytes differs between demyelinating (RSA59) and non-demyelinating (RSMHV2) viral strains both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that direct injury of mature oligodendrocytes is an important mechanism of virus-induced demyelination. In vivo, RSA59 infection was identified in spinal cord gray and white matter, but infected oligodendrocytes were restricted to white matter. In contrast, RSMHV2 infection was restricted to gray matter neurons and was not localized to oligodendrocytes. In vitro, RSA59 can infect both oligodendrocyte precursors and differentiated oligodendrocytes, whereas RSMHV2 can infect oligodendrocyte precursors but not differentiated oligodendrocytes. Viral spreading through axonal means to white matter and release of the demyelinating strain MHV at the nerve end is critical for oligodendrocytes infection and subsequent demyelination. Understanding the mechanisms by which known viruses effect demyelination in this animal model has important therapeutic implications in the treatment of human demyelinating disease. PMID:26733813

  3. Polymorphisms in the taste receptor gene (Tas1r3) region are associated with saccharin preference in 30 mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Reed, D R; Li, S; Li, X; Huang, L; Tordoff, M G; Starling-Roney, R; Taniguchi, K; West, D B; Ohmen, J D; Beauchamp, G K; Bachmanov, A A

    2004-01-28

    The results of recent studies suggest that the mouse Sac (saccharin preference) locus is identical to the Tas1r3 (taste receptor) gene. The goal of this study was to identify Tas1r3 sequence variants associated with saccharin preference in a large number of inbred mouse strains. Initially, we sequenced approximately 6.7 kb of the Tas1r3 gene and its flanking regions from six inbred mouse strains with high and low saccharin preference, including the strains in which the Sac alleles were described originally (C57BL/6J, Sac(b); DBA/2J, Sac(d)). Of the 89 sequence variants detected among these six strains, eight polymorphic sites were significantly associated with preferences for 1.6 mm saccharin. Next, each of these eight variant sites were genotyped in 24 additional mouse strains. Analysis of the genotype-phenotype associations in all 30 strains showed the strongest association with saccharin preference at three sites: nucleotide (nt) -791 (3 bp insertion/deletion), nt +135 (Ser45Ser), and nt +179 (Ile60Thr). We measured Tas1r3 gene expression, transcript size, and T1R3 immunoreactivity in the taste tissue of two inbred mouse strains with different Tas1r3 haplotypes and saccharin preferences. The results of these experiments suggest that the polymorphisms associated with saccharin preference do not act by blocking gene expression, changing alternative splicing, or interfering with protein translation in taste tissue. The amino acid substitution (Ile60Thr) may influence the ability of the protein to form dimers or bind sweeteners. Here, we present data for future studies directed to experimentally confirm the function of these polymorphisms and highlight some of the difficulties of identifying specific DNA sequence variants that underlie quantitative trait loci. PMID:14749438

  4. Attention to Background Strain Is Essential for Metabolic Research: C57BL/6 and the International Knockout Mouse Consortium.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Danielle A; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2016-01-01

    The International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) introduces its targeted constructs into C57BL/6N embryonic stem cells. However, breeding with a Cre-recombinase and/or Flp-recombinase mouse is required for the generation of a null allele with the IKMC cassette. Many recombinase strains are in the C57BL/6J background, resulting in knockout animals on a mixed strain background. This can lead to variability in metabolic data and the use of improper control groups. While C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J are derived from the same parental C57BL/6 strain, there are key genotypic and phenotypic differences between these substrains. Many researchers may not even be aware of these differences, as the shorthand C57BL/6 is often used to describe both substrains. We found that 58% of articles involving genetically modified mouse models did not completely address background strain. This review will describe these two substrains and highlight the importance of separate consideration in mouse model development. Our aim is to increase awareness of this issue in the diabetes research community and to provide practical strategies to enable researchers to avoid mixed strain animals when using IKMC knockout mice. PMID:26696638

  5. Attention to Background Strain Is Essential for Metabolic Research: C57BL/6 and the International Knockout Mouse Consortium.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Danielle A; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2016-01-01

    The International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) introduces its targeted constructs into C57BL/6N embryonic stem cells. However, breeding with a Cre-recombinase and/or Flp-recombinase mouse is required for the generation of a null allele with the IKMC cassette. Many recombinase strains are in the C57BL/6J background, resulting in knockout animals on a mixed strain background. This can lead to variability in metabolic data and the use of improper control groups. While C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J are derived from the same parental C57BL/6 strain, there are key genotypic and phenotypic differences between these substrains. Many researchers may not even be aware of these differences, as the shorthand C57BL/6 is often used to describe both substrains. We found that 58% of articles involving genetically modified mouse models did not completely address background strain. This review will describe these two substrains and highlight the importance of separate consideration in mouse model development. Our aim is to increase awareness of this issue in the diabetes research community and to provide practical strategies to enable researchers to avoid mixed strain animals when using IKMC knockout mice.

  6. A comparative phenotypic and genomic analysis of C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mouse inbred line C57BL/6J is widely used in mouse genetics and its genome has been incorporated into many genetic reference populations. More recently large initiatives such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) are using the C57BL/6N mouse strain to generate null alleles for all mouse genes. Hence both strains are now widely used in mouse genetics studies. Here we perform a comprehensive genomic and phenotypic analysis of the two strains to identify differences that may influence their underlying genetic mechanisms. Results We undertake genome sequence comparisons of C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N to identify SNPs, indels and structural variants, with a focus on identifying all coding variants. We annotate 34 SNPs and 2 indels that distinguish C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N coding sequences, as well as 15 structural variants that overlap a gene. In parallel we assess the comparative phenotypes of the two inbred lines utilizing the EMPReSSslim phenotyping pipeline, a broad based assessment encompassing diverse biological systems. We perform additional secondary phenotyping assessments to explore other phenotype domains and to elaborate phenotype differences identified in the primary assessment. We uncover significant phenotypic differences between the two lines, replicated across multiple centers, in a number of physiological, biochemical and behavioral systems. Conclusions Comparison of C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N demonstrates a range of phenotypic differences that have the potential to impact upon penetrance and expressivity of mutational effects in these strains. Moreover, the sequence variants we identify provide a set of candidate genes for the phenotypic differences observed between the two strains. PMID:23902802

  7. Improved generation of germline-competent embryonic stem cell lines from inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Schoonjans, Luc; Kreemers, Veerle; Danloy, Sophie; Moreadith, Randall W; Laroche, Yves; Collen, Désiré

    2003-01-01

    Genetically altered mice may exhibit highly variable phenotypes due to the variation in genetic background, which can only be circumvented by generation of inbred, isogenic gene-targeted and control mice. Here we report that an embryonic stem (ES) cell culture medium conditioned by a rabbit fibroblast cell line transduced with genomic rabbit leukemia inhibitory factor allows efficient derivation and maintenance of ES cell lines from all of 10 inbred mouse strains tested, including some that were presumed to be nonpermissive for ES cell derivation (129/SvEv, 129/SvJ, C57BL/6N, C57BL/6JOla, CBA/CaOla, DBA/2N, DBA/1Ola, C3H/HeN, BALB/c, and FVB/N). Germline transmission was established by blastocyst injection of established ES cell lines after 10 or more passages from all of seven strains tested (129/SvJ, C57BL/6N, C57BL/6JOla, DBA/2N, DBA/1Ola, BALB/c, and FVB/N), by diploid aggregation of ES cell lines from all of four strains tested (129/SvEv, C57BL/6N, CBA/ CaOla, and FVB/N), or by tetraploid aggregation of ES cell lines from all of three strains tested (129/SvEv, C57BL/6N, and CBA/CaOla). Thus, these inbred ES cell lines may constitute useful tools to derive gene-targeted mice and isogenic controls in selected genetic backgrounds.

  8. Establishment of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in resistant, sensitive, and immunodeficient mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ellison, A R; Yang, L; Voytek, C; Margolis, T P

    2000-03-01

    Productive infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 is limited by both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether these mechanisms also play a role in the establishment of latent HSV infection. First we examined the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), interferon-gamma knockout (GKO), and beige (a strain deficient in natural killer cell activity) mice following ocular inoculation with HSV. Although infection of SCID mice was invariably lethal, we consistently found latently infected neurons in the TG of these animals at 2-4 days postinoculation. HSV infection of GKO and beige mice, while not lethal, was characterized by a greater number of productively infected TG neurons and/or a delay in the time to peak productive infection compared to C57BL/6 controls. However, as assayed by both in situ hybridization for LAT expression and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) for viral DNA, we found that HSV established a latent infection in GKO and beige mice as efficiently as in C57BL/6 controls. We subsequently examined the TG of "HSV-sensitive" strains of mice (Swiss-Webster, CBA, and BALB/c) following ocular infection with HSV. At the peak of acute ganglionic infection the number of productively infected TG neurons in each of these mouse strains was about sevenfold greater than in the "HSV-resistant" strain C57BL/6, consistent with previously reported differences in susceptibility to lethal challenge with HSV. However, as assayed by both in situ hybridization for LAT and Q-PCR for viral DNA, we found that HSV established a latent infection in Swiss-Webster, CBA, and BALB/c mice as efficiently as in C57BL/6 controls. We conclude that HSV efficiently establishes latent infection in the TG of mice in the absence of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that are essential for limiting productive viral infection.

  9. Marine Mammal Brucella Reference Strains Are Attenuated in a BALB/c Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Arias, Maykel A; Pardo, Julián; Álvarez, María Pilar; Alcaraz, Ana; Godfroid, Jacques; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution with numerous animal host species. Since the novel isolation of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in 1994 the bacteria have been isolated from various marine mammal hosts. The marine mammal reference strains Brucella pinnipedialis 12890 (harbour seal, Phoca vitulina) and Brucella ceti 12891 (harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena) were included in genus Brucella in 2007, however, their pathogenicity in the mouse model is pending. Herein this is evaluated in BALB/c mice with Brucella suis 1330 as a control. Both marine mammal strains were attenuated, however, B. ceti was present at higher levels than B. pinnipedialis in blood, spleen and liver throughout the infection, in addition B. suis and B. ceti were isolated from brains and faeces at times with high levels of bacteraemia. In B. suis-infected mice serum cytokines peaked at day 7. In B. pinnipedialis-infected mice, levels were similar, but peaked predominantly at day 3 and an earlier peak in spleen weight likewise implied an earlier response. The inflammatory response induced pathology in the spleen and liver. In B. ceti-infected mice, most serum cytokine levels were comparable to those in uninfected mice, consistent with a limited inflammatory response, which also was indicated by restricted spleen and liver pathology. Specific immune responses against all three strains were detected in vitro after stimulation of splenocytes from infected mice with the homologous heat-killed brucellae. Antibody responses in vivo were also induced by the three brucellae. The immunological pattern of B. ceti in combination with persistence in organs and limited pathology has heretofore not been described for other brucellae. These two marine mammal wildtype strains show an attenuated pattern in BALB/c mice only previously described for Brucella neotomea. PMID:26959235

  10. Marine Mammal Brucella Reference Strains Are Attenuated in a BALB/c Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H.; Arias, Maykel A.; Pardo, Julián; Álvarez, María Pilar; Alcaraz, Ana; Godfroid, Jacques; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution with numerous animal host species. Since the novel isolation of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in 1994 the bacteria have been isolated from various marine mammal hosts. The marine mammal reference strains Brucella pinnipedialis 12890 (harbour seal, Phoca vitulina) and Brucella ceti 12891 (harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena) were included in genus Brucella in 2007, however, their pathogenicity in the mouse model is pending. Herein this is evaluated in BALB/c mice with Brucella suis 1330 as a control. Both marine mammal strains were attenuated, however, B. ceti was present at higher levels than B. pinnipedialis in blood, spleen and liver throughout the infection, in addition B. suis and B. ceti were isolated from brains and faeces at times with high levels of bacteraemia. In B. suis-infected mice serum cytokines peaked at day 7. In B. pinnipedialis-infected mice, levels were similar, but peaked predominantly at day 3 and an earlier peak in spleen weight likewise implied an earlier response. The inflammatory response induced pathology in the spleen and liver. In B. ceti-infected mice, most serum cytokine levels were comparable to those in uninfected mice, consistent with a limited inflammatory response, which also was indicated by restricted spleen and liver pathology. Specific immune responses against all three strains were detected in vitro after stimulation of splenocytes from infected mice with the homologous heat-killed brucellae. Antibody responses in vivo were also induced by the three brucellae. The immunological pattern of B. ceti in combination with persistence in organs and limited pathology has heretofore not been described for other brucellae. These two marine mammal wildtype strains show an attenuated pattern in BALB/c mice only previously described for Brucella neotomea. PMID:26959235

  11. Marine Mammal Brucella Reference Strains Are Attenuated in a BALB/c Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Arias, Maykel A; Pardo, Julián; Álvarez, María Pilar; Alcaraz, Ana; Godfroid, Jacques; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution with numerous animal host species. Since the novel isolation of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in 1994 the bacteria have been isolated from various marine mammal hosts. The marine mammal reference strains Brucella pinnipedialis 12890 (harbour seal, Phoca vitulina) and Brucella ceti 12891 (harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena) were included in genus Brucella in 2007, however, their pathogenicity in the mouse model is pending. Herein this is evaluated in BALB/c mice with Brucella suis 1330 as a control. Both marine mammal strains were attenuated, however, B. ceti was present at higher levels than B. pinnipedialis in blood, spleen and liver throughout the infection, in addition B. suis and B. ceti were isolated from brains and faeces at times with high levels of bacteraemia. In B. suis-infected mice serum cytokines peaked at day 7. In B. pinnipedialis-infected mice, levels were similar, but peaked predominantly at day 3 and an earlier peak in spleen weight likewise implied an earlier response. The inflammatory response induced pathology in the spleen and liver. In B. ceti-infected mice, most serum cytokine levels were comparable to those in uninfected mice, consistent with a limited inflammatory response, which also was indicated by restricted spleen and liver pathology. Specific immune responses against all three strains were detected in vitro after stimulation of splenocytes from infected mice with the homologous heat-killed brucellae. Antibody responses in vivo were also induced by the three brucellae. The immunological pattern of B. ceti in combination with persistence in organs and limited pathology has heretofore not been described for other brucellae. These two marine mammal wildtype strains show an attenuated pattern in BALB/c mice only previously described for Brucella neotomea.

  12. Altered sensitivity to excitotoxic cell death and glutamate receptor expression between two commonly studied mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Rozzy; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic synapse function have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many different neurological disorders including ischemia, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. While studying glutamate receptor function in juvenile Batten disease on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds, we noticed differences unlikely to be due to mutation difference alone. We report here that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures from C57BL/6J mice are more sensitive to NMDA-mediated cell death. Moreover, sensitivity to AMPA-mediated excitotoxicity is more variable and is dependent upon the treatment conditions and age of the cultures. Glutamate receptor surface expression levels examined in vitro by in situ ELISA and in vivo by Western blot in surface cross-linked cerebellar samples indicated that these differences in sensitivity are likely due to strain-dependent differences in cell surface receptor expression levels. We propose that differences in glutamate receptor expression and in excitotoxic vulnerability should be taken into consideration in the context of characterizing disease models on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds. PMID:20544821

  13. Differences in GABA-induced chloride ion influx in brain of inbred mouse strains

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, O.; Chiu, T.H.; Rosenberg, H.C.

    1986-03-01

    Audiogenic seizure-susceptible (AS) mice (DBA2J) are a widely used model of epilepsy. The precise pathophysiology of this mouse strain is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms was a difference in GABA/BZ receptor affinity and population from that of audiogenic seizure resistant (ASR) mice. This study attempted to determine the difference in function of GABA/BZ receptor between DBA2J (AS) and C57BL6J (ASR) mice by directly measuring the GABA-induced chloride ion (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) influx in twice washed crude brain homogenates. /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx was terminated by ice-cold buffer and collected by filtration. A concentration range of 2-1000 ..mu..M GABA and two age-matched groups (20-22 days and 40-42 days) were used. GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx was dose-dependent, and brain homogenates from DBA2J mice (20-22 days) were less sensitive to GABA-induced Cl/sup -/ ion influx than C57BL6J mice at both age groups. However, in older DBA2J mice (40-42 days), the sensitivity to GABA was intermediate between that of the younger AS mice and the control ASR mice. No significant difference in basal influx of Cl/sup -/ was observed between age groups and mouse strains, nor was there any significant difference between 20-22 days old and 40-42 days old C57BL6J mice. In conclusion, this study had demonstrated a malfunction may recover with age.

  14. INDUCTION OF DNA ADDUCTS, TUMORS, AND KI-RAS ONCOGENE MUTATIONS IN STRAIN A/J MOUSE LUNG BY IP. ADMINISTRATION OF DIBENZ[A,H]ANTHRACENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of DNA adducts, tumors, and Ki-ras oncogene mutations in strain AlJ mouse lung by ip. administration of dibenz[a,h]anthracene

    Previous studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (P AH) induced lung tumors in the strain NJ mouse model system have demonstrated qua...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Turicibacter sp. Strain H121, Isolated from the Feces of a Contaminated Germ-Free Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Auchtung, T. A.; Holder, M. E.; Gesell, J. R.; Ajami, N. J.; Duarte, R. T. D.; Itoh, K.; Caspi, R. R.; Petrosino, J. F.; Horai, R.

    2016-01-01

    Turicibacter bacteria are commonly detected in the gastrointestinal tracts and feces of humans and animals, but their phylogeny, ecological role, and pathogenic potential remain unclear. We present here the first complete genome sequence of Turicibacter sp. strain H121, which was isolated from the feces of a mouse line contaminated following germ-free derivation. PMID:27013036

  16. MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, elicits circling behavior in the genetically inbred Balb/c mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Burket, Jessica A; Cannon, William R; Jacome, Luis F; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2010-11-20

    The Balb/c mouse is behaviorally hypersensitive to effects of MK-801 (dizocilpine), a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, and displays impaired sociability. In the current investigation, MK-801-elicited circling behavior in the genetically inbred Balb/c mouse strain that was either not or only minimally observed in similarly treated outbred Swiss-Webster mice. The ability of compounds to attenuate the intensity of MK-801-elicited circling behavior in the Balb/c mouse strain may serve as a preclinical screening paradigm for identifying effective NMDA receptor agonist interventions in the intact animal; ideally, these compounds would have therapeutic value in neuropsychiatric disorders associated with impaired sociability, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

  17. TRPV1 expression level in isolectin B₄-positive neurons contributes to mouse strain difference in cutaneous thermal nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kentaro; Ye, Yi; Viet, Chi T; Dang, Dongmin; Schmidt, Brian L

    2015-05-01

    Differential thermal nociception across inbred mouse strains has genetic determinants. Thermal nociception is largely attributed to the heat/capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1); however, the contribution of this channel to the genetics of thermal nociception has not been revealed. In this study we compared TRPV1 expression levels and electrophysiological properties in primary sensory neurons and thermal nociceptive behaviors between two (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) inbred mouse strains. Using immunofluorescence and patch-clamp physiology methods, we demonstrated that TRPV1 expression was significantly higher in isolectin B4 (IB4)-positive trigeminal sensory neurons of C57BL/6 relative to BALB/c; the expression in IB4-negative neurons was similar between the strains. Furthermore, using electrophysiological cell classification (current signature method), we showed differences between the two strains in capsaicin sensitivity in IB4-positive neuronal cell types 2 and 13, which were previously reported as skin nociceptors. Otherwise electrophysiological membrane properties of the classified cell types were similar in the two mouse strains. In publicly available nocifensive behavior data and our own behavior data from the using the two mouse strains, C57BL/6 exhibited higher sensitivity to heat stimulation than BALB/c, independent of sex and anatomical location of thermal testing (the tail, hind paw, and whisker pad). The TRPV1-selective antagonist JNJ-17203212 inhibited thermal nociception in both strains; however, removing IB4-positive trigeminal sensory neurons with IB4-conjugated saporin inhibited thermal nociception on the whisker pad in C57BL/6 but not in BALB/c. These results suggest that TRPV1 expression levels in IB4-positive type 2 and 13 neurons contributed to differential thermal nociception in skin of C57BL/6 compared with BALB/c.

  18. 129-Derived Mouse Strains Express an Unstable but Catalytically Active DNA Polymerase Iota Variant

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Annie; Delbos, Frédéric; Gelot, Camille; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Mice derived from the 129 strain have a nonsense codon mutation in exon 2 of the polymerase iota (Polι) gene and are therefore considered Polι deficient. When we amplified Polι mRNA from 129/SvJ or 129/Ola testes, only a small fraction of the full-length cDNA contained the nonsense mutation; the major fraction corresponded to a variant Polι isoform lacking exon 2. Polι mRNA lacking exon 2 contains an open reading frame, and the corresponding protein was detected using a polyclonal antibody raised against the C terminus of the murine Polι protein. The identity of the corresponding protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. Although the variant protein was expressed at only 5 to 10% of the level of wild-type Polι, it retained de novo DNA synthesis activity, the capacity to form replication foci following UV irradiation, and the ability to rescue UV light sensitivity in Polι−/− embryonic fibroblasts derived from a new, fully deficient Polι knockout (KO) mouse line. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of 129-derived male mice with Velcade, a drug that inhibits proteasome function, stabilized and restored a substantial amount of the variant Polι in these animals, indicating that its turnover is controlled by the proteasome. An analysis of two xeroderma pigmentosum-variant (XPV) cases corresponding to missense mutants of Polη, a related translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase in the same family, similarly showed a destabilization of the catalytically active mutant protein by the proteasome. Collectively, these data challenge the prevailing hypothesis that 129-derived strains of mice are completely deficient in Polι activity. The data also document, both for 129-derived mouse strains and for some XPV patients, new cases of genetic defects corresponding to the destabilization of an otherwise functional protein, the phenotype of which is reversible by proteasome inhibition. PMID:26124279

  19. Opioid-dependent regulation of high and low fear responses in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Szklarczyk, Klaudia; Korostynski, Michal; Cieslak, Przemyslaw Eligiusz; Wawrzczak-Bargiela, Agnieszka; Przewlocki, Ryszard

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the susceptibility or resilience to trauma-related disorders remain incompletely understood. Opioids modulate emotional learning, but the roles of specific receptors are unclear. Here, we aimed to analyze the contribution of the opioid system to fear responses in two inbred mouse strains exhibiting distinct behavioral phenotypes. SWR/J and C57BL/6J mice were subjected to five consecutive electric footshocks (1mA each), and the contextual freezing time was measured. Stress-induced alterations in gene expression were analyzed in the amygdala and the hippocampus. In both strains, the fear response was modulated using pharmacological tools. SWR/J mice did not develop conditioned fear but exhibited increased transcriptional expression of Pdyn and Penk in the amygdala region. Blocking opioid receptors prior to the footshocks using naltrexone (2 mg/kg) or naltrindole (5 mg/kg) increased the freezing responses in these animals. The C57BL/6J strain displayed high conditioned fear, although no alteration in the mRNA abundance of genes encoding opioid precursors was observed. Double-injection of morphine (20 mg/kg) following stress and upon context re-exposure prevented the enhancement of freezing. Moreover, selective delta and kappa agonists caused a reduction in conditioned fear responses. To summarize, the increased expression of the Pdyn and Penk genes corresponded to reduced intensity of fear responses. Blockade of the endogenous opioid system restored freezing behavior in stress-resistant animals. The pharmacological stimulation of the kappa and delta opioid receptors in stress-susceptible individuals may alleviate fear. Thus, subtype-selective opioid receptor agonists may protect against the development of trauma-related disorders.

  20. Cyclic mechanical strain maintains Nanog expression through PI3K/Akt signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Rie; Akimoto, Takayuki; Hong, Zhang; Ushida, Takashi

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical strain has been reported to affect the proliferation/differentiation of many cell types; however, the effects of mechanotransduction on self-renewal as well as pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical strain on mouse ES cell fate, we examined the expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency as well as Nanog-associated intracellular signaling during uniaxial cyclic mechanical strain. The mouse ES cell line, CCE was plated onto elastic membranes, and we applied 10% strain at 0.17 Hz. The expression of Nanog was reduced during ES cell differentiation in response to the withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF); however, two days of cyclic mechanical strain attenuated this reduction of Nanog expression. On the other hand, the cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling, which is reported as an upstream of Nanog transcription. The cyclic mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Furthermore, cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, also inhibited the mechanical strain-induced increase in phospho-Akt. These findings imply that mechanical force plays a role in regulating Nanog expression in ES cells through the actin cytoskeleton-PI3K-Akt signaling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of 'stemness' was reduced during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain attenuated the reduction of Nanog expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling and mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor and an inhibitor of actin polymerization.

  1. Exome sequencing and arrayCGH detection of gene sequence and copy number variation between ILS and ISS mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Laura; Dickens, C Michael; Anderson, Nathan; Davis, Jonathan; Bennett, Beth; Radcliffe, Richard A; Sikela, James M

    2014-06-01

    It has been well documented that genetic factors can influence predisposition to develop alcoholism. While the underlying genomic changes may be of several types, two of the most common and disease associated are copy number variations (CNVs) and sequence alterations of protein coding regions. The goal of this study was to identify CNVs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms that occur in gene coding regions that may play a role in influencing the risk of an individual developing alcoholism. Toward this end, two mouse strains were used that have been selectively bred based on their differential sensitivity to alcohol: the Inbred long sleep (ILS) and Inbred short sleep (ISS) mouse strains. Differences in initial response to alcohol have been linked to risk for alcoholism, and the ILS/ISS strains are used to investigate the genetics of initial sensitivity to alcohol. Array comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) and exome sequencing were conducted to identify CNVs and gene coding sequence differences, respectively, between ILS and ISS mice. Mouse arrayCGH was performed using catalog Agilent 1 × 244 k mouse arrays. Subsequently, exome sequencing was carried out using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument. ArrayCGH detected 74 CNVs that were strain-specific (38 ILS/36 ISS), including several ISS-specific deletions that contained genes implicated in brain function and neurotransmitter release. Among several interesting coding variations detected by exome sequencing was the gain of a premature stop codon in the alpha-amylase 2B (AMY2B) gene specifically in the ILS strain. In total, exome sequencing detected 2,597 and 1,768 strain-specific exonic gene variants in the ILS and ISS mice, respectively. This study represents the most comprehensive and detailed genomic comparison of ILS and ISS mouse strains to date. The two complementary genome-wide approaches identified strain-specific CNVs and gene coding sequence variations that should provide strong candidates to

  2. Microarray analysis of gene expression in mouse (strain 129) embryonic stem cells after typical synthetic musk exposure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiachen; Li, Ming; Jiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic musks are widely used in personal-care products and can readily accumulate in the adipose tissue, breast milk, and blood of humans. In this study, the Affymetrix Mouse Genome GeneChip was used to identify alterations in gene expression of embryonic stem cells from the 129 strain of the laboratory mouse after treatment with the synthetic musk tonalide (AHTN). Among the 45,037 transcripts in the microarray, 2,879 genes were differentially expressed. According to the microarray analysis, the potential influence of AHTN on the development to embryo should be of concern, and the toxicological effects of it and related musk compounds should be studied further.

  3. Differential effects of acute morphine administrations on polymorphonuclear cell metabolism in various mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, P; Tavazzi, B; Gaziano, R; Lazzarino, G; Casalinuovo, I A; Di Pierro, D; Garaci, E

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows that an acute morphine treatment dose-dependently alters the energetic and oxidative metabolism of polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained from BALB/c and DBA/2 mice, while phagocytic cells from C57BL/6 were not affected. In sensitive mouse strains, i.e. BALB/c and DBA/2, morphine decreased both ATP concentration and energy charge potential. At the same time, ATP catabolic products, i.e. nucleosides (inosine+adenosine) and oxypurines (hypoxanthine+xanthine+uric acid), significantly increased, indicating an imbalance between energy production and consumption. Morphine treatment also induced malondialdehyde and superoxide anions production in leukocyte cells from sensitive mice. The opiate antagonist naloxone blocked morphine-induced modifications by the lower morphine dose. The same parameters in cells from C57BL/6 mice were not affected. These findings confirm that: i) the phagocytic cells are an important target for the in vivo effects of morphine, and ii) the genotype-dependent variation influences the immunological responsiveness to opiates.

  4. Identification of sdiA-regulated genes in a mouse commensal strain of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Sabag-Daigle, Anice; Dyszel, Jessica L.; Gonzalez, Juan F.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria determine their population density using quorum sensing. The most intensively studied mechanism of quorum sensing utilizes proteins of the LuxI family to synthesize a signaling molecule of the acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) type, and a protein of the LuxR family to bind AHL and regulate transcription. Genes regulated by quorum sensing often encode functions that are most effective when a group of bacteria are working cooperatively (e.g., luminescence, biofilm formation, host interactions). Bacteria in the Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, and Enterobacter genera do not encode an AHL synthase but they do encode an AHL receptor of the LuxR family, SdiA. Instead of detecting their own AHL synthesis, these organisms use SdiA to detect the AHLs synthesized by other bacterial species. In this study, we used a genetic screen to identify AHL-responsive genes in a commensal Enterobacter cloacae strain that was isolated from a laboratory mouse. The genes include a putative type VI secretion system, copA (a copper transporter), and fepE (extends O-antigen chain length). A new transposon mutagenesis strategy and suicide vectors were used to construct an sdiA mutant of E. cloacae. The AHL-responsiveness of all fusions was entirely sdiA-dependent, although some genes were regulated by sdiA in the absence of AHL. PMID:26075189

  5. Regeneration of the ear after wounding in different mouse strains is dependent on the severity of wound trauma.

    PubMed

    Rajnoch, Charissa; Ferguson, Sharon; Metcalfe, Anthony D; Herrick, Sarah E; Willis, Hayley S; Ferguson, Mark W J

    2003-02-01

    The replacement and restoration of tissue mass after organ damage or injury in adult higher vertebrates is critical to the architecture and function of the organ. If replacement occurs with scar tissue, this often results in adverse effects on function and growth as well as an undesirable cosmetic appearance. However, certain mammals, such as the MRL/MpJ mouse, have shown a restricted capacity for regeneration, rather than scar tissue formation, after an excisional ear punch wound. To investigate the changes in tissue architecture leading to ear wound closure, initial ear wounding studies with a 2-mm clinical biopsy punch were performed on MRL/MpJ mice, by using C57BL/6 mice as a nonregenerative control strain. In contrast to previously reported studies on mouse ear regeneration, we observed that C57BL/6 mice in fact showed a limited regenerative capacity. One explanation for this difference could be attributed to the method of wounding used; both previous studies on mouse ear regeneration used a thumb punch, whereas our approach was to use a clinical biopsy punch. This approach led us to further investigate whether the severity of trauma applied influenced the rate of wound healing. We, therefore, compared the effects of the sharp clinical biopsy punch with that of a cruder thumb punch, and introduced a third strain of mouse, Balb/c, known to be a slow-healing strain. A new method to quantify ear punch hole closure was developed and a histologic investigation conducted up to 4 months after wounding. Image analysis data showed a reduction in original ear wound area of 85% in MRL/MpJ mice at 4 weeks and of 91.7% over 4 months by using a biopsy punch. In contrast, the crude thumb punch methodology resulted in an increase in wound area of up to 58% in Balb/c ears; thought to be due to increased necrosis of the wound site. All biopsy-punched wound areas plateaued in healing between days 28 and 112. Only 5 of 80 MRL/MpJ mouse ears showed no residual holes

  6. Modelling MS: Chronic-Relapsing EAE in the NOD/Lt Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Dang, Phuc T; Bui, Quyen; D'Souza, Claretta S; Orian, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    Modelling complex disorders presents considerable challenges, and multiple sclerosis (MS) is no exception to this rule. The aetiology of MS is unknown, and its pathophysiology is poorly understood. Moreover, the last two decades have witnessed a dramatic revision of the long-held view of MS as an inflammatory demyelinating white matter disease. Instead, it is now regarded as a global central nervous system (CNS) disorder with a neurodegenerative component. Currently, there is no animal model recapitulating MS immunopathogenesis. Available models are based on autoimmune-mediated demyelination, denoted experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or virally or chemically induced demyelination. Of these, the EAE model has been the most commonly used. It has been extensively improved since its first description and now exists as a number of variants, including genetically modified and humanized versions. Nonetheless, EAE is a distinct disease, and each variant models only certain facets of MS. Whilst the search for more refined MS models must continue, it is important to further explore where mechanisms underlying EAE provide proof-of-principle for those driving MS pathogenesis. EAE variants generated with the myelin component myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) have emerged as the preferred ones, because in this particular variant disease is associated with both T- and B-cell effector mechanisms, together with demyelination. MOG-induced EAE in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain exhibits a chronic-relapsing EAE clinical profile and high disease incidence. We describe the generation of this variant, its contribution to the understanding of MS immune and pathogenetic mechanisms and potential for evaluation of candidate therapies.

  7. A novel spontaneous mutation of BCAR3 results in extrusion cataracts in CF#1 mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tomohiro; Nakamori, Taketo; Nagai, Hiroaki; Takeshita, Ai; Kusakabe, Ken-Takeshi; Okada, Toshiya

    2016-10-01

    A substrain of mice originating from the CF#1 strain (an outbred colony) reared at Osaka Prefecture University (CF#1/lr mice) develops cataracts beginning at 4 weeks of age. Affected mice were fully viable and fertile and developed cataracts by 14 weeks of age. Histologically, CF#1/lr mice showed vacuolation of the lens cortex, swollen lens fibers, lens rupture and nuclear extrusion. To elucidate the mode of inheritance, we analyzed heterozygous mutant hybrids generated from CF#1/lr mice and wild-type BALB/c mice. None of the heterozygous mutants were affected, and the ratio of affected to unaffected mice was 1:3 among the offspring of the heterozygous mutants. For the initial genome-wide screening and further mapping, we used affected progeny of CF#1/lr × (CF#1/lr × BALB/c) mice. We concluded that the cataracts in CF#1/lr mice are inherited through an autosomal recessive mutation and that the mutant gene is located on mouse chromosome 3 between D3Mit79 and D3Mit216. In this region, we identified 8 genes associated with ocular disease. All 8 genes were sequenced and a novel point mutation (1 bp insertion of cytosine) in exon 7 of the Bcar3 gene was identified. This mutation produced a premature stop codon and a truncated protein. In conclusion, we have identified the first spontaneous mutation in the Bcar3 gene associated with lens extrusion cataracts. This novel cataract model may provide further knowledge of the molecular biology of cataractogenesis and the function of the BCAR3 protein. PMID:27364350

  8. Comparative analysis of genetically engineered immunodeficient mouse strains as recipients for human myoblast transplantation.

    PubMed

    Silva-Barbosa, Suse D; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Di Santo, James P; Mouly, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    The development of an optimized animal model for the in vivo analysis of human muscle cells remains an important goal in the search of therapy for muscular dystrophy. Here we examined the efficiency of human myoblast xenografts in three distinct immunodeficient mouse models. We found that different conditioning regimes used to provoke host muscle regeneration (i.e., cardiotoxin versus cryodamage) had a marked impact on xenograft success. Tibialis anterior muscle of Rag2-, Rag-/gammac-, and Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice was treated by cardiotoxin or cryodamage, submitted to enzymatic digestion, and analyzed by cytofluorometry to quantitate inflammatory cells. Human myoblasts were injected into pretreated muscles from immunodeficient recipients and the cell engraftment evaluated by immunocytochemistry, 4-8 weeks after transplantation. Donor cell differentiation and dispersion within the host muscles was also investigated. Host regeneration in cardiotoxin-treated mice was accompanied by a higher inflammatory cell infiltration when compared to that induced by cryodamage. Accordingly, when compared to the cardiotoxin group, more human myogenic cells were found after cryodamage. When the distinct immunodeficient mice were compared, we found that the alymphoid strain lacking the complement component C5 (Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice) was the most efficient host for human muscle xenografts, when compared with C5(+)Rag-/gammac- mice or Rag- mice. Our results demonstrate that cryolesion-conditioned muscles of Rag-/gammac-/C5- mice provide the best environment for long-term in vivo human myoblast differentiation, opening the way for a novel approach to study the pathophysiology of human muscle disorders. PMID:16285254

  9. Learning, memory and search strategies of inbred mouse strains with different visual abilities in the Barnes maze.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Timothy P; Savoie, Vicki; Brown, Richard E

    2011-01-20

    Visuo-spatial learning and memory were assessed in male and female mice of 13 inbred strains on a small diameter mouse version of the Barnes maze surrounded by a wall and intra-maze visual cues. Mice completed acquisition and reversal training to assess learning, followed by a probe test to assess memory for the spatial location of the escape hole. The C57BL/6J and CAST/EiJ strains showed better learning performance than the other strains. A/J and 129/SvImJ strains showed poor learning performance, which may be due to their low rates of exploration. No differences in memory were found between strains in the probe test. Males showed better learning performance than females in the DBA/2J and C3H/HeJ strains, but there were no sex differences in the other strains. However, mice may not have used visuo-spatial cues to locate the escape hole in this maze, as (1) all strains primarily used the non-spatial serial/thigmotaxic search strategy, (2) no strains showed a reversal effect when the escape hole location was moved, and (3) learning and memory performance were not correlated with measures of visual ability. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance indicated that mice with good visual ability performed better than mice with poor visual ability, but the effect sizes were small. The small diameter of the maze and the presence of a wall around the edge of the maze may promote thigmotaxis in mice, increasing the use of a non-visual search strategy, thereby reducing the influence of vision on performance and decreasing the sensitivity of this maze design to detect strain differences in visuo-spatial learning and memory. These results indicate that the design of the Barnes maze has a significant effect on learning and memory processes.

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Kidney Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Uehara, Takeki; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known environmental and occupational toxicant that is classified as carcinogenic to humans based on the epidemiological evidence of an association with higher risk of renal cell carcinoma. A number of scientific issues critical for assessing human health risks from TCE remain unresolved, such as the amount of kidney-toxic glutathione conjugation metabolites formed, inter-species and -individual differences, and the mode of action for kidney carcinogenicity. We hypothesized that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione], and various kidney toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, we observed inter-strain differences in TCE metabolite levels in the kidney. In addition, we found that in several strains kidney-specific effects of TCE included induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, increased cell proliferation, and expression of KIM-1, a marker of tubular damage and regeneration. In sub-chronic study, peroxisome proliferator-marker gene induction and kidney toxicity diminished while cell proliferative response was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in NZW/LacJ, but not C57BL/6J mice. Overall, we show that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity and that these effects are strain-dependent. PMID:25424545

  11. A behavioural test battery to investigate tic-like symptoms, stereotypies, attentional capabilities, and spontaneous locomotion in different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Proietti Onori, Martina; Ceci, Chiara; Laviola, Giovanni; Macrì, Simone

    2014-07-01

    The preclinical study of human disorders associated with comorbidities and for which the aetiology is still unclear may substantially benefit from multi-strain studies conducted in mice. The latter can help isolating experimental populations (strains) exhibiting distinct facets in the parameters isomorphic to the symptoms of a given disorder. Through a reverse-translation approach, multi-strain studies can inform both natural predisposing factors and environmental modulators. Thus, mouse strains selected for a particular trait may be leveraged to generate hypothesis-driven studies aimed at clarifying the potential role played by the environment in modulating the exhibition of the symptoms of interest. Tourette's syndrome (TS) constitutes a paradigmatic example whereby: it is characterized by a core symptom (tics) often associated with comorbidities (attention-deficit-hyperactivity and obsessive-compulsive symptoms); it has a clear genetic origin though specific genes are, as yet, unidentified; its course (exacerbations and remissions) is under the influence of environmental factors. Based on these considerations, we tested four mouse strains (ABH, C57, CD1, and SJL) - varying along a plethora of behavioural, neurochemical, and immunological parameters - on a test battery tailored to address the following domains: tics (through the i.p. administration of the selective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI, 5mg/kg); locomotion (spontaneous locomotion in the home-cage); perseverative responding in an attentional set shifting task; and behavioural stereotypies in response to a single amphetamine (10mg/kg, i.p.) injection. Present data demonstrate that while ABH and SJL mice respectively exhibit selective increments in amphetamine-induced sniffing behaviour and DOI-induced tic-like behaviours, C57 and CD1 mice show a distinct phenotype, compared to other strains, in several parameters. PMID:24675156

  12. Circadian clock control of connexin36 phosphorylation in retinal photoreceptors of the CBA/CaJ mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijing; Li, Hongyan; Liu, Xiaoqin; O'Brien, John; Ribelayga, Christophe P

    2015-01-01

    The gap-junction-forming protein connexin36 (Cx36) represents the anatomical substrate of photoreceptor electrical coupling in mammals. The strength of coupling is directly correlated to the phosphorylation of Cx36 at two regulatory sites: Ser110 and Ser293. Our previous work demonstrated that the extent of biotinylated tracer coupling between photoreceptor cells, which provides an index of the extent of electrical coupling, depends on the mouse strain. In the C57Bl/6J strain, light or dopamine reduces tracer coupling and Cx36 phosphorylation in photoreceptors. Conversely, darkness or a dopaminergic antagonist increases tracer coupling and Cx36 phosphorylation, regardless of the daytime. In the CBA/CaJ strain, photoreceptor tracer coupling is not only regulated by light and dopamine, but also by a circadian clock, a type of oscillator with a period close to 24 h and intrinsic to the retina, so that under prolonged dark-adapted conditions tracer coupling is broader at night compared to daytime. In the current study, we examined whether the modulation of photoreceptor coupling by a circadian clock in the CBA/CaJ mouse photoreceptors reflected a change in Cx36 protein expression and/or phosphorylation. We found no significant change in Cx36 expression or in the number of Cx36 gap junction among the conditions examined. However, we found that Cx36 phosphorylation is higher under dark-adapted conditions at night than in the daytime, and is the lowest under prolonged illumination at any time of the day/night cycle. Our observations are consistent with the view that the circadian clock regulation of photoreceptor electrical coupling is mouse strain-dependent and highlights the critical position of Cx36 phosphorylation in the control of photoreceptor coupling.

  13. The genetic basis of strain-dependent differences in the early phase of radiation injury in mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Franko, A.J.; Sharplin, J.; Ward, W.F.; Hinz, J.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Substantial differences between mouse strains have been reported in the lesions present in the lung during the early phase of radiation injury. Some strains show only classical pneumonitis, while other strains develop substantial fibrosis and hyaline membranes which contribute appreciably to respiratory insufficiency, in addition to pneumonitis. Other strains are intermediate between these extremes. These differences correlate with intrinsic differences in activities of lung plasminogen activator and angiotensin converting enzyme. The genetic basis of these differences was assessed by examining histologically the early reaction in lungs of seven murine hybrids available commercially after whole-thorax irradiation. Crosses between fibrosing and nonfibrosing parents were uniformly nonfibrosing, and crosses between fibrosing and intermediate parents were uniformly intermediate. No evidence of sex linkage was seen. Thus the phenotype in which fibrosis is found is controlled by autosomal recessive determinants. Strains prone to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and hyaline membranes exhibited intrinsically lower activities of lung plasminogen activator and angiotensin converting enzyme than either the nonfibrosing strains or the nonfibrosing hybrid crosses. The median time of death of the hybrids was genetically determined primarily by the longest-lived parent regardless of the types of lesions expressed.

  14. Strain Differences in Behavioral Inhibition in a Go/No-go Task Demonstrated Using 15 Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gubner, Noah R.; Wilhelm, Clare J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2012-01-01

    Background High levels of impulsivity have been associated with a number of substance abuse disorders including alcohol abuse. Research has not yet revealed whether these high levels predate the development of alcohol abuse. Methods The current study examined impulsivity in 15 inbred strains of mice (A/HeJ, AKR/J, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, C57L/J, C58/J, CBA/J, DBA/1J, DBA/2J, NZB/B1NJ, PL/J, SJL/J, SWR/J, and 129P3/J) using a Go/No-go task, which was designed to measure a subject’s ability to inhibit a behavior. Numerous aspects of response to ethanol and other drugs of abuse have been examined in these strains. Results There were significant strain differences in the number of responses made during the No-go signal (false alarms) and the extent to which strains responded differentially during the Go and No-go signals (d′). The rate of responding prior to the cue did not differ among strains, although there was a statistically significant correlation between false alarms and precue responding that was not related to basal activity level. Interstrain correlations suggested that false alarms and rate of responding were associated with strain differences in ethanol-related traits from the published literature. Conclusions The results of this study do support a link between innate level of impulsivity and response to ethanol and are consistent with a genetic basis for some measures of behavioral inhibition. PMID:20491731

  15. A Mouse Model for Candida glabrata Hematogenous Disseminated Infection Starting from the Gut: Evaluation of Strains with Different Adhesion Properties

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Ralitsa; Angoulvant, Adela; Tefit, Maurel; Gay, Frédérick; Guitard, Juliette; Mazier, Dominique; Fairhead, Cécile; Hennequin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion to digestive mucosa is considered a crucial first step in the pathogenicity of invasive Candida infections. Candida glabrata disseminated infections predominantly start from the gut. A mouse model of disseminated infection starting from the gut was set up. Hematogenous dissemination was obtained after a low-protein diet followed by a regimen of cyclophosphamide-methotrexate and an oral inoculation of the yeasts via the drinking water. The liver was the first organ infected (day 7 post-infection), and lethality was 100% at day 21 post-infection. This new mouse model was used to compare the mortality rate and fungal burden in deep organs induced by 5 strains exhibiting different levels of adhesion to enterocyte Caco-2 cells, as determined in a test on 36 C. glabrata strains. In this model, no statistical difference of lethality was demonstrated between the strains, and fungal burden varied in kidneys and lungs but without correlation with the level of adhesion to enterocytes. Further studies using the model developed here allow analysis of the crossing of the digestive mucosa by yeasts, and help relate this to yet-poorly understood adhesion phenotypes. PMID:23936069

  16. Establishment of c-myc-immortalized Kupffer cell line from a C57BL/6 mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Chisato; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated in several mammalian species, a novel procedure to obtain liver-macrophages (Kupffer cells) in sufficient numbers and purity using a mixed primary culture of hepatocytes. In this study, we applied this method to the C57BL/6 mouse liver and established an immortalized Kupffer cell line from this mouse strain. The hepatocytes from the C57BL/6 adult mouse liver were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and cultured in T25 culture flasks. Similar to our previous studies, the mouse hepatocytes progressively changed their morphology into a fibroblastic appearance after a few days of culture. After 7-10 days of culture, Kupffer-like cells, which were contaminants in the hepatocyte fraction at the start of the culture, actively proliferated on the mixed fibroblastic cell sheet. At this stage, a retroviral vector containing the human c-myc oncogene and neomycin resistance gene was introduced into the mixed culture. Gentle shaking of the culture flask, followed by the transfer and brief incubation of the culture supernatant, resulted in a quick and selective adhesion of Kupffer cells to a plastic dish surface. After selection with G418 and cloning by limiting dilutions, a clonal cell line (KUP5) was established. KUP5 cells displayed typical macrophage morphology and were stably passaged at 4-5 days intervals for more than 5 months, with a population doubling time of 19 h. KUP5 cells are immunocytochemically positive for mouse macrophage markers, such as Mac-1, F4/80. KUP5 cells exhibited substantial phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and the release of inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Taken together, KUP5 cells provide a useful means to study the function of Kupffer cells in vitro. PMID:25379377

  17. 1 + 1 = 3: Development and validation of a SNP-based algorithm to identify genetic contributions from three distinct inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Gorham, James D; Ranson, Matthew S; Smith, Janebeth C; Gorham, Beverly J; Muirhead, Kristen-Ashley

    2012-12-01

    State-of-the-art, genome-wide assessment of mouse genetic background uses single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PCR. As SNP analysis can use multiplex testing, it is amenable to high-throughput analysis and is the preferred method for shared resource facilities that offer genetic background assessment of mouse genomes. However, a typical individual SNP query yields only two alleles (A vs. B), limiting the application of this methodology to distinguishing contributions from no more than two inbred mouse strains. By contrast, simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) analysis yields multiple alleles but is not amenable to high-throughput testing. We sought to devise a SNP-based technique to identify donor strain origins when three distinct mouse strains potentially contribute to the genetic makeup of an individual mouse. A computational approach was used to devise a three-strain analysis (3SA) algorithm that would permit identification of three genetic backgrounds while still using a binary-output SNP platform. A panel of 15 mosaic mice with contributions from BALB/c, C57Bl/6, and DBA/2 genetic backgrounds was bred and analyzed using a genome-wide SNP panel using 1449 markers. The 3SA algorithm was applied and then validated using SSLP. The 3SA algorithm assigned 85% of 1449 SNPs as informative for the C57Bl/6, BALB/c, or DBA/2 backgrounds, respectively. Testing the panel of 15 F2 mice, the 3SA algorithm predicted donor strain origins genome-wide. Donor strain origins predicted by the 3SA algorithm correlated perfectly with results from individual SSLP markers located on five different chromosomes (n=70 tests). We have established and validated an analysis algorithm based on binary SNP data that can successfully identify the donor strain origins of chromosomal regions in mice that are bred from three distinct inbred mouse strains. PMID:23204929

  18. The viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra strain induces a stronger mouse macrophage response compared to the heat-inactivated H37Rv strain.

    PubMed

    He, Zong-Lin; Du, Fa-Wang; Du, Xian-Zhi

    2013-05-01

    Macrophages are the target cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) as well as key effector cells for clearance of this pathogen. The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages following exposure to the live M. tuberculosis H37Ra and heat-inactivated H37Rv strains. In vitro phagocytosis assays indicated that the macrophages had a higher capacity to engulf the live H37Ra strain compared to the inactivated H37Rv strain. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) demonstrated that H37Ra‑stimulated macrophages produced significantly increased concentrations of interleukin‑12p40 (IL‑12p40), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF‑α) and interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ) compared to the untreated control cells. However, H37Rv exposure induced little to no increase in the levels of the cytokines examined. The results from ELISA were confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR) at the mRNA level. There was a dose-dependent increase in nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production from the H37Ra‑stimulated macrophages compared to the H37Rv‑stimulated ones. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometric analysis indicated that the IFN‑γ‑stimulated macrophages from viable H37Ra‑immunized mice had an enhanced surface expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L) compared to those from inactivated H37Rv‑immunized mice. Our data collectively indicate that exposure to the viable H37Ra strain induces a stronger macrophage response compared to exposure to the heat-inactivated H37Rv strain, which may be associated with the increased surface expression of CD40L in activated macrophages.

  19. Reproducibility of toxicity test data as a function of mouse strain, animal lot, and operator. [for bisphenol A polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco was evaluated for reproducibility. The variables addressed were strain of mouse, lot of animals, and operator. There was a significant difference in response between Swiss Webster mice and ICR mice, with the latter exhibiting greater resistance. These two strains of mice are not interchangeable in this procedure. Variation between individual animals was significant and unavoidable. In view of this variation, between-lot and between-operator variations appear to have no practical significance. The significant variation between individual animals stresses the need for average values based on at least four animals, and preferably values based on at least two experiments and eight animals. Efforts to compare materials should be based on the evaluation of relatively simple responses using substantial numbers of animals, rather than on elaborate evaluation of single animals

  20. Comparison of atypical Brachyspira spp. clinical isolates and classic strains in a mouse model of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Burrough, Eric; Strait, Erin; Kinyon, Joann; Bower, Leslie; Madson, Darin; Schwartz, Kent; Frana, Timothy; Songer, J Glenn

    2012-12-01

    Multiple Brachyspira spp. can colonize the porcine colon, and the presence of the strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is typically associated with clinical swine dysentery. Recently, several Brachyspira spp. have been isolated from the feces of pigs with clinical disease suggestive of swine dysentery, yet these isolates were not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by genotypic or phenotypic methods. This study used a mouse model of swine dysentery to compare the pathogenic potential of seventeen different Brachyspira isolates including eight atypical clinical isolates, six typical clinical isolates, the standard strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204), and reference strains of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira innocens. Results revealed that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates induced significantly greater cecal inflammation than weakly beta-hemolytic isolates regardless of the genetic identification of the isolate, and that strongly beta-hemolytic isolates identified as 'Brachyspira sp. SASK30446' and B. intermedia by PCR produced lesions indistinguishable from those caused by B. hyodysenteriae in this model.

  1. An edited linkage map for the AXB and BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sampson, S B; Higgins, D C; Elliot, R W; Taylor, B A; Lueders, K K; Koza, R A; Paigen, B

    1998-09-01

    We have updated the history of the AXB and BXA recombinant inbred (RI) strains, typed additional loci, and edited the AXB, BXA RI database. Thirteen of the original 51 AXB and BXA RI strains are either extinct or genetically contaminated, leaving 33 living strains available from The Jackson Laboratory. However, we found a high degree of similarity among three sets of strains, indicating that these strains are not independent, which leaves 27 independent RI strains in the set. Accordingly, we modified the database by combining the AXB and BXA RI sets and eliminating strains that were genetically contaminated or extinct with no available DNA. We added 92 newly typed loci, retyped some questionable genotypings, and removed loci with excessive double crossovers or an insufficient number of typed strains. The edited strain distribution pattern (SDP) is available on the World Wide Web (WWW) (http://www. informatics.jax.org/riset.html) and now includes over 700 loci. Each locus is linked to adjacent loci with a LOD score of at least 3.0 with a few described exceptions. We also carried out a second editing designed for the analysis of quantitative trait loci by deleting extinct strains and loci with identical SDPs; this edited database is also available on the WWW.

  2. A mouse model for Betacoronavirus subgroup 2c using a bat coronavirus strain HKU5 variant.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Yount, Boyd L; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy; Menachery, Vineet D; Gralinski, Lisa E; Graham, Rachel L; Becker, Michelle M; Tomar, Sakshi; Scobey, Trevor D; Osswald, Heather L; Whitmore, Alan; Gopal, Robin; Ghosh, Arun K; Mesecar, Andrew; Zambon, Maria; Heise, Mark; Denison, Mark R; Baric, Ralph S

    2014-03-25

    Cross-species transmission of zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs) can result in pandemic disease outbreaks. Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), identified in 2012, has caused 182 cases to date, with ~43% mortality, and no small animal model has been reported. MERS-CoV and Pipistrellus bat coronavirus (BtCoV) strain HKU5 of Betacoronavirus (β-CoV) subgroup 2c share >65% identity at the amino acid level in several regions, including nonstructural protein 5 (nsp5) and the nucleocapsid (N) protein, which are significant drug and vaccine targets. BtCoV HKU5 has been described in silico but has not been shown to replicate in culture, thus hampering drug and vaccine studies against subgroup 2c β-CoVs. We report the synthetic reconstruction and testing of BtCoV HKU5 containing the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein ectodomain (BtCoV HKU5-SE). This virus replicates efficiently in cell culture and in young and aged mice, where the virus targets airway and alveolar epithelial cells. Unlike some subgroup 2b SARS-CoV vaccines that elicit a strong eosinophilia following challenge, we demonstrate that BtCoV HKU5 and MERS-CoV N-expressing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle (VRP) vaccines do not cause extensive eosinophilia following BtCoV HKU5-SE challenge. Passage of BtCoV HKU5-SE in young mice resulted in enhanced virulence, causing 20% weight loss, diffuse alveolar damage, and hyaline membrane formation in aged mice. Passaged virus was characterized by mutations in the nsp13, nsp14, open reading frame 5 (ORF5) and M genes. Finally, we identified an inhibitor active against the nsp5 proteases of subgroup 2c β-CoVs. Synthetic-genome platforms capable of reconstituting emerging zoonotic viral pathogens or their phylogenetic relatives provide new strategies for identifying broad-based therapeutics, evaluating vaccine outcomes, and studying viral pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE The 2012 outbreak of MERS-CoV raises the specter

  3. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-07-29

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes.

  4. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes. PMID:26923756

  5. Complement gene expression in hepatic and extrahepatic tissues of NZB and NZB x W (F1) mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Passwell, J H; Schreiner, G F; Wetsel, R A; Colten, H R

    1990-01-01

    To study the role of local production of complement proteins during the evolution of a naturally occurring immune complex disease, C3, C4, C2 and Factor B mRNA expression was assessed in several tissues of the inbred mouse strains NZB and (NZB x W) F1 hybrid. In the NZB/W F1 hybrid strain, coincident with the development of glomerulonephritis a marked increase in kidney C3 and C4 mRNA was observed; Factor B mRNA, which is expressed as a doublet in kidney and intestine, showed an increase in expression of the smaller transcript. This alteration of kidney C3, C4 and Factor B mRNA is identical to that noted in association with lupus nephritis in the MRL lpr/lpr strain and following in vivo administration of endotoxin to the BALB/c strain. The development of systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) in the NZB/W F1 was not associated with a marked change in hepatic complement gene expression. These findings support the hypothesis that local production of complement may play a role in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis and other tissue injury in SLE. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2228028

  6. Fentanyl effects on breath generation in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Fechtner, Linnea; El Ali, Mazen; Sattar, Abdus; Moore, Michael; Strohl, Kingman P

    2015-08-15

    We examined the effect of fentanyl on chemoresponsiveness in mouse strains divergent in the expression of spontaneous and post-hypoxic pauses. Frequency and tidal volume were recorded with plethysmography in A/J and C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. Mice selected at random received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of either saline, low dose fentanyl (LDF = 0.04 mg/kg), or high dose fentanyl (HDF = 0.4 mg/kg) under hypoxia (8% O2) or hyperoxia (100%O2). LDF produced a decrease in frequency during hypoxia in B6, but not A/J, mice. HDF significantly decreased frequency and tidal volume in both strains under hypoxia and hyperoxia (p<0.01); naloxone, an opioid antagonist, reversed this response. The acute administration of fentanyl at any dose did not promote apneas in strains of mice exhibiting regular or irregular respiratory patterns. However, higher doses depressed respiratory frequency in both strains. The B6 mice responded with a depressive response to hypoxia that did not recover with reoxygenation, but did recover with time or naloxone.

  7. Different rankings of inbred mouse strains on the Morris maze and a refined 4-arm water escape task.

    PubMed

    Wahlsten, Douglas; Cooper, Sean F; Crabbe, John C

    2005-11-30

    The submerged platform or Morris water escape task is widely used to study genetic variation in spatial learning and memory, but interpretation is sometimes difficult because of wall hugging, jumping off the platform, floating or non-spatial swim strategies. We modified the task by introducing four wide arms into the circular tank and adding features that reduced, eliminated, or compensated for several competing behaviors. Three versions of the 4-arm task were evaluated in detail, and the third version yielded good results for six of eight inbred strains. Furthermore, the 4-arm task could be scored adequately without computerized video tracking. Although performance on the 4-arm task was generally superior to the Morris maze, the extent of the improvement was strain dependent. Two strains with retinal degeneration (C3H/HeJ, FVB/NJ) performed poorly on both the Morris and 4-arm mazes, whereas C57BL/6J and DBA/2J did well on both mazes. A/J performed poorly on the Morris task but became very proficient on the 4-arm maze, despite its strong tendency to hug the walls of the tank. The BALB/cByJ strain, on the other hand, exhibited the best probe trial performance on the Morris maze but was very slow in acquiring the 4-arm task. We conclude that no single task can reveal the full richness of spatially guided behavior in a wide range of mouse genotypes. PMID:16191444

  8. Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) strain in the mouse model with concurrent exposure to PCB 153.

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; das Neves, Carlos G; Tryland, Morten; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Santos, Renato Lima; Turchetti, Andreia Pereira; Janczak, Andrew M; Djønne, Berit; Lie, Elisabeth; Berg, Vidar; Godfroid, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    Brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis, is linked to reproductive problems in primary hosts. A high proportion of Brucella-positive hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) have been detected in the declined Northeast Atlantic stock. High concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have also been discovered in top predators in the Arctic, including the hooded seal, PCB 153 being most abundant. The aim of this study was to assess the pathogenicity of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in the mouse model and to evaluate the outcome of Brucella spp. infection after exposure of mice to PCB 153. BALB/c mice were infected with B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain or Brucella suis 1330, and half from each group was exposed to PCB 153 through the diet. B. pinnipedialis showed a reduced pathogenicity in the mouse model as compared to B. suis 1330. Exposure to PCB 153 affected neither the immunological parameters, nor the outcome of the infection. Altogether this indicates that it is unlikely that B. pinnipedialis contribute to the decline of hooded seals in the Northeast Atlantic.

  9. Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) strain in the mouse model with concurrent exposure to PCB 153.

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; das Neves, Carlos G; Tryland, Morten; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Santos, Renato Lima; Turchetti, Andreia Pereira; Janczak, Andrew M; Djønne, Berit; Lie, Elisabeth; Berg, Vidar; Godfroid, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    Brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis, is linked to reproductive problems in primary hosts. A high proportion of Brucella-positive hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) have been detected in the declined Northeast Atlantic stock. High concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have also been discovered in top predators in the Arctic, including the hooded seal, PCB 153 being most abundant. The aim of this study was to assess the pathogenicity of Brucella pinnipedialis hooded seal strain in the mouse model and to evaluate the outcome of Brucella spp. infection after exposure of mice to PCB 153. BALB/c mice were infected with B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain or Brucella suis 1330, and half from each group was exposed to PCB 153 through the diet. B. pinnipedialis showed a reduced pathogenicity in the mouse model as compared to B. suis 1330. Exposure to PCB 153 affected neither the immunological parameters, nor the outcome of the infection. Altogether this indicates that it is unlikely that B. pinnipedialis contribute to the decline of hooded seals in the Northeast Atlantic. PMID:24534631

  10. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  11. Infection with street strain rabies virus induces modulation of the microRNA profile of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rabies virus (RABV) causes a fatal infection of the central nervous systems (CNS) of warm-blooded animals. Once the clinical symptoms develop, rabies is almost invariably fatal. The mechanism of RABV pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of viral infections. Our recent findings have revealed that infection with laboratory-fixed rabies virus strain can induce modulation of the microRNA profile of mouse brains. However, no previous report has evaluated the miRNA expression profile of mouse brains infected with RABV street strain. Results The results of microarray analysis show that miRNA expression becomes modulated in the brains of mice infected with street RABV. Quantitative real-time PCR assay of the differentially expressed miRNAs confirmed the results of microarray assay. Functional analysis showed the differentially expressed miRNAs to be involved in many immune-related signaling pathways, such as the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, the MAPK signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, and Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis. The predicted expression levels of the target genes of these modulated miRNAs were found to be correlated with gene expression as measured by DNA microarray and qRT-PCR. Conclusion RABV causes significant changes in the miRNA expression profiles of infected mouse brains. Predicted target genes of the differentially expression miRNAs are associated with host immune response, which may provide important information for investigation of RABV pathogenesis and therapeutic method. PMID:22882874

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Novel Polyketide Synthetase-Containing Mouse Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Anthony; Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Garcia, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    We report herein the draft genomes of five novel Escherichia coli strains isolated from surveillance and experimental mice housed at MIT and the Whitehead Institute and describe their genomic characteristics in context with the polyketide synthetase (PKS)-containing pathogenic E. coli strains NC101, IHE3034, and A192PP.

  13. Body Composition QTLs Identified in Intercross Populations Are Reproducible in Consomic Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cailu; Fesi, Brad D.; Marquis, Michael; Bosak, Natalia P.; Theodorides, Maria L.; Avigdor, Mauricio; McDaniel, Amanda H.; Duke, Fujiko F.; Lysenko, Anna; Khoshnevisan, Amin; Gantick, Brian R.; Arayata, Charles J.; Nelson, Theodore M.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Reed, Danielle R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation contributes to individual differences in obesity, but defining the exact relationships between naturally occurring genotypes and their effects on fatness remains elusive. As a step toward positional cloning of previously identified body composition quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from F2 crosses of mice from the C57BL/6ByJ and 129P3/J inbred strains, we sought to recapture them on a homogenous genetic background of consomic (chromosome substitution) strains. Male and female mice from reciprocal consomic strains originating from the C57BL/6ByJ and 129P3/J strains were bred and measured for body weight, length, and adiposity. Chromosomes 2, 7, and 9 were selected for substitution because previous F2 intercross studies revealed body composition QTLs on these chromosomes. We considered a QTL confirmed if one or both sexes of one or both reciprocal consomic strains differed significantly from the host strain in the expected direction after correction for multiple testing. Using these criteria, we confirmed two of two QTLs for body weight (Bwq5-6), three of three QTLs for body length (Bdln3-5), and three of three QTLs for adiposity (Adip20, Adip26 and Adip27). Overall, this study shows that despite the biological complexity of body size and composition, most QTLs for these traits are preserved when transferred to consomic strains; in addition, studying reciprocal consomic strains of both sexes is useful in assessing the robustness of a particular QTL. PMID:26551037

  14. Hidden in plain sight: spike-wave discharges in mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Letts, V A; Beyer, B J; Frankel, W N

    2014-07-01

    Twenty-seven inbred strains of mice were tested for spike-wave discharge (SWD) activity by video-electroencephalographic recordings over a 24-h recording period. Eight strains had reproducible, frequent SWDs, including five strains (C57BLKS/J, CBA/J, DBA/1J, NOR/LtJ, SM/J) previously undiagnosed for this distinctive phenotype. Eighteen other strains exhibited no such activity. Spike-wave discharges usually occurred while the subject was motionless, and in a significant number of annotated instances coincided with an arrest of the subject's relatively unrestrained locomotor activity, which resumed immediately after the discharge ended. In all five new strains, SWDs were suppressed by ethosuximide administration. From the genealogy of inbred strains, we suggest that two ancestors, A and DBA, transmitted genotypes required for SWD in all positive strains. Together these strains with SWDs provide new opportunities to understand the genetic core susceptibility of this distinctive electroencephalographic activity and to explore its relationship to absence epilepsy, a human disorder for which few genes are known. PMID:24861780

  15. The effect of mouse strain on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the central nervous system (CNS)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mice infected with HSV-1 can develop lethal encephalitis or virus induced CNS demyelination. Multiple factors affect outcome including route of infection, virus and mouse strain. When infected with a sub-lethal dose of HSV-1 strain 2 via the oral mucosa, susceptible SJL/J, A/J, and PL/J mice develop demyelinating lesions throughout the brain. In contrast, lesions are restricted to the brainstem (BST) in moderately resistant BALB/c mice and are absent in resistant BL/6 mice. The reasons for the strain differences are unknown. Methods In this study, we combine histology, immunohistochemistry, and in-situ hybridization to investigate the relationship between virus and the development of lesions during the early stage (< 24 days PI) of demyelination in different strains of mice. Results Initially, viral DNA and antigen positive cells appear sequentially in non-contiguous areas throughout the brains of BALB/c, SJL/J, A/J, and PL/J mice but are restricted to an area of the BST of BL/6 mice. In SJL/J, A/J, and PL/J mice, this is followed by the development of 'focal' areas of virus infected neuronal and non-neuronal cells throughout the brain. The 'focal' areas follow a hierarchical order and co-localize with developing demyelinating lesions. When antigen is cleared, viral DNA positive cells can remain in areas of demyelination; consistent with a latent infection. In contrast, 'focal' areas are restricted to the BST of BALB/c mice and do not occur in BL/6 mice. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that susceptible mouse strains, infected with HSV-1 via the oral mucosa, develop CNS demyelination during the first 24 days PI in several stages. These include: the initial spread of virus and infection of cells in non-contiguous areas throughout the brain, the development of 'focal' areas of virus infected neuronal and non-neuronal cells, the co-localization of 'focal' areas with developing demyelinating lesions, and latent infection in a number of the

  16. Mouse hepatitis virus type 4 (JHM strains). induced fatal central nervous system disease. I. genetic control and murine neuron as the susceptible site of disease

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (JHM strain) type 4 induces acute encephalitis followed by death in many strains of laboratory mice. Immunohistochemical study in vivo and analysis of mouse neuronal cells in vitro both indicate that the target cells in this infection is the neuron. Further, examination of several inbred mouse strains and neuronal cells from them shows that disease expression is controlled by a single autosomal gene action at the level of the neuronal cell. Susceptibility is dominant but not H-2 linked. However, cultured neuronal cells and macrophages from SJL/J mice, which are resistant to this infection, fail to make significant amounts of infectious virus after an appropriate viral inoculation. Apparently the defect is not at the level of the virus-cell receptor, because these cells, in part, express viral antigens. PMID:6265583

  17. Food intake, water intake, and drinking spout side preference of 28 mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Reed, Danielle R; Beauchamp, Gary K; Tordoff, Michael G

    2002-11-01

    Male mice from 28 inbred strains (129P3/J, A/J, AKR/J, BALB/cByJ, BUB/BnJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, C57L/J, CAST/Ei, CBA/J, CE/J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, I/LnJ, KK/H1J, LP/J, NOD/LtJ, NZB/B1NJ, P/J, PL/J, RBF/DnJ, RF/J, RIIIS/J, SEA/GnJ, SJL/J, SM/J, SPRET/Ei, and SWR/J) were fed chow and had access to two water bottles. Body weight, food intake, water intake, and drinking spout side preference were measured. There were large strain differences in all the measures collected, with at least a two-fold difference between strains with the lowest and the highest trait values. Estimates of heritability ranged from 0.36 (spout side preference) to 0.87 (body weight). Body weight, food intake, and water intake were interrelated among the strains, although substantial strain variation in food and water intakes independent from body weight was present. The strain differences described here provide useful information for designing mutagenesis screens and choosing strains for genetic mapping studies.

  18. Thermoregulatory responses of two mouse Mus musculus strains selectively bred for high and low food intake.

    PubMed

    Selman, C; Korhonen, T K; Bünger, L; Hill, W G; Speakman, J R

    2001-11-01

    We examined the thermoregulatory responses of male and female mice Mus musculus that had been divergently selected on voluntary food intake, corrected for body mass, to produce a high-intake and a low-intake strain. Resting metabolic rate was determined by indirect calorimetry (at 30 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 15 degrees C and 5 degrees C). Body temperature responses were measured in a separate group of mice in a parallel protocol. High-intake mice had significantly elevated body masses compared to low-intake mice in both sexes. Lower critical temperature in both strains appeared to be around 28 degrees C. At 30 degrees C there was a significant strain effect on resting metabolic rate, with high strain mice having greater metabolism than low strain mice. Sex and body mass were not significant main effects on resting metabolic rate and there were no significant interactions. Body temperature measured at 30 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 15 degrees C and 5 degrees C differed significantly between sexes (females higher) and there was a significant sexxbody mass interaction effect, but there was no difference between strains. Thermal conductance was significantly related to strain and sex, mice from the high strain and males having greater thermal conductances than mice from the low strain and females. Artificial selection has resulted in high-intake mice having greater body masses and greater thermal conductances, which together account for up to 45% of the elevated daily energy demands that underpin the increase in food intake. The greater levels of food intake were also associated with higher resting metabolic rates at 30 degrees C.

  19. Susceptibility of Different Mouse Wild Type Strains to Develop Diet-Induced NAFLD/AFLD-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Vera H. I.; Macheiner, Tanja; Kessler, Sonja M.; Czepukojc, Beate; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Kiemer, Alexandra K.; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Lackner, Carolin; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease have been intensively studied, concerning pathophysiological mechanisms are still incompletely understood. This may be due to the use of different animal models and resulting model-associated variation. Therefore, this study aimed to compare three frequently used wild type mouse strains in their susceptibility to develop diet-induced features of non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease associated clinical, biochemical, and histological features in C57BL/6, CD-1, and 129Sv WT mice were induced by (i) high-fat diet feeding, (ii) ethanol feeding only, and (iii) the combination of high-fat diet and ethanol feeding. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid profiles were compared in CD-1 and 129Sv mice. Additionally hepatic fatty acid composition was determined in 129Sv mice. In C57BL/6 mice dietary regimens resulted in heterogeneous hepatic responses, ranging from pronounced steatosis and inflammation to a lack of any features of fatty liver disease. Liver-related serum biochemistry showed high deviations within the regimen groups. CD-1 mice did not exhibit significant changes in metabolic and liver markers and developed no significant steatosis or inflammation as a response to dietary regimens. Although 129Sv mice showed no weight gain, this strain achieved most consistent features of fatty liver disease, apparent from concentration alterations of liver-related serum biochemistry as well as moderate steatosis and inflammation as a result of all dietary regimens. Furthermore, the hepatic lipid profile as well as the fatty acid composition of 129Sv mice were considerably altered, upon feeding the different dietary regimens. Accordingly, diet-induced non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease is most consistently promoted in 129Sv mice compared to C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. As a conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of genetic background of used mouse strains for modeling diet

  20. What makes a good mother? Implication of inter-, and intrastrain strain "cross fostering" for emotional changes in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Sandra; Brandwein, Christiane; Dormann, Christof; Gass, Peter; Chourbaji, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    Currently, the mouse represents the preferred model organism among mammals used for animal studies. Due to a great availability of mutant strains it represents a standard method to analyze in vivo the effects of targeted gene manipulations. While this - at least in theory - represents a valuable tool to elucidate the pathophysiology of certain human diseases, there are several caveats which need to be considered working with animals. In our study we aimed at elucidating, how a widely established breeding strategy, i.e. the use of "foster mothers" to save the survival of compromised mouse pups for ongoing experiments, per se, affects the emotional phenotype of the fostered offspring. Since it is a popular method to use outbred strains like NMRI to do this job, we sought to evaluate the potential effects of such an artificial postnatal condition and compare either offspring nurtured by their biological mothers or two different strains of foster mothers. Hence we analysed changes in maternal care and later on the emotional behaviour of male and female C57BL/6 mice reared by (i) their biological C57BL/6 mothers, (ii) C57BL/6 foster mothers and (iii) NMRI foster mothers in a behavioural test battery. In addition we assessed corticosterone levels as indicator for stress-physiological changes. Besides clear differences in maternal behaviour, our study indicates an altered emotional state (i.e. differences in anxiety and depressive-like features) in mice reared by different "categories" of mothers, which emphasizes the importance to embed such perinatal conditions in the evaluation of animal-deriving data.

  1. Aeromonas Caviae Strain Induces Th1 Cytokine Response in Mouse Intestinal Tract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small i...

  2. COMPARISON OF SYSTEMIC AND MUCOSAL ROUTES OF SENSITIZATION TO OVALBUMIN ANTIGEN IN THREE MOUSE STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown strain differences in allergic lung responses following ovalbumin (OVA) antigen sensitization and challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these differences were maintained between systemic and mucosal sensitization routes, and to ...

  3. Resistance of novel mouse strains different in MHC class I and the NKC domain to the development of experimental tumors.

    PubMed

    Fišerová, Anna; Richter, Jan; Čapková, Katarína; Bieblová, Jana; Mikyšková, Romana; Reiniš, Milan; Indrová, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the immunological mechanisms critical for tumor progression, we bred novel mouse strains, different in the NKC and H-2D domains. We used inbreeding to generate hybrids of Balb/c and C57BL/6 of stable H-2Db+d-NK1.1neg and H-2Db-d+NK1.1high phenotypes. We analyzed the growth of three established MHC class I-deficient tumor cell lines: TC-1/A9 tumor (HPV-associated) and B16F10 melanoma, both syngeneic to C57BL/6, and the MCB8 (3-methycholanthrene-induced tumor) syngeneic to Balb/c. Furthermore, we induced colorectal carcinoma by azoxymethane-DSS treatment to test the susceptibility to chemically-induced primary cancer. We found that the novel strains spontaneously regressed the tumor transplants syngeneic to both Balb/c (MCB8) and C57BL/6 (B16F10 and TC-1/A9) mice. The H2-Db+d-NK1.1neg, but not the H2-Db-d+NK1.1high strain was also highly resistant to chemically-induced colorectal cancer in comparison to the parental mice. The immune changes during TC-1/A9 cancer development involved an increase of the NK cell distribution in the peripheral blood and spleen along with higher expression of NKG2D activation antigen; this was in correlation with the time-dependent rise of cytotoxic activity in comparison to C57BL/6 mice. The TC-1/A9 cancer regression was accompanied by higher proportion of B cells in the spleen and B220+/CD86+ activated antigen-presenting B cells distributed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the periphery. The changes in the T-cell population were represented mainly by the prevalence of T helper cells reflected by grown CD4/CD8 ratio, most prominent in the b+d-NK1.1neg strain. The results of the present study imply usefulness of the two novel mouse strains as an experimental model for further studies of tumor resistance mechanisms. PMID:27279019

  4. Chromosomes 6 and 13 harbor genes that regulate pubertal timing in mouse chromosome substitution strains.

    PubMed

    Krewson, Thomas D; Supelak, Pamela J; Hill, Annie E; Singer, Jonathan B; Lander, Eric S; Nadeau, Joseph H; Palmert, Mark R

    2004-10-01

    Variation in the onset of puberty among inbred strains of mice suggests that quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affect neurological and hormonal aspects of sexual maturation. Taking a novel approach toward identifying factors that regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, we evaluated pubertal timing [as assessed by vaginal opening (VO)] in two inbred strains of mice, A/J and C57BL/6J (B6), and in a panel of chromosome substitution strains (CSSs) generated from A/J and B6 mice. In each CSS, a single chromosome from A/J has been substituted in a homozygous fashion for the corresponding chromosome in B6, partitioning the A/J genome into 22 strains with a common host (B6) background. VO occurred significantly earlier in A/J compared with B6 mice. Although the majority of the CSSs assessed had a timing of VO that was similar to the progenitor B6 strain, CSSs for chromosomes 6 and 13 each displayed significantly earlier time of VO than B6 mice. F1 (B6 x CSS) mice for chromosomes 6 and 13 displayed phenotypes that were intermediate between the CSS and B6 strains, suggesting that the trait was inherited in a codominant manner. These findings demonstrate that chromosomes 6 and 13 harbor QTLs that control the timing of VO. Identification of the responsible genes may reveal factors that regulate the maturation of the HPG axis and determine the timing of puberty.

  5. Safety, efficacy and efficiency of laser-assisted IVF in subfertile mutant mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Wen; Kinchen, Kristy L; Vallelunga, Jadine M; Young, Diana L; Wright, Kaleb D K; Gorano, Lisa N; Wasson, Katherine; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2013-01-01

    In the present report we studied the safety, efficacy and efficiency of using an infrared laser to facilitate IVF by assessing fertilization, development and birth rates after laser-zona drilling (LZD) in 30 subfertile genetically modified (GM) mouse lines. We determined that LZD increased the fertilization rate four to ten times that of regular IVF, thus facilitating the derivation of 26 of 30 (86.7%) GM mouse lines. Cryopreserved two-cell stage embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF were recovered and developed to blastocysts in vitro at the same rate as frozen–thawed embryos derived by regular IVF. Surprisingly after surgical transfer to pseudopregnant recipients the birth rate of embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF was significantly lower than that of embryos derived by regular IVF. However this result could be completely mitigated by the addition of 0.25 M sucrose to the culture medium during LZD which caused the oocyte to shrink in volume relative to the perivitelline space. By increasing the distance from the laser target site on the zona pellucida, we hypothesize that the hyperosmotic effect of sucrose reduced the potential for laser-induced cytotoxic thermal damage to the underlying oocytes. With appropriate preparation and cautious application, our results indicate that LZD-assisted IVF is a safe, efficacious and efficient assisted reproductive technology for deriving mutant mouse lines with male factor infertility and subfertility caused by sperm–zona penetration defects. PMID:23315689

  6. Genetic control of mammalian meiotic recombination. I. Variation in exchange frequencies among males from inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kara E; Cherry, Jonathan P; Lynn, Audrey; Hunt, Patricia A; Hassold, Terry J

    2002-09-01

    Genetic background effects on the frequency of meiotic recombination have long been suspected in mice but never demonstrated in a systematic manner, especially in inbred strains. We used a recently described immunostaining technique to assess meiotic exchange patterns in male mice. We found that among four different inbred strains--CAST/Ei, A/J, C57BL/6, and SPRET/Ei--the mean number of meiotic exchanges per cell and, thus, the recombination rates in these genetic backgrounds were significantly different. These frequencies ranged from a low of 21.5 exchanges in CAST/Ei to a high of 24.9 in SPRET/Ei. We also found that, as expected, these crossover events were nonrandomly distributed and displayed positive interference. However, we found no evidence for significant differences in the patterns of crossover positioning between strains with different exchange frequencies. From our observations of >10,000 autosomal synaptonemal complexes, we conclude that achiasmate bivalents arise in the male mouse at a frequency of 0.1%. Thus, special mechanisms that segregate achiasmate chromosomes are unlikely to be an important component of mammalian male meiosis.

  7. Interaction between the endocannabinoid and serotonergic system in the exhibition of head twitch response in four mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Chiara; Proietti Onori, Martina; Macrì, Simone; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    More than 10 % of children during school years suffer from a transient tic disorder, and 1 % has a particular type of tic disorder known as Tourette syndrome. At present, there is no available treatment that can improve tics without considerable side effects. Recent evidence indicates that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal psychoactive component of cannabis, reduced in mice the head twitch responses, a tic pharmacologically induced by the selective serotonin 5-HT2 receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI). THC has some considerable side effects that render its use problematic. In this view, cyclohexyl-carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB597), an indirect cannabinoid agonist that enhances endogenous anandamide levels, can constitute a valid alternative to the use of direct CB1 receptor agonists. We investigated whether URB597 may reduce the exhibition of DOI-induced head twitch responses in mice. Moreover, to address whether the effects of URB597 on DOI-induced behavioral response constitute a general phenomenon, we evaluated four (ABH, C57BL/6N, SJL/J, CD-1) mouse strains. These strains have been selected in order to represent an ample spectrum of genetic background and phenotypic variation. Predictably, DOI induced consistent tic-like behaviors in all mice. While URB597 exerted slight sedation in C57BN/6L mice, this cannabinoid agonist remarkably mitigated the exhibition of DOI-induced head twitch in all strains. Present data may disclose novel avenues for the pharmacological treatment of tic disorders.

  8. Characterization of the mouse neuroinvasiveness of selected European strains of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Stephanie M; Koraka, Penelope; van Boheemen, Sander; Roose, Jouke M; Jaarsma, Dick; van de Vijver, David A M C; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E E

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has caused outbreaks and sporadic infections in Central, Eastern and Mediterranean Europe for over 45 years. Most strains responsible for the European and Mediterranean basin outbreaks are classified as lineage 1. In recent years, WNV strains belonging to lineage 1 and 2 have been causing outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease in humans in countries such as Italy, Hungary and Greece, while mass mortality among birds was not reported. This study characterizes three European strains of WNV isolated in Italy (FIN and Ita09) and Hungary (578/10) in terms of in vitro replication kinetics on neuroblastoma cells, LD50 values in C57BL/6 mice, median day mortality, cumulative mortality, concentration of virus in the brain and spinal cord, and the response to infection in the brain. Overall, the results indicate that strains circulating in Europe belonging to both lineage 1 and 2 are highly virulent and that Ita09 and 578/10 are more neurovirulent compared to the FIN strain. PMID:24058590

  9. Genetics of body weight in the LXS recombinant inbred mouse strains

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Beth; Carosone-Line, Phyllis; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Johnson, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This is the first phenotypic analysis of 75 new recombinant inbred (RI) strains derived from ILS and ISS progenitors. We analyzed body weight in two independent cohorts of female mice at various ages and in males at 60 days. Body weight is a complex trait which has been mapped in numerous crosses in rodents. The LXS RI strains displayed a large range of weights, transgressing those of the inbred progenitors, supporting the utility of this large panel for mapping traits not selected in the progenitors. Numerous QTLs for body weight mapped in singleand multilocus scans. We assessed replication between these and previously reported QTLs based on overlapping confidence intervals of published QTLs for body weight at 60 days and used meta-analyses to determine combined p values for three QTL regions located on Chromosomes 4, 5, and 11. Strain distribution patterns of microsatellite marker genotypes, weight, and other phenotypes are available on Web- QTL (http://www.webqtl.org/search.html) and allow genetic mapping of any heritable quantitative phenotype measured in these strains. We report one such analysis, correlating brain and body weights. Large reference panels of RI strains, such as the LXS, are invaluable for identifying genetic correlations, GXE (Gene X Environment) interactions, and replicating previously identified QTLs.

  10. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S L; Lye, D J; McKinstry, Craig A.; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small intestinal extracts, 24 hours after oral infection with an A. caviae strain, provides evidence of a Th1 type immune response. A large number of gamma-interferon (γ-IFN) induced genes are up-regulated as well as several tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) transcripts. A. caviae has always been considered as opportunistic pathogen because it lacks obvious virulence factors. This current effort suggests that an A. caviae strain can colonize the murine intestinal tract and cause what has been described by others as a dysregulatory cytokine response. This response could explain why a number of diarrheal waterborne disease cases have been attributed to A. caviae even though it lacks obvious enteropathogenic properties.

  11. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Samuel L; Lye, Dennis J; McKinstry, Craig A; Vesper, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small intestinal extracts, 24 h after oral infection with an A. caviae strain, provides evidence of a Th1 type immune response. A large number of gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN) induced genes are up-regulated as well as several tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) transcripts. Aeromonas caviae has always been considered an opportunistic pathogen because it lacks obvious virulence factors. This current effort suggests that an A. caviae strain can colonize the murine intestinal tract and cause what has been described by others as a dysregulatory cytokine response. This response could explain why a number of diarrheal waterborne disease cases have been attributed to A. caviae even though it lacks obvious enteropathogenic properties.

  12. Effects of Malignant Effusions on the Mitotic Index of L Strain Mouse Cells Grown in Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hrushovetz, S. B.; Ewaniuk, Meriam H.

    1963-01-01

    By employing a clone of L strain mouse fibroblasts (LE) which does not exhibit cell clumping and lysis (cytolytic antibody reaction), it was possible to screen for the presence of growth-regulating factors in human sera and effusions, exclusive of an antigen-antibody reaction. Under conditions of the test a mitotic index greater than 20% indicated the presence of a growth-promoting factor. A total of 11 pleural effusions was tested. Four of the eight malignant effusions possessed a growth-promoting factor, while none of the three non-malignant effusions or the one sample of human umbilical cord serum possessed such a factor. Overnight storage of the unfiltered effusions at 5° C. resulted in complete loss of the growthpromoting activity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14052976

  13. Double replacement gene targeting for the production of a series of mouse strains with different prion protein gene alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Redhead, N.J.; Selfridge, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a double replacement gene targeting strategy which enables the production of a series of mouse strains bearing different subtle alterations to endogenous genes. This is a two-step process in which a region of the gene of interest is first replaced with a selectable marker to produce an inactivated allele, which is then re-targeted with a second vector to reconstruct the inactivated allele, concomitantly introducing an engineered mutation. Five independent embryonic stem cell lines have been produced bearing different targeted alterations to the prion protein gene, including one which raises the level of expression. We have constructed mice bearing the codon 101 proline to leucine substitution linked to the human familial prion disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. We anticipate that this procedure will have applications to the study of human inherited diseases and the development of therapies. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Photobiomodulation preserves behaviour and midbrain dopaminergic cells from MPTP toxicity: evidence from two mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have shown previously that near-infrared light (NIr) treatment or photobiomodulation neuroprotects dopaminergic cells in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) from degeneration induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in Balb/c albino mice, a well-known model for Parkinson’s disease. The present study explores whether NIr treatment offers neuroprotection to these cells in C57BL/6 pigmented mice. In addition, we examine whether NIr influences behavioural activity in both strains after MPTP treatment. We tested for various locomotive parameters in an open-field test, namely velocity, high mobility and immobility. Results Balb/c (albino) and C57BL/6 (pigmented) mice received injections of MPTP (total of 50 mg/kg) or saline and NIr treatments (or not) over 48 hours. After each injection and/or NIr treatment, the locomotor activity of the mice was tested. After six days survival, brains were processed for TH (tyrosine hydroxylase) immunochemistry and the number of TH+ cells in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) was estimated using stereology. Results showed higher numbers of TH+ cells in the MPTP-NIr groups of both strains, compared to the MPTP groups, with the protection greater in the Balb/c mice (30% vs 20%). The behavioural tests revealed strain differences also. For Balb/c mice, the MPTP-NIr group showed greater preservation of locomotor activity than the MPTP group. Behavioural preservation was less evident in the C57BL/6 strain however, with little effect of NIr being recorded in the MPTP-treated cases of this strain. Finally, there were differences between the two strains in terms of NIr penetration across the skin and fur. Our measurements indicated that NIr penetration was considerably less in the pigmented C57BL/6, compared to the albino Balb/c mice. Conclusions In summary, our results revealed the neuroprotective benefits of NIr treatment after parkinsonian insult at both cellular and behavioural levels and

  15. Acute Dietary Tryptophan Manipulation Differentially Alters Social Behavior, Brain Serotonin and Plasma Corticosterone in Three Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wynne Q.; Smolik, Corey M.; Barba-Escobedo, Priscilla A.; Gamez, Monica; Sanchez, Jesus J.; Javors, Martin A.; Daws, Lynette C.; Gould, Georgianna G.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical evidence indicates brain serotonin (5-HT) stores and neurotransmission may be inadequate in subpopulations of individuals with autism, and this may contribute to characteristically impaired social behaviors. Findings that depletion of the 5-HT precursor tryptophan (TRP) worsens autism symptoms support this hypothesis. Yet dietetic studies show and parents report that many children with autism consume less TRP than peers. To measure the impact of dietary TRP content on social behavior, we administered either diets devoid of TRP, with standard TRP (0.2 gm%), or with 1% added TRP (1.2 gm%) overnight to three mouse strains. Of these, BTBRT+Itpr3tf/J and 129S1/SvImJ consistently exhibit low preference for social interaction relative to C57BL/6. We found that TRP depletion reduced C57BL/6 and 129S social interaction preference, while TRP enhancement improved BTBR sociability (p < 0.05; N= 8–10). Subsequent marble burying was similar regardless of grouping. After behavior tests, brain TRP levels and plasma corticosterone were higher in TRP enhanced C57BL/6 and BTBR, while 5-HT levels were reduced in all strains by TRP depletion (p <0.05; N= 4 −10). Relative hyperactivity of BTBR and hypoactivity of 129S, evident in self-grooming and chamber entries during sociability tests, were uninfluenced by dietary TRP. Our findings demonstrate mouse sociability and brain 5-HT turnover are reduced by acute TRP depletion, and can be enhanced by TRP supplementation. This outcome warrants further basic and/or clinical studies employing biomarker combinations such as TRP metabolism and 5-HT regulated hormones to characterize the conditions wherein TRP supplementation can best ameliorate sociability deficits. PMID:25445490

  16. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus,. Microarray profiling of...

  17. The effect of handling method on the mouse grimace scale in two strains of laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Amy L; Leach, Matthew C

    2016-08-01

    Pain assessment in laboratory animals is an ethical and legal requirement. The mouse grimace scale (MGS) is a new method of pain assessment deemed to be both accurate and reliable, and observers can be rapidly trained to use it. In order for a new pain assessment technique to be effective, we must ensure that the score awarded by the technique is only influenced by pain and not by other husbandry or non-painful but integral aspects of research protocols. Here, we studied 16 male mice, housed under standard laboratory conditions. Eight mice were randomly assigned to tail handling and eight to tube handling on arrival at the unit. On each occasion the mice were removed from their cage for routine husbandry, they were picked up using their assigned handling method. Photographs of the mouse faces were then scored by treatment-blind observers as per the MGS manual (see Nature Methods 2010, Vol. 7, pp 447-449), and scores from the two groups were compared. There was no significant difference in MGS scores between the mice that had been handled using a tube compared with the tail. Consequently, these methods of handling did not influence the baseline grimace score given, suggesting that these handling techniques are not confounding factors when establishing baseline MGS scores, further validating this technique.

  18. A new atypical genotype mouse virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from the heart of a wild caught puma (Felis concolor) from Durango, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nothing is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife in Mexico. In the present study, a mouse virulent T. gondii strain was isolated from the heart of a wild puma (Felis concolor). The puma was found roaming in outskirt of Durango City, Mexico and tranquailized for ...

  19. Differential expression of sets of highly homologous variable region gene products in selected and preimmune repertoires of inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Using mAb that selectively recognize the various allelic forms of the VHT15 and Vk21D-E genes' products, we analyzed the influence of VH and Vk polymorphism on the probability of expression of these gene segments. Our data show that the frequency to which the VHT15 gene product becomes available in the preimmune repertoire is strongly influenced by the polymorphism of the relevant structural gene, suggesting therefore that VH genes cannot be randomly used in the various strains. Contrary to this, the frequency of Vk21D-E+ clones is similar in all mouse strains tested, and in all cases is higher than the frequency of VHT15 clones. This observation strongly suggests that Vk genes can be randomly expressed, and/or that their number is lower than that of their VH counterpart. Finally, analysis of the specificity associated to the expression of the VHT15 segment revealed that VH polymorphism strongly influences not only the probability of expression of each V gene, but also the specificity of the antibodies on which these VH genes are used. PMID:3084699

  20. Putative function of hypothetical proteins expressed by Clostridium perfringens type A strains and their protective efficacy in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Dwivedi, Pratistha

    2016-10-01

    The whole genome sequencing and annotation of Clostridium perfringens strains revealed several genes coding for proteins of unknown function with no significant similarities to genes in other organisms. Our previous studies clearly demonstrated that hypothetical proteins CPF_2500, CPF_1441, CPF_0876, CPF_0093, CPF_2002, CPF_2314, CPF_1179, CPF_1132, CPF_2853, CPF_0552, CPF_2032, CPF_0438, CPF_1440, CPF_2918, CPF_0656, and CPF_2364 are genuine proteins of C. perfringens expressed in high abundance. This study explored the putative role of these hypothetical proteins using bioinformatic tools and evaluated their potential as putative candidates for prophylaxis. Apart from a group of eight hypothetical proteins (HPs), a putative function was predicted for the rest of the hypothetical proteins using one or more of the algorithms used. The phylogenetic analysis did not suggest an evidence of a horizontal gene transfer event except for HP CPF_0876. HP CPF_2918 is an abundant extracellular protein, unique to C. perfringens species with maximum strain coverage and did not show any significant match in the database. CPF_2918 was cloned, recombinant protein was purified to near homogeneity, and probing with mouse anti-CPF_2918 serum revealed surface localization of the protein in C. perfringens ATCC13124 cultures. The purified recombinant CPF_2918 protein induced antibody production, a mixed Th1 and Th2 kind of response, and provided partial protection to immunized mice in direct C. perfringens challenge.

  1. Generation of a Tlx1(CreER-Venus) knock-in mouse strain for the study of spleen development.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Ryo; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Oda, Akihisa; Nishimura, Miyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Azuma, Takachika; Kaifu, Tomonori; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2014-11-01

    The spleen is a lymphoid organ that serves as a unique niche for immune reactions, extramedullary hematopoiesis, and the removal of aged erythrocytes from the circulation. While much is known about the immunological functions of the spleen, the mechanisms governing the development and organization of its stromal microenvironment remain poorly understood. Here we report the generation and analysis of a Tlx1(Cre) (ER) (-Venus) knock-in mouse strain engineered to simultaneously express tamoxifen-inducible CreER(T2) and Venus fluorescent protein under the control of regulatory elements of the Tlx1 gene, which encodes a transcription factor essential for spleen development. We demonstrated that Venus as well as CreER expression recapitulates endogenous Tlx1 transcription within the spleen microenvironment. When Tlx1(Cre) (ER) (-Venus) mice were crossed with the Cre-inducible reporter strain, Tlx1-expressing cells as well as their descendants were specifically labeled following tamoxifen administration. We also showed by cell lineage tracing that asplenia caused by Tlx1 deficiency is attributable to altered contribution of mesenchymal cells in the spleen anlage to the pancreatic mesenchyme. Thus, Tlx1(Cre) (ER) (-Venus) mice represent a new tool for lineage tracing and conditional gene manipulation of spleen mesenchymal cells, essential approaches for understanding the molecular mechanisms of spleen development.

  2. The immunological impact of genetic drift in the B10.BR congenic inbred mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Stacey L; Appel, Michael Y; Berger, Stephanie A; Korngold, Robert; Friedman, Thea M

    2009-10-01

    The MHC-matched, minor histocompatibility Ag (miHA)-mismatched B10.BR-->CBA strain combination has been used to elucidate the immunobiology of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Studies conducted in the 1980s had established that B10.BR CD8+ T cells were capable of mediating GVHD in the absence of CD4+ T cells, and that CD4+ T cells were unable to induce lethal disease. In more recent studies with this GVHD model, we detected etiological discrepancies with the previously published results, which suggested that genetic drift might have occurred within the B10.BR strain. In particular, there was increased allorecognition of CBA miHA by B10.BR CD4+ T cells, as determined by both TCR Vbeta spectratype analysis and the induction of lethal GVHD in CBA recipients. Additionally, alloreactivity was observed between the genetically drifted mice (B10.BR/Jdrif) and mice rederived from frozen embryos of the original strain (B10.BR/Jrep) using Vbeta spectratype analysis and IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays, suggesting that new miHA differences had arisen between the mice. Furthermore, T cell-depleted B10.BR/Jdrif bone marrow cells were unable to provide long-term survival following either allogeneic or syngeneic bone marrow transplantation. Gene expression analysis revealed several genes involved in hematopoiesis that were overexpressed in the lineage-negative fraction of B10.BR/Jdrif bone marrow, as compared with B10.BR/Jrep mice. Taken together, these results suggest that genetic drift in the B10.BR strain has significantly impacted the immune alloreactive response in the GVHD model by causing altered expression of miHA and diminished capacity for survival following transplantation into lethally irradiated recipients.

  3. Age, Strain, and Gender as Factors for Increased Sensitivity of the Mouse Lung to Inhaled Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Vancza, Elizabeth M.; Galdanes, Karen; Gunnison, Al; Hatch, Gary; Gordon, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a respiratory irritant that leads to airway inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction. Animal studies show that neonates are more sensitive to O3 inhalation than adults, and children represent a potentially susceptible population. This latter notion is not well established, and biological mechanisms underlying a predisposition to pollution-induced pulmonary effects are unknown. We examined age and strain as interactive factors affecting differential pulmonary responses to inhaled O3. Male and female adult mice (15 weeks old) and neonates (15–16 days old) from eight genetically diverse inbred strains were exposed to 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h. Pulmonary injury and lung inflammation were quantified as total protein concentration and total polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) number in lavage fluid recovered 24-h postexposure. Dose-response and time-course curves were generated using SJL/J pups, and 18O lung burden dose was assessed in additional mice. Interstrain differences in response to O3 were seen in neonatal mice: Balb/cJ and SJL/J being most sensitive and A/J and 129x1/SvJ most resistant. The PMN response to O3 was greater in neonates than in adults, specifically for SJL/J and C3H/HeJ strains, independent of dose. Small gender differences were also observed in adult mice. Variation in protein concentrations and PMN counts between adults and pups were strain dependent, suggesting that genetic determinants do play a role in age-related sensitivity to O3. Further research will help to determine what genetic factors contribute to these heightened responses, and to quantify the relative contribution of genes vs. environment in O3-induced health effects. PMID:19066396

  4. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Salbaum, J Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  5. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain

    PubMed Central

    Salbaum, J. Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J.; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  6. Differences in hippocampal CREB phosphorylation in trace fear conditioning of two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoo Kyeong; Song, Jae-Chun; Han, Seol-Heui; Cho, Jeiwon; Smith, Dani R; Gallagher, Michela; Han, Jung-Soo

    2010-07-23

    The effects of genetic background on fear trace conditioning were evaluated in relation to phosphorylated levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus using two different inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6 and DBA/2. The male mice received a trace fear conditioning protocol and unpaired control groups were included to assess nonassociative effects on test performance. Both C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice with paired training displayed higher freezing responses during testing than those with unpaired training, respectively. The C57BL/6 mice with paired training also displayed higher freezing responses to the tone-CS during testing than the DBA/2 mice with paired training. Because much evidence implicates the hippocampus as an important neural substrate for trace fear conditioning, the engagement of the hippocampus was examined after testing by measuring levels of CREB and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB). The results revealed that hippocampal CREB levels in both strains of mice were not significantly altered according to the type of training (unpaired vs. paired). However, the hippocampal pCREB levels were significantly higher in the paired training group than the unpaired control group in C57BL/6 mice, but not in DBA/2 mice. These findings indicate that hippocampal pCREB is closely tied to this form of associative conditioning only in C57BL/6 mice and that different neural substrates may support trace conditioning in C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. PMID:20501325

  7. MPTP neurotoxicity is highly concordant between the sexes among BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Gelareh; Miller, Diane B.; O’Callaghan, James P.; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W.; Jones, Byron C.

    2016-01-01

    Continuing our previous work in which we showed wide-ranging strain differences in MPTP neurotoxicity in male mice among ten BXD recombinant inbred strains, we replicated our work in females from nine of the same strains. Mice received a single s.c. injection of 12.5 mg/kg MPTP or saline. Forty-eight hours later the striatum was dissected for neurochemical analysis. Striatal dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, DOPAC and HVA, striatal serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite, 5-HIAA, were analyzed using HPLC. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an astrocytic protein that increases during the astroglial response to neural injury, were measured using ELISA. There were wide genetic variations in the DA, DOPAC, HVA, TH and GFAP responses to MPTP. We also performed principal component analysis (PCA) on the difference values, saline minus MPTP, for DA, DOPAC, HVA and TH and mapped the dominant principal component to a suggestive QTL on chromosome 1 at the same location that we observed previously for males. Moreover, there were significant correlations between the sexes for the effect of MPTP on DA, HVA, and TH. Our findings suggest that the systems genetic approach as utilized here can help researchers understand the role of sex in individual differences. The same approach can pave the way to understand and pinpoint the genetic bases for individual differences in pathology attributable to toxicants. Such systems genetics approach has broad implications for elucidating gene-environment contributions to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27182044

  8. Comparison of mouse strains for susceptibility to styrene-induced hepatotoxicity and pneumotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.P.

    1997-10-01

    Styrene is known to cause both hepatotoxicity and pneumotoxicity in mice. Strain differences have been reported by other investigators suggesting that Swiss mice are less susceptible than non-Swiss mice to styrene-induced liver damage. In this study, All and C57BL16 mice were found to be similar to non-Swiss albino (NSA) mice in susceptibility whereas CD-1 (Swiss) mice were more resistant to hepatotoxicity as assessed by serum sorbitol dehydrogenase levels and pneumotoxicity as determined by gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and lactate dehydrogenase measurements in bronchoalveolar ravage fluid. Styrene was hepatotoxic in CD-1 mice treated with pyridine to induce CYP2E1. CYP2E1 apoprotein levels and p-nitrophenol hydroxylase activities in control and pyridine-induced mice were similar in the two strains. Hepatic and pulmonary microsomal preparations from both strains metabolized styrene to styrene oxide at similar rates. CD-1 mice were as susceptible as the NSA mice to the effects of styrene oxide. The data suggest that there are no differences in the bioactivation of styrene to styrene oxide or innate susceptibility to the active metabolite that would account for the differences between the CD-1 and NSA mice. 26 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Mouse Behavioral Tasks Relevant to Autism: Phenotypes of Ten Inbred Strains

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Sheryl S.; Nadler, Jessica J.; Young, Nancy B.; Perez, Antonio; Holloway, L. Paige; Barbaro, Ryan P.; Barbaro, Justin R.; West, Lindsay M.; Threadgill, David W.; Lauder, Jean M.; Magnuson, Terry R.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2007-01-01

    Three defining clinical symptoms of autism are aberrant reciprocal social interactions, deficits in social communication, and repetitive behaviors, including motor stereotypies and insistence on sameness. We developed a set of behavioral tasks designed to model components of these core symptoms in mice. Male mice from ten inbred strains were characterized in assays for sociability, preference for social novelty, and reversal of the spatial location of the reinforcer in T-maze and Morris water maze tasks. Six strains, C57BL/6J, C57L/J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, C3H/HeJ, and AKR/J, showed significant levels of sociability, while A/J, BALB/cByJ, BTBR T+tf/J, and 129S1/SvImJ mice did not. C57BL/6J, C57L/J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR T+tf/J showed significant preference for social novelty, while C3H/HeJ, AKR/J, A/J, and 129S1/SvImJ did not. Normal scores on relevant control measures confirmed general health and physical abilities in all strains, ruling out artifactual explanations for social deficits. Elevated plus maze scores confirmed high anxiety-like behaviors in A/J, BALB/cByJ, and 129S1/SvImJ, which could underlie components of their low social approach. Strains that showed high levels of performance on acquisition of a T-maze task were also able to reach criterion for reversal learning. On the Morris water maze task, DBA/2J, AKR/J, BTBR T+tf/J, and 129S1/SvImJ failed to show significant quadrant preference during the reversal probe trial. These results highlight a dissociation between social task performance and reversal learning. BTBR T+tf/J is a particularly interesting strain, displaying both low social approach and resistance to change in routine on the water maze, consistent with an autism-like phenotype. Our multitask strategy for modeling symptoms of autism will be useful for investigating targeted and random gene mutations, QTLs, and microarray analyses. PMID:16971002

  10. Resting-state functional MRI and [18F]-FDG PET demonstrate differences in neuronal activity between commonly used mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Shah, Disha; Deleye, Steven; Verhoye, Marleen; Staelens, Steven; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2016-01-15

    The existence of numerous interesting mouse models of neurological disorders enables the investigation of causal relations between pathological events and the effect of treatment regimes. However, mouse models of a specific neurological disease are often generated using different background strains, which raises the question whether the observed effects are specific to pathology or depend on the used strain. This study used two independent in vivo functional imaging techniques to evaluate whether mouse strain differences exist in functional connectivity (FC) and brain glucose metabolism i.e. indirect measures of neuronal activity. For this purpose, C57BL/6, BALB/C and SJL mice (N=15/group, male) were evaluated using resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) and static [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography ([18F]-FDG PET). RsfMRI and [18F]-FDG PET data were analyzed with independent component analysis (ICA). FC was quantified by calculating the mean network-specific FC strength and [18F]-FDG uptake was quantified by calculating the mean network-specific standard uptake value corrected for plasma glucose levels and body weight (SUVglu). The ICA results showed spatially similar neurological components in the rsfMRI and [18F]-FDG PET data, suggesting that patterns of metabolic covariance in the mouse brain reflect FC networks. Comparing FC and [18F]-FDG data showed that strain-dependent differences in brain activity exist for several brain networks i.e. the frontal, cingulate, (hypo)thalamus, striatum, and sensorimotor networks. The results of this study have implications for the interpretation of in vivo functional imaging data in mouse models of neurological disorders generated on different background strains.

  11. Sheltering Behavior and Locomotor Activity in 11 Genetically Diverse Common Inbred Mouse Strains Using Home-Cage Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Aarts, Emmeke; Maroteaux, Gregoire; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Functional genetic analyses in mice rely on efficient and in-depth characterization of the behavioral spectrum. Automated home-cage observation can provide a systematic and efficient screening method to detect unexplored, novel behavioral phenotypes. Here, we analyzed high-throughput automated home-cage data using existing and novel concepts, to detect a plethora of genetic differences in spontaneous behavior in a panel of commonly used inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ, FVB/NJ, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ and CAST/EiJ). Continuous video-tracking observations of sheltering behavior and locomotor activity were segmented into distinguishable behavioral elements, and studied at different time scales, yielding a set of 115 behavioral parameters of which 105 showed highly significant strain differences. This set of 115 parameters was highly dimensional; principal component analysis identified 26 orthogonal components with eigenvalues above one. Especially novel parameters of sheltering behavior and parameters describing aspects of motion of the mouse in the home-cage showed high genetic effect sizes. Multi-day habituation curves and patterns of behavior surrounding dark/light phase transitions showed striking strain differences, albeit with lower genetic effect sizes. This spontaneous home-cage behavior study demonstrates high dimensionality, with a strong genetic contribution to specific sets of behavioral measures. Importantly, spontaneous home-cage behavior analysis detects genetic effects that cannot be studied in conventional behavioral tests, showing that the inclusion of a few days of undisturbed, labor extensive home-cage assessment may greatly aid gene function analyses and drug target discovery. PMID:25264768

  12. Sheltering behavior and locomotor activity in 11 genetically diverse common inbred mouse strains using home-cage monitoring.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Aarts, Emmeke; Maroteaux, Gregoire; van der Sluis, Sophie; Verhage, Matthijs; Smit, August B

    2014-01-01

    Functional genetic analyses in mice rely on efficient and in-depth characterization of the behavioral spectrum. Automated home-cage observation can provide a systematic and efficient screening method to detect unexplored, novel behavioral phenotypes. Here, we analyzed high-throughput automated home-cage data using existing and novel concepts, to detect a plethora of genetic differences in spontaneous behavior in a panel of commonly used inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ, FVB/NJ, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ and CAST/EiJ). Continuous video-tracking observations of sheltering behavior and locomotor activity were segmented into distinguishable behavioral elements, and studied at different time scales, yielding a set of 115 behavioral parameters of which 105 showed highly significant strain differences. This set of 115 parameters was highly dimensional; principal component analysis identified 26 orthogonal components with eigenvalues above one. Especially novel parameters of sheltering behavior and parameters describing aspects of motion of the mouse in the home-cage showed high genetic effect sizes. Multi-day habituation curves and patterns of behavior surrounding dark/light phase transitions showed striking strain differences, albeit with lower genetic effect sizes. This spontaneous home-cage behavior study demonstrates high dimensionality, with a strong genetic contribution to specific sets of behavioral measures. Importantly, spontaneous home-cage behavior analysis detects genetic effects that cannot be studied in conventional behavioral tests, showing that the inclusion of a few days of undisturbed, labor extensive home-cage assessment may greatly aid gene function analyses and drug target discovery. PMID:25264768

  13. In vivo whole body and organ arginine metabolism during endotoxemia (sepsis) is dependent on mouse strain and gender.

    PubMed

    Luiking, Y C; Hallemeesch, M M; Vissers, Y L J; Lamers, W H; Deutz, N E P

    2004-10-01

    Arginine metabolism involves various organs such as the kidney, the intestines, and the liver, which act together in an interorgan axis. Major pathways for arginine production are protein breakdown and de novo arginine production from citrulline; disposal of arginine is mainly used for protein synthesis or used by the enzymes arginase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). To assess in vivo organ arginine metabolism under normal conditions and during endotoxemia we used a mouse model, and analyzed for gender and strain differences. Male and female inbred FVB and C57BL6/J mice were anesthetized and catheterized to study whole body, gut, liver, renal and muscle metabolism, using a stable isotope infusion protocol. Animals were treated with saline or lipopolysaccharide. Plasma arginine levels tended to be higher in female mice, although levels were not significantly different from male mice (P = 0.09). Although not all significantly different, whole body arginine production and arginine clearance tended to be higher in C57BL6/J mice (P < 0.1), while citrulline (P = 0.05), NO (P = 0.08), and de novo arginine (P < 0.01) production were higher in FVB mice. During endotoxemia, NO production increased in general (P < 0.05), while whole body arginine clearance increased in FVB mice, but decreased in C57BL6/J mice (P < 0.01). At the organ level, portal-drained viscera (PDV) arginine metabolism was higher in FVB than in C57BL6/J mice (P < 0.05). During endotoxemia, liver arginine metabolism decreased in general (P < 0.05), while strain differences existed for PDV, muscle, and renal arginine metabolism. In conclusion, stable isotope techniques in multicatheterized mice allow measurements of arginine metabolism on whole body and organ level. Strain and gender differences are present in arginine metabolism under physiological conditions and during endotoxemia.

  14. Integrative Metabolome and Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Discordant Energetic Stress between Mouse Strains with Differential Sensitivity to Acrolein-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fabisiak, James P.; Medvedovic, Mario; Alexander, Danny C.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Concel, Vincent J.; Bein, Kiflai; Jang, An Soo; Brendt, Annerose; Vuga, Louis J.; Brant, Kelly A.; Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Dopico, Richard A.; Ganguly, Koustav; Upadhyay, Swapna; Li, Qian; Hu, Zhen; Kaminski, Naftali; Leikauf, George D.

    2012-01-01

    A respiratory irritant, acrolein is generated by overheating cooking oils or by domestic cooking using biomass fuels, and is in tobacco smoke, an occupational health hazard in the restaurant workplace. To better understand the metabolic role of the lung and to generate insights into the pathogenesis of acrolein-induced acute lung injury, SM/J (sensitive) and 129×1/SvJ (resistant) inbred mouse strains were exposed and the lung metabolome was integrated with the transcriptome profile. A total of 280 small molecules were identified and mean values (log 2 >0.58 or <−0.58, .p<0.05) were considered different for between-strain comparisons or within-strain responses to acrolein treatment. At baseline, 24 small molecules increased and 33 small molecules decreased in the SM/J mouse lung as compared to 129×1/SvJ mouse lung. Notable among the increased compounds was malonyl carnitine. Following acrolein exposure, several compounds indicative of glycolysis and branched chain amino acid metabolism increased similarly in both strains, whereas SM/J mice were less effective in generating metabolites related to fatty acid β-oxidation. These findings suggest management of energetic stress varies between these strains, and that the ability to evoke auxiliary energy generating pathways rapidly and effectively may be critical in enhancing survival during acute lung injury in mice. PMID:21823223

  15. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Jennifer R; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-03-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2- to 5-fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6 J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2 J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2 J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running.

  16. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Jennifer; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2 to 5 fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running. PMID:25435316

  17. A nonsense mutation in the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene (Hpd) causes skipping of the constitutive exon and hypertyrosinemia in mouse strain III.

    PubMed

    Endo, F; Awata, H; Katoh, H; Matsuda, I

    1995-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD; EC 1.13.11.27) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. Decreased activity of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase in the liver of mouse strain III is associated with tyrosinemia. We report a nucleotide substitution that generates a termination codon in exon 7 of the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene in III mice. This mutation is associated with partial exon skipping, and most of the mRNA lacks sequences corresponding to exon 7. The partial exon skipping apparently is the result of a nonsense mutation in the exon. Mouse strain III is a model for human tyrosinemia type 3 (McKusick 276710), and this strain together with recently established models for tyrosinemia type 1 will facilitate studies of hereditary tyrosinemias.

  18. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites. PMID:26658113

  19. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites.

  20. A novel anesthesia regime enables neurofunctional studies and imaging genetics across mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Petrinovic, Marija M.; Hankov, Georges; Schroeter, Aileen; Bruns, Andreas; Rudin, Markus; von Kienlin, Markus; Künnecke, Basil; Mueggler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revolutionized neuroscience by opening a unique window that allows neurocircuitry function and pathological alterations to be probed non-invasively across brain disorders. Here we report a novel sustainable anesthesia procedure for small animal neuroimaging that overcomes shortcomings of anesthetics commonly used in rodent fMRI. The significantly improved preservation of cerebrovascular dynamics enhances sensitivity to neural activity changes for which it serves as a proxy in fMRI readouts. Excellent cross-species/strain applicability provides coherence among preclinical findings and is expected to improve translation to clinical fMRI investigations. The novel anesthesia procedure based on the GABAergic anesthetic etomidate was extensively validated in fMRI studies conducted in a range of genetically engineered rodent models of autism and strains commonly used for transgenic manipulations. Etomidate proved effective, yielded long-term stable physiology with basal cerebral blood flow of ~0.5 ml/g/min and full recovery. Cerebrovascular responsiveness of up to 180% was maintained as demonstrated with perfusion- and BOLD-based fMRI upon hypercapnic, pharmacological and sensory stimulation. Hence, etomidate lends itself as an anesthetic-of-choice for translational neuroimaging studies across rodent models of brain disorders. PMID:27080031

  1. A novel anesthesia regime enables neurofunctional studies and imaging genetics across mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Petrinovic, Marija M; Hankov, Georges; Schroeter, Aileen; Bruns, Andreas; Rudin, Markus; von Kienlin, Markus; Künnecke, Basil; Mueggler, Thomas

    2016-04-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revolutionized neuroscience by opening a unique window that allows neurocircuitry function and pathological alterations to be probed non-invasively across brain disorders. Here we report a novel sustainable anesthesia procedure for small animal neuroimaging that overcomes shortcomings of anesthetics commonly used in rodent fMRI. The significantly improved preservation of cerebrovascular dynamics enhances sensitivity to neural activity changes for which it serves as a proxy in fMRI readouts. Excellent cross-species/strain applicability provides coherence among preclinical findings and is expected to improve translation to clinical fMRI investigations. The novel anesthesia procedure based on the GABAergic anesthetic etomidate was extensively validated in fMRI studies conducted in a range of genetically engineered rodent models of autism and strains commonly used for transgenic manipulations. Etomidate proved effective, yielded long-term stable physiology with basal cerebral blood flow of ~0.5 ml/g/min and full recovery. Cerebrovascular responsiveness of up to 180% was maintained as demonstrated with perfusion- and BOLD-based fMRI upon hypercapnic, pharmacological and sensory stimulation. Hence, etomidate lends itself as an anesthetic-of-choice for translational neuroimaging studies across rodent models of brain disorders.

  2. [Anti-aging studies on the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) strains].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryoya

    2010-01-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse (SAM), a murine model of accelerated senescence, was established by Toshio Takeda and colleagues. SAM consists of series of SAMP (prone) and SAMR (resistant) lines. All SAMP lines (from SAMP1 to SAMP11) are characterized by accelerated accumulation of senile features, earlier onset and faster progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes, such as amyloidosis, impaired immune response, senile osteoporosis and deficits in learning and memory. These SAMP lines are useful for evaluation of putative anti-aging therapies. For example, SAMP1 line is used to study the anti-aging effect of the antioxidant containing foods and various anti-oxidants, such as coenzyme Q10, vitamin C, lycopene. SAMP8 line exhibiting an early onset of impaired learning and memory is often used for test strategies for therapeutic intervention of dementia of early onset. SAMP6 is used as an animal model for developing new strategies for the treatment of osteoporosis in humans. Various lines of SAM (P1, P6, P8, P10 and R1) are now commercially available for research. In this review, I will briefly introduce various usages of SAM in anti-aging research. PMID:20046059

  3. Transgenic mouse strains as platforms for the successful discovery and development of human therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry L

    2014-03-01

    Transgenic mice have yielded seven of the ten currently-approved human antibody drugs, making them the most successful platform for the discovery of fully human antibody therapeutics. The use of the in vivo immune system helps drive this success by taking advantage of the natural selection process that produces antibodies with desirable characteristics. Appropriately genetically-engineered mice act as robust engines for the generation of diverse repertoires of affinity- matured fully human variable regions with intrinsic properties necessary for successful antibody drug development including high potency, specificity, manufacturability, solubility and low risk of immunogenicity. A broad range of mAb drug targets are addressable in these mice, comprising both secreted and transmembrane targets, including membrane multi-spanning targets, as well as human target antigens that share high sequence identity with their mouse orthologue. Transgenic mice can routinely yield antibodies with sub-nanomolar binding affinity for their antigen, with lead candidate mAbs frequently possessing affinities for binding to their target of less than 100 picomolar, without requiring any ex vivo affinity optimization. While the originator transgenic mice platforms are no longer broadly available, a new generation of transgenic platforms is in development for discovery of the next wave of human therapeutic antibodies.

  4. Physical Activity and Food Consumption in High- and Low-Active Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Alan P.; Curtis, Tamera S.; Turner, Michael J.; Lightfoot, J. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of innate activity level and running wheel access on food consumption in high-active (SWR/J) low-active (DBA/2J) mice. Methods Two strains of inbred mice were used in this study due to their high activity level (SWR/J) and low activity level (DBA/2J). The mice were housed in individual cages, and half of the mice in each strain had free access to running wheels in their cages, while the other mice received no running wheel. All mice consumed standard chow and water ad libitum for 13 weeks during the study period. Running-wheel activity (daily), food consumption (bi-weekly), and body mass (weekly) were recorded. Results SWR/J runners consumed more food (6.0±0.4g/day) than SWR/J non-runners (4.7±0.2g/day; p=0.03), DBA/2J runners (4.6±0.2g/day; p=0.02), and DBA/2J non-runners (4.2±0.2g/day; p=0.006). SWR/J non-runners consumed more food than DBA/2J non-runners (p=0.03). Average daily distance and duration were significantly greater for the SWR/J runners (6.4±0.7km/day and 333.6±40.5min/day, respectively) compared to the DBA/2J runners (1.6±0.4km/day and 91.3±23.0min/day, respectively). There was a significant correlation between food consumption and distance (r=0.74, p<0.001), duration (r=0.68, p<0.001), and speed (r=0.58, p<0.001), respectively, in all mice. However, when considering the individuals strains, the relationship between running-wheel activity and food consumption was only statistically significant for the SWR/J mice. Conclusion Higher running-wheel activity in mice was associated with increased food consumption in the SWR/J mice but not the DBA/2J mice. In DBA/2J mice the addition of a running wheel did not result in increased food consumption, suggesting energy expenditure of non-wheel cage activity in the control DBA/2J mice was similar to the energy expenditure of the wheel activity since body mass was similar between the two groups. PMID:20216465

  5. Optical measurement of mouse strain differences in cerebral blood flow using indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-Min; Sohn, Inkyung; Kim, Seunggyu; Kim, Daehwan; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Chan

    2015-06-01

    C57BL/6 mice have more cerebral arterial branches and collaterals than BALB/c mice. We measured and compared blood flow dynamics of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in these two strains, using noninvasive optical imaging with indocyanine green (ICG). Relative maximum fluorescence intensity (Imax) and the time needed for ICG to reach Imax in the MCA of C57BL/c were lower than that in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the mean transit time was significantly lower in C57BL/6 than in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that the higher number of arterial branches and collaterals in C57BL/6 mice yields a lower blood flow per cerebral artery.

  6. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages from lipopolysaccharide responder and nonresponder mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Cuffini, A; Carlone, N A; Forni, G

    1980-01-01

    The phagocytic capacity of macrophages from C3H/H3J mice was assessed against lipopolysaccharide-producing (Escherichia coli) and -nonproducing (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Despite their gene-coded unresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide endotoxin and lymphokines and their defective tumoricidal activity, proteose peptone-induced C3H/HeJ macrophages did not display a defective phagocytic capacity, but rather displayed an enhanced phagocytosis of both bacterial strains compared with macrophages from closely related C3H/HeN mice. Unstimulated peritoneal resident C3H/HeJ macrophages, on the other hand, displayed a normal phagocytic activity toward E. coli and enhanced phagocytosis toward S. aureus. PMID:6995321

  7. Optical measurement of mouse strain differences in cerebral blood flow using indocyanine green

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye-Min; Sohn, Inkyung; Kim, Seunggyu; Kim, Daehwan; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Chan

    2015-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice have more cerebral arterial branches and collaterals than BALB/c mice. We measured and compared blood flow dynamics of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in these two strains, using noninvasive optical imaging with indocyanine green (ICG). Relative maximum fluorescence intensity (Imax) and the time needed for ICG to reach Imax in the MCA of C57BL/c were lower than that in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the mean transit time was significantly lower in C57BL/6 than in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that the higher number of arterial branches and collaterals in C57BL/6 mice yields a lower blood flow per cerebral artery. PMID:25833343

  8. Enhanced alcohol self-administration and reinstatement in a highly impulsive, inattentive recombinant inbred mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Staal, Jorn; Smit, August B; De Vries, Taco J; Spijker, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in executive control have frequently been associated with alcohol use disorder. Here we investigated to what extent pre-existing genetically encoded levels of impulsive/inattentive behavior associate with motivation to take alcohol and vulnerability to cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in an operant self-administration paradigm. We took advantage of BXD16, a recombinant inbred strain previously shown to have enhanced impulsivity and poor attentional control. We compared BXD16 with C57BL/6J mice in a simple choice reaction time task (SCRTT) and confirmed its impulsive/inattentive phenotype. BXD16 mice were less active in a novel open field (OF), and were equally active in an automated home cage environment, showing that increased impulsive responding of BXD16 mice could not be explained by enhanced general activity compared to C57BL/6J mice. After training in a sucrose/alcohol fading self-administration procedure, BXD16 showed increased motivation to earn 10% alcohol solution, both under fixed ratio (FR1) and progressive ratio (PR2) schedules of reinforcement. Responding on the active lever readily decreased during extinction training with no apparent differences between strains. However, upon re-exposure to alcohol-associated cues, alcohol seeking was reinstated to a larger extent in BXD16 than in C57BL/6J mice. Although further studies are needed to determine whether impulsivity/inattention and alcohol seeking depend on common or separate genetic loci, these data show that in mice enhanced impulsivity coincides with increased motivation to take alcohol, as well as relapse vulnerability. PMID:24198771

  9. Gene expression in the mouse eye: an online resource for genetics using 103 strains of mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Freeman-Anderson, Natalie E.; Templeton, Justin P.; Nassr, Mohamed; Wang, Xusheng; Gu, Weikuan; Jiao, Yan; Williams, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Individual differences in patterns of gene expression account for much of the diversity of ocular phenotypes and variation in disease risk. We examined the causes of expression differences, and in their linkage to sequence variants, functional differences, and ocular pathophysiology. Methods mRNAs from young adult eyes were hybridized to oligomer microarrays (Affymetrix M430v2). Data were embedded in GeneNetwork with millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms, custom array annotation, and information on complementary cellular, functional, and behavioral traits. The data include male and female samples from 28 common strains, 68 BXD recombinant inbred lines, as well as several mutants and knockouts. Results We provide a fully integrated resource to map, graph, analyze, and test causes and correlations of differences in gene expression in the eye. Covariance in mRNA expression can be used to infer gene function, extract signatures for different cells or tissues, to define molecular networks, and to map quantitative trait loci that produce expression differences. These data can also be used to connect disease phenotypes with sequence variants. We demonstrate that variation in rhodopsin expression efficiently predicts candidate genes for eight uncloned retinal diseases, including WDR17 for the human RP29 locus. Conclusions The high level of strain variation in gene expression is a powerful tool that can be used to explore and test molecular networks underlying variation in structure, function, and disease susceptibility. The integration of these data into GeneNetwork provides users with a workbench to test linkages between sequence differences and eye structure and function. PMID:19727342

  10. Significant effects of sex, strain, and anesthesia in the intrahippocampal kainate mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Twele, Friederike; Töllner, Kathrin; Brandt, Claudia; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    The intrahippocampal kainate mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is increasingly being used for studies on epileptogenesis and antiepileptogenesis. Almost all previous studies used male mice for this purpose, and no study is available in this or other models of acquired epilepsy that directly compared epileptogenesis in female and male rodents. Epidemiological studies suggest that gender may affect susceptibility to epilepsy and its prognosis; therefore, one goal of this study was to investigate whether sex has an influence on latent period and epileptogenesis in the intrahippocampal kainate model in mice. Another aspect that was examined in the present study was whether mouse strain differences in epileptogenesis exist. Finally, we examined the effects of different types of anesthesia (chloral hydrate, isoflurane) on kainate-induced status epilepticus (SE) and epileptogenesis. Continuous (24/7) video-EEG monitoring was used during SE and the 2 weeks following SE as well as 4-6 weeks after SE. In male NMRI mice with chloral hydrate anesthesia during kainate injection, SE was followed by a seizure-free latent period of 10-14 days if hippocampal paroxysmal discharges (HPDs) recorded from the kainate focus were considered the onset of epilepsy. Anesthesia with isoflurane led to a more rapid onset and higher severity of SE, and not all male NMRI mice exhibited a seizure-free latent period. Female NMRI mice differed from male animals in the lack of any clear latent period, independently of anesthesia type. Furthermore, HPDs were only rarely observed. These problems were not resolved by decreasing the dose of kainate or using other strains (C57BL/6, FVB/N) of female mice. The present data are the first to demonstrate marked sex-related differences in the latent period following brain injury in a rodent model of acquired epilepsy. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that the choice of anesthestic agent during kainate administration affects SE severity and as a

  11. Differences in susceptibility among mouse strains to infection with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA clone) sporozoites and its relationship to protection by gamma-irradiated sporozoites

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.I.; Lowell, G.H.; Gordon, D.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Three inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6 (H-2b), A/J (H-2a), and BALB/c (H-2d), and 1 outbred strain, CD-1, demonstrated differences in susceptibility to iv challenge with the ANKA clone of Plasmodium berghei. Mice were challenged with 100, 1,000, or 10,000 sporozoites, then evaluated daily beginning on day 4 for patency. CD-1 mice were further evaluated at challenge doses of 12,500, 25,000, and 50,000 sporozoites. C57BL/6 mice were the easiest to infect, with 90% becoming infected with 100 sporozoites. The outbred strain CD-1 was the most difficult to infect, requiring a challenge dose of 25,000 sporozoites/mouse in order to achieve a 100% infection rate. Mouse strains also demonstrated differences in their ability to be protected by intravenous immunization with gamma-irradiated sporozoites. A/J mice needed a minimum of 3 doses of irradiated sporozoites for protection against a challenge with 10,000 sporozoites. In contrast, BALB/c mice immunized with a single dose of 1,000 irradiated sporozoites are protected against a 10,000 sporozoite challenge. These data suggest that both infectivity and protection are genetically restricted and that susceptibility to infection may be inversely related to protection.

  12. Alteration of medial-edge epithelium cell adhesion in two Tgf-β3 null mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Del Río, Aurora; Barrio, Carmen; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; Garcillán, Beatriz; Amorós, María; Fuerte, Tamara; Fernández, Álvaro; Trinidad, Eva; Rabadán, M Ángeles; López, Yamila; Martínez, M Luisa; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2008-01-01

    Although palatal shelf adhesion is a crucial event during palate development, little work has been carried out to determine which molecules are responsible for this process. Furthermore, whether altered palatal shelf adhesion causes the cleft palate presented by Tgf-β3 null mutant mice has not yet been clarified. Here, we study the presence/distribution of some extracellular matrix and cell adhesion molecules at the time of the contact of palatal shelves in both wild-type and Tgf-β3 null mutant palates of two strains of mice (C57/BL/6J (C57), and MF1) that develop cleft palates of different severity. We have performed immunohistochemistry with antibodies against collagens IV and IX, laminin, fibronectin, the α5- and β1-integrins, and ICAM-1; in situ hybridization with a Nectin-1 riboprobe; and palatal shelf cultures treated or untreated with TGF-β3 or neutralizing antibodies against fibronectin or the α5-integrin. Our results show the location of these molecules in the wild-type mouse medial edge epithelium (MEE) of both strains at the time of the contact of palatal shelves; the heavier (C57) and milder (MF1) alteration of their presence in the Tgf-β3 null mutants; the importance of TGF-β3 to restore their normal pattern of expression; and the crucial role of fibronectin and the α5-integrin in palatal shelf adhesion. We thus provide insight into the molecular bases of this important process and the cleft palate presented by Tgf-β3 null mutant mice. PMID:18431835

  13. Alteration of medial-edge epithelium cell adhesion in two Tgf-beta3 null mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Del Río, Aurora; Barrio, Carmen; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; Garcillán, Beatriz; Amorós, María; Fuerte, Tamara; Fernández, Alvaro; Trinidad, Eva; Rabadán, María Angeles; López, Yamila; Martínez, María Luisa; Martínez-Alvarez, Concepción

    2008-04-01

    Although palatal shelf adhesion is a crucial event during palate development, little work has been carried out to determine which molecules are responsible for this process. Furthermore, whether altered palatal shelf adhesion causes the cleft palate presented by Tgf-beta3 null mutant mice has not yet been clarified. Here, we study the presence/distribution of some extracellular matrix and cell adhesion molecules at the time of the contact of palatal shelves in both wild-type and Tgf-beta3 null mutant palates of two strains of mice (C57/BL/6J (C57), and MF1) that develop cleft palates of different severity. We have performed immunohistochemistry with antibodies against collagens IV and IX, laminin, fibronectin, the alpha5- and beta1-integrins, and ICAM-1; in situ hybridization with a Nectin-1 riboprobe; and palatal shelf cultures treated or untreated with TGF-beta3 or neutralizing antibodies against fibronectin or the alpha5-integrin. Our results show the location of these molecules in the wild-type mouse medial edge epithelium (MEE) of both strains at the time of the contact of palatal shelves; the heavier (C57) and milder (MF1) alteration of their presence in the Tgf-beta3 null mutants; the importance of TGF-beta3 to restore their normal pattern of expression; and the crucial role of fibronectin and the alpha5-integrin in palatal shelf adhesion. We thus provide insight into the molecular bases of this important process and the cleft palate presented by Tgf-beta3 null mutant mice.

  14. Hypothalamic transcriptomes of 99 mouse strains reveal trans eQTL hotspots, splicing QTLs and novel non-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Hasin-Brumshtein, Yehudit; Khan, Arshad H; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Pan, Calvin; Parks, Brian W; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Piehowski, Paul D; Brümmer, Anneke; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Eskin, Eleazar; Smith, Richard D; Lusis, Aldons J; Smith, Desmond J

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies had shown that the integration of genome wide expression profiles, in metabolic tissues, with genetic and phenotypic variance, provided valuable insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms. We used RNA-Seq to characterize hypothalamic transcriptome in 99 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP), a reference resource population for cardiovascular and metabolic traits. We report numerous novel transcripts supported by proteomic analyses, as well as novel non coding RNAs. High resolution genetic mapping of transcript levels in HMDP, reveals both local and trans expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) demonstrating 2 trans eQTL 'hotspots' associated with expression of hundreds of genes. We also report thousands of alternative splicing events regulated by genetic variants. Finally, comparison with about 150 metabolic and cardiovascular traits revealed many highly significant associations. Our data provide a rich resource for understanding the many physiologic functions mediated by the hypothalamus and their genetic regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15614.001 PMID:27623010

  15. Divergent neuroactive steroid responses to stress and ethanol in rat and mouse strains: Relevance for human studies

    PubMed Central

    Porcu, Patrizia; Morrow, A. Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Neuroactive steroids are endogenous or synthetic steroids that rapidly alter neuronal excitability via membrane receptors, primarily GABAA receptors. Neuroactive steroids regulate many physiological processes including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, ovarian cycle, pregnancy, aging, and reward. Moreover, alterations in neuroactive steroid synthesis are implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. Objectives This review will summarize the pharmacological properties and physiological regulation of neuroactive steroids, with a particular focus on divergent neuroactive steroid responses to stress and ethanol in rats, mice and humans. Results GABAergic neuroactive steroids exert a homeostatic regulation of the HPA axis in rats and humans, whereby the increase in neuroactive steroid levels following acute stress counteracts HPA axis hyperactivity and restores homeostasis. In contrast, in C57BL/6J mice, acute stress decreases neurosteroidogenesis and neuroactive steroids exert paradoxical excitatory effects upon the HPA axis. Rats, mice and humans also differ in the neuroactive steroid responses to ethanol. Genetic variation in neurosteroidogenesis may explain the different neuroactive steroid responses to stress or ethanol. Conclusions Rats and mouse strains show divergent effects of stress and ethanol on neuroactive steroids in both plasma and brain. The study of genetic variation in the various processes that determine neuroactive steroids levels as well as their effects on cell signaling may underlie these differences and may play a relevant role for the potential therapeutic benefits of neuroactive steroids. PMID:24770626

  16. Dissecting the Effect of Genetic Variation on the Hepatic Expression of Drug Disposition Genes across the Collaborative Cross Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nachshon, Aharon; Abu-Toamih Atamni, Hanifa J.; Steuerman, Yael; Sheikh-Hamed, Roa'a; Dorman, Alexandra; Mott, Richard; Dohm, Juliane C.; Lehrach, Hans; Sultan, Marc; Shamir, Ron; Sauer, Sascha; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Gat-Viks, Irit

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in pharmaceutical research is to investigate genetic variation in response to drugs. The Collaborative Cross (CC) mouse reference population is a promising model for pharmacogenomic studies because of its large amount of genetic variation, genetic reproducibility, and dense recombination sites. While the CC lines are phenotypically diverse, their genetic diversity in drug disposition processes, such as detoxification reactions, is still largely uncharacterized. Here we systematically measured RNA-sequencing expression profiles from livers of 29 CC lines under baseline conditions. We then leveraged a reference collection of metabolic biotransformation pathways to map potential relations between drugs and their underlying expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). By applying this approach on proximal eQTLs, including eQTLs acting on the overall expression of genes and on the expression of particular transcript isoforms, we were able to construct the organization of hepatic eQTL-drug connectivity across the CC population. The analysis revealed a substantial impact of genetic variation acting on drug biotransformation, allowed mapping of potential joint genetic effects in the context of individual drugs, and demonstrated crosstalk between drug metabolism and lipid metabolism. Our findings provide a resource for investigating drug disposition in the CC strains, and offer a new paradigm for integrating biotransformation reactions to corresponding variations in DNA sequences. PMID:27761138

  17. Mouse strain-dependent caspase activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not result in apoptosis or modulation of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Koerner, Michael R.; Lampe, Jed N.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-12-15

    The mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-mediated hepatic oncotic necrosis have been extensively characterized. However, it was recently demonstrated that fed CD-1 mice have a transient caspase activation which initiates apoptosis. To evaluate these findings in more detail, outbred (Swiss Webster, SW) and inbred (C57BL/6) mice were treated with APAP with or without pan-caspase inhibitor and compared to the apoptosis model of galactosamine (GalN)/endotoxin (ET). Fasted or fed APAP-treated C57BL/6 mice showed no evidence of caspase-3 processing or activity. Interestingly, a minor, temporary increase in caspase-3 processing and activity (150% above baseline) was observed after APAP treatment only in fed SW mice. The degree of caspase-3 activation in SW mice after APAP was minor compared to that observed in GalN/ET-treated mice (1600% above baseline). The pancaspase inhibitor attenuated caspase activation and resulted in increased APAP-induced injury (plasma ALT, necrosis scoring). The caspase inhibitor did not affect apoptosis because regardless of treatment only < 0.5% of hepatocytes showed consistent apoptotic morphology after APAP. In contrast, > 20% apoptotic cells were observed in GalN/ET-treated mice. Presence of the caspase inhibitor altered hepatic glutathione levels in SW mice, which could explain the exacerbation of injury. Additionally, the infiltration of hepatic neutrophils was not altered by the fed state of either mouse strain. Conclusion: Minor caspase-3 activation without apoptotic cell death can be observed only in fed mice of some outbred strains. These findings suggest that although the severity of APAP-induced liver injury varies between fed and fasted animals, the mechanism of cell death does not fundamentally change. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During acetaminophen overdose caspase-3 can be activated in fed mice of certain outbred strains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hepatic ATP levels are not the determining factor for caspase

  18. A new atypical genotype mouse virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from the heart of a wild caught puma (Felis concolor) from Durango, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Alvarado-Esquivel, C; Herrera-Valenzuela, V H; Ortiz-Diaz, J J; Oliveira, S; Verma, S K; Choudhary, S; Kwok, O C H; Su, C

    2013-11-01

    Nothing is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife in Mexico. In the present study, a mouse virulent T. gondii strain was isolated from the heart of a wild puma (Felis concolor). The puma was found roaming in outskirt of Durango City, Mexico and tranquilized for moving to a zoo. The puma died during translocation and a necropsy examination was performed. The puma had an antibody titer for T. gondii of 200 by the modified agglutination test. Its heart and brain tissue were bioassayed into 2 outbred Swiss Webster (SW) and 1 gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mouse. The KO mouse and the 2 SW mice that became infected after inoculation with homogenate of puma heart died of acute toxoplasmosis 12, 19 and 20 days p.i. respectively and tachyzoites were found in lungs of all 3 mice. None of the 4 SW and 1 KO mouse inoculated with digest of the puma brain became infected with T. gondii. Tachyzoites from the lungs of mice were propagated in cell cultures. Tachyzoites from cell culture were inoculated into 5 SW; the mice died or had to be killed 14 days p.i. and a cat fed tissues of these mice shed T. gondii oocysts. Results of mortality and infectivity of tachyzoites and oocysts in SW mice indicated that the puma T. gondii strain (designated TgPumaMe1) was virulent for outbred mice. DNA isolated from culture-derived tachyzoites was characterized using 11 PCR-RFLP markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico) revealed a new genotype (ToxoDB PCR-RFLP #222). Isolation of atypical genotype T. gondii from wild puma indicates that mouse virulent strains are circulating in wildlife in Mexico.

  19. Reduced social interaction, behavioural flexibility and BDNF signalling in the BTBR T+ tf/J strain, a mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Scattoni, M L; Martire, A; Cartocci, G; Ferrante, A; Ricceri, L

    2013-08-15

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social and communication impairments and repetitive behaviours. The inbred BTBR T+ tf/J (BTBR) strain, a putative mouse model of autism, exhibits lower social interactions, higher repetitive self-grooming levels and unusual pattern of vocalizations as compared to C57BL/6J strain. First aim of the present study was to evaluate at adolescence (postnatal days 30-35) male BTBR and C57BL/6J performances in two different tasks involving either investigation of social cues (same strain partners) or non social ones (inanimate objects). In the social interaction test, BTBR mice showed a reduction of investigation of the social partner, due to a selective reduction of head sniffing, associated with a decrease in ultrasonic vocalizations. By contrast, no strain differences were detected in object investigations. Second aim of the study was to evaluate adult male BTBR and C57BL/6J performances in a fear conditioning task. Strain differences were evident during contextual retest: these strain differences primarily suggested a lack of behavioural flexibility in BTBR mice (i.e., realizing the occurrence of changes in the experimental paradigm). Subsequent electrophysiological analysis in hippocampal slices from adult BTBR and C57BL/6J mice revealed a significant reduction of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-induced potentiation of synaptic transmission in BTBR mice. BDNF and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) protein levels measured in the hippocampal region were also lower in BTBR as compared to C57BL/6J mice. These data confirm the presence of low levels of direct interaction with social stimuli in BTBR mice at adolescence, in the absence of any strain difference as for investigation of physical objects. At adulthood in BTBR mice clear signs of behavioural inflexibility were evident whereas both biochemical and electrophysiological data point to decreased BDNF signalling (likely due to a reduction in TrkB levels) in the

  20. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, V S; Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Tsybko, A S; Tikhonova, M A; Kulikov, A V; Popova, N K

    2012-07-12

    The effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on depressive-like behavior and serotonin (5-HT) system in the brain of antidepressant sensitive cataleptics (ASC)/Icg mouse strain, characterized by depressive-like behavior, in comparison with the parental nondepressive CBA/Lac mouse strain was examined. Significant decrease of catalepsy and tail suspension test (TST) immobility was shown 17days after acute central BDNF administration (300ng i.c.v.) in ASC mice. In CBA mouse strain, BDNF moderately decreased catalepsy without any effect on TST immobility time. Significant difference between ASC and CBA mice in the effect of BDNF on 5-HT system was revealed. It was shown that central administration of BDNF led to increase of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression but not 5-HT(1A) functional activity in ASC mice. Increased tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2) and 5-HT(2A) receptor genes expression accompanied by 5-HT(2A) receptor sensitization was shown in BDNF-treated ASC but not in CBA mouse strain, suggesting BDNF-induced increase of the brain 5-HT system functional activity and activation of neurogenesis in "depressive" ASC mice. There were no changes found in the 5-HT transporter mRNA level in BDNF-treated ASC and CBA mice. In conclusion, central administration of BDNF produced prolonged ameliorative effect on depressive-like behavior accompanied by increase of the Tph-2, 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) genes expression and 5-HT(2A) receptor functional activity in animal model of hereditary behavior disorders.

  1. GENETIC MAPPING OF VOCALIZATION TO A SERIES OF INCREASING ACUTE FOOTSHOCKS USING B6.A CONSOMIC AND B6.D2 CONGENIC MOUSE STRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Douglas B; Chesler, Elissa J; Cook, Melloni N.; Cockroft, Judy; Philip, Vivek M; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Footshock response is used to study biological functions in mammals. However, the genetics underlying variability in footshock sensitivity are not well understood. In the current studies, a panel of B6.A consomic mouse strains, two B6.D2 congenic mouse strains and the progenitor strains were screened for footshock sensitivity as measured by audible vocalization. It was found that A/J (A) mice and C57BL/6J (B6) mice with an A Chromosome 1 (Chr 1) were less sensitive to footshock compared to B6 animals. Furthermore, the offspring of Chr 1 consomic mice crossed with B6 mice had vocalization levels that were intermediate to A/J and B6 animals. A F2 mapping panel revealed two significant QTLs for footshock vocalization centered around D1Mit490 and D1Mit206 on Chr 1. The role of these Chr 1 loci in footshock sensitivity was confirmed in B6.D2 congenic mice. These data identify genetic regions involved in footshock sensitivity and establish additional mouse resources for use in investigating complex behaviors.

  2. A quantitative histological study of strain-dependent differences in the effects of irradiation on mouse lung during the intermediate and late phases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharplin, J.; Franko, A.J. )

    1989-07-01

    Strain differences in the intermediate and late phases of the radiation response of mouse lung were investigated histologically. The proportion of lung impairment in mice at 28 and 52 weeks postirradiation and in mice dying of respiratory insufficiency was assessed by scoring lung acini as nonfunctional due to lesions which obstructed airflow, or open and presumably functional. The nine strains tested were divided into three groups on the basis of the late fibrotic response. Group 1 mice, three C57 strains, developed extensive contracted fibrosis and usually showed enough damage to explain late deaths. Group 2, SWR, A, and BALB/c strains, developed foci of contracted fibrosis. Group 3, CBA and two C3H strains, did not form fibrotic scars. Mice in Groups 2 and 3 that died with no pleural effusions appeared to have insufficient late lung damage to account for respiratory distress. Problems with pulmonary blood flow were indicated by evidence of loss of fine vasculature and right ventricular hypertrophy. In nondistressed, late-stage mice in Groups 2 and 3, loss of capillary perfusion in lung parenchyma free of obvious lesions was demonstrated by infusion of colloidal carbon. In one strain, A, an estimate of the proportion of nonperfused lung was made on distressed late-stage mice. Almost 50% of lung acini were nonfunctional as a result of nonperfusion, and an additional 9% of acini were nonfunctional due to lesions obstructing ventilation. It is suggested that nonperfusion of apparently normal lung acini is a major factor in late-phase deaths in those mouse strains which show little or no fibrosis.

  3. Mouse model of congenital infection with a non-virulent Toxoplasma gondii strain: Vertical transmission, "sterile" fetal damage, or both?

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villavicencio, J A; Cedillo-Peláez, C; Rico-Torres, C P; Besné-Mérida, A; García-Vázquez, F; Saldaña, J I; Correa, D

    2016-07-01

    Congenital transmission of Toxoplasma gondii may occur if the mother gets infected for the first time while pregnant. The risk of mother-to-child transmission depends on the gestation trimester at infection, being lowest in the first and highest in the last. Conversely, fetal damage is frequent and more severe at the beginning of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to evaluate congenital transmission and pathological aspects in the placenta and the fetus using a mouse model of congenital infection of the second gestation third. Forty-five female BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 2.5-10.0 × 10(6) tachyzoites of the ME49 strain at middle gestation. Samples of maternal spleen and fetal/placental units were taken 72 h later. We determined parasite load and vertical transmission by qPCR, as well as damage macroscopically and by histopathology. With the lowest dose, 18% of the fetuses were infected. Also, 40% of fetuses/litter were altered, while this value was 10% in the control group (P < 0.05). These results are similar to those described in humans in terms of vertical transmission and fetal damage during the second third of gestation. The maternal spleen had 10-1000 times more tachyzoites than the placenta, and the later retained 90-99% of the parasites that could reach the fetus. Nevertheless, we found resorptions, abortions or fetal tissue damage in the presence but also in the absence of parasites. Our data indicate a strong protective effect of maternal organs and the placenta against fetal infection, but extensive damage of the later may led to resorption or abortion without vertical transmission. PMID:27068784

  4. Mouse model of congenital infection with a non-virulent Toxoplasma gondii strain: Vertical transmission, "sterile" fetal damage, or both?

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villavicencio, J A; Cedillo-Peláez, C; Rico-Torres, C P; Besné-Mérida, A; García-Vázquez, F; Saldaña, J I; Correa, D

    2016-07-01

    Congenital transmission of Toxoplasma gondii may occur if the mother gets infected for the first time while pregnant. The risk of mother-to-child transmission depends on the gestation trimester at infection, being lowest in the first and highest in the last. Conversely, fetal damage is frequent and more severe at the beginning of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to evaluate congenital transmission and pathological aspects in the placenta and the fetus using a mouse model of congenital infection of the second gestation third. Forty-five female BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 2.5-10.0 × 10(6) tachyzoites of the ME49 strain at middle gestation. Samples of maternal spleen and fetal/placental units were taken 72 h later. We determined parasite load and vertical transmission by qPCR, as well as damage macroscopically and by histopathology. With the lowest dose, 18% of the fetuses were infected. Also, 40% of fetuses/litter were altered, while this value was 10% in the control group (P < 0.05). These results are similar to those described in humans in terms of vertical transmission and fetal damage during the second third of gestation. The maternal spleen had 10-1000 times more tachyzoites than the placenta, and the later retained 90-99% of the parasites that could reach the fetus. Nevertheless, we found resorptions, abortions or fetal tissue damage in the presence but also in the absence of parasites. Our data indicate a strong protective effect of maternal organs and the placenta against fetal infection, but extensive damage of the later may led to resorption or abortion without vertical transmission.

  5. Respiratory allergy to Blomia tropicalis: Immune response in four syngeneic mouse strains and assessment of a low allergen-dose, short-term experimental model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The dust mite Blomia tropicalis is an important source of aeroallergens in tropical areas. Although a mouse model for B. tropicalis extract (BtE)-induced asthma has been described, no study comparing different mouse strains in this asthma model has been reported. The relevance and reproducibility of experimental animal models of allergy depends on the genetic background of the animal, the molecular composition of the allergen and the experimental protocol. Objectives This work had two objectives. The first was to study the anti-B. tropicalis allergic responses in different mouse strains using a short-term model of respiratory allergy to BtE. This study included the comparison of the allergic responses elicited by BtE with those elicited by ovalbumin in mice of the strain that responded better to BtE sensitization. The second objective was to investigate whether the best responder mouse strain could be used in an experimental model of allergy employing relatively low BtE doses. Methods Groups of mice of four different syngeneic strains were sensitized subcutaneously with 100 μg of BtE on days 0 and 7 and challenged four times intranasally, at days 8, 10, 12, and 14, with 10 μg of BtE. A/J mice, that were the best responders to BtE sensitization, were used to compare the B. tropicalis-specific asthma experimental model with the conventional experimental model of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific asthma. A/J mice were also sensitized with a lower dose of BtE. Results Mice of all strains had lung inflammatory-cell infiltration and increased levels of anti-BtE IgE antibodies, but these responses were significantly more intense in A/J mice than in CBA/J, BALB/c or C57BL/6J mice. Immunization of A/J mice with BtE induced a more intense airway eosinophil influx, higher levels of total IgE, similar airway hyperreactivity to methacholine but less intense mucous production, and lower levels of specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies than sensitization with OVA. Finally

  6. Genetic variation responsible for mouse strain differences in integrin {alpha}{sub 2} expression is associated with altered platelet responses to collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tong-Tong; Larrucea, Susana; Souza, Shiloe; Leal, Suzanne M.; Lopez, Jose A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Bray, Paul F.

    2003-11-01

    Formation of a thrombus at the site of an injured vessel requires the coordinated action of critical platelet plasma membrane adhesion molecules. The most important initial contact of platelets with the exposed endothelial collagen and von Willebrand factor (VWF) involves the binding of glycoprotein (GP) Ib{alpha} to immobilized VWF. The VWF-GPIb{alpha} interaction is ''fast-on'' and relatively ''fast-off,'' and results in a rolling of platelets along the exposed subendothelium. This slowing of the platelets allows binding of the activating collagen-receptor, GPVI, to its ligand, resulting in activation of platelet integrins and subsequent firm adhesion, where the reactions between receptor and ligand are relatively ''slow-on'' but irreversible. The binding of integrin {alpha}{sub 2} {beta}{sub 1} underlying firm adhesion. Intracellular signaling between and through these adhesive receptors plays a crucial role in platelet adhesion and aggregation. The importance of the GPIb-IX-V and {alpha}{sub IIb} {beta}{sub 3} in normal hemostasis is under scored by the bleeding diatheses that have been reported in patients with quantitative or qualitative deficiencies of the genes that encode them. Mouse models are now commonplace for studying hemostasis and thrombosis, and important insights pertaining to the major platelet adhesive receptors have been gleaned from mouse studies involving targeted disruptions of the genes for GPIb{alpha}, GPVI, and integrin chains 2,9,10 1,4 IIb 11 and 3.12 A variety of different mouse strains have been used to assess hemostasis. For example, the FVB strain is typically used for transgenic experiments, the 129/Sv strain is used to derive embryonic stem (ES) cells, and the C57 strain is used for uniform background breeding studies. Different strains may exhibit different levels of gene expression, a feature that has been used to elucidate crucial gene regions regulating transcription. We and others have previously studied how genetic changes

  7. A murine model for type III tyrosinemia: lack of immunologically detectable 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase enzyme protein in a novel mouse strain with hypertyrosinemia.

    PubMed

    Endo, F; Katoh, H; Yamamoto, S; Matsuda, I

    1991-04-01

    We have characterized a new mutant strain of mouse that has hypertyrosinemia. The blood tyrosine level was persistently high, and increased amounts of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and its derivatives were excreted into the urine. Succinylacetone was not detected in urine samples from these mice. All the animals were apparently healthy, and there was no evidence of hepatorenal dysfunction. The hypertyrosinemia was transmitted through an autosomal recessive inheritance. Analyses of hepatic enzymes related to tyrosine metabolism revealed that 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase activity was virtually absent, while fumarylacetoacetase and tyrosine aminotransferases (cytosolic and mitochondrial forms) were normal in these mutant mice. Immunoblot analysis of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase protein in the liver indicated that the subunit protein of the enzyme was absent. It would appear that hypertyrosinemia in this mutant strain was caused by a genetic defect in 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase. These features are similar to type III tyrosinemia in humans. Analysis of this mutant strain of mouse is expected to provide valuable information on the pathogenesis of human type III tyrosinemia and can also serve as a useful system for studies on tyrosine metabolism.

  8. New microsatellite polymorphisms identified between C57BL/6, C57BL/10, and C57BL/KsJ inbred mouse strains

    SciTech Connect

    Slingsby, J.H.; Hogarth, M.B.; Walport, M.J.

    1996-06-01

    The C57BL/6 (B6) and C57BL/10 (B10) inbred mouse strains are among the most commonly used in biological research and have provided the genetic background for the construction of many congenic strains. The two substrains were derived from the parental C57BL stock and were separated prior to 1937. Since then, they have been thought to possess a very close genetic relationship. By 1992, 161 loci had been tested, and only three differed between B6 and B10: the minor histocompatibility locus H9, the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus Igh 2 on chromosome 12, and the delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase Lv locus on chromosome 4. B6 and B10 have also been shown to differ over an 8 cM segment on chromosome 4. Due to the differences at the H9 locus, B6 and B10 are not histocompatible. The aim of our study was to identify novel genetic polymorphisms between B6 and B10 mice and to analyze the BKs mouse with genetic markers such that further information can be gathered on the genetic origins of this strain. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viremia and central nervous system invasion in a novel hu-PBL-immunodeficient mouse strain.

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Y; Tanaka, Y; Kira, J; Ito, M; Hioki, K; Misawa, N; Kawano, Y; Yamasaki, K; Tanaka, R; Suzuki, Y; Ueyama, Y; Terada, E; Tanaka, T; Miyasaka, M; Kobayashi, T; Kumazawa, Y; Yamamoto, N

    1997-01-01

    We established four new mouse strains with defective T and B cells as well as defects in innate immunological reactions using an NK cell depletion antibody and showed that all mutant mouse strains efficiently received human peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) engraftment (hu-PBL-scid mice). Higher levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication were observed in these new hu-PBL-scid mice than in conventional hu-PBL-C.B-17-scid mice. In one particular strain, hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice, high levels of HIV-1 viremia (more than 10(6) 50% infectious doses per ml) were detected after infection with HIV-1. The plasma viral load was about 100 to 1,000 times higher than that observed in other hu-PBL-scid mice infected with HIV-1. Although high-level viremia did not correlate with the total amount of HIV-1 RNA in cells from infected mice, high levels of free virions were detected only in hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice. HIV-1 viremia induced systemic HIV-1 infection involving the liver, lungs, and brain. PCR in situ hybridization confirmed that HIV-1-infected cells invaded the brain tissue of the hu-PBL-NOD-scid mice. Our results suggest that the genetic background, including innate immunity, is critical in the development of primary HIV-1 viremia and subsequent central nervous system invasion with HIV-1. The hu-PBL-NOD-scid mouse represents a useful model for the study of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 in vivo, especially brain involvement, and therapy of primary HIV-1 viremia. PMID:9032379

  10. Effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in mouse strains genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Bazovkina, Daria V; Semenova, Alina A; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2013-12-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and on the serotonin (5-HT) system of a mouse strain predisposed to depressive-like behavior, ASC/Icg (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics), in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA/Lac mice was studied. Within 7 days after acute administration, GDNF (800 ng, i.c.v.) decreased cataleptic immobility but increased depressive-like behavioral traits in both investigated mouse strains and produced anxiolytic effects in ASC mice. The expression of the gene encoding the key enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis in the brain, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2), and 5-HT1A receptor gene in the midbrain as well as 5-HT2A receptor gene in the frontal cortex were increased in GDNF-treated ASC mice. At the same time, GDNF decreased 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of ASC mice. GDNF failed to change Tph2, 5-HT1A , or 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels in CBA mice as well as 5-HT transporter gene expression and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor functional activity in both investigated mouse strains. The results show 1) a GDNF-induced increase in the expression of key genes of the brain 5-HT system, Tph2, 5-HT1A , and 5-HT2A receptors, and 2) significant genotype-dependent differences in the 5-HT system response to GDNF treatment. The data suggest that genetically defined cross-talk between neurotrophic factors and the brain 5-HT system underlies the variability in behavioral response to GDNF.

  11. In vivo efficacy of a new fluoroquinolone, sparfloxacin, against penicillin-susceptible and -resistant and multiresistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae in a mouse model of pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Vallee, E; Veber, B; Bedos, J P; Bauchet, J; Pocidalo, J J

    1992-01-01

    The increasing emergence of penicillin-resistant and multiresistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae may pose a problem in coming years. We therefore compared sparfloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone with improved potency against streptococci, with amoxicillin, the "gold standard" in this setting, and another fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin, in a mouse pneumonia model. Their efficacies against penicillin-susceptible (serotype 3), macrolide-resistant (serotype 1), penicillin-resistant (serotype 23), and multiresistant (serotype 6) S. pneumoniae strains were evaluated. Immunocompetent Swiss mice (serotypes 1 and 3) and leukopenic mice (serotypes 6 and 23) were infected by peroral tracheal delivery of 10(4) to 10(6) CFU. Subcutaneous injections of antibiotics were initiated at 6, 18, 48, or 72 h after infection (six injections at 12-h intervals). In the immunocompetent mice, 100% survival was obtained with sparfloxacin (50 mg/kg) and amoxicillin (5 mg/kg) against both penicillin-susceptible and macrolide-resistant strains; ciprofloxacin gave significantly lower survival rates. Two to four injections of sparfloxacin completely cleared bacteria from lungs and blood; the most rapid eradication was achieved with amoxicillin. Sparfloxacin also fully protected leukopenic mice against penicillin-resistant strains. The dose of amoxicillin (50 mg/kg) required to protect mice and eradicate penicillin-resistant and multiresistant strains was 10 times higher than that effective against penicillin-susceptible strains. The microbiological and pharmacokinetic properties of sparfloxacin (e.g., the time during which concentrations exceed the MIC of the test pathogen) accounted for its efficacy against susceptible and resistant strains of S. pneumoniae in this model. PMID:1336343

  12. Steady-state production of IL-4 modulates immunity in mouse strains and is determined by lineage diversity of iNKT cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, You Jeong; Holzapfel, Keli L; Zhu, Jinfang; Jameson, Stephen C; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2013-11-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) can produce copious amounts of interleukin 4 (IL-4) early during infection. However, indirect evidence suggests they may produce this immunomodulatory cytokine in the steady state. Through intracellular staining for transcription factors, we have defined three subsets of iNKT cells (NKT1, NKT2 and NKT17) that produced distinct cytokines; these represented diverse lineages and not developmental stages, as previously thought. These subsets exhibited substantial interstrain variation in numbers. In several mouse strains, including BALB/c, NKT2 cells were abundant and were stimulated by self ligands to produce IL-4. In those strains, steady-state IL-4 conditioned CD8(+) T cells to become 'memory-like', increased serum concentrations of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and caused dendritic cells to produce chemokines. Thus, iNKT cell-derived IL-4 altered immunological properties under normal steady-state conditions.

  13. Enhancing the value of psychiatric mouse models; differential expression of developmental behavioral and cognitive profiles in four inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Molenhuis, Remco T; de Visser, Leonie; Bruining, Hilgo; Kas, Martien J

    2014-06-01

    The behavioral characterization of animal models of psychiatric disorders is often based upon independent traits measured at adult age. To model the neurodevelopmental aspects of psychiatric pathogenesis, we introduce a novel approach for a developmental behavioral analysis in mice. C57BL/6J (C57) mice were used as a reference strain and compared with 129S1/SvImJ (129Sv), BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) and A/J (AJ) strains as marker strains for aberrant development. Mice were assessed at pre-adolescence (4 weeks), adolescence (6 weeks), early adulthood (8 weeks) and in adulthood (10-12 weeks) on a series of behavioral tasks measuring general health, neurological reflexes, locomotor activity, anxiety, short- and long-term memory and cognitive flexibility. Developmental delays in short-term object memory were associated with either a hypo-reactive profile in 129Sv mice or a hyper-reactive profile in BTBR mice. Furthermore, BTBR mice showed persistent high levels of repetitive grooming behavior during all developmental stages that was associated with the adult expression of cognitive rigidity. In addition, strain differences in development were observed in puberty onset, touch escape, and body position. These data showed that this longitudinal testing battery provides sufficient behavioral and cognitive resolution during different development stages and offers the opportunity to address the behavioral developmental trajectory in genetic mouse models for neurodevelopmental disorders. Furthermore, the data revealed that the assessment of multiple behavioral and cognitive domains at different developmental stages is critical to determine confounding factors (e.g., impaired motor behavior) that may interfere with the behavioral testing performance in mouse models for brain disorders.

  14. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of novel mouse cell line (NIH/3T3)-adapted human enterovirus 71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv).

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2014-01-01

    Since its identification in 1969, Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has been causing periodic outbreaks of infection in children worldwide and most prominently in the Asia-Pacific Region. Understanding the pathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is hampered by the virus's inability to infect small animals and replicate in their derived in vitro cultured cells. This manuscript describes the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of two selected EV71 strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv), which have been adapted to replicate in mouse-derived NIH/3T3 cells, in contrast to the original parental virus which is only able to replicate in primate cell lines. The EV71:TLLm strain exhibited productive infection in all primate and rodent cell lines tested, while EV71:TLLmv exhibited greater preference for mouse cell lines. EV71:TLLmv displayed higher degree of adaptation and temperature adaptability in NIH/3T3 cells than in Vero cells, suggesting much higher fitness in NIH/3T3 cells. In comparison with the parental EV71:BS strain, the adapted strains accumulated multiple adaptive mutations in the genome resulting in amino acid substitutions, most notably in the capsid-encoding region (P1) and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3D). Two mutations, E167D and L169F, were mapped to the VP1 canyon that binds the SCARB2 receptor on host cells. Another two mutations, S135T and K140I, were located in the VP2 neutralization epitope spanning amino acids 136-150. This is the first report of human EV71 with the ability to productively infect rodent cell lines in vitro.

  15. Genetic Dissection of Quantitative Trait Loci for Hemostasis and Thrombosis on Mouse Chromosomes 11 and 5 Using Congenic and Subcongenic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hoover-Plow, Jane; Sa, Qila; Huang, Menggui; Grondolsky, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Susceptibility to thrombosis varies in human populations as well as many inbred mouse strains. Only a small portion of this variation has been identified, suggesting that there are unknown modifier genes. The objective of this study was to narrow the quantitative trait locus (QTL) intervals previously identified for hemostasis and thrombosis on mouse distal chromosome 11 (Hmtb6) and on chromosome 5 (Hmtb4 and Hmtb5). In a tail bleeding/rebleeding assay, a reporter assay for hemostasis and thrombosis, subcongenic strain (6A-2) had longer clot stability time than did C57BL/6J (B6) mice but a similar time to the B6-Chr11A/J consomic mice, confirming the Hmtb6 phenotype. Six congenic and subcongenic strains were constructed for chromosome 5, and the congenic strain, 2A-1, containing the shortest A/J interval (16.6 cM, 26.6 Mbp) in the Hmtb4 region, had prolonged clot stability time compared to B6 mice. In the 3A-2 and CSS-5 mice bleeding time was shorter than for B6, mice confirming the Hmtb5 QTL. An increase in bleeding time was identified in another congenic strain (3A-1) with A/J interval (24.8 cM, 32.9 Mbp) in the proximal region of chromosome 5, confirming a QTL for bleeding previously mapped to that region and designated as Hmtb10. The subcongenic strain 4A-2 with the A/J fragment in the proximal region had a long occlusion time of the carotid artery after ferric chloride injury and reduced dilation after injury to the abdominal aorta compared to B6 mice, suggesting an additional locus in the proximal region, which was designated Hmtb11 (5 cM, 21.4 Mbp). CSS-17 mice crossed with congenic strains, 3A-1 and 3A-2, modified tail bleeding. Using congenic and subcongenic analysis, candidate genes previously identified and novel genes were identified as modifiers of hemostasis and thrombosis in each of the loci Hmtb6, Hmtb4, Hmtb10, and Hmtb11. PMID:24147020

  16. The murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 from persistently infected murine cells exhibits an extended host range.

    PubMed Central

    Schickli, J H; Zelus, B D; Wentworth, D E; Sawicki, S G; Holmes, K V

    1997-01-01

    In murine 17 Cl 1 cells persistently infected with murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHV-A59), expression of the virus receptor glycoprotein MHVR was markedly reduced (S. G. Sawicki, J. H. Lu, and K. V. Holmes, J. Virol. 69:5535-5543, 1995). Virus isolated from passage 600 of the persistently infected cells made smaller plaques on 17 Cl 1 cells than did MHV-A59. Unlike the parental MHV-A59, this variant virus also infected the BHK-21 (BHK) line of hamster cells. Virus plaque purified on BHK cells (MHV/BHK) grew more slowly in murine cells than did MHV-A59, and the rate of viral RNA synthesis was lower and the development of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein was slower than those of MHV-A59. MHV/BHK was 100-fold more resistant to neutralization with the purified soluble recombinant MHV receptor glycoprotein (sMHVR) than was MHV-A59. Pretreatment of 17 Cl 1 cells with anti-MHVR monoclonal antibody CC1 protected the cells from infection with MHV-A59 but only partially protected them from infection with MHV/BHK. Thus, although MHV/BHK could still utilize MHVR as a receptor, its interactions with the receptor were significantly different from those of MHV-A59. To determine whether a hemagglutinin esterase (HE) glycoprotein that could bind the virions to 9-O-acetylated neuraminic acid moieties on the cell surface was expressed by MHV/BHK, an in situ esterase assay was used. No expression of HE activity was detected in 17 Cl 1 cells infected with MHV/BHK, suggesting that this virus, like MHV-A59, bound to cell membranes via its S glycoprotein. MHV/BHK was able to infect cell lines from many mammalian species, including murine (17 Cl 1), hamster (BHK), feline (Fcwf), bovine (MDBK), rat (RIE), monkey (Vero), and human (L132 and HeLa) cell lines. MHV/BHK could not infect dog kidney (MDCK I) or swine testis (ST) cell lines. Thus, in persistently infected murine cell lines that express very low levels of virus receptor MHVR and which also have and may

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Genes Regulated by Cholesterol Loading in Two Strains of Mouse Macrophages Associates Lysosome Pathway and ER Stress Response with Atherosclerosis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol loaded macrophages in the arterial intima are the earliest histological evidence of atherosclerosis. Studies of mouse models of atherosclerosis have shown that the strain background can have a significant effect on lesion development. We have previously shown that DBA/2 ApoE−/− mice have aortic root lesions 10-fold larger than AKR ApoE−/−mice. The current study analyzes the response to cholesterol loading of macrophages from these two strains. Macrophages from the atherosclerosis susceptible DBA/2 strain had significantly higher levels of total and esterified cholesterol compared to atherosclerosis resistant AKR macrophages, while free cholesterol levels were higher in AKR cells. Gene expression profiles were obtained and data were analyzed for strain, cholesterol loading, and strain-cholesterol loading interaction effects by a fitted linear model. Pathway and transcriptional motif enrichment were identified by gene set enrichment analysis. In addition to observed strain differences in basal gene expression, we identified many transcripts whose expression was significantly altered in response to cholesterol loading, including P2ry13 and P2ry14, Trib3, Hyal1, Vegfa, Ccr5, Ly6a, and Ifit3. Eight pathways were significantly enriched in transcripts regulated by cholesterol loading, among which the lysosome and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways had the highest number of significantly regulated transcripts. Of the differentially regulated transcripts with a strain-cholesterol loading interaction effect, we identified three genes known to participate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, Ddit3, Trib3 and Atf4. These three transcripts were highly up-regulated by cholesterol in AKR and either down-regulated or unchanged in loaded DBA/2 macrophages, thus associating a robust ER stress response with atherosclerosis resistance. We identified significant transcripts with strain, loading, or strain-loading interaction effect that

  18. Production of a mouse strain with impaired glucose tolerance by systemic heterozygous knockout of the glucokinase gene and its feasibility as a prediabetes model.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mikako; Kaneda, Asako; Sugiyama, Tae; Iida, Ryousuke; Otokuni, Keiko; Kaburagi, Misako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Exon II of glucokinase (Gk) was deleted to produce a systemic heterozygous Gk knockout (Gk(+/-)) mouse. The relative expression levels of Gk in the heart, lung, liver, stomach, and pancreas in Gk(+/-) mice ranged from 0.41-0.68 versus that in wild (Gk(+/+)) mice. On the other hand, its expression levels in the brain, adipose tissue, and muscle ranged from 0.95-1.03, and its expression levels in the spleen and kidney were nearly zero. Gk knockout caused no remarkable off-target effect on the expression of 7 diabetes causing genes (Shp, Hnf1a, Hnf1b, Irs1, Irs2, Kir6.2, and Pdx1) in 10 organs. The glucose tolerance test was conducted to determine the blood glucose concentrations just after fasting for 24 h (FBG) and at 2 h after high-glucose application (GTT2h). The FBG-GTT2h plots obtained with the wild strain fed the control diet (CD), Gk(+/-) strain fed the CD, and Gk(+/-) strain fed the HFD were distributed in separate areas in the FBG-GTT2h diagram. The respective areas could be defined as the normal state, prediabetes state, and diabetes state, respectively. Based on the results, the criteria for prediabetes could be defined for the Gk(+/-) strain developed in this study. PMID:25765873

  19. Sendai virus-induced alterations in lung structure/function correlate with viral loads and reveal a wide resistance/susceptibility spectrum among mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Faisca, Pedro; Anh, Dao Bui Tran; Desmecht, Daniel J-M

    2005-11-01

    The Paramyxoviridae family includes some of the most important and ubiquitous disease-causing viruses of infants and children, most of which cause significant infections of the respiratory tract. Evidence is accumulating in humans that genetic factors are involved in the severity of clinical presentation. As a first step toward the identification of the genes involved, this study was undertaken to establish whether laboratory mouse strains differ in susceptibility to Sendai virus, the murine counterpart of human type-1 parainfluenza virus which, historically, has been used extensively in studies that have defined the basic biological properties of paramyxoviruses in general. With this purpose in mind, double-chamber plethysmography data were collected daily for 7 days after inoculation of Sendai virus in six inbred strains of mice. In parallel, histological examinations and lung viral titration were carried out from day 5 to day 7 after inoculation. Pulmonary structure/function values closely reflected the success of viral replication in the lungs and revealed a pattern of continuous variation with resistant, intermediate, and susceptible strains. The results unambiguously suggest that BALB/c (resistant) and 129Sv (susceptible) strains should be used in crossing experiments aimed at identifying the genes involved in resistance to Paramyxoviridae by the positional cloning approach.

  20. Production of a mouse strain with impaired glucose tolerance by systemic heterozygous knockout of the glucokinase gene and its feasibility as a prediabetes model

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Mikako; KANEDA, Asako; SUGIYAMA, Tae; IIDA, Ryousuke; OTOKUNI, Keiko; KABURAGI, Misako; MATSUOKA, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Exon II of glucokinase (Gk) was deleted to produce a systemic heterozygous Gk knockout (Gk+/−) mouse. The relative expression levels of Gk in the heart, lung, liver, stomach, and pancreas in Gk+/− mice ranged from 0.41–0.68 versus that in wild (Gk+/+) mice. On the other hand, its expression levels in the brain, adipose tissue, and muscle ranged from 0.95–1.03, and its expression levels in the spleen and kidney were nearly zero. Gk knockout caused no remarkable off-target effect on the expression of 7 diabetes causing genes (Shp, Hnf1a, Hnf1b, Irs1, Irs2, Kir6.2, and Pdx1) in 10 organs. The glucose tolerance test was conducted to determine the blood glucose concentrations just after fasting for 24 h (FBG) and at 2 h after high-glucose application (GTT2h). The FBG-GTT2h plots obtained with the wild strain fed the control diet (CD), Gk+/− strain fed the CD, and Gk+/− strain fed the HFD were distributed in separate areas in the FBG-GTT2h diagram. The respective areas could be defined as the normal state, prediabetes state, and diabetes state, respectively. Based on the results, the criteria for prediabetes could be defined for the Gk+/− strain developed in this study. PMID:25765873

  1. Central corneal thickness does not correlate with TonoLab-measured IOP in several mouse strains with single transgenic mutations of matricellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ayan; Oh, Dong-Jin; Kang, Min Hyung; Rhee, Douglas J

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and reliable measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) is crucial in the study of glaucoma using the mouse model. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between TonoLab-measured IOP and central corneal thickness (CCT) in mouse strains with single gene mutations of matricellular proteins. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mouse strains with single gene mutations (KO) of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2), osteopontin (OPN), hevin, and secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC) were imaged at six weeks using optical coherence tomography (Stratus, Zeiss) to determine CCT. IOP was measured between 11am and 3pm using TonoLab, one week later. For all measurements, mice were anesthetized using intraperitoneal injection ketamine:xylazine. CCT and IOP were measured in 583 mice (TSP-1 n = 71 and 41, TSP-2 n = 60 and 32, OPN n = 81 and 50, hevin n = 59 and 76, SPARC n = 54 and 59, WT and KO, respectively). Mean CCT was 5-6% lower in three KO strains-TSP-1, OPN, and SPARC-compared to their corresponding WT (p = 1.55 × 10(-7), 1.63 × 10(-11), and 1.91 × 10(-7), respectively). The mean IOP was 8.3%, 6.6%, and 15.1% lower in three KO strains-TSP-1, TSP-2, and SPARC-compared to corresponding WT (p = 2.11 × 10(-5), 2.93 × 10(-3), and 3.76 × 10(-9), respectively. Linear regression of IOP versus CCT yielded no statistically significant within-strain correlations for TSP-1 (p = 0.12 and 0.073), TSP-2 (p = 0.473 and 0.92), OPN (p = 0.212 and 0.916), Hevin (p = 0.746 and 0.257), and SPARC (p = 0.080 and 0.056), reported as p-values considering a null hypothesis of zero slope (WT and KO, respectively). Neither C57-derived strains (TSP-1 and OPN) nor 129-derived strains (TSP-2, hevin, SPARC) demonstrated a correlation between mean IOP and mean CCT across different strains (p = 0.75 and p = 0.53, respectively). Taken together, these results indicate that CCT is not required to interpret Tono

  2. Nutritional basis for colonization resistance by human commensal Escherichia coli strains HS and Nissle 1917 against E. coli O157:H7 in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Maltby, Rosalie; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Gibson, Terri; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a single species consisting of many biotypes, some of which are commensal colonizers of mammals and others that cause disease. Humans are colonized on average with five commensal biotypes, and it is widely thought that the commensals serve as a barrier to infection by pathogens. Previous studies showed that a combination of three pre-colonized commensal E. coli strains prevents colonization of E. coli O157:H7 in a mouse model (Leatham, et al., 2010, Infect Immun 77: 2876-7886). The commensal biotypes included E. coli HS, which is known to successfully colonize humans at high doses with no adverse effects, and E. coli Nissle 1917, a human commensal strain that is used in Europe as a preventative of traveler's diarrhea. We hypothesized that commensal biotypes could exert colonization resistance by consuming nutrients needed by E. coli O157:H7 to colonize, thus preventing this first step in infection. Here we report that to colonize streptomycin-treated mice E. coli HS consumes six of the twelve sugars tested and E. coli Nissle 1917 uses a complementary yet divergent set of seven sugars to colonize, thus establishing a nutritional basis for the ability of E. coli HS and Nissle 1917 to occupy distinct niches in the mouse intestine. Together these two commensals use the five sugars previously determined to be most important for colonization of E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. As predicted, the two commensals prevented E. coli EDL933 colonization. The results support a model in which invading pathogenic E. coli must compete with the gut microbiota to obtain the nutrients needed to colonize and establish infection; accordingly, the outcome of the challenge is determined by the aggregate capacity of the native microbiota to consume the nutrients required by the pathogen. PMID:23349773

  3. Effect of acute swim stress on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamine levels in bidirectionally selected DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains differing in fear recall and extinction.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caroline A; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 min after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  4. Immune Status, Strain Background, and Anatomic Site of Inoculation Affect Mouse Papillomavirus (MmuPV1) Induction of Exophytic Papillomas or Endophytic Trichoblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Proctor, Mary; Ingle, Arvind; Silva, Kathleen A.; Dadras, Soheil S.; Jenson, A. Bennett; Ghim, Shin-je

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) induce papillomas, premalignant lesions, and carcinomas in a wide variety of species. PVs are classified first based on their host and tissue tropism and then their genomic diversities. A laboratory mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1 (formerly MusPV), was horizontally transmitted within an inbred colony of NMRI-Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu (nude; T cell deficient) mice of an unknown period of time. A ground-up, filtered papilloma inoculum was not capable of infecting C57BL/6J wild-type mice; however, immunocompetent, alopecic, S/RV/Cri-ba/ba (bare) mice developed small papillomas at injection sites that regressed. NMRI-Foxn1nu and B6.Cg-Foxn1nu, but not NU/J-Foxn1nu, mice were susceptible to MmuPV1 infection. B6 congenic strains, but not other congenic strains carrying the same allelic mutations, lacking B- and T-cells, but not B-cells alone, were susceptible to infection, indicating that mouse strain and T-cell deficiency are critical to tumor formation. Lesions initially observed were exophytic papillomas around the muzzle, exophytic papillomas on the tail, and condylomas of the vaginal lining which could be induced by separate scarification or simultaneous scarification of MmuPV1 at all four sites. On the dorsal skin, locally invasive, poorly differentiated tumors developed with features similar to human trichoblastomas. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant differences between the normal skin in these anatomic sites and in papillomas versus trichoblastomas. The primarily dysregulated genes involved molecular pathways associated with cancer, cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell morphology, and connective tissue development and function. Although trichoepitheliomas are benign, aggressive tumors, few of the genes commonly associated with basal cell carcinoma or squamous cells carcinoma were highly dysregulated. PMID:25474466

  5. Nutritional basis for colonization resistance by human commensal Escherichia coli strains HS and Nissle 1917 against E. coli O157:H7 in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Maltby, Rosalie; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Gibson, Terri; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a single species consisting of many biotypes, some of which are commensal colonizers of mammals and others that cause disease. Humans are colonized on average with five commensal biotypes, and it is widely thought that the commensals serve as a barrier to infection by pathogens. Previous studies showed that a combination of three pre-colonized commensal E. coli strains prevents colonization of E. coli O157:H7 in a mouse model (Leatham, et al., 2010, Infect Immun 77: 2876-7886). The commensal biotypes included E. coli HS, which is known to successfully colonize humans at high doses with no adverse effects, and E. coli Nissle 1917, a human commensal strain that is used in Europe as a preventative of traveler's diarrhea. We hypothesized that commensal biotypes could exert colonization resistance by consuming nutrients needed by E. coli O157:H7 to colonize, thus preventing this first step in infection. Here we report that to colonize streptomycin-treated mice E. coli HS consumes six of the twelve sugars tested and E. coli Nissle 1917 uses a complementary yet divergent set of seven sugars to colonize, thus establishing a nutritional basis for the ability of E. coli HS and Nissle 1917 to occupy distinct niches in the mouse intestine. Together these two commensals use the five sugars previously determined to be most important for colonization of E. coli EDL933, an O157:H7 strain. As predicted, the two commensals prevented E. coli EDL933 colonization. The results support a model in which invading pathogenic E. coli must compete with the gut microbiota to obtain the nutrients needed to colonize and establish infection; accordingly, the outcome of the challenge is determined by the aggregate capacity of the native microbiota to consume the nutrients required by the pathogen.

  6. Insertion mutation of the int-1 and int-2 loci by mouse mammary tumor virus in premalignant and malignant neoplasms from the GR mouse strain.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D W; Barry, P A; Bradshaw, H D; Cardiff, R D

    1990-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary adenocarcinomas can develop from several different premalignant precursors common in GR mice. Insertion mutagenesis of the mammary protooncogenes int-1 and int-2 was studied in this multistep system by analyzing samples from various stages of neoplastic development for novel int-1 and int-2 restriction fragments generated by MMTV provirus integration. int-1 and int-2 insertion mutations were observed in both premalignant lesions and malignant tumors. Some of the tumors with insertion mutations were experimentally derived from insertion mutation-free premalignant precursors. Each class of neoplasm examined had a characteristic frequency of int-1 and int-2 insertion mutations; however, no correspondence was observed between neoplasm morphology and mutation of either gene. These results indicate that insertion mutation of the int-1 and int-2 loci by MMTV provirus can be involved in the earliest identifiable stages of neoplastic development as well as during progression of premalignant lesions to tumors. Insertion mutation of int-1 and int-2 is therefore not stage specific in this system. Images PMID:2157060

  7. The effect of two different Individually Ventilated Cage systems on anxiety-related behaviour and welfare in two strains of laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Burman, O; Buccarello, L; Redaelli, V; Cervo, L

    2014-01-30

    The environment in which a laboratory animal is housed can significantly influence its behaviour and welfare, acting as a potential confounding factor for those studies in which it is utilised. This study investigated the impact of two Individually Ventilated Cage (IVC) housing systems on anxiety-related behaviour and welfare indicators in two common strains of laboratory mice. Subjects were juvenile female C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice (N=128) housed in groups of four in two different IVC systems for 7weeks. System One had air delivery at the cage 'cover' level at 75 ACH (Air Changes/Hour) and System Two had air delivery at the 'animal' level at 50 ACH. Mice were assessed twice a week (e.g. bodyweight) or at the end of the study (e.g. anxiety tests). Our results showed significant differences in anxiety-related behaviour between strains and housing systems. Mice in System Two, regardless of strain, defecated more in the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), spent less time in the open arms of the EPM, and less time in the central zone of the Open Field (OF). Strain differences in anxiety-like behaviour were seen in the increased defecation by BALB/c mice in the OF and EPM and less time spent in the open arms of the EPM compared to C57BL/6J mice. These results suggest that different IVC housing systems can influence mouse behaviour in different ways, with mice of both strains studied exhibiting more anxiety-related behaviour when housed in System Two (air entry at the 'animal' level at 50 ACH), which could impact upon experimental data.

  8. Temporal differentiation in two strains of small rodents: a wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) and an albino mouse (Mus musculus OF1).

    PubMed

    Lejeune, H; Huynen, M C.; Ferrara, A

    2000-12-01

    Wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) and OF1 albino mice (Mus musculus) were compared over durations ranging from 0.5 to 7 s, using the differential reinforcement of response duration schedule (DRRD) and a 'platform' response, i.e. staying on a small platform for a specified criterion duration to be reinforced. Species-related differences were found for mean response durations, efficiency and the number of trials needed to reach a preset performance criterion. Coefficients of variation of response durations did not differ. Overall, OF1 mice needed more trials than wood mice to reach a temporal criterion. However, over 3-7 s, data from both strains almost fitted the behavioral assumptions of Scalar Timing theory. Performance of mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) trained in a similar setting was shown for visual comparison.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of Chromosome 17 QTL for carbohydrate and total calorie intake in a mouse congenic strain reveals candidate genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Ganesh; Richards, Brenda K. Smith

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS The genetic basis for ingestive behaviors is virtually unknown. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for carbohydrate and energy intake map to mouse chromosome 17 and were previously confirmed by a congenic strain bearing CAST/Ei (CAST) donor segment on the C57BL/6J (B6) background. METHODS We used microarray technology to facilitate gene identification. Gene expression was compared between the B6.CAST-17 (BC-17) congenic and B6 strains in two diets: 1) chow, and 2) carbohydrate/protein vs. fat/protein. RESULTS Within the QTL and unique to macronutrient selection, Agpat1 (acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1) was differentially expressed in hypothalamus. Irrespective of diet, the gene with the highest fold difference in congenic mice was trefoil factor 3 (Tff3) in liver. Several genes involved in fat metabolism were decreased in carbohydrate-preferring congenic mice, while genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism were increased. In particular, the glyoxalase pathway was enhanced including Glo1, Glo2, and dLDH. Higher expression of Glo1 mRNA in BC-17 congenic mice corresponded to increased protein expression revealed by Western blot, and to higher GLO1 activity in blood. CONCLUSION These genes represent new candidates for nutrient intake phenotypes. We propose that increased GLO1 in the BC-17 strain supports its need to protect against dietary oxidants resulting from high carbohydrate intake. PMID:19776624

  10. A live attenuated strain of Yersinia pestis ΔyscB provides protection against bubonic and pneumonic plagues in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuecan; Qi, Zhizhen; Du, Zongmin; Bi, Yujing; Zhang, Qingwen; Tan, Yafang; Yang, Huiying; Xin, Youquan; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2013-05-24

    To develop a safe and effective live plague vaccine, the ΔyscB mutant was constructed based on Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201 that is avirulent to humans, but virulent to mice. The virulence, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the ΔyscB mutant were evaluated in this study. The results showed that the ΔyscB mutant was severely attenuated, elicited a higher F1-specific antibody titer and provided protective efficacy against bubonic and pneumonic plague in mouse model. The ΔyscB mutant could induce the secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Taken together, the ΔyscB mutant represented a potential vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and to provide good protection against both subcutaneous and intranasal Y. pestis challenge.

  11. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Heteroplasmy in a Mouse Model with Mitochondrial DNA of C57BL/6 and NZB/BINJ Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sangalli, Juliano Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Thiago Bittencourt; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are widely employed to study mitochondrial inheritance, which have implications to several human diseases caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). These mouse models take advantage of polymorphisms between the mtDNA of the NZB/BINJ and the mtDNA of common inbred laboratory (i.e., C57BL/6) strains to generate mice with two mtDNA haplotypes (heteroplasmy). Based on PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), these studies determine the level of heteroplasmy across generations and in different cell types aiming to understand the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial inheritance. However, PCR-RFLP is a time-consuming method of low sensitivity and accuracy that dependents on the use of restriction enzyme digestions. A more robust method to measure heteroplasmy has been provided by the use of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on allelic refractory mutation detection system (ARMS-qPCR). Herein, we report an ARMS-qPCR assay for quantification of heteroplasmy using heteroplasmic mice with mtDNA of NZB/BINJ and C57BL/6 origin. Heteroplasmy and mtDNA copy number were estimated in germline and somatic tissues, providing evidence of the reliability of the approach. Furthermore, it enabled single-step quantification of heteroplasmy, with sensitivity to detect as low as 0.1% of either NZB/BINJ or C57BL/6 mtDNA. These findings are relevant as the ARMS-qPCR assay reported here is fully compatible with similar heteroplasmic mouse models used to study mitochondrial inheritance in mammals. PMID:26274500

  12. IgG subclass responses to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection and immunization suggest a dominant role for Th1 cells in susceptible mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, J D; Waltenbaugh, C; Miller, S D

    1992-01-01

    Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease. A strong correlation between disease susceptibility and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) has been previously demonstrated, but no strong correlation between disease susceptibility and total anti-TMEV ELISA titres was shown. Since both DTH and IgG2a antibody production are regulated by CD4+ Th1 cells, we investigated three strains of mice to determine whether antivirus IgG2a antibody levels, like DTH in previous studies, correlated with disease susceptibility. Susceptible SJL/J, intermediately susceptible C3H/HeJ, and resistant C57BL/6 mice were infected intracerebrally (i.c.) with the BeAn strain of TMEV and monitored for clinical signs of demyelination and for levels of TMEV-specific antibody of different IgG subclasses using a particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay (PCFIA). Resistant C57BL/6 mice were found to have significantly lower concentrations of total anti-TMEV antibody than susceptible SJL/J mice and intermediately susceptible C3H/HeJ mice show variable antibody responses. A predominance of anti-TMEV IgG2a (Th1 regulated) antibody was seen in susceptible and intermediately susceptible mice, whereas resistant mice displayed a predominant anti-TMEV IgG1 (Th2 regulated) response accompanied by a marked deficiency of IgG2a. In contrast, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with UV-inactivated TMEV in adjuvant revealed that this strain was not defective either in its ability to generate high levels of anti-TMEV antibody or in its ability to produce IgG2a antibody. These results suggest that the antivirus IgG subclass profile is dependent upon the immunization route, virus viability and/or the use of adjuvant and that the levels of antivirus subclasses may be predictive of disease susceptibility. PMID:1350571

  13. Validation of operant social motivation paradigms using BTBR T+tf/J and C57BL/6J inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Loren; Sample, Hannah; Gregg, Michael; Wood, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    Background As purported causal factors are identified for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), new assays are needed to better phenotype animal models designed to explore these factors. With recent evidence suggesting that deficits in social motivation are at the core of ASD behavior, the development of quantitative measures of social motivation is particularly important. The goal of our study was to develop and validate novel assays to quantitatively measure social motivation in mice. Methods In order to test the validity of our paradigms, we compared the BTBR strain, with documented social deficits, to the prosocial C57BL/6J strain. Two novel conditioning paradigms were developed that allowed the test mouse to control access to a social partner. In the social motivation task, the test mice lever pressed for a social reward. The reward contingency was set on a progressive ratio of reinforcement and the number of lever presses achieved in the final trial of a testing session (breakpoint) was used as an index of social motivation. In the valence comparison task, motivation for a food reward was compared to a social reward. We also explored activity, social affiliation, and preference for social novelty through a series of tasks using an ANY-Maze video-tracking system in an open-field arena. Results BTBR mice had significantly lower breakpoints in the social motivation paradigm than C57BL/6J mice. However, the valence comparison task revealed that BTBR mice also made significantly fewer lever presses for a food reward. Conclusions The results of the conditioning paradigms suggest that the BTBR strain has an overall deficit in motivated behavior. Furthermore, the results of the open-field observations may suggest that social differences in the BTBR strain are anxiety induced. PMID:25328850

  14. Quantitative trait loci that control plasma lipid levels in an F2 intercross between C57BL/6J and DDD.Cg-A(y) inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Suto, Jun-ichi

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize plasma lipid phenotypes and dissect the genetic basis of plasma lipid levels in an obese DDD.Cg-A(y) mouse strain. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly higher in the DDD.Cg-A(y) strain than in the B6.Cg-A(y) strain. In contrast, plasma total-cholesterol (CHO) levels did not substantially differ between the two strains. As a rule, the A(y) allele significantly increased TG levels, but did not increase CHO levels. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses for plasma TG and CHO levels were performed in two types of F(2) female mice [F(2)A(y) (F(2) mice carrying the A(y) allele) and F(2) non- A(y) mice (F(2) mice without the A(y) allele)] produced by crossing C57BL/6J females and DDD.Cg-A(y) males. Single QTL scan identified one significant QTL for TG levels on chromosome 1, and two significant QTLs for CHO levels on chromosomes 1 and 8. When the marker nearest to the QTL on chromosome 1 was used as covariates, four additional significant QTLs for CHO levels were identified on chromosomes 5, 6, and 17 (two loci). In contrast, consideration of the agouti locus genotype as covariates did not detect additional QTLs. DDD.Cg-A(y) showed a low CHO level, although it had Apoa2(b), which was a CHO-increasing allele at the Apoa2 locus. This may have been partly due to the presence of multiple QTLs, which were associated with decreased CHO levels, on chromosome 8.

  15. Calcium, potassium, iron, copper and zinc concentrations in the white and gray matter of the cerebellum and corpus callosum in brain of four genetic mouse strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Guillou, F.

    2005-04-01

    In the central nervous system, metallic cations are involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelinogenesis. Moreover, the metallic cations have been associated with pathogenesis, particularly multiple sclerosis and malignant gliomas. The brain is vulnerable to either a deficit or an excess of available trace elements. Relationship between trace metals and myelinogenesis is important in understanding a severe human pathology : the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. One approach to understand this disease has used mutant or transgenic mice presenting myelin deficiency or excess. But to date, the concentration of trace metals and mineral elements in white and gray matter areas in wild type brain is unknown. The aim of this study is to establish the reference concentrations of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) in the white and gray matter of the mouse cerebellum and corpus callosum. The brains of four different genetic mouse strains (C57Black6/SJL, C57Black6/D2, SJL and C3H) were analyzed. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow PIXE (Proton-induced X-ray emission) and RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. The results obtained give the first reference values. Furthermore, one species out of the fours testes exhibited differences in calcium, iron and zinc concentrations in the white matter.

  16. Studies using structural analogs and inbred strain differences to support a role for quinone methide metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in mouse lung tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J A; Carlson, T J; Sun, Y; Dwyer-Nield, L D; Malkinson, A M

    2001-03-01

    Chronic treatment of BALB and GRS mice with BHT (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol) following a single urethane injection increases lung tumor multiplicity, but this does not occur in CXB4 mice. Previous data suggest that promotion requires the conversion of BHT to a tert-butyl-hydroxylated metabolite (BHTOH) in lung and the subsequent oxidation of this species to an electrophilic quinone methide. To obtain additional evidence for the importance of quinone methide formation, structural analogs that form less reactive quinone methides were tested and found to lack promoting activity in BHT-responsive mice. The possibility that promotion-unresponsive strains are unable to form BHTOH was tested by substituting this compound for BHT in the promotion protocol using CXB4 mice. No promotion occurred, and in-vitro work demonstrated that CXB4 mice are, in fact, capable of producing BHTOH and its quinone methide, albeit in smaller quantities. Incubations with BALB lung microsomes and radiolabeled substrates confirmed that more covalent binding to protein occurs with BHTOH than with BHT and, in addition, BHTOH quinone methide is considerably more toxic to mouse lung epithelial cells than BHT quinone methide. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a two-step oxidation process, i.e. hydroxylation and quinone methide formation, is required for the promotion of mouse lung tumors by BHT.

  17. Proteomic analysis of HDL from inbred mouse strains implicates APOE associated with HDL in reduced cholesterol efflux capacity via the ABCA1 pathway[S

    PubMed Central

    Pamir, Nathalie; Hutchins, Patrick; Ronsein, Graziella; Vaisar, Tomas; Reardon, Catherine A.; Getz, Godfrey S.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux capacity associates strongly and negatively with the incidence and prevalence of human CVD. We investigated the relationships of HDL’s size and protein cargo with its cholesterol efflux capacity using APOB-depleted serum and HDLs isolated from five inbred mouse strains with different susceptibilities to atherosclerosis. Like humans, mouse HDL carried >70 proteins linked to lipid metabolism, the acute-phase response, proteinase inhibition, and the immune system. HDL’s content of specific proteins strongly correlated with its size and cholesterol efflux capacity, suggesting that its protein cargo regulates its function. Cholesterol efflux capacity with macrophages strongly and positively correlated with retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and PLTP, but not APOA1. In contrast, ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux correlated strongly with HDL’s content of APOA1, APOC3, and APOD, but not RBP4 and PLTP. Unexpectedly, APOE had a strong negative correlation with ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity. Moreover, the ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL isolated from APOE-deficient mice was significantly greater than that of HDL from wild-type mice. Our observations demonstrate that the HDL-associated APOE regulates HDL’s ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity. These findings may be clinically relevant because HDL’s APOE content associates with CVD risk and ABCA1 deficiency promotes unregulated cholesterol accumulation in human macrophages. PMID:26673204

  18. Serotonin transporter, 5-HT1A receptor, and behavior in DBA/2J mice in comparison with four inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Tibeikina, Marina A; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2009-12-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI), the reduction in acoustic startle produced when it is preceded by a weak prepulse stimulus, is impaired in schizophrenic patients. The DBA/2J mouse strain displayed deficient PPI and is therefore suggested as an experimental animal model for the loss of sensorimotor gating in schizophrenia. Brain serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. In the present study, behavior, 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) mRNA level, 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA level, and 5-HT(1A) receptor density in the brain regions were studied in DBA/2J mice in comparison with four inbred mouse strains (CBA/Lac, C57BL/6, BALB/c, and ICR). A decrease in 5-HTT mRNA level in the midbrain and a reduced density of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the frontal cortex without significant changes in 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA level in DBA/2J mice were found. It was shown that, along with decreased PPI, DBA/2J mice demonstrated considerably reduced immobility in the tail suspension test and in the forced swim test. No significant interstrain differences in intermale aggression, or in light-dark box and elevated plus-maze tests, were found. The results suggested the involvement of decreased 5-HTT gene expression and 5-HT(1A) receptor density in genetically defined PPI deficiency and showed a lack of any association between PPI deficiency and predisposition to aggressive, anxiety, and depressive-like behaviors.

  19. Class II-restricted T cell responses in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease. II. Survey of host immune responses and central nervous system virus titers in inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Clatch, R J; Lipton, H L; Miller, S D

    1987-11-01

    Previous studies using mouse strains with limited genetic differences and H-2 haplotypes demonstrated that susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease strongly correlated with chronically high levels of TMEV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), but not with TMEV-specific T cell proliferation (Tprlf), serum antibody responses, or with CNS virus titers. To determine if this correlation would be supported by analysis of these parameters in a more thorough genetic survey, ten inbred mouse strains, representing a wide variety of genetic backgrounds and H-2 haplotypes, were inoculated intracerebrally (i.c.) with the BeAn strain of TMEV. Significant TMEV-specific DTH was observed in all highly susceptible strains, but was not detectable in intermediate and resistant strains. TMEV-specific serum antibody titers also appeared to correlate with susceptibility to demyelinating disease, however even resistant strains had high antibody responses. Significant differences in CNS TMEV titers existed between strains, but did not correlate with disease susceptibility. DTH and Tprlf responses were observed in 3/4 resistant strains following peripheral immunization with UV-inactivated TMEV indicating that most resistant strains are genetically capable of mounting virus-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. The data extends our knowledge of host immune responses and virus titers in many different inbred mouse strains persistently infected with TMEV, supports the hypothesis that the demyelination in highly susceptible mice involves a TMEV-specific DTH response, and suggests that the genetic ability to mount specific DTH responses is necessary, but not sufficient for development of the demyelinating disease.

  20. The effect of sevoflurane on developing A/J strain mouse embryos using a whole-embryo culture system--the incidence of cleft lip in culture embryos.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Morimasa; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ohgami, Saori; Kanazawa, Mayuko; Harada, Jun; Ohno, Norikazu; Natsume, Nagato

    2014-03-01

    A/J strain mice have a high spontaneous incidence of cleft lip (ICL) and/or palate. The primary palate-related effects of sevoflurane on developing A/J strain mouse embryos (embryos) were studied using a whole-embryo culture (WEC) system. This system could separate the direct effects of sevoflurane from those that are maternally mediated. A total of 205 10.5-d embryos were cultured for 24 h in either a control group (control gas: 95% O2 and 5% CO2) or sevoflurane-administered groups (1/4, 1/2, and 1 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) with control gas) for 8 h. After 16 h, 11.5-d culture embryos were examined in terms of crown-rump length, number of somites, and protein content. Crown-rump length in the 1 MAC was significantly shorter than in the control group (p < 0.05). Protein content in the 1/2 MAC (p < 0.05) and 1 MAC (p < 0.001) was significantly lower than in the control group. The ICL showed no significant differences between each group. (The ICL rose with an increase in the sevoflurane concentration, but this was not significant). The positive findings in this study indicate that a WEC system is useful for studying the mechanisms of ICL (teratogenicity) associated with sevoflurane.

  1. Genetic analysis of mouse strains with variable serum sodium concentrations identifies the Nalcn sodium channel as a novel player in osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Sinke, Anne P.; Caputo, Christina; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Yuan, Rong; Ren, Dejian; Deen, Peter M. T.

    2011-01-01

    In central osmoregulation, a 1–2% rise in plasma osmolality is detected by specialized osmoreceptors located in the circumventricular organs of the hypothalamus. A disturbance in this tightly regulated balance will result in either hyponatremia or hypernatremia, which are both common electrolyte disorders in hospitalized patients. Despite the high clinical importance of hypo- and hypernatremia and the fact that this vital process has been studied for many years, the genes and corresponding proteins involved in this process are just beginning to be identified. To identify novel genes involved in the (patho-)physiology of osmoregulation, we therefore employed haplotype association mapping on an aging group of 27 inbred mouse strains. Serum sodium concentrations were determined in all strains at 6, 12, and 18 mo of age, and high-resolution mapping was performed for males and females separately. We identified a total of five loci associated with the serum sodium concentration of which the locus on chromosome 14, containing only one known gene (Nalcn), showed the strongest correlation. Within this locus three different haplotypes could be distinguished, which associated with different average serum sodium levels. The association of Nalcn with sodium levels was confirmed by analysis of heterozygous Nalcn knockout mice, which displayed hypernatremia compared with wild-type littermates. Our study demonstrates that Nalcn associates with serum sodium concentrations in mice and indicates that Nalcn is an important novel player in osmoregulation. PMID:21177381

  2. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-03-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive.

  3. Retrovirus-induced murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: natural history of infection and differing susceptibility of inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, J W; Fredrickson, T N; Yetter, R A; Makino, M; Morse, H C

    1989-01-01

    C57BL mice (Fv-1b) develop a severe immunodeficiency disease following inoculation as adults with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (MuLV), a derivative of Duplan-Laterjet virus which contains B-tropic ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLVs and a putative defective genome which may be the proximal cause of disease. The stages of development of this disease were defined for C57BL mice on the basis of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly; histopathological changes consistent with B-cell activation; and alterations in expression of cell surface antigens affected by proliferation of T cells, B cells, and macrophages. By using this disease profile as a standard, the response of adult mice of various inbred strains and selected F1 hybrids was compared. We show that although the strains which are highly sensitive are of the Fv-1b genotype (i.e., permissive for B-tropic MuLVs), certain Fv-1b strains, e.g., BALB/c and A/J, are resistant to murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, whereas certain Fv-1n strains (permissive for N-tropic MuLVs but restrictive for B-tropic MuLVs), notably P/N, BDP, and AKR, show moderate sensitivity and (C57BL/6 x CBA/N)F1 mice (Fv-1n/b and thus dually restrictive) are of relatively high susceptibility. The results of virus recovery tests suggest that apparently anomalous sensitivity, based on predicted Fv-1 restriction, may reflect MuLV induction and/or mutation to provide a helper virus for which the host is permissive. Images PMID:2536830

  4. Strain variability, injury distribution, and seizure onset in a mouse model of stroke in the immature brain.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne M; Johnston, Michael V; Wilson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal stroke is an important cause of neurologic morbidity and cerebral palsy. Recently, we have determined that in postnatal day 12 CD1 mice unilateral carotid ligation alone results in seizures and brain injury. We have shown that, in this model, seizure scores correlate with brain injury scores. We have applied this model to another strain of mice to assess strain-related differences in vulnerability to seizures and brain injury after unilateral carotid ligation. Under isoflurane anesthesia, unilateral right-sided carotid ligation was performed in postnatal day 12 C3HeB/FeJ mice followed by a 4-hour period of observation in a 35 degrees C incubator. Seizure scores and brain jury scores were assigned and compared to scores in mice receiving sham surgery. Timing of seizure onset and regional distribution of brain injury were compared in the CD1 and C3HeB/FeJ mice. Unilateral carotid ligation in postnatal day 12 C3HeB/FeJ mice resulted in seizure behavior and brain injury in some animals, with similar time to seizure onset and regional injury distribution, but affected a significantly smaller percentage of C3HeB/FeJ pups than that observed in postnatal day 12 CD1 mice, indicating strain-related vulnerability in this model. PMID:16046846

  5. Interaction of mouse splenocytes and macrophages with bacterial strains in vitro: the effect of age in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Van Beek, A A; Hoogerland, J A; Belzer, C; De Vos, P; De Vos, W M; Savelkoul, H F J; Leenen, P J M

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics influence the immune system, both at the local and systemic level. Recent findings suggest the relation between microbiota and the immune system alters with age. Our objective was to address direct effects of six bacterial strains on immune cells from young and aged mice: Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, Lactobacillus casei BL23, Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Bifidobacterium breve ATCC15700, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC15697, and Akkermansia muciniphila ATCC BAA-835. We used splenocytes and naïve or interferon-γ-stimulated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) as responder populations. All tested bacterial strains induced phenotypic and cytokine responses in splenocytes and BMDM. Based on magnitude of the cellular inflammatory response and cytokine profiles, two subgroups of bacteria were identified, i.e. L. plantarum and L. casei versus B. breve, B. infantis, and A. muciniphila. The latter group of bacteria induced high levels of cytokines produced under inflammatory conditions, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10. Responses to L. lactis showed features of both subgroups. In addition, we compared responses by splenocytes and BMDM derived from young mice to those of aged mice, and found that splenocytes and BMDM derived from aged mice had an increased IL-10 production and dysregulated IL-6 and TNF production compared to young immune cells. Overall, our study shows differential inflammatory responses to distinct bacterial strains, and profound age-dependent effects. These findings, moreover, support the view that immune environment importantly influences bacterial immune effects. PMID:26689225

  6. Variation in Taxonomic Composition of the Fecal Microbiota in an Inbred Mouse Strain across Individuals and Time

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Yana Emmy; Bik, Elisabeth M.; Lawley, Trevor D.; Holmes, Susan P.; Monack, Denise M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetics, diet, and other environmental exposures are thought to be major factors in the development and composition of the intestinal microbiota of animals. However, the relative contributions of these factors in adult animals, as well as variation with time in a variety of important settings, are still not fully understood. We studied a population of inbred, female mice fed the same diet and housed under the same conditions. We collected fecal samples from 46 individual mice over two weeks, sampling four of these mice for periods as long as 236 days for a total of 190 samples, and determined the phylogenetic composition of their microbial communities after analyzing 1,849,990 high-quality pyrosequencing reads of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region. Even under these controlled conditions, we found significant inter-individual variation in community composition, as well as variation within an individual over time, including increases in alpha diversity during the first 2 months of co-habitation. Some variation was explained by mouse membership in different cage and vendor shipment groups. The differences among individual mice from the same shipment group and cage were still significant. Overall, we found that 23% of the variation in intestinal microbiota composition was explained by changes within the fecal microbiota of a mouse over time, 12% was explained by persistent differences among individual mice, 14% by cage, and 18% by shipment group. Our findings suggest that the microbiota of controlled populations of inbred laboratory animals may not be as uniform as previously thought, that animal rearing and handling may account for some variation, and that as yet unidentified factors may explain additional components of variation in the composition of the microbiota within populations and individuals over time. These findings have implications for the design and interpretation of experiments involving laboratory animals. PMID:26565698

  7. Remodelling of the zero-stress state and residual strains in apoE-deficient mouse aorta.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Hans; Zhao, Jingbo; Lu, Xiao; Zhou, Ji; Falk, Erling

    2007-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most frequent cause of death and severe chronic disability in North America and Europe. The atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice contain the entire spectrum of lesions observed during atherogenesis. Significant remodelling of the artery occurs in atherosclerosis. The aim was to study the remodelling of the zero-stress state of the aorta in apoE-deficient mice up to 56 weeks of age. Normal wild-type mice served as control groups. The mice were euthanised at ages 10, 28 and 56 weeks and tissue rings where excised from several locations along the aorta. The rings where photographed in the no-load state (without any external forces applied), then cut radially to obtain the zero-stress state and photographed again. The cross-sectional wall area and wall thickness increased over time in apoE-deficient mice compared to controls (P<0.001). The residual strains at the inner and outer surface varied as function of aortic location both in controls and apoE-deficient mice (P<0.001). From age 28 to age 56 weeks a gradual increase in positive strain at the outer surface and negative strain at the inner surface was found in the apoE-deficient mice when compared to age-matched control mice (P<0.001). Furthermore, the inner residual strain in the plaque location was significantly smaller than in the non-plaque location in the rings with atherosclerotic plaques (P<0.001). The change over time of the opening angle was especially pronounced in the aortic arch. The opening angle increased to app. 200 degrees in the aortic arch in apoE-deficient mice at 56 weeks of age whereas it in age-matched controls was app. 125 degrees. Correspondingly, atherosclerotic plaques were prominent in the apoE-deficient mice, especially at week 56 in the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. In conclusion, a pronounced remodelling of the biomechanical properties in aorta was found in apoE-deficient mice. The stress gradient across the vessel wall in the plaque

  8. The effect of high and very low fluorescent light exposure levels on age-related cataract in a pigmented mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Wolf, N S; Penn, P E

    2001-07-01

    This study examined the effect of fluorescent light on the timing and severity of age-related cataracts in a fully pigmented mouse strain, the (C57BL/6 x C3H)F1, that normally develops slowly progressing age-related cataracts only beyond middle age. Two groups of 56 animals each were exposed, respectively, either to a daily range of 66-222 foot candles (FC) or to 1 FC of standard fluorescent lighting for a period beginning at 5 weeks of age and ending at 33.5 months (by which time approximately 65% of the colony had died). Contrary to previous reports involving albino rats or mice and a strain of pigmented but cataract-prone transgenic mice, the two groups of animals in this experiment did not differ for cataract development in time of first occurrence, rate of advancement, or degree of severity. It was concluded that genetic predisposition, based on levels of oxidative free radical production vs antioxidant enzyme and repair enzyme protection in the lens, was probably the major factor governing the rate and degree of age-related cataract development in these animals. The effect of relatively intense life-long fluorescent light exposure was so minimal as not to be manifested in this strain of mice under the conditions of this experiment. Remarkably, maintaining the one group of mice in semi-darkness from 5 weeks of age to beyond their mean lifespans did nothing to delay or reduce the incidence or severity of their age-related cataracts. PMID:11428861

  9. Hypothalamic expression of Peg3 gene is associated with maternal care differences between SM/J and LG/J mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Chiavegatto, Silvana; Sauce, Bruno; Ambar, Guilherme; Cheverud, James M; Peripato, Andrea C

    2012-07-01

    Maternal care is essential in mammals, and variations in the environment provided by mothers may directly influence the viability of newborns and emotional behavior later in life. A previous study investigated genetic variations associated with maternal care in an intercross of LG/J and SM/J inbred mouse strains and identified two single-locus QTLs (quantitative trait loci). Here, we selected three candidate genes located within these QTLs intervals; Oxt on chromosome 2, and FosB and Peg3 on chromosome 7 and tested their association with maternal care. LG/J females showed impaired postpartum nest building and pup retrieval, a one-day delay in milk ejection, reduced exploratory activity, and higher anxiety-like behavior when compared to SM/J females. The nucleotide sequences of Oxt and FosB were similar between strains, as were their hypothalamic expression levels. Conversely, Peg3 nucleotide sequences showed four nonsynonymous replacement substitutions on LG/J dams, T11062G, G13744A, A13808G, and G13813A, and a 30 base pair (10 aa) in tandem repeat in the coding region with three copies in SM/J and five copies in LG/J. Maternal care impaired LG/J mothers express 37% lower Peg3 mRNA levels in the hypothalamus on the second postpartum day. We also found an association of the Peg3 repeat-variant and poor maternal care in F(2) heterozygote females derived from a LG/J × SM/J intercross. These results may suggest that the maternally imprinted Peg3 gene is responsible for the single-locus QTL on chromosome 7 that has been shown to influence maternal care in these strains. Furthermore, these data provide additional support for an epigenetic regulation of maternal behavior.

  10. Congenic Strains Confirm the Pleiotropic Effect of Chromosome 4 QTL on Mouse Femoral Geometry and Biomechanical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kristianto, Jasmin; Litscher, Suzanne J.; Johnson, Michael G.; Patel, Forum; Patel, Mital; Fisher, Jacqueline; Zastrow, Ryley K.; Radcliff, Abigail B.; Blank, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    A pleiotropic quantitative trait locus (QTL) for bone geometry and mechanical performance in mice was mapped to distal chromosome 4 via an intercross of recombinant congenic mice HcB-8 and HcB-23. To study the QTL in isolation, we have generated C3H.B10-(rs6355453-rs13478087) (C.B.4.3) and C3H.B10-(rs6369860-D4Mit170) (C.B.4.2) congenic strains that harbor ~20 Mb and ~3 Mb, respectively, of chromosome 4 overlapping segments from C57BL/10ScSnA (B10) within the locus on a C3H/DiSnA (C3H) background. Using 3-point bend testing and standard beam equations, we phenotyped these mice for femoral mid-diaphyseal geometry and biomechanical performance. We analyzed the results via 2-way ANOVA, using sex and genotype as factors. In the C.B.4.3 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 male mice had smaller cross sectional area (CSA) and reduced total displacement than homozygous C3H/C3H mice. Sex by genotype interaction was also observed for maximum load and stiffness for C3H/C3H and B10/B10 mice, respectively. In C.B.4.2 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 mice had lower total displacement, post-yield displacement (PYD), stiffness, yield load and maximum load than mice harboring C3H allele. Sex by genotype interaction was observed in B10/B10 mice for perimeter, outer minor axis (OMA) and CSA. There were no significant differences in tissue level mechanical performance, which suggest that the QTL acts primarily on circumferential bone size. These data confirm the prior QTL mapping data and support other work demonstrating the importance of chromosome 4 QTL on bone modeling and bone responses to mechanical loading. PMID:26849124

  11. Cooperative effect of the VP1 amino acids 98E, 145A and 169F in the productive infection of mouse cell lines by enterovirus 71 (BS strain).

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Meng, Tao; Chow, Vincent Tk; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotrophic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and occasional neurological infection among children. It infects primate cells but not rodent cells, primarily due to the incompatibility between the virus and the expressed form of its receptor, scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2) protein, on rodent cells (mSCARB2). We previously generated adapted strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv) that were shown to productively infect primate and rodent cell lines and whose genomes exhibited a multitude of non-synonymous mutations compared with the EV71:BS parental virus. In this study, we aimed to identify mutations that are necessary for productive infection of murine cells by EV71:BS. Using reverse genetics and site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed EV71 infectious clones with specific mutations that generated amino acid substitutions in the capsid VP1 and VP2 proteins. We subsequently assessed the infection induced by clone-derived viruses (CDVs) in mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 and murine neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cell lines. We found that the CDV:BS-VP1(K98E,E145A,L169F) with three substitutions in the VP1 protein-K98E, E145A and L169F-productively infected both mouse cell lines for at least three passages of the virus in murine cells. Moreover, the virus gained the ability to utilize the mSCARB2 protein to infect murine cell lines. These results demonstrate that the three VP1 residues cooperate to effectively interact with the mSCARB2 protein on murine cells and permit the virus to infect murine cells. Gain-of-function studies similar to the present work provide valuable insight into the mutational trajectory required for EV71 to infect new host cells previously non-susceptible to infection. PMID:27329847

  12. Cooperative effect of the VP1 amino acids 98E, 145A and 169F in the productive infection of mouse cell lines by enterovirus 71 (BS strain)

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Meng, Tao; Chow, Vincent TK; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotrophic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and occasional neurological infection among children. It infects primate cells but not rodent cells, primarily due to the incompatibility between the virus and the expressed form of its receptor, scavenger receptor class B member 2 (SCARB2) protein, on rodent cells (mSCARB2). We previously generated adapted strains (EV71:TLLm and EV71:TLLmv) that were shown to productively infect primate and rodent cell lines and whose genomes exhibited a multitude of non-synonymous mutations compared with the EV71:BS parental virus. In this study, we aimed to identify mutations that are necessary for productive infection of murine cells by EV71:BS. Using reverse genetics and site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed EV71 infectious clones with specific mutations that generated amino acid substitutions in the capsid VP1 and VP2 proteins. We subsequently assessed the infection induced by clone-derived viruses (CDVs) in mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 and murine neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cell lines. We found that the CDV:BS-VP1K98E,E145A,L169F with three substitutions in the VP1 protein—K98E, E145A and L169F—productively infected both mouse cell lines for at least three passages of the virus in murine cells. Moreover, the virus gained the ability to utilize the mSCARB2 protein to infect murine cell lines. These results demonstrate that the three VP1 residues cooperate to effectively interact with the mSCARB2 protein on murine cells and permit the virus to infect murine cells. Gain-of-function studies similar to the present work provide valuable insight into the mutational trajectory required for EV71 to infect new host cells previously non-susceptible to infection. PMID:27329847

  13. Parvovirus minute virus of mice strain i multiplication and pathogenesis in the newborn mouse brain are restricted to proliferative areas and to migratory cerebellar young neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, J C; Fairén, A; Almendral, J M

    1996-01-01

    Newborn BALB/c mice intranasally inoculated at birth with a lethal dose of the immunosuppressive strain of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMi) developed motor disabilities and intention tremors with a high incidence by the day 6 postinfection (dpi). These neurological syndromes paralleled the synthesis of virus intermediate DNA replicative forms and yield of infectious particles in the brain, with kinetics that peaked by this time. The preferred virus replicative sites in the brain were established early in the infection (2 dpi) and at the onset of clinical symptoms (6 dpi) and were compared with major regions of cellular proliferative activity found after intraperitoneal injection of bromodeoxyuridine 24 h before encephalons were subjected to immunohistochemistry detection. At 2 dpi, viral capsid antigen was located in the laterodorsal thalamic and the pontine nuclei but not in the extensive proliferative regions of the mouse brain at this postnatal day. At 6 dpi, however, the neurotropism of the MVMi was highlighted by its ability to target the subventricular zone of the ventricles, the subependymal zone of the olfactory bulb, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, which are the three main germinal centers of the cerebrum in mouse postbirth neurogenesis. Unexpectedly, in the cerebellum, the MVMi capsid antigen was confined exclusively to cells that have undergone mitosis and have migrated to the internal granular layer (IGL) and not to the proliferative external granular layer (EGL), which was stained with antiproliferative cell nuclear antigen antibody and is the main target in other parvovirus infections. This result implies temporal or differentiation coupling between MVMi cycle and neuroblast morphogenesis, since proliferative granules of the EGL should primarily be infected but must migrate in a virus carrier state into the IGL in order to express the capsid proteins. During migration, many cells undergo destruction, accounting for the marked

  14. Infection with a Mouse-Adapted Strain of the 2009 Pandemic Virus Causes a Highly Severe Disease Associated with an Impaired T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Isabelle; Morisseau, Olivier; Garneau, Émilie; Marois, Isabelle; Cloutier, Alexandre; Richter, Martin V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a relatively low fatality rate, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus differed from other seasonal viruses in that it caused mortality and severe pneumonia in the young and middle-aged population (18–59 years old). The mechanisms underlying this increased disease severity are still poorly understood. In this study, a human isolate of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was adapted to the mouse (MAp2009). The pathogenicity of the MAp2009 virus and the host immune responses were evaluated in the mouse model and compared to the laboratory H1N1 strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8). The MAp2009 virus reached consistently higher titers in the lungs over 14 days compared to the PR8 virus, and caused severe disease associated with high morbidity and 85% mortality rate, contrasting with the 0% death rate in the PR8 group. During the early phase of infection, both viruses induced similar pathology in the lungs. However, MAp2009-induced lung inflammation was sustained until the end of the study (day 14), while there was no sign of inflammation in the PR8-infected group by day 10. Furthermore, at day 3 post-infection, MAp2009 induced up to 10- to 40-fold more cytokine and chemokine gene expression, respectively. More importantly, the numbers of CD4+ T cells and virus-specific CD8+ T cells were significantly lower in the lungs of MAp2009-infected mice compared to PR8-infected mice. Interestingly, there was no difference in the number of dendritic cells in the lung and in the draining lymph node. Moreover, mice infected with PR8 or MAp2009 had similar numbers of CCR5 and CXCR3-expressing T cells, suggesting that the impaired T cell response was not due to a lack of chemokine responsiveness or priming of T cells. This study demonstrates that a mouse-adapted virus from an isolate of the 2009 pandemic virus interferes with the adaptive immune response leading to a more severe disease. PMID:26381265

  15. The RNA structures engaged in replication and transcription of the A59 strain of mouse hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, D; Wang, T; Sawicki, S

    2001-02-01

    In addition to the RI (replicative intermediate RNA) and native RF (replicative form RNA), mouse hepatitis virus-infected cells contained six species of RNA intermediates active in transcribing subgenomic mRNA. We have named these transcriptive intermediates (TIs) and native transcriptive forms (TFs) because they are not replicating genome-sized RNA. Based on solubility in high salt solutions, approximately 70% of the replicating and transcribing structures that accumulated in infected cells by 5-6 h post-infection were multi-stranded intermediates, the RI/TIs. The other 30% were in double-stranded structures, the native RF/TFs. These replicating and transcribing structures were separated by velocity sedimentation on sucrose gradients or by gel filtration chromatography on Sepharose 2B and Sephacryl S-1000, and migrated on agarose gels during electrophoresis, according to their size. Digestion with RNase T1 at 1-10 units/microgram RNA resolved RI/TIs into RF/TF cores and left native RF/TFs intact, whereas RNase A at concentrations of 0.02 microgram/microgram RNA or higher degraded both native RF/TFs and RI/TIs. Viral RI/TIs and native RF/TFs bound to magnetic beads containing oligo(dT)(25), suggesting that the poly(A) sequence on the 3' end of the positive strands was longer than any poly(U) on the negative strands. Kinetics of incorporation of [(3)H]uridine showed that both the RI and TIs were transcriptionally active and the labelling of RI/TIs was not the dead-end product of aberrant negative-strand synthesis. Failure originally to find TIs and TF cores was probably due to overdigestion with RNase A.

  16. Traumatic brain injury causes delayed motor and cognitive impairment in a mutant mouse strain known to exhibit delayed Wallerian degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fox, G B; Faden, A I

    1998-09-15

    Delayed Wallerian degeneration after neuronal injury is a feature of the C57BL/Wld(s) mouse mutant. In the present study, we examined the effect of unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) on motor and cognitive performance in C57BL/6 and C57BL/Wld(s) mice. Performance on a beam-walking task was impaired in both injured groups over the first 3 weeks; however, between 28 and 35 days post injury, C57BL/6 mice continued to improve whereas C57BL/Wld(s) mice showed increased footfaults. In a spatial learning task, C57BL/Wld(s) animals performed consistently better than C57BL/6 mice when tested 7-10 days and 14-17 days following CCI. C57BL/Wld(s) mice also demonstrated improved working memory performance as compared with C57BL/6 mice when trained on days 21-22 after injury; this effect was lost on days 23 and 24, and was not evident in other animals tested in the same task at 28-31 days following injury. These results indicate a marked delay in motor and cognitive impairment following CCI in C57BL/Wld(s) mice compared with injured C57BL/6 controls. This is consistent with previous work showing delayed temporal evolution of neuronal degeneration in C57BL/Wld(s) mice and suggests CCI may be a suitable model for examining the functional consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in genetically altered mice.

  17. Strain-dependent effects of transforming growth factor-β1 and 2 during mouse secondary palate development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiu-Zhen; Ding, Jixiang

    2014-12-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect affecting 1 in 700 births. Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) are important signaling molecules, and their functions in murine palate development have received great attention. TGF-β3 is expressed exclusively in palatal epithelial cells and mediates epithelial fusion, whereas the importance of TGF-β1 and 2 in palate have not yet been demonstrated in vivo, since inactivation of Tgf-β1 or Tgf-β2 genes in mice did not reveal significant palate defects. We hypothesized that TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 can compensate each other during palate formation. To test this, we generated Tgf-β1 and Tgf-β2 compound mutant mice and found that approximately 40% of [Tgf-β1(+/-); Tgf-β2(-/-)] compound mutant embryos display cleft palate on C57 background. In addition, 26% of Tgf-β2(-/-) embryos on 129 background, but not in C57 or Black Swiss, displayed cleft palate. TGF-β1 and 2 functions are required for murine palate development in strain-dependent manner.

  18. Dexamethasone Induces Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells in a Mouse Strain-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hirokazu; Kikuta, Tomohiro; Inoue, Tsutomu; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Ban, Shinichi; Sugaya, Takeshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a downstream mediator of transforming growth factor-β1, mediates mesangial cell/fibroblast proliferation and extracellular matrix production by renal cells. Here, we show that renal tubular epithelial cells from patients with minimal change nephritic syndrome produced CTGF after glucocorticoid treatment. In addition, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) increased CTGF mRNA levels in the kidneys of C57B6 but not SJL mice and produced intermediate CTGF mRNA levels in the kidneys of F1 (C57B6 × SJL) mice, midway between the levels found for parental strains. DEX also increased CTGF mRNA levels in cultured tubular epithelial cells derived from C57B6 (mProx24) but not SJL (MCT) mice via transcriptional up-regulation of CTGF mRNA. Transient transfection experiments using luciferase reporter constructs bearing CTGF promoter fragments revealed that the −897- to −628-bp fragment contained DEX-responsive positive regulatory elements, which were active in mProx24 but not MCT cells. Long-term DEX treatment resulted in fibronectin deposition in the kidneys of C57B6 but not SJL mice, and this effect was inhibited by co-administration of CTGF anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Thus, glucocorticoid-induced renal fibrogenesis seems to be influenced by genetic background, with the critical DEX-responsive elements in the −897- to −628-bp region of the CTGF promoter. PMID:16507889

  19. Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain A59 and Blocking Antireceptor Monoclonal Antibody Bind to the N-Terminal Domain of Cellular Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dveksler, Gabriela S.; Pensiero, Michael N.; Dieffenbach, Carl W.; Cardellichio, Christine B.; Basile, Alexis A.; Elia, Patrick E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    1993-03-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain A59 uses as cellular receptors members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Recombinant receptor proteins with deletions of whole or partial immunoglobulin domains were used to identify the regions of receptor glycoprotein recognized by virus and by antireceptor monoclonal antibody CC1, which blocks infection of murine cells. Monoclonal antibody CC1 and MHV-A59 virions bound only to recombinant proteins containing the entire first domain of MHV receptor. To determine which of the proteins could serve as functional virus receptors, receptor-negative hamster cells were transfected with recombinant deletion clones and then challenged with MHV-A59 virions. Receptor activity required the entire N-terminal domain with either the second or the fourth domain and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Recombinant proteins lacking the first domain or its C-terminal portion did not serve as viral receptors. Thus, like other virus receptors in the immunoglobulin superfamily, including CD4, poliovirus receptor, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, the N-terminal domain of MHV receptor is recognized by the virus and the blocking monoclonal antibody.

  20. The anti-aging effects of LW-AFC via correcting immune dysfunctions in senescence accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) strain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiaorui; Zhang, Xiaorui; Cheng, Junping; Xu, Yiran; Zeng, Ju; Zhou, Wenxia; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Although there were considerable advances in the anti-aging medical field, it is short of therapeutic drug for anti-aging. Mounting evidence indicates that the immunosenescence is the key physiopathological mechanism of aging. This study showed the treatment of LW-AFC, an herbal medicine, decreased the grading score of senescence, increased weight, prolonged average life span and ameliorated spatial memory impairment in 12- and 24-month-old senescence accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) strain. And these anti-aging effects of LW-AFC were more excellent than melatonin. The administration of LW-AFC enhanced ConA- and LPS-induced splenocyte proliferation in aged SAMR1 mice. The treatment of LW-AFC not only reversed the decreased the proportions of helper T cells, suppressor T cells and B cells, the increased regulatory T cells in the peripheral blood of old SAMR1 mice, but also could modulate the abnormal secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, TNF-β, RANTES, eotaxin, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and G-CSF. These data indicated that LW-AFC reversed the immunosenescence status by restoring immunodeficiency and decreasing chronic inflammation and suggested LW-AFC may be an effective anti-aging agent. PMID:27105505

  1. Mouse adaptation of a sub-genogroup B5 strain of human enterovirus 71 is associated with a novel lysine to glutamic acid substitution at position 244 in protein VP1.

    PubMed

    Zaini, Zainun; Phuektes, Patchara; McMinn, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Most human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) strains infect only primates and are unable to cause clinically apparent infection in mice. Here we describe a mouse-adapted HEV71 strain that belongs to sub-genogroup B5 with increased virulence in newborn BALB/c mice. The mouse-virulent strain was initially selected by serial passage of a HEV71 clinical isolate (HEV71-B5) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (CHO-B5), followed by serial passage in newborn mice. Virus from the fifth mouse passage was cultured twice on Vero cells and designated as MP-B5. MP-B5 induces severe disease of high mortality in newborn mice in a dose-dependent manner. Skeletal muscle is the primary site of virus replication and results in severe myositis. CHO-B5 harbours a single amino acid substitution (K(149) → I) in the VP2 capsid protein. Five additional nucleotide sequence changes were identified in MP-B5, two of which are located in the 5' UTR and the three within the open reading frame (ORF). Two of the ORF mutations resulted in deduced amino acid changes in the capsid protein VP1: S(241) → L and K(244) → E; the third ORF mutation was a synonymous C → T change at nucleotide position 6072 within the 3D polymerase gene. Infectious cDNA clone-derived mutant virus populations of HEV71 belonging to sub-genogroup B3 (CHO-26 M) that contain the VP1 mutations identified in MP-B5 were generated in order to determine the mutation(s) responsible for mouse virulence. Only viruses expressing the VP1 (K(244) → E) mutation were virulent in 5-day-old BALB/c mice, indicating that the VP1 (K(244) → E) change is the critical genetic determinant of mouse adaptation and virulence in this model.

  2. Mouse Strain Impacts Fatty Acid Uptake and Trafficking in Liver, Heart, and Brain: A Comparison of C57BL/6 and Swiss Webster Mice.

    PubMed

    Seeger, D R; Murphy, E J

    2016-05-01

    C57BL/6 and Swiss Webster mice are used to study lipid metabolism, although differences in fatty acid uptake between these strains have not been reported. Using a steady state kinetic model, [1-(14)C]16:0, [1-(14)C]20:4n-6, or [1-(14)C]22:6n-3 was infused into awake, adult male mice and uptake into liver, heart, and brain determined. The integrated area of [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 in plasma was significantly increased in C57BL/6 mice, but [1-(14)C]16:0 and [1-(14)C]22:6n-3 were not different between groups. In heart, uptake of [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 was increased 1.7-fold in C57BL/6 mice. However, trafficking of [1-(14)C]22:6n-3 into the organic fraction of heart was significantly decreased 33 % in C57BL/6 mice. Although there were limited differences in fatty acid tracer trafficking in liver or brain, [1-(14)C]16:0 incorporation into liver neutral lipids was decreased 18 % in C57BL/6 mice. In heart, the amount of [1-(14)C]16:0 and [1-(14)C]22:6n-3 incorporated into total phospholipids were decreased 45 and 49 %, respectively, in C57BL/6 mice. This was accounted for by a 53 and 37 % decrease in [1-(14)C]16:0 and 44 and 52 % decrease in [1-(14)C]22:6n-3 entering ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and choline glycerophospholipids, respectively. In contrast, there was a significant increase in [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 esterification into all heart phospholipids of C57BL/6 mice. Although changes in uptake were limited to heart, several significant differences were found in fatty acid trafficking into heart, liver, and brain phospholipids. In summary, our data demonstrates differences in tissue fatty acid uptake and trafficking between mouse strains is an important consideration when carrying out fatty acid metabolic studies.

  3. Effect of GDNF on depressive-like behavior, spatial learning and key genes of the brain dopamine system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Ilchibaeva, Tatyana V; Khotskin, Nikita V; Semenova, Alina A; Popova, Nina K

    2014-11-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and brain dopamine system in predisposed to depressive-like behavior ASC (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics) mice in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA mice was studied. In 7days after administration (800ng, i.c.v.) GDNF decreased escape latency time and the path traveled to reach hidden platform in Morris water maze in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavioral traits in both "nondepressive" CBA and "depressive" ASC mice. In CBA mice, GDNF decreased functional response to agonists of D1 (chloro-APB hydrobromide) and D2 (sumanirole maleate) receptors in tail suspension test, reduced D2 receptor gene expression in the substantia nigra and increased monoamine oxydase A (MAO A) gene expression in the striatum. GDNF increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in the nucleus accumbens of ASC mice but failed to alter expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, MAO B and tyrosine hydroxylase genes in both investigated mouse strains. Thus, GDNF produced long-term genotype-dependent effect on behavior and the brain dopamine system. GDNF pretreatment (1) reduced D1 and D2 receptors functional responses and D2 receptor gene expression in s. nigra of CBA mice; (2) increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in n. accumbens of ASC mice and (3) improved spatial learning in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavior both in CBA and ASC mice. The data suggest that genetically defined variance in the cross-talk between GDNF and brain dopamine system contributes to the variability of GDNF-induced responses and might be responsible for controversial GDNF effects.

  4. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy reveals genomic loci regulating the tissue response in high fat diet fed BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity-associated organ-specific pathological states can be ensued from the dysregulation of the functions of the adipose tissues, liver and muscle. However, the influence of genetic differences underlying gross-compositional differences in these tissues is largely unknown. In the present study, the analytical method of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy has been combined with a genetic approach to identify genetic differences responsible for phenotypic alterations in adipose, liver and muscle tissues. Results Mice from 29 BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains were put on high fat diet and gross-compositional changes in adipose, liver and muscle tissues were measured by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. The analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations revealed significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosome 12 for the content of fat and collagen, collagen integrity, and the lipid to protein ratio in adipose tissue and on chromosome 17 for lipid to protein ratio in liver. Using gene expression and sequence information, we suggest Rsad2 (viperin) and Colec11 (collectin-11) on chromosome 12 as potential quantitative trait candidate genes. Rsad2 may act as a modulator of lipid droplet contents and lipid biosynthesis; Colec11 might play a role in apoptopic cell clearance and maintenance of adipose tissue. An increased level of Rsad2 transcripts in adipose tissue of DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice suggests a cis-acting genetic variant leading to differential gene activation. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the analytical method of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy effectively contributed to decompose the macromolecular composition of tissues that accumulate fat and to link this information with genetic determinants. The candidate genes in the QTL regions may contribute to obesity-related diseases in humans, in particular if the results can be verified in a bigger BXD cohort. PMID:23758785

  5. Characterization of mouse hepatitis virus-specific cytotoxic T cells derived from the central nervous system of mice infected with the JHM strain.

    PubMed Central

    Stohlman, S A; Kyuwa, S; Polo, J M; Brady, D; Lai, M M; Bergmann, C C

    1993-01-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity of spleen cells from BALB/c (H-2d) mice immunized with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was stimulated in vitro for 7 days. CTL were tested for recognition of target cells infected with either JHMV or vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the four virus structural proteins. Only target cells infected with either JHMV or the vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the JHMV nucleocapsid protein were recognized. Cytotoxic T cell lines were established by limiting dilution from the brains of mice undergoing acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis after infection with JHMV. Twenty of the 22 lines recognized JHMV-infected but not uninfected syngeneic target cells, indicating that they are specific for JHMV. All T-cell lines except one were CD8+. The specificity of the CTL lines was examined by using target cells infected with vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the JHMV nucleocapsid, spike, membrane, and hemagglutinin-esterase structural proteins. Seventeen lines recognized target cells expressing the nucleocapsid protein. Three of the JHMV-specific T-cell lines were unable to recognize target cells expressing any of the JHMV structural proteins, indicating that they are specific for an epitope of a nonstructural protein(s) of JHMV. These data indicate that the nucleocapsid protein induces an immunodominant CTL response. However, no CTL activity specific for the nucleocapsid protein could be detected in either the spleens or cervical lymph nodes of mice 4, 5, 6, or 7 days after intracranial infection, suggesting that the CTL response to JHMV infection within the central nervous system may be induced or expanded locally. PMID:8230429

  6. RIII S/J (H-2r). An inbred mouse strain with a massive deletion of T cell receptor V beta genes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have identified an inbred strain of mouse, RIII S/J (H-2r), that has the largest known deletion of the TCR V beta genes by screening with mAb and TCR V beta specific probes. Upon screening of PBL with mAb F23.1, which is specific for V beta 8 TCR, RIII S/J was found to be negative. On further screening with mAb KJ 23a, which is specific for V beta 17a TCR, RIII S/J was completely negative. We next tested RIII S/J with mAb 44-22-1, which is specific for V beta 6 TCR, and found it also to be negative. The (B10 X RIII)F1 mice showed a 50% expression of V beta 6 gene, indicating a genomic rather than a clonal deletion. mAb KJ25, detecting V beta 3, was positive in RIII S/J, denoting the downstream boundary for the deletion. Southern blot analysis of liver DNA using TCR V beta-specific probes confirmed the deletion of V beta 8 gene subfamily and V beta 5 gene subfamily, along with V beta 9, V beta 11, V beta 12, and V beta 13 genes similar to the known TCR V beta deletion mutants (SWR, SJL, C57L, and C57Br). In addition, RIII S/J is missing V beta 6, V beta 15, and V beta 17 genes. Our mapping of the deletion indicates that RIII S/J has lost approximately 130 kb of V beta chromosome and with it 13 V beta genes out of the known 21 V beta genes of the TCR. The deletion is marked by the presence of V beta 10 gene upstream and V beta 3 gene downstream. PMID:2525171

  7. Mouse strain differences in immobility and sensitivity to fluvoxamine and desipramine in the forced swimming test: analysis of serotonin and noradrenaline transporter binding.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Kajiwara, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Kazufumi; Yamada, Shizuo; Tagawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Jun

    2008-09-11

    Strain differences in immobility time in the forced swimming test were investigated in five strains of mice, namely, ICR, ddY, C57BL/6, DBA/2 and BALB/c mice. There were significant strain differences. The immobility times of ICR, ddY and C57BL/6 mice were longer than those of DBA/2 and BALB/c mice. Immobility times were not significantly related to locomotor activity in these strains. There were also differences in sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine. In ICR, ddY and C57BL/6 mice, fluvoxamine did not affect immobility time, while it reduced the immobility time of DBA/2 and BALB/c mice dose-dependently. The noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor desipramine decreased immobility time in all strains of mice. Serotonin (5-HT) transporter binding in the brains of all five strains of mice was also investigated. Analysis of 5-HT transporter binding revealed significant strain differences, being lower in DBA/2 and BALB/c mice than in other strains of mice. The amount of 5-HT transporter binding was correlated to baseline immobility time. However, there was no significant relation between noradrenaline transporter binding and immobility time. These results suggest that the duration of baseline immobility depends on the levels of 5-HT transporter binding, leading to apparent strain differences in immobility time in the forced swimming test. Furthermore, differences in 5-HT transporter binding may cause variations in responses to fluvoxamine.

  8. Comparison of BALB/c and B6-albino mouse strain blastocysts as hosts for the injection of C57BL6/N-derived C2 embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Alcantar, Tuija M; Wiler, Rhonda; Rairdan, Xin Y

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells from a C57BL/6N (B6N) background injected into B6(Cg)-Tyrc-2J/J (B6-albino) recipient blastocysts are commonly used for generating genetically modified mouse models. To understand the influence of the recipient blastocyst strain on germline transmission, BALB/cAnNTac and B6-albino germline transmission rates were compared using the C57BL6/N-derived C2 ES cell line. A total of 92 ES cell clones from 27 constructs were injected. We compared blastocyst yield, birth rate, chimera formation rate, and high-percentage (>50 %) male chimera formation rate. For germline transmission, we analyzed 24 clones from 19 constructs, which generated high-percentage male chimeras from both donor strains. B6-albino hosts resulted in higher mean blastocyst yields per donor than did BALB/c ones (3.6 vs. 2.5). However, BALB/c hosts resulted in a higher birth rate than B6-albino ones (36 vs. 27 %), a higher chimera formation rate (50 vs. 42 %), a higher high-percentage male chimera rate (10 vs. 8 %), and a higher germline transmission rate (65 vs. 49 %), respectively. Our data suggest that BALB/c is a suitable blastocyst host strain for C2 ES cells and has an advantage over the B6-albino strain for receiving the injection of C2 ES cells. PMID:26852382

  9. Detection of restricted predominant epitopes of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus capsid proteins expressed in the lambda gt11 system: differential patterns of antibody reactivity among different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Crane, M A; Jue, C; Mitchell, M; Lipton, H; Kim, B S

    1990-05-01

    Intracerebral injection of mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in chronic demyelination in susceptible strains, and serves as a model system for the study of multiple sclerosis. The role of individual epitopes in the disease process remains to be elucidated. Random fragments of DNA from the viral capsid protein genome covering the coding regions from VP1, VP2, and VP3 have been expressed in the lambda gt11 vector system. Fusion proteins from the clones were expressed and probed with antibodies from both resistant and susceptible strains of mice. Each strain displays a distinctive pattern with certain fusion proteins recognized by all of the strains and others recognized uniquely by either the susceptible or the resistant strains.

  10. Harvard U.'s Request for Commercial Rights to New Strain of Mouse Forces Debate in Europe over Whether Animals Can Be Patented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The European Patent Convention has informed Harvard University that its application for a patent on a genetically engineered mouse may be refused. The application was the first to obtain patent protection across most of Europe for a transgenic animal, one which has been implanted with genes from another animal. (MSE)

  11. QTL Analysis of Type I and Type IIA Fibers in Soleus Muscle in a Cross between LG/J and SM/J Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Andrew M.; Palmer, Abraham A.; Lionikas, Arimantas

    2011-01-01

    Properties of muscle fibers, i.e., their type, number and size, are important determinants of functional characteristics of skeletal muscle, and of the quality of meat in livestock. Genetic factors play an important role in determining variation in fiber properties, however, specific genes remain largely elusive. We examined histological properties of soleus muscle fibers in two strains of mice exhibiting a twofold difference in muscle mass, LG/J and SM/J, and their F2 intercross. The total number of muscle fibers (555 ± 106; mean ± SD) did not differ between the strains or between males and females. A higher percentage of type I fibers was observed in the LG/J compared to the SM/J strain (P < 0.001) in both males (45 ± 3 vs. 37 ± 4%) and females (58 ± 4 vs. 41 ± 3%). Across strains, females had a higher percentage of type I fibers than males (P < 0.001), and the sex effect was greater in the LG/J strain (strain-by-sex interaction, P < 0.001). The cross-sectional area (CSA) did not differ between type I and type IIA fibers, but was greater in the LG/J than the SM/J strain (1365 ± 268 vs. 825 ± 229 μm2, P < 0.001). Three significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting CSA for type I and type IIA fibers mapped to chromosomes (Chr) 1, 6, and 11 and three suggestive QTL for percentage of type I fibers mapped to Chr 2, 3, and 4. Within each significant QTL, regions of conserved synteny were also implicated in variation of similar traits in an analogous study in pigs. Our results provide the evidence that the intercross between the SM/J and LG/J strains is a promising model to search for genes affecting muscle fiber properties. PMID:22303393

  12. QTL Analysis of Type I and Type IIA Fibers in Soleus Muscle in a Cross between LG/J and SM/J Mouse Strains.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Palmer, Abraham A; Lionikas, Arimantas

    2011-01-01

    Properties of muscle fibers, i.e., their type, number and size, are important determinants of functional characteristics of skeletal muscle, and of the quality of meat in livestock. Genetic factors play an important role in determining variation in fiber properties, however, specific genes remain largely elusive. We examined histological properties of soleus muscle fibers in two strains of mice exhibiting a twofold difference in muscle mass, LG/J and SM/J, and their F2 intercross. The total number of muscle fibers (555 ± 106; mean ± SD) did not differ between the strains or between males and females. A higher percentage of type I fibers was observed in the LG/J compared to the SM/J strain (P < 0.001) in both males (45 ± 3 vs. 37 ± 4%) and females (58 ± 4 vs. 41 ± 3%). Across strains, females had a higher percentage of type I fibers than males (P < 0.001), and the sex effect was greater in the LG/J strain (strain-by-sex interaction, P < 0.001). The cross-sectional area (CSA) did not differ between type I and type IIA fibers, but was greater in the LG/J than the SM/J strain (1365 ± 268 vs. 825 ± 229 μm(2), P < 0.001). Three significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting CSA for type I and type IIA fibers mapped to chromosomes (Chr) 1, 6, and 11 and three suggestive QTL for percentage of type I fibers mapped to Chr 2, 3, and 4. Within each significant QTL, regions of conserved synteny were also implicated in variation of similar traits in an analogous study in pigs. Our results provide the evidence that the intercross between the SM/J and LG/J strains is a promising model to search for genes affecting muscle fiber properties.

  13. The ROP18 and ROP5 allele types are highly predictive of mouse-virulence across globally distributed strains of Toxoplasma gondii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is one of the known most successful eukaryotic pathogens on Earth. Virulence of T. gondii strains varies greatly in mice, and mounting evidence suggests that such variations may be relevant to the manifestation of human toxoplasmosis. Polymorphic rhoptry-secr...

  14. Epithelial entry rather than the ensuing systemic immune response determines the pathogenicity of two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Rikke; Petersen, Anne; Brix, Susanne; Licht, Tine Rask; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2013-11-01

    Most studies of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection focus only on the pathogenicity of one strain. We investigated whether differences in pathogenicity of two wild-type S. Typhimurium strains; DT120 and SL1344, were related to gut invasion or the resulting immune response. Oral administration of a ten-fold lower number of SL1344 (10(6) CFU) as compared to DT120 (10(7) CFU) resulted in higher bacterial counts in liver and lymph nodes, and led to massive neutrophil infiltration of the spleen, while DT120 administration did not. In contrast, administration of the same dose (10(3) CFU) of the two strains intravenously resulted in the same levels of bacteria and neutrophils in spleen and bone marrow. Oral administration of SL1344 led to an increase in neutrophil apoptosis in both spleen and the bone marrow and four out of five mice died before Day 8, while in DT120 mice, no increase in neutrophil apoptosis was observed and all mice survived until Day 8. This study reveals that two wild-type S. Typhimurium strains, despite evoking highly comparable immune responses upon intravenous injection, exhibit diverse pathogenicity in mice and thus suggests that differences in their invasiveness and survival during gut passage determines the success of the ensuing immune response.

  15. The in vitro and in vivo effects of constitutive light expression on a bioluminescent strain of the mouse enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Read, Hannah M.; Mills, Grant; Johnson, Sarah; Tsai, Peter; Dalton, James; Barquist, Lars; Print, Cristin G.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescent reporter genes, such as those from fireflies and bacteria, let researchers use light production as a non-invasive and non-destructive surrogate measure of microbial numbers in a wide variety of environments. As bioluminescence needs microbial metabolites, tagging microorganisms with luciferases means only live metabolically active cells are detected. Despite the wide use of bioluminescent reporter genes, very little is known about the impact of continuous (also called constitutive) light expression on tagged bacteria. We have previously made a bioluminescent strain of Citrobacter rodentium, a bacterium which infects laboratory mice in a similar way to how enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) infect humans. In this study, we compared the growth of the bioluminescent C. rodentium strain ICC180 with its non-bioluminescent parent (strain ICC169) in a wide variety of environments. To understand more about the metabolic burden of expressing light, we also compared the growth profiles of the two strains under approximately 2,000 different conditions. We found that constitutive light expression in ICC180 was near-neutral in almost every non-toxic environment tested. However, we also found that the non-bioluminescent parent strain has a competitive advantage over ICC180 during infection of adult mice, although this was not enough for ICC180 to be completely outcompeted. In conclusion, our data suggest that constitutive light expression is not metabolically costly to C. rodentium and supports the view that bioluminescent versions of microbes can be used as a substitute for their non-bioluminescent parents to study bacterial behaviour in a wide variety of environments. PMID:27366640

  16. The in vitro and in vivo effects of constitutive light expression on a bioluminescent strain of the mouse enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium.

    PubMed

    Read, Hannah M; Mills, Grant; Johnson, Sarah; Tsai, Peter; Dalton, James; Barquist, Lars; Print, Cristin G; Patrick, Wayne M; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescent reporter genes, such as those from fireflies and bacteria, let researchers use light production as a non-invasive and non-destructive surrogate measure of microbial numbers in a wide variety of environments. As bioluminescence needs microbial metabolites, tagging microorganisms with luciferases means only live metabolically active cells are detected. Despite the wide use of bioluminescent reporter genes, very little is known about the impact of continuous (also called constitutive) light expression on tagged bacteria. We have previously made a bioluminescent strain of Citrobacter rodentium, a bacterium which infects laboratory mice in a similar way to how enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) infect humans. In this study, we compared the growth of the bioluminescent C. rodentium strain ICC180 with its non-bioluminescent parent (strain ICC169) in a wide variety of environments. To understand more about the metabolic burden of expressing light, we also compared the growth profiles of the two strains under approximately 2,000 different conditions. We found that constitutive light expression in ICC180 was near-neutral in almost every non-toxic environment tested. However, we also found that the non-bioluminescent parent strain has a competitive advantage over ICC180 during infection of adult mice, although this was not enough for ICC180 to be completely outcompeted. In conclusion, our data suggest that constitutive light expression is not metabolically costly to C. rodentium and supports the view that bioluminescent versions of microbes can be used as a substitute for their non-bioluminescent parents to study bacterial behaviour in a wide variety of environments. PMID:27366640

  17. Increased expression of the Vesicular Glutamate Transporter-1 (VGLUT1) in the prefrontal cortex correlates with differential vulnerability to chronic stress in various mouse strains: effects of fluoxetine and MK-801.

    PubMed

    Farley, Séverine; Dumas, Sylvie; El Mestikawy, Salah; Giros, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    supports the conclusion that BDNF and VGLUT1 are depressive state markers, but not involved in its etiology. Finally, there is a substantial similarity between the phenotypes that are observed in the BALB/c mice and endogenous depression in humans, as well as between C57BL/6 mice and atypical depression. To have a better understanding of the variability of depression etiologies in human, and the implication of the glutamatergic system, it may be suggested that future animal studies in the mouse would systematically compare the two strains BALB/c and C57BL/6 for the identification of relevant biological mechanisms. This article is part of a special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  18. Increased expression of the Vesicular Glutamate Transporter-1 (VGLUT1) in the prefrontal cortex correlates with differential vulnerability to chronic stress in various mouse strains: effects of fluoxetine and MK-801.

    PubMed

    Farley, Séverine; Dumas, Sylvie; El Mestikawy, Salah; Giros, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    supports the conclusion that BDNF and VGLUT1 are depressive state markers, but not involved in its etiology. Finally, there is a substantial similarity between the phenotypes that are observed in the BALB/c mice and endogenous depression in humans, as well as between C57BL/6 mice and atypical depression. To have a better understanding of the variability of depression etiologies in human, and the implication of the glutamatergic system, it may be suggested that future animal studies in the mouse would systematically compare the two strains BALB/c and C57BL/6 for the identification of relevant biological mechanisms. This article is part of a special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21945287

  19. A mineral extract from red algae ameliorates chronic spontaneous colitis in IL-10 deficient mice in a mouse strain dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Aviello, Gabriella; Amu, Sylvie; Saunders, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G

    2014-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an urgent public health problem with a high incidence in developed countries. Alterations of lifestyle or dietary interventions may attenuate the disease progression and increase the efficacy of current therapies. Here we tested the effect of chronic supplementation with a mineral extract from red marine algae - rich in calcium (34%), magnesium, phosphorus, selenium and other trace minerals - in a clinically relevant model of spontaneous enterocolitis, interleukin (IL)-10(-/-) mice. The mineral extract was administered in the drinking water of Il10(-/-) mice on C57BL/6 J and BALB/c strain backgrounds for 25 weeks commencing from 3 to 4 weeks of age. The mineral extract ameliorated the spontaneous development of colitis and severity of disease in Il10(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 J background. Mineral extract-treated Il10(-/-) C57BL/6 J strain mice had significantly reduced mortality, circulating levels of serum Amyloid A and reduced colonic tissue damage. In contrast, comparable treatment of Il10(-/-) mice on a BALB/c background with the mineral extract did not alter the course of colitis. These data demonstrate that chronic supplementation with a natural mineral extract selectively ameliorates spontaneous mild-moderate colitis in Il10(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 J, but does not attenuate more moderate-severe colitis in BALB/c strain animals.

  20. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. PMID:27126613

  1. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone.

  2. The relationship between adjunctive drinking, blood ethanol concentration and plasma corticosterone across fixed-time intervals of food delivery in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ford, Matthew M; Steele, Andrea M; McCracken, Aubrey D; Finn, Deborah A; Grant, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Schedules of intermittent food delivery induce excessive fluid intake, termed schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation is important for the expression and maintenance of this adjunctive behavior. Previous work has focused on examining the relationship between water intake and plasma corticosterone (CORT) in rats at a single or a limited range of fixed time (FT) intervals. However, little remains known regarding SIP and the corresponding stress response (1) across the bitonic function that epitomizes adjunctive behavior, (2) when ethanol is the available fluid, and (3) when a species other than rat or multiple strains are studied. Here we report the findings from ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and non-preferring DBA/2J (D2) mice serially exposed to progressively larger FT intervals (0 → 60 min) and given access to either water or a 5% (v/v) ethanol solution. Following 2 weeks of experience with each schedule, blood samples were collected at the conclusion of the last 60-min session to evaluate CORT and the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) achieved. While both strains exhibited a bitonic function of ethanol intake and BEC that peaked at or near a 5-min interval, only D2 mice showed a similar response with water. In contrast, CORT levels rose monotonically with incremental increases in the FT interval regardless of the strain examined or fluid type offered, indicating that glucocorticoid release likely reflects the aversive aspects of increasing intervals between reinforcement rather than engagement in adjunctive behavior. These findings also caution against the use of a single intensity stressor to evaluate the relationship between stress and ethanol intake, as the magnitude of stress appears to affect ethanol consumption in a non-linear fashion.

  3. The relationship between adjunctive drinking, blood ethanol concentration and plasma corticosterone across fixed-time intervals of food delivery in two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ford, Matthew M; Steele, Andrea M; McCracken, Aubrey D; Finn, Deborah A; Grant, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Schedules of intermittent food delivery induce excessive fluid intake, termed schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP), and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation is important for the expression and maintenance of this adjunctive behavior. Previous work has focused on examining the relationship between water intake and plasma corticosterone (CORT) in rats at a single or a limited range of fixed time (FT) intervals. However, little remains known regarding SIP and the corresponding stress response (1) across the bitonic function that epitomizes adjunctive behavior, (2) when ethanol is the available fluid, and (3) when a species other than rat or multiple strains are studied. Here we report the findings from ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and non-preferring DBA/2J (D2) mice serially exposed to progressively larger FT intervals (0 → 60 min) and given access to either water or a 5% (v/v) ethanol solution. Following 2 weeks of experience with each schedule, blood samples were collected at the conclusion of the last 60-min session to evaluate CORT and the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) achieved. While both strains exhibited a bitonic function of ethanol intake and BEC that peaked at or near a 5-min interval, only D2 mice showed a similar response with water. In contrast, CORT levels rose monotonically with incremental increases in the FT interval regardless of the strain examined or fluid type offered, indicating that glucocorticoid release likely reflects the aversive aspects of increasing intervals between reinforcement rather than engagement in adjunctive behavior. These findings also caution against the use of a single intensity stressor to evaluate the relationship between stress and ethanol intake, as the magnitude of stress appears to affect ethanol consumption in a non-linear fashion. PMID:23827168

  4. The BALB.B6-Cmv1{sup r} mouse: A strain congenic for Cmv1 and the NK gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Scalzo, A.A.; Lyons, P.A.; Fitzgerald, N.A.; Forbes, C.A.; Shellam, G.A.

    1995-01-11

    Genetically determined resistance to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in mice is controlled by both H2 and non-H2 genes. We have identified a phenotypically-defined, autosomal dominant, non-H2 gene, designated Cmvl, that regulates MCMV replication in the spleens of inbred mice. C57BL/6J mice possess the Cmvl{sup r} and exhibit low titers of MCMV replication, whereas the BALB/c strain, which possesses the Cmvl{sup s} allele, exhibits high virus titers in the spleen. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Analysis of Individual Mouse Activity in Group Housed Animals of Different Inbred Strains using a Novel Automated Home Cage Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Rasneer S.; Cater, Heather L.; Sillito, Rowland R.; Chartsias, Agisilaos; Sneddon, Duncan; Concas, Danilo; Keskivali-Bond, Piia; Lukins, Timothy C.; Wells, Sara; Acevedo Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Armstrong, J. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system disorders such as autism as well as the range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease are commonly investigated using genetically altered mouse models. The current system for characterizing these mice usually involves removing the animals from their home-cage environment and placing them into novel environments where they undergo a battery of tests measuring a range of behavioral and physical phenotypes. These tests are often only conducted for short periods of times in social isolation. However, human manifestations of such disorders are often characterized by multiple phenotypes, presented over long periods of time and leading to significant social impacts. Here, we have developed a system which will allow the automated monitoring of individual mice housed socially in the cage they are reared and housed in, within established social groups and over long periods of time. We demonstrate that the system accurately reports individual locomotor behavior within the group and that the measurements taken can provide unique insights into the effects of genetic background on individual and group behavior not previously recognized. PMID:27375446

  6. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  7. Opportunistic bacterial infections in breeding colonies of the NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mouse strain

    PubMed Central

    foreman, Oded; Kavirayani, Anoop M; Griffey, Stephen M; Reader, Rachel; Shultz, Leonard D

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous morbidity primarily affecting female breeders in three independent breeding colonies of NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice prompted an investigation to uncover the cause of disease. Necropsies were performed on 264 (157 female and 107 male) spontaneously sick, experimentally unmanipulated NSG mice. 42 (15.9%) of the mice had acute or chronic renal inflammatory lesions. 12 of the mice with nephritis had concurrent histologic evidence of an ascending urinary tract infection. From 94 kidneys cultured for bacterial organisms, 23 (24.4%) grew Enterococcus species and 19 (20%) grew Klebsiella Oxytoca. Female mice were twice more likely to present with nephritis than males. These findings indicate that bacterial nephritis is a major contributor to morbidity in the NSG strain. PMID:20817888

  8. A mouse monoclonal antibody against dengue virus type 1 Mochizuki strain targeting envelope protein domain II and displaying strongly neutralizing but not enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji

    2013-12-01

    Dengue fever and its more severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever, are major global concerns. Infection-enhancing antibodies are major factors hypothetically contributing to increased disease severity. In this study, we generated 26 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the dengue virus type 1 Mochizuki strain. We selected this strain because a relatively large number of unique and rare amino acids were found on its envelope protein. Although most MAbs showing neutralizing activities exhibited enhancing activities at subneutralizing doses, one MAb (D1-IV-7F4 [7F4]) displayed neutralizing activities without showing enhancing activities at lower concentrations. In contrast, another MAb (D1-V-3H12 [3H12]) exhibited only enhancing activities, which were suppressed by pretreatment of cells with anti-FcγRIIa. Although antibody engineering revealed that antibody subclass significantly affected 7F4 (IgG3) and 3H12 (IgG1) activities, neutralizing/enhancing activities were also dependent on the epitope targeted by the antibody. 7F4 recognized an epitope on the envelope protein containing E118 (domain II) and had a neutralizing activity 10- to 1,000-fold stronger than the neutralizing activity of previously reported human or humanized neutralizing MAbs targeting domain I and/or domain II. An epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that a dengue virus-immune population possessed antibodies sharing an epitope with 7F4. Our results demonstrating induction of these antibody species (7F4 and 3H12) in Mochizuki-immunized mice may have implications for dengue vaccine strategies designed to minimize induction of enhancing antibodies in vaccinated humans. PMID:24049185

  9. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain in a novel weaned mouse model: exacerbation by malnutrition, biofilm as a virulence factor and treatment by nitazoxanide.

    PubMed

    Bolick, David T; Roche, James K; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Nataro, James P; Guerrant, Richard L

    2013-06-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is increasingly recognized as a common cause of diarrhoea in healthy, malnourished and immune-deficient adults and children. There is no reproducible non-neonatal animal model for longitudinal studies of disease mechanism or therapy. Using two strains of human-derived EAEC to challenge weaned C57BL/6 mice, we explored an in vivo model of EAEC infection in mice, in which disease was monitored quantitatively as the growth rate, stool shedding and tissue burden of organisms; nutritional status was varied, and a new class of therapeutics was assessed. A single oral challenge of EAEC strain 042 resulted in significant growth shortfalls (5-8 % of body weight in 12 days), persistent shedding of micro-organisms in stools [>10(3.2) c.f.u. (10 mg stool)(-1) for at least 14 days] and intestinal tissue burden [~10(3) c.f.u. (10 mg tissue)(-1) detectable up to 14 days post-challenge]. Moderate malnourishment of mice using a 'regional basic diet' containing 7 % protein and reduced fat and micronutrients heightened all parameters of infection. Nitazoxanide in subMIC doses, administered for 3 days at the time of EAEC challenge, lessened growth shortfalls (by >10 % of body weight), stool shedding [by 2-3 logs (10 mg stool)(-1)] and tissue burden of organisms (by >75 % in the jejunum and colon). Thus, weaned C57BL/6 mice challenged with EAEC is a convenient, readily inducible model of EAEC infection with three highly quantifiable outcomes in which disease severity is dependent on the nutritional status of the host, and which is modifiable in the presence of inhibitors of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase such as nitazoxanide.

  10. Methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in LG/J and SM/J mouse strains and an F45/F46 advanced intercross line.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Camron D; Kole, Loren A; Guido, Michael A; Cheng, Riyan; Palmer, Abraham A

    2012-01-01

    The conditioned place preference (CPP) test is frequently used to evaluate the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse in mice. Despite its widespread use in transgenic and knockout experiments, there are few forward genetic studies using CPP to identify novel genes contributing to drug reward. In this study, we tested LG/J and SM/J inbred strains and the parents/offspring of 10 families of an F(45)/F(46) advanced intercross line (AIL) for methamphetamine-induced CPP (MA-CPP) once per week over 2 weeks. Both LG/J and SM/J mice exhibited significant MA-CPP that was not significantly different between the two strains. Furthermore, LG/J mice showed significantly less acute MA-induced locomotor activity as well as locomotor sensitization following subsequent MA injections. AIL mice (N = 105) segregating LG/J and SM/J alleles also demonstrated significant MA-CPP that was equal in magnitude between the first and second week of training. Importantly, MA-CPP in AIL mice did not correlate with drug-free or MA-induced locomotor activity, indicating that MA-CPP was not confounded by test session activity and implying that MA-CPP is genetically distinct from acute psychomotor sensitivity. We estimated the heritability of MA-CPP and locomotor phenotypes using midparent-offspring regression and maximum likelihood estimates derived from the kinship coefficients of the AIL pedigree. Heritability estimates of MA-CPP were low (0-0.21) and variable (SE = 0-0.33) which reflected our poor power to estimate heritability using only 10 midparent-offspring observations. In sum, we established a short-term protocol for MA-CPP in AIL mice that could reveal LG/J and SM/J alleles important for MA reward. The use of highly recombinant genetic populations like AIL should facilitate the identification of these genes and may have implications for understanding psychostimulant abuse in humans.

  11. Conditioned response suppression in the IntelliCage: assessment of mouse strain differences and effects of hippocampal and striatal lesions on acquisition and retention of memory.

    PubMed

    Voikar, Vootele; Colacicco, Giovanni; Gruber, Oliver; Vannoni, Elisabetta; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Wolfer, David P

    2010-12-01

    The IntelliCage allows fully automated continuous testing of various behaviours in the home cage environment without handling the mice. Here we tested whether conditioned avoidance is retained after a time period delay spent outside the IntelliCage. During the training, nosepokes in one of the four learning corners were punished with an air-puff. After 24h of training, the mice were placed in regular cages for 24h. During the last 18h of this interval, the mice were water deprived and then returned to the IntelliCage for a probe trial where drinking was allowed in all corners. The C57BL/6 mice developed a significant suppression of nosepoking in the punished corner during training, and the avoidance was carried over to the following probe trial. Repetition of the experiment by delivering punishment in a different corner assigned to individual mice revealed a similar performance pattern. Comparison between the different strains revealed a reduced nosepoke suppression in DBA/2 and B6D2F1 mice as compared to C57BL/6 mice in the probe trial, despite similar error rates during the training with short (1-s) air-puffs. However, the performance of the three strains in the probe trial were equalised when the air-puffs were prolonged until the end of the corner visit. Significant extinction of the nosepoke suppression occurred after 6 days. A prolonged interval (7 days) between the training and the probe trial resulted in a loss of suppression in DBA/2 mice, but not in C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mice. Additional experiments revealed that performance in the probe trial was dependent on a complex set of intramaze cues. Testing of mice with bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the hippocampus or dorso-lateral striatum revealed that learning this task was dependent on an intact hippocampus, but not on an intact striatum. In summary, the conditioned nosepoke suppression test presented here is sensitive to both genetic differences and hippocampal lesions. This test could be applied to the

  12. Prenatal diethylstilbestrol induces malformation of the external genitalia of male and female mice and persistent second-generation developmental abnormalities of the external genitalia in two mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Mahawong, Phitsanu; Sinclair, Adriane; Li, Yi; Schlomer, Bruce; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Max, Ferretti M.; Liu, Baomei; Baskin, Laurence S.; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Potential trans-generational influence of diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure emerged with reports of effects in grandchildren of DES-treated pregnant women and of reproductive tract tumors in offspring of mice exposed in utero to DES. Accordingly, we examined the trans-generational influence of DES on development of external genitalia (ExG) and compared effects of in utero DES exposure in CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice injected with oil or DES every other day from gestational days 12 to 18. Mice were examined at birth, and on 5 to 120 days postnatal to evaluate ExG malformations. Of 23 adult (≥60 days) prenatally DES-exposed males, features indicative of urethral meatal hypospadias (see text for definitions) ranged from 18 to 100% in prenatally DES-exposed CD-1 males and 31 to 100% in prenatally DES-exposed C57BL/6 males. Thus, the strains differed in the incidence of male urethral hypospadias. Ninety-one percent of DES-exposed CD-1 females and 100% of DES-exposed C57BL/6 females had urethral-vaginal fistula. All DES-exposed CD-1 and C57BL/6 females lacked an os clitoris. None of the prenatally oil-treated CD-1 and C57BL/6 male and female mice had ExG malformations. For the second-generation study, 10 adult CD-1 males and females, from oil- and DES-exposed groups, respectively, were paired with untreated CD-1 mice for 30 days, and their offspring evaluated for ExG malformations. None of the F1 DES-treated females were fertile. Nine of 10 prenatally DES-exposed CD-1 males sired offspring with untreated females, producing 55 male and 42 female pups. Of the F2 DES-lineage adult males, 20% had exposed urethral flaps, a criterion of urethral meatal hypospadias. Five of 42 (11.9%) F2 DES lineage females had urethral-vaginal fistula. In contrast, all F2 oil-lineage males and all oil-lineage females were normal. Thus, prenatal DES exposure induces malformations of ExG in both sexes and strains of mice, and certain malformations are transmitted to the second-generation. PMID

  13. Phase III Clinical Trials Comparing the Immunogenicity and Safety of the Vero Cell-Derived Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine Encevac with Those of Mouse Brain-Derived Vaccine by Using the Beijing-1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Chiaki; Okada, Kenji; Ozaki, Takao; Hirose, Mizuo; Iribe, Kaneshige; Ishikawa, Yuji; Togashi, Takehiro; Ueda, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated cell culture Japanese encephalitis vaccine (CC-JEV) were compared with those of an inactivated mouse brain-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine (MB-JEV) in phase III clinical multicenter trials conducted in children. The vaccines contain the same Japanese encephalitis virus strain, the Beijing-1 strain. Two independent clinical trials (trials 1 and 2) were conducted. Trial 1 was conducted in 468 healthy children. Each subject was injected with 17 μg per dose of either CC-JEV or MB-JEV, and the immunogenicity and safety of the vaccines were investigated. Trial 1 showed that CC-JEV was more immunogenic and reactive than MB-JEV at the same dose. Therefore, to adjust the immunogenicity of CC-JEV to that of MB-JEV, a vaccine that has had a good track record regarding its efficacy for a long time, trial 2 was conducted in 484 healthy children. To improve the stability, CC-JEV was converted from a liquid type to a freeze-dried type of vaccine. Each subject was injected subcutaneously with either 4 μg per dose of CC-JEV, 8 μg per dose of CC-JEV, or 17 μg per dose of MB-JEV twice, at an interval of 2 to 4 weeks, followed by an additional booster immunization 1 to 15 months after the primary immunization. Based on the results of trial 2, 4 μg per dose of the freeze-dried CC-JEV (under the label Encevac) was selected as a substitute for the MB-JEV. Encevac was approved and launched in 2011 and has since been in use as a 2nd-generation Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Japan. (These studies have been registered at the JapicCTI under registration no. JapicCTI-132063 and JapicCTI-080586 for trials 1 and 2, respectively.) PMID:24334689

  14. Cd hyperfine interactions in DNA bases and DNA of mouse strains infected with Trypanosoma cruzi investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Philippe A D; Silva, Andreia S; Gonçalves, Marcos B; Lapolli, André L; Ferreira, Ana Maria C; Carbonari, Artur W; Petrilli, Helena M

    2014-06-01

    In this work, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy is used to study differences in the nuclear quadrupole interactions of Cd probes in DNA molecules of mice infected with the Y-strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The possibility of investigating the local genetic alterations in DNA, which occur along generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, using hyperfine interactions obtained from PAC measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations in DNA bases is discussed. A comparison of DFT calculations with PAC measurements could determine the type of Cd coordination in the studied molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use DFT calculations and PAC measurements to investigate the local environment of Cd ions bound to DNA bases in mice infected with Chagas disease. The obtained results also allowed the detection of local changes occurring in the DNA molecules of different generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, opening the possibility of using this technique as a complementary tool in the characterization of complicated biological systems.

  15. Pattern of inflammatory response to Loxosceles intermedia venom in distinct mouse strains: a key element to understand skin lesions and dermonecrosis by poisoning.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M F; Oliveira, F L; Monteiro-Machado, M; Cardoso, P F; Guilarducci-Ferraz, V V C; Melo, P A; Souza, C M V; Calil-Elias, S

    2015-03-01

    Envenomation caused by spiders Loxosceles induce intense dermonecrosis at the bite site and systemic disease. In this work we described the hyaluronidase and collagenase activities in vitro of the Loxosceles intermedia venom, but no phospholipase A2 activity. In vivo, we evaluated the effect of L. intermedia venom used different strain of mice, C57BL/6, BALB/c and Swiss. All mice developed paw edema after venom injection, persistent for 24 h in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Histopathological analysis of the skin after venom injection revealed vascular congestion in Swiss mice and an inflammatory reaction in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. The mobilization of inflammatory cells from bone marrow, spleen and blood was investigated. Typical innate immune response with mobilization of myeloid cells and cytotoxic CD8 T lymphocytes was observed in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, typical acquired/humoral immune response was observed in BALB/c mice, with preferential involvement of conventional B lymphocytes and CD4 T helper cells. The skin inflammation associated to mobilization of inflammatory cells indicated that mice models are strongly recommended to investigate specific cell types involved with immune response to the envenomation and mechanisms to inhibit skin lesions.

  16. Formation of a host range mutant of the lymphotropic strain of minute virus of mice during persistent infection in mouse L cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, D; Tattersall, P; Tal, J

    1984-01-01

    Minute virus of mice (i), the lymphotropic strain of minute virus of mice, established a persistent infection in normally restrictive L cells. The carrier state, which lasted 150 days, exhibited three clearly distinguishable stages. During the early stage (days 1 to 10 postinfection), small amounts of virus were formed. A "crisis" then developed that lasted 50 to 60 days and was characterized by massive cell lysis and high titers of virus. This was followed by a 70- to 80-day period in which small but stable quantities of virus were produced. Virus shed by the carrier culture during the latter phase had acquired an altered host range, namely, it had lost its ability to replicate in T-lymphocyte cell lines and had adapted to growth in L cells. Virus isolated at this time from a single plaque in L cells, designated hr301, was shown to possess similar host range properties. No differences, however, could be found between the DNAs of minute virus of mice (i) and of hr301 by restriction enzyme analysis, suggesting that the mutation that affected the viral host range did not involve an extensive region of the viral genome. Images PMID:6090711

  17. The susceptibility of the hamster to mouse encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    DEAN, D J; DALLDORF, G

    1948-12-01

    The OT strain of mouse encephalomyelitis virus induces an inapparent infection in suckling hamsters associated with lesions of the central nervous system and skeletal muscles. The virus increases in pathogenicity after alternating mouse-hamster transfers and then induces both paralysis and encephalitis. Pathogenicity is lost through serial hamster passages but is restored by a single mouse transfer.

  18. Whole-mount X-Gal staining of mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Gierut, Jessica J; Jacks, Tyler E; Haigis, Kevin M

    2014-04-01

    Although the development of improved mouse models, including conditional deletions, marks an exciting time in mouse genetics, it is important to characterize and validate these models. Cre reporter strains allow researchers to assess the recombinase expression profile and function in individual Cre mouse lines. These strains are engineered to express a reporter gene (usually LacZ) following the removal of a floxed STOP cassette, thus marking cell lineages that can be targeted with a given Cre line. This protocol provides a detailed method for the histochemical detection of β-galactosidase activity in Cre mouse strains.

  19. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  20. Real-time PCR analysis of candidate imprinted genes on mouse chromosome 11 shows balanced expression from the maternal and paternal chromosomes and strain-specific variation in expression levels.

    PubMed

    Tuskan, Robert G; Tsang, Shirley; Sun, Zhonghe; Baer, Jessica; Rozenblum, Ester; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David J; Reilly, Karlyne M

    2008-01-01

    Imprinted genes are monoallelically expressed from either the maternal or paternal genome. Because cancer develops through genetic and epigenetic alterations, imprinted genes affect tumorigenesis depending on which parental allele undergoes alteration. We have shown previously in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) that inheriting mutant alleles of Nf1 and Trp53 on chromosome 11 from the mother or father dramatically changes the tumor spectrum of mutant progeny, likely due to alteration in an imprinted gene(s) linked to Nf1 and Trp53. In order to identify imprinted genes on chromosome 11 that are responsible for differences in susceptibility, we tested candidate imprinted genes predicted by a bioinformatics approach and an experimental approach. We have tested 30 candidate genes (Havcr2, Camk2b, Ccdc85a, Cntnap1, Ikzf1, 5730522E02Rik, Gria1, Zfp39, Sgcd, Jup, Nxph3, Spnb2, Asb3, Rasd1, Map2k3, Map2k4, Trp53, Serpinf1, Crk, Rasl10b, Itga3, Hoxb5, Cbx1, Pparbp, Igfbp4, Smarce1, Stat3, Atp6v0a1, Nbr1 and Meox1), two known imprinted genes (Grb10 and Impact) and Nf1, which has not been previously identified as an imprinted gene. Although we confirmed the imprinting of Grb10 and Impact, we found no other genes imprinted in the brain. We did, however, find strain-biased expression of Camk2b, 5730522E02Rik, Havcr2, Map2k3, Serpinf1, Rasl10b, Itga3, Asb3, Trp53, Nf1, Smarce1, Stat3, Cbx1, Pparbp and Cntnap1. These results suggest that the prediction of imprinted genes is complicated and must be individually validated. This manuscript includes supplementary data listing primer sequences for Taqman assays and Ct values for Taqman PCR. PMID:18188004

  1. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): from genes to mice--a community resource for mouse biology.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A; Anagnostopoulos, A; Baldarelli, R M; Baya, M; Beal, J S; Bello, S M; Boddy, W J; Bradt, D W; Burkart, D L; Butler, N E; Campbell, J; Cassell, M A; Corbani, L E; Cousins, S L; Dahmen, D J; Dene, H; Diehl, A D; Drabkin, H J; Frazer, K S; Frost, P; Glass, L H; Goldsmith, C W; Grant, P L; Lennon-Pierce, M; Lewis, J; Lu, I; Maltais, L J; McAndrews-Hill, M; McClellan, L; Miers, D B; Miller, L A; Ni, L; Ormsby, J E; Qi, D; Reddy, T B K; Reed, D J; Richards-Smith, B; Shaw, D R; Sinclair, R; Smith, C L; Szauter, P; Walker, M B; Walton, D O; Washburn, L L; Witham, I T; Zhu, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) forms the core of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) system (http://www.informatics.jax.org), a model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse. MGD provides essential integration of experimental knowledge for the mouse system with information annotated from both literature and online sources. MGD curates and presents consensus and experimental data representations of genotype (sequence) through phenotype information, including highly detailed reports about genes and gene products. Primary foci of integration are through representations of relationships among genes, sequences and phenotypes. MGD collaborates with other bioinformatics groups to curate a definitive set of information about the laboratory mouse and to build and implement the data and semantic standards that are essential for comparative genome analysis. Recent improvements in MGD discussed here include the enhancement of phenotype resources, the re-development of the International Mouse Strain Resource, IMSR, the update of mammalian orthology datasets and the electronic publication of classic books in mouse genetics.

  2. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Richardson, Joel E; Kadin, James A; Smith, Cynthia L; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  3. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1997-01-01

    Logarithmic strain is the preferred measure of strain used by materials scientists, who typically refer to it as the "true strain." It was Nadai who gave it the name "natural strain," which seems more appropriate. This strain measure was proposed by Ludwik for the one-dimensional extension of a rod with length l. It was defined via the integral of dl/l to which Ludwik gave the name "effective specific strain." Today, it is after Hencky, who extended Ludwik's measure to three-dimensional analysis by defining logarithmic strains for the three principal directions.

  4. [Behavior of Argentine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus strains in rodents].

    PubMed

    Saavedra, María del Cármen; Ambrosio, Ana M; Riera, Laura; Sabattini, Marta S

    2007-01-01

    The activity of LCM virus was first reported in Argentina at the beginning of the seventies and only five strains have been isolated from rodents Mus domesticus and two from humans. The objective of this paper was to find differential biological characteristics of Argentine strains of LCM virus comparing them in relation to the historical strains WE and Armstrong. Regarding the results obtained in tissue culture, when L 929 cells were used, plaque forming units (PFU) were obtained with human and mouse strains, whilst on Vero cells only human strains developed PFU. Differentials characteristics of historical and Argentine strain's plates were not found, neither differences related to the strain's origin. Neither historical nor Argentine strains were lethal to new-born mice giving a persistent infection, that was demonstrated when we inoculated new-born mouse by intracranial route with different strains of LCM virus and virus was isolated from brains harvested at different days post inoculation. The only exception was Cba An 13065 strain that exhibited virulence in new-born mice, only with 0.026 PFU was obtained 1 DL50. All the strains resulted lethal to adult mice. The mouse strains were more virulent than human strains, being Cba An 13065 the most virulent. These results demonstrate a different behavior in tissue culture between human and mouse strains and allow the identification of virulence markers by intracranial inoculation into new-born or adult mice.

  5. Natural Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a consistent and thorough development of the strain and strain-rate measures affiliated with Hencky. Natural measures for strain and strain-rate, as I refer to them, are first expressed in terms of of the fundamental body-metric tensors of Lodge. These strain and strain-rate measures are mixed tensor fields. They are mapped from the body to space in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian configurations, and then transformed from general to Cartesian fields. There they are compared with the various strain and strain-rate measures found in the literature. A simple Cartesian description for Hencky strain-rate in the Lagrangian state is obtained.

  6. The mouse resources at the RIKEN BioResource center.

    PubMed

    Yoshiki, Atsushi; Ike, Fumio; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Nakata, Hatsumi; Hiraiwa, Noriko; Mochida, Keiji; Ijuin, Maiko; Kadota, Masayo; Murakami, Ayumi; Ogura, Atsuo; Abe, Kuniya; Moriwaki, Kazuo; Obata, Yuichi

    2009-04-01

    Mice are one of the most important model organisms for studying biological phenomena and diseases processes in life sciences. The biomedical research community has succeeded in launching large scale strategic knockout mouse projects around the world. RIKEN BRC, a comprehensive government funded biological resource center was established in 2001. RIKEN BRC has been acting as the core facility for the mouse resources of the National BioResource Project (NBRP) of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Japan since 2002. RIKEN BRC is a founding member of the Federation of International Mouse Resources (FIMRe) together with the Jackson Laboratory, the European Mouse Mutant Archive, and other centers, and has participated in the International Mouse Strain Resource (IMSR) to distribute mouse strains worldwide. With the support of the scientific community, RIKEN BRC has collected over 3,800 strains including inbred, transgenic, knockout, wild-derived, and ENU-induced mutant strains. Excellent mouse models for human diseases and gene functions from academic organizations and private companies are distributed through RIKEN BRC. To meet research and social needs, our mice will be rederived to a specific pathogen-free state, strictly monitored for their health, and accurately tested for their genetic modifications and backgrounds. Users can easily access our mouse resources through the internet and obtain the mouse strains for a minimal fee. Cryopreservation of embryos and sperm is used for efficient preservation of the increasing number of mouse resources. RIKEN BRC collaborates with FIMRe members to support Japanese scientists in the use of valuable mouse resources from around the world.

  7. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  8. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  9. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  10. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  11. The Mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD)

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T.; Begley, Dale A.; Corradi, John P.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; Hill, David P.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2001-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of gene expression information for the laboratory mouse. By combining the different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide increasingly complete information about the expression profiles of genes in different mouse strains and mutants, thus enabling valuable insights into the molecular networks that underlie normal development and disease. GXD is integrated with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Extensive interconnections with sequence databases and with databases from other species, and the development and use of shared controlled vocabularies extend GXD’s utility for the analysis of gene expression information. GXD is accessible through the Mouse Genome Informatics web site at http://www.informatic s.jax.org/ or directly at http://www.informatics.jax.org/me nus/expression_menu.shtml. PMID:11125060

  12. Integration of Mouse Phenome Data Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, John M; Adams, Neils; Aidinis, Vassilis; Blake, Judith A; Bogue, Molly; Brown, Steve D M; Chesler, Elissa J; Davidson, Duncan; Duran, Christopher; Eppig, Janan T; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Greenaway, Simon; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Kollias, George; Leblanc, Sophie; Lee, Kirsty; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Masuya, Hiroshi; Melvin, David; Muller, Werner; Parkinson, Helen; Proctor, Glenn; Reuveni, Eli; Schofield, Paul; Shukla, Aadya; Smith, Cynthia; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Vasseur, Laurent; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; Zouberakis, Michalis

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded in the mouse genome will be central to an understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. To achieve this it will be essential to be able to characterise the phenotypic consequences of variation and alterations in individual genes. Data on the phenotypes of mouse strains are currently held in a number of different forms (detailed descriptions of mouse lines, first line phenotyping data on novel mutations, data on the normal features of inbred lines, etc.) at many sites worldwide. For the most efficient use of these data sets, we have set in train a process to develop standards for the description of phenotypes (using ontologies), and file formats for the description of phenotyping protocols and phenotype data sets. This process is ongoing, and needs to be supported by the wider mouse genetics and phenotyping communities to succeed. We invite interested parties to contact us as we develop this process further.

  13. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies.

  14. Reversed light-dark cycle and cage enrichment effects on ethanol-induced deficits in motor coordination assessed in inbred mouse strains with a compact battery of refined tests.

    PubMed

    Munn, Elizabeth; Bunning, Mark; Prada, Sofia; Bohlen, Martin; Crabbe, John C; Wahlsten, Douglas

    2011-10-31

    The laboratory environment existing outside the test situation itself can have a substantial influence on results of some behavioral tests with mice, and the extent of these influences sometimes depends on genotype. For alcohol research, the principal issue is whether genotype-related ethanol effects will themselves be altered by common variations in the lab environment or instead will be essentially the same across a wide range of lab environments. Data from 20 inbred strains were used to reduce an original battery of seven tests of alcohol intoxication to a compact battery of four tests: the balance beam and grip strength with a 1.25 g/kg ethanol dose and the accelerating rotarod and open-field activation tests with 1.75 g/kg. The abbreviated battery was then used to study eight inbred strains housed under a normal or reversed light-dark cycle, or a standard or enriched home cage environment. The light-dark cycle had no discernable effects on any measure of behavior or response to alcohol. Cage enrichment markedly improved motor coordination in most strains. Ethanol-induced motor coordination deficits were robust; the well-documented strain-dependent effects of ethanol were not altered by cage enrichment.

  15. Involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in the forced swimming test and mouse strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Furutani, Sachiko; Kajiwara, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Kazufumi; Yamada, Shizuo; Tagawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Jun

    2010-03-10

    We previously demonstrated the presence of strain differences in baseline immobility time and sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine in five strains of mice (ICR, ddY, C57BL, DBA/2 and BALB/c mice). Furthermore, variations in serotonin (5-HT) transporter binding in the brain were strongly related to strain differences in baseline immobility and sensitivity to fluvoxamine. In the present study, we examined the involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in anti-immobility effects in DBA/2 mice, which show high sensitivity to fluvoxamine. The anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice were inhibited by the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635). However, the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist 3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-4-hydroxy-N-[4-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]benzamide (GR55562), the 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist 6-methyl-1-(methylethyl)-ergoline-8beta-carboxylic acid 2-hydroxy-1-methylpropyl ester (LY 53857), the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron and the 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist 4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxy-benzoic acid 2-(diethylamino)ethyl ester (SDZ 205,557) did not influence the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice. These results suggest that fluvoxamine-induced antidepressant-like effects in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor. We analyzed 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in the brains of five strains of mice. Strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding were observed. 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in brain was not correlated with baseline immobility time in the five strains of mice examined. These results suggest that, although the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor, strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding are not related to variation in immobility time and responses to fluvoxamine.

  16. Response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) differs in mouse strains and reveals a divergence in JNK signaling and COX-2 induction prior to loss of neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Justin D; Jang, Haeman; Shepherd, Kennie R; Faherty, Ciaran; Slack, Sally; Jiao, Yun; Smeyne, Richard J

    2007-10-17

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease whose hallmark pathological features include a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain. Recent studies have described the activation of a stress-induced signal cascade, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated activation of c-Jun, and an increase in the expression of a downstream effector, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), in postmortem PD brains. The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which induces selective neuronal loss in the midbrain similar to that seen in PD, also induces JNK-mediated activation of c-Jun and generates a COX-2 response in C57BL/6J mice. However, mice exhibit a strain-dependent susceptibility to MPTP. Identifying the point(s) of molecular divergence in the MPTP-induced response may provide insight into the cause of PD or a means to identify susceptibility to PD in humans. Here we examined JNK signaling and COX-2 induction in two strains of mice, the MPTP-sensitive C57BL/6J and the MPTP-resistant Swiss Webster (SW). We show that C57BL/6J and SW strains differ in JNK and c-Jun activation in response to MPTP. In addition, the MPTP-induced COX-2 response occurs exclusively in C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, strain-specific responses to MPTP are not due to differences in MPP(+) levels and are not secondary to cell death. These results provide evidence toward a mechanism of strain-dependent sensitivity to MPTP.

  17. Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    HITEC Corporation developed a strain gage application for DanteII, a mobile robot developed for NASA. The gage measured bending forces on the robot's legs and warned human controllers when acceptable forces were exceeded. HITEC further developed the technology for strain gage services in creating transducers out of "Indy" racing car suspension pushrods, NASCAR suspension components and components used in motion control.

  18. Long-term preservation of freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takehito; Serikawa, Tadao

    2012-06-01

    Many genetically engineered mice strains have been generated worldwide and sperm preservation is a valuable method for storing these strains as genetic resources. Freeze-drying is a useful sperm preservation method because it requires neither liquid nitrogen nor dry ice for preservation and transportation. We report here successful long-term preservation at 4 °C of mouse spermatozoa freeze-dried using a simple buffer solution (10mM Tris, 1mM EDTA, pH 8.0). Offspring with fertility were obtained from oocytes fertilized with freeze-dried spermatozoa from C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mouse strains stored at 4 °C for 3 years. This freeze-drying method is a safe and economical tool for the biobanking of valuable mouse strains.

  19. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  20. A Mouse Strain Defective in Both T Cells and NK Cells Has Enhanced Sensitivity to Tumor Induction by Plasmid DNA Expressing Both Activated H-Ras and c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Sheng-Fowler, Li; Tu, Wei; Fu, Haiqing; Murata, Haruhiko; Lanning, Lynda; Foseh, Gideon; Macauley, Juliete; Blair, Donald; Hughes, Stephen H.; Coffin, John M.; Lewis, Andrew M.; Peden, Keith

    2014-01-01

    As part of safety studies to evaluate the risk of residual cellular DNA in vaccines manufactured in tumorigenic cells, we have been developing in vivo assays to detect and quantify the oncogenic activity of DNA. We generated a plasmid expressing both an activated human H-ras gene and murine c-myc gene and showed that 1 µg of this plasmid, pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc, was capable of inducing tumors in newborn NIH Swiss mice. However, to be able to detect the oncogenicity of dominant activated oncogenes in cellular DNA, a more sensitive system was needed. In this paper, we demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon transgenic mouse, which is defective in both T-cell and NK-cell functions, can detect the oncogenic activity of 25 ng of the circular form of pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc. When this plasmid was inoculated as linear DNA, amounts of DNA as low as 800 pg were capable of inducing tumors. Animals were found that had multiple tumors, and these tumors were independent and likely clonal. These results demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon mouse is highly sensitive for the detection of oncogenic activity of DNA. To determine whether it can detect the oncogenic activity of cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-cell lines (HeLa, A549, HT-1080, and CEM), DNA (100 µg) was inoculated into newborn CD3 epsilon mice both in the presence of 1 µg of linear pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc as positive control and in its absence. While tumors were induced in 100% of mice with the positive-control plasmid, no tumors were induced in mice receiving any of the tumor DNAs alone. These results demonstrate that detection of oncogenes in cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-derived cell lines in this mouse system was not possible; the results also show the importance of including a positive-control plasmid to detect inhibitory effects of the cellular DNA. PMID:25302710

  1. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  2. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  3. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  4. Optical mouse acting as biospeckle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Michel Melo; Nozela, Jose Roberto de Almeida; Chaves, Marcio Jose; Alves Braga, Roberto; Rabal, Hector Jorge

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose some experiments with the use of optical computer mouse, associated to low cost lasers that can be used to perform several measurements with applications in industry and in human health monitoring. The mouse was used to grab the movements produced by speckle pattern changes and to get information through the adaptation of its structure. We measured displacements in wood samples under strain, variations of the diameter of an artery due to heart beat and, through a hardware simulation, the movement of an eye, an experiment that could be of low cost help for communication to severely handicapped motor patients. Those measurements were done in spite of the fact that the CCD sensor of the mice is monolithically included into an integrated circuit so that the raw image cannot be accessed. If, as was the case with primitive optical mouse, that signal could be accessed, the quality and usefulness of the measurements could be significantly increased. As it was not possible, a webcam sensor was used for measuring the drying of paint, a standard phenomenon for testing biospeckle techniques, in order to prove the usefulness of the mouse design. The results showed that the use of the mouse associated to a laser pointer could be the way to get metrological information from many phenomena involving the whole field spatial displacement, as well as the use of the mouse as in its prime version allowed to get images of the speckle patterns and to analyze them.

  5. Host Genetic and Environmental Effects on Mouse Cecum Microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James H; Foster, Carmen M; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Campbell, Alisha G; Yang, Zamin Koo; Wymore, Ann; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Podar, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gut harbors complex and variable microbial communities, across both host phylogenetic space and conspecific individuals. A synergy of host genetic and environmental factors shape these communities and account for their variability, but their individual contributions and the selective pressures involved are still not well understood. We employed barcoded pyrosequencing of V1-2 and V4 regions of bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes to characterize the effects of host genetics and environment on cecum assemblages in 10 genetically distinct, inbred mouse strains. Eight of these strains are the foundation of the Collaborative Cross (CC), a panel of mice derived from a genetically diverse set of inbred founder strains, designed specifically for complex trait analysis. Diversity of gut microbiota was characterized by complementing phylogenetic and distance-based, sequence-clustering approaches. Significant correlations were found between the mouse strains and their gut microbiota, reflected by distinct bacterial communities. Cohabitation and litter had a reduced, although detectable effect, and the microbiota response to these factors varied by strain. We identified bacterial phylotypes that appear to be discriminative and strain-specific to each mouse line used. Cohabitation of different strains of mice revealed an interaction of host genetic and environmental factors in shaping gut bacterial consortia, in which bacterial communities became more similar but retained strain specificity. This study provides a baseline analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in the eight CC progenitor strains and will be linked to integrated host genotype, phenotype and microbiota research on the resulting CC panel.

  6. Immobility and hyperthermia in the tail suspension test: association with the Porsolt test and the reflex startle reaction in 11 inbred mouse strains and the effects of genetic knockout of MAO A.

    PubMed

    Popova, N K; Tibeikina, M A

    2010-06-01

    Immobility and hyperthermia induced by unavoidable stress imposed by the tail suspension test (TST) and the acoustic startle reaction were assessed in mice of 11 inbred strains and in Tg8 mice, which have genetic knockout of MAO A. Sharp genotypic differences in immobility were seen, while there was no correlation with the hyperthermic response to the TST. A correlation was found between the extent of immobility in the TST and the startle reaction. Studies of 11 strains of mice revealed a positive correlation between the duration of immobility in the TST and the Porsolt "despair test." Genetic knockout of MAO A, one of the key enzymes in catecholamine and serotonin metabolism in the brain, weakened the startle reaction and TST-induced hyperthermia but had no significant effect on the immobility of Tg8 mice, which provides evidence of differences in the neurochemical regulation of these reactions. These data provide grounds for using the TST as a "dry" Porsolt test and identify TST-induced hyperthermia as a model for reactions to unavoidable stress.

  7. Mechanisms of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercaria- I. analysis of antibody and T-lymphocyte responses in mouse strains developing differing levels of immunity

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.L.; Labine, M.; Sher, A.

    1981-11-15

    The kinetics of cellular and humoral responses directed against schistosomula were examined in mice of three inbred strains which demonstrate differences in the degree of resistance induced by immunization with irradiated cercariae. T-Cell reactivity was observed during the first 4 weeks after vaccination but declined to control levels thereafter. Anti-schistosomulum antibody was first detected 2 weeks after vaccination, peaked by 6 weeks, and persisted as late as 15 weeks. In sera obtained at 6 weeks, antibody activity was detected in affinity chromatography-purified fractions containing IgM, IgA, IgG/sub 1/, IgG/sub 2//sub a/, and IgG/sub 3/ immunoglobulins. In general, the cellular and humoral responses observed in C57Bl/6J mice, which consistently developed a high level of immunity after vaccination, were not significantly different from those observed in C3H/HeJ or CBA/J mice, which achieved only low to moderate levels of immunity. Thus, although antibody production appears to correlate more closely than T lymphocyte responsiveness with the typical long-term resistance pattern observed in this model, the absence of striking differences in parasite-specific antibody levels between mice of these different strains suggests that additional mechanisms may be involved in the development of immunity after vaccination.

  8. Enterotoxigenicity of aeromonas strains in suckling mice.

    PubMed

    Jánossy, G; Tarján, V

    1980-01-01

    The enterotoxigenicity of 170 Aeromonas strains isolated from different sources (food poisoning, random food sampling, water, faeces) was examined by the suckling mouse test. The strains were grown on Syncaye culture medium covered with sterilized membrane for Kiil-kidney. The culture supernatants were inoculated orally. Ileal loop dilatation was compared to that produced by the international standard enterotoxic Escherichia coli B7A (O148 : H28) and B2C (O6 : H16) strains. Of the 87 Aeromonas hydrophila strains 69, of the 76 Aeromonas punctate subsp. caviae strains 9, the 6 Aeromonas punctata subsp. punctata strains 5, and 1 Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. achromogenes gave a positive reaction in the test.

  9. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis.

  10. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis. PMID:26055730

  11. Transurethral induction of mouse urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Thai, Kim H; Thathireddy, Anuradha; Hsieh, Michael H

    2010-08-05

    Uropathogenic bacterial strains of interest are grown on agar. Generally, uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and other strains can be grown overnight on Luria-Bertani (LB) agar at 37 degrees C in ambient air. UPEC strains grow as yellowish-white translucent colonies on LB agar. Following confirmation of appropriate colony morphology, single colonies are then picked to be cultured in broth. LB broth can be used for most uropathogenic bacterial strains. Two serial, overnight LB broth cultures can be employed to enhance expression of type I pili, a well-defined virulence factor for uropathogenic bacteria. Broth cultures are diluted to the desired concentration in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Eight to 12 week old female mice are placed under isoflurane anesthesia and transurethrally inoculated with bacteria using polyethylene tubing-covered 30 gauge syringes. Typical inocula, which must be empirically determined for each bacterial/mouse strain combination, are 10(6) to 10(8) cfu per mouse in 10 to 50 microliters of PBS. After the desired infection period (one day to several weeks), urine samples and the bladder and both kidneys are harvested. Each organ is minced, placed in PBS, and homogenized in a Blue Bullet homogenizer. Urine and tissue homogenates are serially diluted in PBS and cultured on appropriate agar. The following day, colony forming units are counted.

  12. Mouse kidney transplantation: models of allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tse, George H; Hesketh, Emily E; Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique.

  13. Mouse Kidney Transplantation: Models of Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Michael; Borthwick, Gary; Hughes, Jeremy; Marson, Lorna P.

    2014-01-01

    Rejection of the transplanted kidney in humans is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The mouse model of renal transplantation closely replicates both the technical and pathological processes that occur in human renal transplantation. Although mouse models of allogeneic rejection in organs other than the kidney exist, and are more technically feasible, there is evidence that different organs elicit disparate rejection modes and dynamics, for instance the time course of rejection in cardiac and renal allograft differs significantly in certain strain combinations. This model is an attractive tool for many reasons despite its technical challenges. As inbred mouse strain haplotypes are well characterized it is possible to choose donor and recipient combinations to model acute allograft rejection by transplanting across MHC class I and II loci. Conversely by transplanting between strains with similar haplotypes a chronic process can be elicited were the allograft kidney develops interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. We have modified the surgical technique to reduce operating time and improve ease of surgery, however a learning curve still needs to be overcome in order to faithfully replicate the model. This study will provide key points in the surgical procedure and aid the process of establishing this technique. PMID:25350513

  14. Removing the cloak of invisibility: phenotyping the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Monica J.

    2008-01-01

    If you study a human disease, it is likely that you have tried to generate a mouse model. Sometimes, these models are excellent; others are disappointing. Or, so we think. How often does our mouse mutant not model the human disease because of limitations in how we may look at it? In any living organism, many factors work together to produce the phenotype. Here, new phenotyping paradigms for assessing mouse biology and physiology are described and proposed. Advances in mouse phenotype assessments have paralleled human clinical diagnostics. The future brings a multitude of mouse strains that might be exposed to a variety of conditions. To assess health will require the ability to perform a broad-based phenotype assessment of every animal until we can understand how the perturbation of one system affects others. PMID:19048073

  15. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-03-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience," which aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging. Progeroid mouse models are frequently used in geroscience as they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the highly complex process of natural aging. This review provides an overview of the most commonly reported nonneoplastic macroscopic and microscopic pathologic findings in progeroid mouse models (eg, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc degeneration, kyphosis, sarcopenia, cutaneous atrophy, wound healing, hair loss, alopecia, lymphoid atrophy, cataract, corneal endothelial dystrophy, retinal degenerative diseases, and vascular remodeling). Furthermore, several shortcomings in pathologic analysis and descriptions of these models are discussed. Progeroid mouse models are valuable models for aging, but thorough knowledge of both the mouse strain background and the progeria-related phenotype is required to guide interpretation and translation of the pathology data. PMID:26864891

  16. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  17. SodA is a major metabolic antioxidant in Brucella abortus 2308 that plays a significant, but limited, role in the virulence of this strain in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel W; Baumgartner, John E; Gee, Jason M; Anderson, Eric S; Roop, R Martin

    2012-07-01

    The gene designated BAB1_0591 in the Brucella abortus 2308 genome sequence encodes the manganese-cofactored superoxide dismutase SodA. An isogenic sodA mutant derived from B. abortus 2308, designated JB12, displays a small colony phenotype, increased sensitivity in vitro to endogenous superoxide generators, hydrogen peroxide and exposure to acidic pH, and a lag in growth when cultured in rich and minimal media that can be rescued by the addition of all 20 amino acids to the growth medium. B. abortus JB12 exhibits significant attenuation in both cultured murine macrophages and experimentally infected mice, but this attenuation is limited to the early stages of infection. Addition of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin to infected macrophages does not alleviate the attenuation exhibited by JB12, suggesting that the basis for the attenuation of the B. abortus sodA mutant is not an increased sensitivity to exogenous superoxide generated through the oxidative burst of host phagocytes. It is possible, however, that the increased sensitivity of the B. abortus sodA mutant to acid makes it less resistant than the parental strain to killing by the low pH encountered during the early stages of the development of the brucella-containing vacuoles in macrophages. These experimental findings support the proposed role for SodA as a major cytoplasmic antioxidant in brucella. Although this enzyme provides a clear benefit to B. abortus 2308 during the early stages of infection in macrophages and mice, SodA appears to be dispensable once the brucellae have established an infection.

  18. Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2 Amplifies the Induction of Cyclooxygenase 2 and Delayed Prostaglandin D2 Generation in Mouse Bone Marrow Culture-Derived Mast Cells in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Bruno L.; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Kikawada, Eriya; Balestrieri, Barbara; Arm, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) with stem cell factor (SCF) or IgE and antigen elicits exocytosis and an immediate phase of prostaglandin (PG) D2 and leukotriene (LT) C4 generation. Activation of BMMC by SCF, IL-1β and IL-10 elicits a delayed phase of PGD2 generation dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 induction. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 α provides arachidonic acid in both phases and amplifies COX-2 induction. Pharmacological experiments implicate an amplifying role for secretory (s) PLA2. We used mice lacking the gene encoding group V sPLA2 (Pla2g5 −/−) to definitively test its role in eicosanoid generation by BMMC. Pla2g5 −/− BMMC on a C57BL/6 genetic background showed a modest reduction in exocytosis and immediate PGD2 generation after activation with SCF or with IgE and antigen, while LTC4 generation was not modified. Delayed-phase PGD2 generation and COX-2 induction were reduced ~35% in C57BL/6 Pla2g5 −/− BMMC and were restored by exogenous PGE2. There was no deficit in either phase of eicosanoid generation by Pla2g5 −/− BMMC on a BALB/c background. Thus, group V sPLA2 amplifies COX-2 expression and delayed phase PGD2 generation in a strain-dependent manner; it has at best a limited role in immediate eicosanoid generation by BMMC. PMID:17064958

  19. Genetic characterization of senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM).

    PubMed

    Higuchi, K

    1997-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains are unique and appropriate models for genetic studies on aging because the SAMP strains have an "accelerated senescence" phenotype for which the SAMR strains are controls, and each SAMP strain has a strain-specific age-associated disorder. Furthermore, because they have gone through sufficient generations of sister-brother mating, they can be considered inbred strains, which can be analyzed genetically. There are now 11 SAMP strains and 3 SAMR strains descended from the progenitor litters. Analysis with the Gompertz function shows that the SAMP strains have the same initial mortality rate (IMR) as the SAMR strains but a shorter mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), presumably due to genes that accelerated the rate of senescence in the SAMP strains. This accelerated senescence may also occur in cultured fibroblast-like cells. We performed molecular genetic characterization of all the SAM strains to acquire a base of genetic information from which we could develop hypotheses on the mechanism of development of SAM strains and genetic factors that contribute to accelerated senescence. PMID:9088910

  20. The MOUSE Squad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  1. Prion infection of mouse neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Ranjit K.; Young, Rebecca; Pitstick, Rose; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Carlson, George A.

    2006-01-01

    Only a few cell lines have been infected with prions, offering limited genetic diversity and sensitivity to several strains. Here we report that cultured neurospheres expressing cellular prion protein (PrPC) can be infected with prions. Neurosphere lines isolated from the brains of mice at embryonic day 13–15 grow as aggregates and contain CNS stem cells. We produced neurosphere cultures from FVB/NCr (FVB) mice, from transgenic (Tg) FVB mice that overexpress mouse PrP-A (Tg4053), and from congenic FVB mice with a targeted null mutation in the PrP gene (Prnp0/0) and incubated them with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory prion strain. While monitoring the levels of disease-causing PrP (PrPSc) at each passage, we observed a dramatic rise in PrPSc levels with time in the Tg4053 neurosphere cells, whereas the level of PrPSc decayed to undetectable levels in cell cultures lacking PrP. PrPSc levels in cultures from FVB mice initially declined but then increased with passage. Prions produced in culture were transmissible to mice and produced disease pathology. Intracellular aggregates of PrPSc were present in cells from infected cultures. The susceptibility of neurosphere cultures to prions mirrored that of the mice from which they were derived. Neurosphere lines from Tg4053 mice provide a sensitive in vitro bioassay for mouse prions; neurosphere lines from other Tg mice overexpressing PrP might be used to assay prions from other species, including humans. PMID:16495413

  2. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  3. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  4. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  5. The volume effect in irradiated mouse colorectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark William

    1997-11-01

    Damage of the colorectum is the dose-limiting normal tissue complication following radiotherapy of prostate and cervical cancers. One approach for decreasing complications is to physically reduce the treatment volume. Mathematical models have been previously developed to describe the change in associated toxicity with a change in irradiated volume, i.e. the 'volume effect', for serial-type normal tissues including the colorectum. The first goal of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that there would not be a threshold length in the development of obstruction after irradiation of mouse colorectum, as predicted by the Probability model of the volume effect. The second goal was to examine if there were differences in the threshold and in the incidence of colorectal obstruction after irradiation of two mouse strains, C57B1/6 (C57) and C3Hf/Kam (C3H), previously found to be fibrosis-prone and-resistant, respectively, after lung irradiation due, in part, to genetic differences. The hypothesis examined was that differences in incidence between strains were due to the differential expression of the fibrogenic cytokines TGF/beta and TNF/alpha. Various lengths of C57 and C3H mouse colorectum were irradiated and the incidence of colorectal obstruction was followed up to 15 months. A threshold length was observed for both mouse strains, in contradiction of model predictions. The mechanism of the threshold was epithelial regeneration after irradiation. C57 mice had significantly higher incidence of colorectal obstruction compared to C3H mice, especially at smaller irradiated lengths. Colorectal tissue was obtained at various times after irradiation and prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and RNase protection assay for measurement of TGF/beta 1, 2, 3 and TNF/alpha mRNA. Distinct strain differences in the histological time of appearance and spatial locations of fibrosis were observed. However, there were no consistent strain difference in mRNA levels or

  6. D-Cycloserine improves the impaired sociability of the Balb/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephen I; Burket, Jessica A; Jacome, Luis F; Cannon, William R; Herndon, Amy L

    2011-01-15

    The genetically inbred Balb/c mouse strain shows evidence of impaired sociability in a standard paradigm. For example, relative to 8-week-old male outbred Swiss-Webster mice, 8 week-old male Balb/c mice spend less time sniffing and in the vicinity of an enclosed 4 week-old male ICR stimulus mouse and, when allowed to interact freely with the stimulus mouse for five minutes, make fewer discrete episodes of social approach and show suppression of locomotor activity. We explored the effect of D-cycloserine (320mg/kg, intraperitoneally), a partial glycine agonist that binds to the obligatory co-agonist glycine binding site on the NMDA receptor, on the sociability of the Balb/c and Swiss-Webster mouse strains in a standard paradigm. The results show that treatment with D-cycloserine increased the locomotor activity of the Balb/c mouse strain in the presence of an enclosed social stimulus mouse and when these mice were allowed to interact freely with each other. Also, D-cycloserine increased the number of discrete episodes of social approach when Balb/c mice were allowed to interact freely with social stimulus mice. However, D-cycloserine had similar effects on measures of sociability in the Swiss-Webster mouse, raising the possibility that the positive effects on the sociability of the Balb/c mouse strain may be mediated by indirect effects on locomotion, arousal, and anxiety.

  7. Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U.; Soldatow, Valerie Y.; Witek, Rafal; Kaiser, Robert; Stewart, Todd; Amaral, Kirsten; Freeman, Kimberly; Black, Chris; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Ferguson, Stephen S.

    2010-12-15

    Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

  8. Large-scale mouse knockouts and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Solis, Ramiro; Ryder, Edward; Houghton, Richard; White, Jacqueline K; Bottomley, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Standardized phenotypic analysis of mutant forms of every gene in the mouse genome will provide fundamental insights into mammalian gene function and advance human and animal health. The availability of the human and mouse genome sequences, the development of embryonic stem cell mutagenesis technology, the standardization of phenotypic analysis pipelines, and the paradigm-shifting industrialization of these processes have made this a realistic and achievable goal. The size of this enterprise will require global coordination to ensure economies of scale in both the generation and primary phenotypic analysis of the mutant strains, and to minimize unnecessary duplication of effort. To provide more depth to the functional annotation of the genome, effective mechanisms will also need to be developed to disseminate the information and resources produced to the wider community. Better models of disease, potential new drug targets with novel mechanisms of action, and completely unsuspected genotype-phenotype relationships covering broad aspects of biology will become apparent. To reach these goals, solutions to challenges in mouse production and distribution, as well as development of novel, ever more powerful phenotypic analysis modalities will be necessary. It is a challenging and exciting time to work in mouse genetics.

  9. D-Cycloserine enhances social exploration in the Balb/c mouse.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Luis F; Burket, Jessica A; Herndon, Amy L; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2011-05-30

    Inbred Balb/c mice show deficits of sociability. The endogenous tone of NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission is altered in Balb/c mice, which may explain the beneficial effect of D-cycloserine on impaired sociability. In the current study, Balb/c mice spent more time than the Swiss Webster comparator strain in the open arms of an elevated plus maze (EPM), suggesting that they are not more anxious or fearful in the absence of a social stimulus mouse. Moreover, Balb/c and Swiss Webster mice did not differ in the amount of time they spent exploring an inanimate object in an open field. Differences in exploratory activity between strains emerged only when a salient social stimulus mouse was enclosed in the open field. D-Cycloserine increased the amount of time Balb/c mice spent exploring the enclosed stimulus mouse to levels observed in vehicle-treated Swiss Webster mice. Finally, irrespective of strain, D-cycloserine increased exploratory activity as measured in open arm entries in the EPM, when no enclosed stimulus mouse was present. The data show that mouse strain influences D-cycloserine's effect on exploration in the presence of a salient social stimulus mouse. In the absence of an enclosed stimulus mouse, D-cycloserine increased open arm entries significantly in both the sociability-impaired Balb/c and comparator Swiss Webster strains. Thus, D-cycloserine positively affects exploratory activity in general, but strain differences emerge when the stimulus eliciting exploration is a salient social stimulus mouse versus an inanimate object. Further, the sociability deficit of the Balb/c mouse is not an epiphenomenon of increased generalized anxiety.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS VIRULENCE USING AN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED MOUSE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An immunocompromised mouse model was used to characterize Aeromonas strains for their ability to cause opportunistic, extraintestinal infections. A total of 34 isolates of Aeromonas (A. hydrophila [n = 12]), A. veronii biotype sobria [n = 7], A. caviae [n = 4], A. enchelia [n = 4...

  11. Ultrastructure of Campylobacter jejuni in gamma-irradiated mouse jejunum

    SciTech Connect

    Sosula, L.; Nicholls, E.M.; Skeen, M.

    1988-04-01

    This paper describes the ultrastructure of intracellular elongated, transitional and coccoid forms of Campylobacter jejuni, in irradiated mouse jejunum infected both in vitro and in vivo and in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Jejunum of irradiated mouse incubated for 1 hour under conditions favorable to the organisms showed minimal tissue degeneration. The intracellular organisms in this material were free cytoplasmic forms showing inner membrane degeneration, loss of cytoplasmic granules, and absence of flagella. The diameter of the coccoids was up to four times that of the elongated forms, as in plate cultures. Intracellular organisms were not found in challenged unirradiated controls, indicating that irradiation of mouse cells may be required for intracellular infection with human strains of C jejuni. In contrast, challenged human fibroblasts contained typical elongated organisms in cytoplasmic vacuoles. These findings are discussed with reference to Campylobacter strain, host resistance, and natural animal and human Campylobacter infections.

  12. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  13. Mouse or man? Which are pertussis vaccines to protect?

    PubMed

    Preston, N W; Stanbridge, T N

    1976-04-01

    Type 1 strains of Bordetella pertussis can infect mouse brain and have been recovered as type 1 organisms after death. When introduced into the naso-pharynx of the marmoset, they immediately acquired agglutinogen 2 or 3, and the resulting type 1,2 or 1,3 infection persisted for many weeks. As in the child, agglutinogens 2 and/or 3 appear to be essential for infection of the marmoset, whereas they are quite unnecessary in mouse brain. A vaccine (extract or whole cell) containing agglutinogen 1 may be sufficient to pass the mouse protection test but it may fail to immunize children. The mouse test is inadequate even for the screening of such extracts. PMID:177701

  14. Elemental profiles in Emory mouse lens

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, M.; Emanuel, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of chloride, potassium, phosphorus and sulfur in the epithelial cells of the lenses obtained from 3 to 7 month old Emory mice and 7 month old cataract resistant strain of Emory mice. Rapidly frozen lenses were fractured in the frozen state and lyophilized. The anterior epithelial cells were analyzed from equator to equator. The results show that the epithelial cells of the 7 month old Emory mouse lens have considerably higher amounts of chloride, sulfur, potassium and phosphorus. Presence of increased amount of potassium in the epithelial cells is intriguing. The data obtained from these experiments show that the changes in the elemental levels of epithelial cells are similar to observed alteration found in the lens fiber mass of 7 month old Emory mouse.

  15. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  16. Biological and molecular characterizations of Toxoplasma gondii strains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, R.A.; Lindsay, D.S.; Howe, D.K.; Roderick, Constance L.; Dubey, J.P.; Thomas, N.J.; Baeten, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from brain or heart tissue from 15 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) in cell cultures. These strains were used to infect mice that developed antibodies to T. gondii as detected in the modified direct agglutination test and had T. gondii tissue cysts in their brains at necropsy. Mouse brains containing tissue cysts from 4 of the strains were fed to 4 cats. Two of the cats excreted T. gondii oocysts in their feces that were infectious for mice. Molecular analyses of 13 strains indicated that they were all type II strains, but that they were genetically distinct from one another.

  17. Human-mouse interspecies collagen I heterotrimer is functional during embryonic development of Mov13 mutant mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Bateman, J F; Schnieke, A; Sharpe, A; Barker, D; Mascara, T; Eyre, D; Bruns, R; Krimpenfort, P; Berns, A

    1990-04-01

    To investigate whether the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen chain could form an in vivo functional interspecies heterotrimer with the mouse pro alpha 2(I) collagen chain, we introduced the human COL1A1 gene into Mov13 mice which have a functional deletion of the endogenous COL1A1 gene. Transgenic mouse strains (HucI and HucII) carrying the human COL1A1 gene were first generated by microinjecting the COL1A1 gene into wild-type mouse embryos. Genetic evidence indicated that the transgene in the HucI strain was closely linked to the endogenous mouse COL1A1 gene and was X linked in the HucII transgenic strain. Northern (RNA) blot and S1 protection analyses showed that the transgene was expressed in the appropriate tissue-specific manner and as efficiently as the endogenous COL1A1 gene. HucII mice were crossed with Mov13 mice to transfer the human transgene into the mutant strain. Whereas homozygous Mov13 embryos die between days 13 and 14 of gestation, the presence of the transgene permitted apparently normal development of the mutant embryos to birth. This indicated that the mouse-human interspecies collagen I heterotrimer was functional in the animal. The rescue was, however, only partial, as all homozygotes died within 36 h after delivery, with signs of internal bleeding. This could have been due to a functional defect in the interspecies hybrid collagen. Extensive analysis failed to reveal any biochemical or morphological abnormalities of the collagen I molecules in Mov13-HucII embryos. This may indicate that there was a subtle functional defect of the interspecies hybrid protein which was not revealed by our analysis or that another gene has been mutated by the retroviral insertion in the Mov13 mutant strain.

  18. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  19. Within-strain variation in behavior differs consistently between common inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Aarts, Emmeke; Maroteaux, Gregoire; van der Sluis, Sophie; Verhage, Matthijs; Smit, August B

    2015-08-01

    Genetic and environmental factors interact throughout life and give rise to individual differences, i.e., individuality. The diversifying effect of environmental factors is counteracted by genetic mechanisms to yield persistence of specific features (robustness). Here, we compared robustness between cohorts of isogenic mice of eight different commonly used strains by analyzing to what extent environmental variation contributed to individuality in each of the eight genotypes, using a previously published dataset. Behavior was assessed in the home-cage, providing control over environmental factors, to reveal within-strain variability in numerous spontaneous behaviors. Indeed, despite standardization and in line with previous studies, substantial variability among mice of the same inbred strain was observed. Strikingly, across a multidimensional set of 115 behavioral parameters, several strains consistently ranked high in within-strain variability (DBA/2J, 129S1/Sv A/J and NOD/LtJ), whereas other strains ranked low (C57BL/6J and BALB/c). Strain rankings of within-strain variability in behavior were confirmed in an independent, previously published behavioral dataset using conventional behavioral tests administered to different mice from the same breeding colonies. Together, these show that genetically inbred mouse strains consistently differ in phenotypic robustness against environmental variation, suggesting that genetic factors contribute to variation in robustness. PMID:26123533

  20. Geobacteraceae strains and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Yi, Hana

    2015-07-07

    Embodiments of the present invention provide a method of producing genetically modified strains of electricigenic microbes that are specifically adapted for the production of electrical current in microbial fuel cells, as well as strains produced by such methods and fuel cells using such strains. In preferred embodiments, the present invention provides genetically modified strains of Geobacter sulfurreducens and methods of using such strains.

  1. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  2. Recent Progress in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Embryonic and Neonatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse has been widely used as a model system to investigate the genetic control mechanisms of mammalian brain development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool to characterize changes in brain anatomy in mutant mouse strains and injury progression in mouse models of fetal and neonatal brain injury. Progress in the last decade has enabled us to acquire MRI data with increasing anatomical details from the embryonic and neonatal mouse brain. High-resolution ex vivo MRI, especially with advanced diffusion MRI methods, can visualize complex microstructural organizations in the developing mouse brain. In vivo MRI of the embryonic mouse brain, which is critical for tracking anatomical changes longitudinally, has become available. Applications of these techniques may lead to further insights into the complex and dynamic processes of brain development. PMID:26973471

  3. Letting a typical mouse judge whether mouse social interactions are atypical

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Charisma R.; Forsberg, Carl Gunnar; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    LAY ABSTRACT Diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) requires a qualitative assessment of social aptitude: one person judging whether another person interacts in a ‘typical’ way. Quantitative or computerized assessment of social aptitude cannot substitute for this subjective judgment. We hypothesized that mice could be used to make a similar judgment if they prefer ‘typical’ over ‘atypical’ social interactions with mouse models relevant to ASD. We used typical C57BL/6 (B6) mice as ‘judges’ and evaluated their preference for a chamber containing a ‘typical’ or an ‘atypical’ mouse. For our atypical mice, we chose two strains with well-documented social phenotypes, as well a mutant line with abnormal social behavior and seizures. Overall, we observed a characteristic pattern of behavior over the course of 30 minutes, with the judges preferring the typical mouse chamber to the atypical mouse chamber during the last 10 minutes of the test. When we evaluated the individual stimulus pairings, two of the three showed a similar pattern as the overall results, and the other stimulus comparison showed a trend for a preference for the typical mouse chamber across the entire test. We repeated the experiments using the 129S6 strain of typical mice as judges and found a much less strong preference pattern across time. These data suggest that a characteristic pattern of exploration in B6 mice can distinguish some socially atypical animals from controls. SCIENTIFIC ABSTRACT Diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) requires a qualitative assessment of social aptitude: one person judging whether another person interacts in a ‘typical’ way. We hypothesized that mice could be used to make a similar judgment if they prefer ‘typical’ over ‘atypical’ social interactions with mouse models relevant to ASD. We used wildtype C57BL/6 (B6) mice as ‘judges’ and evaluated their preference for a chamber containing a ‘typical’ (B6 or 129S6

  4. Periodic properties of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Rozov, Stanislav V; Zant, Janneke C; Karlstedt, Kaj; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti

    2014-01-01

    Brain histamine is involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and alertness. Despite the widespread use of the mouse as an experimental model, the periodic properties of major markers of the mouse histaminergic system have not been comprehensively characterized. We analysed the daily levels of histamine and its first metabolite, 1-methylhistamine, in different brain structures of C57BL/6J and CBA/J mouse strains, and the mRNA level and activity of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in C57BL/6J mice. In the C57BL/6J strain, histamine release, assessed by in vivo microdialysis, underwent prominent periodic changes. The main period was 24 h peaking during the activity period. Additional 8 h periods were also observed. The release was highly positively correlated with active wakefulness, as shown by electroencephalography. In both mouse strains, tissue histamine levels remained steady for 24 h in all structures except for the hypothalamus of CBA/J mice, where 24-h periodicity was observed. Brain tissue 1-methylhistamine levels in both strains reached their maxima in the periods of activity. The mRNA level of histidine decarboxylase in the tuberomamillary nucleus and the activities of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in the striatum and cortex did not show a 24-h rhythm, whereas in the hypothalamus the activities of both enzymes had a 12-h periodicity. These results show that the activities of histamine-metabolizing enzymes are not under simple direct circadian regulation. The complex and non-uniform temporal patterns of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain suggest that histamine is strongly involved in the maintenance of active wakefulness.

  5. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  6. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  7. Human-mouse interspecies collagen I heterotrimer is functional during embryonic development of Mov13 mutant mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Bateman, J F; Schnieke, A; Sharpe, A; Barker, D; Mascara, T; Eyre, D; Bruns, R; Krimpenfort, P; Berns, A

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen chain could form an in vivo functional interspecies heterotrimer with the mouse pro alpha 2(I) collagen chain, we introduced the human COL1A1 gene into Mov13 mice which have a functional deletion of the endogenous COL1A1 gene. Transgenic mouse strains (HucI and HucII) carrying the human COL1A1 gene were first generated by microinjecting the COL1A1 gene into wild-type mouse embryos. Genetic evidence indicated that the transgene in the HucI strain was closely linked to the endogenous mouse COL1A1 gene and was X linked in the HucII transgenic strain. Northern (RNA) blot and S1 protection analyses showed that the transgene was expressed in the appropriate tissue-specific manner and as efficiently as the endogenous COL1A1 gene. HucII mice were crossed with Mov13 mice to transfer the human transgene into the mutant strain. Whereas homozygous Mov13 embryos die between days 13 and 14 of gestation, the presence of the transgene permitted apparently normal development of the mutant embryos to birth. This indicated that the mouse-human interspecies collagen I heterotrimer was functional in the animal. The rescue was, however, only partial, as all homozygotes died within 36 h after delivery, with signs of internal bleeding. This could have been due to a functional defect in the interspecies hybrid collagen. Extensive analysis failed to reveal any biochemical or morphological abnormalities of the collagen I molecules in Mov13-HucII embryos.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1690840

  8. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    PubMed

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  9. Rat Strain Ontology: structured controlled vocabulary designed to facilitate access to strain data at RGD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Rat Genome Database (RGD) ( http://rgd.mcw.edu/) is the premier site for comprehensive data on the different strains of the laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus). The strain data are collected from various publications, direct submissions from individual researchers, and rat providers worldwide. Rat strain, substrain designation and nomenclature follow the Guidelines for Nomenclature of Mouse and Rat Strains, instituted by the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. While symbols and names aid in identifying strains correctly, the flat nature of this information prohibits easy search and retrieval, as well as other data mining functions. In order to improve these functionalities, particularly in ontology-based tools, the Rat Strain Ontology (RS) was developed. Results The Rat Strain Ontology (RS) reflects the breeding history, parental background, and genetic manipulation of rat strains. This controlled vocabulary organizes strains by type: inbred, outbred, chromosome altered, congenic, mutant and so on. In addition, under the chromosome altered category, strains are organized by chromosome, and further by type of manipulations, such as mutant or congenic. This allows users to easily retrieve strains of interest with modifications in specific genomic regions. The ontology was developed using the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontology (OBO) file format, and is organized on the Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) structure. Rat Strain Ontology IDs are included as part of the strain report (RS: ######). Conclusions As rat researchers are often unaware of the number of substrains or altered strains within a breeding line, this vocabulary now provides an easy way to retrieve all substrains and accompanying information. Its usefulness is particularly evident in tools such as the PhenoMiner at RGD, where users can now easily retrieve phenotype measurement data for related strains, strains with similar backgrounds or those with similar

  10. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier; Brégeon, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 10(4) C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  11. Comparison of different assays for definition of heat-stable enterotoxigenicity of Escherichia coli porcine strains.

    PubMed

    Olsson, E; Söderlind, O

    1980-01-01

    Ninety-one Escherichia coli strains isolated from porcine neonatal diarrhea, representing 28 O-groups and rough and non-O-groupable strains, were examined for enterotoxigenicity (heat stable [ST] or heat labile [LT]) by using bacterial suspensions in intestinal loop tests in 3- to 7-week-old piglets and culture supernatant fluids in the Y1 adrenal cell test, the 18-h rabbit intestinal loop test, and the infant mouse test. Eleven strains in O-groups 101, 138, 147, and 149 were positive in all four assay systems and were designated ST + LT. Fourteen strains within O-groups 8, 9, 20, 64, 141, and 149 and non-O-groupable were positive only in the 3- to 7-week-old piglet loop test and the infant mouse test and were designated ST pig + mouse. Sixteen strains distributed among O-groups 8, 16, 32, 50, 51, 98, 115, 141, 149, and 157 were positive only in the piglet intestinal loop test and were designated ST pig. Three strains of O-groups 8, 9, and 140 were positive only in the infant mouse assay and were designated ST mouse. Two strains of O-group 149 were positive in all tests except the infant mouse test and were designated LT. A total of 42 strains were negative in all four tests (Ent(-)), and 3 strains could not be categorized by the enterotoxigenicity criteria used. All K88-positive isolates, 17 strains of O-groups 8, 32, 147, and 149, were positive in at least one enterotoxigenicity test. ST pig and ST mouse strains gave positive intestinal loop tests as bacterial suspensions in 4- to 10-day-old piglets. A 6-h piglet intestinal loop test performed with heat-inactivated culture supernatants was preferable to an 18- to 20-h test for determination of ST production by strains of diverse O-groups. ST production by the two strains designated LT was detected by the 6-h test. The infant mouse test, although highly reproducible and convenient, appears to possess considerable limitations in routine screening of E. coli of porcine origin for ST production.

  12. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  13. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  14. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  15. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  16. Phenotypic and functional characterization of Bst+/− mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Riazifar, Hamidreza; Sun, Guoli; Wang, Xinjian; Rupp, Alan; Vemaraju, Shruti; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Lang, Richard A.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Hattar, Samer; Guan, Min-Xin; Huang, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The belly spot and tail (Bst+/−) mouse phenotype is caused by mutations of the ribosomal protein L24 (Rpl24). Among various phenotypes in Bst+/− mice, the most interesting are its retinal abnormalities, consisting of delayed closure of choroid fissures, decreased ganglion cells and subretinal vascularization. We further characterized the Bst+/− mouse and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms to assess the feasibility of using this strain as a model for stem cell therapy of retinal degenerative diseases due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss. We found that, although RGCs are significantly reduced in retinal ganglion cell layer in Bst+/− mouse, melanopsin+ RGCs, also called ipRGCs, appear to be unchanged. Pupillary light reflex was completely absent in Bst+/− mice but they had a normal circadian rhythm. In order to examine the pathological abnormalities in Bst+/− mice, we performed electron microscopy in RGC and found that mitochondria morphology was deformed, having irregular borders and lacking cristae. The complex activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were significantly decreased. Finally, for subretinal vascularization, we also found that angiogenesis is delayed in Bst+/− associated with delayed hyaloid regression. Characterization of Bst+/− retina suggests that the Bst+/− mouse strain could be a useful murine model. It might be used to explore further the pathogenesis and strategy of treatment of retinal degenerative diseases by employing stem cell technology. PMID:26035379

  17. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium Web Portal, a unified point of access for knockout mice and related phenotyping data.

    PubMed

    Koscielny, Gautier; Yaikhom, Gagarine; Iyer, Vivek; Meehan, Terrence F; Morgan, Hugh; Atienza-Herrero, Julian; Blake, Andrew; Chen, Chao-Kung; Easty, Richard; Di Fenza, Armida; Fiegel, Tanja; Grifiths, Mark; Horne, Alan; Karp, Natasha A; Kurbatova, Natalja; Mason, Jeremy C; Matthews, Peter; Oakley, Darren J; Qazi, Asfand; Regnart, Jack; Retha, Ahmad; Santos, Luis A; Sneddon, Duncan J; Warren, Jonathan; Westerberg, Henrik; Wilson, Robert J; Melvin, David G; Smedley, Damian; Brown, Steve D M; Flicek, Paul; Skarnes, William C; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) web portal (http://www.mousephenotype.org) provides the biomedical community with a unified point of access to mutant mice and rich collection of related emerging and existing mouse phenotype data. IMPC mouse clinics worldwide follow rigorous highly structured and standardized protocols for the experimentation, collection and dissemination of data. Dedicated 'data wranglers' work with each phenotyping center to collate data and perform quality control of data. An automated statistical analysis pipeline has been developed to identify knockout strains with a significant change in the phenotype parameters. Annotation with biomedical ontologies allows biologists and clinicians to easily find mouse strains with phenotypic traits relevant to their research. Data integration with other resources will provide insights into mammalian gene function and human disease. As phenotype data become available for every gene in the mouse, the IMPC web portal will become an invaluable tool for researchers studying the genetic contributions of genes to human diseases.

  18. In Vivo Axial Loading of the Mouse Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Katherine M.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Non-invasive methods to apply controlled, cyclic loads to the living skeleton are used as an anabolic agent to stimulate new bone formation in adults and enhance bone mass accrual in growing animals. These methods are also invaluable for understanding bone signaling pathways. Our focus here is on a particular loading model: in vivo axial compression of the mouse tibia. An advantage of loading the tibia is that changes are present in both the cancellous envelope of the proximal tibia and the cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. To load the tibia of the mouse axially in vivo, a cyclic compressive load is applied up to five times a week to a single tibia per mouse for a duration lasting from 1 day to 6 weeks. With the contralateral limb as an internal control, the anabolic response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli can be studied in a pairwise experimental design. Here, we describe the key parameters that must be considered before beginning an in vivo mouse tibial loading experiment, including methods for in vivo strain gauging of the tibial midshaft, and then we describe general methods for loading the mouse tibia for an experiment lasting multiple days. PMID:25331046

  19. In vivo axial loading of the mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Melville, Katherine M; Robling, Alexander G; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive methods to apply controlled, cyclic loads to the living skeleton are used as anabolic procedures to stimulate new bone formation in adults and enhance bone mass accrual in growing animals. These methods are also invaluable for understanding bone signaling pathways. Our focus here is on a particular loading model: in vivo axial compression of the mouse tibia. An advantage of loading the tibia is that changes are present in both the cancellous envelope of the proximal tibia and the cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. To load the tibia of the mouse axially in vivo, a cyclic compressive load is applied up to five times a week to a single tibia per mouse for a duration lasting from 1 day to 6 weeks. With the contralateral limb as an internal control, the anabolic response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli can be studied in a pairwise experimental design. Here, we describe the key parameters that must be considered before beginning an in vivo mouse tibial loading experiment, including methods for in vivo strain gauging of the tibial midshaft, and then we describe general methods for loading the mouse tibia for an experiment lasting multiple days. PMID:25331046

  20. Lgn1, a gene that determines susceptibility to Legionella pneumophila, maps to mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.F.; Damron, D.M.; Lander, E.S.

    1995-04-10

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is unable to replicate in macrophages derived from most inbred mouse strains. Here, we report the mapping of a gene, called Lgn1, that determines whether mouse macrophages are permissive for the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. Although Lgn1 has been previously reported to map to mouse chromosome 15, we show here that it actually maps to chromosome 13, between D13Mit128 and D13Mit70. In the absence of any regional candidates for Lgn1, this map position will facilitate positional cloning attempts directed at this gene. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Functional genomics in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Archibald S

    2002-08-01

    The mouse is the premier genetic model organism for the study of human disease and development. With the recent advances in sequencing of the human and mouse genomes, there is strong interest now in large-scale approaches to decipher the function of mouse genes using various mutagenesis technologies. This review discusses what tools are currently available for manipulating and mutagenizing the mouse genome, such as ethylnitrosourea and gene trap mutagenesis, engineered inversions and deletions using the cre-lox system, and proviral insertional mutagenesis in somatic cells, and how these are being used to uncover gene function.

  2. Stably luminescent Staphylococcus aureus clinical strains for use in bioluminescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Plaut, Roger D; Mocca, Christopher P; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Merkel, Tod J; Stibitz, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging permits the visualization of bacteria in live animals, allowing researchers to monitor, both temporally and spatially, the progression of infection in each animal. We sought to engineer stably luminescent clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus, with the goal of using such strains in mouse models. The gram-positive shuttle vector pMAD was used as the backbone for an integration plasmid. A chloramphenicol resistance gene, a modified lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens, and approximately 650 bp of homology to the chromosome of the USA300 S. aureus strain NRS384 were added, generating plasmid pRP1195. Electroporation into strain RN4220 followed by temperature shift led to integration of pRP1195 into the chromosome. The integrated plasmid was transferred to clinical strains by phage transduction. Luminescent strains displayed no in vitro growth defects. Moreover, luminescence was stable in vitro after three rounds of subculture over 48 hours of growth in the absence of antibiotics. Mice were infected with a luminescent strain of NRS384 in skin and intravenous models. In a mouse skin model, luminescent bacteria were present in lesions that formed and cleared over the course of several days, and in an intravenous model, bacteria inoculated in the mouse tail vein were observed spreading to multiple tissues. No statistically significant difference in virulence was observed between NRS384 and the luminescent strain in either infection model. These preliminary data suggest that this luminescent USA300 strain is suitable for use in mouse models. Similar strains were engineered using other sequenced clinical strains. Because these strains are stably luminescent, they should prove useful in animal models of infection. PMID:23555002

  3. A Genetic Map of the Mouse Suitable for Typing Intraspecific Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, W.; Katz, H.; Lincoln, S. E.; Shin, H. S.; Friedman, J.; Dracopoli, N. L.; Lander, E. S.

    1992-01-01

    We report the construction of a genetic linkage map of the mouse, consisting entirely of genetic markers that can be rapidly typed by polymerase chain reaction and that show a high degree of polymorphism among inbred laboratory strains. Specifically, the map contains 317 simple sequence length polymorphisms at an average spacing of 4.3 cM and is detectably linked to approximately 99% of the mouse genome. In typical crosses between inbred laboratory strains, about 50% of the markers are polymorphic, making it straightforward to follow inheritance in almost any cross. PMID:1353738

  4. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Myocardial Deformation in the Mouse Heart: An MR Tagging Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia; Liu, Wei; Yu, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop a 3D MR tagging method that combines harmonic phase (HARP) and homogeneous strain analysis methods for quantification of regional myocardial wall motion in mice. Materials and Methods 3D tagged images were acquired from seven C57BL/6 mice. Intersecting tag points were reconstructed and 3D strains were quantified at apical, midventricular, and basal levels. Circumferential and radial strains quantified with 2D MR tagging were compared with those calculated from 3D tagged images. Results Our data showed significant heterogeneity in radial, circumferential, and shear strains. Longitudinal strain was more homogeneous. The circumferential-longitudinal shear strain, a unitless measure of ventricular torsion, was positive throughout the left ventricle. There were strong correlations between 2D and 3D studies at the basal and midventricular levels. Conclusion This work demonstrates the feasibility of 3D characterization of cardiac function in mouse via the combination of HARP and homogeneous strain analysis. PMID:18504746

  5. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon. Tendons are tissues that connect muscle to bone. Twisting or pulling these tissues can ... suddenly or develop over time. Back and hamstring muscle strains are common. Many people get strains playing ...

  6. Innate immunity is sufficient for the clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis from the female mouse genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Sturdevant, Gail L.; Caldwell, Harlan D.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia muridarum and C. trachomatis, mouse and human strains respectively, have been used to study immunity in a murine model of female genital tract infection. Despite evidence that unique genes of these otherwise genomically similar strains could play a role in innate immune evasion in their respective mouse and human hosts there have been no animal model findings to directly support this conclusion. Here, we infected C57BL/6 and adaptive immune deficient Rag1−/− female mice with these strains and evaluated their ability to spontaneously resolve genital infection. Predictably, C57BL/6 mice spontaneously cleared infection caused by both chlamydial strains. In contrast, Rag1−/− mice which lack mature T and B cell immunity but maintain functional innate immune effectors, were incapable of resolving C. muridarum infection but spontaneously cleared C. trachomatis infection. This distinct dichotomy in adaptive and innate immune-mediated clearance between mouse and human strains has important cautionary implications for the study of natural immunity and vaccine development in the mouse model. PMID:24585717

  7. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  8. Significant determinants of mouse pain behaviour.

    PubMed

    Minett, Michael S; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Wood, John N

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mouse behavioural analysis has furthered our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying damage sensing and pain. However, it is not unusual for conflicting data on the pain phenotypes of knockout mice to be generated by reputable groups. Here we focus on some technical aspects of measuring mouse pain behaviour that are often overlooked, which may help explain discrepancies in the pain literature. We examined touch perception using von Frey hairs and mechanical pain thresholds using the Randall-Selitto test. Thermal pain thresholds were measured using the Hargreaves apparatus and a thermal place preference test. Sodium channel Nav1.7 knockout mice show a mechanical deficit in the hairy skin, but not the paw, whilst shaving the abdominal hair abolished this phenotype. Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 knockout mice show deficits in noxious mechanosensation in the tail, but not the paw. TRPA1 knockout mice, however, have a loss of noxious mechanosensation in the paw but not the tail. Studies of heat and cold sensitivity also show variability depending on the intensity of the stimulus. Deleting Nav1.7, Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 in Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons attenuates responses to slow noxious heat ramps, whilst responses to fast noxious heat ramps are only reduced when Nav1.7 is lost in large diameter sensory neurons. Deleting Nav1.7 from all sensory neurons attenuates responses to noxious cooling but not extreme cold. Finally, circadian rhythms dramatically influence behavioural outcome measures such as von Frey responses, which change by 80% over the day. These observations demonstrate that fully characterising the phenotype of a transgenic mouse strain requires a range of behavioural pain models. Failure to conduct behavioural tests at different anatomical locations, stimulus intensities, and at different points in the circadian cycle may lead to a pain behavioural phenotype being misinterpreted, or missed altogether. PMID:25101983

  9. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

  10. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Struebing, Felix L.; Lee, Richard K.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin) were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma. PMID:27733864

  11. Structure and genetic polymorphism of the mouse KCC1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shmukler, B E; Brugnara, C; Alper, S L

    2000-07-24

    The KCC1 K-Cl cotransporter is a major regulator of erythroid and non-erythroid cell volume, and the KCC1 gene is a candidate modifier gene for sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies. We have cloned and sequenced the mouse KCC1 (mKCC1) gene, defined its intron-exon junctions, and analyzed (AC)/(TG) intragenic polymorphisms. A highly polymorphic (AC) repeat of mKCC1 intron 1 was characterized in musculus strains, and used to prove lack of linkage between the mKCC1 gene and the rol (resistant to osmotic lysis) locus. The intron 1 (AC) repeat in CAST/Ei and SPRET/Ei was not only more divergent in length but also underwent additional sequence variation. A dimorphic (TG) repeat in intron 2 distinguished CAST/Ei from other strains, and an intron 17 B1 Alu-like SINE present in all musculus strains was found to be absent from intron 17 in SPRET/Ei. These and additional described strain-specific polymorphisms will be useful mapping and genetic tools in the study of mouse models of sickle cell disease.

  12. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli strains isolated from Swedish piglets with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Söderlind, O; Thafvelin, B; Möllby, R

    1988-01-01

    Parenteral vaccination of sows against Escherichia coli diarrhea in their newborn piglets has become more common during the last decade in Sweden, and the vaccination has generally had positive effects. For more than 20 years we have investigated E. coli strains isolated from piglets and weaned pigs with enteric disorders, noting the presence of O groups, enterotoxins, and adhesins. There has been a continuous change in the frequency of these virulence factors. The present study was performed during 1983 and 1984 to follow this change, since such information is essential for the proper choice of vaccines. A total of 856 E. coli strains were obtained from 683 herds divided into three age groups: 1 to 6 days old, 1 to 6 weeks old, and weaned pigs. O group 149 still dominated in the last two age groups, while O group 101 was, for the first time, the most frequent O group in neonatal piglets. All but four O149 strains carried the K88 antigen, which was found in only one other strain (O group 8). K99 antigen was most often found in O groups 101 and 64, and among all the K99 strains ST mouse was the most common (44 of 57), followed by ST mouse-ST pig strains (12 of 57). The 987P antigen was demonstrated in 26 strains belonging to O groups 141 and OX46 and nontypable strains. Two strains belonging to O group 101 were positive for F41 antigen; one of them also carried the K99 antigen. Among all non-O149 strains, ST mouse was the most common type of enterotoxigenic E. coli ( n = 88), followed in decreasing order by ST mouse-ST pig strains ( n = 69) and ST pig strains ( n = 33). In 114 strains producing enterotoxins no adhesive factor was found. Thus, vaccination of the Swedish sow population for more than 5 years with vaccines containing O149 and K88 antigens has apparently changed the pattern of enterotoxigenic E. coli in neonatal diarrhea. The frequency of O149:K88 strains has been reduced, and O101:K99:ST mouse strains now dominate. However, O149 strains remain the

  13. Applications of the human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model for human carcinogen testing.

    PubMed

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2010-08-01

    Tumor-driving mutations in the TP53 gene occur frequently in human cancers. These inactivating mutations arise predominantly from a single-point mutation in the DNA-binding domain of this tumor suppressor gene (i.e., exons 4-9). The human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model was constructed using gene-targeting technology to create a mouse strain that harbors human wild-type TP53 DNA sequences in both copies of the mouse TP53 gene. Replacement of exons 4-9 of the endogenous mouse TP53 alleles in the Hupki mouse with the homologous normal human TP53 gene sequences has offered a humanized replica of the TP53 gene in a murine genetic environment. The Hupki mouse model system has proven to be an invaluable research tool for studying the underlying mechanisms of human TP53 mutagenesis. The utility of the Hupki mouse model system for exploring carcinogen-induced TP53 mutagenesis has been demonstrated in both in vivo animal experiments and in vitro cell culture experiments. Here, we highlight applications of the Hupki mouse model system for investigating mutagenesis induced by a variety of environmental carcinogens, including sunlight ultraviolet radiation, benzo[a]pyrene (a tobacco smoke-derived carcinogen), 3-nitrobenzanthrone (an urban air pollutant), aristolochic acid (a component of Chinese herbal medicine), and aflatoxin B1 (a food contaminant). We summarize the salient findings of the respective studies and discuss their relevance to human cancer etiology.

  14. Cloning the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, T; Yanagimachi, R

    1999-06-01

    A brief account is given of early attempts to clone mammals (mice) by transferring cells (nuclei) of preimplantation embryos into enucleated oocytes, zygotes or blastomeres of two-cell embryos. This is followed by a brief review of recent successes using adult somatic cells: mammary gland cells for sheep, muscle cells for cattle and cumulus cells for mice. We have developed a technique for cloning the laboratory mouse by transferring cumulus cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. With this technique, we have produced a population of over 80 cloned animals, and have carried the process over four generations. Development and fertility of these appear normal. However, the yield is very low; only approximately 1% of injected oocytes are carried to term. The challenge is now to understand the reason for this high loss. Is it a problem of technique, genomic reprogramming, somatic mutation, imprinting or incompatible cell cycle phases?

  15. Expression of lactoperoxidase in differentiated mouse colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Wook; Esworthy, R Steven; Hahn, Maria A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2012-05-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is known to be present in secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva. Functionally, LPO teams up with dual oxidases (DUOXs) to generate bactericidal hypothiocyanite in the presence of thiocyanate. DUOX2 is expressed in intestinal epithelium, but there is little information on LPO expression in this tissue. To fill the gap of knowledge, we have analyzed Lpo gene expression and its regulation in mouse intestine. In wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (B6) mouse intestine, an appreciable level of mouse Lpo gene expression was detected in the colon, but not the ileum. However, in B6 mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and -2, GPx1/2-double-knockout (DKO), which had intestinal pathology, the colon Lpo mRNA levels increased 5- to 12-fold depending on mouse age. The Lpo mRNA levels in WT and DKO 129S1/SvlmJ (129) colon were even higher, 9- and 5-fold, than in B6 DKO colon. Higher levels of Lpo protein and enzymatic activity were also detected in the 129 mouse colon compared to B6 colon. Lpo protein was expressed in the differentiated colon epithelial cells, away from the crypt base, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Similar to human LPO mRNA, mouse Lpo mRNA had multiple spliced forms, although only the full-length variant 1 was translated. Higher methylation was found in the 129 than in the B6 strain, in DKO than in control colon, and in older than in juvenile mice. However, methylation of the Lpo intragenic CpG island was not directly induced by inflammation, because dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis did not increase DNA methylation in B6 DKO colon. Also, Lpo DNA methylation is not correlated with gene expression.

  16. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  17. A High-Resolution Map of Segmental DNA Copy Number Variation in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Graubert, Timothy A; Selzer, Rebecca R; Richmond, Todd A; Eis, Peggy S; Shannon, William D; Li, Xia; McLeod, Howard L; Cheverud, James M; Ley, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Submicroscopic (less than 2 Mb) segmental DNA copy number changes are a recently recognized source of genetic variability between individuals. The biological consequences of copy number variants (CNVs) are largely undefined. In some cases, CNVs that cause gene dosage effects have been implicated in phenotypic variation. CNVs have been detected in diverse species, including mice and humans. Published studies in mice have been limited by resolution and strain selection. We chose to study 21 well-characterized inbred mouse strains that are the focus of an international effort to measure, catalog, and disseminate phenotype data. We performed comparative genomic hybridization using long oligomer arrays to characterize CNVs in these strains. This technique increased the resolution of CNV detection by more than an order of magnitude over previous methodologies. The CNVs range in size from 21 to 2,002 kb. Clustering strains by CNV profile recapitulates aspects of the known ancestry of these strains. Most of the CNVs (77.5%) contain annotated genes, and many (47.5%) colocalize with previously mapped segmental duplications in the mouse genome. We demonstrate that this technique can identify copy number differences associated with known polymorphic traits. The phenotype of previously uncharacterized strains can be predicted based on their copy number at these loci. Annotation of CNVs in the mouse genome combined with sequence-based analysis provides an important resource that will help define the genetic basis of complex traits. PMID:17206864

  18. Resource partitioning in relation to cohabitation of Lactobacillus species in the mouse forestomach.

    PubMed

    Tannock, Gerald W; Wilson, Charlotte M; Loach, Diane; Cook, Gregory M; Eason, Jocelyn; O'Toole, Paul W; Holtrop, Grietje; Lawley, Blair

    2012-05-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of gut communities of vertebrates is advanced, but the relationships, especially at the trophic level, between commensals that share gut habitats of monogastric animals have not been investigated to any extent. Lactobacillus reuteri strain 100-23 and Lactobacillus johnsonii strain 100-33 cohabit in the forestomach of mice. According to the niche exclusion principle, this should not be possible because both strains can utilise the two main fermentable carbohydrates present in the stomach digesta: glucose and maltose. We show, based on gene transcription analysis, in vitro physiological assays, and in vivo experiments that the two strains can co-exist in the forestomach habitat because 100-23 grows more rapidly using maltose, whereas 100-33 preferentially utilises glucose. Mutation of the maltose phosphorylase gene (malA) of strain 100-23 prevented its growth on maltose-containing culture medium, and resulted in the numerical dominance of 100-33 in the forestomach. The fundamental niche of L. reuteri 100-23 in the mouse forestomach can be defined in terms of 'glucose and maltose trophism'. However, its realised niche when L. johnsonii 100-33 is present is 'maltose trophism'. Hence, nutritional adaptations provide niche differentiation that assists cohabitation by the two strains through resource partitioning in the mouse forestomach. This real life, trophic phenomenon conforms to a mathematical model based on in vitro bacterial doubling times, in vitro transport rates, and concentrations of maltose and glucose in mouse stomach digesta.

  19. Heat-killed and γ-irradiated Brucella strain RB51 stimulates enhanced dendritic cell activation, but not function compared with the virulent smooth strain 2308.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Naveen; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Heid, Bettina; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2010-11-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause abortion in livestock and undulant fever in humans worldwide. Brucella abortus strain 2308 is a pathogenic strain that affects cattle and humans. Currently, there are no efficacious human vaccines available. However, B. abortus strain RB51, which is approved by the USDA, is a live-attenuated rough vaccine against bovine brucellosis. Live strain RB51 induces protection via CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity. To generate an optimal T-cell response, strong innate immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial. Because of safety concerns, the use of live vaccine strain RB51 in humans is limited. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the differential ability of the same doses of live, heat-killed (HK) and γ-irradiated (IR) strain RB51 in inducing DC activation and function. Smooth strain 2308, live strain RB51 and lipopolysaccharide were used as controls. Studies using mouse bone marrow-derived DCs revealed that, irrespective of viability, strain RB51 induced greater DC activation than smooth strain 2308. Live strain RB51 induced significantly (P≤0.05) higher DC maturation than HK and IR strains, and only live strain RB51-infected DCs (at multiplicity of infection 1:100) induced significant (P≤0.05) tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 secretion.

  20. Archiving and Distributing Mouse Lines by Sperm Cryopreservation, IVF, and Embryo Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hideko; Liu, Chengyu

    2012-01-01

    The number of genetically modified mouse lines has been increasing exponentially in the past few decades. In order to safeguard them from accidental loss and genetic drifting, to reduce animal housing cost, and to efficiently distribute them around the world, it is important to cryopreserve these valuable genetic resources. Preimplantation-stage embryos from thousands of mouse lines have been cryopreserved during the past two to three decades. Although reliable, this method requires several hundreds of embryos, which demands a sizable breeding colony, to safely preserve each line. This requirement imposes significant delay and financial burden for the archiving effort. Sperm cryopreservation is now emerging as the leading method for storing and distributing mouse lines, largely due to the recent finding that addition of a reducing agent, monothioglycerol, into the cryoprotectant can significantly increase the in vitro fertilization (IVF) rate in many mouse strains, including the most widely used C57BL/6 strain. This method is quick, inexpensive, and requires only two breeding age male mice, but it still remains tricky and strain-dependent. A small change in experimental conditions can lead to significant variations in the outcome. In this chapter, we describe in detail our sperm cryopreservation, IVF, and oviduct transfer procedures for storing and reviving genetically modified mouse lines. PMID:20691860

  1. Paternally biased X inactivation in mouse neonatal brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background X inactivation in female eutherian mammals has long been considered to occur at random in embryonic and postnatal tissues. Methods for scoring allele-specific differential expression with a high degree of accuracy have recently motivated a quantitative reassessment of the randomness of X inactivation. Results After RNA-seq data revealed what appeared to be a chromosome-wide bias toward under-expression of paternal alleles in mouse tissue, we applied pyrosequencing to mouse brain cDNA samples from reciprocal cross F1 progeny of divergent strains and found a small but consistent and highly statistically significant excess tendency to under-express the paternal X chromosome. Conclusions The bias toward paternal X inactivation is reminiscent of marsupials (and extraembryonic tissues in eutherians), suggesting that there may be retained an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic mark driving the bias. Allelic bias in expression is also influenced by the sampling effect of X inactivation and by cis-acting regulatory variation (eQTL), and for each gene we quantify the contributions of these effects in two different mouse strain combinations while controlling for variability in Xce alleles. In addition, we propose an efficient method to identify and confirm genes that escape X inactivation in normal mice by directly comparing the allele-specific expression ratio profile of multiple X-linked genes in multiple individuals. PMID:20663224

  2. Transporting mouse embryos and germplasm as frozen or unfrozen materials.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Janet; Guan, Mo; Bogani, Debora; Marschall, Susan; Raspa, Marcello; Pickard, Amanda; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Fray, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The 21st century has seen a huge proliferation in the availability of genetically altered mice. The availability of these resources has been accompanied by ever greater opportunities for international collaborations between laboratories involving the exchange of mouse strains. This exchange can involve significant costs in terms of animal welfare and transportation expenses. In an attempt to mitigate some of these costs, the mouse community has developed a battery of techniques that can be used to avoid transporting live mice. Transporting frozen embryos and sperm at liquid nitrogen (LN2 ) temperatures using dry shippers has been common practice for some time. However, current advances in this field have refined transportation procedures and introduced new techniques for disseminating embryos and sperm: for example, shipping frozen sperm on dry ice, exchanging unfrozen epididymides from which sperm can be extracted, and transporting frozen/thawed embryos in isotonic media. This article discusses some of the current practices used by laboratories to transport mouse strains around the world without having to exchange live mice. PMID:25723918

  3. Organization and evolution of D region class I genes in the mouse major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Chromosome walking has been used to study the organization of the class I genes in the D and Qa regions of the MHC of the BALB/c mouse and in the D region of the AKR mouse. Five and eight class I genes are found in the D and Qa regions of the BALB/c mouse, respectively, while the AKR mouse contains only a single class I D region gene that has been identified by transfection as the Dk gene. Restriction map homologies and crosshybridization experiments suggest that the multiple class I genes in the D region of the BALB/c mouse have been generated by unequal crossing-over involving class I genes from the Qa region. The expanded D region of BALB/c and other H-2d haplotype mouse strains appears to be metastable, since evidence for gene contraction in the Dd region has been found in two mutant strains. Thus the D region and also the Qa region class I genes are in a dynamic state, evolving by gene expansion and contraction. PMID:3701254

  4. Characterization of the serotoninergic system in the C57BL/6 mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Pisarchik, Alexander; Semak, Igor; Sweatman, Trevor; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2003-08-01

    We showed expression of the tryptophan hydroxylase gene and of tryptophan hydroxylase protein immunoreactivity in mouse skin and skin cells. Extracts from skin and melanocyte samples acetylated serotonin to N-acetylserotonin and tryptamine to N-acetyltryptamine. A different enzyme from arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase mediated this reaction, as this gene was defective in the C57BL6 mouse, coding predominantly for a protein without enzymatic activity. Serotonin (but not tryptamine) acetylation varied according to hair cycle phase and anatomic location. Serotonin was also metabolized to 5-hydroxytryptophol and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, probably through stepwise transformation catalyzed by monoamine oxidase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase. Activity of the melatonin-forming enzyme hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase was notably below detectable levels in all samples of mouse corporal skin, although it was detectable at low levels in the ears and in Cloudman melanoma (derived from the DBA/2 J mouse strain). In conclusion, mouse skin has the molecular and biochemical apparatus necessary to produce and metabolize serotonin and N-acetylserotonin, and its activity is determined by topography, physiological status of the skin, cell type and mouse strain. PMID:12899690

  5. A cDNA encoding tyrosinase-related protein maps to the brown locus in mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, I J

    1988-01-01

    A mouse melanoma cDNA clone was isolated by virtue of its reactivity with two antisera raised against tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) from two species, hamster and mouse. The cDNA (5A) cross-hybridizes with another, pMT4 [Shibahara, S., Tomita, V., Sakakura, T., Nager, C., Bhabatosh, C. & Muller, R. (1986) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 2413-2427], previously thought to encode mouse tyrosinase. Two other cDNAs, one human and one mouse, have been reported recently [Kwon, B. S., Haq, A. K., Pomerantz, S. H. & Halaban, R. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 7473-7477; and Yamamoto, H., Takeuchi, S., Kudo, T., Makino, K., Nakata, A., Shinoda, T. & Takeuchi, T. (1987) Jpn. J. Genet. 62, 271-277] as candidates for tyrosinase, and they map at or very close to the mouse albino (c) locus. The proteins they encode are very similar to each other but are distinct from (although related to) the pMT4-encoded protein. Here I use recombinant inbred strains to localize pMT4 at or close to the mouse brown (b) locus. I suggest that the gene mapping to c is the authentic tyrosinase gene, whereas that mapping to b encodes a tyrosinase-related protein. All b mutations in laboratory strains are associated with the same diagnostic Taq I fragment, suggesting that all derive from the same original mutation. I discuss possible function(s) of the tyrosinase-related protein. Images PMID:3132713

  6. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  7. Differential response of C57BL/6J mouse and DBA/2J mouse to optic nerve crush

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Justin P; Nassr, Mohamed; Vazquez-Chona, Felix; Freeman-Anderson, Natalie E; Orr, William E; Williams, Robert W; Geisert, Eldon E

    2009-01-01

    Background Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is the final consequence of many blinding diseases, where there is considerable variation in the time course and severity of RGC loss. Indeed, this process appears to be influenced by a wide variety of genetic and environmental factors. In this study we explored the genetic basis for differences in ganglion cell death in two inbred strains of mice. Results We found that RGCs are more susceptible to death following optic nerve crush in C57BL/6J mice (54% survival) than in DBA/2J mice (62% survival). Using the Illumina Mouse-6 microarray, we identified 1,580 genes with significant change in expression following optic nerve crush in these two strains of mice. Our analysis of the changes occurring after optic nerve crush demonstrated that the greatest amount of change (44% of the variance) was due to the injury itself. This included changes associated with ganglion cell death, reactive gliosis, and abortive regeneration. The second pattern of gene changes (23% of the variance) was primarily related to differences in gene expressions observed between the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mouse strains. The remaining changes in gene expression represent interactions between the effects of optic nerve crush and the genetic background of the mouse. We extracted one genetic network from this dataset that appears to be related to tissue remodeling. One of the most intriguing sets of changes included members of the crystallin family of genes, which may represent a signature of pathways modulating the susceptibility of cells to death. Conclusion Differential responses to optic nerve crush between two widely used strains of mice were used to define molecular networks associated with ganglion cell death and reactive gliosis. These results form the basis for our continuing interest in the modifiers of retinal injury. PMID:19643015

  8. Can strain magnetize light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Strain in photonic structures can induce pseudomagnetic fields and Landau levels. Nature Photonics spoke to Mordechai Segev, Mikael Rechtsman, Alexander Szameit and Julia Zeuner about their unique approach.

  9. Decoding mechanisms of loss of fertilization ability of cryopreserved mouse sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeffrey Earl

    Cryopreservation of mouse sperm is an important technology for management of biomedical research resources. Dramatic progress has been made recently in the development of protocols that combat mouse-strain specific reduction of IVF after cryopreservation. Equal emphasis, however, has not been placed on investigating the biological mechanisms underlying these improvements to IVF. This dissertation broadly investigates the basic question of how mouse-strain specific reduction of IVF occurs after cryopreservation, and how recently developed protocols prevent this process. My research investigated the effects of antioxidants, the cholesterol-acceptor CD, reduced calcium media, and TYH capacitation media on sperm function and oxidative stress after cryopreservation in a variety of mouse strains. I found that reduced IVF was associated with loss of capacitation-dependent sperm function in three strains, B6/J, B6/N, and 129X1, and CD improved sperm function and IVF in all three strains. These findings suggest that cryopreservation inhibits cholesterol efflux resulting in reduced IVF of many mouse strains. I also found that cryopreservation induces uniquely high production of mitochondrial H2O2 by B6/J sperm. H2O2 present in other cellular compartments of B6/J sperm was not elevated compared to other strains. High levels of mitochondrial H2O2 were associated with lipid peroxidation of the sperm head and inability to acrosome react. Antioxidants reduced mitochondrial H2O2 production, decreased sperm head lipid peroxidation, and improved acrosome reaction. The cryopreservation-induced increase in mitochondrial H2O2 production of B6/J and B6129XF1 sperm was associated with elevation of intracellular calcium after cryopreservation and dependent on mitochondrial metabolic substrates. Reducing intracellular calcium levels or removing mitochondrial metabolic substrates decreased mitochondrial H2O2 production and increased IVF rates of cryopreserved B6/J sperm. Many of the strains

  10. Mouse genotypes drive the liver and adrenal gland clocks

    PubMed Central

    Košir, Rok; Prosenc Zmrzljak, Uršula; Korenčič, Anja; Juvan, Peter; Ačimovič, Jure; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate a plethora of physiological processes. Perturbations of the rhythm can result in pathologies which are frequently studied in inbred mouse strains. We show that the genotype of mouse lines defines the circadian gene expression patterns. Expression of majority of core clock and output metabolic genes are phase delayed in the C56BL/6J line compared to 129S2 in the adrenal glands and the liver. Circadian amplitudes are generally higher in the 129S2 line. Experiments in dark – dark (DD) and light – dark conditions (LD), exome sequencing and data mining proposed that mouse lines differ in single nucleotide variants in the binding regions of clock related transcription factors in open chromatin regions. A possible mechanisms of differential circadian expression could be the entrainment and transmission of the light signal to peripheral organs. This is supported by the genotype effect in adrenal glands that is largest under LD, and by the high number of single nucleotide variants in the Receptor, Kinase and G-protein coupled receptor Panther molecular function categories. Different phenotypes of the two mouse lines and changed amino acid sequence of the Period 2 protein possibly contribute further to the observed differences in circadian gene expression. PMID:27535584

  11. Foot Pad Skin Biopsy in Mouse Models of Hereditary Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dacci, Patrizia; Dina, Giorgia; Cerri, Federica; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Lauria, Giuseppe; Feltri, Maria Laura; Bolino, Alessandra; Comi, Giancarlo; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Quattrini, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Numerous transgenic and knockout mouse models of human hereditary neuropathies have become available over the past decade. We describe a simple, reproducible, and safe biopsy of mouse skin for histopathological evaluation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in models of hereditary neuropathies. We compared the diagnostic outcome between sciatic nerve and dermal nerves found in skin biopsy (SB) from the hind foot. A total of five animal models of different Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies, and one model of congenital muscular dystrophy associated neuropathy were examined. In wild type mice, dermal nerve fibers were readily identified by immunohistochemistry, light, and electron microscopy and they appeared similar to myelinated fibers in sciatic nerve. In mutant mice, SB manifested myelin abnormalities similar to those observed in sciatic nerves, including hypomyelination, onion bulbs, myelin outfolding, redundant loops, and tomacula. In many strains, however, SB showed additional abnormalities—fiber loss, dense neurofilament packing with lower phosphorylation status, and axonal degeneration—undetected in sciatic nerve, possibly because SB samples distal nerves. SB, a reliable technique to investigate peripheral neuropathies in human beings, is also useful to investigate animal models of hereditary neuropathies. Our data indicate that SB may reveal distal axonal pathology in mouse models and permits sequential follow-up of the neuropathy in an individual mouse, thereby reducing the number of mice necessary to document pathology of the PNS. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20878767

  12. Mouse genotypes drive the liver and adrenal gland clocks.

    PubMed

    Košir, Rok; Prosenc Zmrzljak, Uršula; Korenčič, Anja; Juvan, Peter; Ačimovič, Jure; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate a plethora of physiological processes. Perturbations of the rhythm can result in pathologies which are frequently studied in inbred mouse strains. We show that the genotype of mouse lines defines the circadian gene expression patterns. Expression of majority of core clock and output metabolic genes are phase delayed in the C56BL/6J line compared to 129S2 in the adrenal glands and the liver. Circadian amplitudes are generally higher in the 129S2 line. Experiments in dark - dark (DD) and light - dark conditions (LD), exome sequencing and data mining proposed that mouse lines differ in single nucleotide variants in the binding regions of clock related transcription factors in open chromatin regions. A possible mechanisms of differential circadian expression could be the entrainment and transmission of the light signal to peripheral organs. This is supported by the genotype effect in adrenal glands that is largest under LD, and by the high number of single nucleotide variants in the Receptor, Kinase and G-protein coupled receptor Panther molecular function categories. Different phenotypes of the two mouse lines and changed amino acid sequence of the Period 2 protein possibly contribute further to the observed differences in circadian gene expression. PMID:27535584

  13. Blastocyst genotyping for quality control of mouse mutant archives: an ethical and economical approach.

    PubMed

    Scavizzi, Ferdinando; Ryder, Edward; Newman, Stuart; Raspa, Marcello; Gleeson, Diane; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Montoliu, Lluis; Fernandez, Almudena; Dessain, Marie-Laure; Larrigaldie, Vanessa; Khorshidi, Zuzana; Vuolteenaho, Reetta; Soininen, Raija; André, Philippe; Jacquot, Sylvie; Hong, Yi; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Doe, Brendan

    2015-10-01

    With the advent of modern developmental biology and molecular genetics, the scientific community has generated thousands of newly genetically altered strains of laboratory mice with the aim of elucidating gene function. To this end, a large group of Institutions which form the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is generating and phenotyping a knockout mouse strain for each of the ~20,000 protein-coding genes using the mutant ES cell resource produced by the International Knockout Mouse Consortium. These strains are made available to the research community via public repositories, mostly as cryopreserved sperm or embryos. To ensure the quality of this frozen resource there is a requirement that for each strain the frozen sperm/embryos are proven able to produce viable mutant progeny, before the live animal resource is removed from cages. Given the current requirement to generate live pups to demonstrate their mutant genotype, this quality control check necessitates the use and generation of many animals and requires considerable time, cage space, technical and economic resources. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method of genotyping pre-implantation stage blastocysts with significant ethical and economic advantages especially beneficial for current and future large-scale mouse mutagenesis projects. PMID:26178246

  14. NIG_MoG: a mouse genome navigator for exploring intersubspecific genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Takada, Toyoyuki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Obata, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2015-08-01

    The National Institute of Genetics Mouse Genome database (NIG_MoG; http://molossinus.lab.nig.ac.jp/msmdb/) primarily comprises the whole-genome sequence data of two inbred mouse strains, MSM/Ms and JF1/Ms. These strains were established at NIG and originated from the Japanese subspecies Mus musculus molossinus. NIG_MoG provides visualized genome polymorphism information, browsing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short insertions and deletions in the genomes of MSM/Ms and JF1/Ms with respect to C57BL/6J (whose genome is predominantly derived from the West European subspecies M. m. domesticus). This allows users, especially wet-lab biologists, to intuitively recognize intersubspecific genome divergence in these mouse strains using visual data. The database also supports the in silico screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that contain genomic DNA from MSM/Ms and the standard classical laboratory strain C57BL/6N. NIG_MoG is thus a valuable navigator for exploring mouse genome polymorphisms and BAC clones that are useful for studies of gene function and regulation based on intersubspecific genome divergence.

  15. Blastocyst genotyping for quality control of mouse mutant archives: an ethical and economical approach.

    PubMed

    Scavizzi, Ferdinando; Ryder, Edward; Newman, Stuart; Raspa, Marcello; Gleeson, Diane; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Montoliu, Lluis; Fernandez, Almudena; Dessain, Marie-Laure; Larrigaldie, Vanessa; Khorshidi, Zuzana; Vuolteenaho, Reetta; Soininen, Raija; André, Philippe; Jacquot, Sylvie; Hong, Yi; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Doe, Brendan

    2015-10-01

    With the advent of modern developmental biology and molecular genetics, the scientific community has generated thousands of newly genetically altered strains of laboratory mice with the aim of elucidating gene function. To this end, a large group of Institutions which form the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is generating and phenotyping a knockout mouse strain for each of the ~20,000 protein-coding genes using the mutant ES cell resource produced by the International Knockout Mouse Consortium. These strains are made available to the research community via public repositories, mostly as cryopreserved sperm or embryos. To ensure the quality of this frozen resource there is a requirement that for each strain the frozen sperm/embryos are proven able to produce viable mutant progeny, before the live animal resource is removed from cages. Given the current requirement to generate live pups to demonstrate their mutant genotype, this quality control check necessitates the use and generation of many animals and requires considerable time, cage space, technical and economic resources. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method of genotyping pre-implantation stage blastocysts with significant ethical and economic advantages especially beneficial for current and future large-scale mouse mutagenesis projects.

  16. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and long term use. Potential Hazards: When the sensitivity for the input device is not appropriately set, ... provide adequate control. A mouse that has insufficient sensitivity may require large deviation of the wrist to ...

  17. Mouse models for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Moore, Lynette; Ji, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to learn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Journal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue. PMID:21352691

  18. Tympanometry Assessment of 61 Inbred Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qing Yin; Tong, Yi-Cai Isaac; Alagramam, Kumar N.; Yu, Heping

    2007-01-01

    Otitis Media (OM) accounts for more than 20 million clinic visits in the United States every year. Resistance to antibiotics has hampered current management of the disease. Identification of genetic factors underlying susceptibility to OM is greatly needed in order to develop alternative treatment strategies. Genetically defined inbred mouse strains offer a powerful tool for dissecting genetic and environmental factors that may lead to OM in mice. Here we report a study of middle ear function of 61 genetically diverse inbred strains of mice using tympanometry. Of the 61 inbred strains tested, the 129P1/ReJ, 129P3/J, 129S1/SvImJ, 129X1/SvJ, A/HeJ, BALB/cJ, BUB/BnJ, C57L/J, EL/SuzSeyFrkJ, FVB/NJ, I/LnJ, LP/J, NZB/BlNJ, PL/J and YBR/Ei strains exhibited tympanograms that were statistically different from other healthy strains according to parameters including middle ear pressure, volume and compliance. These differences are most likely the result of genetic factors that, when understood, will facilitate prevention and treatment of otitis media in humans. In addition, a negative correlation between age and compliance of the tympanic membrane was discovered. This is the first report to successfully use tympanometry to measure mouse middle ear function, which has been a challenge for the hearing research field because of the mouse’s tiny ear size. PMID:17611057

  19. Reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes with thrombin-treated mouse platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1989-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with mouse platelets before and after thrombin treatment was assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-BrMRBC antibodies could bind to thrombin-treated platelets, although normal platelets were also weakly reactive with the antibodies. The binding of anti-BrMRBC antibodies to platelets was confirmed by complement-dependent lysis. It is suggested that thrombin-activated platelets may be a real target for anti-BrMRBC antibodies. PMID:2467876

  20. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  1. Novel object exploration in the C58/J mouse model of autistic-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Blick, Mikkal G; Puchalski, Breann H; Bolanos, Veronica J; Wolfe, Kaitlin M; Green, Matthew C; Ryan, Bryce C

    2015-04-01

    Mouse models of autistic like behaviors are a valuable tool to use when studying the causes, symptoms, and potential treatments for autism. The inbred C58/J strain is a strain of interest for this model and has previously been shown to possess face validity for some of the core traits of autism, including low social behavior and elevated motor stereotypies. Higher order repetitive behaviors have not been extensively studied in this strain, or in mice in general. In this study, we looked for evidence of higher-order repetitive behaviors in the C58/J strain using a novel object assay. This assay utilized a mouse's natural exploratory behavior among unfamiliar objects to identify potential sequencing patterns in motor activity. The motor stereotypies displayed by the C58/J strain during testing were consistent with past studies. The C58/J strain also displayed a high preference for a single object in the round arena assays and the females demonstrating elevated sequencing patterns in the round arena. Although the C58/J strain did not show pervasive evidence of higher-order repetitive behaviors across all measures, there was evidence of higher order repetitive behaviors in certain situations. This study further demonstrates the potential of the C58/J mouse strains as a model for lower-order and potentially, higher-order repetitive behaviors. This study also demonstrates that the shape of the novel object arena can change the behavior displayed by the test animals. Further studies utilizing the C58/J strain and further validation of the novel object assay are warranted.

  2. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-01-01

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance. Images PMID:2994005

  3. Mink-mouse interspecific hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, E G; Galakhar, N L; Matjakhina, L D; Khlebodarova, T M; Djatchenko, S N

    1991-08-01

    Mink-mouse interspecific hybridomas were produced by fusion of the american mink spleen cells with the NSO cells. Seven cloned lines of the mink-mouse hybridoma were isolated, and their functional mink Ig secretion and karyological characteristics are given. During cytogenetic analysis of mink-mouse hybridoma cell lines, we observed the elimination of mink chromosomes, and inter- and intralineral variability of the numbers of the cells with particular quantities of mink DNA. We did not find that the characteristic peculiarities of mink DNA distribution in the hybridoma cell lines had any bearing upon the secretion or non-secretion of mink Ig. There was no synthesis of lambda-L-chains of mink Ig in line 7 cells because the line lost the lambda-gene. With the aid of in situ hybridization with 3H-labeled total mink DNA, a considerable transformation of hybridoma cell karyotype was observed. Multiple integration of the mink DNA into mouse chromosomes and the appearance of chromosomes not characteristic for either the mink or mouse parent cells were noted. Increasing numbers of cells with translocations of mink chromosomes fragments into mouse chromosomes were found in the hybridoma lines cultivated for lengthy periods. PMID:1937502

  4. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 686-692] PMID:23261053

  5. The mouse genome database (MGD): new features facilitating a model system.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2007-01-01

    The mouse genome database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org/), the international community database for mouse, provides access to extensive integrated data on the genetics, genomics and biology of the laboratory mouse. The mouse is an excellent and unique animal surrogate for studying normal development and disease processes in humans. Thus, MGD's primary goals are to facilitate the use of mouse models for studying human disease and enable the development of translational research hypotheses based on comparative genotype, phenotype and functional analyses. Core MGD data content includes gene characterization and functions, phenotype and disease model descriptions, DNA and protein sequence data, polymorphisms, gene mapping data and genome coordinates, and comparative gene data focused on mammals. Data are integrated from diverse sources, ranging from major resource centers to individual investigator laboratories and the scientific literature, using a combination of automated processes and expert human curation. MGD collaborates with the bioinformatics community on the development of data and semantic standards, and it incorporates key ontologies into the MGD annotation system, including the Gene Ontology (GO), the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, and the Anatomical Dictionary for Mouse Development and the Adult Anatomy. MGD is the authoritative source for mouse nomenclature for genes, alleles, and mouse strains, and for GO annotations to mouse genes. MGD provides a unique platform for data mining and hypothesis generation where one can express complex queries simultaneously addressing phenotypic effects, biochemical function and process, sub-cellular location, expression, sequence, polymorphism and mapping data. Both web-based querying and computational access to data are provided. Recent improvements in MGD described here include the incorporation of single nucleotide polymorphism data and search tools, the addition of PIR gene superfamily classifications

  6. Light intensity strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for the analysis of the strain field of structures subjected to large deformations involving a low modulus substrate having a high modulus, relatively thin coating. The optical properties of transmittance and reflectance are measured for the coated substrate while stressed and unstressed to indicate the strain field for the coated substrate.

  7. Identification of lymphocytic choriomeningitis mammarenavirus in house mouse (Mus musculus, Rodentia) in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Anne; de Thoisy, Benoît; Tirera, Sourakhata; Donato, Damien; Bouchier, Christiane; Catzeflis, François; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-seven house mice (Mus musculus, Rodentia) caught in different localities in French Guiana were screened to investigate the presence of lymphocytic choriomeningitis mammarenavirus (LCMV). Two animals trapped in an urban area were found positive, hosting a new strain of LCMV, that we tentatively named LCMV "Comou". The complete sequence was determined using a metagenomic approach. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this strain is related to genetic lineage I composed of strains inducing severe disease in humans. These results emphasize the need for active surveillance in humans as well as in house mouse populations, which is a rather common rodent in French Guianese cities and settlements.

  8. Lineage-Specific Biology Revealed by a Finished Genome Assembly of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, LaDeana W.; Zody, Michael C.; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J.; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L.; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C.; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C.; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2009-01-01

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non–protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not. PMID:19468303

  9. Cryptococcus Strains with Different Pathogenic Potentials Have Diverse Protein Secretomes

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Leona T.; Simonin, Anna R.; Chen, Cuilan; Ferdous, Jannatul; Padula, Matthew P.; Harry, Elizabeth; Hofer, Markus; Campbell, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Secreted proteins are the frontline between the host and pathogen. In mammalian hosts, secreted proteins enable invasive infection and can modulate the host immune response. Cryptococcosis, caused by pathogenic Cryptococcus species, begins when inhaled infectious propagules establish to produce pulmonary infection, which, if not resolved, can disseminate to the central nervous system to cause meningoencephalitis. Strains of Cryptococcus species differ in their capacity to cause disease, and the mechanisms underlying this are not well understood. To investigate the role of secreted proteins in disease, we determined the secretome for three genome strains of Cryptococcus species, including a hypovirulent and a hypervirulent strain of C. gattii and a virulent strain of C. neoformans. Sixty-seven unique proteins were identified, with different numbers and types of proteins secreted by each strain. The secretomes of the virulent strains were largely limited to proteolytic and hydrolytic enzymes, while the hypovirulent strain had a diverse secretome, including non-conventionally secreted canonical cytosolic and immunogenic proteins that have been implicated in virulence. The hypovirulent strain cannot establish pulmonary infection in a mouse model, but strains of this genotype have caused human meningitis. To directly test brain infection, we used intracranial inoculation and found that the hypovirulent strain was substantially more invasive than its hypervirulent counterpart. We suggest that immunogenic proteins secreted by this strain invoke a host response that limits pulmonary infection but that there can be invasive growth and damage if infection reaches the brain. Given their known role in virulence, it is possible that non-conventionally secreted proteins mediate this process. PMID:25841021

  10. Haplotype mapping and sequence analysis of the mouse Nramp gene predict susceptibility to infection with intracellular parasites

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, D.; Hu, Jinxin; Schurr, E.

    1994-09-01

    The mouse chromosome 1 locus Bcg (Ity, Lsh) controls the capacity of the tissue macrophage to restrict the replication of antigenically unrelated intracellular parasites and therefore determines the natural resistance (BCG-R, dominant) or susceptibility (BCG-S, recessive) of inbred mouse strains to infection with diverse pathogens. We have used a positional cloning strategy based on genetic and physical mapping, YAC cloning, and exon trapping to isolate a candidate gene for Beg (Nramp) that encodes a predicted macrophage-specific transport protein. We have analyzed a total of 27 inbred mouse strains of BCG-R and BCG-S phenotypes for the presence of nucleotide sequence variations within the coding portion of Nramp and have carried out haplotype typing of the corresponding chromosome 1 region in these mice, using 11 additional polymorphic markers mapping in the immediate vicinity of Nramp. cDNA cloning and nucleotide sequencing identified 5 nucleotide sequence variations within Nramp in the inbred strains.

  11. Detection of a large RIII-derived chromosomal segment on chromosome 10 in the H-2 congenic strain B10.RIII(71NS)/Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Hood, L.; McIndoe, R.A.

    1996-01-15

    This report describes the results of a study of the chromosomal localization of certain loci related to the susceptibility of specific mouse strains to collagen-induced arthritis, the biological model for rheumatoid arthritis. There were surprising results concerning the chromosomal mapping of mouse chromosome 10 and 17 and the backcrosses of mice involved. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. A systematic evaluation of hybridization-based mouse exome capture system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exome sequencing is increasingly used to search for phenotypically-relevant sequence variants in the mouse genome. All of the current hybridization-based mouse exome capture systems are designed based on the genome reference sequences of the C57BL/6 J strain. Given that the substantial sequence divergence exists between C57BL/6 J and other distantly-related strains, the impact of sequence divergence on the efficiency of such capture systems needs to be systematically evaluated before they can be widely applied to the study of those strains. Results Using the Agilent SureSelect mouse exome capture system, we performed exome sequencing on F1 generation hybrid mice that were derived by crossing two divergent strains, C57BL/6 J and SPRET/EiJ. Our results showed that the C57BL/6 J-based probes captured the sequences derived from C57BL/6 J alleles more efficiently and that the bias was higher for the target regions with greater sequence divergence. At low sequencing depths, the bias also affected the efficiency of variant detection. However, the effects became negligible when sufficient sequencing depth was achieved. Conclusion Sufficient sequence depth needs to be planned to match the sequence divergence between C57BL/6 J and the strain to be studied, when the C57BL/6 J–based Agilent SureSelect exome capture system is to be used. PMID:23870319

  13. Approaches to Investigating Complex Genetic Traits in a Large-Scale Inbred Mouse Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Berndt, A; Sundberg, B A; Silva, K A; Kennedy, V; Smith, R S; Cooper, T K; Schofield, P N

    2016-03-01

    Inbred mice are a unique model system for studying aging because of the genetic homogeneity within inbred strains, the short life span of mice relative to humans, and the rich array of analytic tools that are available. A large-scale aging study was conducted on 28 inbred strains representing great genetic diversity to determine, via histopathology, the type and diversity of spontaneous diseases that aging mice develop. A total of 20 885 different diagnoses were made, with an average of 12 diagnoses per mouse in the study. Eighteen inbred strains have had their genomes sequenced, and many others have been partially sequenced to provide large repositories of data on genetic variation among the strains. This vast amount of genomic information can be utilized in genome-wide association studies to find candidate genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of spontaneous diseases. As an illustration, this article presents a genome-wide association study of the genetic associations of age-related intestinal amyloidosis, which implicated 3 candidate genes: translocating chain-associated membrane protein 1 (Tram1); splicing factor 3b, subunit 5 (Sf3b5); and syntaxin 11 (Stx11). Representative photomicrographs are available on the Mouse Tumor Biology Database and Pathbase to serve as a reference when evaluating inbred mice used in other genetic or experimental studies to rule out strain background lesions. Many of the age-related mouse diseases are similar, if not identical, to human diseases; therefore, the genetic discoveries have direct translational benefit. PMID:26936752

  14. Cells as strain-cued automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brian N.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2016-02-01

    We argue in favor of representing living cells as automata and review demonstrations that autonomous cells can form patterns by responding to local variations in the strain fields that arise from their individual or collective motions. An autonomous cell's response to strain stimuli is assumed to be effected by internally-generated, internally-powered forces, which generally move the cell in directions other than those implied by external energy gradients. Evidence of cells acting as strain-cued automata have been inferred from patterns observed in nature and from experiments conducted in vitro. Simulations that mimic particular cases of pattern forming share the idealization that cells are assumed to pass information among themselves solely via mechanical boundary conditions, i.e., the tractions and displacements present at their membranes. This assumption opens three mechanisms for pattern formation in large cell populations: wavelike behavior, kinematic feedback in cell motility that can lead to sliding and rotational patterns, and directed migration during invasions. Wavelike behavior among ameloblast cells during amelogenesis (the formation of dental enamel) has been inferred from enamel microstructure, while strain waves in populations of epithelial cells have been observed in vitro. One hypothesized kinematic feedback mechanism, "enhanced shear motility", accounts successfully for the spontaneous formation of layered patterns during amelogenesis in the mouse incisor. Directed migration is exemplified by a theory of invader cells that sense and respond to the strains they themselves create in the host population as they invade it: analysis shows that the strain fields contain positional information that could aid the formation of cell network structures, stabilizing the slender geometry of branches and helping govern the frequency of branch bifurcation and branch coalescence (the formation of closed networks). In simulations of pattern formation in

  15. In vivo characterization of two additional Leishmania donovani strains using the murine and hamster model.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, F; Dumetz, F; Hendrickx, S; Muraille, E; Dujardin, J-C; Maes, L; Magez, S; De Trez, C

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania donovani is a protozoan parasite causing the neglected tropical disease visceral leishmaniasis. One difficulty to study the immunopathology upon L. donovani infection is the limited adaptability of the strains to experimental mammalian hosts. Our knowledge about L. donovani infections relies on a restricted number of East African strains (LV9, 1S). Isolated from patients in the 1960s, these strains were described extensively in mice and Syrian hamsters and have consequently become 'reference' laboratory strains. L. donovani strains from the Indian continent display distinct clinical features compared to East African strains. Some reports describing the in vivo immunopathology of strains from the Indian continent exist. This study comprises a comprehensive immunopathological characterization upon infection with two additional strains, the Ethiopian L. donovani L82 strain and the Nepalese L. donovani BPK282 strain in both Syrian hamsters and C57BL/6 mice. Parameters that include parasitaemia levels, weight loss, hepatosplenomegaly and alterations in cellular composition of the spleen and liver, showed that the L82 strain generated an overall more virulent infection compared to the BPK282 strain. Altogether, both L. donovani strains are suitable and interesting for subsequent in vivo investigation of visceral leishmaniasis in the Syrian hamster and the C57BL/6 mouse model. PMID:27012562

  16. The Mouse Grimace Scale: A Clinically Useful Tool?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amy L.; Leach, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Medical research has a heavy and continuing demand for rodent models across a range of disciplines. Behavioural assessment of pain in such models is highly time consuming, thus limiting the number of models and analgesics that can be studied. Facial expressions are widely used to assess pain in human infants. Recently the mouse grimace scale (MGS) has been developed and shown to be accurate and reliable, requiring only a short amount of training for the observer. This system therefore has the potential to become a highly useful tool both in pain research and clinical assessment of mouse pain. To date, the MGS has only been used as a research tool, however there is increasing interest in its use in cage-side clinical assessment. It is often wrongly assumed that MGS scores of animals not in pain (i.e. at baseline) are zero. Here, we aimed to assess the variability in baseline MGS scores between cohorts, sexes and strains of mice. Establishing the presence of a consistent baseline MGS score could lead to a valuable clinical pain assessment tool for mice when baseline information from the individual mouse may not be available as a comparator. Results demonstrated a significant difference in baseline MGS scores between both sexes (males > females) and strains of mice. The method used to score the facial action units (Live vs. retrospectively from still images) demonstrated significant differences in scores with live scores being significantly lower than retrospective scoring from images. The level of variation shown demonstrates the need for further research to be undertaken with regard to establishing baseline MGS scores for specific strains and sexes of mice, taking into account the method of scoring, prior to considering clinical implementation of this method in pain assessment. PMID:26406227

  17. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Mouse Model in Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cong; Li, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by increased proliferation of granulocytic cells without the loss of their capability to differentiate. CML is a clonal disease, originated at the level of Hematopoietic Stem Cells with the Philadelphia chromosome resulting from a reciprocal translocation between the chromosomes 9 and 22t(9;22)-(q34;q11). This translocation produces a fusion gene known as BCR-ABL which acquires uncontrolled tyrosine kinase activity, constantly turning on its downstream signaling molecules/pathways, and promoting proliferation of leukemia cell through anti-apoptosis and acquisition of additional mutations. To evaluate the role of each critical downstream signaling molecule of BCR-ABL and test therapeutic drugs in vivo, it is important to use physiological mouse disease models. Here, we describe a mouse model of CML induced by BCR-ABL retrovirus (MSCV-BCR-ABL-GFP; MIG-BCR-ABL) and how to use this model in translational research.Moreover, to expand the application of this retrovirus induced CML model in a lot of conditional knockout mouse strain, we modified this vector to a triple gene coexpression vector in which we can co-express BCR-ABL, GFP, and a third gene which will be tested in different systems. To apply this triple gene system in conditional gene knockout strains, we can validate the CML development in the knockout mice and trace the leukemia cell following the GFP marker. In this protocol, we also describe how we utilize this triple gene system to prove the function of Pten as a tumor suppressor in leukemogenesis. Overall, this triple gene system expands our research spectrum in current conditional gene knockout strains and benefits our CML translational research. PMID:27150093

  18. Antigens of Bordetella pertussis V. Separation of Agglutinogen 1 and Mouse-Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Ross, R F; Munoz, J

    1971-02-01

    Agglutinogen 1 of Bordetella pertussis strain 353/Z (serotype 1) was separated from protective antigen and histamine-sensitizing factor by starch-block electrophoresis. Most of the agglutinogen 1 migrated towards the cathode in starch-block electrophoresis, although some remained near the origin. Fractions containing most of the agglutinogen 1 were free of detectable mouse-protecting or histamine-sensitizing activities. Agglutinogen 1 from a serotype 1, 3 B. pertussis strain (J20) migrated similarly to the agglutinogen 1 from strain 353/Z. All agglutinogen 3 activity was found at the point of application in the starch block. No clear relationship was found between agglutinogen 1 and mouse-protecting antigen or histamine-sensitizing factor. PMID:16557960

  19. Better colonisation of newly emerged Bordetella pertussis in the co-infection mouse model study.

    PubMed

    Safarchi, Azadeh; Octavia, Sophie; Luu, Laurence Don Wai; Tay, Chin Yen; Sintchenko, Vitali; Wood, Nicholas; Marshall, Helen; McIntyre, Peter; Lan, Ruiting

    2016-07-25

    Molecular epidemiological data indicates that the resurgence of pertussis (whooping cough) in populations with high vaccine coverage is associated with genomic adaptation of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of the disease, to vaccine selection pressure. We have previously shown that in the period after the introduction of acellular pertussis vaccine (ACV), the majority of circulating strains in Australia switched to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) cluster I (carrying ptxP3/prn2), replacing SNP cluster II (carrying ptxP1/prn3). In this study, we carried out an in vivo competition assay using a mouse model infected with SNP cluster I and II B. pertussis strains from Australia. We found that the SNP cluster I strain colonised better than the SNP cluster II strain, in both naïve and immunised mice, suggesting that SNP cluster I strains had better fitness regardless of immunisation status of the host, consistent with SNP cluster I strains replacing SNP cluster II. Nevertheless, we found that ACV enhanced clearance of both SNP cluster I and II strains from the mouse respiratory tract.

  20. Better colonisation of newly emerged Bordetella pertussis in the co-infection mouse model study.

    PubMed

    Safarchi, Azadeh; Octavia, Sophie; Luu, Laurence Don Wai; Tay, Chin Yen; Sintchenko, Vitali; Wood, Nicholas; Marshall, Helen; McIntyre, Peter; Lan, Ruiting

    2016-07-25

    Molecular epidemiological data indicates that the resurgence of pertussis (whooping cough) in populations with high vaccine coverage is associated with genomic adaptation of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of the disease, to vaccine selection pressure. We have previously shown that in the period after the introduction of acellular pertussis vaccine (ACV), the majority of circulating strains in Australia switched to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) cluster I (carrying ptxP3/prn2), replacing SNP cluster II (carrying ptxP1/prn3). In this study, we carried out an in vivo competition assay using a mouse model infected with SNP cluster I and II B. pertussis strains from Australia. We found that the SNP cluster I strain colonised better than the SNP cluster II strain, in both naïve and immunised mice, suggesting that SNP cluster I strains had better fitness regardless of immunisation status of the host, consistent with SNP cluster I strains replacing SNP cluster II. Nevertheless, we found that ACV enhanced clearance of both SNP cluster I and II strains from the mouse respiratory tract. PMID:27346304

  1. The chromosomal integration site determines the tissue-specific methylation of mouse mammary tumour virus proviral genes.

    PubMed Central

    Günzburg, W H; Groner, B

    1984-01-01

    Multiple endogenous mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) proviral genes are present at different chromosomal locations in inbred mouse strains. Proviral DNA methylation is location and tissue specific. The methylation patterns are stably inherited and appear to be conferred upon the viral DNA by the flanking mouse genomic DNA. In transformed cells, either mammary carcinoma cells, or cells immortalized by SV40 in vitro, the stable pattern of methylation is lost. Although hypomethylation of proviral genes, both in normal and in transformed tissue, accompanies MMTV-specific RNA expression, it is also observed in non-expressing tissues. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6329738

  2. Nanowires enabling strained photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Greil, J.; Bertagnolli, E.; Lugstein, A.; Birner, S.

    2014-04-21

    Photovoltaic nano-devices have largely been relying on charge separation in conventional p-n junctions. Junction formation via doping, however, imposes major challenges in process control. Here, we report on a concept for photovoltaic energy conversion at the nano scale without the need for intentional doping. Our approach relies on charge carrier separation in inhomogeneously strained germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). This concept utilizes the strain-induced gradient in bandgap along tapered NWs. Experimental data confirms the feasibility of strain-induced charge separation in individual vapor-liquid-solid grown Ge NW devices with an internal quantum efficiency of ∼5%. The charge separation mechanism, though, is not inherently limited to a distinct material. Our work establishes a class of photovoltaic nano-devices with its opto-electronic properties engineered by size, shape, and applied strain.

  3. Magnetocaloric materials: Strained relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordblad, Per

    2013-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect could form the basis for efficient refrigeration technologies. The finding that large and reversible magnetocaloric effects can be induced through a strain-mediated feedback mechanism may expand the range of available magnetocaloric materials.

  4. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for strains. Gymnastics, tennis, rowing, golf, and other sports that require extensive gripping can ... Trials and You was designed to help people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and ...

  5. What Are Sprains and Strains?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprain, one or more ligaments is stretched or torn. What Causes a Sprain? Where Do Sprains Usually ... strain, a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn. What Causes Strains? A strain is caused by ...

  6. Strain-dependent variations in visceral sensitivity: relationship to stress, anxiety and spinal glutamate transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-04-01

    Responses to painful stimuli differ between populations, ethnic groups, sexes and even among individuals of a family. However, data regarding visceral pain are still lacking. Thus, we investigated differences in visceral nociception across inbred and outbred mouse strains using colorectal distension. Anxiety and depression-like behaviour were assessed using the open field and forced swim test as well as the corticosterone stress response. Possible mechanistic targets [excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT-1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and 5HT1A receptor] were also assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Adult, male, inbred and outbred mouse strains were used in all assays (inbred strains; CBA/J Hsd, C3H/HeNHsd, BALB/c OlaHsd, C57 BL/6JOlaHsd, DBA/2J RccHsd, CAST/EiJ, SM/J, A/J OlaHsd, 129P2/OlaHsd, FVB/NHan Hsd and outbred strains: Swiss Webster, CD-1). mRNA expression levels of EAAT-1, BDNF and 5HT1A receptor (HTR1A) were quantified in the lumbosacral spinal cord, amygdala and hippocampus. A significant effect of strain was found in visceral sensitivity, anxiety and depressive-like behaviours. Strain differences were also seen in both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels. CBA/J mice consistently exhibited heightened visceral sensitivity, anxiety behaviour and depression-like behaviour which were associated with decreased spinal EAAT-1 and hippocampal BDNF and HTR1A. Our results show the CBA/J mouse strain as a novel mouse model to unravel the complex mechanisms of brain-gut axis disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, in particular the underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity, for which there is great need. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of genotype and the consequences for future development of transgenic strains in pain research.

  7. Strain-dependent variations in visceral sensitivity: relationship to stress, anxiety and spinal glutamate transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-04-01

    Responses to painful stimuli differ between populations, ethnic groups, sexes and even among individuals of a family. However, data regarding visceral pain are still lacking. Thus, we investigated differences in visceral nociception across inbred and outbred mouse strains using colorectal distension. Anxiety and depression-like behaviour were assessed using the open field and forced swim test as well as the corticosterone stress response. Possible mechanistic targets [excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT-1), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and 5HT1A receptor] were also assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Adult, male, inbred and outbred mouse strains were used in all assays (inbred strains; CBA/J Hsd, C3H/HeNHsd, BALB/c OlaHsd, C57 BL/6JOlaHsd, DBA/2J RccHsd, CAST/EiJ, SM/J, A/J OlaHsd, 129P2/OlaHsd, FVB/NHan Hsd and outbred strains: Swiss Webster, CD-1). mRNA expression levels of EAAT-1, BDNF and 5HT1A receptor (HTR1A) were quantified in the lumbosacral spinal cord, amygdala and hippocampus. A significant effect of strain was found in visceral sensitivity, anxiety and depressive-like behaviours. Strain differences were also seen in both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels. CBA/J mice consistently exhibited heightened visceral sensitivity, anxiety behaviour and depression-like behaviour which were associated with decreased spinal EAAT-1 and hippocampal BDNF and HTR1A. Our results show the CBA/J mouse strain as a novel mouse model to unravel the complex mechanisms of brain-gut axis disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, in particular the underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity, for which there is great need. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of genotype and the consequences for future development of transgenic strains in pain research. PMID:25851919

  8. A Tetrodotoxin-Producing Vibrio Strain, LM-1, from the Puffer Fish Fugu vermicularis radiatus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Ja; Jeong, Dong-Youn; Kim, Woo-Seong; Kim, Hyun-Dae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Park, Won-Whan; Park, Yong-Ha; Kim, Kyung-Sam; Kim, Hyung-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2000-01-01

    Identification of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and its derivatives produced from a Vibrio strain in the intestine of the puffer fish Fugu vermicularis radiatus was performed by thin-layer chromatography, electrophoresis, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, together with a mouse bioassay for toxicity. It was demonstrated that the isolated bacterium produced TTX, 4-epi-TTX, and anhTTX during cultivation, suggesting that Vibrio strains are responsible for the toxification of the puffer fish. PMID:10742263

  9. The rat exposure test: a model of mouse defensive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mu; Augustsson, Hanna; Markham, Chris M; Hubbard, David T; Webster, Dylan; Wall, Phillip M; Blanchard, Robert J; Blanchard, D Caroline

    2004-05-01

    In order to facilitate behavioral, and potentially pharmacological, analyses of risk assessment behaviors in mice, a rat exposure test (RET) was devised and evaluated. This test provides a home chamber connected via a tunnel to a rat (predator) exposure area. Familiar substrate is provided to permit burying, and mouse subjects are habituated to the apparatus prior to exposure to an amphetamine-activated rat. In comparison to toy-rat-exposed controls, rat-exposed BALB/c mice showed significantly more risk assessment [stretch attend posture (SAP) and stretch approach], freezing, and avoidance (time in the home chamber), and less time in contact with the wire mesh screen between itself and the threat stimulus. When BALB/c, C57BL/6, CD-1, and Swiss-Webster mice were compared in this test, the two inbred strains (BALB/c and C57BL/6) tended to show more extreme values of particular defensive behaviors, compared to the two outbred strains (Swiss-Webster and CD-1). C57BL/6 mice showed more avoidance and higher levels of SAP, freezing, and burying than BALB/c and more than one or both outbred strains as well. BALB/c mice showed little defensive burying, both in comparison to toy-exposed controls (Experiment 1), and in comparison to the three other strains in Experiment 2. These findings are somewhat at variance with characterizations of anxiety in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, based on tests utilizing novel areas and noxious stimuli, suggesting strain differences in defensiveness to such stimuli, compared to antipredator defense levels. Nonetheless, with the exception of burying in BALB/c mice, all strains showed all defensive behaviors measured to the rat stimulus. In particular, SAP levels were substantial in all strains tested, suggesting the usefulness of this test in assessment of the role of risk assessment in defense.

  10. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a biogerontological resource in aging research.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T

    1999-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), consisting of 14 senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) and 4 senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR) has been under development since 1970 through the selective inbreeding of AKR/J strain mice donated by the Jackson laboratory in 1968, based on the data of the grading score of senescence, life span, and pathologic phenotypes. The characteristic feature of aging common to all SAMP and SAMR mice is accelerated senescence and normal aging, respectively. Furthermore, SAMP and SAMR strains manifest various pathobiological phenotypes which include such neurobiological phenotypes as deficits in learning and memory, emotional disorders, abnormal circadian rhythms, brain atrophy, hearing impairment, etc., and are often characteristic enough to differentiate the strains. Various efforts are currently being made using the SAM model to clarify the underlying mechanisms in accelerated senescence as well as the etiopathogenic mechanisms in age-associated pathobiologies. Genetic background and significance of SAM development are discussed. PMID:10537019

  11. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  12. Teratology studies in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Edward; Leroy, Mariline

    2013-01-01

    The rat is the routine species of choice as the rodent model for regulatory safety testing of xenobiotics such as medicinal products, food additives, and other chemicals. However, the rat is not always suitable for pharmacological, toxicological, immunogenic, pharmacokinetic, or even practical reasons. Under such circumstances, the mouse offers an alternative for finding a suitable rodent model acceptable to the regulatory authorities. Since all essential routes of administration are possible, the short reproductive cycle and large litter size of the mouse make it a species well adapted for use in teratology studies. Given that good quality animals, including virgin mated females, can be acquired relatively easily and inexpensively, the mouse has been used in reproductive toxicity studies for decades and study protocols are well established.

  13. Modeling metastasis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Paula D.; Nguyen, Don X.; Massagué, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is a complex clinical and biological problem presently under intense study, and several model systems are in use to experimentally recapitulate and dissect the various steps of the metastatic process. Genetically engineered mouse models provide faithful renditions of events in tumor progression, angiogenesis, and local invasion that set the stage for metastasis, whereas engrafting of human or mouse tumor tissues into mouse hosts has been successfully exploited to investigate metastatic dissemination and colonization of distant organs. Real-time, high-resolution microscopy in live animals, and comprehensive genetic and molecular profiling are effective tools to interrogate diverse metastatic cancer cell phenotypes as well as the metastatic tumor microenvironment in different organs. By integrating the information obtained with these complementary approaches the field is currently obtaining an unprecedented level of understanding of the biology, molecular basis, and therapeutic vulnerabilities of metastasis. PMID:20598638

  14. Applications of the human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model for human carcinogen testing

    PubMed Central

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-driving mutations in the TP53 gene occur frequently in human cancers. These inactivating mutations arise predominantly from a single-point mutation in the DNA-binding domain of this tumor suppressor gene (i.e., exons 4–9). The human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model was constructed using gene-targeting technology to create a mouse strain that harbors human wild-type TP53 DNA sequences in both copies of the mouse TP53 gene. Replacement of exons 4–9 of the endogenous mouse TP53 alleles in the Hupki mouse with the homologous normal human TP53 gene sequences has offered a humanized replica of the TP53 gene in a murine genetic environment. The Hupki mouse model system has proven to be an invaluable research tool for studying the underlying mechanisms of human TP53 mutagenesis. The utility of the Hupki mouse model system for exploring carcinogen-induced TP53 mutagenesis has been demonstrated in both in vivo animal experiments and in vitro cell culture experiments. Here, we highlight applications of the Hupki mouse model system for investigating mutagenesis induced by a variety of environmental carcinogens, including sunlight ultraviolet radiation, benzo[a]pyrene (a tobacco smoke-derived carcinogen), 3-nitrobenzanthrone (an urban air pollutant), aristolochic acid (a component of Chinese herbal medicine), and aflatoxin B1 (a food contaminant). We summarize the salient findings of the respective studies and discuss their relevance to human cancer etiology.—Besaratinia, A., Pfeifer, G. P. Applications of the human p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model for human carcinogen testing. PMID:20371617

  15. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  16. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan J; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O'Leary, Timothy P; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-10

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming.

  17. Difference in Bgp-independent fusion activity among mouse hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, F; Matsuyama, S; Saeki, K

    1999-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) utilizes a mouse biliary glycoprotein (Bgp) as a receptor. Co-cultivation of MHV-nonpermissive hamster BHK cells devoid of mouse Bgp with mouse DBT cells infected with MHV-A59 or JHMV induces syncytia formation on BHK cells (Bgp-independent fusion). This study shows the difference in Bgp-independent fusion activity among various MHV strains. Under a phase contrast microscopy, JHMV (cl-2, sp-4) induced the Bgp-independent syncytia on BHK cells similar to those observed on DBT cells, while such syncytia were not seen with the infection of other MHV strains (MHV-1, MHV-3, MHV-A59, MHV-S, srr7, srr11 and srr18). Tiny syncytia detectable only by immunofluorescence were produced with the latter MHV strains except for srr7 which failed to produce syncytia. MHVs except for srr7 grew in BHK cells after Bgp-independent infection. The Bgp-independent fusion by JHMV was inhibited either by anti-S1 or anti-S2 antibodies. These results showed that the JHMV spike protein had a remarkably high Bgp-independent fusion activity.

  18. Foster dams rear fighters: strain-specific effects of within-strain fostering on aggressive behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kimberly H; So, Nina L T; Rissman, Emilie F

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that genes and environment interact to produce behavioral phenotypes. One environmental factor with long-term effects on gene transcription and behavior is maternal care. A classic paradigm for examining maternal care and genetic interactions is to foster pups of one genetic strain to dams of a different strain ("between-strain fostering"). In addition, fostering to a dam of the same strain ("within-strain fostering") is used to reduce indirect effects, via behavioral changes in the dams, of gestation treatments on offspring. Using within-and between-strain fostering we examined the contributions of genetics/prenatal environment, maternal care, and the effects of fostering per se, on adult aggressive behavior in two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (DBA). We hypothesized that males reared by dams of the more aggressive DBA strain would attack intruders faster than those reared by B6 dams. Surprisingly, we found that both methods of fostering enhanced aggressive behavior, but only in B6 mice. Since all the B6 offspring are genetically identical, we asked if maternal behavior of B6 dams was affected by the relatedness of their pups. In fact, B6 dams caring for foster B6 pups displayed significantly reduced maternal behaviors. Finally, we measured vasopressin and corticotrophin releasing hormone mRNA in the amygdalae of adult B6 males reared by foster or biological dams. Both genes correlated with aggressive behavior in within-strain fostered B6 mice, but not in mice reared by their biological dams. In sum, we have demonstrated in inbred laboratory mice, that dams behave differently when rearing their own newborn pups versus pups from another dam of the same strain. These differences in maternal care affect aggression in the male offspring and transcription of Avp and Crh in the brain. It is likely that rearing by foster dams has additional effects and implications for other species.

  19. MEMS Graphene Strain Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Clinton Wen-Chieh

    Graphene is a two dimensional honeycomb structure of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms that has possibilities in many applications due to its excellent mechanical and electrical properties. One application for Graphene is in the field of sensors. Graphene's electronic properties do not degrade when it undergoes mechanical strain which is advantageous for strain sensors. In this thesis, certain properties, such as the piezo-resistivity and flexibility, of graphene will be explored to show how they can be utilized to make a strain sensing device. Our original fabrication process of patterning graphene and the transfer process of graphene onto a flexible substrate will be discussed. The development of a stretchable and flexible graphene based rosette strain sensor will also be detailed. Developing a novel, reliable patterning process for the graphene is the first step to manufacture a stretchable graphene based sensor. The graphene was patterned using a photolithography and etching process that was developed by our research team, then it was transferred to a flexible polymer substrate with the use of a combination of soft lithography and wet etching of the Ni foil with ferric chloride solution. Graphene patterning is an essential step in fabricating reliable and sensitive sensors. With this process, graphene can be consistently patterned into different shapes and sizes. To utilize the graphene as the sensing material it also needs to be transferred onto a flexible substrate. The innovative transfer process developed by our research team consistently adheres graphene to a flexible PDMS substrate while removing the original nickel substrate. In the end, the graphene was transferred from the metal substrate to the desired flexible substrate. This process was repeated multiple times to create a stack and multilayer device. While many graphene-based strain sensors have been developed, they are uni-directional and can only measure the strain applied on the sensor in a principle

  20. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): mouse biology and model systems.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A

    2008-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database, (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org/), integrates genetic, genomic and phenotypic information about the laboratory mouse, a primary animal model for studying human biology and disease. MGD data content includes comprehensive characterization of genes and their functions, standardized descriptions of mouse phenotypes, extensive integration of DNA and protein sequence data, normalized representation of genome and genome variant information including comparative data on mammalian genes. Data within MGD are obtained from diverse sources including manual curation of the biomedical literature, direct contributions from individual investigator's laboratories and major informatics resource centers such as Ensembl, UniProt and NCBI. MGD collaborates with the bioinformatics community on the development of data and semantic standards such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) Ontology. MGD provides a data-mining platform that enables the development of translational research hypotheses based on comparative genotype, phenotype and functional analyses. Both web-based querying and computational access to data are provided. Recent improvements in MGD described here include the association of gene trap data with mouse genes and a new batch query capability for customized data access and retrieval.

  1. International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) —

    Cancer.gov

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comprises a group of major mouse genetics research institutions along with national funding organisations formed to address the challenge of developing an encyclopedia of mammalian gene function.

  2. Introduction of the human pro. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene into pro. cap alpha. 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-02-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro..cap alpha..2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro..cap alpha..2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human ..cap alpha..1 chains and one mouse ..cap alpha..2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both ..cap alpha..1(I) and ..cap alpha..2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the ..cap alpha..(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human ..cap alpha.. chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro..cap alpha..1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I.

  3. Introduction of the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into pro alpha 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Schnieke, A; Dziadek, M; Bateman, J; Mascara, T; Harbers, K; Gelinas, R; Jaenisch, R

    1987-01-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro alpha 2 mRNA are synthesized. We have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro alpha 1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro alpha 2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human alpha 1 chains and one mouse alpha 2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the alpha (I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human alpha chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow us to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro alpha 1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I. Images PMID:3468512

  4. Attenuation of virulence by P and V plasmids in Vibrio cholerae: strains suitable for oral immunization*

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, V. B.; Srivastava, Brahm S.

    1979-01-01

    In a virulent strain of Vibrio cholerae, KB9, P and V plasmids were introduced by bacterial conjugation. Characterization of PV isolates and systematic screening of them in animal models of cholera revealed that a large number of PV isolates were non-pathogenic, owing to the loss of ability to synthesize toxin. Results obtained with two such strains, designated as KB9:PV and CD24, are described. The strains with plasmids were stable during in vitro cultivation or during two successive passages in rabbit intestine. Protection conferred by PV strains was determined in mouse protection tests and in the rabbit ileal loop model. The plasmid strains were immunogenic. In view of the results, it is proposed that PV-bearing attenuated strains should be tried in oral immunization. PMID:316741

  5. A Murine Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Model: The DBA/2J Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Chen, Yuanjian; Zhao, Fengbo; Gu, Qingqing; Williams, Robert W; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Lu, Lu; Sun, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is attributed to mutations in genes that encode for the sarcomere proteins, especially Mybpc3 and Myh7. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies show significant variability in HCM phenotypes among affected individuals with identical causal mutations. Morphological changes and clinical expression of HCM are the result of interactions with modifier genes. With the exceptions of angiotensin converting enzyme, these modifiers have not been identified. Although mouse models have been used to investigate the genetics of many complex diseases, natural murine models for HCM are still lacking. In this study we show that the DBA/2J (D2) strain of mouse has sequence variants in Mybpc3 and Myh7, relative to widely used C57BL/6J (B6) reference strain and the key features of human HCM. Four-month-old of male D2 mice exhibit hallmarks of HCM including increased heart weight and cardiomyocyte size relative to B6 mice, as well as elevated markers for cardiac hypertrophy including β-myosin heavy chain (MHC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and skeletal muscle alpha actin (α1-actin). Furthermore, cardiac interstitial fibrosis, another feature of HCM, is also evident in the D2 strain, and is accompanied by up-regulation of type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-markers of fibrosis. Of great interest, blood pressure and cardiac function are within the normal range in the D2 strain, demonstrating that cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are not secondary to hypertension, myocardial infarction, or heart failure. Because D2 and B6 strains have been used to generate a large family of recombinant inbred strains, the BXD cohort, the D2 model can be effectively exploited for in-depth genetic analysis of HCM susceptibility and modifier screens.

  6. Dynamics of chromosomal aberrations in male mice of various strains during aging.

    PubMed

    Rozenfel'd, S V; Togo, E F; Mikheev, V S; Popovich, I G; Zabezhinskii, M A; Anisimov, V N

    2001-05-01

    We studied the incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells and primary spermatocytes in various mouse strains. Experiments were performed on SAMP mice (accelerated aging), control SAMR mice, and long-living CBA and SHR mice. Experiments revealed a positive correlation between the age and the incidence of mutations in their somatic cells and gametes. PMID:11550060

  7. Microevolution During Serial Mouse Passage Demonstrates FRE3 as a Virulence Adaptation Gene in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guowu; Chen, Shu Hui; Qiu, Jin; Bennett, John E.; Myers, Timothy G.; Williamson, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passage in mice of opportunistic pathogens such as Cryptococcus neoformans is known to increase virulence, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in virulence adaptat