Science.gov

Sample records for mouse urinary bladder

  1. Effects of morphine in the isolated mouse urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, C G; Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute morphine increased the responses to acetylcholine of the isolated mouse urinary bladder. A chronic morphine treatment did not change the responses of the urinary bladder to acetylcholine or ATP. The acute administration of morphine did not modify the contractile response to ATP in the urinary bladders from untreated or chronically morphine treated mice. Methadone and ketocyclazocine decreased the responses to the electrical stimulation of the urinary bladder. These depressant effects were not modified by naloxone. The results suggest the nonexistence of opiate receptors in the mouse urinary bladder and the lack of direct effects of morphine on the neuroeffector junction.

  2. Blood-urine barrier formation in mouse urinary bladder development.

    PubMed

    Jezernik, K; Pipan, N

    1993-04-01

    Formation of the blood-urine permeability barrier in differentiating mouse transitional urothelium was studied. It was established that the development of superficial cell barrier is a two-phase process: beginning with formation of the tight junctions, followed by formation of fusiform vesicles and asymmetric apical plasma membranes. Fusiform vesicles differentiate during days 15 and 17 of gestation and fuse with the apical plasmalemma. Thus a thick membrane is formed before the excretion of hypertonic urine into the embryonic bladder. Through some degenerative superficial cells slough between fetal day 17 and the day of birth, the bladder epithelium in mice does not lack an effective permeability barrier.

  3. The postganglionic excitatory innervation of the mouse urinary bladder and its modulation by prejunctional GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Santicioli, P; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1986-03-01

    Field stimulation produced reproducible contractions of the mouse isolated urinary bladder whose amplitude was frequency-related. These contractions were partially sensitive to atropine (3 microM), unaffected by hexamethonium (10 microM) and almost abolished by tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM). Atropine (3 microM) suppressed contractions produced by exogenous acetylcholine thereby indicating atropine-resistance of the nerve-mediated contractions. Nerve-mediated contractions of the mouse urinary bladder were enhanced by physostigmine (0.1-0.5 microM) and inhibited by hemicholinium-3 (0.5 mM) thus confirming the presence of a cholinergic component in the excitatory postganglionic innervation. Atropine (3 microM) inhibition of the nerve-mediated contractions increased with increasing duration and strength of the train of stimulation. The nerve-mediated contractions of the mouse bladder were unaffected by phentolamine (0.2 microM), propranolol (0.3 microM) or indomethacin (5 microM). ATP (1mM) the major candidate for the role of nonadrenergic-noncholinegic (NANC) excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian urinary bladder produced a contraction of the mouse isolated bladder. Exposure to the stable ATP analogue alpha, beta-methylene ATP (APCPP) or beta, gamma-methylene ATP (APPCP) produced a partial desensitization of the nerve-mediated response which, for APCPP, was greater in the presence than in the absence of atropine (3 microM). In the presence of atropine (3 microM) and after APCPP desensitization the amplitude of the response to field stimulation amounted to about 20% of the original response and was sensitive to tetrodotoxin, indicating that it is nerve-mediated. GABA (0.001-0.3 mM) inhibited the amplitude of field stimulation induced contractions of mouse urinary bladder. This effect was mimicked by the selective GABAB receptor agonist, (+/-)-baclofen, but not by the selective GABAA receptor agonist, homotaurine. GABA and (+/-)-baclofen exhibited cross

  4. Impaired M3 and enhanced M2 muscarinic receptor contractile function in a streptozotocin model of mouse diabetic urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pak, K. J.; Ostrom, R. S.; Matsui, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the contractile roles of M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors in urinary bladder from streptozotocin-treated mice. Wild-type and M2 muscarinic receptor knockout (M2 KO) mice were given a single injection of vehicle or streptozotocin (125 mg kg−1) 2–24 weeks prior to bladder assays. The effect of forskolin on contractions elicited to the muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine-M, was measured in isolated urinary bladder (intact or denuded of urothelium). Denuded urinary bladder from vehicle-treated wild-type and M2 KO mice exhibited similar contractile responses to oxotremorine-M, when contraction was normalized relative to that elicited by KCl (50 mM). Eight to 9 weeks after streptozotocin treatment, the EC50 value of oxotremorine-M increased 3.1-fold in urinary bladder from the M2 KO mouse (N = 5) compared to wild type (N = 6; P < 0.001). Analogous changes were observed in intact bladder. In denuded urinary bladder from vehicle-treated mice, forskolin (5 µM) caused a much greater inhibition of contraction in M2 KO bladder compared to wild type. Following streptozotocin treatment, this forskolin effect increased 1.6-fold (P = 0.032). At the 20- to 24-week time point, the forskolin effect increased 1.7-fold for denuded as well as intact bladders (P = 0.036, 0.01, respectively). Although streptozotocin treatment inhibits M3 receptor-mediated contraction in denuded urinary bladder, muscarinic contractile function is maintained in wild-type bladder by enhanced M2 contractile function. M2 receptor activation opposes forskolin-induced relaxation of the urinary bladder, and this M2 function is enhanced following streptozotocin treatment. PMID:20349044

  5. Evaluation of urinary bladder fibrogenesis in a mouse model of long-term ketamine injection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Shou-Chieh; Wang, Shou-Tsung; Lin, Shu-Mei; Wu, Jiann-Der; Lin, Chang-Te; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Long-term ketamine abuse has been shown to affect the lower urinary tract and result in interstitial cystitis-like syndrome. However, the causative mechanism of ketamine-induced dysfunction remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the physiological, histological and molecular changes on ketamine-associated cystitis (KC) in a mouse model. Both male and female Balb/c mice were separately distributed into the control group (normal saline) and ketamine group, which received ketamine hydrochloride (100 mg/kg/day) daily by intraperitoneal injection for a total period of 20 weeks. In each group, the urine was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure the concentration of ketamine and its metabolites. Urinary frequency and urine volume were examined to investigate the urinary voiding functions. Mice bladders were excised for cDNA microarray and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The ketamine and metabolites were detected only in ketamine-treated mice urine. The voiding interval was reduced in the male mice group after 20 week ketamine administration. Additionally, the result of cDNA array analysis revealed a number of gene expression levels involved in chronic wound healing response and collagen accumulation, which were closely associated with fibrosis progression in the connective tissue. In HE staining of the bladder tissue, the ketamine-injected mice exhibited prominently denser blood vessel distribution in the submucosal layer. Based on the evidence in the present study, a mechanism that delineates fibrosis formation of urinary bladder induced by the pathogenesis of ketamine abuse can be constructed. PMID:27431428

  6. The M2-Muscarinic Receptor Inhibits the Development of Streptozotocin-Induced Neuropathy in Mouse Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pak, K. J.; Ostrom, R. S.; Matsui, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the role of M2-muscarinic receptors in maintaining neurogenic bladder contraction during hyperglycemia. Mice were injected with a single dose of streptozotocin (125 mg/kg), and neurogenic contraction of urinary bladder from wild type and M2-muscarinic receptor knockout (M2 KO) mice was measured at 8 to 24 weeks after treatment. In wild-type bladder lacking urothelium, the summation of the cholinergic (64%) and purinergic (56%) components of the electrical-field-stimulated response exceeded 100%, indicating a reserve capacity. Although the cholinergic component was slightly less in the M2 KO mouse, the total electrical-field-stimulated contraction was the same as wild type. The cholinergic and purinergic components of contraction in wild-type bladder were minimally affected by streptozotocin treatment. In M2 KO bladder, streptozotocin treatment reduced both the cholinergic (after 8–9 and 20–24 weeks) and purinergic (after 20–24 weeks only) components. The loss of function was approximately 50 to 70%. Similar results were observed in bladder with intact urothelium. M2 KO bladder was more sensitive to the relaxant effect of isoproterenol compared with wild type, and this difference significantly increased at the early and late time points after streptozotocin treatment. In the presence of urothelium, however, this difference in isoproterenol sensitivity was smaller with streptozotocin treatment, but this trend reversed over time. Our results show that M2 receptors oppose urinary bladder distension in wild-type bladder and inhibit streptozotocin-induced neuropathy. PMID:20624991

  7. Effect of Recombinant Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor (rHuKGF, Palifermin) on Radiation-Induced Mouse Urinary Bladder Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Jaal, Jana Doerr, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of Palifermin (rHuKGF) on acute and late radiation effects in mouse urinary bladder. Methods and Materials: Graded radiation doses were applied on day 0. Single subcutaneous injections of Palifermin (15 mg/kg) were given on day -2 or day +2. Changes in bladder function (i.e., a reduction in bladder volume by {>=}50% of the individual preirradiation value) were assessed by cystometry. Results: Early changes in mouse bladder after irradiation occur in two phases. In the first early phase, a single injection of Palifermin on day -2 increased the ED{sub 50} (dose associated with a positive bladder response in 50% of the mice) from 20.0 {+-} 3.3 Gy to 27.1 {+-} 6.9 Gy (p < .0051). Palifermin given on day +2 was not beneficial. No significant effects of Palifermin were seen in the second early phase. However, Palifermin administration before, but not after, irradiation, also modified late radiation effects, with an ED{sub 50} of 22.2 {+-} 4.8 Gy compared with 16.2 {+-} 4.9 Gy in control animals (p < .0187). Conclusions: Initial early functional changes in the mouse urinary bladder after irradiation as well as late effects can be significantly reduced by a single administration of Palifermin before irradiation.

  8. Prostaglandin E2 induces spontaneous rhythmic activity in mouse urinary bladder independently of efferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Kobayter, S; Young, JS; Brain, KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The acute effects of PGE2 on bladder smooth muscle and nerves were examined to determine the origin of PGE2-induced spontaneous rhythmic contractions. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Contraction studies, confocal Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiological recordings in strips of mouse urinary bladder were used to differentiate the effects of PGE2 on bladder smooth muscle and efferent nerves. KEY RESULTS PGE2 (50 µM) increased the tone and caused phasic contractions of detrusor smooth muscle strips. Confocal Ca2+ imaging showed that PGE2 increased the frequency of whole-cell Ca2+ transients (WCTs) (72 ± 5%) and intracellular recordings showed it increased the frequency of spontaneous depolarizations, from 0.31·s−1 to 0.90·s−1. Non-selective inhibition of EP receptors using SC-51322 and AH-6809 (10 µM), or the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (1 µM), prevented these phasic contractions and WCTs, and reduced the tone (by 45 ± 7% and 59 ± 6%, respectively). Blocking P2X1 receptors with NF449 (10 µM) caused a small but significant reduction in the frequency of PGE2-induced phasic contractions (24 ± 9%) and WCTs (28 ± 17%) but had no significant effect on spontaneous depolarizations or tone. Inhibiting muscarinic receptors with cyclopentolate (1 µM) had no significant effect on these measures. Spontaneous WCTs became synchronous in PGE2, implying enhanced functional coupling between neighbouring cells. However, the electrical input resistance was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS It was concluded that depolarization alone is sufficient to explain a functional increase in intercellular coupling and the ability of PGE2 to increase detrusor spontaneous rhythmic activity does not require parasympathetic nerves. PMID:21671904

  9. Properties and molecular basis of the mouse urinary bladder voltage-gated K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Thorneloe, Kevin S; Nelson, Mark T

    2003-01-01

    Potassium channels play an important role in controlling the excitability of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Here we describe the biophysical, pharmacological and molecular properties of the mouse UBSM voltage-gated K+ current (IK(V)). The IK(V) activated, deactivated and inactivated slowly with time constants of 29.9 ms at +30 mV, 131 ms at −40 mV and 3.4 s at +20 mV. The midpoints of steady-state activation and inactivation curves were 1.1 mV and −61.4 mV, respectively. These properties suggest that IK(V) plays a role in regulating the resting membrane potential and contributes to the repolarization and after-hyperpolarization phases of action potentials. The IK(V) was blocked by tetraethylammonium ions with an IC50 of 5.2 mm and was unaffected by 1 mm 4-aminopyridine. RT-PCR for voltage-gated K+ channel (KV) subunits revealed the expression of Kv2.1, Kv5.1, Kv6.1, Kv6.2 and Kv6.3 in isolated UBSM myocytes. A comparison of the biophysical properties of UBSM IK(V) with those reported for Kv2.1 and Kv5.1 and/or Kv6 heteromultimeric channels demonstrated a marked similarity. We propose that heteromultimeric channel complexes composed of Kv2.1 and Kv5.1 and/or Kv6 subunits form the molecular basis of the mouse UBSM IK(V). PMID:12679374

  10. Urinary bladder xanthomatous cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shrenik J.; Ajitsaria, Vineet; Singh, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    Xanthoma cystitis of urinary bladder is a rare entity and may present as an intravesical mass. A 38-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and imaging was done which was suggestive of a malignant mass with surrounding tissue infiltration. Partial cystectomy was performed, and histological examination of the mass showed xanthomatous cystitis. PMID:28197037

  11. Expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in human, mouse, and rat urinary bladder and effects of FAAH inhibition on bladder function in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Frank; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Benigni, Fabio; Bettiga, Arianna; Rigatti, Patrizio; Montorsi, Francesco; Gratzke, Christian; Stief, Christian; Colciago, Giorgia; Hedlund, Petter

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor (CB)-mediated functions may be involved in the regulation of bladder function, but information on endocannabinoid signals during micturition is scarce. Investigate the expression of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in human, rat, and mouse bladders and study the effects of inhibition of FAAH during urodynamics in awake rats. Bladder tissue from humans, mice, and rats was used for measurements. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered the FAAH inhibitor oleoyl ethyl amide (OEtA) or vehicle intravenously (IV) or intravesically (IVES) with or without rimonabant (CB1 antagonist) or SR144528 (CB2 antagonist). Real-time transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and cystometry in awake rats. Messenger RNA and protein for FAAH was expressed in the mucosa of human, mouse, and rat urinary bladders. Immunoreactivities for FAAH and CB2 were codistributed in rat and human urothelium. IV OEtA (0.3mg/kg) to rats increased intercontraction intervals (ICIs), micturition volume (MV), bladder capacity (BC), and threshold pressure (TP) by 17±1%, 16±1%, 17±1%, and 19±5%, respectively (all p<0.05 vs baseline). IVES OEtA (1 and 10mg/l) in rats dose-dependently increased (p<0.05 vs baseline) ICI (19±2% and 35±5%), MV (15±3% and 32±4%), BC (16±2% and 34±4%), and TP (15±1%, 21±3%). SR144528 (IVES 5mg/l) abolished all effects of OEtA, whereas rimonabant only counteracted effects of OEtA on TP. Bladder mucosa of all species expressed FAAH. Rat and human urothelium coexpressed FAAH and CB2. The FAAH inhibitor OEtA altered urodynamic parameters that reflect sensory functions of micturition in rats. Suggesting a role for the endocannabinoid system in bladder mechanoafferent functions of rats, effects of IVES OEtA were abolished by an IVES CB2 antagonist and partly counteracted by an IVES CB1 antagonist. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  12. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  13. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  14. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  15. [Evolution of urinary bladder substitution].

    PubMed

    Kock, N G

    1992-11-01

    The historical background to the currently used methods for continent bladder substitution is shortly outlined. The significance for the patient's quality of life of various methods for bladder reconstruction or urinary diversion is briefly discussed. The importance of reservoir configuration for achieving a high compliant urinary receptacle is pointed out. Factors affecting reabsorption of urinary constituents are stressed and the significance of an antireflux mechanism is discussed. Currently the majority of patients undergoing cystectomy for cancer or for other reasons can be offered bladder substitutes providing continence and easy emptying; that is, complete control over voiding. This can be achieved by orthotopic bladder reconstruction or by diverting the urine to the augmented and valved rectum or to the skin via a continent intestinal reservoir.

  16. Transcriptional and translational plasticity in rodent urinary bladder TRP channels with urinary bladder inflammation, bladder dysfunction, or postnatal maturation.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Liana; Girard, Beatrice M; May, Victor; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2012-11-01

    These studies examined the transcriptional and translational plasticity of three transient receptor potential (TRP) channels (TRPA1, TRPV1, TRPV4) with established neuronal and non-neuronal expression and functional roles in the lower urinary tract. Mechanosensor and nociceptor roles in either physiological or pathological lower urinary tract states have been suggested for TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPV4. We have previously demonstrated the neurochemical, organizational, and functional plasticity in micturition reflex pathways following induction of urinary bladder inflammation using the antineoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide. More recently, we have characterized similar plasticity in micturition reflex pathways in a transgenic mouse model with chronic urothelial overexpression (OE) of nerve growth factor (NGF) and in a transgenic mouse model with deletion of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). In addition, the micturition reflex undergoes postnatal maturation that may also reflect plasticity in urinary bladder TRP channel expression. Thus, we examined plasticity in urinary bladder TRP channel expression in diverse contexts using a combination of quantitative, real-time PCR and western blotting approaches. We demonstrate transcriptional and translational plasticity of urinary bladder TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRVP4 expression. Although the functional significance of urinary bladder TRP channel plasticity awaits further investigation, these studies demonstrate context- (inflammation, postnatal development, NGF-OE, VIP deletion) and tissue-dependent (urothelium + suburothelium, detrusor) plasticity.

  17. Simple cyst of urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bo, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Simple cysts are rare in the urinary bladder and can pose a diagnostic dilemma to both the urologist and the histopathologist. No case study was found in the database of Elsevier Science Direct, Spring-Link, or PubMed. We present two cases of subserous cyst in the bladder and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the condition. The cystic lesion at bladder dome was detected by radiologic examination and confirmed by cystoscopy. In case 1, transurethral resection was first performed which was followed by partial cystectomy; In case 2, the cyst was removed with the urachus using laparoscopic surgery. The patients recovered uneventfully and the histopathology showed cysts in subserous layer of urinary bladder. The bladder cyst should be distinguished from urachal tumor, and laparoscopic partial cystectomy is the preferred operative procedure.

  18. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Adraktas, Dionesia; Caserta, Melanie; Tchelepi, Hisham

    2014-09-01

    Extra-adrenal paragangliomas of the urinary bladder are rare. Typically, patients present with symptoms related to catecholamine hypersecretion or mass effect, but these tumors can also be encountered incidentally on imaging studies obtained for a different purpose. It is important to recognize the key imaging features of this entity so that it may be suggested as a possible differential diagnosis in the setting of a newly identified bladder mass.

  19. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  20. Repeated Treatments with Chitosan in Combination with Antibiotics Completely Eradicate Uropathogenic Escherichia coli From Infected Mouse Urinary Bladders.

    PubMed

    Erman, Andreja; Hergouth, Veronika Križan; Blango, Matthew G; Kos, Mojca Kerec; Mulvey, Matthew A; Veranic, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections, colonize and invade the epithelial cells of the bladder urothelium. Infection of immature urothelial cells can result in the formation of persistent intracellular reservoirs that are refractory to antibiotic treatments. Previously, we defined a novel therapeutic strategy that used the bladder cell exfoliant chitosan to deplete UPEC reservoirs. However, although a single treatment of chitosan followed by ciprofloxacin administration had a marked effect on reducing UPEC titers within the bladder, this treatment failed to prevent relapsing bacteriuria. We show here that repeated use of chitosan in conjunction with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin completely eradicates UPEC from the urinary tract and prevents the development of relapsing bouts of bacteriuria. In addition, microscopy revealed rapid restoration of bladder integrity following chitosan treatment, indicating that chitosan can be used to effectively combat recalcitrant bladder infections without causing lasting harm to the urothelium. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Studies on localization and function of annexin A4a within urinary bladder epithelium using a mouse knockout model.

    PubMed

    Hill, Warren G; Meyers, Susan; von Bodungen, Maximilian; Apodaca, Gerard; Dedman, John R; Kaetzel, Marcia A; Zeidel, Mark L

    2008-04-01

    Annexin A4 (anxA4) is a member of the Ca(2+)-dependent membrane-binding family of proteins implicated in the regulation of ion conductances, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and membrane trafficking. We demonstrate, in mice, that annexins 1-6 are present in whole bladder and exhibit differential expression in the urothelium. An anxA4a-knockout (anxA4a(-/-)) mouse model shows no protein in the urothelium by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. In wild-type bladders, anxA4a in umbrella cells showed uniform cytoplasmic staining and some association with the nuclear membrane. Application of a hydrostatic pressure to bladders mounted in Ussing chambers resulted in redistribution of anxA4a from cytoplasm to cellular boundaries in the basal and intermediate cells but not in superficial umbrella cells. We hypothesized that anxA4a might be important for barrier function or for stretch-activated membrane trafficking. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a series of functional and morphological analyses on bladders from control and anxA4a(-/-) animals. The transepithelial resistances, water permeabilities, and urea permeabilities of anxA4a(-/-) bladders were not different from controls, indicating that barrier function was intact. Membrane trafficking in response to hydrostatic pressure as measured by capacitance increases was also normal for anxA4a(-/-) bladders. Cystometrograms performed on live animals showed that voiding frequency and intrabladder pressures were also not different. There were no differences in bladder surface morphology or cellular architecture examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. We conclude that loss of anxA4 from the urothelium does not affect barrier function, membrane trafficking, or normal bladder-voiding behavior.

  2. TRPV4 mediates afferent pathways in the urinary bladder. A spinal c-fos study showing TRPV1 related adaptations in the TRPV4 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Dick A W; Hoenderop, Joost G; Heesakkers, John P F A; Schalken, Jack A

    2016-10-01

    The role of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4) channels in urinary bladder afferent neural pathways was investigated using spinal c-fos measurements in mice. Anesthetized wild type and TRPV4 knockout (-/-) mice underwent noxious bladder distention and treatment with either intravesical instillation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX), vehicle or an intraperitoneal injected TRPV4 antagonist (HC067047). Mice underwent paraformaldehyde perfusion for rapid fixation and L6-S1 spinal cord sections were removed followed by immunohistochemical staining for c-fos. A number of c-fos expressing neurons in the dorsal horns of L6-S1 spinal cord transections were quantified. Groups were compared using univariate ANOVA. Even with the absence of bladder inflammation on H&E, the TRPV4 -/- mice still have a significant twofold higher c-fos expression (n = 39, SD 2) after noxious bladder distention compared to wild type mice (n = 20, SD 3). A twofold increase in c-fos expression was observed after LPS treatment in wild types (n = 42, SD 5), but no increase was seen in TRPV4 -/- mice (n = 42, SD 2). After desensitization of primary afferent C-nerve fibers with RTX, c-fos expression in TRPV4-/- mice decreased significantly (threefold) (n = 12, SD 4). Results imply that TRPV4 channels are important for bladder afferent signaling. TRPV4 -/- mice bladders generate more noxious sensory output, which is predominantly mediated through TRPV1 expressing high threshold nerve fibers. This study reveals TRPV1 related adaptive changes in afferent pathways of the TRPV4 -/- mouse. We propose that this effect is caused by a congenital impairment of low threshold nerves that mediate normal bladder filling sensations.

  3. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-10-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function.

  4. Concentration- and time-dependent genomic changes in the mouse urinary bladder following exposure to arsenate in drinking water for up to 12 weeks.

    PubMed

    Clewell, H J; Thomas, R S; Kenyon, E M; Hughes, M F; Adair, B M; Gentry, P R; Yager, J W

    2011-10-01

    Inorganic arsenic (As(i)) is a known human bladder carcinogen. The objective of this study was to examine the concentration dependence of the genomic response to As(i) in the urinary bladders of mice. C57BL/6J mice were exposed for 1 or 12 weeks to arsenate in drinking water at concentrations of 0.5, 2, 10, and 50 mg As/l. Urinary bladders were analyzed using gene expression microarrays. A consistent reversal was observed in the direction of gene expression change: from predominantly decreased expression at 1 week to predominantly increased expression at 12 weeks. These results are consistent with evidence from in vitro studies of an acute adaptive response that is suppressed on longer exposure due to downregulation of Fos. Pathways with the highest enrichment in gene expression changes were associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, inflammation, and proliferation. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis determined that the lowest median BMD values for pathways were above 5 mg As/l, despite the fact that pathway enrichment was observed at the 0.5 mg As/l exposure concentration. This disparity may result from the nonmonotonic nature of the concentration-responses for the expression changes of a number of genes, as evidenced by the much fewer gene expression changes at 2 mg As/l compared with lower or higher concentrations. Pathway categories with concentration-related gene expression changes included cellular morphogenesis, inflammation, apoptosis/survival, cell cycle control, and DNA damage response. The results of this study provide evidence of a concentration-dependent transition in the mode of action for the subchronic effects of As(i) in mouse bladder cells in the vicinity of 2 mg As(i)/l.

  5. Urinary Bladder Cancer in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah Saleh; Aulaqi, Saleh Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study are to highlight the clinicopathological features of urinary bladder cancer in Yemen, and to describe the histological grading of urothelial neoplasms according to the World Health Organization and International Society of Urologic pathology (WHO/ISUP 1998) classification. Methods This is a descriptive record-based study of 316 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed by two pathologists at the Department of pathology, Sana'a University from 1st January 2005 to 30th April 2009. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and categorized according to WHO/ISUP 1998 classification. Results Out of 316 urinary bladder cancers, 248 (78%) were urothelial neoplasms, 53 (17%) were squamous cell carcinoma, 7 (2%) were adenocarcinoma, and 3 (1%) were rhabdomyosarcoma. The remaining cases were metastatic carcinomas (n=3), small cell carcinoma (n=1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1). The urothelial neoplasms observed were carcinoma in situ 4 (2%), papilloma 7 (3%), papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential 26 (11%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade 107 (43%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 18 (7%), and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 85 (34%), with 60 years mean age for males and 58 years for females; along with a male to female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was observed in the 61-70 years age group. Conclusion This study documents a high frequency of urothelial neoplasms, mostly papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade with male preponderance and peak incidence in 6th decade of age. PMID:24044060

  6. β1-Subunit of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel regulates contractile activity of mouse urinary bladder smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Georgi V; Bonev, Adrian D; Heppner, Thomas J; Brenner, Robert; Aldrich, Richard W; Nelson, Mark T

    2001-01-01

    The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel plays an important role in controlling membrane potential and contractility of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). These channels are composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and an accessory, smooth muscle-specific, β1-subunit. Our aim was to determine the functional role of the β1-subunit of the BK channel in controlling the contractions of UBSM by using BK channel β1-subunit ‘knock-out’ (KO) mice. The β-galactosidase reporter (lacZ gene) was targeted to the β1 locus, which provided the opportunity to examine the expression of the β1-subunit in UBSM. Based on this approach, the β1-subunit is highly expressed in UBSM. BK channels lacking β1-subunits have reduced activity, consistent with a shift in BK channel voltage/Ca2+ sensitivity. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of BK channels, increased the amplitude and decreased the frequency of phasic contractions of UBSM strips from control mice. The effects of the β1-subunit deletion on contractions were similar to the effect of iberiotoxin on control mice. The UBSM strips from β1-subunit KO mice had elevated phasic contraction amplitude and decreased frequency when compared to control UBSM strips. Iberiotoxin increased the amplitude and frequency of phasic contractions, and UBSM tone of UBSM strips from β1-subunit KO mice, suggesting that BK channels still regulate contractions in the absence of the β1-subunit. The results indicate that the β1-subunit, by modulating BK channel activity, plays a significant role in the regulation of phasic contractions of the urinary bladder. PMID:11731577

  7. Concentration-and time-dependent genomic changes in the mouse urinary bladder following exposure to arsenate in drinking water for up to twelve weeks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic (AsD is a known human bladder carcinogen. The objective of this study was to examine the concentration dependence of the genomic response to ASi in the urinary bladders of mice. C57BL/6J mice were exposed for 1 or 12 weeks to arsenate in drinking water at concen...

  8. Concentration-and time-dependent genomic changes in the mouse urinary bladder following exposure to arsenate in drinking water for up to twelve weeks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inorganic arsenic (AsD is a known human bladder carcinogen. The objective of this study was to examine the concentration dependence of the genomic response to ASi in the urinary bladders of mice. C57BL/6J mice were exposed for 1 or 12 weeks to arsenate in drinking water at concen...

  9. Primary malignant lymphoma of urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Aigen, A B; Phillips, M

    1986-09-01

    A case of primary malignant lymphoma of the urinary bladder is described. The classic presentation of gross hematuria and dysuria with a benign clinical course is illustrated. From a review of the literature and our experience, we conclude that localized primary lymphoma of the bladder, especially those with favorable histologic findings, often does not require medical or surgical intervention. Persistent irritative bladder symptoms can be palliated adequately with external beam radiotherapy, while surgical intervention is rarely indicated.

  10. Cyclophosphamide-induced Down-Regulation of Uroplakin II in the Mouse Urinary Bladder Epithelium is Prevented by S-Allyl Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Sayed Aliul Hasan; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Raisuddin, Sheikh

    2016-12-01

    The alkylating anticancer drug, cyclophosphamide (CP), induces a number of toxic effects including haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in the urinary bladder. Uroplakins are unique urinary transmembrane proteins of urothelium, which may become potential targets of CP metabolites and reactive free radicals. Natural compounds, especially those rich in thiols, have shown protective effects against CP-induced HC. In this study, we studied the modulatory effect of the thiol-rich compound S-allyl cysteine (SAC) on the mRNA level of uroplakin II by real-time polymerase chain reaction and expression of uroplakin II protein by immunoblotting. SAC (150 mg/kg) showed significant (p < 0.001) protective effects against CP (200 mg/kg)-induced alteration in mRNA level and protein expression of uroplakin II. SAC also protected animals from CP-induced HC as assessed by gross morphological examination of urinary bladder. When compared with mercaptoethane sulphonic acid (mesna) (40 mg/kg), a known thiol-rich drug used in clinical application, SAC was found to be more efficacious in affording protection in urinary bladder tissues. Role of uroplakins in CP-induced urinary bladder toxicity has not been well investigated. This study demonstrated that uroplakins may be the potential target of toxic metabolites of CP and natural compounds such as SAC have the capacity to modulate their expression leading to reduced toxicity burden on the urinary bladder epithelium.

  11. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The vertebrate urinary bladder: osmoregulatory and other uses.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    The bladder may serve more biological uses than simple storage. The importance of bladder functions can be inferred from its presence among vertebrates, its anatomy and histology. From an evolutionary perspective, bladders have evolved at least twice in the vertebrates. The variability of permeability of the urinary bladder to water and solutes among species is discussed. Finally, the urinary bladder may play an osmoregulatory role. PMID:538956

  13. FOREIGN BODY IN URINARY BLADDER: AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Saadat-Hassan; Khan, Ikramullah

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder functions for the storage and expulsion of urine. Foreign bodies in male urinary bladder are rare due to lengthy urethra, especially when they are rounded in shape and difficult to be introduced into urinary bladder. This is a case report of a middle age male with thin body habitus and slightly disturbed psychiatric status. He presented with both irritative and obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). He was investigated and found to have an intact bangle in the urinary bladder. The patient was planned for surgery, and the foreign body was removed endoscopically with the help of cystoscope. Later on the patient was referred to a psychiatrist for psychological management.

  14. Genetics of human congenital urinary bladder disease.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Adrian S; Stuart, Helen M; Newman, William G

    2014-03-01

    Lower urinary tract and/or kidney malformations are collectively the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in children, and they are also likely to account for a major subset of young adults requiring renal replacement therapy. Advances have been made regarding the discovery of the genetic causes of human kidney malformations. Indeed, testing for mutations of key nephrogenesis genes is now feasible for patients seen in nephrology clinics. Unfortunately, less is known about defined genetic bases of human lower urinary tract anomalies. The focus of this review is the genetic bases of congenital structural and functional disorders of the urinary bladder. Three are highlighted. First, prune belly syndrome, where mutations of CHRM3, encoding an acetylcholine receptor, HNF1B, encoding a transcription factor, and ACTA2, encoding a cytoskeletal protein, have been reported. Second, the urofacial syndrome, where mutations of LRIG2 and HPSE2, encoding proteins localised in nerves invading the fetal bladder, have been defined. Finally, we review emerging evidence that bladder exstrophy may have genetic bases, including variants in the TP63 promoter. These genetic discoveries provide a new perspective on a group of otherwise poorly understood diseases.

  15. Occult mucin secreting adenocarcinoma of gall bladder with metastasis to urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Tarun; Mandal, Soumendra Nath; Kamal, Mir Reza; Das, Anjan Kumar; Karmakar, Dilip

    2012-09-01

    Mucin secreting adenocarcinoma of the gall bladder is rare. Although it has propensity to metastasise, urinary metastasis is extremely unusual. We report a case with mucin secreting adenocarcinoma of the gall bladder with metastasis to the urinary bladder. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of its kind in the literature.

  16. Bladder sensory desensitization decreases urinary urgency.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos; Silva, João; Castro, Helder; Reis, Frederico; Dinis, Paulo; Avelino, António; Cruz, Francisco

    2007-06-11

    Bladder desensitization has been investigated as an alternative treatment for refractory detrusor overactivity. Most open and controlled clinical trials conducted with intravesical RTX showed that desensitization delays the appearance of involuntary detrusor contractions during bladder filling and decreases the number of episodes of urgency incontinence. Urgency is being recognised as the fundamental symptom of overactive bladder (OAB), a symptomatic complex which recent epidemiological studies have shown to affect more than 10% of the Western population. As anti-muscarinic drugs, the first line treatment for OAB, are far from being able to fully control urgency, the opportunity to test other therapeutic approaches is created. The present work was, therefore, designed as an exploratory investigation to evaluate the effect of bladder desensitization on urinary urgency. Twenty-three OAB patients with refractory urgency entered, after given informed consent, a 30 days run-in period in which medications influencing the bladder function were interrupted. At the end of this period patients filled a seven-day voiding chart where they scored, using a 0-4 scale, the bladder sensations felt before each voiding. Then, patients were instilled with 100 ml of 10% ethanol in saline (vehicle solution) and 30 days later a second seven-day voiding chart was collected. Finally, patients were instilled with 100 ml of 50 nM RTX in 10% ethanol in saline. At 1 and 3 months additional voiding charts were collected. At the end of the vehicle and 3 months period patients were asked to give their subjective impression about the outcome of the treatment and about the willingness to repeat the previous instillation. At the end of the run-in period the mean number of episodes of urgency per week was 71 +/- 12 (mean +/- SEM). After vehicle instillation, the mean number of episodes of urgency was 56 +/- 11, but only 4 patients (17%) considered that their urinary condition had improved enough to

  17. Bladder sensory desensitization decreases urinary urgency

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos; Silva, João; Castro, Helder; Reis, Frederico; Dinis, Paulo; Avelino, António; Cruz, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Background Bladder desensitization has been investigated as an alternative treatment for refractory detrusor overactivity. Most open and controlled clinical trials conducted with intravesical RTX showed that desensitization delays the appearance of involuntary detrusor contractions during bladder filling and decreases the number of episodes of urgency incontinence. Urgency is being recognised as the fundamental symptom of overactive bladder (OAB), a symptomatic complex which recent epidemiological studies have shown to affect more than 10% of the Western population. As anti-muscarinic drugs, the first line treatment for OAB, are far from being able to fully control urgency, the opportunity to test other therapeutic approaches is created. The present work was, therefore, designed as an exploratory investigation to evaluate the effect of bladder desensitization on urinary urgency. Methods Twenty-three OAB patients with refractory urgency entered, after given informed consent, a 30 days run-in period in which medications influencing the bladder function were interrupted. At the end of this period patients filled a seven-day voiding chart where they scored, using a 0–4 scale, the bladder sensations felt before each voiding. Then, patients were instilled with 100 ml of 10% ethanol in saline (vehicle solution) and 30 days later a second seven-day voiding chart was collected. Finally, patients were instilled with 100 ml of 50 nM RTX in 10% ethanol in saline. At 1 and 3 months additional voiding charts were collected. At the end of the vehicle and 3 months period patients were asked to give their subjective impression about the outcome of the treatment and about the willingness to repeat the previous instillation. Results At the end of the run-in period the mean number of episodes of urgency per week was 71 ± 12 (mean ± SEM). After vehicle instillation, the mean number of episodes of urgency was 56 ± 11, but only 4 patients (17%) considered that their urinary

  18. Pathogenesis of Bladder Calculi in the Presence of Urinary Stasis

    PubMed Central

    Childs, M. Adam; Mynderse, Lance A.; Rangel, Laureano J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Lingeman, James E.; Krambeck, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although minimal evidence exists, bladder calculi in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia are thought to be secondary to bladder outlet obstruction induced urinary stasis. We performed a prospective, multi-institutional clinical trial to determine whether metabolic differences were present in men with and without bladder calculi undergoing surgical intervention for benign prostatic hyperplasia induced bladder outlet obstruction. Materials and Methods Men who elected surgery for bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia with and without bladder calculi were assessed prospectively and compared. Men without bladder calculi retained more than 150 ml urine post-void residual urine. Medical history, serum electrolytes and 24-hour urinary metabolic studies were compared. Results Of the men 27 had bladder calculi and 30 did not. Bladder calculi were associated with previous renal stone disease in 36.7% of patients (11 of 30) vs 4% (2 of 27) and gout was associated in 13.3% (4 of 30) vs 0% (0 of 27) (p <0.01 and 0.05, respectively). There was no observed difference in the history of other medical conditions or in serum electrolytes. Bladder calculi were associated with lower 24-hour urinary pH (median 5.9 vs 6.4, p = 0.02), lower 24-hour urinary magnesium (median 106 vs 167 mmol, p = 0.01) and increased 24-hour urinary uric acid supersaturation (median 2.2 vs 0.6, p <0.01). Conclusions In this comparative prospective analysis patients with bladder outlet obstruction and benign prostatic hyperplasia with bladder calculi were more likely to have a renal stone disease history, low urinary pH, low urinary magnesium and increased urinary uric acid supersaturation. These findings suggest that, like the pathogenesis of nephrolithiasis, the pathogenesis of bladder calculi is likely complex with multiple contributing lithogenic factors, including metabolic abnormalities and not just urinary stasis. PMID:23159588

  19. MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    Epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between chronic exposure to chlorinated drinking water and human cancer, particularly of the urinary bladder. MX (3- chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydrox...

  20. MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MX-INDUCED URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL HYPERPLASIA IN EKER RATS

    Epidemiological studies have shown a positive association between chronic exposure to chlorinated drinking water and human cancer, particularly of the urinary bladder. MX (3- chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydrox...

  1. A Mouse Model of Furosemide-Induced Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Saporito, Michael S; Zuvich, Eva; DiCamillo, Amy

    2016-09-16

    Detailed in this unit is a mouse model of overactive bladder and urinary incontinence based on diuretic stress-induced urination. The procedure involves the use of a unique, highly sensitive, and automated urine capturing method to measure urinary latency, frequency, and void volume. Although this method was first described and validated using an anti-muscarinic drug used for treating overactive bladder, subsequent work has shown that effective non-cholinergic agents can be detected. These findings indicate good predictive value for this model regarding the possible clinical utility of test agents as treatments for overactive bladder, regardless of their site of action. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Genotoxicity in the rodent urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    King, C; Wang, C; Gorelick, N; Frederick, C

    1995-09-01

    Elucidation of the mechanisms by which a chemical may induce urinary bladder tumours in rodents can be expected to provide insight into the relative risk from that agent. The methodologies for exploring whether tumour induction may be a response to direct genotoxic effect of the compound have been successfully applied to the bladders of both mice and rats. Thus, with experimental approaches that utilize adduct detection through the use of immunochemical and postlabelling techniques, unscheduled DNA synthesis and mutagenicity as studied with transgenic animals it is possible to obtain fundamental information on the genotoxic potential of carcinogens in the target bladder. Application of these experimental approaches to carcinogens for which the mechanisms of action are not known should permit assessment of the likelihood that genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms are involved in the tumour induction process. Moreover, such studies may provide knowledge of the molecular pathways that are involved in the action of genotoxic agents, thus enabling judgements to be made as to whether humans are subject to tumour induction by the chemical.

  3. An unusual cause of death: spontaneous urinary bladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Limon, Onder; Unluer, Erden Erol; Unay, Fulya Cakalagaoglu; Oyar, Orhan; Sener, Aslı

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous urinary bladder perforation is a rare and life-threatening condition similar to traumatic and iatrogenic perforation. The connection with the underlying bladder damage due to previous radiotherapy, inflammation, malignancy, obstruction, or other causes can be found in almost all cases. The symptoms are often nonspecific, and misdiagnosis is common. Here, we present a case of spontaneous urinary bladder perforation due to bladder necrosis in a diabetic woman. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Exploratory laparotomy was performed by surgeons and revealed necrosis of the anterior and lateral walls of the urinary bladder. Microscopic examination revealed necrotic changes throughout the bladder wall. Ghost-like cellular outlines were compatible with coagulative necrosis. Clusters of bacteria were also present in some necrobiotic tissues. Malignant cells were not present. It appears probable that the infection was due to local interference with the blood supply (arterial, capillary, or venous) combined with the systemic metabolic upset that led to the bladder condition. In our case, we observed partial necrosis of the bladder rather than distortion of the entire blood supply to the bladder as consequences of the microvascular effects of diabetes. Urinary bladder perforation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with free fluid in the abdomen/peritonitis, decreased urine output, and hematuria, and in whom increased levels of urea/creatinine are detected in serum and/ or peritoneal fluid aspirate.

  4. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  5. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  6. Laparoscopic Rectopexy with Urinary Bladder Xenograft Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aradhana; Afshar, Rami; Gardner, Amy; Ackerman, Ellen; Brandt, Jared; Sasse, Kent C.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Rectal prolapse is often repaired laparoscopically, frequently with the use of reinforcement material. Both synthetic and biologically derived materials reduce recurrence rate compared to primary suture repair. Synthetic mesh introduces potential complications such as mesh erosion, fibrosis, and infection. Urinary bladder matrix (UBM) represents a biologically derived material for reinforcement of rectal prolapse repair with the potential to improve durability without risks of synthetic materials. The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness, durability, and functional result of laparoscopic rectopexy using urinary bladder matrix xenograft reinforcement at three years follow up. Methods: The 20 cases presented describe rectal prolapse repair by means of laparoscopic rectopexy with presacral UBM reinforcement. Patients were followed up for an average of 3 years and assessed with interviews, physical examination, manometry, and the fecal incontinence severity index (FISI). Results: Each repair was completed laparoscopically. UBM exhibited favorable handling characteristics when sutured to the sacrum and the lateral rectal walls. One patient underwent laparoscopic drainage of a postoperative abscess; no other complications occurred. In 3 years of follow-up, there have been no full-thickness recurrences, erosions, reoperations, or long-term complications. Two patients exhibited a small degree of mucosal prolapse on follow-up physical examination that did not require surgery. Three-year FISI scores averaged 8 (range, 0–33 of a possible 61), indicating low fecal incontinence symptomatology. Follow-up anorectal manometry was performed in 9 patients, showing mixed results. Conclusion: Surgeons may safely use laparoscopic rectopexy with UBM reinforcement for repair of rectal prolapses. In this series, repairs with UBM grafts have been durable at 3-year follow-up and may be an alternative to synthetic mesh reinforcement of rectal

  7. Role of the chronic bacterial infection in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Higgy, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether or not bacterial infection of the urinary bladder had a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate this proposition, four separate studies were conducted. The first study developed an experimental animal model where bacterial infection of the urinary bladder could be introduced and maintained for a period in excess of one year. The method of infection, inoculation of bacteria (Escherichia coli type 04) subserosally into the vesical wall, successfully caused persistent infection in the majority of animals. In the second study the temporal effects of bacterial infection on the induction of urothelial ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis were examined. Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder induced urothelial ODC with a peak in enzyme activity 6 hr after infection./sup 3/H-Thymidine uptake and DNA synthesis peaked 48 hr after infection and coincided with the urothelial hyperplasia that occurred in response to the infection. In the third study the specific bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to rats concurrent with the urinary bacterial infection. In the fourth study rats were administered sodium nitrate and either dibutylamine or piperazine in the drinking water. The infected group developed bladder tumors while none were detected in the non-infected rats. From these studies it may be concluded that bacterial infection may have a significant role in the process of urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

  8. [Capsaicin and lidocaine usage in functional disorders of urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Kajetan; Thor, Piotr J

    2011-01-01

    Most of the drugs in the treatment of functional disorders of the urinary bladder has a peripheral effect. Their work consists mainly in reducing detrusor contractility of the bladder, or effects on the afferent innervation. Anticholinergics are the first drugs of choice. An alternative pharmacological treatment is to eliminate the overactivity by acting on the bladder afferent innervation, while not inhibiting its contractility. One option is to modulate the pharmacological activity of sensory mechanisms governing the functioning of the bladder via the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and ancyrin (TRPA1). Intravesical treatment with capsaicin or lidocaine only partially reduces bladder sensation. Furthermore, clinical use of lidocaine in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is reduced to intravesical supply before capsaicin instillation to reduce the symptoms associated with initial phase of C-fibres sensitization. This paper presents the current state of knowledge regarding the use of capsaicin and lidocaine in functional disorders of the urinary bladder, as well as discusses the impact of these substances on afferent C-fibres and the activity of the urinary bladder. Based on previous studies intravesical capsaicin and lidocaine therapy is one of the alternative treatment options in selected patients with functional disorders of the urinary bladder (in particular OAB) in addition to standard anticholinergics therapy or the newer generation of therapies using botulinum toxin.

  9. Experimental evaluation of urinary bladder marsupialization in male goats.

    PubMed

    May, Kimberly A; Moll, H David; Duncan, Robert B; Moon, Martha M; Pleasant, R Scott; Howard, Rick D

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of urinary bladder marsupialization in male goats. Prospective, experimental study. Six healthy mixed-breed male goats. After experimentally induced urethral obstruction, 6 male goats had urinary bladder marsupialization. Renal ultrasonography, complete blood count, and serum biochemical analysis were evaluated preoperatively (day 0), at 7 postoperative days, and then at 30-day intervals until 180 days. Stomal diameter was recorded immediately postoperatively and at each postoperative interval. Necropsy examination was performed on day 180 or when stomal stricture or death occurred. Stomal stricture occurred in 1 goat at 120 days. Another goat was found dead at 150 days; severe, suppurative cystitis was identified on necropsy. All goats had mild urine scald dermatitis. Serum biochemical values remained within normal limits, but significant decreases in white blood cell count, serum creatinine concentration, and stomal diameter occurred. At necropsy, all bladders were tubular in shape. Histological evidence of chronic suppurative cystitis and chronic, mild lymphoplasmacytic pyelitis occurred in all goats. Bacterial culture of renal tissue yielded growth in 3 goats, and bladder mucosal swabs yielded bacterial growth in all goats. Although clinical signs of ascending urinary tract infection were not observed in goats with patent stomata, urinary bladder marsupialization may result in ascending urinary tract inflammation or infection. Based on our results, urinary bladder marsupialization should be recommended with caution as the primary method for management of urinary tract obstruction in clinical cases. Copyright 2002 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  10. Expression of constitutive heat shock protein-70 in normal (non-stressed) rabbit urinary bladder tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Levin, R M; Monson, F C; Chacko, S

    1993-04-07

    The expression of constitutive HSP-70 in the urinary bladder was determined by SDS-PAGE and western blotting using a mouse monoclonal antibody against HSP-70. The western blot analysis showed that the mouse anti-HSP-70 cross-reacted with a 70 kDa protein present in the extracts of the urinary bladder muscle and mucosa. Densitometric scanning of the western blots allowed us to specifically quantitate the relative amounts of the HSP-70. The quantitation of the HSP-70 by combining immunoblotting and densitometry using a laser scanner is reproducible and this technique requires only a small amount of tissue. The amounts of HSP-70 can be estimated from a standard curve of nanogram(ng) of HSP-70 vs absorption from the immunoblots. The amounts of HSP-70 in the muscular and mucosal layers in the body of the urinary bladder are more than those in the base of the bladder. The presence of HSP-70 in the muscle and mucosal epithelium of the bladder was demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis of freshly removed tissue from the base and the body of bladder from normal animals.

  11. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Tazi, Elmehdi; Benlemlih, Amal; Chbani, Leila; Amarti, Afaf; EL Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Urinary bladder pheochromocytoma is rare. From a case report of unsuspected pheochromocytoma and literature review, the authors develop a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the management of this ectopic pheochromocytoma localization. PMID:19830088

  12. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Ahallal, Youness; Tazi, Elmehdi; Benlemlih, Amal; Chbani, Leila; Amarti, Afaf; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2009-07-22

    Urinary bladder pheochromocytoma is rare. From a case report of unsuspected pheochromocytoma and literature review, the authors develop a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the management of this ectopic pheochromocytoma localization.

  13. Spontaneous, idiopathic urinary bladder perforation--case report.

    PubMed

    Wieloch, Maria; Bazylińska, Kamila; Ziemniak, Piotr

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous, idiopathic urinary bladder rupture is a very rare disease entity, which may face the problem of proper preoperative diagnosis. In many cases the medical history, physical examination, and additional tests raise false suspicion of gastrointestinal perforation. The study presented a case of a female patient with spontaneous urinary bladder perforation, paying particular attention to the diagnostic difficulties associated with the above-mentioned pathology. The aim of the study was to analyse the presence of symptoms and imaging and laboratory results observed in case of spontaneous urinary bladder rupture, as well as differentiate the above-mentioned pathology with gastrointestinal perforation. Whenever diagnosing a patient with acute peritonitis symptoms, in whom the predominating symptoms include sudden abdominal pain, peritoneal cavity fluid presence, hematuria, oliguria, and coexisting increased urea, creatinine, and potassium levels, one should consider the possibility of urinary bladder rupture.

  14. [Staging urinary bladder cancer with dynamic MR imaging].

    PubMed

    Tsuda, K; Narumi, Y; Nakamura, H; Nonomura, I; Okuyama, A

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews the magnetic resonance (MR) staging of bladder cancer. The multiplanar and soft-tissue characterization capabilities of MR imaging make it a valuable diagnostic tool to image the urinary bladder. Recent advances of MR imaging such as fast imaging, pelvic phased array coil, and dynamic imaging improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy for staging bladder cancer. Some patient-related factors are also important for optimal imaging of the urinary bladder, especially motion artifacts from the gastrointestinal tract and the degree of bladder distension. An anticholinergic agent should be used for suppressing the motion artifacts. Optimal bladder filling can be achieved by asking patients to void and drink water 1 hour before examinations. Scanning perpendicular to the bladder wall is necessary for optimal evaluation for staging bladder cancer. Oblique scanning is needed in cases when a tumor is not located on the dome, base, anterior wall, posterior wall, or lateral walls. The early phase image of dynamic imaging is most useful for staging tumors. Better contrast between tumor and bladder wall on dynamic images provides high staging accuracy, especially in differentiation between superficial tumors and tumors with muscle invasion. MR imaging is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of lymph nodes. Although MR imaging currently is not appropriate for screening for bladder cancer and detecting small tumors, it has been proved to be most useful in the staging of bladder cancer.

  15. [Tissue engineering in urology, new approaches for urinary bladder reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, A N; Orlova, N V; Blinova, M I; Iudintseva, N M

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering as applied to urologic pathology is covered extremely poor in the literature despite recently gaining popularity of regenerative medicine. The review reflects the current problems associated with reconstructive surgery of the urinary bladder, experience of the researchers from the United States in implementing cellular technologies for bladder replacement, the problems and prospects of this direction in case of such a severe pathology, as fibrous transformated bladder.

  16. Inguinal Herniation of the Urinary Bladder Presenting as Recurrent Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Amit; Roy-Shapira, Aviel; Shelef, Ilan; Shaked, Gadi; Koyfman, Leonid; Borer, Abraham; Klein, Moti

    2015-01-01

    Herniation of the urinary bladder into the inguinal canal is an uncommon finding, observed in 0.5–4% of inguinal hernias (Curry (2000)). It is usually associated with other conditions that increase intra-abdominal pressure such as bladder neck obstruction due to prostatic hypertrophy. Consequently, in men, it is usually associated with some degree of urinary retention. We present a 42-year-old man in whom herniation of the urinary bladder was the cause of urinary retention, and not vice versa. The patient was on tumor necrosis factor alpha antagonist (TNFA) (Etanercept) for severe Ankylosing spondylitis. Initially, the urinary retention was thought to be a side effect of the medication, but after the drug was discontinued, urinary retention persisted. CT and MRI demonstrated huge herniation of the urinary bladder into the inguinal canal. Immediately after the hernia was repaired, bladder function was restored. TNF treatment was restarted, and no further urinary symptoms were observed in the next two years of follow-up. In this case, the primary illness and its treatment were distracting barriers to early diagnosis and treatment. In younger patients with a large hernia who develop unexpected urinary retention, herniation of the urinary bladder should be highly considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26075132

  17. Radiation Dose–Volume Effects Of The Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Shipley, William U.

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth overview of the normal-tissue radiation tolerance of the urinary bladder is presented. The most informative studies consider whole-organ irradiation. The data on partial-organ/nonuniform irradiation are suspect because the bladder motion is not accounted for, and many studies lack long enough follow-up data. Future studies are needed. PMID:20171505

  18. Unusual location of a urinary bladder cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Forte, Serafino; Kos, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Adrienne

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy among men in the Western world. Bone metastasis occurs in 27 % of the cases. Usually, the location is the spine. The present report describes the first case of a proven distant bone metastasis to the acromion from a urinary bladder carcinoma in a patient with shoulder pain.

  19. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects of the Urinary Bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Shipley, William U.

    2010-03-01

    An in-depth overview of the normal-tissue radiation tolerance of the urinary bladder is presented. The most informative studies consider whole-organ irradiation. The data on partial-organ/nonuniform irradiation are suspect because the bladder motion is not accounted for, and many studies lack long enough follow-up data. Future studies are needed.

  20. TP53 modulating agent, CP-31398 enhances antitumor effects of ODC inhibitor in mouse model of urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Kumar, Gaurav; Lightfoot, Stan; Wu, Xueru; Steele, Vernon; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 and elevated levels of polyamines are known to play key roles in urothelial tumorigenesis. We investigated the inhibition of polyamines biosynthesis and the restoration of p53 signaling as a possible means of preventing muscle invasive urothelial tumors using DFMO, an ODC-inhibiting agent, and CP-31398 (CP), a p53 stabilizing agent. Transgenic UPII-SV40T male mice at 6weeks age (n=15/group) were fed control diet (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing DFMO (1000 and 2000 ppm) or 150 ppm CP or both. At 40 weeks of age, all mice were euthanized and urinary bladders were evaluated to determine tumor weight and histopathology. Low-dose DFMO had a moderate significant inhibitory effect on tumor growth (38%, P<0.02) and tumor invasion (23%). High-dose DFMO had a 47% tumor inhibition (P<0.0001) and 40% inhibition tumor invasion. There was no significant difference between 1000 and 2000 ppm doses of DFMO (P>0.05). CP at 150 ppm alone had a strong inhibitory effect on tumor growth by 80% (P<0.0001); however, no effect on tumor invasion was observed. Interestingly, the combination of DFMO (1000 ppm) and CP (150 ppm) led to significant decrease in tumor weight (70%, P<0.0001) and tumor invasion (62.5%; P<0.005). Molecular analysis of the urothelial tumors suggested a modulation of polyamine biosynthesis, proliferation, cell cycle regulators resulting from the use of these agents. These results suggest that targeting two or more pathways could be an effective approach for chemoprevention. A combination of CP and DFMO appears to be a promising strategy for urothelial TCC prevention.

  1. TP53 modulating agent, CP-31398 enhances antitumor effects of ODC inhibitor in mouse model of urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Kumar, Gaurav; Lightfoot, Stan; Wu, Xueru; Steele, Vernon; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 and elevated levels of polyamines are known to play key roles in urothelial tumorigenesis. We investigated the inhibition of polyamines biosynthesis and the restoration of p53 signaling as a possible means of preventing muscle invasive urothelial tumors using DFMO, an ODC-inhibiting agent, and CP-31398 (CP), a p53 stabilizing agent. Transgenic UPII-SV40T male mice at 6weeks age (n=15/group) were fed control diet (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing DFMO (1000 and 2000 ppm) or 150 ppm CP or both. At 40 weeks of age, all mice were euthanized and urinary bladders were evaluated to determine tumor weight and histopathology. Low-dose DFMO had a moderate significant inhibitory effect on tumor growth (38%, P<0.02) and tumor invasion (23%). High-dose DFMO had a 47% tumor inhibition (P<0.0001) and 40% inhibition tumor invasion. There was no significant difference between 1000 and 2000 ppm doses of DFMO (P>0.05). CP at 150 ppm alone had a strong inhibitory effect on tumor growth by 80% (P<0.0001); however, no effect on tumor invasion was observed. Interestingly, the combination of DFMO (1000 ppm) and CP (150 ppm) led to significant decrease in tumor weight (70%, P<0.0001) and tumor invasion (62.5%; P<0.005). Molecular analysis of the urothelial tumors suggested a modulation of polyamine biosynthesis, proliferation, cell cycle regulators resulting from the use of these agents. These results suggest that targeting two or more pathways could be an effective approach for chemoprevention. A combination of CP and DFMO appears to be a promising strategy for urothelial TCC prevention. PMID:26693057

  2. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS--URINARY BLADDER DUPLICATION IN A CAT.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alysa B; Langston, Cathy E; Fischetti, Anthony J; Donovan, Taryn A

    2015-01-01

    A female kitten presented for chronic, intermittent, antibiotic-responsive urinary incontinence and chronic kidney disease. Abdominal ultrasound identified bilateral pelvic/ureteral dilation and three closely apposed thin-walled fluid-filled structures in the caudal abdomen, extending toward the pelvic inlet. Excretory urography and negative contrast cystography identified contrast medium accumulation from the dilated ureters into two tubular soft tissue masses of the caudal abdomen, with subsequent gradual filling of a more cranially located urinary bladder. A retrograde vaginocystourethrogram identified a normal uterus, normal vagina, and a single urethra continuous with the cranially located urinary bladder. Antemortem diagnosis was suspicious for bilateral ectopic ureteroceles. Postmortem diagnosis, 35 months following initial presentation, determined the fluid-filled masses to have abundant smooth muscle in the wall, including a muscularis mucosa connected by a common ostium, consistent with urinary bladder duplication. Urinary bladder duplication should be included as a differential diagnosis in cats with these clinical and imaging characteristics. In this case, differentiation of ectopic ureterocele from urinary bladder duplication required histological confirmation.

  3. [Urodynamics of upper urinary tracts after intestinal plastic surgery on urinary bladder (experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Mudraia, I S; David'iants, A A; Zaĭtsev, A V

    1999-01-01

    In dog experiments, the urinary bladder was replaced for an isolated intestinal segment to test upper urinary tract function as regards configuration of the established urine reservoir early and late after the surgery. Intestinal plastic surgery of the bladder changes parameters of ureteral function in unchanged potential reserve of ureteral contraction. Postileocystoplasty urodynamics of the upper urinary tracts is characterized by lowering of intraureteral pressure, decreased amplitude of ureteral contractions, enhanced tonicity and motility. Plastic replacement of the bladder with isolated intestinal segment is not contraindicated in the solitary kidney.

  4. Application of bladder acellular matrix in urinary bladder regeneration: the state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Gubanska, Iga; Drewa, Gerard; Drewa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Construction of the urinary bladder de novo using tissue engineering technologies is the "holy grail" of reconstructive urology. The search for the ideal biomaterial for urinary bladder reconstruction has been ongoing for decades. One of the most promising biomaterials for this purpose seems to be bladder acellular matrix (BAM). In this review we determine the most important factors, which may affect biological and physical properties of BAM and its regeneration potential in tissue engineered urinary bladder. We also point out the directions in modification of BAM, which include incorporation of exogenous growth factors into the BAM structure. Finally, we discuss the results of the urinary bladder regeneration with cell seeded BAM.

  5. The utility of stem cells in pediatric urinary bladder regeneration.

    PubMed

    Iannaccone, Philip M; Galat, Vasil; Bury, Matthew I; Ma, Yongchao C; Sharma, Arun K

    2017-09-15

    Pediatric patients with a neurogenic urinary bladder caused by developmental abnormalities including spina bifida exhibit chronic urological problems. Surgical management in the form of enterocystoplasty is used to enlarge the bladder but is associated with significant clinical complications. Thus, alternative methods to enterocystoplasty have been explored through the incorporation of stem cells with tissue engineering strategies. Within the context of this review, we will examine the use of bone marrow stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as they relate to bladder regeneration at the anatomic and molecular levels. The use of bone marrow stem cells has demonstrated significant advances in bladder tissue regeneration as multiple aspects of bladder tissue have been recapitulated including urothelium, bladder smooth muscle, vasculature and peripheral nerves. iPSCs, on the other hand, have been well characterized and used in multiple tissue regenerative settings, yet iPSC research is still in its infancy with regards to bladder tissue regeneration with recent studies describing the differentiation of iPSCs to bladder urothelium. Finally, we examine the role of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling cascade that mediate the proliferative response during regeneration between bladder smooth muscle and urothelium. Taken together, this review provides a current, comprehensive perspective on bladder regeneration.Pediatric Research accepted article preview online, 15 September 2017. doi:10.1038/pr.2017.229.

  6. Ruptured urinary bladder in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Roussel, A J; Ward, D S

    1985-06-15

    A yearling Holstein heifer was admitted with abdominal pain and bilateral, ventral abdominal distention. Bladder rupture was diagnosed by abdominocentesis and endoscopy. Correction of metabolic derangements was accomplished by volume diuresis, with maintenance of a urethral catheter before surgical repair of the bladder. The cause of the bladder rupture was believed to be related to adhesions resulting from previous surgery for urachal abscessation. Bladder rupture, which usually occurs in bulls or steers secondary to urolithiasis or in cows after dystocia, also should be considered in prepartum heifers with dehydration, abdominal pain, and abdominal distention.

  7. A Rare Case of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma with Urinary Bladder Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Rahoma E.; Denning, Krista; Pacioles, Toni O.

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma to the urinary bladder is extremely rare. We describe a previously healthy 49-year-old female with recent diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction with metastatic disease to the liver. Biopsy was positive for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH). She received six cycles of Cisplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Herceptin and subsequently developed symptomatic anemia and hematuria. Cystoscopy with retroflexion was performed and she received a transurethral resection of bladder tumor with fulguration. Pathology of the bladder tumor revealed similar morphology to her liver metastasis and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with metastatic esophageal cancer. Three weeks after being diagnosed with metachronous urinary bladder metastasis from esophageal adenocarcinoma primary, she expired. She only received her first cycle of palliative chemotherapy with Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel. PMID:28642830

  8. Dynamic multi-planar EPI of the urinary bladder during voiding with simultaneous detrusor pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Simmons, A; Williams, S C; Craggs, M; Andrew, C; Gregory, L; Allin, M; Mundy, A; Leaker, B

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging gives high quality images of the urinary bladder with excellent contrast. We report here the first application of dynamic, multi-slice, echo planar imaging to a study of urinary bladder emptying. Changes in urinary bladder volumes and rates of urine expulsion from the bladder have been measured simultaneously with bladder pressure. The method shows promise for clinical applications involving compromised bladder function, for reappraising bladder contraction strength-volume relationships, and for investigating the rate of change of length, three-dimensional shape, and wall tension in different parts of the bladder during micturition.

  9. Radiation dose-volume effects of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Yorke, Ellen D; Marks, Lawrence B; Eifel, Patricia J; Shipley, William U

    2010-03-01

    An in-depth overview of the normal-tissue radiation tolerance of the urinary bladder is presented. The most informative studies consider whole-organ irradiation. The data on partial-organ/nonuniform irradiation are suspect because the bladder motion is not accounted for, and many studies lack long enough follow-up data. Future studies are needed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in the puerperium.

    PubMed

    Kekre, A N; Kekre, N; Nath, V; Seshadri, L

    1997-11-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in the puerperium is extremely rare. The patient usually presents with acute abdominal pain. Awareness on the part of the treating surgeon that bladder rupture is a possibility will lead to an early diagnosis. Immediate exploration, removing urine from the peritoneal cavity or retropubic space, closing the rupture and securing good vesical drainage, results in resumption of vesical function, and thereby decreases the mortality and morbidity.

  11. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Yagnik, Vipul; Chadha, Amit; Chaudhari, Sanjay; Patel, Keyuri

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) of bladder is an uncommon benign tumor of bladder, which is of unknown neoplastic potential, characterized by spindle cell proliferation with characteristic fibroinflammatory and pseudosarcomatous appearance. Essential criteria for the diagnosis of IMT are: spindle myoepithelial cell proliferation and lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. PMID:20882160

  12. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Thomas J.; Tykocki, Nathan R.; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Nelson, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms. PMID:26224686

  13. Social stress in mice induces urinary bladder overactivity and increases TRPV1 channel-dependent afferent nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Heppner, Thomas J; Tykocki, Nathan R; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Vizzard, Margaret A; Nelson, Mark T

    2015-09-15

    Social stress has been implicated as a cause of urinary bladder hypertrophy and dysfunction in humans. Using a murine model of social stress, we and others have shown that social stress leads to bladder overactivity. Here, we show that social stress leads to bladder overactivity, increased bladder compliance, and increased afferent nerve activity. In the social stress paradigm, 6-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed for a total of 2 wk, via barrier cage, to a C57BL/6 retired breeder aggressor mouse. We performed conscious cystometry with and without intravesical infusion of the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine, and measured pressure-volume relationships and afferent nerve activity during bladder filling using an ex vivo bladder model. Stress leads to a decrease in intermicturition interval and void volume in vivo, which was restored by capsazepine. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that at low pressures, bladder compliance and afferent activity were elevated in stressed bladders compared with unstressed bladders. Capsazepine did not significantly change afferent activity in unstressed mice, but significantly decreased afferent activity at all pressures in stressed bladders. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 colocalizes with CGRP to stain nerve fibers in unstressed bladders. Colocalization significantly increased along the same nerve fibers in the stressed bladders. Our results support the concept that social stress induces TRPV1-dependent afferent nerve activity, ultimately leading to the development of overactive bladder symptoms. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Effect of esophagus distention on urinary bladder function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G; Qnais, E Y; Allouh, M Z

    2012-01-01

    Micturition process is a spinobulbospinal reflex that is affected by the viscero-visceral interactions due to convergent inputs into spinal and/or supraspinal centers controlling that reflex. Although interaction between bladder and other pelvic organs, such as colon, are well studied, the viscero-visceral interaction between urinary bladder and internal organs in other regions are rarely studied. In the present study, continuous filling cystometry recordings, in male rats, were used to investigate the effects of mechanical stimulation of distal-esophagus (distention), as well as, electrical stimulation of abdominal branches of the vagus nerve on urinary bladder micturition cycles. Distal esophagus distention and electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve significantly increased the micturition frequency through decreasing the time of the storage phase of the micturition cycle. However, bilateral cervical vagotomy eliminated the effects of distal esophagus distention and electrical stimulation of vagus nerve on micturition cycles. The results of this study indicate that there is a viscero-visceral interaction between esophagus and urinary bladder, which is mediated through vagal afferents. Understanding the properties of the viscero-visceral interactions affecting the urinary bladder will help in the diagnosis and management of micturition problems. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. An abattoir survey of urinary bladder lesions in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Herenda, Drago; Dukes, Thomas W.; Feltmate, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Postmortem examination of 21,340 cattle at an Ontario abattoir over a one-year period revealed macroscopic lesions in urinary bladders of 2,296 animals (10.8%). Chronic cystitis, the most frequent finding, was observed in 2,209 cases (10.4%); uroliths were found in 994 (4.7%) of the cattle with chronic cystitis. Other types of urinary bladder lesions included acute cystitis, developmental abnormalities, hyperplasia, neoplasia, emphysema, and a parasitic cystitis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:17423629

  16. Mesh erosion into urinary bladder following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Arjun Singh; Kumar, Ameet; Kumar, Bharath N.

    2017-01-01

    Along with advantages, evolving surgical techniques bring unique complications. A young male developed urinary symptoms a few months after undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. On evaluation, mesh erosion into the urinary bladder was found. Removal of mesh with repair of bladder was done. A vesico-cutaneous fistula resulted which was managed with repeat surgery. We review all such cases reported in literature; discuss the etiopathogenesis, presentation, management and possible preventive measures. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the 12th case being reported. PMID:28281479

  17. Bladder augmentation and urinary diversion for neurogenic LUTS: current indications.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Goldman, Howard B

    2012-10-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty and urinary diversion are no longer commonplace in the management of patients with neurogenic bladder, but remain an important surgical treatment for those with refractory LUTS who have failed neuromodulation and onabotulinum toxin treatment or who are not candidates for those treatments. Augmentation is an option in patients who can perform intermittent catheterization and is usually performed with ileum or large intestine. Some patients benefit from continent cutaneous catherizable channels. Supravesical urinary diversion may be necessary in more severe cases. Ileovesicostomies are being supplanted by indwelling suprapubic catheters, and when catheters fail conduits may be a better option. When feasible, the diverted bladder should be excised to avoid pyocystis.

  18. [A pheochromocytoma of urinary bladder treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Naokazu; Komura, Kazumasa; Koyama, Kouhei; Inamoto, Teruo; Segawa, Naoki; Tanimoto, Keiji; Tuji, Motomu; Azuma, Haruhito; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2009-12-01

    A 69-year-old female presented with hypertension and a solid mass in the bladder on ultrasonography. Cystoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the right lateral wall of the bladder. A transurethral resection was performed. Histologically, pathologic examination revealed a malignant pheochromocytoma. She refused surgical therapy and radiation therapy. She had no treatment for two years. She suddenly complained of gross hematuria. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a bladder tumor of high intensity and extra-bladder invasion. She was treated with chemotherapy (CVD) for 26 cycles. Since the tumor size was reduced, she was referred to our hospital for operative indication. Partial cystectomy was performed. Histologically, the tumor was a pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder. Ten months after the operation, she has no clinical evidence of recurrence.

  19. Urinary Bladder Leiomyosarcoma: Primary Surgical Treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    Slaoui, Hakim; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Validire, Pierre; Barret, Eric; Rozet, François; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cases of bladder leiomyosarcoma represent 0.1% of all nonurothelial tumors. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy for a high-grade bladder leiomyosarcoma with an ileal diversion. The patient recovered uneventfully and no surgical margins were verified in final pathology. Early follow-up at 3 months shows no signs of computed tomography recurrence and adequate adaptation to ileal diversion. Although bladder sarcomas were once thought to have a grim prognosis, recent studies suggest that adequate surgical treatment is able to achieve optimal cancer control outcomes. PMID:26839792

  20. Ultrasound-guided urinary bladder biopsy through a urinary catheter in a bitch.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Julio; Norman, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    A 34.4 kg 5 yr old spayed female mixed-breed dog was presented for evaluation of a urinary bladder mass. The dog had a recent onset of hematuria and stranguria but otherwise appeared to be healthy. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a mass in the urinary bladder. The dog was sedated and a 10-French rubber catheter that had the blunt end removed was passed from the urethra to the urinary bladder. Using ultrasound guidance, ellipsoid cup biopsy forceps were advanced through the rubber catheter to the urinary bladder mass and biopsies were successfully obtained. The dog was discharged from the hospital a few hours after the procedure. Histopathology of the mass was consistent with polypoid cystitis. Follow-up surgical removal of the polyp was uneventful, and histopathology confirmed the presurgical biopsy diagnosis. Procurement of urinary bladder biopsies through a urinary catheter with ultrasound guidance was used as a minimally invasive alternative to either cystoscopy or surgery in a bitch. Use of this technique achieved a diagnosis without the need for specialized endoscopic equipment, anesthesia, or surgery.

  1. The NOTES Approach to Management of Urinary Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fyock, Christopher J.; Parekattil, Sijo J.; Atalah, Hany; Su, Li-Ming; Forsmark, Chris E.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Inadvertent bladder injury is a potential complication of various urological and pelvic surgeries. Bladder injury can also be a complication of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of a NOTES approach to repair bladder lacerations in a blinded porcine study. Methods: Intentional bladder lacerations were made to mimic accidental injury during NOTES in 7 pigs. In 3 animals, the site of bladder injury was identified and repaired by a blinded endoscopist. Bladder laceration and transluminal access sites were closed with Endoclips. Leak test was performed to confirm adequate closure. Survival animals were monitored postoperatively and surgical sites were inspected for abscess, bleeding, or damage to surrounding structures at necropsy. Results: Complete endoscopic closure of bladder injuries was achieved in all 7 animals with a negative leak test. The site of laceration was successfully identified by the blinded endoscopist and repaired in all 3 animals in which it was attempted. Survival animals had an uneventful postoperative course without any complications. Conclusion: This blinded feasibility study shows that urinary bladder injury occurring during NOTES can be successfully managed via a NOTES approach using currently available endoscopic accessories. PMID:21985711

  2. The NOTES approach to management of urinary bladder injury.

    PubMed

    Fyock, Christopher J; Parekattil, Sijo J; Atalah, Hany; Su, Li-Ming; Forsmark, Chris E; Wagh, Mihir S

    2011-01-01

    Inadvertent bladder injury is a potential complication of various urological and pelvic surgeries. Bladder injury can also be a complication of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of a NOTES approach to repair bladder lacerations in a blinded porcine study. Intentional bladder lacerations were made to mimic accidental injury during NOTES in 7 pigs. In 3 animals, the site of bladder injury was identified and repaired by a blinded endoscopist. Bladder laceration and transluminal access sites were closed with Endoclips. Leak test was performed to confirm adequate closure. Survival animals were monitored postoperatively and surgical sites were inspected for abscess, bleeding, or damage to surrounding structures at necropsy. Complete endoscopic closure of bladder injuries was achieved in all 7 animals with a negative leak test. The site of laceration was successfully identified by the blinded endoscopist and repaired in all 3 animals in which it was attempted. Survival animals had an uneventful postoperative course without any complications. This blinded feasibility study shows that urinary bladder injury occurring during NOTES can be successfully managed via a NOTES approach using currently available endoscopic accessories.

  3. Spontaneous rupture of urinary bladder: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Albino, Giuseppe; Bilardi, Francesco; Gattulli, Domenico; Maggi, Pietro; Corvasce, Antonio; Marucco, Ettore Cirillo

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the bladder is a rare event. The clinical presentation shows the signs and symptoms of peritonitis, but the diagnosis is made at the operating table. This event is burdened with a high mortality rate. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who came to our observation. He was a chronic carrier of urinary catheter, at least 7 times removed traumatically by himself. At the time of admission he showed drastic reduction in urine output, absence of hydronephrosis, normal functioning of the catheter, a tense and widely meteoric abdomen, the presence of air-fluid levels, normal kidneys, absence of free fluid in the abdomen. The CT showed a fluid collection of about 7 cm diameter between the bladder and rectum. The explorative laparotomy found a small fissuration of the posterior wall of the bladder. For his severe conditions, the patient died a few hours after surgery, in intensive care unit. Although it is a rare event, since 1980, 177 cases of spontaneous rupture of the bladder are reported in the literature. Their causes may be essentially divided into two groups: for increase of intravesical pressure; or for weakening of the bladder wall. In most cases, the spontaneous rupture of the bladder takes place in presence of a urothelial neoplasm or after radiation therapy of the pelvic organs. The etiology of spontaneous rupture of the bladder in our case does not relate to a bladder tumor or radiotherapy. It may have been caused by repeated episodes of acute retention of urine with extreme bladder distension up to 3 liters. It is not easy to think of a bladder perforation in patients presenting signs of peritonitis without a history of bladder cancer or pelvic radiotherapy. A CT with intravesical contrast medium could help the diagnostic orientation.

  4. Donepezil-induced response of Spirulina supplemented rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Nurullahoglu-Atalik, K E; Okudan, N; Gokbel, H; Nurullahoglu, Z U

    2013-01-01

    At present, very little is known about the effects of donepezil on vascular reactivity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the responses of rat urinary bladder to donepezil (10-10-3x10-4 M) and the role of Spirulina supplementation in these effects. Animals were divided into the two groups of six animals in each group. The first group received only distilled water daily as vehicle for six weeks and served as the control. The second group received Spirulina 750 mg kg -1 orally, daily for six weeks and served as the spirulina group. Preparations of rat urinary bladder were used from both groups. Donepezil produced concentration dependent relaxation of rat urinary bladder preparations pre-contracted with KCl.The pIC50 value, but not the maximal response of donepezil, was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the Spirulina supplemented group. These results demonstrated for the first time that spirulina treatment can affect urinary bladder activity (Fig. 1, Ref. 20).

  5. Anoctamin-1 in the Juvenile Rat Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bijos, Dominika A.; Drake, Marcus J.; Vahabi, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate presence, location and functional role of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) Anoctamin-1 (Ano1) in rat urinary bladder. Materials and Methods Bladders from 3 week old Wistar rats were studied. End-point PCR on total mRNA was used to assess the expression of Ano1. Immunofluorescent labelling of whole mount bladder tissue imaged with confocal microscope allowed localization of Ano1 and vimentin immunopositive cells. The effects of CaCC blockers: niflumic acid (NFA) (3,10,30 µM) and 5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) (10, 30 µM) on spontaneous phasic contractile activity of intact (with mucosa) and denuded (without mucosa) detrusor strips were measured under isometric tension in organ baths (n = 141, N = 60). Results Ano1 expression was found at mRNA level in mucosa and detrusor layers. Confocal microscopy revealed presence of Ano1 immunopositive cells in mucosa and in detrusor layers; a subpopulation of vimentin positive cells expressed Ano1. Both chloride channel blockers reduced the amplitude and frequency of phasic contractions in denuded and intact strips. Conclusions Ano1 is expressed in rat urinary bladder and is present in cells sharing markers with interstitial cells. CaCC blockers reduced phasic activity of the bladder tissue. Ano1 is expressed in the bladder and plays a role in its spontaneous phasic contractile activity. PMID:25181534

  6. Malakoplakia in the urinary bladder of a kitten.

    PubMed

    Bayley, C; Slocombe, R; Tatarczuch, L

    2008-07-01

    Malakoplakia is a form of chronic granulomatous inflammation that in humans most commonly affects the urinary bladder of middle-aged women. Naturally occurring malakoplakia is rare in animals, having been described twice in the pig only. An 8-week-old kitten was diagnosed with malakoplakia of the urinary bladder after a 3-week history of dysuria. Post-mortem examination revealed a markedly enlarged bladder with a diffusely nodular mucosal surface. Microscopically, there was diffuse submucosal infiltration by histiocytes stained positively by periodic acid Schiff (PAS) and described in the human condition as "von Hansemann cells". Intracellular and extracellular "Michaelis-Gutman" inclusion bodies were seen on light and electron microscopical examination. These structures are considered pathognomonic for malakoplakia. The pathogenesis of malakoplakia is enigmatic. Defective function of phagolysosomes is currently suspected to underlie the abnormal accumulation of submucosal histiocytes; however the primary functional defect remains unknown.

  7. A rare case of malignant paraganglioma of urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vinaya B; Bhandare, Amit T

    2015-01-01

    Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder is a rare pathologic entity with no definitive histological, immunohistochemical or molecular features to determine its malignant potential. Malignancy is essentially determined by the presence of deep local invasion, invasion of adjacent structures and lymph node or distant metastases. So far, up to 180 cases of paraganglioma have been reported, with <30 being malignant. A 50-year-old male presented with painless hematuria for 6 months. Cystoscopic biopsy of the bladder mass was given as invasive urothelial carcinoma. Patient underwent radical cystectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The gross morphological brown discoloration of mass on formalin fixation was suspicious of paraganglioma and was confirmed on immunohistochemistry. The diagnosis of malignant paraganglioma was made based on regional lymph node metastases. We describe a rare case of a patient with malignant urinary bladder paraganglioma with main differential diagnostic considerations on the histomorphology.

  8. Lymphoma affecting the urinary bladder in three dogs and a cat.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Livia; Lamb, Christopher R; Corzo-Menendez, Nuria; Holloway, Andrew; Eastwood, Jane M

    2006-01-01

    Three dogs and one cat with lymphoma affecting the urinary bladder are reported and the findings on abdominal radiographs and ultrasound are described. Mural lesions representing lymphoma affecting the urinary bladder were identified ultrasonographically in all animals. The most common complications associated with urinary bladder lymphoma were hydronephrosis and hydroureter. In two patients contrast radiography was necessary to detect leakage of urine in the peritoneal and retroperitoneal space. The radiographic and ultrasonographic signs were similar to those reported with other urinary bladder neoplasms; hence urinary bladder lymphoma could not be distinguished from the more common urinary bladder neoplasms, such as transitional cell carcinoma. It is important to include lymphoma in the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder wall thickening and mural mass in dogs and cats.

  9. The urinary bladder of spontaneously hypertensive rat demonstrates bladder hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis but not hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shanwei; Xia, Chun-mei; Qiao, Li-Ya

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to systemically characterize the factors that are associated with urinary bladder organ enlargement in the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Material and Methods We compared the SHR to age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats in the levels of bladder pro-inflammatory factors, collagen expression (type I), and detrusor smooth muscle growth. Key Findings Our results showed that enhanced inflammatory responses and fibrosis were key factors that were closely associated with bladder wall thickening in SHR. Specifically the mRNA levels of inflammatory factors interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6 and TNFα were significantly higher in SHR than those in WKY. The SHR also had a higher number of mast cells in the suburothelium space. Type I collagen production was also significantly higher in SHR when compared to those in control rats. However, the smooth muscle content stayed the same in SHR and WKY rats. This was shown as that the ratio of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) to the nuclear protein histone H3 showed no difference between these two rat strains. The mRNA and protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) also showed no change in the urinary bladder of SHR and WKY. Further study showed that the phosphorylation level of Akt in the urinary bladder was not changed in SHR when compared to WKY. In contrast, the phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 was significantly higher in SHR bladder when compared to WKY. Significance These results suggest that inflammation and fibrosis are primary factors that may lead to urinary bladder hypertrophy in SHR. PMID:25445218

  10. Neurotrophin/receptor expression in urinary bladder of mice with overexpression of NGF in urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Beatrice M.; Malley, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Urothelium-specific overexpression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the urinary bladder of transgenic mice stimulates neuronal sprouting in the urinary bladder, produces increased voiding frequency, and results in increased referred somatic hypersensitivity. Additional NGF-mediated pleiotropic changes might contribute to the increased voiding frequency and pelvic hypersensitivity observed in these transgenic mice, such as modulation of other growth factor/receptor systems. Chronic overexpression of NGF in the urothelium was achieved through the use of a highly urothelium-specific uroplakin II promoter. In the present study, we examined NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and associated receptor [p75NTR, tyrosine kinase (Trk)A, TrkB] transcript and protein expression in urothelium and detrusor smooth muscle of NGF-overexpressing (OE) and littermate wild-type mice, using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, ELISAs, and semiquantitation of immunohistochemistry. We focused on these growth factor/receptors given the established roles of NGF/TrkA, NGF/p75NTR, and BDNF/TrkB systems in bladder function. Increased voiding frequency in NGF-OE mice was confirmed by examining urination patterns. BDNF, TrkA, and TrkB protein expression was significantly (P ≤ 0.01) reduced and p75NTR protein expression was significantly (P ≤ 0.01) increased in urinary bladder of NGF-OE mice. The NGF-OE-induced changes in neurotrophic factor/receptor expression in urinary bladder may represent compensatory changes to reduce voiding frequency in the NGF-OE mouse. PMID:21048026

  11. Developing a functional urinary bladder: a neuronal context

    PubMed Central

    Keast, Janet R.; Smith-Anttila, Casey J. A.; Osborne, Peregrine B.

    2015-01-01

    The development of organs occurs in parallel with the formation of their nerve supply. The innervation of pelvic organs (lower urinary tract, hindgut, and sexual organs) is complex and we know remarkably little about the mechanisms that form these neural pathways. The goal of this short review is to use the urinary bladder as an example to stimulate interest in this question. The bladder requires a healthy mature nervous system to store urine and release it at behaviorally appropriate times. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the construction of these neural circuits is not only relevant to defining the basis of developmental problems but may also suggest strategies to restore connectivity and function following injury or disease in adults. The bladder nerve supply comprises multiple classes of sensory, and parasympathetic or sympathetic autonomic effector (motor) neurons. First, we define the developmental endpoint by describing this circuitry in adult rodents. Next we discuss the innervation of the developing bladder, identifying challenges posed by this area of research. Last we provide examples of genetically modified mice with bladder dysfunction and suggest potential neural contributors to this state. PMID:26389118

  12. A case of signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder with spontaneous urinary extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Sanish S.; Thachil, Joseph V.; Raja, T. `; Mani, Rama

    2011-01-01

    Primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (PSRCC) of the bladder is a relatively rare variant of adenocarcinoma of the bladder with poor prognosis. Also PSRCC of the bladder presenting with spontaneous urinary extravasation is very rare. We present the case of a 48-year male who presented with spontaneous urinary extravasation and was diagnosed to have PSRCC of the urinary bladder on evaluation. He was treated with radical cystectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. This report emphasizes the need to rule out other primary sites of adenocarcinoma in the body, which may metastasize to the urinary bladder. PMID:22022068

  13. Structure and function in urinary bladder of foetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    France, Venetia M.; Stanier, Margaret W.; Wooding, F. B. P.

    1974-01-01

    1. The structure and function of the epithelial lining of the urinary bladder of sheep foetuses was investigated by electron microscopic studies made in conjunction with a series of experiments in which the permeability of the bladder to sodium and water was measured in vitro. Measurements were made at gestational ages ranging from 50 to 141 days (term = 147 days) Osmolarity and electrolyte concentrations of urine found in the foetal bladder were also measured. 2. The development of tight junctions between the bladder epithelial cells was investigated by incubating the tissue with solutions containing 1 mM-LaCl3 on the mucosal surface. No penetration of the junctions by lanthanum was observed in foetuses of 90 days or older. In younger bladders, the epithelial layer was stripped by treatment with lanthanum, but tight junctions appeared to be fully developed in early bladders incubated without lanthanum. 3. The surface structure of the luminal (mucosal) plasmalemma was fully developed at 50 days. 4. Unidirectional fluxes of labelled sodium and water were measured with identical solutions bathing the two surfaces of the bladder wall. No net water movement occurred; the mean ratio of efflux to influx in nine bladders was 1·002 ± 0·039 (S.E. of mean). Under these conditions, the flux ratio for sodium was 1·735 ± 0·143 (S.E. of mean) in twelve bladders. 5. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) had no effect on net water movement but reduced the net efflux of sodium so that the flux ratio became 1·285 ± 0·255 (S.E. of mean) n = 8. ADH also had a striking effect on the structure of the epithelium, causing marked swelling of the intercellular spaces. The tight junctions remained an effective barrier to lanthanum penetration under these conditions; lanthanum was not observed in the enlarged spaces. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3Plate 4Plate 5Plate 6 PMID:4854429

  14. Spontaneous Urinary Bladder Perforation: An Unusual Presentation of Diabetes Mellitus☆

    PubMed Central

    Kabarriti, Abdo E.; Ramchandani, Parvati; Guzzo, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous urinary bladder perforation is a rare event, which requires immediate medical attention due to its extremely high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented with acute-onset abdominal pain without any inciting events. His glucose level at the time of presentation was 1107 mg/dL. On initial abdominal imaging, it was believed that he had a large pelvic mass likely originating from the bladder. On further workup at our hospital, it was discovered that he had an intraperitoneal perforation after which he underwent an exploratory laparotomy and a cystorrhaphy. PMID:26955559

  15. Macroscopic electrical propagation in the guinea pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Hammad, F T; Stephen, B; Lubbad, L; Morrison, J F B; Lammers, W J

    2014-07-15

    There is little knowledge about macroscopic electrical propagation in the wall of the urinary bladder. Recording simultaneously from a large number of extracellular electrodes is one technology that could be used to study the patterns of macroscopic electrical propagations. The urinary bladders from 14 guinea pigs were isolated and placed in an organ bath. A 16 × 4-electrode array was positioned at various sites on the serosal bladder surface, and recordings were performed at different intravesical volumes. In four experiments, carbachol (CCH; 10(-6) M), nifedipine (10 mM), or tetrodotoxin (TTX; 10(-6) M) was added to the superfusing fluid. After the experiments, the extracellular signals were analyzed and propagation maps were constructed. Electrical waves were detected at all sites on the bladder surface and propagated for a limited distance before terminating spontaneously. The majority of waves (>90%) propagated in the axial direction (i.e., from dome to base or vice versa). An increase in vesicle volume significantly decreased the conduction velocity (from 4.9 ± 1.5 to 2.7 ± 0.7 cm/s; P < 0.05). CCH increased, nifedipine decreased, while TTX had little effect on electrical activities. In addition, a new electrical phenomenon, termed a "patch," was discovered whereby a simultaneous electrical deflection was detected across an area of the bladder surface. Two types of electrical activities were detected on the bladder surface: 1) electrical waves propagating preferentially in the axial direction and 2) electrical patches. The propagating electrical waves could form the basis for local spontaneous contractions in the bladder during the filling phase.

  16. Diuresis and urinary saturation in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Burr, R G; Nuseibeh, I

    1981-03-01

    The effects of variation in fluid intake, of hard or softened drinking water, and of dietary calcium restriction on urinary relative saturation with calcium phosphates and magnesium ammonium phosphate were studied in 36 patients with neruogenic bladder. The relationship between urine volume and brushite saturation was statistically significant in 25 patients. For 8, an output of at least 4 liters per day should provide effective antistone therapy. For 17, an impossibly large volume (up to 11 liters daily) would be required. In two patients brushite saturation was significantly reduced in response to substitution of softened water for hard drinking, and in another two soft water combined with dietary calcium restriction had a similar effect. Unless urinary pH can be controlled, limitation of calcium intake is of no value in the majority of patients with neurogenic bladder and calculous disease.

  17. [Fall during dancing can lead to urinary bladder rupture].

    PubMed

    Winck-Flyvholm, Lili

    2013-12-02

    The definition of dancing is body movements performed to music. It is hard to imagine any festive occasion without music and dancing. It is also a great exercise which helps you to stay in shape. As with any other form of sports, dancing can lead to injury. In this case report it is described how a fall during dancing resulted in urinary bladder rupture. This type of injury under these circumstances has never been described before in the literature.

  18. mTOR inhibitors in urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Leite, R; Arantes-Rodrigues, R; Sousa, Nuno; Oliveira, P A; Santos, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the great scientific advances that have been made in cancer treatment, there is still much to do, particularly with regard to urinary bladder cancer. Some of the drugs used in urinary bladder cancer treatment have been in use for more than 30 years and show reduced effectiveness and high recurrence rates. There have been several attempts to find new and more effective drugs, to be used alone or in combination with the drugs already in use, in order to overcome this situation.The biologically important mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is altered in cancer and mTOR inhibitors have raised many expectations as potentially important anticancer drugs. In this article, the authors will review the mTOR pathway and present their experiences of the use of some mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus, everolimus and temsirolimus, in isolation and in conjunction with non-mTOR inhibitors cisplatin and gemcitabine, on urinary bladder tumour cell lines. The non-muscle-invasive cell line, 5637, is the only one that exhibits a small alteration in the mTOR and AKT phosphorylation after rapalogs exposure. Also, there was a small inhibition of cell proliferation. With gemcitabine plus everolimus or temsirolimus, the results were encouraging as a more effective response was noticed with both combinations, especially in the 5637 and T24 cell lines. Cisplatin associated with everolimus or temsirolimus also gave promising results, as an antiproliferative effect was observed when the drugs were associated, in particular on the 5637 and HT1376 cell lines. Everolimus or temsirolimus in conjunction with gemcitabine or cisplatin could have an important role to play in urinary bladder cancer treatment, depending on the tumour grading.

  19. Functional role of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa (maijuana), and their derivatives produce a wide spectrum of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have clinical applications. The discovery of specific cannabinoid receptors and a family of endogenous ligands of those receptors has attracted much attention to the general cannabinoid pharmacology. In recent years, studies on the functional role of cannabinoid receptors in bladder have been motivated by the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids on voiding dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients. In this review, we shall summarize the literature on the expression of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder and the peripheral influence of locally and systemically administered cannabinoids in the bladder. The ongoing search for cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies devoid of psychotropic effects can be complemented with local delivery into bladder by the intravesical route. A greater understanding of the role of the peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptor system in lower urinary tract is necessary to allow the development of new treatment for pelvic disorders. PMID:20535281

  20. Bilateral Hydroureteronephrosis with a Hypertrophied, Trabeculated Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Showkathali; Raiz, Iqbal; Faiz, Iqbal

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral hydroureteronephrosis involves the dilatation of the renal pelvis, calyces and ureter; it develops secondary to urinary tract obstruction and leads to a build-up of back pressure in the urinary tract, and it may lead to impairment of renal function and ultimately culminate in renal failure. Although clinically silent in most cases, it can be diagnosed as an incidental finding during evaluation of an unrelated cause. In a minority of patients, it presents with signs and symptoms. Renal calculus is the most common cause, but there are multiple non-calculus aetiologies, and they depend on age and sex. Pelviureteric junction obstruction, benign prostatic hypertrophy, urethral stricture, neurogenic bladder, retroperitoneal mass and bladder outlet obstruction are some of the frequent causes of hydroureteronephrosis in adults. The incidence of non-calculus hydronephrosis is more common in males than in females. Ultrasonography is the most important baseline investigation in the evaluation of patients with hydronephrosis. Here, we report a rarely seen case of bilateral hydroureteronephrosis associated with a hypertrophied, trabeculated bladder in an adult male cadaver, suspected to be due to a primary bladder neck obstruction, and analyse its various other causes, clinical presentations and outcomes. PMID:28894411

  1. [Principles and indications of electrostimulation of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Tanagho, E A

    1990-07-01

    Neurostimulation to restore the essential elements of lower urinary tract function is a very promising approach in the management of the neuropathic bladder. The goal of neurostimulation is to restore the three main functions of the lower urinary tract: the reservior capacity of the bladder, the sphincteric activity of the continence mechanism, and the ability of the bladder to evacuate completely. In extensive experimental studies conducted over the past 18 years, the physiological foundations of micturition and sphincteric control were investigated, which made the clinical application of neurostimulation in the management of the neurogenic bladder possible. In human studies, the essential experimental model of ventral root stimulation after dorsal rhizotomy and selective peripheral neurotomy proved to be the most successful. To date, over 220 patients have been treated, of whom 35 have spinal cord injury or severe neuropathy and received multiple sacral root implants. 25 of the 35 patients are evaluable, 15 (60%) of these achieved the three goals of the study: complete continence, restoration of reservoir function with adequate capacity, and voiding to neurostimulation with minimal residual urine or none. The remaining 185 patients with a variety of voiding dysfunctions classified under four main headings: 1) urge incontinence; 2) post-prostatectomy incontinence; 3) pelvic dysfunction syndrome in the male; 4) pelvic dysfunction syndrome in the female were treated by single electrode implantation in order to modulate spastic voiding dysfunction and pelvic floor activity. Success rates (improvement of 50% or more) were 72%, 38%, 46%, and 47% in the four groups, respectively.

  2. Pure Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma Originating from the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takashi; Naiki, Taku; Kawai, Noriyasu; Iida, Keitaro; Etani, Toshiki; Ando, Ryosuke; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Sugiyama, Yosuke; Okada, Atsushi; Mizuno, Kentaro; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Yasui, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder (LELCB) is a rare variant of infiltrating urothelial carcinoma. We report a case of LELCB in a 43-year-old man. Ultrasonography and cystoscopy revealed two bladder tumors, one on the left side of the trigone and the other on the right side of the trigone. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumors was performed and pathological analysis revealed undifferentiated carcinoma. We therefore performed radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization as found for previous cases of LELCB. The final pathological diagnosis was a lymphoepithelioma-like variant of urothelial carcinoma with perivesical soft tissue invasion. For adjuvant systemic chemotherapy, three courses of cisplatin were administered. The patient subsequently became free of cancer 72 months postoperatively. Based on the literature, pure or predominant LELCB types show favorable prognoses due to their sensitivity to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. An analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of bladder tumors examined in our institution revealed that the ADC value measured for this LELCB was relatively low compared to conventional urothelial carcinomas. This suggests that measuring the ADC value of a lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma prior to operation may be helpful in predicting LELCB. PMID:27099604

  3. Organic cation secretion by Cancer borealis urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.; Holliday, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    In the crab, Cancer borealis, initial clearance studies showed a potent renal excretory system for the model organic cation, tetraethylammonium (TEA). (/sup 14/C)-TEA clearance averaged 145 +/- 32 ml/day, which was 18 times the paired polyethylene glycol clearance. TEA uptake by slices of urinary bladder was concentrative, saturable, inhibitable by N/sup 1/-methylnicotinamide chloride, and dependent on glycolytic, but not oxidative, metabolism. When mounted in flux chambers, bladders exhibited a large net secretory flux. For 0.1 mM TEA, the ratio of secretory to reabsorptive fluxes was 65. Urinary bladders from another crab, Cancer irroratus, and a lobster, Homarus americanus, also exhibited net TEA secretion. In C. borealis bladder, secretory transport was concentrative, saturable, and nearly abolished by addition of 1 mM quinine to the serosol bath. Reabsorptive transport was not concentrative and was not reduced by luminal quinine. The data are consistent with a secretory pathway that is transcellular and mediated by carriers at both the serosal and luminal membranes.

  4. [The medical rehabilitation of the children presenting with the hyperactive urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Novikova, E V; Popova, O F

    2015-01-01

    The present article is focused on the modern technologies for the medical rehabilitation of the children presenting with the hyperactive urinary bladder (UB) designed to promote the act of urination in the children at all levels of bladder innervation.

  5. Functional and Morphological Alterations of the Urinary Bladder in Type 2 Diabetic FVBdb/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liyang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xiao, Nan; Huang, Yexiang; Kavran, Michael; Elrashidy, Rania A.; Wang, Mingshuai; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming

    2016-01-01

    Aims Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) has been extensively studied in animal models of type 1 diabetes. We aimed to examine the functional and morphological alterations of the urinary bladder in a type 2 diabetes model, FVBdb/db mice. Methods FVBdb/db mice and age-matched FVB/NJ control mice were tested at either 12, 24 or 52 weeks of age. Body weight, blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were measured. Bladder function was assessed by measurement of 24-hour urination behavior and conscious cystometry. Bladder was harvested for Masson's Trichrome staining and morphometric analysis. Results The body weights of FVBdb/db mice were twice as those of FVB/NJ control mice. The blood glucose and HbA1c levels were higher in FVBdb/db mice at 12 and 24 weeks, but not at 52 weeks. A significant increase in the mean volume per void, but decrease in the voiding frequency, in FVBdb/db mice was observed. Cystometry evaluation showed increased bladder capacity, voided volume, and peak micturition pressure in FVBdb/db mice compared with FVB/NJ mice. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increase in the areas of detrusor muscle and urothelium in FVBdb/db mice. In addition, some FVBdb/db mice, especially males at 12 and 24 weeks, showed small-volume voiding during 24-hour urination behavior measurement, and detrusor overactivity in the cystometry measurement. Conclusions The FVBdb/db mouse, displaying DBD characterized by not only increased bladder capacity, void volume, and micturition pressure, but also bladder overactivity, is a useful model to further investigate the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes-related bladder dysfunction. PMID:27037041

  6. Neurite outgrowth in cultured mouse pelvic ganglia - Effects of neurotrophins and bladder tissue.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Mari; Zhu, Baoyi; Swärd, Karl; Uvelius, Bengt

    2017-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors regulate survival and growth of neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated via both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons located in the major pelvic ganglion. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on the sprouting rate of sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites from the female mouse ganglion. The pelvic ganglion was dissected out and attached to a petri dish and cultured in vitro. All three factors (BDNF, NT-3 and NGF) stimulated neurite outgrowth of both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites although BDNF and NT-3 had a higher stimulatory effect on parasympathetic ganglion cells. The neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC were all expressed in neurons of the ganglia. Co-culture of ganglia with urinary bladder tissue, but not diaphragm tissue, increased the sprouting rate of neurites. Active forms of BDNF and NT-3 were detected in urinary bladder tissue using western blotting whereas tissue from the diaphragm expressed NGF. Neurite outgrowth from the pelvic ganglion was inhibited by a TrkB receptor antagonist. We therefore suggest that the urinary bladder releases trophic factors, including BDNF and NT-3, which regulate neurite outgrowth via activation of neuronal Trk-receptors. These findings could influence future strategies for developing pharmaceuticals to improve re-innervation due to bladder pathologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. [Functional status of urinary tract after plastic surgery of the urinary bladder with a segment of the ileum (experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Kirpatovskiĭ, V I; Mudraia, I S; David'iants, A A; Kaprin, A D; Obukhova, T V; Lavrinova, L N

    1999-01-01

    Replacement of the gall bladder with an isolated ileal segment was made to evaluate function of the urinary tracts depending on configuration of the created urine reservoir early and late after the operation in dogs. Intestinoplasty of the gall bladder changes parameters of ureteral function. Upper urinary tract urodynamics after ileocystoplasty is characterized by lowering of intraureteral pressure, decreased amplitude of the contractions, high tonicity and motility. The intestinal bladder has the same mean basal pressure at rest but less when full than the control animals. Reflex urination after the bladder reconstruction in subtotal resection was intact. Detubulized urinary reservoir had low intravesical pressure and no spontaneous contraction activity.

  8. Urinary nerve growth factor levels in overactive bladder syndrome and lower urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Chen, Chia-Yen; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2010-12-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome based on self-reported symptoms of urgency and frequency with or without urge incontinence. Although urgency is the core symptom of OAB, patients might have difficulty to distinguish urgency from the urge to void. Urodynamic study is a useful diagnostic tool to discover detrusor overactivity (DO) in patients with OAB; however, not all OAB patients have DO. Therefore, a more objective and non-invasive way to diagnose and assess OAB including DO is needed. Recent research has focused on urinary biomarkers in assessment of OAB. Urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) level increases in patients with OAB-wet, bladder outlet obstruction, mixed urinary incontinence and urodynamic DO. Urinary NGF levels are correlated with severity of OAB symptoms. In patients with OAB and DO who have been well treated with antimuscarinics or botulinum toxin injection, urinary NGF levels have been shown to decrease significantly in association with reduction of urgency severity. However, not all patients with OAB have an elevated urinary NGF level. It might also be increased in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, cerebrovascular accident and lower urinary tract diseases such as urinary tract stone, bacterial infection and urothelial tumor. It is possible to use urinary NGF levels as a bio-marker for diagnosis of OAB as well as for the assessment of therapeutic outcome in patients with OAB or DO. Here, we review the latest medical advances in this field. Copyright © 2010 Formosan Medical Association & Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Angela

    2014-10-01

    We review the morphology and differential diagnoses of pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia of the bladder, using a study case to illustrate the discussion. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia is a rare, reactive response to an ischemic insult, classically to radiation therapy, and consists of proliferative, pseudoinfiltrative urothelial nests within the stroma. The presence of background radiation therapy-related changes, such as numerous dilated thrombosed vessels, reactive-appearing endothelial and stromal cells, edema, and hemorrhage, can provide clues to the diagnosis. The main differential diagnoses include invasive urothelial carcinoma and the nested variant of urothelial carcinoma; morphologic features, such as the presence or absence of background therapy-related changes and the architecture and the cytologic atypia of the nests, can help distinguish between pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia and urothelial carcinoma.

  10. Identification and functional study of phosphodiesterases in rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Kraft, P; Craig, E C; Liu, X; Haynes-Johnson, D

    2001-12-01

    Abstract Cyclic nucleotides are important secondary messengers involved in modulating the contractility of various smooth muscles. Phosphodiesterases (PDE) play important roles in this process by modulating the levels of cyclic nucleotides and their duration of action. This study was designed to identify and characterize the PDE isoenzymes in rat urinary bladder and to evaluate their roles in regulating bladder smooth muscle tone. The involvement of cAMP and cGMP pathways in this process was also assessed. The studies were carried out with tissues from male and female rats and no significant sex-related difference was found in the results. Utilizing the unique pharmacological properties of different isoenzymes, PDE1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were identified in rat bladder. Organ bath experiments showed that forskolin was most potent in relaxing pre-contracted rat bladder strips while sodium nitroprusside was moderately effective, suggesting the relaxation was mainly mediated by the cAMP pathway and that the cGMP pathway is moderately involved. For PDE inhibitors, the non-specific inhibitor papaverine was most effective in relaxing pre-contracted bladder strips. Among isoenzyme-selective inhibitors, vinpocetine, EHNA, and sildenafil induced more relaxation than milrinone and rolipram.

  11. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  12. The Urinary Bladder Transcriptome and Proteome Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling.

    PubMed

    Habuka, Masato; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Pontén, Fredrik; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    To understand functions and diseases of urinary bladder, it is important to define its molecular constituents and their roles in urinary bladder biology. Here, we performed genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis of human urinary bladder samples and identified genes up-regulated in the urinary bladder by comparing the transcriptome data to those of all other major human tissue types. 90 protein-coding genes were elevated in the urinary bladder, either with enhanced expression uniquely in the urinary bladder or elevated expression together with at least one other tissue (group enriched). We further examined the localization of these proteins by immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays and 20 of these 90 proteins were localized to the whole urothelium with a majority not yet described in the context of the urinary bladder. Four additional proteins were found specifically in the umbrella cells (Uroplakin 1a, 2, 3a, and 3b), and three in the intermediate/basal cells (KRT17, PCP4L1 and ATP1A4). 61 of the 90 elevated genes have not been previously described in the context of urinary bladder and the corresponding proteins are interesting targets for more in-depth studies. In summary, an integrated omics approach using transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling has been used to define a comprehensive list of proteins elevated in the urinary bladder.

  13. Effects of propiverine hydrochloride on the spontaneous contractions of isolated guinea-pig urinary bladder strip and rhythmic urinary bladder contractions of anesthetized dog.

    PubMed

    Haruno, A

    1992-12-01

    The effects of propiverine hydrochloride (P-4, CAS 60569-19-9), a new drug to treat pollakiuria, was investigated on the spontaneous contractions of isolated guinea-pig urinary bladder strip and rhythmic urinary bladder contractions of anesthetized dog. At 10(-6)-10(-5) mol/l P-4 raised the base line of an isolated guinea-pig urinary bladder strip and accelerated its spontaneous contraction. At 10(-4) mol/l P-4 raised, and then lowered the baseline, and accelerated then suppressed its spontaneous contractions. Papaverine at 10(-6)-10(-4) mol/l also showed a similar action as P-4 in the isolated guinea-pig urinary bladder strip. Flavoxate at 10(-6)-10(-4) mol/l raised its base line and accelerated its spontaneous contractions. Those of P-4 at 10(-5) mol/l were not inhibited by tetrodotoxin 10(-6) mol/l). At doses of 50 mg/kg or more, intraduodenal administration of P-4 suppressed the frequency of rhythmic urinary bladder contractions of anesthetized dog in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that P-4 shows mainly an accelerating action on the endogenous spontaneous contractions of urinary bladder, but on exogenous contractions induced by the Balloon's method it shows an suppressing action and regulates the functions of the urinary bladder, so P-4 might become a useful drug for the clinical treatment of micturitional dysfunction, for example, pollakiuria.

  14. Urinary Diversion and Morbidity After Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John L.; Yu, Hua-Yin; Setodji, Claude; Hanley, Jan M.; Litwin, Mark S.; Saigal, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The rate of continent urinary diversion after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer varies by patient and provider characteristics. Demonstration of equivalent complication rates, independent of diversion type, may decrease provider reluctance to perform continent reconstructions. The authors sought to determine whether continent reconstructions confer increased complication rates after radical cystectomy. METHODS From the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the authors used International Classification of Disease (ICD-9) codes to identify subjects who underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer during 2001–2005. They determined acute postoperative medical and surgical complications from ICD-9 codes and compared complication rates by reconstruction type using the nearest neighbor propensity score matching method and multivariate logistic regression models. RESULTS Adjusting for case-mix differences between reconstructive groups, continent diversions conferred a lower risk of medical, surgical, and disposition-related complications that was statistically significant for bowel (3.1% lower risk; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], −6.8% to −0.1%), urinary (1.2% lower risk; 95% CI, −2.3%, to −0.4%), and other surgical complications (3.0% lower risk; 95% CI, −6.2% to −0.4%), and discharge other than home (8.2% lower risk; 95% CI, −12.1% to −4.6%) compared with ileal conduit subjects. Older age and certain comorbid conditions, including congestive heart failure and preoperative weight loss, were associated with significantly increased odds of postoperative medical and surgical complications in all subjects. CONCLUSIONS Mode of urinary diversion after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer is not associated with increased risk of immediate postoperative complications. These results may encourage broader consideration of continent urinary diversion without concern for increased complication rates. PMID:19924831

  15. Urine cytology of micropapillary carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Takahiko; Furuta, Michiko; Mimura, Akihiro; Tanigawa, Naoto; Takamizu, Ryuichi; Kawano, Kiyoshi

    2011-11-01

    A case of micropapillary carcinoma (MPC) of urinary bladder is presented, in which the urine smear was studied in detail in an attempt to better characterize the cytologic findings of MPC. When the voided urine was examined in low power, cancer cells were scattered in the specimens as compact papillary/spheroidal clusters composed of pleomorphic cancer cells. Solitary carcinoma cells were occasionally observed. High power view of the smear revealed that the papillae/spheroids consisted of high-grade urothelial carcinoma cells. The cancer cells had pleomorphic nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin and thickened, irregular nuclear membrane, and thick cytoplasm. Histologically, the tumor in the resected bladder appeared as small nests with surrounding hallo both in the luminal surface and in the site of wall involvement. These tightly bound papillary/spheroidal clusters comprised of highly atypical cancer cells were the most specific cytologic finding in the urine of MPC, which were considered as a key diagnostic clue of MPC. The background of the urine smear showed numerous granulocytes and bacilli compatible with cystitis, which is a previously known complication of MPC. Differential diagnoses of MPC from those with pertinent cytologic findings such as conventional UC (including glandular differentiation), and primary/secondary adenocarcinoma of urinary bladder are discussed with a brief review of literature. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Bladder Neck Urothelial Carcinoma: A Urinary Bladder Subsite Carcinoma With Distinct Clinicopathology.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Rashid, Hani

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the clinicopathology of carcinomas originating in the urinary bladder neck, 316 cystectomies for urinary bladder carcinoma performed between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were analyzed. Clinicopathological parameters were compared between bladder neck carcinomas (BNCs) and non-BNCs. Among the 316 cystectomies were 19 BNCs and 297 non-BNCs. BNCs accounted for 19/316 (6%) of all the cases, with a male-to-female ratio 18:1. Bladder neck location was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage. Ninety percent and 58% BNCs presented at stage ≥T2 and ≥T3, respectively, versus 62% and 38% non-BNCs at ≥T2 and ≥T3, respectively. Significantly higher percentage of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were also seen in BNCs (68% and 47%, respectively) than in non-BNCs (29% and 17%, respectively). In conclusion, BNCs present with a significantly higher frequency of muscle invasion and advanced tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, as well as local and distant metastasis at diagnosis compared with the non-BNCs group. Recognition of these unique clinicopathologic features with early detection and possibly more aggressive management of BNC can potentially have a significant impact on the patient's outcome.

  17. Differences in the expression of transient receptor potential channel V1, transient receptor potential channel A1 and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K+ channels between the lumbar splanchnic and pelvic nerve innervations of mouse urinary bladder and colon.

    PubMed

    La, J H; Schwartz, E S; Gebhart, G F

    2011-07-14

    The bladder and distal colon are innervated by lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and pelvic nerves (PN) whose axons arise from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons at thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) spinal levels, respectively. In an attempt to understand the molecular basis of differences between LSN and PN mechanosensitive afferents, we analyzed the gene expression of two potentially counteracting ion channel groups involved in mechanosensation, transient receptor potential channels (TRPV1 and TRPA1) and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels (TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK), in TL and LS DRG neurons innervating mouse bladder or distal colon. The proportion of TRPV1-expressing cells (41∼61%) did not differ between TL and LS neurons innervating bladder or colon. TRPA1 was seldom detected in bladder LS neurons whereas it was expressed in 64∼66% of bladder TL, colon TL and colon LS neurons. Coexpression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was frequent. TREK-1-expressing cells were more prevalent in LS than TL ganglia in both bladder- and colon-DRG neurons. All three K(2P) channels were detected more frequently in TRPV1-positive neurons in TL ganglia. More than half of TL neurons expressing only TRPA1 were devoid of any of the three K(2P) channels, whereas all TL neurons expressing both TRPA1 and TRPV1 expressed at least one of the K(2P) channels. These results reveal clear differences between LSN and PN sensory pathways in TRPA1 and TREK-1 gene expression and in the gene expression of K(2P) channels in TRPV1-expressing neurons. This study further documents heterogeneity of visceral afferents based on combinations of the five channels examined.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy of gallium in bladder tissue following gallium maltolate administration during urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ball, Katherine R; Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L; Blyth, Robert I R; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M; Thompson, Julie

    2013-11-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli.

  19. Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microscopy of Gallium in Bladder Tissue following Gallium Maltolate Administration during Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Chirino, Manuel; Hamilton, Don L.; Blyth, Robert I. R.; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Dowling, Patricia M.; Thompson, Julie

    2013-01-01

    A mouse model of cystitis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was used to study the distribution of gallium in bladder tissue following oral administration of gallium maltolate during urinary tract infection. The median concentration of gallium in homogenized bladder tissue from infected mice was 1.93 μg/g after daily administration of gallium maltolate for 5 days. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bladder sections confirmed that gallium arrived at the transitional epithelium, a potential site of uropathogenic E. coli infection. Gallium and iron were similarly but not identically distributed in the tissues, suggesting that at least some distribution mechanisms are not common between the two elements. The results of this study indicate that gallium maltolate may be a suitable candidate for further development as a novel antimicrobial therapy for urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:23877680

  20. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies. PMID:28098199

  1. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies.

  2. Prognostic significance of selected lifestyle factors in urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Wakai, K; Ohno, Y; Obata, K; Aoki, K

    1993-12-01

    To examine the prognostic significance of lifestyle factors in urinary bladder cancer, we conducted a follow-up study of 258 incident bladder cancer patients, who were originally recruited in a case-control study in metropolitan Nagoya. Information on individual survivals was obtained from the computer data-file of the tumor registry of the Nagoya Bladder Cancer Research Group. Univariate analyses revealed significant associations of 5-year survivorship with educational attainment, marital status, drinking habits and consumption of green tea in males, and age at first consultation, histological type and grade of tumor, stage and distant metastasis in both sexes. After adjustment for age, stage, histology (histological type and grade) and distant metastasis by means of a proportional hazards model, drinking of alcoholic beverages was significantly associated with the prognosis of bladder cancer in males. Its adjusted hazard ratio was 0.46 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.79), favoring patients who had taken alcoholic beverages. In detailed analysis, ex-drinkers and all levels of current drinkers demonstrated hazard ratios smaller than unity, although no clear dose-response relationship was detected. No prognostic significance was found for such lifestyle factors as smoking habit, uses of artificial sweeteners and hairdye, and consumption of coffee, black tea, matcha (powdered green tea) and cola.

  3. Recent Advances in Urinary Tract Reconstruction for Neuropathic Bladder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Roberto I.; Lorenzo, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic bladder usually causes several limitations to patients’ quality of life, including urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, and upper urinary tract damage. Its management has significantly changed over the last few years. The aim of our paper is to address some salient features of recent literature dealing with reconstructive procedures in pediatric and adolescent patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26962441

  4. Urothelial cell detachment and differentiation in urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Jezernik, K; Romih, R; Veranic, P

    2000-01-01

    In developing and in repairing bladder, proliferation of the transitional urothelium is followed by cell detachment--desquamation or apoptosis. Proliferation results in formation of terminally differentiated superficial cells and this process may be followed by checking the cells on the presence of differentiation markers. The formation of an asymmetric unit membrane (AUM) structure (plaque) on the cell surface is in correlation with urothelial differentiation. Thus, the microstructure of the luminal surface of the urinary bladder provides a very convenient differentiation biomarker. The surface of immature cells showed a pattern of microvilli. The progress of differentiation was associated with microvili arranged in rows finally forming the characteristic pattern of ridges in terminally differentiated cells. These results demonstrate that the characteristic surface pattern and the AUM plaque formation in the apical plasma membrane of superficial urothelial cells are associated with specific morphology, and patterns and thus help detect differentiation level of cell.

  5. Clinical significance of the VEGF level in urinary bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sankhwar, Monica; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Abhishek, Amar; Rajender, Singh

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and micro-vessel density (MVD) with urinary bladder tumor and its stage. The study was conducted between January 2010 and December 2012. The study included screening of 122 patients at elevated risk for bladder cancer, of which 35 patients were finally enrolled in the study. Diagnosis was made on the basis of urine cytology, radiological investigation (ultrasound KUB, and CT-scan) and histopathology. Thirty-five normal cancer-free individuals were enrolled as controls. Human VEGF levels were measured using an enzyme linked immunoassay and protein content (pg/mg protein) by Lowry method. SPSS for Windows version 10.0.7 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis of the data. Mean urine VEGF level in the cases was significantly higher in comparison to the control group. There was a direct correlation between VEGF level and tumor stage. Mean urine VEGF values were minimum in the control group (22.75 ± 15.41 pg/mg creatinine) and maximum in stage IV patients (180.15 ± 75.93 pg/mg creatinine). Tissue VEGF levels also showed a similar trend of increase with increase in stage. Urine VEGF level also showed a correlation with tissue VEGF level. Similarly, MVD showed a significant increase with increase in tumor stage. A correlation between bladder cancer and MVD and VEGF suggest that the latter can serve as markers for therapeutic guidance. This is the first study from India on clinical and pathological correlation among urine VEGF, tumor tissue VEGF levels, and Micro Vessel Density (MVD) in urinary bladder cancer patients.

  6. Long-term bladder, colorectal, and sexual functions after radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Fokdal, Lars; Høyer, Morten; Meldgaard, Peter; von der Maase, Hans

    2004-08-01

    To describe bladder, colorectal, and sexual dysfunctions among long time survivors after radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer, and compare the results with a healthy control group. We identified 261 patients who had received radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer in the period 1994-2001. Patients were treated with a CT-based three-field technique with 60 Gy in 2 Gy fractions, 5 fractions/week. Sixty-two patients were alive and candidates for the study. For comparison, 185 controls were selected from the Danish National Register. Information was collected in an interview based on the LENT SOMA tables and questions concerning changes in daily life following radiotherapy. Fifty-three patients (85%), median age 77 years (range 51-84) entered the study. Median follow-up time was 29 months (range 18-103 months). There were 63 controls (34%). Fourteen percent of the patients reported that radiotherapy had moderate to severe impact on their present bladder function. Compared with the control group, significantly more patients had dysuria, and urethral stenosis, and were using bladder catheter. Twenty-nine percent of the patients reported moderate to severe impact on their present bowel function. Significantly more patients had diarrhoea, fecal urgency and fecal incontinence, and were using antidiarrhoea medication and sanitary pads. Twenty-five percent of the patients reported moderate to severe impact on their present sexual function. Impotence and lack of sexual desire were significantly higher among the male patients. Following radical radiotherapy, most patients had a well functioning bladder, whereas 14% reported moderate to severe bladder dysfunctions. Due to the presence of bowel in the treatment field, radiotherapy is associated with considerable long-term intestinal side effects. Moreover, radiotherapy may result in sexual dysfunctions.

  7. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease in the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dropkin, Benjamin M; Ingimarsson, Johann P; Jones, Jonathan D; Pettus, Jason R; Seigne, John D

    2015-06-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease is a fibroinflammatory condition of unclear etiology that can present with inflammatory changes and enlargement of a wide variety of organs, most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract. A diagnosis requires an elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 concentration and a tissue biopsy showing a dense plasma cell infiltrate with an increased percentage of immunoglobulin G4+ plasma cells. This disease infrequently presents in the genitourinary tract, and as such might be unfamiliar to and potentially overlooked by urologists. Here we present the third reported case of immunoglobulin G4-related disease manifesting as a mass in the urinary bladder.

  8. [Clinical evaluation of urinary basic fetoprotein and the BTA test for detection of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Imamura, M; Inoue, K; Megumi, Y; Nishimura, M; Ohmori, K; Nishimura, K

    2000-10-01

    We compared the results of urinary basic fetoprotein (BFP) and the BTA test with those of urinary cytology in patients with bladder cancer. We also analyzed the urinary BFP and the BTA test results in patients with benign diseases and postoperative bladder cancer with no evidence of recurrence. The cutoff value for urinary BFP was set at 10 ng/ml. Classes 4 and 5 according to urinary cytology were defined as positive. The sensitivity of urinary BFP for Ta, 1 bladder cancer was significantly higher than that of urinary cytology (p < 0.05). The urinary cytology positive rate for Ta, 1 bladder cancer improved when combined with urinary BFP and the BTA test. The urinary BFP positive rate for benign diseases was significantly higher in patients with pyuria than in patients without pyuria (p < 0.05). The BTA test positive rate for benign diseases was higher in patients with pyuria than in patients without pyuria. The urinary BFP and the BTA test positive rates for postoperative bladder cancer with no evidence of recurrence was significantly higher in patients with urinary diversion than in patients without urinary diversion (BFP: p < 0.01, BTA: p < 0.05).

  9. Urinary bladder herniation through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect in a mature cat.

    PubMed

    Neville-Towle, Jack; Sakals, Sherisse

    2015-09-01

    A 16-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with no history of trauma was presented to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine for assessment of urinary incontinence. Diagnostic investigation revealed herniation of the urinary bladder through a caudoventral abdominal wall defect. Clinical signs resolved after surgical reduction of the bladder.

  10. Urinary bladder diverticulum and its association with malignancy: an anatomical study on cadavers.

    PubMed

    Prakash; Rajini, T; Kumar Bhardwaj, Ajay; V, Jayanthi; Kalyani Rao, P; Singh, Gajendra

    2010-01-01

    Present work was directed to study the prevalence and anatomical basis of diverticulum formation and its association with malignancy inside the urinary bladder on cadavers. Urinary bladder diverticulum and its complications including malignancy has been reported by different authors based on their study on radiological findings and endoscopy. Present study was undertaken on cadavers to meet the aforementioned objectives. Thirty properly embalmed cadavers (19 males and 11 females) of different ages were dissected. Sagittal section of pelvis was studied. Urinary bladder was incised to expose the interior and it was examined for the presence of diverticulum (including number and location). Detailed history of the cause of death of cadavers with diverticulum was studied to determine how many of them suffered from urinary bladder diverticular carcinoma. 23.4% cadavers (31.6% males and 9.1% females) showed presence of urinary bladder diverticulum. The location of the diverticulum in all the cadavers was on superior and lateral side of the ureteric opening on the posterior surface of the urinary bladder. Diverticulum of one male cadaver aged 74 years was complicated by malignancy. Our study observed greater prevalence of diverticulum formation as compared to previous reports. In the present work, 14.3% diverticulum of the urinary bladder showed malignant change, which is more than earlier reports in the literature. Urinary bladder diverticulum should neither be neglected nor ignored. Appropriate early treatment (including the cause) of the diverticulum should be undertaken to avoid complications like malignancy which will finally ensure longevity.

  11. Calcitonin-producing well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (carcinoid tumor) of the urinary bladder: case report

    PubMed Central

    Mascolo, Massimo; Altieri, Vincenzo; Mignogna, Chiara; Napodano, Giorgio; De Rosa, Gaetano; Insabato, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Background The occurrence of calcitonin-secreting primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder is extremely rare. Case presentation The case of a 68-year-old male with carcinoid tumor arising in the urinary bladder is presented. Transurethral resection of a polypoid small tumor 0.4 cm in diameter was performed. Immunohistochemical study using neuroendocrine markers allowed a straightforward diagnosis of a low-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (carcinoid tumor) of the urinary bladder. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated calcitonin immunoreactivity in the most of the tumor cells. Conclusion This tumor shows specific clinical, macroscopical and histological features and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of bladder neoplasms. PMID:16048646

  12. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity

    PubMed Central

    Gon, Sonia; Majumdar, Bipasa; Dey, Ranjan Kumar; Mitra, Subrata Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represent a challenge both to the pathologist and urologists for its diagnosis and treatment, respectively. PMID:24049389

  13. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity.

    PubMed

    Gon, Sonia; Majumdar, Bipasa; Dey, Ranjan Kumar; Mitra, Subrata Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represent a challenge both to the pathologist and urologists for its diagnosis and treatment, respectively.

  14. Urinary APE1/Ref-1: A Potential Bladder Cancer Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunga; Shin, Ju Hyun; Lee, Yu Ran; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Song, Ki Hak; Na, Yong Gil; Chang, Seok Jong; Lim, Jae Sung; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is one of the most common urothelial cancers with still noticeable incidence rate. Early detection of BCa is highly correlated with successful therapeutic outcomes. We previously showed that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) was expressed at an increased level in the serum of BCa patients when compared to the level in healthy controls. In this study, we investigated whether urinary APE1/Ref-1 was also elevated in patients with BCa. In this case-control study, voided urine was collected from 277 subjects including 169 BCa patients and 108 non-BCa controls. Urinary APE1/Ref-1 level was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). APE1/Ref-1 levels were significantly elevated in BCa patients relative to levels in non-BCa controls and were correlated with tumor grade and stage. Urinary APE1/Ref-1 levels were also higher in patients with recurrence history of BCa. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of APE1/Ref-1 showed an area under the curve of 0.83, indicating the reliability and validity of this biomarker. The optimal combination of sensitivity and specificity was determined to be 82% and 80% at a cut-off value of 0.376 ng/100 μL for detection of APE1/Ref-1 in urine. In conclusion, urinary APE1/Ref-1 levels measured from noninvasively obtained body fluids would be clinically applicable for diagnosis of BCa.

  15. Explosion of the urinary bladder during transurethral resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Baldvinsdóttir, Bryndís; Gíslason, Thornorsteinn; Jónsson, Eiríkur

    2014-12-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) remains the gold standard for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Complications during the procedure are rare. An extremely rare complication is a rupture of the urinary bladder. This article reports a case where an explosion occurred during TURP, resulting in a large intraperitoneal rupture of the urinary bladder. The patient underwent emergency laparotomy to repair the bladder.

  16. Changes in Aquaporin 1 Expression in Rat Urinary Bladder after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Ouck; Song, Seung Hee; Ahn, Kuyoun; Kwon, Dongdeuk; Ryu, Soo Bang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins that facilitate water movement across biological membranes. AQPs are also called water channels, and they have recently been reported to be expressed in rat and human urothelium. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effect of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) on the rat urothelium and AQP1 expression in rat urothelium. Materials and Methods Female Sprague-Dawley rats (230-240 g each, n=20) were divided into 2 groups: the sham group (the Con group, n=10) and the partial BOO group (the BOO group, n=10). The BOO group underwent a partial BOO. The expression and cellular localization of AQP1 were determined by performing Western blotting and immunohistochemistry on the rat urinary bladder. Results AQP1 immunoreactivity in both the control and the BOO groups was localized in the capillaries, arterioles, and venules of the lamina propria of the urinary bladder. The protein expression of AQP1 was significantly increased in the BOO group. Conclusions This study showed that BOO causes a significant increase in the expression of AQP1. This may imply that AQP1 has a functional role in the detrusor instability that occurs in association with BOO. PMID:20428433

  17. Structural Changes of the Urinary Bladder After Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury in Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Roider, Karin; Patras, Irina; Hutu, Ioan; Bauer, Sophina; Janetschek, Günter; Zimmermann, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the structural changes of the urinary bladder after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) in minipigs with the primary focus on the analysis of urinary bladder wall proteins and their quantitative distribution. Methods Seven Göttingen minipigs (adult, female) underwent a complete spinal cord transection. Follow-up time was 4 months during which the bladder was drained by frequent single catheterisation and data from the bladder diary and daily urine strip test were collected. Samples from the urinary bladder were taken, fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and stained for histological analyses. Bladder wall thickness, single tissue quantities/distributions, types I and III collagen, and elastin quantifications were performed. Comparisons to healthy urinary bladder tissue of age-matched minipigs were performed for statistical analyses. Results No urinary tract infections were observed in our SCI minipig collective during follow-up. A trend towards a reduction in bladder volumes and an increase in incontinence periods were seen. The bladder wall thickness significantly increased after chronic SCI. Furthermore, bladder wall composition was severely altered by a significant loss of smooth muscle tissue and a significant increase in connective tissue. Elastic fibres were reduced in number and altered in their structural appearance after SCI. Type I collagen was significantly increased, while type III collagen was significantly decreased after SCI. Conclusions Chronic SCI highlighted that the urinary bladder wall undergoes fibrotic events with reduced contractile and elastic properties due to changes of the bladder wall protein composition. These changes show in detail how SCI severely influences the urinary bladder wall composition and depicts the similarities between minipigs and humans. PMID:28361517

  18. Improved estimates of the radiation absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Martin; Minarik, David; Johansson, Lennart; Mattsson, Sören; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2014-05-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have been calculated as a function of the content in the urinary bladder in order to allow more realistic calculations of the absorbed dose to the bladder wall. The SAFs were calculated using the urinary bladder anatomy from the ICRP male and female adult reference computational phantoms. The urinary bladder and its content were approximated by a sphere with a wall of constant mass, where the thickness of the wall depended on the amount of urine in the bladder. SAFs were calculated for males and females with 17 different urinary bladder volumes from 10 to 800 mL, using the Monte Carlo computer program MCNP5, at 25 energies of mono-energetic photons and electrons ranging from 10 KeV to 10 MeV. The decay was assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the urinary bladder content and the urinary bladder wall, and the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall was calculated. The Monte Carlo simulations were validated against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The SAFs obtained for a urine volume of 200 mL were compared to the values calculated for the urinary bladder wall using the adult reference computational phantoms. The mean absorbed dose to the urinary wall from 18F-FDG was found to be 77 µGy/MBq formales and 86 µGy/MBq for females, while for 99mTc-DTPA the mean absorbed doses were 80 µGy/MBq for males and 86 µGy/MBq for females. Compared to calculations using a constant value of the SAF from the adult reference computational phantoms, the mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were 60% higher for 18F-FDG and 30% higher for 99mTc-DTPA using the new SAFs.

  19. Improved estimates of the radiation absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Martin; Minarik, David; Johansson, Lennart; Mattsson, Sören; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2014-05-07

    Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have been calculated as a function of the content in the urinary bladder in order to allow more realistic calculations of the absorbed dose to the bladder wall. The SAFs were calculated using the urinary bladder anatomy from the ICRP male and female adult reference computational phantoms. The urinary bladder and its content were approximated by a sphere with a wall of constant mass, where the thickness of the wall depended on the amount of urine in the bladder. SAFs were calculated for males and females with 17 different urinary bladder volumes from 10 to 800 mL, using the Monte Carlo computer program MCNP5, at 25 energies of mono-energetic photons and electrons ranging from 10 KeV to 10 MeV. The decay was assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the urinary bladder content and the urinary bladder wall, and the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall was calculated. The Monte Carlo simulations were validated against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The SAFs obtained for a urine volume of 200 mL were compared to the values calculated for the urinary bladder wall using the adult reference computational phantoms. The mean absorbed dose to the urinary wall from (18)F-FDG was found to be 77 µGy/MBq formales and 86 µGy/MBq for females, while for (99m)Tc-DTPA the mean absorbed doses were 80 µGy/MBq for males and 86 µGy/MBq for females. Compared to calculations using a constant value of the SAF from the adult reference computational phantoms, the mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were 60% higher for (18)F-FDG and 30% higher for (99m)Tc-DTPA using the new SAFs.

  20. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  1. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > α-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, α-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed

  2. Primary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew J; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Tsihlias, John; Lajoie, Ginette; Sweet, Joan M; Chapman, William B

    2002-10-01

    Reports of primary large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urinary bladder are few; we identified only 2 cases in the literature. Both of these cases involved male patients with rapid progression of disease culminating in death with widespread metastases. We report a case of primary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the bladder, with an admixed minor element of adenocarcinoma, in an 82-year-old man. This solitary lesion arose in a bladder diverticulum lateral to the left ureteric orifice. Two attempts at transurethral resection were unsuccessful at achieving local control. The patient underwent a partial cystectomy with left-sided pelvic lymphadenectomy following preoperative staging investigations that found no metastatic disease. Pathologically, the tumor invaded into the deep aspect of the muscularis propria, without extension into perivesical fat. The lateral resection margin was microscopically positive for tumor, but no malignancy was found in the pelvic lymph nodes. The adenocarcinoma comprised less than 5% of total tumor volume, and areas of transition between the neuroendocrine and adenocarcinoma components were apparent. The patient developed a local recurrence 8 months postoperatively, which was managed by a combination of transurethral resection and radiation therapy. Currently, the patient has no evidence of local or metastatic disease 2 years after initial diagnosis.

  3. Does mechanical stimulation have any role in urinary bladder tissue engineering?

    PubMed

    Farhat, Walid A; Yeger, Herman

    2008-08-01

    Tissue engineering of the urinary bladder currently relies on biocompatible scaffolds that deliver biological and physical functionality with negligible risks of immunogenic or tumorigenic potential. Recent research suggests that autologous cells that are propagated in culture and seeded on scaffolds prior to implantation improve clinical outcomes. For example, normal urinary bladder development in utero requires regular filling and emptying, and current research suggests that bladders constructed in vitro may also benefit from regular mechanical stimulation. Such stimulation appears to induce favorable cellular changes, proliferation, and production of structurally suitable extracellular matrix (ECM) components essential for the normal function of hollow dynamic organs. To mimic in vivo urinary bladder dynamics, tissue bioreactors that imitate the filling and emptying of a normal bladder have been devised. A "urinary bladder tissue bioreactor" that is able to recapitulate these dynamics while providing a cellular environment that facilitates cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions normally seen in-vivo may be necessary to successfully engineer bladder tissue. The validation of a urinary bladder tissue bioreactor that permits careful control of physiological conditions will generate a broad interest from researchers interested in urinary bladder physiology and tissue engineering.

  4. A RARE CASE OF SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA IN URINARY BLADDER DIVERTICULUM SUCCESSFULLY TREATED BY BLADDER-SPARING SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Štimac, Goran; Knežević, Matej; Grubišić, Igor; Soipi, Soip; Tomas, Davor; Krušlin, Božo

    2015-09-01

    The aim is to report a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a urinary bladder diverticulum and present recent literature overview of treatment options. A 56-year-old man presented with intermittent hematuria. Ultrasound examination indicated primary carcinoma in the urinary bladder diverticulum. Diagnosis was confirmed with cystoscopy and computed tomography. Transvesical diverticulectomy with regional lymphadenectomy was undertaken. Two years after initial treatment, the patient was well without evidence of tumor relapse. This report implicates that although aggressive surgical approach is recommended in the majority of bladder diverticulum tumors, simple diverticulectomy may be indicated in selected, confined cases.

  5. Giant Urinary Bladder and Bilateral Giant Hydronephrosis due to Bladder Neck Obstruction: One Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Riyach, Omar; Ahallal, Youness; Mellas, Soufiane; Khallouk, Abdelhak; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to urinary obstruction leads to a buildup of back pressure in the urinary tract and may lead to impairment of renal function. Cases of giant hydronephrosis are rare and usually contain no more than 1-2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. Here, we report a rarely seen case with giant urinary bladder and bilateral giant hydronephrosis due to bladder neck obstruction which contains 4000 mL fluid in the collecting system of the kidney mimicking an ascites in an adult male.

  6. Giant Urinary Bladder and Bilateral Giant Hydronephrosis due to Bladder Neck Obstruction: One Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Riyach, Omar; Ahallal, Youness; Mellas, Soufiane; Khallouk, Abdelhak; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to urinary obstruction leads to a buildup of back pressure in the urinary tract and may lead to impairment of renal function. Cases of giant hydronephrosis are rare and usually contain no more than 1-2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. Here, we report a rarely seen case with giant urinary bladder and bilateral giant hydronephrosis due to bladder neck obstruction which contains 4000 mL fluid in the collecting system of the kidney mimicking an ascites in an adult male. PMID:22606637

  7. Is the Poly (L- Lactide- Co– Caprolactone) Nanofibrous Membrane Suitable for Urinary Bladder Regeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Warda, Karolina; Rasmus, Marta; Buchholz, Lukasz; Krzyzanowska, Sandra; Nakielski, Pawel; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Bodnar, Magdalena; Marszalek, Andrzej; Debski, Robert; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Malgorzata; Mikułowski, Grzegorz; Nowacki, Maciej; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare: a new five-layered poly (L–lactide–co–caprolactone) (PLC) membrane and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a control in rat urinary bladder wall regeneration. The five-layered poly (L–lactide–co–caprolactone) membrane was prepared by an electrospinning process. Adipose tissue was harvested from five 8-week old male Wistar rats. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) were seeded in a density of 3×106 cells/cm2 onto PLC membrane and SIS scaffolds, and cultured for 5-7 days in the stem cell culture medium. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five equal groups. Augmentation cystoplasty was performed in a previously created dome defect. Groups: (I) PLC+ 3×106ADSCs; (II) SIS+ 3×106ADSCs; (III) PLC; (IV) SIS; (V) control. Cystography was performed after three months. The reconstructed urinary bladders were evaluated in H&E and Masson's trichrome staining. Regeneration of all components of the normal urinary bladder wall was observed in bladders augmented with cell-seeded SIS matrices. The urinary bladders augmented with SIS matrices without cells showed fibrosis and graft contraction. Bladder augmentation with the PLC membrane led to numerous undesirable events including: bladder wall perforation, fistula or diverticula formation, and incorporation of the reconstructed wall into the bladder lumen. The new five-layered poly (L–lactide–co–caprolactone) membrane possesses poorer potential for regenerating the urinary bladder wall compared with SIS scaffold. PMID:25162451

  8. Is the poly (L- lactide- co- caprolactone) nanofibrous membrane suitable for urinary bladder regeneration?

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Jundzill, Arkadiusz; Adamowicz, Jan; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Warda, Karolina; Rasmus, Marta; Buchholz, Lukasz; Krzyzanowska, Sandra; Nakielski, Pawel; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Bodnar, Magdalena; Marszalek, Andrzej; Debski, Robert; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Malgorzata; Mikułowski, Grzegorz; Nowacki, Maciej; Kowalewski, Tomasz A; Drewa, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare: a new five-layered poly (L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLC) membrane and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a control in rat urinary bladder wall regeneration. The five-layered poly (L-lactide-co-caprolactone) membrane was prepared by an electrospinning process. Adipose tissue was harvested from five 8-week old male Wistar rats. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) were seeded in a density of 3×10(6) cells/cm2 onto PLC membrane and SIS scaffolds, and cultured for 5-7 days in the stem cell culture medium. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five equal groups. Augmentation cystoplasty was performed in a previously created dome defect. Groups: (I) PLC+ 3×10(6)ADSCs; (II) SIS+ 3×10(6)ADSCs; (III) PLC; (IV) SIS; (V) control. Cystography was performed after three months. The reconstructed urinary bladders were evaluated in H&E and Masson's trichrome staining. Regeneration of all components of the normal urinary bladder wall was observed in bladders augmented with cell-seeded SIS matrices. The urinary bladders augmented with SIS matrices without cells showed fibrosis and graft contraction. Bladder augmentation with the PLC membrane led to numerous undesirable events including: bladder wall perforation, fistula or diverticula formation, and incorporation of the reconstructed wall into the bladder lumen. The new five-layered poly (L-lactide-co-caprolactone) membrane possesses poorer potential for regenerating the urinary bladder wall compared with SIS scaffold.

  9. Human urinary bladder regeneration through tissue engineering - an analysis of 131 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Adamowicz, Jan; Sharma, Arun K; Drewa, Tomasz

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of urinary bladder tissue with functional equivalents remains one of the most challenging problems of reconstructive urology over the last several decades. The gold standard treatment for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy is the ileal conduit or neobladder; however, this technique is associated with numerous complications including electrolyte imbalances, mucus production, and the potential for malignant transformation. Tissue engineering techniques provide the impetus to construct functional bladder substitutes de novo. Within this review, we have thoroughly perused the literature utilizing PubMed in order to identify clinical studies involving bladder reconstruction utilizing tissue engineering methodologies. The idea of urinary bladder regeneration through tissue engineering dates back to the 1950s. Many natural and synthetic biomaterials such as plastic mold, gelatin sponge, Japanese paper, preserved dog bladder, lyophilized human dura, bovine pericardium, small intestinal submucosa, bladder acellular matrix, or composite of collagen and polyglycolic acid were used for urinary bladder regeneration with a wide range of outcomes. Recent progress in the tissue engineering field suggest that in vitro engineered bladder wall substitutes may have expanded clinical applicability in near future but preclinical investigations on large animal models with defective bladders are necessary to optimize the methods of bladder reconstruction by tissue engineering in humans.

  10. Severe systemic toxicity and urinary bladder cytotoxicity and regenerative hyperplasia induced by arsenite in arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase knockout mice. A preliminary report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes reactions which convert inorganic arsenic to methylated metabolites. This study determined whether the As3mt null genotype in the mouse modifies cytotoxic and proliferative effects seen in urinary bladders of wild t...

  11. Severe systemic toxicity and urinary bladder cytotoxicity and regenerative hyperplasia induced by arsenite in arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase knockout mice. A preliminary report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes reactions which convert inorganic arsenic to methylated metabolites. This study determined whether the As3mt null genotype in the mouse modifies cytotoxic and proliferative effects seen in urinary bladders of wild t...

  12. Chronic Infections of the Urinary Tract and Bladder Cancer Risk: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Otunu, Oghenetejiri; Akhtar, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Literature on the relationship between recurrent urinary tract infections and urinary bladder carcinoma risk has been inconsistent. Therefore, we carried out this systematic review of observational studies to ascertain if there is any association between chronic urinary tract infection and urinary bladder carcinoma. A total of 10 databases were searched using Boolean: CINAHL, PUBMED, Google Scholar, Medline, Science Direct, SCIRUS, Cochrane, UK PubMed central, NHS evidence and WHO-website. The search yielded an initial hit of 3,518 articles and after screening and critical appraisal, seven studies were included for this review. Four articles reported an association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer while three concluded a weak or no association at least in one gender. Main findings in this review were that most of the studies reported an association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk. However, inferences about the causal association between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk should be drawn cautiously considering the methodological limitations of case-control studies included in this review. Therefore, more empirical evidence is needed to determine the causal nature of relationships between chronic urinary tract infections and bladder cancer risk.

  13. Perineal Bull Gore with Urinary Bladder Perforation and Pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    R, Santhosh; Barad, Arun Kumar; Ghalige, Hemanth Sureshwara; K, Sridartha; Sharma M, Birkumar

    2013-01-01

    Animal related injuries are frequently reported in India and other countries, where bulls are used for sporting events as well as in places where farming and livestock rearing is practised. The presentation is, many times, atypical and misleading as well. They have unique mechanics of injury. The patterns of the injury are reviewed. An intra-peritoneal urinary bladder injury which is caused by a perineal bull gore with a pneumoperitoneum is unusual and it has not been reported in the literature which was reviewed. We are reporting a successfully treated 25 years old male patient from the slopes of the southern district of Manipur, India, who had presented 40 hours after he was injured. The identification and prompt exploration, keeping in mind the mechanics of bull goring, helps the surgeons to adequately deal such atypical injuries, for optimal outcomes. PMID:23814738

  14. Nephrogenic adenoma of the urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed

    Bhagavan, B S; Tiamson, E M; Wenk, R E; Berger, B W; Hamamoto, G; Eggleston, J C

    1981-10-01

    The histologic and ultrastructural features of nephrogenic adenomas of the urinary bladder and urethra were studied in multiple specimens obtained from eight patients. Three of these were studied by indirect immunofluorescence for Tamm-Horsfall uromucoprotein. The lesions are uncommon benign metaplastic proliferations of urothelium, occurring most frequently in males as small cystic, papillary, or nodular masses and most often presenting with hematuria. Typically the metaplastic tubules resemble nephronic tubules. A florid atypical and pseudoinfiltrative proliferation of these tubules may led to an erroneous diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Ultrastructural features of proximal convoluted tubules were identified in some of the tubules, but resemblance to specific segments of distal tubules was less certain. The ultrastructural features combined with the absence of Tamm-Horsfall protein in tubular lumina or cells suggest a mesonephric rather than metanephric homology. The lesions are appropriately treated by transurethral resection or fulguration, but persistent lesions were present in three patients up to 18 yeas after initial treatment.

  15. Case report: microcystic transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Radopoulos, Demetrios; Kalyvas, Konstantinos; Kotakidou, Rodi; Panagiotopoulou, Konstantina; Katsikas, Vasilios; Papathanasiou, Michalis

    2005-01-01

    We report a rare case of microcystic transitional cell carcinoma involving the urinary bladder, in a 38-year-old man, and we add our experience in the treatment of this neoplasm. The tumor was muscle invasive, and a radical cystectomy was performed. The patient received no postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and he has not signs of local recurrence or distal metastasis after 3 years of intense follow up. Even though the number of cases documented so far, is insufficient to draw safe conclusions regarding the optimal treatment of the microcystic variant of transitional cell carcinoma. Our case indicates that even in cases of microcystic transitional cell carcinoma with infiltrative nature, aggressive therapy is associated with good control of the disease locally and distally.

  16. Unusual appearance for urinary bladder obstruction detected with 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Wright, Chadwick L; Sharma, Akash

    2015-12-01

    Unanticipated but clinically significant nonosseous findings can be detected during routine bone scintigraphy. We present a case of an 83-year-old man who presented with a pathologic fracture of the right femur. Whole-body bone scintigraphy for osseous staging revealed intense radiotracer accumulation in the kidneys and ureters but no activity within the urinary bladder. The patient had not voided for 14 hours. A Foley catheter was inserted, and more than 2000 mL of urine was drained, most consistent with urinary bladder obstruction. Subsequent repeat images demonstrated marked reduction of the renal and ureteral activity with trace activity in the urinary bladder.

  17. Unexpected small urinary bladder pheochromocytoma: a nonspecific presentation.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Faouzi; Hmida, Wissem; Slama, Adel; Mosbah, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely rare tumor that typically presents with a hypertensive crisis during micturition. Preoperatively, it may be misdiagnosed due to nonspecific symptomatology, physical, and radiologic findings. Method. We report a case of unsuspected small pheochromocytoma which was incidentally found by CT scan and confirmed by the histological aspects after transurethral resection in a 63-year-old woman. Here, we have described the clinical presentation, physical findings, laboratory investigations, and treatment provided in our case. We have also included radiological images and histopathology slides with input from both radiologists and pathologists. Surgical management and postoperative follow-up are discussed, as are details of previous published data. Results. After undergoing surgical treatment (transurethral resection), our patient is asymptomatic, with complete resolution of her pathology. Conclusion. Diagnosis is difficult before histopathological examination and should be considered in patients with no risk factors for usual bladder tumor. Our purpose is to raise clinician's awareness for this condition so that they will be more likely to diagnose it. This will facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment and especially prevent complications due to pheochromocytoma which may be severe.

  18. Agricultural Workers and Urinary Bladder Cancer Risk in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Sania; Dawson, Rebecca; Saleh, Doa’a A.; Magder, Laurence S.; Mikhail, Nabiel N.; St. George, Diane Marie; Squibb, Katherine; Khaled, Hussein; Loffredo, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the associations between farming and the risk for squamous cell (SCC) or urothelial (UC) carcinoma of the urinary bladder among Egyptians. We used data from a multi-center case-control study (1525 male and 315 female cases, and 2069 male and 547 female age-, and residence-matched, population-based controls), to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Men in farming and who never smoked had increased risk for either SCC or UC (AOR and (95% CI): 4.65 (2.59-8.36) and 6.22 (3.82-10.15), respectively); If they ever smoked, their risks were 2.27 (1.75-2.95) and 1.93 (1.58-2.35), respectively). Women in farmer households were at increased risk for SCC (1.40 (0.93-2.09) and UC (1.25 (0.82-1.89), although not statistically significant. Occupational and environmental exposures to farming increased the risk for bladder cancer among Egyptians. PMID:23930791

  19. The Role(s) of Cytokines/Chemokines in Urinary Bladder Inflammation and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Eric J.; Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be bladder related and with at least one urinary symptom. It was recently concluded that 3.3–7.9 million women (>18 years old) in the United States exhibit BPS/IC symptoms. The impact of BPS/IC on quality of life is enormous and the economic burden is significant. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of BPS/IC are unknown, numerous theories including infection, inflammation, autoimmune disorder, toxic urinary agents, urothelial dysfunction, and neurogenic causes have been proposed. Altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder (i.e., pain at low or moderate bladder filling) that accompany BPS/IC may be mediated by many factors including changes in the properties of peripheral bladder afferent pathways such that bladder afferent neurons respond in an exaggerated manner to normally innocuous stimuli (allodynia). The goals for this review are to describe chemokine/receptor (CXCL12/CXCR4; CCL2/CCR2) signaling and cytokine/receptor (transforming growth factor (TGF-β)/TGF-β type 1 receptor) signaling that may be valuable LUT targets for pharmacologic therapy to improve urinary bladder function and reduce somatic sensitivity associated with urinary bladder inflammation. PMID:24738044

  20. The role of prostanoids in the urinary bladder function and a potential use of prostanoid-targeting pharmacological agents in bladder overactivity treatment.

    PubMed

    Dobrek, Łukasz; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a syndrome involving urinary urgency with accompanying increased daytime urinary frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency urinary incontinence, in the absence of an urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. The detailed OAB pathophysiology remains unclear. There is evidence that OAB pathogenesis also includes abnormal bladder paracrine activity, associated with release of local prostanoids. Those agents contribute to disturbances of peripheral neuronal bladder control resulting in detrusor instability. Thus, pharmacological agents abolishing prostanoid-induced bladder overactivity seem to be a potential, future OAB therapeutical option. This paper shortly describes the rationale for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and EP-1 receptor antagonists administration in future OAB pharmacotherapy.

  1. Bladder neck preservation during radical retropubic prostatectomy and postoperative urinary continence.

    PubMed

    Razi, Ali; Yahyazadeh, Seyed Reza; Sedighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Kazemeyni, Seyed Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Bladder neck-sparing modification of radical retropubic prostatectomy has been reported to lower the risk of urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. We reviewed the outcomes in men with prostate cancer who had undergone prostatectomy with either bladder neck preservation or bladder neck reconstruction. In this retrospective study, a total of 103 patients who had undergone radical retropubic prostatectomy were assessed. The patients were divided into two groups of bladder neck preservation (51 patients) and bladder neck reconstruction (52 patients). We compared frequency of biochemical failure, bladder neck stricture, and urinary incontinence between these two groups. Biochemical failure was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen level higher than 0.2 ng/mL and its rising trend in at least 2 postoperative subsequent measurements. Continence was defined as no need to use sanitary pads or diapers. The two groups were comparable in terms of age, serum prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and prostate volume. After a mean follow-up period of 32.5 months, all patients with bladder neck preservation and 46 (88.5%) with bladder neck reconstruction were continent (P = .03). There were no significant differences in the frequency of biochemical failure and bladder neck stricture that required dilation between the two groups of patients. Bladder neck preservation during radical retropubic prostatectomy may improve long-term results of urinary continence and be effective in eradicating prostate cancer without increasing recurrence rate.

  2. Foreign body in urinary bladder--early CT cystogram is investigation of choice.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Raja Farhat; Anwar, Fahim; Barron, Dominic

    2008-05-01

    Extra peritoneal bladder injuries are very difficult to diagnose on clinical examination alone. CT-scan with cystogram (Contrast: Ultavista300) is a reliable diagnostic tool to evaluate such injuries at an early stage. For accurate diagnosis of bladder injury, enhancement of bladder contents is necessary otherwise extravasated urine can be mistaken for haematoma or ascites. Retrograde filling of bladder with minimum 250 -300 ml of contrast material is necessary before performing abdominopelvic CT to rule out any form of bladder injury. Therefore in case of suspected bladder injury CT cystogram should be performed at the time of initial CT examination in the emergency room. We report a case of extraperitoneal bladder injury and foreign body in urinary bladder after a firework injury.

  3. Microscopic investigations in a diabetic rat urinary bladder infected with Trichosomoides crassicauda.

    PubMed

    Ozkorkmaz, Ebru Gokalp

    2011-01-01

    Rats are widely used laboratory animals and have several parasites. One of these are helminths, known not only to cause serious effects on the experimental results in healthy subjects, but also in subjects with heavy infections. One of the relatively pathologic helminth is Trichosomoides crassicauda, which lives in the nodules of the urinary bladder. It is known that diabetics are more prone to infections with several microorganisms. Observations in a diabetic rat bladder showed T. crassicauda eggs inside the transitional epithelium, and structural changes in the bladder epithelium were evident. Urinary-bladder tissues taken from streptozotocin-injected diabetic subjects and citrate buffer-injected control subjects were fixed, embedded in araldite and investigated under a light microscope. Distinct changes in the histological structure of a diabetic urinary bladder transitional epithelium were observed after T. crassicauda infection. Many papillomas were formed and the epithelial tissues were completely degenerated. In addition, electron microscopic examinations also revealed degeneration of the subepithelial tissues.

  4. Primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder with prominent subnuclear eosinophilic granules.

    PubMed

    Zozumi, Masataka; Nakai, Mayumi; Matsuda, Ikuo; Hao, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yasuo; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Hirota, Seiichi

    2012-02-15

    Primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder is a very rare neoplasm. We report here a case of primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder with an unusual cytological feature in a 72-year-old Japanese man. A bladder polypoid mass was incidentally found by ultrasonography during the follow-up of a benign prostate hyperplasia. Histological examination of the transurethrally resected tissue revealed that the upper part of the mass was a tumor showing tubuloglandular anastomosing structures. Most of the tumor cells had peculiar subnuclear eosinophilic granules. The features of the granules were reminiscent of those observed in neuroendocrine cells of the intestine. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The tumor was diagnosed as carcinoid tumor of pure form of the urinary bladder. The lower part of the mass showed the findings of glandular cystitis, as its coexistence with carcinoid tumors of the bladder has often been described in previous reports.

  5. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) grafts in reconstruction of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Senel, F M; Akman, R Y; Arikan, A Y; Gürdal, M; Can, C

    1999-01-01

    The safety and histopathologic effects of polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) grafts in reconstruction of the urinary bladder were examined. Following partial excision of the bladder Gore-Tex was placed, and the rats were sacrificed at days 7, 14 and 30. Gore-Tex did not cause urine infection, and there was no peritonitis or sepsis in any of the rats. Inflammation around the Gore-Tex diminished after four weeks. Some mononuclear cells and exudate were observed on the inner surface of the Gore-Tex. There was no inflammation or fibrosis in the mucosa and muscular layers of the remaining bladder. In this study the Gore-Tex graft was found to be an infection resistant, urine impermeable material, with no adverse effects on the urinary bladder. Gore-Tex is suggested as a safe material for the reconstruction of the urinary bladder.

  6. [Effective dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) occlusive dressing technique for amyloidosis of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Kanda, Hideki; Miki, Manabu; Masui, Satoru; Yoshio, Yuko; Yamada, Yasushi; Soga, Norihito; Arima, Kiminobu; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    2013-10-01

    A 48-year-old married woman complaining of macroscopic hematuria and cystitis symptom was admitted to our institute. Flexible cystoscopy revealed many yellowish, nodular masses at the paries posterior of the urinary bladder, and cold-punch biopsy proved it to be amyloidosis. Serum amyloid protein A (SAA) was high, and suggested systemic amyloidosis. Renal biopsy and colon fiberscopy did not reveal any abnormalities. We therefore diagnosed a primary localized amyloidosis of the urinary bladder. Transurethral resection and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) infusion therapy are used to treat amyloidosis of the urinary bladder. However there is no definite cure for amyloidosis of the urinary bladder. Therefore we selected DMSO occlusive dressing technique therapy. After 5 years of therapy, there was no evidence of a recurrence of amyloidosis.

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life after Cystectomy and Urinary Diversion for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Cheryl; Porter, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    With multiple options for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer that have comparable cancer control and complication rates, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important consideration. This article reviews the methods for defining HRQOL, the challenges in measuring HRQOL in bladder cancer, and the literature comparing HRQOL after various methods of urinary diversion. Recent contributions include the validation of HRQOL instruments specific to bladder cancer and the publication of several prospective studies measuring HRQOL outcomes after cystectomy and urinary diversion. There is no convincing evidence from existing literature that any particular method of urinary diversion offers superior HRQOL outcomes. Rather, there is growing evidence that good HRQOL can be achieved with patient education and consideration of each patient's clinical and psychosocial situation. Future research should utilize the validated bladder cancer specific HRQOL instruments and perhaps explore the impact of preoperative counseling on postoperative HRQOL. PMID:21826139

  8. Mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation induces urinary storage dysfunction via upregulation of epithelial sodium channel expression in the rat urinary bladder epithelium.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Hotta, Yuji; Maeda, Kotomi; Kataoka, Tomoya; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Hamakawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Yasui, Takahiro; Asai, Kiyofumi; Kimura, Kazunori

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) expression in rat bladder and the physiological role of the MR-epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) pathway in controlling bladder function in 10-12-week-old, male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, we examined the mRNA expression of MR and localization of MR and ENaC-α proteins in the urinary bladder. MR mRNA expression was observed in untreated-rat urinary bladders, and MR and ENaC-α proteins were localized in the epithelium. Next, rats were treated with vehicle (controls) or fludrocortisone (an MR agonist) for 3 days, and ENaC-α protein expression levels and bladder function were evaluated on day 4. ENaC-α protein expression was significantly higher in fludrocortisone-treated rats than in controls. In addition, cystometry was performed during intravesical infusion of saline and amiloride (an ENaC inhibitor). While intercontraction intervals (ICIs) during saline infusion were significantly shorter in the fludrocortisone group than in the controls, infusion of amiloride normalized the ICIs in the fludrocortisone group. However, no intra- or inter-group differences in maximum intravesical pressure were observed. Taken together, MR protein is localized in the rat urinary bladder epithelium, and may regulate ENaC expression and bladder afferent input. The MR-ENaC pathway may be a therapeutic target for ameliorating storage symptoms.

  9. Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in a 14-year-old dog

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old spayed female poodle-pekinese dog with a history of hematuria was tentatively diagnosed with non-radiopaque uroliths or urinary bladder neoplasia following temporary resolution of clinical signs after several rounds of antibiotic treatments, normal abdominal radiographs and no growth on urine culture. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a mass in the trigone area of the urinary bladder which was confirmed to be an invasive transitional cell carcinoma by histopathology following euthanasia. PMID:22131588

  10. [Peculiarities of urinary bladder cancer tumor cells apoptosis response on neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Iatsyna, A I; Stakhovskiĭ, É A; Sheremet, Ia A; Spivak, S I; Stakhovskiĭ, A É; Gavriliuk, O N; Vitruk, Iu V; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2011-01-01

    Induced apoptosis in urinary bladder cancer tumor cells of patients was studied using TUNEL reaction. It was shown that increase in induced apoptosis value had a definite correlation between corresponding features of tumor reaction as a response on Gemcitabine-Cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy application. It was found that evaluation of induced apoptosis in urinary bladder cancer tumor cells using TUNEL method allows forecasting the effectiveness of chemotherapy on the cellular level in patients with this type of cancer.

  11. Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in a 14-year-old dog.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Melissa

    2011-06-01

    A 14-year-old spayed female poodle-pekinese dog with a history of hematuria was tentatively diagnosed with non-radiopaque uroliths or urinary bladder neoplasia following temporary resolution of clinical signs after several rounds of antibiotic treatments, normal abdominal radiographs and no growth on urine culture. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a mass in the trigone area of the urinary bladder which was confirmed to be an invasive transitional cell carcinoma by histopathology following euthanasia.

  12. [Mast cells and innervation of the wall of the hyperactive urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Shvalev, V N; Pisarev, S A; Kleĭmenova, N V; Sukhorukov, V S

    2007-01-01

    Anterior urinary bladder wall biopsy specimens were examined in 24 males and 4 females, aged 52 to 76 years, who had been suffering from the hyperactive urinary bladder for 1-10 years. Increases in the number and activity of interstitial mast cells and their degranulation and the symptoms of chronic immune inflammation were revealed. Neuromuscular spastic dysfunction of the detrusor is considered to result from the activation of mast cells.

  13. Rare case of urinary bladder agenesis--multislice CT abdomen imaging.

    PubMed

    Indiran, Venkatraman; Chokkappan, Kabilan; Gunaseelan, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Complete agenesis of urinary bladder is an extremely rare anomaly with only a few live cases reported so far. In most of the instances death occurs early as it may be incompatible with life. Here we report a case of adolescent female with urinary bladder and unilateral renal agenesis, who presented with a rather unusual presentation of incontinence, for a computed tomography (CT) examination. Other congenital abnormalities visualised in the CT abdomen are also discussed.

  14. Role of galectin-1 in urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma cell invasion through the JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kun-Hung; Li, Chien-Feng; Chien, Lan-Hsiang; Huang, Cheng-Hao; Su, Chia-Cheng; Liao, Alex C; Wu, Ting-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Human galectin-1 is a member of the galectin family, proteins with conserved carbohydrate-recognition domains that bind galactoside. Galectin-1 is highly expressed in various tumors and participates in various oncogenic processes. However, detailed descriptions of the function of galectin-1 in urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma have not been reported. Our previous cohort investigation showed that galectin-1 is associated with tumor invasiveness and is a possible independent prognostic marker of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma. The present study aimed to clarify the relevance of galectin-1 expression level to tumor progression and invasion. In order to decipher a mechanism for the contribution of galectin-1 to the malignant behavior of urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma, two bladder cancer cell lines (T24 and J82) were established with knockdown of galectin-1 expression by shRNA. Bladder cancer cells with LGALS1 gene silencing showed reduced cell proliferation, lower invasive capability, and lower clonogenicity. Extensive signaling pathway studies indicated that galectin-1 participated in bladder cancer cell invasion by mediating the activity of MMP9 through the Ras-Rac1-MEKK4-JNK-AP1 signaling pathway. Our functional analyses of galectin-1 in urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma provided novel insights into the critical role of galectin-1 in tumor progression and invasion. These results revealed that silencing the galectin-1-mediated MAPK signaling pathway presented a novel strategy for bladder cancer therapy. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. G-protein-coupled receptor 137 accelerates proliferation of urinary bladder cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Du, Yiheng; Bi, Wenhuan; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Wenbo; Xia, Shujie; Liu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a worldwide concern because of its level of incidence and recurrence. To search an effective therapeutic strategy for urinary bladder cancer, it is important to identify proteins involved in tumorigenesis that could serve as potential targets for diagnosis and treatment. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) constitute a large protein family of receptors that sense molecules outside the cell and activate signal transduction pathways and cellular responses inside the cell. GPR137 is a newly discovered human gene encoding orphan GPRs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the physiological role of GPR137 in urinary bladder cancer. The effect of GPR137 on cell growth was examined via an RNA interference (RNAi) lentivirus system in two human urinary bladder cancer cell lines BT5637 and T24. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi could specifically suppressed GPR137 expression in vitro, resulting in alleviated cell viability and impaired colony formation, as well as blocks G0/G1 and S phases of the cell cycle. These results suggested GPR137 as an essential player in urinary bladder cancer cell growth, and it may serve as a potential target for gene therapy in the treatment of urinary bladder cancer.

  16. The urinary bladder carcinogen propoxur does not produce genotoxic effects in the urinary bladder of Wistar male rats.

    PubMed

    Iatropoulos, M J; Duan, J-D; Schmuck, G; Williams, G M

    2015-09-01

    Propoxur (PPX) is a carbamate insecticide which induced urinary bladder cancer in Wistar rats when fed at 5000ppm in Altromin 1321 diet (1321). In the present investigation, PPX was studied for induction of several key events related to modes of action (MOA) of carcinogenicity in urinary bladders (UBs). Wistar rats were administered the compound for 28 days at 8000ppm in Provini Liba SA 3883 diet, which is similar to the 1321 diet. o-Anisidine HCl (AH) was used as a genotoxic UB carcinogenic comparator, and trisodium nitrilotriacetate (NTA) as an epigenetic UB carcinogen comparator. Along with the non-dosed control and three test substance groups (PPX, AH, NTA), four more groups were additionally fed 2% ammonium chloride (AC) in the diet to acidify the urine, since 1321 was reported to increase urinary pH. AC did acidify the urine, as expected, although the 3883 diet itself did not increase pH values above 8. In the alkaline comet assay, AH produced DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in the UB urothelium (UBU) irrespective of AC administration, whereas PPX and NTA did not. In the nucleotide (32)P-postlabeling assay (NPL), AH produced DNA adducts irrespective of AC administration, whereas PPX and NTA did not. Routine (H&E) histopathology evaluation of the UBU did not reveal any hyperplasia or evidence of luminal microprecipitates or calculi in any of the groups. Assessment of UBU proliferation as measured by immunohistochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, revealed that NTA and NTA plus AC increased the replicating fraction (RF). Also AH plus AC, but not AH alone, increased the RF of UBU, whereas PPX groups were not significantly different from controls. Thus, the results reveal no evidence for DNA SSBs, binding, or alteration of DNA synthesis in the UBU by PPX, while demonstrating UBU DNA damage by AH and showing that NTA does not damage DNA, but causes increased UBU proliferation. The findings are in accord with a genotoxic MOA for AH, and an epigenetic

  17. Urinary markers in the everyday diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Dal Moro, Fabrizio; Valotto, Claudio; Guttilla, Andrea; Zattoni, Filiberto

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) represents the fourth most common neoplasia in men and the ninth most common cancer in women, with a significant morbidity and mortality. Cystoscopy and voided urine cytology (involving the examination of cells in voided urine to detect the presence of cancerous cells) are currently the routine initial investigations in patients with hematuria or other symptoms suggestive of BC. Around 75-85% of the patients are diagnosed as having non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Despite the treatment, these patients have a probability of recurrence at 5 years ranging from 50 to 70% and of progression to muscle invasive disease of 10-15%. Patients with NMIBC must undergo life-long surveillance, consisting of serial cystoscopies, possibly urine cytology and ultrasonography. Cystoscopy is unsuitable for screening because of its invasiveness and costs; serial cystoscopies may cause discomfort and distress to patients. Furthermore, cystoscopy may be inconclusive, falsely positive or negative. Although urine cytology has a reasonable sensitivity for the detection of high-grade BC, it lacks sensitivity to detect low-grade tumors (sensitivity ranging from 4 to 31%). The overall sensitivity and specificity of urine cytology range from 7 to 100 and from 30 to 70%, respectively. There is a need for new urine biomarkers that may help in BC diagnosis and surveillance. A lot of urinary biomarkers with high sensitivity and/or specificity have been investigated. Although none of these markers have proven to be powerful enough to replace standard cystoscopy, some of them may represent accurate predictors of BC. A review of recent studies is presented.

  18. Urinary bladder marsupialization for treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in male goats.

    PubMed

    May, K A; Moll, H D; Wallace, L M; Pleasant, R S; Howard, R D

    1998-01-01

    To describe a surgical procedure for urinary bladder marsupialization and to report the results obtained from its use in the treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in male goats. Retrospective evaluation. Male goats with obstructive urolithiasis. Medical records of male goats that had urinary bladder marsupialization for the treatment of obstructive urolithiasis were reviewed. Data retrieved from the medical records included signalment, postoperative treatment, duration of hospitalization, and short-term and long-term complications. Median values for measured variables were calculated. A total of 18 of 19 goats survived. Urinary flow was re-established in all 19 goats at the conclusion of surgery. Short-term postoperative complications (bladder mucosal prolapse and death) were observed in 2 goats. Long-term postoperative complications (cystitis and fibrotic stomal closure) occurred in 2 animals. Median duration of hospitalization was 4 days. At the time of follow-up, mild urine scald was reported for all goats. Clinical signs of upper urinary tract disease or obstruction were not reported. A total of 15 of 17 owners were satisfied with the procedure. Urinary bladder marsupialization provided long-term resolution of urinary outflow obstruction in all goats with acceptable morbidity. Urinary bladder marsupialization is a procedure that provides a good prognosis for long-term resolution of obstructive urolithiasis in male goats.

  19. Small-cell Carcinomas of the Urinary Bladder and Prostate: TERT Promoter Mutation Status Differentiates Sites of Malignancy and Provides Evidence of Common Clonality Between Small-cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder and Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Priemer, David S; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Kouba, Erik; Montironi, Rodolfo; Davidson, Darrell D; MacLennan, Gregory T; Wang, Lisha; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Deng, Youping; Emerson, Robert E; Cheng, Liang

    2017-03-31

    Small-cell carcinoma (SCC) of the urinary bladder frequently appears alongside urothelial carcinoma, suggesting common clonality. TERT promoter mutations have been recently implicated in urothelial carcinogenesis. To investigate the degree to which TERT promoter mutations are involved in SCC of the urinary bladder, the linked tumorigenesis between urothelial carcinoma and SCC of the urinary bladder, and the molecular distinctions between SCC of the urinary bladder and of the prostate. We investigated TERT promoter mutations in 53 cases of SCC of the urinary bladder and in 26 cases of SCC of the prostate using laboratory-based studies of tissue samples and clinical data. We measured the frequency of TERT promoter mutations in SCCs of the urinary bladder and prostate, and concordance of the mutation status between concurrent urinary bladder SCC and urothelial carcinoma. TERT promoter mutations were detected in 29/53 (55%) cases of urinary bladder and 0/26 (0%) cases of prostate SCC. Of 25 cases with concurrent urinary bladder SCC and non-small-cell components, all cases harbored identical TERT promoter mutation status in both phenotypes. TERT promoter mutations are found in more than half of urinary bladder SCCs. Mutation status is also identical in urothelial carcinoma and SCC components of concomitant malignancies, providing evidence of a common clonality. TERT promoter mutation status can differentiate SCC of the urinary bladder from prostate SCC, suggesting potential diagnostic use. Small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder shares a common clonal origin with conventional urothelial carcinoma and may arise from a heterogeneous subclone. TERT promoter mutations may have utility as a differential biomarker for determining the primary site of a genitourinary small-cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Perineal hernia because of retroflexion of the urinary bladder in a rottweiler bitch during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sontas, B H; Apaydin, S O; Toydemir, T S F; Kasikci, G; Ekici, H

    2008-08-01

    A young pregnant rottweiler bitch was presented with a large mass of tissue protruding through the vulvar lips. Foetal death was diagnosed on ultrasonography, and ovariohysterectomy was performed, at which time the bladder was observed to be dislocated caudally into the pelvic cavity under the vagina. The bladder was manually repositioned during surgery. One week later, the bitch was healthy with no evidence of dysuria, stranguria or urinary incontinence. Two months later, the owner reported that the bitch was clinically normal with no recurrence of the retroflexion. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of retroflexion of the urinary bladder during pregnancy.

  1. Diuretics stimulate H+ secretion in turtle urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lief, P D; Mutz, B F; Bank, N

    1980-01-01

    The effect of various diuretics on H+ secretion was studied in the isolated short-circuited urinary bladder of the turtle. Mucosal (urinary) chlorothiazide stimulated H+ secretion promptly, from 1.33 +/- 0.24 to 3.03 +/- 0.25 mueq/h (P less than 0.001). The effect was rapidly reversible upon washout of the drug, H+ returning to control levels, 1.37 +/- 0.26 mueq/h (P less than 0.001). Similar effects were observed with mucosal hydrochlorothiazide and mucosal ethacrynic acid/cysteine. Stimulation of H+ secretion occurred in the presence or the absence of exogenous CO2, in the presence or absence of mucosal Na+ and during inhibition of Na+ transport by ouabain. There was no stimulation of H+ secretion by uncomplexed ethacrynic acid or by mucosal furosemide. The nondiuretic sulfonamide, sulfasoxizole, and the nonsulfonamide buffer, borate, had no effect on H+ SECRETION. These observations indicate that the stimulatory effect of diuretics on H+ secretion is not related to active sodium transport, transepithelial electrical potential, or the buffering capacity of the drugs. Since the transepithelial pH gradient at which active H+ secretion was abolished was identical for chlorothiazide-treated tissues (2.68 pH U) as for control tissues (2.65 pH U, NS), the data suggest that the protonmotive force of the H+ pump was unaffected by the diuretic. This observation, plus the rapid onset and reversibility of the drugs, is consistent with an effect on the mucosal membrane to increase H+ conductance (K). The findings raise the possibility that direct enhancement of renal H+ secretion may play a role in the metabolic alkalosis induced by some diuretics. PMID:7364939

  2. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for treatment of overactive bladder and urinary retention in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Zinkgraf, Kristine; Quinn, Annette O'Leary; Ketterhagen, Debra; Kreuziger, Betty; Stevenson, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is a treatment option for patients who present with urinary urgency, frequency, urge incontinence, or urinary retention. When behavior modification and/or pharmacotherapy did not adequately relieve symptoms, this treatment was found to decrease incidence of overactive bladder or retention symptoms in the authors' patient population.

  3. Vitamin D induction of the human antimicrobial Peptide cathelicidin in the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Hertting, Olof; Holm, Åsa; Lüthje, Petra; Brauner, Hanna; Dyrdak, Robert; Jonasson, Aino Fianu; Wiklund, Peter; Chromek, Milan; Brauner, Annelie

    2010-12-14

    The urinary tract is frequently being exposed to potential pathogens and rapid defence mechanisms are therefore needed. Cathelicidin, a human antimicrobial peptide is expressed and secreted by bladder epithelial cells and protects the urinary tract from infection. Here we show that vitamin D can induce cathelicidin in the urinary bladder. We analyzed bladder tissue from postmenopausal women for expression of cathelicidin, before and after a three-month period of supplementation with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3). Cell culture experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanisms for cathelicidin induction. We observed that, vitamin D per se did not up-regulate cathelicidin in serum or in bladder tissue of the women in this study. However, when the bladder biopsies were infected with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), a significant increase in cathelicidin expression was observed after 25D3 supplementation. This observation was confirmed in human bladder cell lines, even though here, cathelicidin induction occurred irrespectively of infection. Vitamin D treated bladder cells exerted an increased antibacterial effect against UPEC and colocalization to cathelicidin indicated the relevance of this peptide. In the light of the rapidly growing problem of resistance to common urinary tract antibiotics, we suggest that vitamin D may be a potential complement in the prevention of UTI.

  4. Combined uterine and urinary bladder rupture: an unusual complication of obstructed labor in a primigravida.

    PubMed

    Takai, Idris Usman; Abubakar, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    Combined uterine and urinary bladder rupture following prolonged obstructed labor is indeed a momentous uro-obstetric emergency. The urinary bladder involvement is distinctly rare in the absence of factors that predispose the bladder to be adherent to the lower uterine segment and is quite unusual in a primigravida. To report a rare case of uterine rupture involving urinary bladder secondary to a prolonged obstructed labor in a primigravida from a low resource setting. A 17-year-old married unbooked primigravida who presented with a 3-day history of spontaneous onset of labor at term that was initially managed at home and later in a primary health care center where she had fundal pressure and oxytocin augmentation, respectively. The labor was complicated by combined uterine and urinary bladder rupture with sepsis. She was resuscitated and had exploratory laparotomy with uterine and urinary bladder repair. The postoperative period was uneventful and she was followed-up at the gynecology and family planning clinics. There is a need for community reawakening on the inherent risks of teenage pregnancy, bad obstetric practices, and unsupervised pregnancy, labor, and delivery, particularly in the rural settings as in the index patient. A high index of suspicion and prompt appropriate intervention will reduce the sequel of morbidity and occasional mortality from this predicament.

  5. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder presenting as a mandibular gingival swelling.

    PubMed

    de Courten, A; Irle, C; Samson, J; Lombardi, T

    2001-05-01

    Oral cavity metastases mostly originate from the breasts, lungs, or kidneys. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), the most frequent malignant tumor of the urinary bladder, rarely metastasizes to the jaws. To the best of our knowledge, only 8 cases of bladder carcinoma have been reported in the English literature to metastasize to the jawbones. A new case of mandibular metastasis of urinary bladder TCC with extension to the gingiva is presented in a 64-year-old white man. The patient was referred for a periodontal infection of the upper right first molar. The clinical examination also showed a gingival swelling located in the lower left premolar region with a hypoasthesia of the left side of the lower lip. The gingival mass was biopsied, and the microscopy showed a mandibular metastatic TCC of the urinary bladder extending to the gingiva. Periodontists should be aware that, although gingival metastases are rare, when they occur they may mimic other local benign pathological conditions.

  6. Respiration and sodium transport in rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, S U; Eaton, D C

    1982-07-28

    Respiration of rabbit urinary bladder was measured in free-floating pieces and in short-circuited pieces mounted in an Ussing chamber. Ouabain, amiloride, and potassium-free saline inhibited respiration approx. 20%; sodium-free saline depressed respiration approx. 40-50%. The coupling ratio between respiration and transport in short-circuited tissues was about two sodium ions per molecule O2. Chloride-free saline depressed mean oxygen consumption 21% in free-floating tissue pieces; 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) and furosemide had no effect. The effect of chloride-free saline in short-circuited tissues was variable; in tissues with low transport rates, respiration was stimulated about 21% while in tissue with high transport rates respiration was reduced about 24%. Nystatin and monensin, both of which markedly increase the conductance of cell membranes with a concomitant increase in sodium entry, stimulated respiration. These data indicate that 50-60% of the total oxygen consumption is not influenced by sodium, 20-25% is linked to (Na+ +K+)-ATPase transport, while the remaining 25-30% is sodium-dependent but not ouabain-inhibitable.

  7. Immunohistochemical expression of keratin proteins in urinary bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Asamoto, M; Fukushima, S; Tatemoto, Y; Yamada, K; Fukui, S; Mori, M

    1989-02-01

    Transitional carcinomas of the urinary bladder were examined immunohistochemically for keratin proteins with the use of polyclonal antiserum (TK, 41-65 kDa) and 3 monoclonal antibodies (KL 1, 55-57 kDa; PKK 1, nos. 19, 18, 8; and K 8.12, nos. 16, 13). Umbrella cells gave particularly strong staining for TK, KL 1 and PKK 1, whereas they were negative for K 8.12. Basal- and intermediate-layer cells in urothelial epithelium were moderately positive for all keratins. Brunn's nests cells showed comparatively slight or moderate keratin staining, and K 8.12 staining of Brunn's nests was higher than in urothelial epithelial cells. Transitional carcinoma (grades I and II) indicated uniform keratin distribution, and staining was strong with TK, while that of KL 1, PKK 1 and K 8.12 varied, and grade III tumors showed the lowest intensity of staining. K 8.12 staining in papillary transitional carcinomas was strongly positive in basal located tumor cells, as compared with apical tumor cells. Squamous cell carcinoma was varying positive to keratin reactions dependent on the degree of keratinization. Heterogenity of keratin distribution in papillary transitional carcinomas was given between basal tumor cells and well differentiated tumor cells including umbrella-like cells.

  8. Passive Electrical Properties of Toad Urinary Bladder Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Reuss, Luis; Finn, Arthur L.

    1974-01-01

    The electrical resistances of the transcellular and paracellular pathways across the toad urinary bladder epithelium (a typical "tight" sodium-transporting epithelium) were determined by two independent sets of electrophysiological measurements: (a) the measurement of the total transepithelial resistance, the ratio of resistance of the apical to the basal cell membrane, and cable analysis of the voltage spread into the epithelium; (b) the measurement of the total transepithelial resistance and the ratio of resistances of both cell membranes before and after replacing all mucosal sodium with potassium (thus, increasing selectively the resistance of the apical membrane). The results obtained with both methods indicate the presence of a finite transepithelial shunt pathway, whose resistance is about 1.8 times the resistance of the transcellular pathway. Appropriate calculations show that the resistance of the shunt pathway is almost exclusively determined by the zonula occludens section of the limiting junctions. The mean resistance of the apical cell membrane is 1.7 times that of the basal cell membrane. The use of nonconducting materials on the mucosal side allowed us to demonstrate that apparently all epithelial cells are electrically coupled, with a mean space constant of 460 µm, and a voltage spread consistent with a thin sheet model. PMID:4209766

  9. ISL1 is a major susceptibility gene for classic bladder exstrophy and a regulator of urinary tract development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Knapp, Michael; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kajioka, Daiki; Schmidt, Johanna M; Winkler, Jonas; Yilmaz, Öznur; Pleschka, Michael; Cao, Jia; Kockum, Christina Clementson; Barker, Gillian; Holmdahl, Gundela; Beaman, Glenda; Keene, David; Woolf, Adrian S; Cervellione, Raimondo M; Cheng, Wei; Wilkins, Simon; Gearhart, John P; Sirchia, Fabio; Di Grazia, Massimo; Ebert, Anne-Karolin; Rösch, Wolfgang; Ellinger, Jörg; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Zwink, Nadine; Feitz, Wout F; Marcelis, Carlo; Schumacher, Johannes; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Barth, Sandra; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Brusco, Alfredo; Ludwig, Michael; Newman, William; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Yamada, Gen; Odermatt, Benjamin; Reutter, Heiko

    2017-02-08

    Previously genome-wide association methods in patients with classic bladder exstrophy (CBE) found association with ISL1, a master control gene expressed in pericloacal mesenchyme. This study sought to further explore the genetics in a larger set of patients following-up on the most promising genomic regions previously reported. Genotypes of 12 markers obtained from 268 CBE patients of Australian, British, German Italian, Spanish and Swedish origin and 1,354 ethnically matched controls and from 92 CBE case-parent trios from North America were analysed. Only marker rs6874700 at the ISL1 locus showed association (p = 2.22 × 10(-08)). A meta-analysis of rs6874700 of our previous and present study showed a p value of 9.2 × 10(-19). Developmental biology models were used to clarify the location of ISL1 activity in the forming urinary tract. Genetic lineage analysis of Isl1-expressing cells by the lineage tracer mouse model showed Isl1-expressing cells in the urinary tract of mouse embryos at E10.5 and distributed in the bladder at E15.5. Expression of isl1 in zebrafish larvae staged 48 hpf was detected in a small region of the developing pronephros. Our study supports ISL1 as a major susceptibility gene for CBE and as a regulator of urinary tract development.

  10. ISL1 is a major susceptibility gene for classic bladder exstrophy and a regulator of urinary tract development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Knapp, Michael; Suzuki, Kentaro; Kajioka, Daiki; Schmidt, Johanna M.; Winkler, Jonas; Yilmaz, Öznur; Pleschka, Michael; Cao, Jia; Kockum, Christina Clementson; Barker, Gillian; Holmdahl, Gundela; Beaman, Glenda; Keene, David; Woolf, Adrian S.; Cervellione, Raimondo M.; Cheng, Wei; Wilkins, Simon; Gearhart, John P.; Sirchia, Fabio; Di Grazia, Massimo; Ebert, Anne-Karolin; Rösch, Wolfgang; Ellinger, Jörg; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Zwink, Nadine; Feitz, Wout F.; Marcelis, Carlo; Schumacher, Johannes; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Barth, Sandra; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Brusco, Alfredo; Ludwig, Michael; Newman, William; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Yamada, Gen; Odermatt, Benjamin; Reutter, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    Previously genome-wide association methods in patients with classic bladder exstrophy (CBE) found association with ISL1, a master control gene expressed in pericloacal mesenchyme. This study sought to further explore the genetics in a larger set of patients following-up on the most promising genomic regions previously reported. Genotypes of 12 markers obtained from 268 CBE patients of Australian, British, German Italian, Spanish and Swedish origin and 1,354 ethnically matched controls and from 92 CBE case-parent trios from North America were analysed. Only marker rs6874700 at the ISL1 locus showed association (p = 2.22 × 10−08). A meta-analysis of rs6874700 of our previous and present study showed a p value of 9.2 × 10−19. Developmental biology models were used to clarify the location of ISL1 activity in the forming urinary tract. Genetic lineage analysis of Isl1-expressing cells by the lineage tracer mouse model showed Isl1-expressing cells in the urinary tract of mouse embryos at E10.5 and distributed in the bladder at E15.5. Expression of isl1 in zebrafish larvae staged 48 hpf was detected in a small region of the developing pronephros. Our study supports ISL1 as a major susceptibility gene for CBE and as a regulator of urinary tract development. PMID:28176844

  11. Extranodal B-cell lymphoma in the urinary bladder with cytological evidence of concurrent involvement of the gall bladder in a cat.

    PubMed

    Geigy, C A; Dandrieux, J; Miclard, J; Kircher, P; Howard, J

    2010-05-01

    A 15-year-old domestic shorthair cat was presented with severe haematuria, stranguria, anorexia and lethargy of 10 days' duration. Physical examination revealed a large painful urinary bladder and pain in the cranial abdomen. Abdominal ultrasound revealed severe generalised mural thickening of both the gall bladder and the urinary bladder. Lymphoma was diagnosed on cytology of urine sediment and fine-needle aspirates of the gall bladder. Despite a transitory clinical improvement and partial remission following chemotherapy, the cat was euthanased six weeks after initial presentation due to recurrent clinical signs. Post-mortem examination confirmed a B-cell lymphoma in the urinary bladder. This report is the first description of gall bladder and bladder lymphoma in a cat.

  12. A calibrated human PBPK model for benzene inhalation with urinary bladder and bone marrow compartments.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Kerger, Brent D; Finley, Brent; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2013-07-01

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of benzene inhalation based on a recent mouse model was adapted to include bone marrow (target organ) and urinary bladder compartments. Empirical data on human liver microsomal protein levels and linked CYP2E1 activities were incorporated into the model, and metabolite-specific conversion rate parameters were estimated by fitting to human biomonitoring data and adjusting for background levels of urinary metabolites. Human studies of benzene levels in blood and breath, and phenol levels in urine were used to validate the rate of human conversion of benzene to benzene oxide, and urinary benzene metabolites from Chinese benzene worker populations provided model validation for rates of human conversion of benzene to muconic acid (MA) and phenylmercapturic acid (PMA), phenol (PH), catechol (CA), hydroquinone (HQ), and benzenetriol (BT). The calibrated human model reveals that while liver microsomal protein and CYP2E1 activities are lower on average in humans compared to mice, the mouse also shows far lower rates of benzene conversion to MA and PMA, and far higher conversion of benzene to BO/PH, and of BO/PH to CA, HQ, and BT. The model also differed substantially from existing human PBPK models with respect to several metabolic rate parameters of importance to interpreting benzene metabolism and health risks in human populations associated with bone marrow doses. The model provides a new methodological paradigm focused on integrating linked human liver metabolism data and calibration using biomonitoring data, thus allowing for model uncertainty analysis and more rigorous validation. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  13. Cure of urinary bladder functions in severe (95%) motoric complete cervical spinal cord injury in human.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    Severe cervical Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) leads to quadriplegia, and autonomic dysfunctions. Bladder/bowel continence, cardiovascular performance, and breathing are impaired besides movements. Even though there are no fully restorative treatments for SCI, I report about a patient, who suffered a severe cervical, motoric complete SCI, in whom urinary bladder functions were fully repaired by functional and structural repair (limited regeneration of the cord) upon 2.5 years of Coordination Dynamics Therapy (CDT). On the repair of the blood circulation (no occurrence of pressure ulcers any more), breathing and motor functions was reported earlier. The mechanism that underlies this important repair of urinary bladder functions is the learning transfer from movements to bladder functions. The human bladder repair is analyzed at the neuron level, the collective variable level (System Theory of Pattern Formation), the movement, and the clinical diagnostic level.

  14. Development of Urinary Bladder Pre-Neoplasia by Schistosoma haematobium Eggs and Chemical Carcinogen in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chala, Bayissa; Choi, Min-Ho; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, Hyung Suk; Kwak, Cheol; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2017-02-01

    Schistosoma haematobium is a biocarcinogen of human urinary bladder (UB). The present study investigated developing UB cancer mouse model by injecting S. haematobium eggs into the bladder wall and introduction of chemical carcinogens. Histopathological findings showed mild hyperplasia to epithelial vacuolar change, and high grade dysplasia. Squamous metaplasia was observed in the S. haematobium eggs+NDMA group at week 12 but not in other groups. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly high expression of Ki-67 in urothelial epithelial cells of the S. haematobium eggs+BBN group at week 20. The qRT-PCR showed high expression of p53 gene in S. haematobium eggs group at week 4 and S. haematobium eggs+BBN group at week 20. E-cadherin and vimentin showed contrasting expression in S. haematobium eggs+BBN group. Such inverse expression of E-cadherin and vimentin may indicate epithelial mesenchymal transition in the UB tissue. In conclusion, S. haematobium eggs and nitrosamines may transform UB cells into squamous metaplasia and dysplasia in correlation with increased expression of Ki-67. Marked decrease in E-cadherin and increase in p53 and vimentin expressions may support the transformation. The present study introduces a promising modified animal model for UB cancer study using S. haematobium eggs.

  15. Development of Urinary Bladder Pre-Neoplasia by Schistosoma haematobium Eggs and Chemical Carcinogen in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chala, Bayissa; Choi, Min-Ho; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, Hyung Suk; Kwak, Cheol; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Schistosoma haematobium is a biocarcinogen of human urinary bladder (UB). The present study investigated developing UB cancer mouse model by injecting S. haematobium eggs into the bladder wall and introduction of chemical carcinogens. Histopathological findings showed mild hyperplasia to epithelial vacuolar change, and high grade dysplasia. Squamous metaplasia was observed in the S. haematobium eggs+NDMA group at week 12 but not in other groups. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly high expression of Ki-67 in urothelial epithelial cells of the S. haematobium eggs+BBN group at week 20. The qRT-PCR showed high expression of p53 gene in S. haematobium eggs group at week 4 and S. haematobium eggs+BBN group at week 20. E-cadherin and vimentin showed contrasting expression in S. haematobium eggs+BBN group. Such inverse expression of E-cadherin and vimentin may indicate epithelial mesenchymal transition in the UB tissue. In conclusion, S. haematobium eggs and nitrosamines may transform UB cells into squamous metaplasia and dysplasia in correlation with increased expression of Ki-67. Marked decrease in E-cadherin and increase in p53 and vimentin expressions may support the transformation. The present study introduces a promising modified animal model for UB cancer study using S. haematobium eggs. PMID:28285503

  16. Spontaneous Atraumatic Urinary Bladder Rupture Secondary to Alcohol Intoxication: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Mohammed; Abdelrahman, Husham; El-Menyar, Ayman; Zarour, Ahmad; Awad, Ahmed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 45 Final Diagnosis: Atraumatic urinary bladder rupture Symptoms: Drowsiness • diffuse abdominal pain • vomiting Medication: None Clinical Procedure: CT cystogram • exploratory laparotomy • urinary bladder repair Specialty: Urology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB) secondary to alcohol intoxication is an uncommon presentation with high morbidity and mortality. Herein, we reported a rare case of spontaneous atraumatic rupture of the urinary bladder due to alcohol intoxication. Case Reports: A 45-year-old Sri Lankan man presented with drowsiness, diffuse abdominal pain, vomiting with odor of alcohol, and urinary retention 24 hours prior to the index admission. CT cystogram confirmed the urinary bladder rupture at the dome, which was repaired through exploratory laparotomy. Conclusions: An SRUB patient with alcohol abuse often presents with non-specific symptoms due to absence of a traumatic event, which results in missed or delayed-diagnosis. Early diagnosis and management of SRUB is crucial for uneventful recovery. PMID:26522816

  17. Use of urinary bladder measurements from a point-of-care cysto-colic ultrasonographic view to estimate urinary bladder volume in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Lisciandro, Gregory R; Fosgate, Geoffrey T

    2017-09-26

    To develop a point-of-care ultrasound-derived formula to estimate urinary bladder volume noninvasively in dogs and cats. Prospective case series. Private 24-hour veterinary emergency center. Client-owned dogs and cats requiring urethral catheterization. Ultrasound measurements of length, width, and height of balloons filled with known water volumes were used to develop a formula to estimate urinary bladder volume using linear regression. The formula was then applied to point-of-care ultrasound-derived cysto-colic view measurements, and calculations were compared to total aspirated urine volume. Fifteen balloons with known volumes (median, 126 mL [range, 27-689 mL]) were used to identify length × width × height (cm) × 0.2 × π as the best formula to estimate urinary bladder volume in milliliters. Fourteen cats and 14 dogs were used for comparison of formula-derived volume estimate to actual urinary bladder volume. Median aspirated urine volume, bias (formula-derived minus actual aspirated), and percentage difference were 80 mL, -4.1 mL, and -6.6% for cats, respectively. For dogs, the results were 78 mL, 3.4 mL, and 3.6%, respectively. The point-of-care ultrasound-derived formula may be useful to estimate urine volume noninvasively in dogs and cats. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  18. Interesting Layering of Excreted 18F-FDG in the Urinary Bladder in Patients with Urinary Tract Infection and Distended Bladder.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Zhang, Wenjie; Jia, Zhiyun; Deng, Houfu

    2015-09-01

    Settling of (18)F-FDG in the bladder is often noted on whole-body PET/CT images, but this phenomenon has never received any careful attention and the mechanism has been unclear. The 2 patients described in this report, one with a T1 pathologic fracture and another with widespread bone and lymph node metastases from an unknown primary tumor, underwent PET/CT. Both had urinary tract infection and a distended bladder during scanning. The interesting layering of (18)F-FDG in the urinary bladder was observed in both patients. The presence of this phenomenon demands careful evaluation of the urine by the clinician, and the mechanism is hypothesized to be slow (18)F-FDG excretion in patients with a distended urinary bladder, resulting in delayed mixing with urine. In addition, urinary tract infection may be a potential cause. Images showing this interesting layering should be interpreted with care. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  19. Use of bladder volume measurement assessed with ultrasound to predict postoperative urinary retention

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Kavakli, Ali Sait

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is a common complication after spinal anesthesia. Ultrasound (US) is a simple, non-invasive method to estimate bladder volume before and after surgery. Primary aim of the present study was to investigate utility of bladder volume measured before and after surgery in prediction of POUR risk. Secondary aim was to investigate necessity of urethral catheter use and risk of urethral catheter-related infections. METHODS: Eighty patients who received spinal anesthesia for arthroscopic knee surgery were included in the study. Level and duration of sensory and motor block; bladder volume measured preoperatively, in post-anesthetic care unit (PACU), and when discharged from PACU; use of urethral catheter; and incidence of urinary tract infection data were recorded. RESULTS: POUR was observed in 28.7% of patients. Length of time for sensory block regression was significantly shorter in patients without POUR (p=0.012). Spontaneous urination was not observed in 3 of 23 patients with POUR, although bladder volume was less than 600 mL. Bladder volume over 600 mL without urination was recorded in 20 patients. There was no statistical difference in preoperative bladder volume between patients who did or did not develop POUR. Bladder volume on admission to PACU was higher in patients with POUR (p=0.023). Urgency and dysuria were observed in 5 patients who required urethral catheterization during postoperative period. Urinary tract infection developed in 1 patient. There was no statistical difference in development of urinary tract infection between patient groups who did and did not undergo urethral catheterization. CONCLUSION: Assessment of patient bladder volume with US before arthroscopic knee surgery may be used to foresee development of POUR. Avoiding elective urinary catheterization may reduce urinary infections. PMID:28275753

  20. Intrauterine device migration to the urinary bladder causing sexual dysfunction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulos, K; Skriapas, K; Karvounis, G; Tzortzis, V

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intravesical migration represents an uncommon complication of intrauterine device (IUD) insertion. We present the case of an IUD that migrated to the urinary bladder, causing significant sexual complaints. Case report: A 38-year-old woman presented with complaints of gradually evolving dyspareunia and recurrent urinary tract infections during the past 12 months. She reported an IUD insertion 18 months before. Further detailed evaluation revealed disorders in all sexual domains. Imaging and cystoscopy detected the presence of IUD in the urinary bladder. Under anesthesia, the IUD was removed out of the bladder without any complications. In her follow-up evaluation after six months, her sexual function was significantly improved and she had no urinary symptoms. Conclusion: Sexual difficulties in a woman with an IUD should raise the suspicion of device dislodgement or dislocation. Hippokratia 2016, 20(1): 70-72 PMID:27895447

  1. Cold- and menthol-sensitive C afferents of cat urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, C H; Maziéres, L; Lindström, S

    2002-01-01

    Cold-sensitive C afferents of the urinary bladder were studied in adult cats anaesthetised with α-chloralose. The bladder was catheterised for fluid instillations and bladder pressure recordings. Pelvic nerve branches were stimulated electrically close to the bladder. Evoked afferent activity was recorded from dissected filaments of the ipsilateral S1-S2 dorsal roots. Responsive afferents were identified using the ‘marking technique', based on activity-dependent decrease in C fibre conduction velocity. Of 108 examined bladder C afferents, 14 were activated by innocuous cooling of the bladder wall. Their conduction velocities ranged from 0.6 to 1.7 ms−1 and their activity dependent decrease in conduction velocity was <10 %. All nine cold-sensitive afferents tested responded to menthol exposure. Cold-sensitive C afferents failed to respond to bladder filling with body-warm saline and to active bladder contractions. These characteristics indicate that the cold-sensitive C afferents of the bladder resemble cutaneous cold receptors rather than cold-sensitive mechanoreceptors or nociceptors. It is concluded that the bladder wall is endowed with cold receptors with unmyelinated C afferents in the pelvic nerves and that these afferents are responsible for the bladder cooling reflex. PMID:12181293

  2. Pleomorphic lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Fadare, Oluwole; Renshaw, Idris L; Rubin, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) of the urinary bladder is often mixed with conventional transitional cell carcinoma and/or other histotypes. The pathologist's determination of the morphologic purity of a given LELC at the biopsy stage is a clinically relevant endeavour, because there is some anecdotal evidence suggesting that pure or predominant LELC may be comparatively chemosensitive and have a favorable prognostic profile, which may potentially offer the possibility of effective therapy without bladder resection. The precise degree of cellular pleomorphism that is allowed in a pure LELC is unclear. We describe herein an otherwise conventional and pure LELC that showed, in a localized area that constituted approximately 25% of the overall tumor volume, a two to six fold variation in nuclear size, including multinucleated tumor cells. These pleomorphic areas were set in the same lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate as their conventional counterparts, and similarly displayed cellular syncytia. We performed a detailed immunophenotypic comparison between the conventional areas and the pleomorphic areas. No significant differences were found between the 2 areas in overall lymphoplasmacytic or histiocytic density, lymphocytic CD4/CD8 ratio, and lymphoplasmacytic kappa/lambda ratio. Similarly, both displayed similar qualitative and quantitative staining indices for p53, Ki67, cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and p16(INKa). Scattered cells were cytoplasmically beta-catenin positive exclusively in the pleomorphic areas; however these cells were not notably larger than the cells in the conventional areas. Both components were immunohistochemically negative for HMB-45, CD1a, the estrogen receptor, Epstein-Barr virus, CD117, D2-40, CD56, cytokeratin 20 and chromogranin. Clinicopathologic analysis of a series of cases is required to establish if there is any significance to nuclear pleomorphism in LELC. However, the phenotypic similarity between the 2 areas in this case, the intimate

  3. Nicotine interferes with purinergic signaling in smooth muscle cells isolated from urinary bladders of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jenes, Agnes; Szigeti, Gyula P; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Varga, Attila; Lorincz, Laszlo; Csernoch, Laszlo

    2013-09-01

    In patients with outlet obstruction, the contraction of the base is reduced compared to that of healthy individuals, while the contraction of the dome is not affected. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms that might be responsible for cholinergic effects blocking non-adrenergic non-cholinergic contractions in the base of the urinary bladder. Smooth muscle cells either from the base or from the dome of human urinary bladders were cultured to determine the contribution of cholinergic and purinergic mechanisms to their Ca2+ homeostasis. While ATP evoked Ca2+ transients in all the cells, nicotine and carbachol induced Ca2+ transients only in 56% and 44% of the cells, respectively. When ATP was administered together with nicotine or carbachol, the amplitudes of the Ca2+ transients recorded from cells prepared from the base of bladders were significantly smaller (42 ± 6% with nicotine and 56 ± 9% with carbachol) than those evoked by ATP alone. This inhibition was much less apparent in the dome of bladders. The inhibition between the cholinergic and purinergic signaling pathways reported in this work may decrease the strength of the contraction of the base of the urinary bladder in patients with outlet obstruction during voiding.

  4. Importance of contraction history on muscle force of porcine urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Robin; Böl, Markus; Siebert, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive dataset of porcine urinary bladder smooth muscle properties. Particularly, the history dependence of force production, namely force depression (FD) following shortening and force enhancement (FE) following stretch, was analysed. During active micturition, the circumference of the urinary bladder changes enormously. Thus, FD might be an important phenomenon during smooth muscle contraction. Electrically stimulated, intact urinary bladder strips from pigs (n = 10) were suspended in an aerated-filled organ bath, and different isometric, isotonic, and isokinetic contraction protocols were performed to determine the force-length and the force-velocity relation. FD and FE were assessed in concentric and eccentric contractions with different ramp lengths and ramp velocities. Bladder smooth muscles exhibit considerable amounts of FD and FE. The amount of FD increased significantly with ramp length, while FE did not change. However, FE and FD were independent of ramp velocity. The results imply that smooth muscle bladder strips exhibit similar muscle properties and history-dependent behaviour compared to striated muscles. The provided dataset of muscle properties is important for bladder modelling as well as for the analyses and interpretation of dynamic bladder filling and voiding.

  5. p16 expression is not associated with human papillomavirus in urinary bladder squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Riley E; Hu, Yingchuan; Kum, Jennifer B; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Maclennan, Gregory T; Idrees, Muhammad T; Emerson, Robert E; Ulbright, Thomas M; Grignon, David G; Eble, John N; Cheng, Liang

    2012-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is unusual and of unknown etiology. There is a well-established association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the development of cervical and head/neck squamous cell carcinomas. However, the role of HPV in the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is uncertain. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible role of HPV in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and to determine if p16 expression could serve as a surrogate marker for HPV in this malignancy. In all, 42 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and 27 cases of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation were investigated. HPV infection was analyzed by both in situ hybridization at the DNA level and immunohistochemistry at the protein level. p16 protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. HPV DNA and protein were not detected in 42 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (0%, 0/42) or 27 cases of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation (0%, 0/15). p16 expression was detected in 13 cases (31%, 13/42) of squamous cell carcinoma and 9 cases (33%, 9/27) of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. There was no correlation between p16 expression and the presence of HPV infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. Our data suggest that HPV does not play a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. p16 expression should not be used as a surrogate marker for evidence of HVP infection in either squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation as neither HVP DNA nor protein is detectable in these neoplasms.

  6. Cocaine-and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript Peptide (CARTp): Distribution and Function in Rat Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Zvarova, K.; Herrera, G. M.; May, V.; Vizzard, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of CARTp(55-102) in rat lower urinary tract and evaluated its effect on urinary bladder function in vitro. Immunohistochemistry and a vertical isolated tissue bath system were used. Neurons, clusters of non-neuronal endocrine cells, and nerve fibers stained positive for CARTp(55-102) in young adult rat urinary bladder. In addition, a dense plexus of CARTp-immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers was detected in ureters and small blood vessels in the bladder. The CARTp-expressing neuronal elements were nitric oxide synthase (NOS)- and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-IR, whereas all non-neuronal CARTp-IR elements stained positively only for TH (100%). In isolated bladder strips, CARTp significantly increased the amplitude of electric field stimulation (EFS)-induced detrusor contractions at stimulation frequencies ≤ 12.5 Hz (p ≤ 0.001) as well as amplitude and frequency of spontaneous phasic urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) contractions (p ≤ 0.05). The responses to CARTp stimulation were dose-dependent and increased in the presence of the urothelium. To determine if the CARTp-increase in nerve mediated contractions may involve an action of CARTp on specific neural pathways, we blocked cholinergic, purinergic and adrenergic pathways and determined CARTp actions on EFS-medicated contractions. CARTp enhancement of EFS-mediated contractions does not involve alteration in purinergic, adrenergic or cholinergic pathways. The study demonstrates that CARTp(55-102) is highly expressed in rat urinary bladder. CARTp increased the amplitude of EFS-induced detrusor contractions as well as the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous phasic urinary bladder smooth muscle contractions. We conclude that CARTp may alter the release of compounds from the urothelium that leads to an enhancement of UBSM contractility/excitability. PMID:24740629

  7. Bladder pressure measurements and urinary tract infection in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Duane, Therèse M; Young, Andrew; Weber, William; Wolfe, Luke G; Malhotra, Ajai K; Aboutanos, Michel B; Whelan, James F; Mayglothling, Julie; Ivatury, Rao R

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this trial was to determine if using a closed technique for bladder pressure measurements (BPMs) would eliminate them as a risk factor for urinary tract infection (UTI) in trauma patients, as was shown previously using an open technique. Data were collected prospectively from January 2006 until December 2009 by a dedicated epidemiology nurse and combined with trauma registry data at our Level 1 trauma center. All trauma patients admitted to the surgical trauma intensive care unit (STICU) with and without UTIs were compared for demographic and epidemiologic data. A closed system was used in which the urinary drainage catheter (UDC) remained connected to the bag and 45 mL of saline was injected through a two-way valved sideport, with subsequent measurements through the sideport. There were 1,641 patients in the trial. The UTI group was sicker (Injury Severity Score [ISS] 18.7±11.9 no UTI vs. 28±10.7 UTI; p<0.0001), with longer stays (11.4±12.4 days no UTI vs. 37.9±20.3 days UTI; p<0.0001) and more UDC days (4.3±6.6 no UTI vs. 23.9±16.6 UTI; p<0.0001). The BPM group had more UDC days (15.6 days±16.0 BPM vs. 5.4 days±7.3 no BPM; p<0.0001), yet no difference in UTI rate/1,000 UDC days (5.7 no BPM vs. 8.0 BPM; p=0.5291). Logistic regression demonstrated only UDC days to be a predictor of UTI (1.125; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.097-1.154; p<0.0001), whereas ISS (1.083, 95% CI 1.063-1.104; p<0.0001) and age (1.051, 95% CI 1.037-1.065; p<0.0001) were the only predictors of death. Although patients undergoing BPM have more UTIs than patients without BPM, the measurements are not an independent predictor of UTI when done by the closed technique. These findings emphasize the judicious use of BPM with a closed system and, more importantly, the need for early removal of catheters.

  8. Cervical vagotomy increased the distal colon distention to urinary bladder inhibitory reflex in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kaddumi, Ezidin G

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the convergence of vagal inputs into brainstem centers with inputs from the urinary bladder and colon, as well as the convergence of vagal inputs into other centers controlling the urinary bladder and colon reflexes. However, the effect of the vagal inputs on the interaction between the urinary bladder and other pelvic organs has not been studied. In this study, the effect of bilateral cervical vagotomy on the distal colon to urinary bladder reflex was examined. Changes to cystometry parameters in response to increased distal colon distensions (1, 2, and 3 ml) were tested in urethane-anesthetized male rats with or without bilateral cervical vagotomy. In animals with intact vagus nerves, 1 and 2 ml distal colon distentions had no significant effects on micturition frequency; however, 3 ml distal colon distention significantly decreased the frequency of micturition cycles. Also, 3 ml distal colon distention inhibited micturition cycles in 37.5 % of these animals. On the other hand, following cervical vagotomy, 1 ml distal colon distention was enough to significantly decrease the frequency of micturition cycles and to inhibit the cycles in 75 % of the animals. These results demonstrate the presence of supraspinal inhibitory regulation, via the vagus nerve, over the distal colon to urinary bladder inhibitory reflex.

  9. Subchronic urinary bladder toxicity evaluation of N-Nitrosodiphenylamine in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Darol E; Pluta, Linda J; Sochaski, Mark A; Funk, Kathleen A; Thomas, Russell S

    2013-05-01

    Female Fischer 344 (F344) rats were exposed to N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPA) by dietary feed at concentrations of 0, 250, 1000, 2000, 3000 or 4000 ppm for 5 days, 2, 4 and 13 weeks duration. Endpoints evaluated included clinical observations, body weights, urinary bladder weights, blood NDPA, gross pathology and urinary bladder histopathology. There were no NDPA exposure-related clinical signs of toxicity. The mean body weight decreased 3% to 5% compared with the control in the 4000 ppm group during study weeks 2 through to 13. Statistically significant increases in urinary bladder weight were observed as early as after 5 days exposure and were concentration dependent at ≥ 3000 ppm. NDPA-related urinary bladder microscopic alterations consisted of mixed cell infiltrates, increased mitosis, increased necrosis of epithelial cells, diffuse and/or nodular transitional epithelial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of transitional epithelium. These changes affected only rats exposed to NDPA concentrations ≥ 2000 ppm. Blood NDPA concentrations were negligible in animals exposed to ≤ 1000 ppm and ranged from 0.12 to 0.19 µg ml(-1) in rats of the ≥ 2000 ppm groups at the 5 days and 2 weeks time points. A no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 1000 ppm NDPA (60 mg kg(-1) day(-1) ) was selected based on the absence of urinary bladder histopathology.

  10. [Neoadjuvant chemotherapy of invasive cancer of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Selivanov, S P; Isaeva, S N; Kovalik, T A; Chén', M N; Aleksandrovich, I N; Kaliev, E A

    2007-01-01

    We studied efficacy of a combination of intraosseous and systemic administration of drugs in patients with invasive cancer of the urinary bladder (UB). A total of 20 patients aged 54-79 years with verified had recurrence, 2 had tumors with continuous growth. T2N0M0 UB carcinoma was diagnosed in 7 patients, T3N0M0--in 12, T6N0M0--in 1 patient. All the patients received systemic chemotherapy with gemzar in a single daily dose 800-1000 mg/m2 on day 1, 7 and 14. On day 2 a single intraosseous 100 mg eloxatin was given. A total of three courses of combined chemotherapy with 4-week interval was used. Intravenous gemzar administration was accompanied with mild leukopenia in 4 patients, moderate leukopenia--in 1, allergic reaction--in 2 patients. This required gemzar discontinuation. No side effects were seen in response to intraosseous administration of eloxatin. The combined chemotherapy produced complete regression of UB cancer in 3 of 18 patients, partial regression--in 12, stabilization--in 3 patients. Neither local nor long-term tumor progression was found. Short-term therapeutic efficacy of combined therapy was 70%. Fifteen patients with partial regression or stabilization have undergone transurethral resection. Duration of a recurrence-free period reached 5 to 72 months (mean 17 months). The neoadjuvant chemotherapy proposed by us allows achievement of a high percentage of regression in patients with invasive UB cancer located in UB cervix and provides concervative surgery including patients over 70 years of age.

  11. Alterations in Nerve-Evoked Bladder Contractions in a Coronavirus-Induced Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Malykhina, Anna P.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s often present with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and retention) resulting from damage to the peripheral and central nervous systems. These studies were designed to examine the changes in the function of the bladder that may underlie neurogenic bladder dysfunction using a mouse model of demyelination in the CNS. Methods Bladders from 12 week old male C57BL/6J mice with coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis (CIE, a chronic, progressive demyelinating disease model of human MS), and age-matched controls, were cut into 5–7 strips and suspended in physiological muscle baths for tension measurement in response to agonists and electric field stimulation (EFS). Experiments were performed on intact and denuded (with mucosa removed) bladder strips. Results The maximum effect of EFS was not significantly different between CIE and control bladders. Nerve-evoked EFS contractions (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) were blocked by a combination of atropine (cholinergic antagonist) and α,β-methylene ATP (an ATP analog that desensitizes purinergic receptors). In response to EFS, the α,β-methylene ATP-resistant (cholinergic) component of contraction was significantly reduced, while the atropine-resistant (purinergic) component was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Removal of the mucosa in CIE bladders restored the cholinergic component. Bethanechol (muscarinic receptor agonist) potency was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a deficit in the nerve-evoked cholinergic component of contraction that is not due to the ability of the smooth muscle to respond to acetylcholine. We conclude that neurodegenerative bladder dysfunction in this model of multiple sclerosis may be due, in part, to pathologic changes in the mucosa that causes suppression of muscarinic receptor-mediated contractile response

  12. Alterations in nerve-evoked bladder contractions in a coronavirus-induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lamarre, Neil S; Braverman, Alan S; Malykhina, Anna P; Barbe, Mary F; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's often present with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and retention) resulting from damage to the peripheral and central nervous systems. These studies were designed to examine the changes in the function of the bladder that may underlie neurogenic bladder dysfunction using a mouse model of demyelination in the CNS. Bladders from 12 week old male C57BL/6J mice with coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis (CIE, a chronic, progressive demyelinating disease model of human MS), and age-matched controls, were cut into 5-7 strips and suspended in physiological muscle baths for tension measurement in response to agonists and electric field stimulation (EFS). Experiments were performed on intact and denuded (with mucosa removed) bladder strips. The maximum effect of EFS was not significantly different between CIE and control bladders. Nerve-evoked EFS contractions (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) were blocked by a combination of atropine (cholinergic antagonist) and α,β-methylene ATP (an ATP analog that desensitizes purinergic receptors). In response to EFS, the α,β-methylene ATP-resistant (cholinergic) component of contraction was significantly reduced, while the atropine-resistant (purinergic) component was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Removal of the mucosa in CIE bladders restored the cholinergic component. Bethanechol (muscarinic receptor agonist) potency was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Our data demonstrate a deficit in the nerve-evoked cholinergic component of contraction that is not due to the ability of the smooth muscle to respond to acetylcholine. We conclude that neurodegenerative bladder dysfunction in this model of multiple sclerosis may be due, in part, to pathologic changes in the mucosa that causes suppression of muscarinic receptor-mediated contractile response and augmentation of purinergic response of

  13. Distribution and function of the hydrogen sulfide-sensitive TRPA1 ion channel in rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Streng, Tomi; Axelsson, Helena E; Hedlund, Petter; Andersson, David A; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Bevan, Stuart; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Högestätt, Edward D; Zygmunt, Peter M

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the distribution of the transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 ion channel in the rat urinary bladder, and to study the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and known TRPA1 activators on micturition in conscious rats and on heterologously expressed ion channels. The expression of TRPA1 in urinary bladder was studied with fluorescence immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Cystometric investigations were performed in conscious animals subjected to intravesical administration of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, donor of H(2)S), allyl isothiocyanate (AI), and cinnamaldehyde (CA). Fluorometric calcium imaging was used to study the effect of NaHS on human and mouse TRPA1 expressed in CHO cells. TRPA1 immunoreactivity was found on unmyelinated nerve fibres within the urothelium, suburothelial space, and muscle layer as well as around blood vessels throughout the bladder. All TRPA1 immunoreactive nerves fibres also expressed TRPV1 immunoreactivity and vice versa. TRPA1 was also detected in urothelial cells at both transcriptional and protein levels. AI increased micturition frequency and reduced voiding volume. CA and NaHS produced similar changes in urodynamic parameters after disruption of the urothelial barrier with protamine sulfate. NaHS also induced calcium responses in TRPA1-expressing CHO cells, but not in untransfected cells. The expression of TRPA1 on C-fibre bladder afferents and urothelial cells together with the finding that intravesical TRPA1 activators initiate detrusor overactivity indicate that TRPA1 may have a role in sensory transduction in this organ. The study also highlights H(2)S as a TRPA1 activator potentially involved in inflammatory bladder disease.

  14. Clinical outcome of primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Chen-Pang; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Chien-Lun; Chang, Phei-Lang; Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare malignant disease. It accounts for less than 1% of all urinary bladder carcinomas. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical features, the treatment modalities, and the overall survival of these patients. We also compare the clinical outcomes between patients of bladder small cell carcinoma (SCC) and bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC). Materials and methods We reviewed the charts of patients with bladder tumors from January 1995 to December 2012 in the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. A total of 2421 malignant bladder tumor patients were reviewed and there were 18 patients who were diagnosed with primary bladder SCC. The patients’ characteristics, including age, gender, smoking history, presented symptoms, tumor size, locations, clinical stages, treatment modalities, pathology appearance, recurrence conditions, and survival conditions were all recorded. We also compared the clinical outcomes and the overall survival rates between patients with bladder SCC and those with UC. Results Bladder SCC accounted for about 0.74% of all bladder malignancies in our institution. The mean age at diagnosis was 70.67 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 2.6:1. Thirteen patients had a history of cigarette smoking. All patients presented with symptoms of gross hematuria, and three of them had bladder tamponade requiring blood clot evacuation by cystoscopy. Only one patient had T1 disease, ten patients had stage III disease, and seven patients had lymph node or distant metastasis (stage IV disease). The mean tumor size was 4.29 cm in diameter. For the majority (61.11%) of patients, SCC coexisted with UC components. The average survival time was 10.92 months. Patients with bladder SCC had worse overall survival rates than those of stage III and stage IV bladder UC. Performing radical cystectomy does not significantly improve their overall survival rates. None of the clinicopathologic parameters, including

  15. Urinary excretion patterns of pseudouridine and beta-aminoisobutyric acid in patients with tumours of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Kvist, E; Sjølin, K E; Iversen, J; Nyholm, K

    1993-01-01

    The preoperative and postoperative values of urinary pseudouridine:creatinine (phi:C) and beta-aminoisobutyric acid:creatinine (beta AIB:C) were estimated, in 192 patients with urothelial tumours of the bladder, 92 of whom had not previously been diagnosed. Urinary phi:C ratio correlated with the grade of tumour cell dysplasia (being highest in dysplasia grade 3), and to a lesser extent with the clinical stage. The treatment had no major influence on the excretion ratios. Decreased ratios, or those within the reference range, were associated with a better prognosis than increased ratios, and if both were increased at the same time the risk for progression of the disease was high. The biological tumour markers pseudouridine and beta-aminoisobutyric acid may be helpful in the diagnosis of tumours in the upper urinary tract, and in the follow-up of patients with tumours of the bladder.

  16. The effect of hysterectomy on urinary symptoms and residual bladder volume.

    PubMed

    Prasad, M; Sadhukhan, M; Tom, B; Al-Taher, H

    2002-09-01

    This was a prospective, clinical study to evaluate the effect of abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy for benign indications on urinary symptoms and residual bladder volume. One hundred and seven women undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions were included in the study that took place in a district general hospital between April 1998 and January 2000. Urinary symptoms such as stress incontinence of urine, urgency, frequency, nocturia, sensation of incomplete voiding and voiding difficulties were considered. A questionnaire was filled out and the residual bladder volume measured with a 'Bard' bladder scanner on three occasions-before the operation, postoperative days 3 or 4 and at the 6-week postoperative visit. Statistical analysis involved using a generalised estimating equation and significance assessed at the 5% level. Each woman acted as her own control. There was no evidence of changes in nocturia and voiding difficulties after surgery. All other symptoms and residual bladder volumes decreased significantly postoperatively. The type of hysterectomy did not have an effect.

  17. Metastatic malignant melanoma of the urinary bladder: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Topal, Cumhur Selcuk; Kır, Gözde; Daş, Taner; Sarbay, Billur; Tosun, Muzaffer İlkay

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic bladder tumors constitute <5% of all bladder tumors and metastatic malignant melanoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. We present a case report of a metastatic malignant melanoma of the urinary bladder. A 70-year-old woman without any apparent significant clinical history was admitted to the Department of Urology for gross hematuria. Microscopic findings of the transurethral resection specimen revealed fascicles, sheets, and diffuse areas composed of oval and fusiform cells with focal pigmentation. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the tumor cells were positive for human melanoma black-45, Melan-A, and S100, and negative for pancytokeratin. Subsequently, we contacted the patient and learned that she was admitted to the Department of Ophthalmology for painless and progressive visual field loss 15 years ago. She had been diagnosed with a primary ocular (uveal) melanoma. A detailed patient history coupled with histological and immunohistochemical findings were necessary to make the final diagnosis of metastatic melanoma.

  18. From gene discovery to new biological mechanisms: heparanases and congenital urinary bladder disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Neil A.; Hilton, Emma N.; Woolf, Adrian S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a scientific investigation into the pathogenesis of a urinary bladder disease. The disease in question is called urofacial syndrome (UFS), a congenital condition inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. UFS features incomplete urinary bladder emptying and vesicoureteric reflux, with a high risk of recurrent urosepsis and end-stage renal disease. The story starts from a human genomic perspective, then proceeds through experiments that seek to determine the roles of the implicated molecules in embryonic frogs and newborn mice. A future aim would be to use such biological knowledge to intelligently choose novel therapies for UFS. We focus on heparanase proteins and the peripheral nervous system, molecules and tissues that appear to be key players in the pathogenesis of UFS and therefore must also be critical for functional differentiation of healthy bladders. These considerations allow the envisioning of novel biological treatments, although the potential difficulties of targeting the developing bladder in vivo should not be underestimated. PMID:26315301

  19. Colonization of frog Rana temporaria L. urinary bladder by Gram-negative bacteria leads to decreased effect of arginine-vasotocin on water reabsorption from the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Fock, Ekaterina; Lavrova, Elena; Parnova, Rimma

    2013-11-01

    In frogs and toads the urinary bladder is very important for the maintenance of water balance due to its ability to store water which can be reabsorbed under the action of arginine-vasotocin (AVT). The usage of isolated bladders as a model for studying the osmotic water permeability (OWP) regulation has a disadvantage which relates to high variability of AVT effect among individuals, some showing insensitivity to the hormone. We hypothesized that the response of the bladder to AVT could depend on the colonization of the mucosal epithelium by Gram-negative bacteria. To test this, paired hemibladders of the frog Rana temporaria were used for measurement of OWP and for analysis of Gram-negative bacteria in the bladder tissue or isolated epithelial cells. Among the 206 frogs studied, 41% were infected by different Enterobacteriaceae, with prevalence of Hafnia alvei and Escherichia coli. In infected bladders the basal level of OWP was unchanged, whereas OWP stimulated by AVT was reduced (non-infected: 2.53 ± 0.13, n = 59, infected: 1.21 ± 0.17 µL min(-1)  cm(-2), n = 38, for the 15 min of AVT action, P < 0.001). In the sample, 100% of hemibladders that responded to AVT very weakly (OWP <0.5 µL min(-1)  cm(-2)) had a bacterial infection. Overnight treatment of hemibladders with mucosal lipopolysaccharide E. coli decreased OWP induced by AVT, forskolin, or IBMX lowering basal and stimulated level of cAMP. The data obtained indicate that the frog bladder epithelium could be colonized by Gram-negative bacteria, probably of cloacal origin, leading to reduction of sensitivity to AVT and to impairment of the urinary bladder to provide osmoregulation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Urinary bladder stone associated with seminal vesicle and prostate infection in a Copenhagen rat

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Shantibhusan; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Mallik, Hrudananda; Panda, Sabyasachi; Hota, Datteswar; Baisakh, Manas R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a very rare case of urinary bladder stone in a laboratory rat, which was associated with severe prostatitis and seminal vesiculitis. Importantly, the histopathological analysis revealed the rare variety of keratinizing desquamative squamous metaplasia of bladder, prostate, and seminal vesicle epithelium. Immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin protein and aniline blue staining for collagen clearly showed interstitial prostate fibrosis. The detail information about these findings and subsequent discussion are provided here. PMID:27433075

  1. Late Age (≥85 Years) Peak Incidence of Urinary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schultzel, Matthew; Saltzstein, Sidney L; Downs, Tracy M.; Shimasaki, Suzuho; Sanders, Catherine; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2013-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is classically considered to be caused by industrial exposure and tobacco use; however the usual causative factors in this type of cancer fail to explain the peak age-specific incidence in the age 85–95 group. The peak is observed consistently with both sexes and bridges ethnicity. This late peak in age of onset has significance in health care delivery and financing, as well as in research in to the causes of bladder cancer. PMID:18289593

  2. Differential expression of microRNAs in mouse embryonic bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Benchun; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2009-08-07

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in several biological processes including development, differentiation and proliferation. Analysis of miRNA expression patterns in the process of embryogenesis may have substantial value in determining the mechanism of embryonic bladder development as well as for eventual therapeutic intervention. The miRNA expression profiles are distinct among the cellular types and embryonic stages as demonstrated by microarray technology and validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR approach. Remarkably, the miRNA expression patterns suggested that unique miRNAs from epithelial and submucosal areas are responsible for mesenchymal cellular differentiation, especially regarding bladder smooth muscle cells. Our data show that miRNA expression patterns are unique in particular cell types of mouse bladder at specific developmental stages, reflecting the apparent lineage and differentiation status within the embryonic bladder. The identification of unique miRNAs expression before and after smooth muscle differentiation in site-specific area of the bladder indicates their roles in embryogenesis and may aid in future clinical intervention.

  3. Toxic effects of 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (Raphasatin) in the rat urinary bladder without genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Isamu; Cho, Young-Man; Hirata, Tadashi; Toyoda, Takeshi; Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Sasaki, Azusa; Nakamura, Takako; Okamoto, Shigehisa; Shirota, Koji; Suetome, Noboru; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC) exerts chemopreventive effects on the rat esophageal carcinogenesis model at a low dose of 80 ppm in a diet. In contrast, some isothiocyanates (ITCs) have been reported to cause toxic effects, promotion activity, and/or carcinogenic potential in the urinary bladder of rats. In the present study, we investigated whether MTBITC had toxic effects in the urinary bladder similar to other ITCs, such as phenethyl ITC (PEITC). First, to examine the early toxicity of MTBITC, rats were fed a diet supplemented with 100, 300 or 1000 ppm MTBITC for 14 days. Treatment with 1000 ppm MTBITC caused increased organ weights and histopathological changes in the urinary bladder, producing lesions similar to those of 1000 ppm PEITC. In contrast, rats treated with 100 or 300 ppm MTBITC showed no signs of toxicity. Additionally, we performed in vivo genotoxicity studies to clarify whether MTBITC may exhibit a carcinogenic potential through a genotoxic mechanism in rats. Rats were treated with MTBITC for 3 days at doses of 10, 30 or 90 mg kg(-1) body weight by gavage, and comet assays in the urinary bladder and micronucleus assays in the bone marrow were performed. No genotoxic changes were observed after treatment with MTBITC at all doses. Overall, these results suggested that the effects of MTBITC in the rat urinary bladder are less than those of PEITC, but that MTBITC could have toxic effects through a nongenotoxic mechanism in the urinary bladder of rats at high doses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CARTp): distribution and function in rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Zvarova, K; Herrera, G M; May, V; Vizzard, M A

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the distribution of CARTp(55-102) in rat lower urinary tract and evaluated its effect on urinary bladder function in vitro. Immunohistochemistry and a vertical isolated tissue bath system were used. Neurons, clusters of nonneuronal endocrine cells, and nerve fibers stained positive for CARTp(55-102) in young adult rat urinary bladder. The CARTp-expressing neuronal elements were nitric oxide synthase (NOS)- and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-IR, whereas all nonneuronal CARTp-IR elements stained positively only for TH (100 %). In isolated bladder strips, CARTp significantly increased the amplitude of electric field stimulation (EFS)-induced detrusor contractions at stimulation frequencies ≤12.5 Hz (p ≤ 0.001) as well as amplitude and frequency of spontaneous phasic urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) contractions (p ≤ 0.05). The responses to CARTp stimulation were dose-dependent and increased in the presence of the urothelium. To determine if the CARTp increase in nerve-mediated contractions may involve an action of CARTp on specific neural pathways, we blocked cholinergic, purinergic, and adrenergic pathways and determined CARTp actions on EFS-medicated contractions. CARTp enhancement of EFS-mediated contractions does not involve alteration in purinergic, adrenergic, or cholinergic pathways. The study demonstrates that CARTp(55-102) is highly expressed in rat urinary bladder. CARTp increased the amplitude of EFS-induced detrusor contractions as well as the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous phasic urinary bladder smooth muscle contractions. We conclude that CARTp may alter the release of compounds from the urothelium that leads to an enhancement of UBSM contractility/excitability.

  5. Molecular and cellular characterization of urinary bladder-type aquaporin in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yuki; Katayama, Izumi; Nakakura, Takashi; Ogushi, Yuji; Okada, Reiko; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to many anuran amphibians, water is not reabsorbed from the urinary bladder in aquatic Xenopus, thereby helping to prevent excessive water influx. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms for this process. In the present study, we have identified urinary bladder-type aquaporin, AQP-x2, in Xenopus laevis by cDNA cloning. The predicted amino acid sequence contained six putative transmembrane domains and the two conserved Asn-Pro-Ala motifs, characteristic of AQPs. The sequence also contained a putative N-glycosylation site and phosphorylation motifs for protein kinase A and protein kinase C. The oocyte swelling assay showed that AQP-x2 facilitated water permeability. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that AQP-x2 mRNA was expressed in the urinary bladder and lung, and faintly in the kidney. Immunomicroscopical study further localized AQP-x2 protein to the cytoplasm of granular cells in the luminal epithelium of the urinary bladder whilst AQP3 was observed along the basolateral side of these cells. In vitro stimulation of the urinary bladder with 10(-8)M vasotocin (AVT), 10(-8)M hydrin 1, or 10(-8)M hydrin 2 had no clear effect on the subcellular distribution of AQP-x2. When the AVT concentration was increased to 10(-6)M, however, AQP-x2 was partially transferred to the apical plasma membrane. The treatment with hydrin 1 or hydrin 2 at the same concentration failed to induce the translocation to the apical membrane. On the other hand, AQP3 remained along the basolateral side even after the treatment with vasotocin or hydrins. The results suggest that the poor responsiveness of AQP-x2 to neurohypophyseal peptides may be a main cause for the little water permeability of the urinary bladder of X. laevis.

  6. Contractile mechanisms coupled to TRPA1 receptor activation in rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Edinéia Lemos; Ferreira, Juliano; André, Eunice; Calixto, João B

    2006-06-28

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family present in sensory neurons. Here we show that vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) stimulation with capsaicin and activation of TRPA1 with allyl isothiocyanate or cinnamaldehyde cause a graded contraction of the rat urinary bladder in vitro. Repeated applications of maximal concentrations of the agonists produce desensitization to their contractile effects. Moreover, contraction caused by TRPA1 agonists generates cross-desensitization with capsaicin. The TRP receptor antagonist ruthenium red (10-100 microM) inhibits capsaicin (0.03 microM), allyl isothiocyanate (100 microM) and cinnamaldehyde (300 microM)-induced contractions in the rat urinary bladder. The selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist SB 366791 (10 microM) blocks capsaicin-induced contraction, but partially reduces allyl isothiocyanate- or cinnamaldehyde-mediated contraction. However, allyl isothiocyanate and cinnamaldehyde (10-1000 microM) completely fail to interfere with the specific binding sites for the TRPV1 agonist [(3)H]-resiniferatoxin. Allyl isothiocyanate or cinnamaldehyde-mediated contractions of rat urinary bladder, which rely on external Ca(2+) influx, are significantly inhibited by tachykinin receptor antagonists as well as by tetrodotoxin (1 microM) or indomethacin (1 microM). Allyl isothiocyanate-induced contraction is not changed by atropine (1 microM) or suramin (300 microM). The exposure of urinary bladders to allyl isothiocyanate (100 microM) causes an increase in the prostaglandin E(2) and substance P levels. Taken together, these results indicate that TRPA1 agonists contract rat urinary bladder through sensory fibre stimulation, depending on extracellular Ca(2+) influx and release of tachykinins and cyclooxygenase metabolites, probably prostaglandin E(2). Thus, TRPA1 appears to exert an important role in urinary bladder function.

  7. [Metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma to the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, S; Komatsu, H; Doi, N; Wakumoto, Y; Tominaga, T; Nishimura, Y

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of metastasis of a hepatocellular carcinoma to the bladder. Clinically the tumor was suspected to be a primary bladder tumor with subsequent metastasis to the liver. However, the pathological diagnosis yielded different results. The tumor cells resembled liver cells and sometimes bile production was even observed. No therapy was available and the patient died of cachexia 6 months later.

  8. Muscarinic agonists and antagonists: effects on the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2012-01-01

    Voiding of the bladder is the result of a parasympathetic muscarinic receptor activation of the detrusor smooth muscle. However, the maintenance of continence and a normal bladder micturition cycle involves a complex interaction of cholinergic, adrenergic, nitrergic and peptidergic systems that is currently little understood. The cholinergic component of bladder control involves two systems, acetylcholine (ACh) released from parasympathetic nerves and ACh from non-neuronal cells within the urothelium. The actions of ACh on the bladder depend on the presence of muscarinic receptors that are located on the detrusor smooth muscle, where they cause direct (M₃) and indirect (M₂) contraction; pre-junctional nerve terminals where they increase (M₁) or decrease (M₄) the release of ACh and noradrenaline (NA); sensory nerves where they influence afferent nerve activity; umbrella cells in the urothelium where they stimulate the release of ATP and NO; suburothelial interstitial cells with unknown function; and finally, other unidentified sites in the urothelium from where prostaglandins and inhibitory/relaxatory factors are released. Thus, the actions of muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists on the bladder may be very complex even when considering only local muscarinic actions. Clinically, muscarinic antagonists remain the mainstay of treatment for the overactive bladder (OAB), while muscarinic agonists have been used to treat hypoactive bladder. The antagonists are effective in treating OAB, but their precise mechanisms and sites of action (detrusor, urothelium, and nerves) have yet to be established. Potentially more selective agents may be developed when the cholinergic systems within the bladder are more fully understood.

  9. Angiogenesis in Schistosoma haematobium-associated urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Dematei, Anderson; Fernandes, Rúben; Soares, Raquel; Alves, Helena; Richter, Joachim; Botelho, Monica C

    2017-09-28

    Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic flatworm that infects more than 100 million people, mostly in the developing world, is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis, and is associated with a high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder. During infection, eggs are deposited in the bladder causing an intense inflammatory reaction. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones and is recognized as a key event in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis and spread of malignant lesions. A growing amount of evidence points to angiogenesis playing a key role in schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer. Thus, identifying biomarkers of this process plays an important role in the study of cancer. Here, we review recent findings on the role of angiogenesis in bladder cancer and the growth factors that induce and assist in their development, particularly SCC of the bladder associated to urogenital schistosomiasis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder in a Beluga Whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, D.; Lagacé, A.; Massé, R.; Morin, M.; Béland, P.

    1985-01-01

    A transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder was found in a beluga whale stranded in the St. Lawrence middle estuary. Various organs of this animal were submitted to high resolution gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. High frequency of urinary bladder cancer in the human population of the same area and the presence of carcinogenic compounds in the marine environment of this animal are discussed. Concurrent isolation of Edwardsiella tarda from various organs of this whale is also reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:17422578

  11. Transvaginal Sonography Versus Cystoscopy for Detecting Urinary Bladder Invasion in Early Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Garg, Anju; Batra, Swaraj

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality from cancer among women. In it’s early stage pre operative staging with cystoscopy is a standard procedure for the detection of urinary bladder involvement. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to compare the efficacy of Transvaginal Sonography (TVS) and cystoscopy in diagnosing bladder involvement in early stage cervical cancer patients by confirming it intraoperatively and further by histopathologic examination. Materials and Methods A prospective partially blinded study was conducted between March 2006 and September 2008 on 30 patients with early stage cervical cancer (Stage I and IIa) who were planned to undergo radical hysterectomy. Pre operatively, these patients underwent both TVS and cystoscopy to diagnose bladder involvement. Presence or absence of bladder involvement was then confirmed intra operatively and by histopathologic examination. Results In all the 30 patients studied, no bladder involvement was seen on cystoscopy where as TVS showed bladder involvement in three patients. Involvement of the bladder in these three patients was confirmed intra operatively and by histopathologic examination. Thus, in our study, TVS was 100% sensitive in detecting bladder involvement. Conclusion TVS is highly sensitive in diagnosing bladder involvement in early stage cervical cancer and could potentially detect cases missed with a cystoscopy.

  12. A level set based algorithm to reconstruct the urinary bladder from multiple views.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Jorge, Renato Natal; Mascarenhas, T; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2013-12-01

    The urinary bladder can be visualized from different views by imaging facilities such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Multi-view imaging can present more details of this pelvic organ and contribute to a more reliable reconstruction. Based on the information from multi-view planes, a level set based algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the 3D shape of the bladder using the cross-sectional boundaries. The algorithm provides a flexible solution to handle the discrepancies from different view planes and can obtain an accurate bladder surface with more geometric details. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Expect the unexpected: malposition of a large-bore central venous catheter in the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Wolfram; Schummer, Claudia; Gorse, Andrej; Becker, Udo; Marx, Christiane; Brauer, Martin

    2004-12-01

    We report the case of a femoral vein cannulation in a critically ill trauma patient with the malposition of a large-bore central venous catheter in the urinary bladder. Recognition of the malposition was hampered by bloody tamponade of the bladder in the context of blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma with kidney and liver laceration. A high index of clinical suspicion and the institution of adequate therapy were the key to achieving a successful clinical outcome. We discuss the anatomy of femoral veins, including their close relation to a distended bladder. The application of ultrasound even in emergency situations is stressed.

  14. De novo reconstitution of a functional mammalian urinary bladder by tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Oberpenning, F; Meng, J; Yoo, J J; Atala, A

    1999-02-01

    Human organ replacement is limited by a donor shortage, problems with tissue compatibility, and rejection. Creation of an organ with autologous tissue would be advantageous. In this study, transplantable urinary bladder neo-organs were reproducibly created in vitro from urothelial and smooth muscle cells grown in culture from canine native bladder biopsies and seeded onto preformed bladder-shaped polymers. The native bladders were subsequently excised from canine donors and replaced with the tissue-engineered neo-organs. In functional evaluations for up to 11 months, the bladder neo-organs demonstrated a normal capacity to retain urine, normal elastic properties, and histologic architecture. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that successful reconstitution of an autonomous hollow organ is possible using tissue-engineering methods.

  15. Concise Review: Tissue Engineering of Urinary Bladder; We Still Have a Long Way to Go?

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Jan; Pokrywczynska, Marta; Vontelin Van Breda, Shane; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

    2017-10-10

    Regenerative medicine is a new branch of medicine based on tissue engineering technology. This rapidly developing field of science offers revolutionary treatment strategy aimed at urinary bladder regeneration. Despite many promising announcements of experimental urinary bladder reconstruction, there has been a lack in commercialization of therapies based on current investigations. This is due to numerous obstacles that are slowly being identified and precisely overcome. The goal of this review is to present the current status of research on urinary bladder regeneration and highlight further challenges that need to be gradually addressed. We put an emphasis on expectations of urologists that are awaiting tissue engineering based solutions in clinical practice. This review presents also a detailed characteristic of obstacles on the road to successful urinary bladder regeneration from urological clinician perspective. A defined interdisciplinary approach might help to accelerate planning transitional research tissue engineering focused on urinary tracts. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  16. Nonkeratinised Squamous Metaplasia of the Urinary Bladder in Children: A Report of Case Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Jurkiewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Background. Squamous metaplasia refers to the pathological transformation of the urothelium leading to nonkeratinised stratified squamous metaplasia (N-KSM). Objective. To present our experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of N-KSM of the urinary bladder in children. Materials and Methods. In this study, we present our experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of N-KSM of the urinary bladder in children aged from 5 to 17 years. From 2005 to 2013, metaplasia was diagnosed in 119 patients. The reasons behind visiting the hospital were nonspecific intense pain in the abdomen, recurrent urinary tract infections, and urination disorders. The most common symptoms of urinary bladder dysfunction were pollakiuria and difficulties in initiating micturition and retention of urine (reduced detrusor muscle activity). Results. In 20/119 patients (16.8%), metaplasia was incidentally diagnosed during cystoscopy performed for other causes. The changes characteristic for squamous metaplasia were diagnosed—in all these patients, a biopsy was performed. In all 119 patients, a squamous metaplasia was histopathologically diagnosed. Conclusions. Squamous metaplasia of the urinary bladder mucosa occurs in children and adolescents. Symptomatic treatment is administered mainly to improve the patients' quality of life and disease prognosis. PMID:24822222

  17. Are you experienced? Understanding bladder innate immunity in the context of recurrent urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recurrent urinary tract infection (rUTI) is a serious clinical problem, yet effective therapeutic options are limited, especially against multidrug-resistant uropathogens. In this review, we explore the development of a clinically relevant model of rUTI in previously infected mice and review recent developments in bladder innate immunity that may affect susceptibility to rUTI. Recent findings Chronic bladder inflammation during prolonged bacterial cystitis in mice causes bladder mucosal remodelling that sensitizes the host to rUTI. Although constitutive defenses help prevent bacterial colonization of the urinary bladder, once infection occurs, induced cytokine and myeloid cell responses predominate and the balance of immune cell defense and bladder immunopathology is critical for determining disease outcome, in both naïve and experienced mice. In particular, the maintenance of the epithelial barrier appears to be essential for preventing severe infection. Summary The innate immune response plays a key role in determining susceptibility to rUTI. Future studies should be directed towards understanding how the innate immune response changes as a result of bladder mucosal remodelling in previously infected mice, and validating these findings in human clinical specimens. New therapeutics targeting the immune response should selectively target the induced innate responses that cause bladder immunopathology, while leaving protective defenses intact. PMID:25517222

  18. Combined method of bladder neck closure and concomitant augmentation cystoplasty in the setting of refractory urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Blaschko, Sarah D; Yang, Jennifer H; Baskin, Laurence S; Deng, Donna Y

    2012-04-01

    To describe the technique of concomitant bladder neck closure and augmentation cystoplasty in a 22-year-old woman with a history of bladder exstrophy and refractory urinary incontinence. This patient had prior augmentation cystoplasty and circumferential fascial urethral sling placement with continued incontinence. During closure of the bladder neck, the bladder neck was incorporated into the augmentation cystoplasty to help prevent failure of bladder neck closure. The patient had previously undergone augmentation cystoplasty, circumferential fascial urethral sling placement, and antegrade collagen injection of the bladder neck. Despite these interventions, she continued to have refractory urinary incontinence. Her bladder neck was closed by incorporating the bladder neck into the cystotomy and using the bladder neck as an edge of anastomosis during augmentation cystoplasty. The patient tolerated the procedure well. She catheterizes easily through her appendicovesicostomy and has remained continent. She has no leakage from her closed bladder neck 30 months after closure. Incorporating the bladder neck into the cystotomy during a planned augmentation cystoplasty and bladder neck closure should be considered as an alternative to separate bladder neck closure, which can fail and can result in continued urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Agreement between clinical methods of measurement of urinary frequency and functional bladder capacity.

    PubMed

    McCormack, M; Infante-Rivard, C; Schick, E

    1992-01-01

    We assessed the agreement between 2 methods of data gathering of particular interest in urology: patient questionnaire and examination vs. frequency-volume charts. One hundred consecutive patients consulting our out-patient clinic were chosen for this study; 88 completed the study. Urinary frequency and bladder capacity were evaluated in each patient by using the above methods. The agreement between different methods of measurement was assessed by determining whether the 2 methods were interchangeable, a condition occurring if results of both methods fall within predetermined limits of variability. The results showed poor agreement between subjectively estimated urinary frequency and chart-determined urinary frequency. Moreover, different methods of measuring bladder capacity (endoscopic vs. chart) gave different results. Since chart-determined data are probably a more valid indication of urinary habits, we suggest that frequency-volume charts should be used more often in the investigation and follow-up of patients with micturition disorders.

  20. Mouse Models of Human Bladder Cancer as a Tool for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Seager, Catherine; Puzio-Kuter, Anna M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; McKiernan, James; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is a deadly condition in dire need of effective new treatments. This unit contains a description of mouse models suitable for the evaluation of potential new therapies. Included is a genetically engineered mouse model of bladder cancer generated by the delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase into the bladder lumen. Also described is an orthotopic mouse model created by the instillation of human bladder tumor cells into the bladder lumen of immune deficient mice. Protocols are also provided on the use of these models for the preclinical evaluation of new chemical entities, with mTOR inhibitors shown as an example. PMID:22294368

  1. Management of Urinary Incontinence in Complete Bladder Duplication by Injection of Bulking Agent at Bladder Neck Level into the Proximal Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Khorramirouz, Reza; Ladi Seyedian, Seyedeh Sanam; Keihani, Sorena; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Bladder duplication is a rare entity in children. The term encompasses a wide spectrum of anomalies from isolated bladder duplication in coronal or sagittal planes to duplicated bladder exstrophy and associated musculoskeletal and visceral anomalies. Given this wide variability, the treatment of these patients is not standardized. We hereby present a female patient with chief complaint of long-standing urinary incontinence who had complete bladder and urethral duplication and pubic diastasis. The patient was treated with bulking agent injection at the incompetent bladder neck and proximal urethra with resolution of incontinence, obviating the need for extensive surgeries. PMID:26904349

  2. [Testing an ultrasonic scanner for determination of urinary bladder volume].

    PubMed

    Rohde, T; Jensen, K M; Colstrup, H

    1992-11-30

    Bladderscan BVI 2000 is a portable ultrasound scanner, specially constructed for determination of bladder volume. We have tested this scanner for accuracy, systematic errors and the training required to use it. The bladder volumes measured by ultrasound scanning were compared with the true volumes. Fifty-six measurements were made. We found the accuracy of BVI 2000 sufficient to determine bladder volumes as either small or large. We found no systematic errors. No special training is required to use the scanner. The device is thus useful in most clinical situations when greater accuracy than indicated here is not necessary.

  3. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe).

    PubMed

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-09-27

    To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding author. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  4. IMPROVED BLADDER EMPTYING IN URINARY RETENTION BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF PUDENDAL AFFERENTS

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Cheng, Chen-Li; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary retention is the inability to empty the bladder completely, and may result from bladder hypocontractility, increases in outlet resistance, or both. Chronic urinary retention can lead to several urological complications and is often refractory to pharmacologic, behavioral, and surgical treatments. We sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of sensory fibers in the pudendal nerve could engage an augmenting reflex and thereby improve bladder emptying in an animal model of urinary retention. We measured the efficiency of bladder emptying with and without concomitant electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents in urethane anesthetized rats. Voiding efficiency (VE=voided volume/initial volume) was reduced from 72±7% to 29±7% following unilateral transection of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve (UST) and from 70±5% to 18±4% following bilateral transection (BST). Unilateral electrical stimulation of the proximal transected sensory pudendal nerve during distention-evoked voiding contractions significantly improved VE. Low intensity stimulation at frequencies of 1–50 Hz increased VE to 40–51% following UST and to 39–49% following BST, while high intensity stimulation was ineffective at increasing VE. The increase in VE was mediated by increases in the duration of distention-evoked voiding bladder contractions, rather than increases in contraction amplitude. These results are consistent with an essential role for pudendal sensory feedback in efficient bladder emptying, and raise the possibility that electrical activation of pudendal nerve afferents may provide a new approach to restore efficient bladder emptying in persons with urinary retention. PMID:18430976

  5. Improved bladder emptying in urinary retention by electrical stimulation of pudendal afferents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason; Cheng, Chen-Li; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-06-01

    Urinary retention is the inability to empty the bladder completely, and may result from bladder hypocontractility, increases in outlet resistance or both. Chronic urinary retention can lead to several urological complications and is often refractory to pharmacologic, behavioral and surgical treatments. We sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of sensory fibers in the pudendal nerve could engage an augmenting reflex and thereby improve bladder emptying in an animal model of urinary retention. We measured the efficiency of bladder emptying with and without concomitant electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents in urethane-anesthetized rats. Voiding efficiency (VE = voided volume/initial volume) was reduced from 72 ± 7% to 29 ± 7% following unilateral transection of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve (UST) and from 70 ± 5% to 18 ± 4% following bilateral transection (BST). Unilateral electrical stimulation of the proximal transected sensory pudendal nerve during distention-evoked voiding contractions significantly improved VE. Low-intensity stimulation at frequencies of 1-50 Hz increased VE to 40-51% following UST and to 39-49% following BST, while high-intensity stimulation was ineffective at increasing VE. The increase in VE was mediated by increases in the duration of distention-evoked voiding bladder contractions, rather than increases in contraction amplitude. These results are consistent with an essential role for pudendal sensory feedback in efficient bladder emptying, and raise the possibility that electrical activation of pudendal nerve afferents may provide a new approach to restore efficient bladder emptying in persons with urinary retention.

  6. Localization of the FA-CHIP water channel in frog urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Abrami, L; Gobin, R; Berthonaud, V; Thanh, H L; Chevalier, J; Ripoche, P; Verbavatz, J M

    1997-07-01

    Like mammalian kidney collecting duct, the water permeability of frog urinary bladder epithelial cells is antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-sensitive. In kidney, this permeability is mediated by water channels named aquaporins. We recently reported the cloning of the frog aquaporin CHIP (FA-CHIP), a water channel from frog urinary bladder. FA-CHIP has 79% identity with rat Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) and only 42% identity with the kidney collecting duct Aquaporin 2 (AQP2). The purpose of this study was to examine the localization of FA-CHIP in frog urinary bladder. We raised antibodies against peptides of 15 to 17 residues, encompassing the N-ter and C-ter regions of FA-CHIP. Anti-FA-CHIP antibodies were used for Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and gold labeling electron microscopy in urinary bladder and other frog tissues. By Western blotting of frog urinary bladder total homogenate, the antibodies recognized a band of 29 kDa and glycosylated forms of the protein between 40 and 70 kDa. No signal was found on membrane preparations from epithelial cell homogenate. FA-CHIP was also found in frog skin, brain, gall bladder, and lung. In immunofluorescence microscopy on urinary bladder sections, FA-CHIP was localized to endothelial cells of blood capillaries and on mesothelial cells of the serosal face. Red blood cells, epithelial and basal cells were unstained. The localization of FA-CHIP in cell plasma membranes was confirmed by gold labeling electron microscopy. In other positive tissues, FA-CHIP was also localized to capillaries. In brain, plasma membranes of epithelial cells were also stained. In conclusion, like its mammalian homologue AQP1, FA-CHIP appears to be localized to constitutively water permeable cells of frog. Therefore, it belongs to the AQP1 family of proteins although unlike AQP1, FA-CHIP is absent from red blood cells and kidney. In frog urinary bladder and skin, FA-CHIP probably plays an important role in water transport across the

  7. Appraisal of diagnostic ability of UCA1 as a biomarker of carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A K; Singh, P K; Rath, S K; Dalela, D; Goel, M M; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-11-01

    Initial diagnosis of carcinoma of the urinary bladder remains to be a challenge. Urine cytology, as an adjunct to cystoscopy, is less sensitive for low-grade tumors. Urothelial cancer associated 1 (UCA1) is a novel non-coding RNA gene, which plays a pivotal role in bladder cancer progression. Our aim is to investigate the significance of urinary UCA1 for the non-invasive diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder. We examined UCA1 expression in a bladder cancer cell line (T24) and in urine of 28 healthy individuals, 46 patients of non-malignant disorders, and 117 cases (69 primary and 48 recurrent cases) of histologically proven TCC prior to transurethral resection by using real-time PCR and compared it with voided urinary cytology. UCA1 expression was found in T24 cell line and also found to be significantly higher in the cancer group as compared to the controls (p<0.001). UCA1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression showed a significant (p<0.05) association with stage and grade (p<0.05). UCA1 showed a sensitivity of 79.49% and a specificity of 79.73% (p<0.001), whereas urine cytology had a sensitivity of 66.67% and a specificity of 95.95% for TCC cases. Higher expression of UCA1 was associated with high grade (G2-G3, sensitivity=84.09%) (p<0.001). UCA1 mRNA expression did not significantly correlate with the patient's age, sex, and smoking habit (p>0.05). UCA1 can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for TCC bladder as an adjunct to cytology in the early diagnosis of primary urinary bladder cancer.

  8. Effect of urinary excretion on the bladder tissue distribution of fluoroquinolones in rats.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shigeru; Yamaoka, Makiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate which of blood or urine has the greater effect on bladder tissue concentrations of fluoroquinolones important for the treatment of urinary tract infections by measuring concentrations of fluoroquinolones in the vesical tissue (chemically and immunohistochemically) and intravesical space (chemically). Thirty-minute incubation of isolated rat bladders with fluoroquinolones showed only a 1.9-fold difference in transferability among norfloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and sparfloxacin. Intravesical instillation of norfloxacin and sparfloxacin in rats yielded similar vesical tissue distributions. Thus, there were no large differences in vesical tissue transfer among the four fluoroquinolones. The bladder tissue/plasma concentration ratios of norfloxacin (high urinary excretion-type) and sparfloxacin (low urinary excretion-type) at 1 h after a single oral dose (10 mg/kg) to rats were 15.4 and 1.3, respectively. The bladder tissue/plasma concentration ratios of norfloxacin after an intravenous injection (10 mg/kg) to ureter-catheterized and sham-operated rats were 1.36 and 57.8. Thus the bladder tissue distribution was significantly higher in the urine-exposed bladder. Immunohistochemical examination of the vesical tissue localization of norfloxacin in rats given a single intravenous dose revealed the presence of the drug-positive image in the cytoplasm of surface layer cells (both in umbrella and cover cells) of the bladder transitional epithelium. In conclusion, the results suggest that norfloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are excreted into urine and then transferred to the surface layer of the bladder transitional epithelium. Therefore, the urine levels have a greater effect on the vesicle tissue distribution of fluoroquinolones than the plasma levels in rats. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunoglobulin G4-associated inflammatory pseudotumor of urinary bladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Sanghui; Ro, Jae Y; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Choi, Sun Young; Koo, Heasoo

    2013-12-01

    A previously healthy 72-year old woman was admitted with a chief complaint of gross hematuria and fecaluria for 4 months. On initial computed tomographic examination, a lobulated shaped intravesical protruding mass with adhesion to the sigmoid colon was identified. Under a clinical diagnosis of bladder cancer with vesicosigmoid fistula vs sigmoid colon cancer with vesicosigmoid fistula, a frozen section evaluation of the bladder mass was performed to determine the origin of the tumor. Because the frozen section diagnosis of the bladder mass was an inflammatory origin, a partial cystectomy with segmental resection of the adherent sigmoid colon was elected. The microscopic examination of the partial resection of the urinary bladder revealed suburothelial inflammatory mass lesion, involving the entire wall of bladder with extension to the sigmoid colon, which was composed of spindle cells without significant atypia admixed with many lymphocytes, plasma cells, and some scattered eosinophils. Chronic inflammation around nerve bundles, sclerotic fibrosis, and prominent lymphoid follicles with plasma cells were the main features of the mass. No urothelial dysplasia or malignancy was seen. An average of 57 plasma cells per 1 high-power field was immunoreactive for immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 with IgG4/IgG ratio of more than 40%, a diagnostic feature of IgG4-associated inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT), arising in the bladder with the secondary involvement of the sigmoid colon. Recent studies reported many IPTs associated with IgG4 in other locations; however, to the best of our knowledge, IgG4-associated IPT in the urinary bladder has not been reported. We describe herein the first case of IgG4-associated IPT, lymphoplasmacytic type in the urinary bladder.

  10. Urinary bladder injury during cesarean delivery: Maternal outcome from a contemporary large case series.

    PubMed

    Salman, Lina; Aharony, Shachar; Shmueli, Anat; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Chen, Rony; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat

    2017-06-01

    Urinary bladder injury is a rare complication during cesarean delivery. Little is known on maternal outcome following this injury. To evaluate short and long-term maternal outcome following bladder injury during cesarean delivery. A retrospective case series of all pregnancies complicated by full-thickness bladder injury during cesarean delivery in a single university affiliated tertiary medical center (August 2007-June 2016). Data on demographics, labor and surgery parameters, postpartum sequelae, and cystography were collected and reviewed by study personnel. Short-term maternal outcome included catheterization period, cystography results (if performed), any febrile illness and/or need for second operation prior to maternal discharge. Long term maternal outcome was obtained by searching our urology departmental and ambulatory database for follow up for all women. Univariate analysis was used to compare maternal outcome following first or repeat cesarean delivery. Of 17,326 cesarean deliveries performed during study period, 81 (0.47%) were complicated by bladder injury. Of them, 8 cases (9.9%) occurred during primary cesarean delivery (overall risk in primary cesarean 0.07%). Of the other 73 cases that followed repeated cesarean, adhesions were documented in 55 (75.3%) of them. Six cases (8.2%) had placenta accreta. Bladder injury occurred at peritoneal entry in 55 (67.9%) cases, and involved the bladder dome in 49 (60.5%) of them. Injury was diagnosed during cesarean delivery in all but 3 women, in whom abdominal pain and bloating prompted evaluation on first to third postoperative day. All 3 underwent re-laparotomy with bladder closure without further adverse sequelae. Cystography was performed in 35 patients on median postoperative day 8 (6-11 days). Eleven patients had abnormal findings as follows: 5 urinary leakage, 4 bladder wall irregularity and two urinary reflux. Two of the 11 patients (18%) required additional interventions: One patient required

  11. Neuronal GABA release and GABA inhibition of ACh release in guinea pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, M; Taniyama, K; Tanaka, C

    1984-04-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) are present in the urinary bladder of guinea pigs, and the possible correlation in regional distribution between GABA, GAD, and the number of vesical ganglion cells was studied. Electrical stimulation of the bladder strips produced an increase in the calcium-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive [3H]GABA release and contractions in the strips preloaded with [3H]GABA. Nicotine, acetylcholine chloride (ACh), and hexamethonium did not significantly alter the release of [3H]GABA. Bicuculline significantly enhanced [3H]ACh release and cholinergic components of contractions evoked by electrical stimulation of the bladder strips preloaded with [3H]choline, thereby suggesting that this compound antagonizes the effect of endogenous GABA released during stimulation. GABA and muscimol but not baclofen reduced both the [3H]ACh release and contractions evoked by nicotine. These effects of GABA were antagonized by bicuculline and furosemide but not by alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockers. These findings suggest that GABA may be a noncholinergic nonadrenergic inhibitory neurotransmitter in the urinary bladder. The motility of the urinary bladder is thus inhibited by reducing the release of ACh from the postganglionic cholinergic neurons through bicuculline-sensitive GABA receptors probably associated with the chloride ion channel.

  12. [A collision cancer between urothelial carcinoma and malignant lymphoma of the urinary bladder: a case report].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Keiko; Kato, Kumiko; Furuhashi, Kenichi; Suzuki, Koichi; Murase, Tatsuro

    2007-09-01

    A man in his 70's visited the Department of Internal Medicine due to lumbago that had first appeared two months previously. Abdominal computed tomography showed a low-density area in the liver and swelling of lymph nodes surrounding the abdominal aorta. Four months later, he was hospitalized on an emergency basis in a urology ward in order to control bladder tamponade. Cystoscopy revealed massive blood clots and a papillary tumor at the left wall of the urinary bladder. He underwent transurethral resection of a bladder tumor, and the pathological diagnosis was a collision tumor between urothelial carcinoma (G2, pTa) and malignant lymphoma (B cell type). He underwent a liver biopsy soon thereafter, and the pathological diagnosis was malignant lymphoma (as for the one found in the urinary bladder). Bladder tamponade was repeated, which was relieved after one course of chemotherapy for malignant lymphoma. He underwent six courses of chemotherapy (THP-CO), and he was well without recurrence of either malignant lymphoma or urothelial carcinoma with 3 years' follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the 14th reported case of a collision tumor in the urinary tract.

  13. Urinary ATP May Be a Dynamic Biomarker of Detrusor Overactivity in Women with Overactive Bladder Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Olga; Ferreira, Sónia; Reis, Maria Júlia; Oliveira, José Carlos; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, there is a considerable bulk of evidence showing that ATP has a prominent role in the regulation of human urinary bladder function and in the pathophysiology of detrusor overactivity. ATP mediates nonadrenergic-noncholinergic detrusor contractions in overactive bladders. In vitro studies have demonstrated that uroepithelial cells and cholinergic nerves from overactive human bladder samples (OAB) release more ATP than controls. Here, we compared the urinary ATP concentration in samples collected non-invasively from OAB women with detrusor overactivity and age-matched controls. Methods Patients with neurologic diseases, history of malignancy, urinary tract infections or renal impairment (creatinine clearance <70 ml/min) were excluded. All patients completed a 3-day voiding diary, a 24 h urine collection and blood sampling to evaluate creatinine clearance. Urine samples collected during voluntary voids were immediately freeze-preserved for ATP determination by the luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay; for comparison purposes, samples were also tested for urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) by ELISA. Results The urinary content of ATP, but not of NGF, normalized to patients’ urine creatinine levels (ATP/Cr) or urinary volume (ATP.Vol) were significantly (P<0.05) higher in OAB women with detrusor overactivity (n = 34) than in healthy controls (n = 30). Significant differences between the two groups were still observed by boosting urinary ATP/Cr content after water intake, but these were not detected for NGF/Cr. In OAB patients, urinary ATP/Cr levels correlated inversely with mean voided volumes determined in a 3-day voiding diary. Conclusion A high area under the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve (0.741; 95% CI 0.62–0.86; P<0.001) is consistent with urinary ATP/Cr being a highly sensitive dynamic biomarker for assessing detrusor overactivity in women with OAB syndrome. PMID:23741373

  14. Early Detection of Genotoxic Urinary Bladder Carcinogens by Immunohistochemistry for γ-H2AX.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Takeshi; Cho, Young-Man; Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Mizuta, Yasuko; Hirata, Tadashi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2015-12-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by exposure to genotoxic agents are known to cause genome instability and cancer development. To evaluate the applicability of γ-H2AX, a sensitive marker of DSBs, in the early detection of genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of chemicals using animal models, we examined γ-H2AX expression in urinary bladders of rats. Six-week-old male F344 rats were orally treated for 4 weeks with a total of 12 chemicals divided into 4 categories based on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the urinary bladder. Animals were sacrificed at the end of administration or after 2 weeks of recovery, and immunohistochemistry for γ-H2AX was performed. At week 4, γ-H2AX expression in bladder epithelial cells was significantly increased by all 4 genotoxic bladder carcinogens as compared with the controls, whereas the 3 chemicals that were genotoxic but not carcinogenic in the bladders did not cause upregulation of γ-H2AX. After the recovery period, γ-H2AX expression was markedly reduced in all groups but remained significantly elevated in rats treated with 3 of the 4 genotoxic bladder carcinogens. Although slight increases in γ-H2AX expression were induced by a weak bladder carcinogen with equivocal genotoxicity (phenethyl isothiocyanate) and 2 nongenotoxic bladder carcinogens (melamine and uracil) at week 4, these differences were not significant and were thought to be associated with activated proliferation by urothelial hyperplasia, as demonstrated by increased Ki67-positive cells. These results suggested that γ-H2AX may be a potential biomarker for the early detection of genotoxic bladder carcinogens.

  15. Recurrent urinary tract infections and bladder dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Duran-Barragan, S; Ruvalcaba-Naranjo, H; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, L; Solano-Moreno, H; Hernandez-Rios, G; Sanchez-Ortiz, A; Ramos-Remus, C

    2008-12-01

    To assess bladder function in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). A convenience sample of consecutive patients with SLE (American College of Rheumatology criteria), with recurrent UTIs (>/=3 events in the preceding 12 months), without history of central nervous system involvement, urolithiasis or preceding tuberculosis were studied. Disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), damage (SDI), lower urinary tract symptoms [Pelvic pain and Urgency/Frequency (PUF) and the Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Index (ICSPI) scales] and Autonomic Symptom Profile (ASP) were assessed. All patients underwent urological examination and urodynamic assessment with cystometry, uroflow, micturition and urethral pressure profile. Ten patients (nine women) were included. The majority of the patients reported urinary symptoms: urgency (n = 8), frequency (n = 8), nocturia (n = 9) and pain (n = 10). The patients had a mean (SD) ICSPI score of 18.4 (9.8), PUF score of 17.4 (5.3) and ASP weighted score of 31.7 (16.1). Abnormal urodynamics findings were identified in seven of the 10 patients, including small bladder capacity (two patients), reduced bladder sensation (four patients), subnormal urinary flow rate (one patient) and a significant amount of residual urine (two patients). The urodynamics findings suggest that bladder dysfunction could be one of the mechanisms involved on the occurrence of recurrent UTIs in patients with SLE. These findings have potential implications for the proper assessment and management of SLE patients with recurrent UTIs. Further studies are needed to corroborate our results.

  16. COMPARISON OF GENE EXPRESSION IN KIDNEY AND URINARY BLADDER FROM RATS TREATED WITH DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is widespread in the environment and a human carcinogen. A major metabolite of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in most species, including humans, is dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which is also used as a pesticide. Unlike iAs, DMA induces urinary bladder tumors in rats. DMA is belie...

  17. The enhancement of pipemidic acid permeation into the pig urinary bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Kerec, M; Svigelj, V; Bogataj, M; Mrhar, A

    2002-06-20

    The influence of interactions between polycarbophil and calcium on a model drug permeation into the pig urinary bladder wall was investigated. Pipemidic acid was used as a model drug. One percent w/v polycarbophil dispersion significantly increases the permeation of pipemidic acid into the urinary bladder wall. The enhanced absorption of pipemidic acid caused by polycarbophil is significantly less pronounced in polycarbophil dispersions containing calcium. The enhancement of pipemidic acid permeation into the urinary bladder wall could be due to the opening of tight junctions, which causes higher paracellular permeability. In the case of polycarbophil dispersion with calcium some carboxylic groups of polymer are already occupied with calcium, present in the dispersions. As a consequence extracellular calcium binds to polycarbophil in lower extent if compared with polycarbophil dispersion without calcium and transport is increased to a lesser degree. We concluded that the mechanism of drug absorption enhancement caused by polycarbophil could be similar for urinary bladder as described in the literature for intestinal mucosa.

  18. Retrograde catheterization of the urinary bladder in healthy male goats by use of angiographic catheters.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Emily J; Streeter, Robert N; Simpson, Katharine M; Taylor, Jared D

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify and evaluate 3 types of angiographic catheters for retrograde urinary bladder catheterization in healthy male goats. ANIMALS 12 sexually intact yearling Alpine-cross bucks. PROCEDURES Three 5F angiographic catheters of the same length (100 cm) and diameter (0.17 cm) but differing in curvature at the tip were labeled A (straight tip), B (tip bent in 1 place), and C (tip bent in 2 places). During a single anesthetic episode, attempts were made to blindly pass each catheter into the urinary bladder of each goat. Order of catheters used was randomized, and the veterinarian passing the catheter was blinded as to catheter identity. The total number of attempts at catheter passage and the total number of successful attempts were recorded. RESULTS Catheter A was unsuccessfully passed in all 12 goats, catheter B was successfully passed in 8 goats, and catheter C was successfully passed in 4 goats. The success rate for catheter B was significantly greater than that for catheter A; however, no significant difference was identified between catheters B and C or catheters A and C. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE 2 angiographic catheters were identified that could be successfully, blindly advanced in a retrograde direction into the urinary bladder of healthy sexually intact male goats. Such catheters may be useful for determining urethral patency, emptying the urinary bladder, and instilling chemolysing agents in goats with clinical obstructive urolithiasis.

  19. Endoscopy-guided ectopic egg removal from the urinary bladder in a leopard tortoise (Stigmochelys pardalis)

    PubMed Central

    Mans, Christoph; Foster, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Egg retention in the urinary bladder of a leopard tortoise was diagnosed by radiography and confirmed by cystoscopy. The egg was removed with a modified polypectomy snare, aided by a flexible endoscope and insufflation. No complications occurred during the procedures and the tortoise made a complete recovery. PMID:24891641

  20. Endoscopy-guided ectopic egg removal from the urinary bladder in a leopard tortoise (Stigmochelys pardalis).

    PubMed

    Mans, Christoph; Foster, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    Egg retention in the urinary bladder of a leopard tortoise was diagnosed by radiography and confirmed by cystoscopy. The egg was removed with a modified polypectomy snare, aided by a flexible endoscope and insufflation. No complications occurred during the procedures and the tortoise made a complete recovery.

  1. COMPARISON OF GENE EXPRESSION IN KIDNEY AND URINARY BLADDER FROM RATS TREATED WITH DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is widespread in the environment and a human carcinogen. A major metabolite of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in most species, including humans, is dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which is also used as a pesticide. Unlike iAs, DMA induces urinary bladder tumors in rats. DMA is belie...

  2. [EFFECT OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE ON NEUTRAL LIPID METABOLISM AND CELLULAR ENERGETICS IN FROG URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIAL CELLS].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, E V; Fock, E M; Braylovskaya, I V; Bachteeva, V T; Lavrova, E A; Zabelinskiĭ, S A; Parnova, R G

    2015-09-01

    It was shown previously that colonization of the frog urinary bladder by gram-negative bacteria leads to decreased ability of antidiuretic hormone to reabsorb water from the urinary bladder (Fock et al. J. Exp. Zool., 2013, 319A: 487-494). In the present work performed on epithelial cells isolated from the frog urinary bladder the influence of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on neutral lipid metabolism and cellular energetics was studied. It was shown that incubation of cells with LPS led to decrease of fatty acids oxidation and to retention of triacylglycerols (TAG) followed by an increase of the cytoplasmic lipid droplets content and cellular amount of TAG. Fatty acid composition of TAG was not changed under LPS. LPS did not alter mitochondrial membrane potential, however, LPS decreased oxygen consumption rate both in basal and uncoupling conditions. Cellular ATP production was also reduced in the presence of LPS. The data obtained indicate that a decreased ability of antidiuretic hormone to reabsorb water from the urinary bladder induced by bacterial pathogens could be related to inhibition of fatty acids oxidation and impaired energy metabolism.

  3. Effect of cranberry juice concentrate on chemically-induced urinary bladder cancers

    PubMed Central

    Prasain, Jeevan K.; Jones, Kenneth; Moore, Ray; Barnes, Stephen; Leahy, Marge; Roderick, Robin; Juliana, M. Margaret; Grubbs, Clinton J.

    2009-01-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of cranberry juice concentrate in an experimental model of urinary bladder cancer was evaluated using female Fischer-344 rats. The animals received N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine (OH-BBN) for a period of eight weeks. Cranberry juice concentrate was administered at doses of 1.0 or 0.5 ml/rat/ day beginning one week after the final OH-BBN treatment and continuing until the end of the study. The urinary bladders of all the rats were weighed and examined grossly for lesions, and all masses were submitted for pathological evaluation. A dose-dependent preventive effect of cranberry treatment was observed, with a reduced number of urinary bladder cancers (38%) in the 1.0 ml/rat/day group versus the control group. The cranberry extract neither affected body weight gain nor caused other signs of toxicity. For the metabolic studies, serum and urine were collected at 4 and 12 h after the administration of the cranberry juice concentrate and were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Quercetin and its methylated derivative were detected in the urine samples. However, no quercetin was detected in the serum samples, indicating its poor bioavailability. These data suggest that components of cranberries may be effective in preventing urinary bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:18497966

  4. A Preliminary Evaluation of Ovine Bladder Mucosal Damage Associated with Two Different Indwelling Urinary Catheters.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, James A; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T; Webb, Brett T; Sun, Xin; Vonnahme, Kimberly A

    2017-08-25

    To determine whether a new catheter design with a low-profile, open-ended rounded rather than pointed Foley catheter tip can reduce mucosal damage to the bladder of ewes. 6 ewes were randomly assigned to one of two indwelling urinary catheters - a 16 Fr Foley catheter or a 16 Fr open-tip CystoSure catheter. After 96 hours, all the animals were sacrificed and their bladder and urethra harvested for analysis. Image-analysis of the bladder surfaces demonstrated a significant decrease in the percentage of bladder area covered by ulceration and inflammation in sheep with CystoSure catheters compared to Foley catheters (P<0.002) as well as a trend towards less edema (P=0.17). Macro-morphological evaluations were confirmed with immunohistochemical markers of cell proliferation and inflammation. In this pilot study, we were able to demonstrate that a new catheter design with an open-ended rounded rather than pointed tip and a reduced balloon base to tip profile may reduce mucosal damage to the bladder of ewes. Based on the findings from this trial, we believe this new catheter design with its low-profile, rounded tip may reduce bladder mucosal injury which is a risk factor for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI's). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Urinary Bladder Function and Somatic Sensitivity in Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP)-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Studeny, Simon; Cheppudira, Bopaiah B.; Meyers, Susan; Balestreire, Elena M.; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A.; Braas, Karen M.; Waschek, James A.; May, Victor; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2009-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is an immunomodulatory neuropeptide widely distributed in neural pathways that regulate micturition. VIP is also an endogenous anti-inflammatory agent that has been suggested for the development of therapies for inflammatory disorders. In the present study, we examined urinary bladder function, hindpaw and pelvic sensitivity in VIP-/- and littermate wildtype controls. We demonstrated increased bladder mass and fewer but larger urine spots on filter paper in VIP-/- mice. Using cystometry in conscious, unrestrained mice, VIP-/- mice exhibited increased void volumes and shorter intercontraction intervals with continuous intravesical infusion of saline. No differences in transepithelial resistance or water permeability were demonstrated between VIP-/- and WT mice; however, an increase in urea permeability was demonstrated in VIP-/- mice. With the induction of bladder inflammation by acute administration of cyclophosphamide (CYP), an exaggerated or prolonged bladder hyperreflexia, hindpaw and pelvic sensitivity were demonstrated in VIP-/- mice. The changes in bladder hyperreflexia and somatic sensitivity in VIP-/- mice may reflect increased expression of neurotrophins and/or or proinflammatory cytokines in the urinary bladder. Thus, these changes may further regulate the neural control of micturition. PMID:18561033

  6. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the urinary bladder during pregnancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaolei; Xia, Haibo; Gao, Zhiming

    2015-05-01

    A 31 year-old pregnant female who had not menstruated for 31 weeks presented to The Affiliated Hospital of Chifeng College (Chifeng, China) with painless gross hematuria, which had been present for 10 days. A computed tomography scan revealed a tumor of 5.8×6.3 cm in diameter. A biopsy was not obtained prior to surgery. Following the initial workup, the patient underwent a cesarean section and partial cystectomy of bladder. Pathological examination revealed inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). An initial cytoscope examination was performed one year after surgery, with subsequent follow-up cystoscope examinations performed every three months, and at the time of writing the patient was alive, with no evidence of tumor recurrence. IMT of the urinary bladder is a rare benign lesion and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case describing IMT of the urinary bladder during pregnancy. This study describes the process of diagnosis and management of the patient.

  7. Breast metastasis from signet ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAOMIN; WEI, HAIYAN; LI, JUN; LIU, XIAOJIAO; FU, PEIFEN

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma of the bladder metastatic to the breast is only sporadically reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first described case of signet ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder metastasizing to the breast. The patient was a 43-year-old woman who underwent transurethral partial cystectomy for signet ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine. At 7 months postcystectomy, the patient presented with a solitary nodule in the right breast. Following transdermic core needle puncture biopsy of the lesion and histological examination, the tumor was found to be composed of signet ring cells, which were similar to the cells in the original cystectomy specimen. The patient underwent mastectomy without further chemotherapy and has remained free from metastasis to other organs during 1 year follow-up. PMID:27330778

  8. Breast metastasis from signet ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaomin; Wei, Haiyan; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiaojiao; Fu, Peifen

    2016-07-01

    Carcinoma of the bladder metastatic to the breast is only sporadically reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first described case of signet ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder metastasizing to the breast. The patient was a 43-year-old woman who underwent transurethral partial cystectomy for signet ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and gemcitabine. At 7 months postcystectomy, the patient presented with a solitary nodule in the right breast. Following transdermic core needle puncture biopsy of the lesion and histological examination, the tumor was found to be composed of signet ring cells, which were similar to the cells in the original cystectomy specimen. The patient underwent mastectomy without further chemotherapy and has remained free from metastasis to other organs during 1 year follow-up.

  9. The urinary bladder as a physiological reservoir that moderates dehydration in a large desert lizard, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jon R; DeNardo, Dale F

    2007-04-01

    Animals inhabiting xeric environments use a variety of behavioral and physiological strategies to balance water budgets. We studied the potential contribution of the urinary bladder to osmoregulation in a large desert lizard, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Here we present results of a series of in vivo laboratory experiments which tested the hypothesis that the Gila monster urinary bladder serves as a physiological reservoir, as in amphibians and chelonians, providing water that buffers increases in plasma osmolality when food and water are unavailable. Adult Gila monsters absorbed water from the urinary bladder into circulation and absorption of water from the urinary bladder and drinking water provided similar osmoregulatory benefits within 24 h, although drinking water provided a more immediate osmotic benefit. During food and water deprivation, plasma osmolality increased 2.5 times faster in lizards with an empty urinary bladder compared with those with a full bladder. During rehydration, stereotyped binge drinking behavior increased body mass nearly 22%, which resulted in a 24% reduction in plasma osmolality and a substantial increase in bladder water within 24 h. These results support our hypothesis and demonstrate for the first time in an adult lizard that the urinary bladder can function as a long-term physiological water reservoir. This trait can provide a critical benefit to osmoregulation during the 2- to 3-month summer dry season characteristic of the deserts that Gila monsters inhabit.

  10. Rb deficiency accelerates progression of carcinoma of the urinary bladder in vivo and in vitro through inhibiting autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Jiang-Ping; Jiao, Yong; Zhang, Bo

    2017-02-22

    Urinary bladder cancer is known as a common cancer diagnosed across the world and results in significant mortality and morbidity rates among patients. The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, as a main tumor suppressor, controls cellular responses to potentially oncogenic stimulation. Rb phosphorylation could disrupt E2F complex formation, resulting in diverse transcription factor dysfunction. In our study, we investigated how Rb is involved in controlling urinary bladder cancer progression. The results indicate that Rb expression is reduced in mice with urinary bladder tumor, and its suppression leads to urinary bladder cancer progression in vivo and in vitro. Rb mutation directly results in tumor size with lower survival rate in vivo. Rb knockdown in vitro promoted bladder tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Interestingly, Rb knockout and knockdown result in autophagy and apoptosis inhibition via suppressing p53 and caspase-3 signaling pathways, enhancing bladder cancer development in vitro and in vivo. These findings reveal that Rb deficiency accelerated urinary bladder cancer progression, exposing an important role of Rb in suppressing urinary bladder cancer for treatment in the future.

  11. Association of overactive bladder and stress urinary incontinence in rats with pudendal nerve ligation injury.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akira; Kita, Masafumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Egawa, Shin; Chancellor, Michael B; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) also suffer from urgency incontinence, which is one of the major symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Pudendal nerve injury has been recognized as a possible cause for both SUI and OAB. Therefore, we investigated the effects of pudendal nerve ligation (PNL) on bladder function and urinary continence in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Conscious cystometry with or without capsaicin pretreatment (125 mg/kg sc), leak point pressures (LPPs), contractile responses of bladder muscle strips to carbachol or phenylephrine, and levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and mRNA in the bladder were compared in sham and PNL rats 4 wk after the injury. Urinary frequency detected by a reduction in intercontraction intervals and voided volume was observed in PNL rats compared with sham rats, but it was not seen in PNL rats with capsaicin pretreatment that desensitizes C-fiber-afferent pathways. LPPs in PNL rats were significantly decreased compared with sham rats. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to phenylephrine, but not to carbachol, were significantly increased in PNL rats. The levels of NGF protein and mRNA in the bladder of PNL rats were significantly increased compared with sham rats. These results suggest that pudendal nerve neuropathy induced by PNL may be one of the potential risk factors for OAB, as well as SUI. Somato-visceral cross sensitization between somatic (pudendal) and visceral (bladder) sensory pathways that increases NGF expression and alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-mediated contractility in the bladder may be involved in this pathophysiological mechanism.

  12. α1-, α2- and β-adrenoceptors in the urinary bladder, urethra and prostate

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Martin C; Vrydag, Wim

    2006-01-01

    We have systematically reviewed the presence, functional responses and regulation of α1-, α2- and β-adrenoceptors in the bladder, urethra and prostate, with special emphasis on human tissues and receptor subtypes. α1-Adrenoceptors are only poorly expressed and play a limited functional role in the detrusor. α1-Adrenoceptors, particularly their α1A-subtype, show a more pronounced expression and promote contraction of the bladder neck, urethra and prostate to enhance bladder outlet resistance, particularly in elderly men with enlarged prostates. α1-Adrenoceptor agonists are important in the treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, but their beneficial effects may involve receptors within and outside the prostate. α2-Adrenoceptors, mainly their α2A-subtype, are expressed in bladder, urethra and prostate. They mediate pre-junctional inhibition of neurotransmitter release and also a weak contractile effect in the urethra of some species, but not humans. Their overall post-junctional function in the lower urinary tract remains largely unclear. β-Adrenoceptors mediate relaxation of smooth muscle in the bladder, urethra and prostate. The available tools have limited the unequivocal identification of receptor subtypes at the protein and functional levels, but it appears that the β3- and β2-subtypes are important in the human bladder and urethra, respectively. β3-Adrenoceptor agonists are promising drug candidates for the treatment of the overactive bladder. We propose that the overall function of adrenoceptors in the lower urinary tract is to promote urinary continence. Further elucidation of the functional roles of their subtypes will help a better understanding of voiding dysfunction and its treatment. PMID:16465187

  13. Near infrared imaging to identify sentinel lymph nodes in invasive urinary bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Deborah W.; Adams, Larry G.; Niles, Jacqueline D.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Ramos-Vara, Jose; Bonney, Patty L.; deGortari, Amalia E.; Frangioni, John V.

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 12,000 people are diagnosed with invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (InvTCC) each year in the United States. Surgical removal of the bladder (cystectomy) and regional lymph node dissection are considered frontline therapy. Cystectomy causes extensive acute morbidity, and 50% of patients with InvTCC have occult metastases at the time of diagnosis. Better staging procedures for InvTCC are greatly needed. This study was performed to evaluate an intra-operative near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) system (Frangioni laboratory) for identifying sentinel lymph nodes draining InvTCC. NIRF imaging was used to map lymph node drainage from specific quadrants of the urinary bladder in normal dogs and pigs, and to map lymph node drainage from naturally-occurring InvTCC in pet dogs where the disease closely mimics the human condition. Briefly, during surgery NIR fluorophores (human serum albumen-fluorophore complex, or quantum dots) were injected directly into the bladder wall, and fluorescence observed in lymphatics and regional nodes. Conditions studied to optimize the procedure including: type of fluorophore, depth of injection, volume of fluorophore injected, and degree of bladder distention at the time of injection. Optimal imaging occurred with very superficial injection of the fluorophore in the serosal surface of the moderately distended bladder. Considerable variability was noted from dog to dog in the pattern of lymph node drainage. NIR fluorescence was noted in lymph nodes with metastases in dogs with InvTCC. In conclusion, intra-operative NIRF imaging is a promising approach to improve sentinel lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer.

  14. Effects of seven chemicals on DNA damage in the rat urinary bladder: a comet assay study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kunio; Yoshida, Toshinori; Takahashi, Naofumi; Matsumoto, Kyomu

    2014-07-15

    The in vivo comet assay has been used for the evaluation of DNA damage and repair in various tissues of rodents. However, it can give false-positive results due to non-specific DNA damage associated with cell death. In this study, we examined whether the in vivo comet assay can distinguish between genotoxic and non-genotoxic DNA damage in urinary bladder cells, by using the following seven chemicals related to urinary bladder carcinogenesis in rodents: N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN), glycidol, 2,2-bis(bromomethyl)-1,3-propanediol (BMP), 2-nitroanisole (2-NA), benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), uracil, and melamine. BBN, glycidol, BMP, and 2-NA are known to be Ames test-positive and they are expected to produce DNA damage in the absence of cytotoxicity. BITC, uracil, and melamine are Ames test-negative with metabolic activation but have the potential to induce non-specific DNA damage due to cytotoxicity. The test chemicals were administered orally to male Sprague-Dawley rats (five per group) for each of two consecutive days. Urinary bladders were sampled 3h after the second administration and urothelial cells were analyzed by the comet assay and subjected to histopathological examination to evaluate cytotoxicity. In the urinary bladders of rats treated with BBN, glycidol, and BMP, DNA damage was detected. In contrast, 2-NA induced neither DNA damage nor cytotoxicity. The non-genotoxic chemicals (BITC, uracil, and melamine) did not induce DNA damage in the urinary bladders under conditions where some histopathological changes were observed. The results indicate that the comet assay could distinguish between genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals and that no false-positive responses were obtained.

  15. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans. PMID:24872936

  16. Pumpkin Seed Oil Extracted From Cucurbita maxima Improves Urinary Disorder in Human Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroji; Takeda, Hiroshi; Nishihira, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The pumpkin seed oil obtained from Cucurbita pepo has been shown to be useful for the treatment of nocturia in patients with urinal disorders in several western countries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the pumpkin seed oil from Cucurbita maxima on urinary dysfunction in human overactive bladder (OAB). Forty-five subjects were enrolled in this study. An extract of pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima (10 g of oil/day) was orally administrated for 12 weeks. After 6 and 12 weeks, urinary function was evaluated using Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). Pumpkin seed oil from C. maxima significantly reduced the degree of OABSS in the subjects. The results from our study suggest that pumpkin seed oil extracts from C. maxima as well as from C. pepo are effective for urinary disorders such as OAB in humans.

  17. Nonoccupational exposure to agricultural work and risk of urinary bladder cancer among Egyptian women.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah S; St George, Diane Marie; Loffredo, Christopher A; Amr, Sania

    2017-05-04

    This study examined the associations between nonoccupational exposure to agricultural work, through husband or head of household (H/HH) occupation, and urinary bladder cancer risk among Egyptian women. A total of 1,167 women (388 bladder cases and 779 age- and residence-matched, population-based controls) from a multicenter case-control study were included in the analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Among married women, those who reported H/HH to be an agricultural worker were at increased risk for bladder cancer as compared to those with H/HH in other occupations, AOR = 1.54, 95% CI [1.09, 2.18]; among unmarried women the risk was not increased, AOR = 0.77, 95% CI [0.45, 1.32]. Nonoccupational exposure to agricultural work, defined as living with an agricultural worker, increased the risk for bladder cancer among married Egyptian women.

  18. Inflammatory Urinary Cytokine Expression and Quality of Life in Patients With Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Pillalamarri, Nirmala; Shalom, Dara F; Pilkinton, Marjorie L; Winkler, Harvey A; Chatterjee, Prodyot K; Solanki, Malvika; Metz, Christine N

    2017-09-25

    The aims of this study were to analyze levels of selected inflammatory urinary cytokines/chemokines in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB) and to determine if cytokine/chemokine levels correlate with quality of life and symptom distress. This prospective, case-control pilot analysis included 23 women with OAB and 22 control subjects. Overactive bladder subjects were enrolled if they had symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency, or urge incontinence for more than 3 months and urodynamic evidence of detrusor overactivity. Control subjects denied urinary symptoms. Subjects and control subjects were excluded if they had known inflammatory bladder or systemic conditions, cystitis, stones, or recent anticholinergic use. Urine samples were collected from each subject and control. Subjects filled out the Incontinence Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Urinary Distress Inventory Questionnaire 6. Cytokine/chemokine levels were determined using the multiplexed Meso Scale Discovery Platform and were corrected for urinary creatinine concentrations. Statistical analysis comparing cytokine/chemokine levels was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test; relationships between cytokine/chemokine and questionnaire scores were calculated with Spearman correlation coefficient. Subjects with OAB had significantly lower urinary interleukin 10 (IL-10), IL-12-p70, and IL-13 levels compared with control subjects. Interleukin 1 correlated with worsening symptom distress on Urinary Distress Inventory Questionnaire 6. To our knowledge, this is at present the only study correlating inflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels in women with OAB with quality of life and distress. Interleukin 1 signified worsening distress, whereas IL-10, IL-12p70, and IL-13 were the only cytokines found at different levels in subjects. Our findings support a larger study in order to evaluate the value of urinary cytokines/chemokines as potential biomarkers.

  19. Downregulation of glutathione S-transferase M1 protein in N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced mouse bladder carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Jing-Jing; Dai, Yuan-Chang; Lin, Yung-Lun; Chen, Yang-Yi; Lin, Wei-Han; Chan, Hong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2014-09-15

    Bladder cancer is highly recurrent following specific transurethral resection and intravesical chemotherapy, which has prompted continuing efforts to develop novel therapeutic agents and early-stage diagnostic tools. Specific changes in protein expression can provide a diagnostic marker. In our present study, we investigated changes in protein expression during urothelial carcinogenesis. The carcinogen BBN was used to induce mouse bladder tumor formation. Mouse bladder mucosa proteins were collected and analyzed by 2D electrophoresis from 6 to 20 weeks after commencing continuous BBN treatment. By histological examination, the connective layer of the submucosa showed gradual thickening and the number of submucosal capillaries gradually increased after BBN treatment. At 12-weeks after the start of BBN treatment, the urothelia became moderately dysplastic and tumors arose after 20-weeks of treatment. These induced bladder lesions included carcinoma in situ and connective tissue invasive cancer. In protein 2D analysis, the sequentially downregulated proteins from 6 to 20 weeks included GSTM1, L-lactate dehydrogenase B chain, keratin 8, keratin 18 and major urinary proteins 2 and 11/8. In contrast, the sequentially upregulated proteins identified were GSTO1, keratin 15 and myosin light polypeptide 6. Western blotting confirmed that GSTM1 and NQO-1 were decreased, while GSTO1 and Sp1 were increased, after BBN treatment. In human bladder cancer cells, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased the GSTM1 mRNA and protein expression. These data suggest that the downregulation of GSTM1 in the urothelia is a biomarker of bladder carcinogenesis and that this may be mediated by DNA CpG methylation. - Highlights: • GSTM1 and NQO-1 proteins decreased in the mouse bladder mucosa after BBN treatment. • BBN induced GSTO1 and Sp1 protein expression in the mouse bladder mucosa. • 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased GSTM1 mRNA and protein in human bladder cancer cell. • GSTM1

  20. Three-dimensional mechano-electrochemical model for smooth muscle contraction of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Seydewitz, Robert; Menzel, Robin; Siebert, Tobias; Böl, Markus

    2017-04-12

    The urinary bladder is a central organ of vertebrates and imposes, based on its extreme deformation (volume changes up to several 100%), special requirements on the overall bladder tissue. However, studies focusing on three-dimensional modelling of bladder deformation and bladder function during micturition are rare. Based on three fields, namely, the membrane potential, calcium concentration, and placement, a mechano-electrochemical-coupled, three-dimensional model describing the contractile behaviour of urinary bladder smooth muscle is presented using a strain energy function. The strain energy functions for the different layers of the bladder wall are additively decomposed into a passive part comprising elastin, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and collagen and an active electrochemical-driven part comprising the contraction of smooth muscle cells (SMC). While the two-variable FitzHugh-Nagumo-type membrane model (FitzHugh, 1961; Nagumo et al., 1962) has been used to describe the membrane potential characteristics, the four-state, cross-bridge model of Hai and Murphy (1988) is implemented into the finite element method for the quantification of the calcium phase. Appropriate model parameters were determined experimentally using 40 tissue strips isolated from porcine bladders. Characteristic orientation-dependent passive and active stress-stretch relationships were identified for muscle strips, including the entire bladder wall structure and those featuring the isolated muscle layer only. Active experiments on the smooth muscle layers revealed higher stresses in the longitudinal (28.9kPa) direction than in the transversal (22.7kPa) one. Additionally, three-dimensional deformation characteristics were recorded from single muscle strips to qualitatively confirm the strip simulations. Three-dimensional simulations at the tissue strip level and the organ level were performed to analyse the interaction among the electrical action potential, calcium distribution

  1. Kinetic model of drug distribution in the urinary bladder wall following intravesical instillation.

    PubMed

    Grabnar, I; Bogataj, M; Belic, A; Logar, V; Karba, R; Mrhar, A

    2006-09-28

    Intravesical administration of cytotoxic agents is commonly used in urological practice for treatment of superficial bladder cancer. The leading motive is optimisation of drug delivery near the site of action and reduction of systemic toxicity. Bladder pharmacokinetics is complicated by several mechanisms. The objectives of this work were to develop a kinetic model of drug distribution in the bladder wall following intravesical instillation and to study the effect of various parameters on tissue and systemic drug exposure and explore the potential benefits of permeability enhancing effects of chitosan (CH) and polycarbophil (PC) through simulation. Key elements of the model are variable urinary drug concentration due to urine formation and voiding, biphasic diffusion in the bladder tissue and systemic absorption. Model parameters were estimated from bladder-tissue concentration profiles obtained in previous in vitro experiments with pipemidic acid (PPA) as a model drug. The results support further investigations on application of CH and PC in intravesical drug delivery. Both polymers increase permeability of the bladder wall by diffusion enhancement in the urothelium and presumably by improving the contact with the bladder surface. The developed mathematical model could serve for optimisation of intravesical drug delivery and future development of intravesical drug delivery systems.

  2. Physiological and pathophysiological implications of micromotion activity in urinary bladder function.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, B; Drake, M J

    2015-02-01

    'Micromotions' is a term signifying the presence of localized microcontractions and microelongations, alongside non-motile areas. The motile areas tend to shift over the bladder surface with time, and the intravesical pressure reflects moment-by-moment summation of the interplay between net contractile force generated by micromotions and general bladder tone. Functionally, the bladder structure may comprise modules with variable linkage, which supports presence of localized micromotions (no functional linkage between modules), propagating contractions (where emergence of linkage allows sequential activation) and the shifting of micromotions over time. Detrusor muscle, interstitial cells and intramural innervation have properties potentially relevant for initiating, coordinating and modulating micromotions. Conceptually, such activity could facilitate the generation of afferent activity (filling state reporting) in the absence of intravesical pressure change and the ability to transition to voiding at any bladder volume. This autonomous activity is an intrinsic property, seen in various experimental contexts including the clinical setting of human (female) overactive bladder. 'Disinhibited autonomy' may explain the obvious micromotions in isolated bladders and perhaps contribute clinically in neurological disease causing detrusor overactivity. Furthermore, any process that could increase the initiation or propagation of microcontractions might be anticipated to have a functional effect, increasing the likelihood of urinary urgency and detrusor overactivity respectively. Thus, models of bladder outlet obstruction, neurological trauma and ageing provide a useful framework for detecting cellular changes in smooth muscle, interstitial cells and innervation, and the consequent effects on micromotions.

  3. An extended-release formulation of oxybutynin chloride for the treatment of overactive urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, M M

    1999-04-01

    Detrusor instability, or urinary incontinence, is common in elderly patients, particularly elderly women. The clinical symptoms of overactive, or unstable, urinary bladder include urge urinary incontinence, urgency, and frequency. Mixed urinary incontinence, which comprises urge urinary incontinence and stress incontinence, is manifested by increased intraabdominal pressure on coughing or sneezing. The detrusor muscle of the bladder is under the control of the parasympathetic, or muscarinic, nervous system. The drug of choice in this condition is oxybutynin chloride, which has the ability to block acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves in the urinary bladder, preventing contractions of the muscle and exerting a direct spasmolytic effect on the bladder. A new extended-release oral tablet formulation, OROS oxybutynin, uses osmotic pressure to deliver the drug at a controlled rate over approximately 24 hours. It resembles a conventional tablet but has a two-part core consisting of a drug layer and below it, a "push" layer containing osmotically active components, the whole surrounded by a semipermeable membrane with a laser-drilled opening in the drug side. Water in the gastrointestinal tract enters the tablet and mixes with the drug to form a suspension. The "push" layer expands and pushes the suspended drug out of the orifice and into the gastrointestinal tract for eventual absorption. Pharmacokinetic studies have indicated a slow rise in mean plasma concentration of the isomer R-oxybutynin for 4 to 6 hours after a single dose of OROS oxybutynin, followed by maintenance of steady concentrations for up to 24 hours, minimizing the fluctuations between peak and trough associated with TID dosing of 5-mg immediate-release oxybutynin tablets. Efficacy and safety studies comparing the extended-release with the immediate-release formulation of oxybutynin demonstrated equivalent efficacy in patients with overactive urinary bladder. The adverse-event profile of

  4. Novel pathologic findings associated with urinary retention in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB.

    PubMed

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Sanberg, Paul R; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Monforte, Hector; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2009-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB; Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a metabolic disorder with devastating clinical characteristics starting in early childhood and leading to premature death. A knockout mouse strain was developed that models this disease. Mice of the strain B6.129S6- Naglu(tm1Efn)/J are invaluable for investigating pathogenesis and possible treatment modalities. However, the mouse strain also exhibits some objectionable phenotypic features. One such feature, urinary retention, not only is atypical of human MPS IIIB but often leads to early termination of experiments due to animal welfare concerns. The aim of this study was to investigate abnormalities associated with the urinary retention. Necropsies were performed on 9-mo-old mice; urinalysis, hematology and blood chemistry parameters were evaluated, and urogenital specimens were microscopically examined. Histopathologic examinations of urinary tract specimens proved illuminating regarding pathology in the urinary tract. A large mononuclear cell infiltrate was discovered in mutant mice of both sexes, more pronounced in females compared with male mice. The infiltrate comprises of large rounded or polygonal cells with generous variably vacuolated, granular eosinophilic cytoplasm and small round vesicular nuclei. These cells were present throughout and expand the interstitium of the lower urinary tract. Either this results in extrinsic compression of the lumen of the urethra, eventually leading to obstructive uropathy, bladder hyperdistension, and urinary retention or possibly interferes with the neurogenic component of micturition needs to be further investigated. The novel finding of an unexpected mononuclear cell infiltrate in the urinary tract in the knockout mice B6.129S6- Naglu(tm1Efn)/J is reported.

  5. Novel Pathologic Findings Associated with Urinary Retention in a Mouse Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Gografe, Sylvia I; Sanberg, Paul R; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Monforte, Hector; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2009-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB; Sanfilippo syndrome type B) is a metabolic disorder with devastating clinical characteristics starting in early childhood and leading to premature death. A knockout mouse strain was developed that models this disease. Mice of the strain B6.129S6- Naglutm1Efn/J are invaluable for investigating pathogenesis and possible treatment modalities. However, the mouse strain also exhibits some objectionable phenotypic features. One such feature, urinary retention, not only is atypical of human MPS IIIB but often leads to early termination of experiments due to animal welfare concerns. The aim of this study was to investigate abnormalities associated with the urinary retention. Necropsies were performed on 9-mo-old mice; urinalysis, hematology and blood chemistry parameters were evaluated, and urogenital specimens were microscopically examined. Histopathologic examinations of urinary tract specimens proved illuminating regarding pathology in the urinary tract. A large mononuclear cell infiltrate was discovered in mutant mice of both sexes, more pronounced in females compared with male mice. The infiltrate comprises of large rounded or polygonal cells with generous variably vacuolated, granular eosinophilic cytoplasm and small round vesicular nuclei. These cells were present throughout and expand the interstitium of the lower urinary tract. Either this results in extrinsic compression of the lumen of the urethra, eventually leading to obstructive uropathy, bladder hyperdistension, and urinary retention or possibly interferes with the neurogenic component of micturition needs to be further investigated. The novel finding of an unexpected mononuclear cell infiltrate in the urinary tract in the knockout mice B6.129S6- Naglutm1Efn/J is reported. PMID:19389305

  6. Urinary pH, cigarette smoking and bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil, Juan; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra T.; Malats, Núria; Real, Francisco X.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Tardón, Adonina; Rivas, Manuel; Torà, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fortuny, Joan; Samanic, Claudine; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of 4-aminobiphenyl and its N-hydroxy metabolite can be rapidly hydrolyzed in acidic urine to undergo further metabolic activation and form DNA adducts in the urothelium. We conducted a large multicenter case–control study in Spain to explore the etiology of bladder cancer and evaluated the association between urine pH and bladder cancer risk, alone and in combination with cigarette smoking. In total, 712 incident urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 611 hospital controls directly measured their urine pH with dipsticks twice a day (first void in the morning and early in the evening) during four consecutive days 2 weeks after hospital discharge. We found that a consistently acidic urine pH ≤6.0 was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–1.9] compared with all other subjects. Furthermore, risk estimates for smoking intensity and risk of bladder cancer among current smokers tended to be higher for those with a consistently acidic urine (OR = 8.8, 11.5 and 23.8) compared with those without (OR = 4.3, 7.7 and 5.8, respectively, for 1–19, 20–29 and 30+ cigarettes per day; Pinteraction for 30+ cigarettes per day = 0.024). These results suggest that urine pH, which is determined primarily by diet and body surface area, may be an important modifier of smoking and risk of bladder cancer. PMID:21402590

  7. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Risk of Bladder Cancer in Men: Results from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiachen; Kelsey, Karl T.; Smith, Scott; Giovannucci, Edward; Michaud, Dominique S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand the association between Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and risk of bladder cancer in a large men's cohort. Methods Using data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we examined risk of bladder cancer in relation to severity of LUTS among 30,183 men. During the follow-up period from 1996 until 2010, 476 newly diagnosed cases of bladder cancer occurred. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. Results Among men with severe LUTS, risk of bladder cancer was 64% higher (relative risk (RR): 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87, 3.08) compared with men who reported no LUTS. Subjects with both voiding and storage dysfunction had a significantly higher risk of bladder cancer (RR: 1.60, 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 2.56). Among individual urinary symptoms, urinary hesitancy was strongly associated with bladder cancer; those who experienced urinary hesitancy at least 50% of the time had more than twice the risk of bladder cancer (RR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.29, 3.78). Conclusions Our findings suggest that LUTS, especially urinary hesitancy, are associated with the development of bladder cancer in men. PMID:25863833

  8. Outcomes of Surgical Management of Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis of the Ureter and Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rozsnyai, Francisc; Resch, Benoit; Dugardin, Fabrice; Berrocal, Juan; Descargues, Gérôme; Schmied, Remi; Boukerrou, Malik; Marpeau, Loïc

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To report the outcomes of surgical management of urinary tract endometriosis and discuss the choice between conservative and radical surgery. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data concerning women managed for ureteral or bladder deep infiltrating endometriosis in 5 surgical departments participating in the CIRENDO prospective database. Preoperative data, surgical procedure data, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. Results: Data from 30 women pooled in the database showed 15 women presenting with ureteral endometriosis, 14 women with bladder nodules, and 1 with both types of lesions. Ureterolysis was performed in 14 cases; the ureter was satisfactorily freed in 10 of these. In 4 women over 40 years old, who were undergoing definitive amenorrhea, moderate postoperative ureteral stenosis was tolerated and later improved in 3 cases, while the fourth underwent secondary ureteral resection and ureterocystoneostomy. Primary ureterectomy was carried out in 4 women. Two cases of intrinsic ureteral endometriosis were found in 5 ureter specimens. Four complications were related to surgical procedures on ureteral nodules, and 2 complications followed the removal of bladder endometriosis. Delayed postoperative outcomes were favorable with a significant improvement in painful symptoms and an absence of unpleasant urinary complaints, except for one patient with prolonged bladder denervation. Conclusion: Conservative surgery, in association with postoperative amenorrhea, can be proposed in a majority of cases of urinary tract endometriosis. Although the outcomes are generally favorable, the risk of postoperative complications should not be overlooked, as surgery tends to be performed in conjunction with other complex procedures such as colorectal surgery. PMID:22643496

  9. Ruptured urinary bladder attributable to urethral compression by a haematoma after vertebral fracture in a bull

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In male cattle, rupture of the urinary bladder is usually associated with urethral obstruction by uroliths. Less common causes include urethral compression or stricture. This case report describes the findings in a young Limousion breeding bull with rupture of the urinary bladder because of urethral compression by a haematoma after coccygeal fracture. Case presentation The bull had been introduced into a 40-head Red-Holstein herd one week before being injured. One week after introduction to the herd, the bull had an acute onset of anorexia and he was referred to the clinic. There was marked abdominal distension, reduced skin turgor and enophthalmus. The serum concentration of urea and creatinine was increased. Ultrasonographic examination revealed severe ascites and abdominocentesis yielded clear yellow fluid with high urea and creatinine concentrations, which supported a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. The bull was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed a comminuted fracture of the first two coccygeal vertebrae associated with a massive haematoma that obstructed entire pelvic cavity. The haematoma compressed the urethra thereby preventing outflow of urine, which resulted in a 5-cm tear ventrally at the neck of the bladder. It was assumed that the newly-introduced bull had sustained the vertebral fractures when he was mounted by a cow. Conclusions The present case study serves to expand the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder rupture. Therefore, in addition to obstructive urolithiasis, compression and stricture of the urethra might be considered in male cattle with uroperitoneum. PMID:24666697

  10. Central control of micturition in women: Brain-bladder pathways in continence and urgency urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Arya, Nisha G; Weissbart, Steven J

    2017-04-01

    Urinary incontinence disproportionately affects women. Anatomical textbooks typically describe continence mechanisms in women in the context of the pelvic floor support of the urinary bladder and the urethral sphincters. However, the urinary bladder and urethral sphincters are under the central control of the brain through a complex network of neurons that allow storage of urine followed by voiding when socially appropriate. Recent studies suggest that the most common type of urinary incontinence in women, urgency urinary incontinence, involves significant dysfunction of the central control of micturition. In this paper, we review the anatomy and functional connectivity of the nervous system structures involved in the control of micturition. Clinical application of this anatomy in the context of urgency urinary incontinence is also discussed. Understanding the anatomy of the neural structures that control continence will allow clinicians to better understand the underlying pathology of urge incontinence and consider new ways of treating this distressing condition. Clin. Anat. 30:373-384, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Guo, Charles C; Gomez, Enrique; Tamboli, Pheroze; Bondaruk, Jolanta E; Kamat, Ashish; Bassett, Roland; Dinney, Colin P; Czerniak, Bogdan A

    2009-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is an uncommon histologic type in the urinary bladder. We searched our surgical pathology files and identified 16 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. The mean age of patients was 65.4 years (range, 41-77 years). All patients received transurethral resection of the bladder, which demonstrated pure squamous cell carcinomas. Seven patients had clinical evidence of tumor spreading out of the bladder (T4) and did not undergo radical cystectomy. The other 9 patients underwent cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection. The cystectomy specimens revealed tumors invading muscularis propria (T2) (n = 4) or perivesical soft tissue (T3) (n = 5). Two patients also had metastasis to lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that squamous cell carcinoma cells were positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (n = 16) and for p53 (n = 11). For the 9 patients who received cystectomy, 5 patients were alive at a mean of 92.8 months (range, 59-128 months) and 4 patients died of disease at a mean of 24.0 months (range, 6-58 months). For the 7 patients who did not receive cystectomy, 6 died at a mean of 5.7 months (range, 3-9 months), and no follow-up was available for the remaining patient. In conclusion, squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder frequently presents at an advanced stage and is associated with enhanced expression of EGFR and p53.

  12. Modeling and simulation of a low-grade urinary bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana; Pisarev, Vladimir; Kashdan, Eugene

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we present a mathematical model of the initiation and progression of a low-grade urinary bladder carcinoma. We simulate the crucial processes affecting tumor growth, such as oxygen diffusion, carcinogen penetration, and angiogenesis, within the framework of the urothelial cell dynamics. The cell dynamics are modeled using the discrete technique of cellular automata, while the continuous processes of carcinogen penetration and oxygen diffusion are described by nonlinear diffusion-absorption equations. As the availability of oxygen is necessary for tumor progression, processes of oxygen transport to the tumor growth site seem most important. Our model yields a theoretical insight into the main stages of development and growth of urinary bladder carcinoma with emphasis on the two most common types: bladder polyps and carcinoma in situ. Analysis of histological structure of bladder tumor is important to avoid misdiagnosis and wrong treatment. We expect our model to be a valuable tool in the study of bladder cancer progression due to the exposure to carcinogens and the oxygen dependent expression of genes promoting tumor growth. Our numerical simulations have good qualitative agreement with in vivo results reported in the corresponding medical literature.

  13. Pheochromocytoma of the urinary bladder: a systematic review of the contemporary literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pheochromocytoma (paraganglioma) of the urinary bladder is a rare tumor. Herein we sought to review the contemporary literature on pheochromocytomas of the urinary bladder in order to further illustrate the presentation, treatment options and outcomes of patients diagnosed with these tumors. Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed database and using the search terms “paraganglioma, pheochromocytoma, bladder.” This search resulted in the identification of 186 articles published between January 1980 and April 2012 of which 80 articles were ultimately included in our analysis. Results Pheochromocytomas usually occurred in young adult Caucasians (mean age, 43.3 years; range,11–84 years). According to the literature, the most common symptoms and signs of pheochromocytomas of the urinary bladder were hypertension, headache, and hematuria. Of the 77 cases that commented on catecholamine production, 65 patients had biochemically functional tumors. Approximately 20% of patients were treated by transurethral resection alone, 70% by partial cystectomy and 10% by radical cystectomy. The 75 patients with follow-up information had a mean follow-up of 35 months. At the time of last follow-up, 15 (14.2%) had disease recurrence, 10 (9.4%) had metastasis, and 65 (61.3%) were alive. Conclusions Pheochromocytomas of the urinary bladder tend to be functional and occur mostly in young adult Caucasians. Patients with localized tumors have an extremely favorable prognosis and may be managed by less aggressive modalities, whereas patients with metastatic disease have a significant reduction in survival rates despite aggressive treatment. PMID:23627260

  14. Effect of Doxazosin on Autonomic Nervous Control and Urodynamics of Rat Urinary Bladder during Modeled Infravesical Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kirpatovskii, V I; Mudraya, I S; Revenko, S V; Bablumyan, A Yu; Adamyan, N K; Ivanov, V P

    2016-09-01

    The therapeutic effect of doxazosin (40 μg/kg/day over one month) on urinary bladder was examined in female rats with modeled chronic infravesical obstruction (IVO) produced by graduated mechanical constriction of the proximal urethral segment. In one month, IVO induced a pronounced vesical hypertrophy both in treated and untreated rats that manifested in increased bladder weight and capacity, the latter increment being pronouncedly greater in treated rats. In untreated IVO rats, infusion cystometry revealed elevated basal intravesical pressure of void bladder P0, markedly increased maximal (premicturitional) pressure Pmax, and increased amplitude of spontaneous oscillations of intravesical pressure ΔPdet in filled bladder. Doxazosin produced no significant effect on Pmax rise during IVO, but prevented elevation of P0 and increment of ΔPdet in filled bladder. During gradual filling of urinary bladder in control (intact) rats, the parasympathetic vesical influences increased progressively, while in untreated IVO rats, the adrenergic influences prevailed even at maximal filling of the bladder. In IVO rats, doxazosin prevented the bias of the sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the filled bladder in favor of sympathetic influences, but did not prevent this bias in a void bladder. It is hypothesized that α-adrenoblockers improve micturition during IVO caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia not only by decreasing the urethral resistance to urine flow due to down-regulation of prostate smooth muscle tone, but also by a direct action of these blockers on detrusor adrenergic receptors and central structures involved in urinary bladder control.

  15. Risk of Fracture After Radical Cystectomy and Urinary Diversion for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Atoria, Coral L.; Ehdaie, Behfar; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Rabbani, Farhang; Herr, Harry W.; Bochner, Bernard H.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Radical cystectomy and urinary diversion may cause chronic metabolic acidosis, leading to long-term bone loss in patients with bladder cancer. However, the risk of fractures after radical cystectomy has not been defined. We assessed whether radical cystectomy and intestinal urinary diversion are associated with increased risk of fracture. Patients and Methods Population-based study using SEER-Medicare–linked data from 2000 through 2007 for patients with stage 0-III bladder cancer. We evaluated the association between radical cystectomy and risk of fracture at any site, controlling for patient and disease characteristics. Results The cohort included 50,520 patients, of whom 4,878 had cystectomy and urinary diversion. The incidence of fracture in the cystectomy group was 6.55 fractures per 100 person-years, compared with 6.39 fractures per 100 person-years in those without cystectomy. Cystectomy was associated with a 21% greater risk of fracture (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.32) compared with no cystectomy, controlling for patient and disease characteristics. There was no evidence of an interaction between radical cystectomy and age, sex, comorbidity score, or cancer stage. Conclusion Patients with bladder cancer who have radical cystectomy and urinary diversion are at increased risk of fracture. PMID:25185104

  16. Botulinum Toxin A Injection in the Bladder Neck: A Promising Treatment for Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Marianne; Zgheib, Joseph; El Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to failure of optimal medical therapy and the high morbidity that accompanies surgical techniques in high risk patients, the use of de novo treatments including botulinum toxin A is emerging in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the treatment of urinary retention secondary to BPH via injecting botulinum toxin into the bladder neck is not well established in the literature. This case report describes the case of a 75-year-old male patient with a chronic history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and multiple comorbidities who was admitted to the hospital for management of recurrent urinary retention. The patient was not a surgical candidate for transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Botulinum toxin injection into the bladder neck was performed with very satisfying results. Botulinum toxin injection in the bladder neck presents a promising minimally invasive, tolerated, and cost-effective approach for the treatment of urinary retention in patients with benign prostatic obstruction who are not candidates for surgery or in whom medical treatment has failed. More research is needed to identify the efficacy of this novel approach. PMID:27088032

  17. Solifenacin objectively decreases urinary sensation in women with overactive bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Lior; Kenton, Kimberly; Mueller, Elizabeth R; Brubaker, Linda; Sabo, Edmond; Durazo-Arivzu, Ramón A; Fitzgerald, Mary P

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the test-retest reliability of a device that measures urinary sensation during cystometry, and to use that device to determine whether treatment of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) with solifenacin is associated with a change in urinary sensation. Overall 15 women were recruited for this study, ten women with OAB and urodynamically demonstrated detrusor overactivity and five controls without OAB underwent filling cystometry twice with contemporaneous, continuous recording of urinary sensation. Women with OAB received solifenacin 10 mg daily during the weeks between testing. We compared the areas under the initial and repeat sensation-volume curves. While taking solifenacin, the maximum cystometric capacity increased from 329 ± 168 ml to 464 ± 123 ml (P < 0.002), and the area under the bladder volume-sensation curve decreased (P < 0.0001). Untreated controls did not exhibit these changes. We present psychometric data demonstrating improved bladder sensation during the treatment of OAB with solifenacin. If clinical correlations are confirmed by future study, such urinary sensation measures may prove useful as assessment, treatment predictor, or outcome measures in OAB research and/or clinical care.

  18. Urinary nerve growth factor and a variable solifenacin dosage in patients with an overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Seyfettin; Ozkurkcugil, Cuneyd; Yilmaz, Hasan; Ustuner, Murat; Yavuz, Ufuk; Yuksekkaya, Mustafa; Cekmen, Mustafa Baki

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated changes in urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and NGF/creatinine (NGF/Cr) levels after increasing the dosage of solifenacin in overactive bladder patients. The study groups included 59 overactive bladder (OAB) patients and 20 healthy subjects as controls. We measured NGF at baseline for the patients and controls, and used the Overactive Bladder Awareness Tool (OAB-V8) to evaluate urinary symptoms. All patients received a treatment of solifenacin 5 mg for 6 weeks. The responders to treatment served as group 1 and nonresponders received solifenacin 10 mg for an additional 6 weeks. Responders and nonresponders to the 10-mg treatment were defined as groups 2 and 3 respectively. NGF was measured after each treatment using the ELISA method and normalized by the urinary creatinine levels (NGF/Cr). There were 21, 22 and 16 patients in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively. At baseline, the NGF and NGF/Cr levels were higher in groups 1, 2, and 3 compared with the controls. After the solifenacin 5 mg treatment, the NGF and NGF/Cr levels of group 1 individuals decreased to those of the control level. After increasing the dosage of solifenacin to 10 mg in group 2, the NGF and NGF/Cr levels decreased to normal levels. In group 3 (patients who did not responded to any treatment), these levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest that urinary NGF could be a potential biomarker for monitoring the treatment of symptoms in OAB patients who are treated with solifenacin.

  19. Distribution of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript in ureters and urinary bladder of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Janiuk, I; Kasacka, I

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a neuropeptide of the central and peripheral nervous system plays an essential role in maintaining body homeostasis by regulating body temperature, orexia, digestive motility and blood pressure. Very few studies describe the relationship of hyperten¬sion with CART. Therefore, the present research was undertaken to identify, locate and determine the number of CART-immunopositive neuroendocrine cells (NE) and structures in the urinary bladder and ureter of rats with experimentally induced nephrogenic hypertension. The experiments were conducted on 20 Wistar rats in which hypertension was experimentally induced by applying a clamp on the left renal artery based on the two kidney, one clip experimental model (2K1C). After 6 weeks, fragments of the ureters and urinary bladder were sampled from rats with permanent hypertension. Immunohisto¬chemical analyses revealed a salient effect of renovascular hypertension on the neuroendocrine system of rat ureters and urinary bladder. Differences in the number of neuroendocrine cells and in the density of CART-positive structures were identified between the hypertensive and normotensive (control) rats. Hypertension greatly increased the number of NE cells and the density of CART- immunoreactive (IR) structures in the analysed urinary system organs.

  20. Mechanical stretch upregulates proteins involved in Ca2+ sensitization in urinary bladder smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Gomes, Cristiano; Zderic, Stephen A; Malkowicz, Bruce; Chakrabarti, Ranjita; Patel, Darshan P; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2014-09-15

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO)-induced remodeling of bladder detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is associated with the modulation of cell signals regulating contraction. We analyzed the DSM from obstructed murine urinary bladders for the temporal regulation of RhoA GTPase and Rho-activated kinase (ROCK), which are linked to Ca(2+) sensitization. In addition, the effects of equibiaxial cell stretch, a condition thought to be associated with pBOO-induced bladder wall smooth muscle hypertrophy and voiding frequency, on the expression of RhoA, ROCK, and C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase I inhibitor (CPI-17) were investigated. DSM from 1-, 3-, 7-, and 14-day obstructed male mice bladders and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-induced obstructed human bladders revealed overexpression of RhoA and ROCK-β at the mRNA and protein levels compared with control. Primary human bladder myocytes seeded onto type I collagen-coated elastic silicone membranes were subjected to cyclic equibiaxial stretch, mimicking the cellular mechanical stretch in the bladder in vivo, and analyzed for the expression of RhoA, ROCK-β, and CPI-17. Stretch caused a significant increase of RhoA, ROCKβ, and CPI-17 expression. The stretch-induced increase in CPI-17 expression occurs at the transcriptional level and is associated with CPI-17 promoter binding by GATA-6 and NF-κB, the transcription factors responsible for CPI-17 gene transcription. Cell stretch caused by bladder overdistension in pBOO is the likely mechanism for initiating overexpression of the signaling proteins regulating DSM tone.

  1. Mechanical stretch upregulates proteins involved in Ca2+ sensitization in urinary bladder smooth muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Gomes, Cristiano; Zderic, Stephen A.; Malkowicz, Bruce; Chakrabarti, Ranjita; Patel, Darshan P.; Wein, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO)-induced remodeling of bladder detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is associated with the modulation of cell signals regulating contraction. We analyzed the DSM from obstructed murine urinary bladders for the temporal regulation of RhoA GTPase and Rho-activated kinase (ROCK), which are linked to Ca2+ sensitization. In addition, the effects of equibiaxial cell stretch, a condition thought to be associated with pBOO-induced bladder wall smooth muscle hypertrophy and voiding frequency, on the expression of RhoA, ROCK, and C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase I inhibitor (CPI-17) were investigated. DSM from 1-, 3-, 7-, and 14-day obstructed male mice bladders and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-induced obstructed human bladders revealed overexpression of RhoA and ROCK-β at the mRNA and protein levels compared with control. Primary human bladder myocytes seeded onto type I collagen-coated elastic silicone membranes were subjected to cyclic equibiaxial stretch, mimicking the cellular mechanical stretch in the bladder in vivo, and analyzed for the expression of RhoA, ROCK-β, and CPI-17. Stretch caused a significant increase of RhoA, ROCKβ, and CPI-17 expression. The stretch-induced increase in CPI-17 expression occurs at the transcriptional level and is associated with CPI-17 promoter binding by GATA-6 and NF-κB, the transcription factors responsible for CPI-17 gene transcription. Cell stretch caused by bladder overdistension in pBOO is the likely mechanism for initiating overexpression of the signaling proteins regulating DSM tone. PMID:25031021

  2. Simultaneous Transabdominal Hysterectomy and Cystolithotomy in an Augmented Urinary Bladder: Challenges and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay; Kapoor, Rakesh; Yadav, Priyank; Gaur, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty is a procedure to increase the anatomical as well as functional capacity of the urinary bladder using a segment of bowel or ureter. Upto half of these patients develop complications but most of them are minor and managed easily. Urolithiasis, especially bladder calculi are seen in upto half of the cases and are removed endoscopically or by open approach. Hysterectomy is an uncommon procedure in patients with augmentation cystoplasty and is complicated by the altered anatomy of the pelvis. We describe a rare case of simultaneous abdominal hysterectomy and cystolithotomy in a patient with augmentation cystoplasty and discuss the relevant surgical anatomy. PMID:28208926

  3. Cutaneous metastasis of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: Cytological aspect

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Modugumudi Ananta Satya; Patnayak, Rashmi; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Kottu, Radhika; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis from transitional cell carcinoma urinary bladder is a rare clinical entity associated with poor prognosis. This case report describes a 51-year-old male who presented with multiple cutaneous metastases arising from high grade transitional cell carcinoma bladder with lamina propria invasion. The prominent cytological features include medium sized to large pleomorphic cells with irregular nuclear outlines, coarse chromatin pattern, and tumor giant cells. An awareness of this rare clinical entity and high index of suspicion is needed for diagnosis. PMID:25190986

  4. Transrectal impalement of an incense stick in a child presenting as foreign body in the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Singha Mahapatra, Rajkumar; Priyadarshi, Vinod; Sarma Madduri, Vijay kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of objects that can be found in the urinary bladder often surpasses the urologist's imagination and mostly they are introduced per urethrally. Impalement injuries of the rectum with bladder perforation have been rarely reported. A high index of clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis of bladder perforation while assessing patients presenting with rectal impalement. In this interesting case, a young male child presented with haematuria and dysuria. He had a history of accidentally sitting on an agarbatti (Indian incense stick) stand while playing, followed by perianal pain which subsided spontaneously. Next day he presented with haematuria and dysuria. Clinical examination was inconclusive. On thorough investigation, a linear echogenic foreign body was found in the urinary bladder. The child was operated and the foreign body (incense stick) was removed. This is the first reported case of rectal impalement injury with incense stick, migrated to the urinary bladder in a 2-year-old child. PMID:24925539

  5. Impaired Excitatory Neurotransmission in the Urinary Bladder from the Obese Zucker Rat: Role of Cannabinoid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Blaha, Igor; Recio, Paz; Martínez, María Pilar; López-Oliva, María Elvira; Ribeiro, Ana S. F.; Agis-Torres, Ángel; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Fernandes, Vítor S.; Hernández, Medardo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a known risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms. This study investigates whether functional and expression changes of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors are involved in the bladder dysfunction in an obese rat model with insulin resistance. Bladder samples from obese Zucker rat (OZR) and their respective controls lean Zucker rat (LZR) were processed for immunohistochemistry and western blot for studying the cannabinoid receptors expression. Detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) strips from LZR and OZR were also mounted in myographs for isometric force recordings. Neuronal and smooth muscle CB1 and CB2 receptor expression and the nerve fiber density was diminished in the OZR bladder. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine (ACh) induced frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions of LZR and OZR DSM. ACh contractile responses were similar in LZR and OZR. EFS-elicited contractions, however, were reduced in OZR bladder. Cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists failed to modify the DSM basal tension in LZR and OZR In LZR bladder, EFS responses were inhibited by ACEA and SER-601, CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists, respectively, these effects being reversed by ACEA plus the CB1 antagonist, AM-251 or SER-601 plus the CB2 antagonist, AM-630. In OZR bladder, the inhibitory action of ACEA on nerve-evoked contractions was diminished, whereas that SER-601 did not change EFS responses. These results suggest that a diminished function and expression of neuronal cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, as well as a lower nerve fiber density is involved in the impaired excitatory neurotransmission of the urinary bladder from the OZR. PMID:27285468

  6. Impaired Excitatory Neurotransmission in the Urinary Bladder from the Obese Zucker Rat: Role of Cannabinoid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Blaha, Igor; Recio, Paz; Martínez, María Pilar; López-Oliva, María Elvira; Ribeiro, Ana S F; Agis-Torres, Ángel; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Fernandes, Vítor S; Hernández, Medardo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a known risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms. This study investigates whether functional and expression changes of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors are involved in the bladder dysfunction in an obese rat model with insulin resistance. Bladder samples from obese Zucker rat (OZR) and their respective controls lean Zucker rat (LZR) were processed for immunohistochemistry and western blot for studying the cannabinoid receptors expression. Detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) strips from LZR and OZR were also mounted in myographs for isometric force recordings. Neuronal and smooth muscle CB1 and CB2 receptor expression and the nerve fiber density was diminished in the OZR bladder. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine (ACh) induced frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions of LZR and OZR DSM. ACh contractile responses were similar in LZR and OZR. EFS-elicited contractions, however, were reduced in OZR bladder. Cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists failed to modify the DSM basal tension in LZR and OZR In LZR bladder, EFS responses were inhibited by ACEA and SER-601, CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists, respectively, these effects being reversed by ACEA plus the CB1 antagonist, AM-251 or SER-601 plus the CB2 antagonist, AM-630. In OZR bladder, the inhibitory action of ACEA on nerve-evoked contractions was diminished, whereas that SER-601 did not change EFS responses. These results suggest that a diminished function and expression of neuronal cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, as well as a lower nerve fiber density is involved in the impaired excitatory neurotransmission of the urinary bladder from the OZR.

  7. Central role of the BK channel in urinary bladder smooth muscle physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Georgi V

    2014-09-15

    The physiological functions of the urinary bladder are to store and periodically expel urine. These tasks are facilitated by the contraction and relaxation of the urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM), also known as detrusor smooth muscle, which comprises the bladder wall. The large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK, BKCa, MaxiK, Slo1, or KCa1.1) channel is highly expressed in UBSM and is arguably the most important physiologically relevant K(+) channel that regulates UBSM function. Its significance arises from the fact that the BK channel is the only K(+) channel that is activated by increases in both voltage and intracellular Ca(2+). The BK channels control UBSM excitability and contractility by maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping the repolarization phase of the spontaneous action potentials that determine UBSM spontaneous rhythmic contractility. In UBSM, these channels have complex regulatory mechanisms involving integrated intracellular Ca(2+) signals, protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and close functional interactions with muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors. BK channel dysfunction is implicated in some forms of bladder pathologies, such as detrusor overactivity, and related overactive bladder. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the functional role of UBSM BK channels under normal and pathophysiological conditions and provides new insight toward the BK channels as targets for pharmacological or genetic control of UBSM function. Modulation of UBSM BK channels can occur by directly or indirectly targeting their regulatory mechanisms, which has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches for bladder dysfunction, such as overactive bladder and detrusor underactivity.

  8. Time-dependent aldosterone metabolism in toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Brem, A.S.; Pacholski, M.; Morris, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) metabolism was examined in the toad bladder. Bladders were incubated with (/sup 3/H)aldosterone (10(-7) M) for 5 h, 1 h, or 10 min. Tissues were analyzed for metabolites using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). In separate experiments, Na+ transport was assessed by the short-circuit current (SCC) technique. Following a 5-h tissue incubation, about 25% of the (/sup 3/H)-aldosterone was converted into metabolites including a polar monosulfate metabolite, 20 beta-dihydroaldo (20 beta-DHAldo), small quantities of 5 beta-reduced products, and a variety of 5 alpha-reduced Aldo products including 5 alpha-DHAldo, 3 alpha,5 alpha-tetrahydroaldo (3 alpha,5 alpha-THAldo), and 3 beta,5 alpha-THAldo. Tissues metabolized approximately 10% of the labeled hormone into the same compounds by 1 h. Measurable quantities of these metabolites were also synthesized by bladders exposed to Aldo for only 10 min and then incubated in buffer for an additional 50 min without Aldo. Bladders pretreated with the spironolactone, K+-canrenoate (3.5 X 10(-4) M), and stimulated with Aldo (10(-7) M) generated a peak SCC 44 +/- 6% of that observed in matched pairs stimulated with Aldo (P less than 0.001; n = 6). K+-canrenoate also markedly diminished (/sup 3/H)aldosterone metabolism at both 5 and 1 h. Thus, metabolic transformation of Aldo begins prior to hormone-induced increases in Na+ transport. Both the generation of certain metabolites (e.g., 5 alpha-reductase pathway products) and the increase in Na+ transport can be selectively inhibited by K+-canrenoate.

  9. Myogenic bladder defects in mouse models of human oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Shao, Qing; Barr, Kevin; Simek, Jamie; Fishman, Glenn I.; Laird, Dale W.

    2015-01-01

    To date, over 65 mutations in the gene encoding Cx43 (connexin43) have been linked to the autosomal-dominant disease ODDD (oculodentodigital dysplasia). A subset of these patients experience bladder incontinence which could be due to underlying neurogenic deterioration or aberrant myogenic regulation. BSMCs (bladder smooth muscle cells) from wild-type and two Cx43 mutant lines (Cx43G60S and Cx43I130T) that mimic ODDD exhibit a significant reduction in total Cx43. Dye transfer studies revealed that the G60S mutant was a potent dominant-negative inhibitor of co-expressed Cx43, a property not equally shared by the I130T mutant. BSMCs from both mutant mouse strains were defective in their ability to contract, which is indicative of phenotype changes due to harbouring the Cx43 mutants. Upon stretching, Cx43 levels were significantly elevated in controls and mutants containing BSMCs, but the non-muscle myosin heavy chain A levels were only reduced in cells from control mice. Although the Cx43G60S mutant mice showed no difference in voided urine volume or frequency, the Cx43I130T mice voided less frequently. Thus, similar to the diversity of morbidities seen in ODDD patients, genetically modified mice also display mutation-specific changes in bladder function. Furthermore, although mutant mice have compromised smooth muscle contraction and response to stretch, overriding bladder defects in Cx43I130T mice are likely to be complemented by neurogenic changes. PMID:24228978

  10. Flavonoid galangin prevents smooth muscle fatigue of pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dambros, Miriam; de Jongh, Rik; van Koeveringe, Gommert A; Bast, Aalt; Heijnen, C G M; van Kerrebroeck, Philip E V

    2005-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that the generation of free radicals plays a role in the development of bladder dysfunction. Flavonoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds with broad pharmacological activity. In the present study, the protective effects of the flavonoid galangin on the progressive decrease of bladder smooth muscle contractile responses during repetitive field stimulation (RFS; a model for muscular fatigue) were demonstrated. Pig detrusor strips were mounted for tension recording in organ baths aand were subjected to RFS for 90 min at 32 Hz for 15 s every 5 min. The strips were then washed four times with fresh buffer and allowed a period of recovery for 90 min. The 90 min of RFS caused a progressive decrease in maximal contractile response to electrical field stimulation and to muscarinic agonist-induced contractions (34% and 46% decrease, respectively). Galangin (10(-7) M) prevented the decrease in contractile smooth muscle response of strips to electrical field stimulation during RFS compared with untreated tissues. The antioxidant activity of galangin was assessed by measuring its ability to inhibit the lipid peroxidation induced by iron and ascorbate in rat liver microsomes (IC50 1.7+0.12x10(-6) M). If the data are confirmed in-vivo, exogenously administered galangin may be a new approach in the prevention and/or treatment of bladder dysfunction.

  11. Experimental Reconstruction of the Trachea with Urinary Bladder Wall

    PubMed Central

    Hirayasu, Tsuneo; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Uehara, Kanou; Kinjo, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate tracheal reconstruction with autologous bladder wall using modern refined surgical procedures. Methods: Experiments were performed on 16 female beagle dogs. Six tracheal cartilages were resected to create a tracheal deficit, then tracheal replacement with autologous bladder wall was performed. In the first 10 dogs (first series), the transplant site was covered with pedicled omental flap. In the next six dogs (second series), we performed tracheal reconstruction without omental covering, and secured tracheal cartilages above and below the graft with sutures to prevent excessive graft stretching. Results: No surgical mortality or lethal infection of the transplant site was encountered in either series. Complications in the first series comprised tracheal stenosis in four dogs. One dog died suddenly at 4 months postoperatively due to stent migration, so cartilage sutures were adopted in the second series. The lumen surface of the grafts was covered with squamous metaplastic epithelium. Osseous tissue was present in the submucosa of grafts, particularly prominently in areas lacking omental covering. Conclusions: Tracheal reconstruction using bladder wall may become clinically useful. A pedicled omental covering does not appear always necessary to prevent graft necrosis and infection. Ischemic stimulation may be involved with bone formation in grafts. PMID:27009558

  12. Stimulation of urinary acidification by insulin in the turtle bladder.

    PubMed

    Arruda, J A

    1983-07-01

    Addition of insulin to the substrate-containing serosal solution of freshly excised bladders or to that of bladders incubated overnight in substrate-enriched media increases the rate of H+ secretion to a greater extent in the latter (overnight group) than in the former. This effect can be blocked by pretreatment with anti-insulin antibody, suggesting that the stimulation of H+ secretion is a specific effect of insulin. The effect of insulin is concentration dependent with half-maximal stimulation of H+ secretion at 100 mU/ml and maximal stimulation at 250 mU/ml. Other characteristics of the insulin-induced stimulation of H+ secretion were its independence of any effect of Na transport and its absolute requirement for the presence of substrate (glucose or pyruvate) under aerobic conditions only. The proton-secreting action of insulin is associated with an increase in the proton-selective conductance in series with the proton pump while the estimated electromotive force of the proton pump remains constant. Finally, the insulin-induced and aldosterone-induced stimulations of proton secretion are mutually independent, as shown by the additivity of these events and by the fact that the effect of insulin was not blocked by pretreatment with cycloheximide. These data suggest that endogenous insulin modulates the rate of H+ secretion by the in vivo turtle bladder.

  13. The Relationship between Acidic Urinary pH and Overactive Bladder; Alkalization of Urine Improves the Symptoms of Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, Arif; Sarici, Hasmet; Kilinc, M Fatih; Telli, Onur; Ozgur, Berat Cem; Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Bozkurt, Selen

    2015-01-01

    To determine association between urine pH and OAB symptoms and to determine if urinary alkalization improves overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. 659 patients with OAB were enrolled in this study between June 2012 and May 2014. 329 patients (group 1) were included in the final analysis. 201 adults were used as a control group (group 2). 24-hour urinary pH and the validated Turkish version of the OAB-V8 questionnaire were performed in patients. A 24-hour urine pH <6.2 was considered acidic urine. In the second part, a diet program was performed for 4 weeks in 30 participants. Urine pH values and OAB-V8 scoring results were recorded before the diet program and 2 and 4 weeks after the diet program. Acidic urinary pH was determined in 61.4% of patients with OAB. There was a significant association between the presence of acidic urine and OAB. Also, the OAB-V8 scores of patients were significantly higher in patients with acidic urine than nonacidic urine. OAB-V8 scores of patients showed statistically significant improvement after diet therapy (17.87 ± 6.52 vs. 10.43 ± 7.17; p < 0.001). We found that acidic urinary pH was closely associated with OAB, and alkalization of urine improved lower urinary tract symptoms. We suggest that urinary pH should be considered as a parameter in treatment planning of patients with OAB. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Primary fibrosarcoma of the urinary bladder in a cat: follow-up after incomplete surgical excision.

    PubMed

    Greci, Valentina; Rocchi, Paola M; Sontuoso, Antonio F; Olivero, Daniela; Capasso, Angelo; Raiano, Vera

    2017-01-01

    An 11-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented with haematuria of 2 months' duration followed by pollakiuria and stranguria. A firm, non-painful mass in the urinary bladder was palpated. Abdominal radiographs and ultrasound were suggestive of a urinary neoplasia. During explorative laparotomy, a partial cystectomy and surgical debulking were performed. Histopathology and immunostaining were consistent with a fibrosarcoma. The cat was discharged 10 days after surgery with a residual mass of about 1.8 cm on ultrasound re-examination. The cat was not given adjuvant therapy. The cat was euthanased 8 months after surgery because of tumour invasion of the urinary trigone and subsequent ureter dilation, hydronephrosis and severe azotaemia. Malignant urinary fibrosarcoma in this cat appeared to be only locally invasive. Palliative surgery without adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy in this cat resulted in an 8 month period of good quality of life.

  15. A novel excitation-emission wavelength model to facilitate the diagnosis of urinary bladder diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Ilya; Palmer, Scott; Litvinova, Karina; Dremin, Victor; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-02-01

    Diseases of urinary bladder are a common healthcare problem world over. Diagnostic precision and predicting response to treatment are major issues. This study aims to create an optical cross-sectionional model of a bladder, capable of visually representing the passage of photons through the tissue layers. The absorption, transmission and reflectance data, along with the derived transmission coefficients (of scattering and absorption) were obtained from literature analysis and were used in the creation of a "generic" cross-section optical property model simulating the passage of thousands of photons through the tissue at different wavelengths. Fluorescence spectra of diagnostically relevant biomarkers excited by the UV and blue wavelengths were modelled on the basis of the Monte-Carlo method. Further to this, fluorescence data gathered by the "LAKK-M" system from pig bladders was applied to the model for a specific representation of the photon passage through the tissues. The ultimate goal of this study is to employ this model to simulate the effects of different laser wavelength and energy inputs to bladder tissue and to determine the effectiveness of potential photonics based devices for the diagnosis of bladder pathologies. The model will aid in observing differences between healthy and pathological bladder tissues registered by photonics based devices.

  16. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (p<0.05). Micturition contraction amplitude (34.6±4.7mmHg versus 49.6±2.5mmHg), duration (14.5±1.7 seconds versus 23.33±4.6 seconds) and interval (87.5±17.02 seconds versus 281.11±20.24 seconds) were significantly greater in alloxan diabetic rats. Voided urine volume per micturition contraction was also significantly higher in diabetic animals. However the post-voiding residual volume was not statistically different. Bethanechol potency (EC50 3µM versus 5µM) and maximal effect (31.2±5.9g/g versus 36.1±6.8g/g) in isolated bladder strips as well as number (169±4fmol/mg versus 176±3fmol/mg protein) and affinity (0.69±0.1nM versus 0.57±0.1nM) of bladder muscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  17. Metastatic signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A novel management approach to a rare tumour

    PubMed Central

    Pugashetti, Neil; Yap, Stanley A.; Lara, Primo N.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Dall’Era, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the urinary bladder, a variant of adenocarcinoma, is exceedingly rare and as a result no gold standard exists for its management. We report a case of primary SRCC of the bladder with recurrent metastases; we utilized an innovative diagnostic approach and the patient exhibited a treatment response to palliative FOLFOX-6 chemotherapy. PMID:26085880

  18. Metastatic signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A novel management approach to a rare tumour.

    PubMed

    Pugashetti, Neil; Yap, Stanley A; Lara, Primo N; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Dall'Era, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the urinary bladder, a variant of adenocarcinoma, is exceedingly rare and as a result no gold standard exists for its management. We report a case of primary SRCC of the bladder with recurrent metastases; we utilized an innovative diagnostic approach and the patient exhibited a treatment response to palliative FOLFOX-6 chemotherapy.

  19. Role of urinary and cloacal bladders in chelonian water economy: historical and comparative perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, C B

    1998-11-01

    The Parisian comparative anatomist Claude Perrault, dissecting an Indian giant tortoise in 1676, was the first to observe that the urinary bladder is of an extraordinary size in terrestrial tortoises. In 1799, the English comparative physiologist Robert Townson suggested that the bladder functioned as a water reservoir, as he had shown previously for frogs and toads. However, these observations went unnoticed in subsequent reports on tortoise water economy that were made by travellers and naturalists visiting the Galapagos Archipelago and marvelling over the huge numbers of giant tortoises that inhabited these desert-like islands. The first such report was by an American naval officer, David Porter, who was a privateer in the 1812-15 war with England. In his journal he referred to the constant supply of water which the Galapagos tortoises carried with them. References to the location in the body, as well as the amounts and quality of the water stored, were, however, contradictory. The confusion concerning the anatomical identity of the water reservoir in the Galapagos tortoise, Geochelone elephantopus, persisted throughout the nineteenth century, and continued when studies of tortoise water economy and drinking behaviour in arid environments were taken up independently in the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii, which inhabits the desert regions in the south-western United States. In 1881 Cox found large sacs filled with clear water under the carapace, but it was half a century later that these sacs were identified as the large bilobed bladder; references to specific water sacs continued to appear in the literature until the 1960s. Since 1970, information on the water economy of desert tortoises has been obtained from extensive field studies. Rates of disappearance of tritiated water injected into the body have shown that during the drought periods of the summer, water turnover (intake) rates do not differ from the rates of metabolic water production. Under these

  20. Female Functional Constipation Is Associated with Overactive Bladder Symptoms and Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Masuomi; Sakai, Gen; Funakoshi, Shinsuke; Komatsuda, Akari; Ito, Yujiro; Nagata, Hirohiko; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Nakamura, So

    2017-01-01

    This noninterventional cross-sectional study aims to assess the association between functional constipation (FC) and urinary symptoms in female patients with no treatment for urination and defecation. The Rome III criteria for evaluation of defecation, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) for evaluation of urinary symptoms, and clinical features were investigated in 145 female patients. Latent FC and moderate to severe overactive bladder (OAB) were defined on the basis of positivity for two or more of the Rome III criteria and an OABSS ≥ 6 with OABSS Q3 ≥ 2, respectively. In 60 latent FC patients, the OABSS was higher (5.0 versus 3.2, p = 0.001), and concurrent moderate to severe OAB symptoms and OAB with urinary incontinence were more frequent than those in 85 nonlatent FC patients (33.3 versus 10.6%, p = 0.001, and 31.7 versus 7.1%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that moderate to severe OAB symptoms were a significant associated factor of latent FC (odds ratio (OR) = 4.125, p = 0.005), while latent FC was the only associated factor of moderate to severe OAB and OAB with urinary incontinence (OR = 4.227, p = 0.005 and OR = 4.753, p = 0.004). In conclusion, moderate to severe OAB symptoms are correlated with FC. Moreover, FC is related to moderate to severe OAB symptoms and to OAB with urinary incontinence. PMID:28337444

  1. Errors in the ultrasound diagnosis of the kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Andrzej Paweł; Woźniak, Magdalena Maria; Tyloch, Janusz F

    2013-09-01

    The article presents the most frequent errors made in the ultrasound diagnosis of the urinary system. They usually result from improper technique of ultrasound examination or its erroneous interpretation. Such errors are frequent effects of insufficient experience of the ultrasonographer, inadequate class of the scanner, insufficient knowledge of its operation as well as of wrong preparation of patients, their constitution, severe condition and the lack of cooperation during the examination. The reasons for misinterpretations of ultrasound images of the urinary system may lie in a large polymorphism of the kidney (defects and developmental variants) and may result from improper access to the organ as well as from the presence of artefacts. Errors may also result from the lack of knowledge concerning clinical and laboratory data. Moreover, mistakes in ultrasound diagnosis of the urinary system are frequently related to the lack of knowledge of the management algorithms and diagnostic possibilities of other imaging modalities. The paper lists errors in ultrasound diagnosis of the urinary system divided into: errors resulting from improper technique of examination, artefacts caused by incorrect preparation of patients for the examination or their constitution and errors resulting from misinterpretation of ultrasound images of the kidneys (such as their number, size, fluid spaces, pathological lesions and others), ureters and urinary bladder. Each physician performing kidney or bladder ultrasound examination should possess the knowledge of the most frequent errors and their causes which might help to avoid them.

  2. Scientific basis for learning transfer from movements to urinary bladder functions for bladder repair in human patients with CNS injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    Coordination Dynamics Therapy (CDT) has been shown to be able to partly repair CNS injury. The repair is based on a movement-based re-learning theory which requires at least three levels of description: the movement or pattern (and anamnesis) level, the collective variable level, and the neuron level. Upon CDT not only the actually performed movement pattern itself is repaired, but the entire dynamics of CNS organization is improved, which is the theoretical basis for (re-) learning transfer. The transfer of learning for repair from jumping on springboard and exercising on a special CDT and recording device to urinary bladder functions is investigated at the neuron level. At the movement or pattern level, the improvement of central nervous system (CNS) functioning in human patients can be seen (or partly measured) by the improvement of the performance of the pattern. At the collective variable level, coordination tendencies can be measured by the so-called 'coordination dynamics' before, during and after treatment. At the neuron level, re-learning can additionally be assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) as alterations of single motor unit firings and motor programs. But to express the ongoing interaction between the numerous neural, muscular, and metabolic elements involved in perception and action, it is relevant to inquire how the individual afferent and efferent neurons adjust their phase and frequency coordination to other neurons to satisfy learning task requirements. With the single-nerve fibre action potential recording method it was possible to measure that distributed single neurons communicate by phase and frequency coordination. It is shown that this timed firing of neurons is getting impaired upon injury and has to be improved by learning The stability of phase and frequency coordination among afferent and efferent neuron firings can be related to pattern stability. The stability of phase and frequency coordination at the neuron level can

  3. Effect of the flavonoid galangin on urinary bladder rat contractility in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Raffaele; Tavares, Ignatius A

    2002-08-01

    Galangin is a flavanol with several biological activities. We have evaluated the effect of galangin on the contractile response elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the rat isolated urinary bladder. Galangin (10(-8)-10(-4) M) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the EFS contractile response without modifying the contractions produced by exogenous acetylcholine (10(-6) M). Blockade of adrenergic and cholinergic nerves with a combination of atropine (10(-6) M), phentolamine (10(-6) M) and propranolol (10(-6) M) or blockade of tachykinin NK1 and NK2 receptors with SR140333 (10(-7) M) and SR48968 (10(-6) M) did not modify the inhibitory effect of galangin. However, verapamil (10(-7) M) significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of galangin. It is concluded that the galangin inhibits EFS-induced contractions of the rat urinary bladder by acting on L-type calcium channels on presynaptic nerves.

  4. The use of urinary bladder matrix in the treatment of trauma and combat casualty wound care.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Ian L; Campbell, Paul; Sabino, Jennifer; Dearth, Christopher L; Fleming, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of combat injuries and resulting wounds can be difficult to treat due to compromised and evolving tissue necrosis, environmental contaminants, multidrug resistant microbacterial and/or fungal infections, coupled with microvascular damage and/or hypovascularized exposed vital structures. Our group has developed surgical care algorithms with identifiable salvage techniques to achieve stable, definitive wound coverage often with the aid of certain regenerative medicine biologic scaffold materials and advanced wound care to facilitate tissue coverage and healing. This case series reports on the role of urinary bladder matrix scaffolds in the wound care and reconstruction of traumatic and combat wounds. Urinary bladder matrix was found to facilitate definitive soft tissue reconstruction by establishing a neovascularized soft tissue base acceptable for second stage wound and skin coverage options within traumatic and combat-related wounds.

  5. Histology of the kidney and urinary bladder of Siphonops annulatus (Amphibia-Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, E T; Junqueira, L C

    1999-03-01

    The histology of the kidney and urinary bladder of Siphonops annulatus was studied by light microscopy in semithin sections of tissue embedded in hydrophilic resin. The kidney's nephron comprises the renal corpuscle, neck segment, proximal tubule, intermediate segment, distal tubule and collecting tubule. Nephrostomes are present. This structure, the neck segment, and intermediate tubules present long cilia, and probably play important roles in the propulsion of the peritoneal fluid and glomerular filtrate. The proximal tubule cells possess loosely packed microvilli and contain abundant polymorphic granules and vesicles that assume the aspect of lysosomes in different stages of intracellular digestion. The distal tubules are characterized by large, vertically disposed mitochondria assuming the aspect of ions transporting cells. The urinary bladder is lined with a transitional epithelium, whose aspect varies according to the quantity of urine.

  6. Uric acid stones in the urinary bladder of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Ryan; Inzunza, Jose; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice raised in the laboratory of Fujii-Kuriyama have been under investigation for several years because of the presence in their urinary bladder of large, yellowish stones. The stones are composed of uric acid and become apparent in the bladders as tiny stones when mice are 10 wk of age. By the time the mice are 6 mo of age, there are usually two or three stones with diameters of 3–4 mm. The urate concentration in the serum was normal but in the urine the concentration was 40–50 mg/dL, which is 10 times higher than that in the WT littermates. There were no apparent histological pathologies in the kidney or joints and the levels of enzymes involved in elimination of purines were normal. The source of the uric acid was therefore judged to be from degradation of nucleic acids due to a high turnover of cells in the bladder itself. The bladder was fibrotic and the luminal side of the bladder epithelium was filled with eosinophilic granules. There was loss of E-cadherin between some epithelial cells, with an enlarged submucosal area filled with immune cells and sometimes invading epithelial cells. We hypothesize that in the absence of AhR there is loss of detoxifying enzymes, which leads to accumulation of unconjugated cytotoxins and carcinogens in the bladder. The presence of bladder toxins may have led to the increased apoptosis and inflammation as well as invasion of epithelial cells in the bladders of older mice. PMID:22232670

  7. Uric acid stones in the urinary bladder of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ryan; Inzunza, Jose; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2012-01-24

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) knockout mice raised in the laboratory of Fujii-Kuriyama have been under investigation for several years because of the presence in their urinary bladder of large, yellowish stones. The stones are composed of uric acid and become apparent in the bladders as tiny stones when mice are 10 wk of age. By the time the mice are 6 mo of age, there are usually two or three stones with diameters of 3-4 mm. The urate concentration in the serum was normal but in the urine the concentration was 40-50 mg/dL, which is 10 times higher than that in the WT littermates. There were no apparent histological pathologies in the kidney or joints and the levels of enzymes involved in elimination of purines were normal. The source of the uric acid was therefore judged to be from degradation of nucleic acids due to a high turnover of cells in the bladder itself. The bladder was fibrotic and the luminal side of the bladder epithelium was filled with eosinophilic granules. There was loss of E-cadherin between some epithelial cells, with an enlarged submucosal area filled with immune cells and sometimes invading epithelial cells. We hypothesize that in the absence of AhR there is loss of detoxifying enzymes, which leads to accumulation of unconjugated cytotoxins and carcinogens in the bladder. The presence of bladder toxins may have led to the increased apoptosis and inflammation as well as invasion of epithelial cells in the bladders of older mice.

  8. A novel type of unmyelinated chemosensitive nociceptor in the acutely inflamed urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M

    1988-12-01

    Single primary afferents supplying the cat urinary bladder were electrophysiologically recorded in the sacral dorsal roots. Under normal conditions, afferents were not spontaneously active when the bladder was empty and innocuous increases of intravesical pressure excited mainly thin myelinated, low-threshold mechanoreceptors. Less than 2.5% of all unmyelinated visceral afferents responded to a mechanical stimulus, but all had high, presumably noxious thresholds. During an acute inflammation induced with intravesical injections of 2.5% mustard oil or 50-100% turpentine oil both populations developed resting activity and changed their mechanosensitive properties. Out of the many unmyelinated afferents without appreciable mechanosensitivity, an entirely new subpopulation was activated by chemical irritants during an acute inflammation. Subsequently, some of these chemosensitive receptors started to display new mechanosensitive properties. This novel population of sensory neurones may contribute considerably to the pathogenesis of visceral pain states including reflex disturbances of bladder motility.

  9. An Unusual Complication of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt: Urinary Bladder Stone Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Songtao; Sheng, Weixin; Qiu, Yufa; Wang, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (V-P) shunt surgery is the most common technique used for the treatment of hydrocephalus. The migration of ventriculoperitoneal shunt to the bladder is rare. Only two cases have been previously reported in the literature. We report on a 38-year-old male who had hydrocephalus and V-P shunt for 12 years. Two years ago, he found himself with recurrent urinary tract infections, haematuria and urges incontinence, and then he was diagnosed with bladder perforation and merge stones. The patient had an abdominal operation to cut off and take out the shunt catheter, as well as a transurethral holmium laser lithotripsy. Bladder perforation and stones are rare examples of complications in V-P surgical procedures. Controlling the effective length of the terminal V-P shunt and modifying it appropriately can effectively reduce these complications.

  10. Smooth muscle in the wall of the developing human urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A

    1983-01-01

    A series of human fetal and neonatal specimens ranging in age from the second month of intrauterine development to 4 1/2 years after birth has been examined using histological and histochemical techniques. In both sexes histologically differentiated smooth muscle cells were evident in the bladder wall from the 52 mm crown-rump length stage onwards--urethral smooth muscle was not distinguishable until 119 mm crown-rump length. In addition to relatively late differentiation, urethral smooth muscle was histochemically distinct from the urinary bladder detrusor muscle. Sex differences in the arrangement and innervation of smooth muscle in the proximal urethra have also been observed, and these findings lend support to the presence of a pre-prostatic urethra sphincter. It seems likely that this sphincter acts principally to prevent reflux of ejaculate into the bladder during seminal emission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6654742

  11. Guinea worm infection of urinary bladder manifesting as obstructive uropathy in rural Maharashtra.

    PubMed

    Birare, Shivaji D; Kamble, M H; Lanjewar, D N; Parija, S C; Girji, D D; Kulkarni, P V; Gupta, Rashmi S; Abdul Jabbar, A M

    2005-10-01

    Guinea worm or Dracunculus medinensis is a well-documented helminthic infestation in many areas of Asia. In this report, we describe a rare case of guinea worm infestation in a 25-year-old woman who had developed symptoms of obstructive uropathy, in whom fragments of guinea worm were removed after urethral catheterization. To the best of our knowledge, adult guinea worm occurring in the urinary bladder has not been previously described.

  12. Cystogram with dumbbell shaped urinary bladder in a sliding inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Mahadevappa, Basant; Suresh, Sumanth Channapatna; Natarajan, K; Thomas, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Sliding inguinal hernias present with various symptoms and these are usually direct inguinal hernias containing various abdominal viscera. Case reports and series have been published with various organs and rare organs being part of the hernia. Urinary bladder is a known content of sliding hernias. This case report emphasizes this aspect in a picturesque manner and the importance of radiological investigations for pre-surgical evaluation.

  13. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-03-01

    Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (p<0.001). The expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA in BC patients was also significantly higher than that in noncancer patient controls and hematuria patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). High expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA was also detected in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC.

  14. Dual effect of GABA on the contractile activity of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Santicioli, P; Meli, A

    1985-06-01

    The effects of GABA and related substances were examined in isolated detrusor strips from the dome of the guinea-pig urinary bladder. GABA (0.01-1 mM) produced concentration-related phasic contractions of isolated strips from the guinea-pig urinary bladder dome. This effect of GABA was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol, selective GABAA receptor agonists but not by (+/-)-baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist. A specific cross desensitization was observed between GABA, homotaurine and muscimol but not between (+/-)-baclofen and GABA. GABA (1 mM)-induced contractions were antagonized by picrotoxin, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist. GABA-induced contractions were almost abolished by tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM, TTX) thus indicating their neurogenic origin. In addition GABA-induced contractions were partially antagonized by atropine (to about the same extent as those produced by dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP), a ganglionic stimulant), but were unaffected by hexamethonium (10 microM), phentolamine (0.2 microM) or indomethacin (5 microM). In the presence of GABA the contractile effect of both DMPP (TTX-sensitive) and acetylcholine (ACh, TTX-insensitive) were significantly reduced. Similar findings were obtained with DMPP, i.e. in preparations exposed to this ganglionic stimulant both GABA- and ACh-induced contractions were depressed. Homotaurine but not (+/-)-baclofen mimicked the depressant effect of GABA on DMPP-induced contractions. The depressant effect of GABA on ACh-induced contractions of the guinea-pig urinary bladder was neurogenic in origin, i.e., was not observed in preparations exposed to TTX. These experiments indicate that GABA has a dual effect on the contractile behaviour of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder. Recently it has been proposed that endogenous GABA plays a neuromodulatory role in this organ. Our data suggest that in the early phase of neurogenic activation of detrusor muscle (micturition reflex) GABA might transiently

  15. Developing urinary metabolomic signatures as early bladder cancer diagnostic markers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Sun, Zeyu; Chen, Deying; Su, Xiaoling; Jiang, Jing; Li, Gonghui; Lin, Biaoyang; Yan, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Early detection is vital to improve the overall survival rate of bladder cancer (BCa) patients, yet there is a lack of a reliable urine-based assay for early detection of BCa. Urine metabolites represented a potential rich source of biomarkers for BCa. This study aimed to develop a metabolomics approach for high coverage discovery and identification of metabolites in urine samples. Urine samples from 23 early stage BCa patients and 21 healthy volunteers with minimum sample preparations were analyzed by a short 30 min UPLC-HRMS method. We detected and quantified over 9000 unique UPLC-HRMS features, which is more than four times than about 2000 features detected in previous urine metabolomic studies. Furthermore, multivariate OPLS-DA classification models were established to differentiate urine samples from bladder cancer cohort and normal health cohort. We identified three BCa-upregulated metabolites: nicotinuric acid, trehalose, AspAspGlyTrp, and three BCa-downregulated metabolites: inosinic acid, ureidosuccinic acid, GlyCysAlaLys. Finally, analysis of six post-surgery BCa urine samples showed that these BCa-metabolomic features reverted to normal state after tumor removal, suggesting that they reflected metabolomic features associated with BCa. ROC analyses using two linear regression models to combine the identified markers showed a high diagnostic performance for detecting BCa with AUC (area under the ROC curve) values of 0.919 to 0.934. In summary, we developed a high coverage metabolomic approach that has potential for biomarker discovery in cancers.

  16. Malignant lymphoma of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathological study of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bates, A; Norton, A; Baithun, S

    2000-01-01

    Aim—To report the clinical and histological features and outcome of primary and secondary malignant lymphomas of the urinary bladder. Methods—Eleven cases of malignant lymphoma of the urinary bladder were obtained from the registry of cases at St Bartholomews and the Royal London Hospitals. The lymphomas were classified on the basis of their morphology and immunophenotype, and the clinical records were reviewed. Results—There were six primary lymphomas: three extranodal marginal zone lymphomas of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type and three diffuse large B cell lymphomas. Of the five secondary cases, four were diffuse large B cell lymphomas, one secondary to a systemic follicular follicle centre lymphoma, and one nodular sclerosis Hodgkins disease. Four patients with secondary lymphoma for whom follow up was available had died of disease within 13 months of diagnosis. Primary lymphomas followed a more indolent course. In one case, there was evidence of transformation from low grade MALT-type to diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The most common presenting symptom was haematuria. Cystoscopic appearances were of solid, sometimes necrotic tumours resembling transitional cell carcinoma, and in one case the tumours were multiple. These cases represented 0.2% of all bladder neoplasms. Conclusions—Diffuse large B cell lymphoma and MALT-type lymphoma are the most common primary malignant lymphomas of the bladder. Lymphoepithelial lesions in MALT-type lymphoma involve transitional epithelium, and their presence in high grade lymphoma suggests a primary origin owing to transformation of low grade MALT-type lymphoma. Primary and secondary diffuse large B cell lymphomas of the bladder are histologically similar, but the prognosis of the former is favourable. Key Words: bladder • lymphoma • mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma PMID:10911804

  17. Comparative biochemical responses and antioxidant activities of the rabbit urinary bladder to whole grapes versus resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Francis, Johdi-Ann; Leggett, Robert E; Schuler, Catherine; Levin, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the antioxidant activity of a whole-grape suspension with the antioxidant activity or pure resveratrol on the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on malondialdehyde (MDA) generation, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity, calcium ATPase activity, and sarcoendoplasmic reticular ATPase (SERCA) of the male rabbit urinary bladder. MDA was used as a model for the effect of H2O2 on lipid peroxidation. ChAT, SERCA, and calcium ATPase were evaluated based on their importance in urinary bladder physiology and pathology. Four male rabbit bladders were used. Each bladder was separated into muscle and mucosa, frozen under liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C for biochemical evaluation. The effect of H2O2 on the enzymes listed above was determined in the presence and absence of either resveratrol or a whole-grape suspension. (1) Resveratrol was significantly more effective than the grape suspension at protecting the bladder muscle and mucosa against peroxidation as quantitated by MDA formation. (2) The grape suspension was significantly more effective at protecting ChAT activity against oxidative stress of the muscle than resveratrol. (3) Neither the grape suspension nor resveratrol were particularly effective at protecting the bladder muscle or mucosa calcium ATPase or SERCA against oxidative stress. (4) ChAT was significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress than either calcium ATPase or SERCA. These data support the idea that the grape suspension protects the mitochondria and nerve terminals to a significantly greater degree than resveratrol which suggests that the activities of the grape suspension are due to the combination of active components found in the grape suspension and not just resveratrol alone.

  18. Chronic psychological stress enhances nociceptive processing in the urinary bladder in high-anxiety rats.

    PubMed

    Robbins, M T; DeBerry, J; Ness, T J

    2007-08-15

    This study sought to determine whether acute and/or chronic psychological stress produce changes in urinary bladder nociception. Female Sprague-Dawley (SD; low/moderate anxiety) or Wistar-Kyoto (WK; high-anxiety) rats were exposed to either an acute (1 day) or a chronic (10 days) water avoidance stress paradigm or a sham stress paradigm. Paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli and fecal pellet output, were quantified at baseline and after the final stress or sham stress exposure. Rats were then sedated, and visceromotor responses (VMRs) to urinary bladder distension (UBD) were recorded. While acute stress exposure did not significantly alter bladder nociceptive responses in either strain of rats, WK rats exposed to a chronic stress paradigm exhibited enhanced responses to UBD. These high-anxiety rats also exhibited somatic analgesia following acute, but not chronic, stress. Furthermore, WK rats had greater fecal pellet output than SD rats when stressed. Significant stress-induced changes in nociceptive responses to mechanical stimuli were observed in SD rats. That chronic psychological stress significantly enhanced bladder nociceptive responses only in high-anxiety rats provides further support for a critical role of genetics, stress and anxiety as exacerbating factors in painful urogenital disorders such as interstitial cystitis (IC).

  19. Polyomavirus (BK)-associated pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Borislav A; Papadimitriou, John C; Chai, Toby C; Ramos, Emilio; Staats, Paul N; Drachenberg, Cinthia B

    2013-04-01

    This report describes the morphological features of a pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with focal trophoblastic differentiation of the urinary bladder in a male, 12 years post living related donor renal transplant. The voided urine cytology demonstrated rare decoy cells admixed with markedly atypical urothelial cell clusters, papillae and giant cells. Cystoprostatectomy demonstrated a nodular mass involving the trigone and right lateral-posterior wall, adjacent to the ureteral orifice. Hematoxylin-eosin stained sections showed two synchronous malignancies: (a) pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with focal trophoblastic differentiation of the urinary bladder, metastatic to the omentum and (b) prostatic adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 3+4=7, involving the right prostate lobe. Strong diffuse expression of polyomavirus large T antigen was demonstrated in the primary and metastatic pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma, supporting a possible role for polyomavirus (BK) in the oncogenetic pathway. The prostatic adenocarcinoma was negative for polyomavirus large T antigen. Our findings of p63, CK7 and CK903 expression in pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma suggest that the tumor is of urothelial derivation. This is the first report describing the morphological features of urinary bladder pleomorphic giant cell carcinoma with trophoblastic differentiation, positive for polyomavirus large T antigen, arising in the background of BKV reactivation.

  20. Mucoadhesion on urinary bladder mucosa: the influence of sodium, calcium, and magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    Kos, M Kerec; Bogataj, M; Mrhar, A

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to establish if different cations present in the lumen of the urinary bladder at the time of application affect the mucoadhesion strength of cationic chitosan, anionic sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC), and nonionic hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC). The mucoadhesion strength of polymeric films was determined on pig urinary bladder mucosa. Sodium, calcium, and magnesium ions decreased the mucoadhesion strength of all three polymers except NaCMC, whose detachment forces were not influenced by the presence of sodium. Lower mucoadhesion strength in the presence of cations should be considered when drug delivery systems, for example microspheres, containing the tested mucoadhesive polymers are applied intravesically. In the majority of the experiments, cations decreased the mucoadhesion strength of the polymers already in concentrations normally present in urine. For stronger mucoadhesion, application of microspheres into the empty urinary bladder would be recommended. Additionally, the mucoadhesion properties of the tested polymers could be controlled by the selection of a proper medium for the suspension of microspheres. Namely, for all three polymers bivalent calcium and magnesium had stronger influence on mucoadhesion compared to univalent sodium, and with increasing concentrations of cations mucoadhesion strength of the polymers decreased.

  1. Synergistic Effect between Cisplatin and Sunitinib Malate on Human Urinary Bladder-Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Arantes-Rodrigues, Regina; Pinto-Leite, Rosário; Fidalgo-Gonçalves, Lio; Palmeira, Carlos; Santos, Lúcio; Colaço, Aura; Oliveira, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse sunitinib malate in vitro ability to enhance cisplatin cytotoxicity in T24, 5637, and HT1376 human urinary bladder-cancer cell lines. Cells were treated with cisplatin (3, 6, 13, and 18 μM) and sunitinib malate (1, 2, 4, 6, and 20 μM), either in isolation or combined, over the course of 72 hours. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, acridine orange, and monodansylcadaverine staining and flow cytometry were performed. The combination index (CI) was calculated based on the Chou and Talalay method. In isolation, cisplatin and sunitinib malate statistically (P < 0.05) decrease cell viability in all cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, with the presence of autophagic vacuoles. A cell cycle arrest in early S-phase and in G0/G1-phase was also found after exposure to cisplatin and sunitinib malate, in isolation, respectively. Treatment of urinary bladder-cancer cells with a combination of cisplatin and sunitinib malate showed a synergistic effect (CI < 1). Autophagy and apoptosis studies showed a greater incidence when the combined treatment was put into use. This hints at the possibility of a new combined therapeutic approach. If confirmed in vivo, this conjugation may provide a means of new perspectives in muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer treatment. PMID:24369536

  2. L-carnitine treatment partially restores urinary bladder function of streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Irat, Ali Murat

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with urinary bladder dysfunction. This study determined whether or not detrusor responses were altered and reversed by L-carnitine treatment in the urinary bladders of diabetic rats. Three groups of animals were used: streptozotocin-treated (45 mg x kg(-1) i.p., 8 weeks), parallel L-carnitine-treated (0.6 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) i.p.), and control rats. Contractile and relaxant responses were measured using isolated bath techniques. Serum glucose levels in diabetic rats were partially reversed after L-carnitine treatment. Detrusor strips from diabetic rats exhibited an increase in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS; 0.5-32 Hz). Treatment with L-carnitine restored the hyperreactivity to EFS-induced contractility. The response to direct activation of the smooth muscle with carbachol and KCl remained unaltered. In relaxation studies, the urinary bladders of diabetic rats displayed a diminished response to isoprenaline, an unchanged response to ATP, and an increased response to adenosine of the ATP metabolite. L-carnitine treatment restored the hyporesponsiveness of isoprenaline and the hyperresponsiveness of adenosine-elicited relaxation. These findings show that carnitine can be implicated in the contractile response of noradrenergic noncholinergic nerve stimulation and the relaxation response of isoprenaline and adenosine. Hence, L-carnitine deficiency can contribute to voiding deficiency in diabetic patients. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Serum periplakin as a potential biomarker for urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Masaomi; Matsumoto, Toshihide; Nagashio, Ryo; Nishimori, Takanori; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Nomura, Fumio; Sato, Yuichi; Kitasato, Hidero; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine serum periplakin expression in patients with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder and in normal controls, and to examine relationships with clinicopathological findings. Detection of serum periplakin was performed in 50 patients and 30 normal controls with anti-periplakin antibodies using the automatic dot blot system, and a micro-dot blot array with a 256 solid-pin system. Levels in patients with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder were significantly lower than those in normal controls (0.31 and 5.68, respectively; p<0.0001). The area under the receiver-operator curve level for urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder was 0.845. The sensitivity and specificity, using a cut-off point of 4.045, were 83.7% and 73.3%, respectively. In addition, serum periplakin levels were significantly higher in patients with muscle-invasive cancer than in those with nonmuscle-invasive cancer (P=0.03). In multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, none of the clinicopathological factors was associated with an increased risk for progression and cancer-specific survival. Examination of the serum periplakin level may play a role as a non- invasive diagnostic modality to aid urine cytology and cystoscopy.

  4. Fish bone migration to the urinary bladder after rectosigmoid colon perforation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Kyung; Lee, Moon-Soo; Han, Hyun-Young; Woo, Seung Hyo

    2014-06-14

    Fish bones are the most common foreign objects leading to bowel perforation. Most cases are confined to the extraluminal space without penetration of an adjacent organ. However, abscess formation due to the perforation of the rectosigmoid colon by a fish bone can lead to the penetration of the urinary bladder and may subsequently cause the fish bone to migrate into the urinary bladder. In the presented case, a 42-year-old female was admitted for lower abdominal pain. The computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a 5 cm pelvic abscess containing a thin and curvilinear foreign body. After conservative management, the patient was discharged. After 1 mo, the subject developed a mechanical ileus. Surgery had to be delayed due to her hyperthyroidism. Migration of the foreign body to the urinary bladder was shown on additional CT. A Yellowish fish bone 3.5 cm in size was removed through intra-operative cystoscopy. The patient was discharged 8 d after the operation without any unexpected event.

  5. Regulation of (/sup 3/H)GABA release from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, J.; Taniyama, K.; Iwai, S.; Tanaka, C.

    1988-12-01

    The presence of receptors that regulate the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was studied in strips of the guinea pig urinary bladder. GABA (10(-8)-10(-5) M) and muscimol (10(-8)-10(-5) M), but not baclofen (10(-5) M), reduced the Ca2+-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant release of (/sup 3/H)GABA evoked by high K+ from the urinary bladder strips preloaded with (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of muscimol was antagonized by bicuculline and potentiated by diazepam, clonazepam, and pentobarbital sodium. The potentiating effect of clonazepam was antagonized by Ro 15-1788. Acetylcholine (ACh) inhibited the high K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of ACh was antagonized by atropine sulfate and pirenzepine but not by hexamethonium. Norepinephrine (NE) inhibited the evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of NE was mimicked by clonidine, but not by phenylephrine, and was antagonized by yohimbine but not by prazosin. These results provide evidence that the release of GABA from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder is regulated via the bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptor, M1-muscarinic, and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors.

  6. Common site of urinary calculi in kidney, ureter and bladder region.

    PubMed

    Chand, R B; Shah, A K; Pant, D K; Paudel, S

    2013-03-01

    Urolithiasis is an ancient disease with global distribution. It refers to stones originating anywhere in the urinary system. Urinary calculi or stones are the most common cause of acute urinary system obstruction. The study was aimed with finding out the common site of urinary calculus in kidney ureter bladder (KUB) region. This was a prospective cross-sectional study conducted from June 2012 to September 2012 at Tribhuvan University, Teaching Hospital, Maharajgunj. A total 240 urolitiasis patients were enrolled for plain KUB examination. Site of urinary calculus was identified by observing KUB film of the subjects under the supervision of radiologist. The data were analyzed prospectively with outcome measures of gender & stone location. Out of 240 patients, 138 were male and 102 were female with male to female ratio of 1.35:1. The age ranged from 9 to 83 years. Out of total 240 patients, 71.9% (187) patients belonged to productive age group (20-60 years). Total number of urinary calculi was 345 in which 208 were found in male patients and 137 were found in female patients. Of total 345 calculi, 237 were renal stones, 47 were ureteric stones, 22 of the stones were found in pelviureteric junction (PUJ), 33 of stones were found in vesicoureteric junction (VUJ), and 6 were in bladder. In conclusion, urinary stone disease is a major public health problem in a developing country like Nepal with male and productive age group predominance. Kidney stones are most common. Distal ureter is the most common site of ureteric stone.

  7. Radiation effects on cellularity, proliferation and EGFR expression in mouse bladder urothelium.

    PubMed

    Jaal, Jana; Dörr, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    This study was designed to determine changes in cell numbers, proliferation (using Ki-67) and EGFR expression in mouse bladder urothelium during the early and late radiation response. Groups of mice were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy and assayed 0-360 days later. Urothelial cells were counted. After immunohistochemistry, the absolute and relative numbers of Ki-67(+) and EGFR(+) cells were analyzed. Radiation exposure resulted in a decrease in total urothelial cell numbers to 49% by day 31, with restoration of cellularity by day 180. In contrast, at day 360, an increase in total cell number (143%) was seen. Slightly increased Ki-67 expression was found at days 120 and 180 after treatment, followed by a pronounced elevation at days 240 and 360. Compared to controls, higher EGFR expression was detected up to day 360 after irradiation. A positive correlation was found between total urothelial cells numbers and Ki-67 as well as EGFR expression. Radiation exposure results in an increased urothelial expression of EGFR that precedes urothelial restoration, indicating a contribution of the EGF/EGFR system to urothelial proliferation and differentiation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of EGFR inhibition on radiation effects in the urinary bladder.

  8. Development of a Long-Term Ascending Urinary Tract Infection Mouse Model for Antibiotic Treatment Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hvidberg, Hanne; Struve, Carsten; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Christensen, Nils; Rasmussen, Søren N.; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2000-01-01

    A model of ascending unobstructed urinary tract infection (UTI) in mice was developed to study the significance of the antibiotic concentration in urine, serum, and kidney tissue for efficacy of treatment of UTI in general and pyelonephritis in particular. Outbred Ssc-CF1 female mice were used throughout the study, and Escherichia coli was used as the pathogen. The virulence of 11 uropathogenic E. coli isolates and 1 nonpathogenic laboratory E. coli strain was examined. Strain C175-94 achieved the highest counts in the kidneys, and this strain was subsequently used as the infecting organism. The model gave reproducible bladder infections, i.e., bacteria were recovered from 22 of 23 control mice after 3 days, and histological examination of kidney tissue showed that of 14 infected kidneys, 7 (50%) showed major histological changes, whereas 3 of 36 uninfected kidneys showed major histological changes (P = 0.018). Once the model was established, the efficacies of different doses of cefuroxime and gentamicin, corresponding to active concentrations in urine only or in urine, serum, and kidney tissue simultaneously, were examined. All cefuroxime doses resulted in significantly lower counts in urine than control treatments, but the dose which produced concentrations of cefuroxime only in urine and not in serum or kidney tissue had no effect on kidney infection. Even low doses of gentamicin (0.05 mg/mouse) resulted in concentrations in renal tissue for prolonged times due to accumulation. All gentamicin doses had a significant effect (compared to the effect of the control treatment) on bacterial counts in urine and kidneys. The antibiotic effect on bacterial counts in bladders was negligible for unknown reasons. Use of the mouse UTI model is feasible for study of the effect of an antibiotic in the urinary system, although the missing antibacterial effect in the bladder needs further evaluation. PMID:10602738

  9. Bladder Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  10. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder complicated by extensive fascitis: the importance of a high index of suspicion.

    PubMed

    Carmon, M; Nissan, A; Pappo, I; Perlberg, S; Seror, D; Haskel, Y

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder is a rare entity. This is, in part, the cause for the low rate of correct preoperative diagnosis, the high rate of delayed diagnosis, morbidity and mortality. We report a case of spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder in an adult patient, complicated by extensive fascitis of the abdominal wall. The stormy course and long hospitalization in the case described are characteristic of patients with spontaneous bladder rupture and warrant a high index of suspicion in order to achieve an early diagnosis.

  11. Giant bladder diverticulum presenting with recurrent acute urinary retention--a rare event in adult patients: case report.

    PubMed

    Petito, Luigi; Lurati, Massimo; Verbo, Alessandro; Manno, Alberto; Pedretti, Giorgio; Coco, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Acquired giant bladder diverticula of obstructive genesis are not particularly unusual. On the other hand, acute urinary retention due to bladder diverticula is an extremely rare event in adult patients, since most cases are paediatric. A 40-year-old white male with a history of invasive urological procedures presented with recurrent acute urinary retention. Diagnostic procedures including cystourethrography and cystoscopy revealed a giant bladder diverticulum causing ab extrinseco compression of the urethra. The iatrogenic aetiology of the vicious circle of chronic urethral obstruction and increased luminal pressure promoting diverticular growth is discussed.

  12. Energy dependence of urinary bicarbonate secretion in turtle bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J A; Himmelstein, S; Steinmetz, P R

    1975-01-01

    Addition of HCO3- to the serosal side (S) of the isolated turtle bladder results in a HCO3- flow from S to the mucosal side (M) which markedly reduces the net rate of acid secretion. To characterize the driving forces for this downhill HCO3- flow, the effects of metabolic inhibitors and substrates were examined. In short-circuited bladders with the M pH lowered to the point of zero net H+ secretion, the rate of HCO3- entry into M in response to a 20-mM HCO3- gradient was measured by pH stat titration. Deoxygenation reduced the HCO3- flux from 1.24 plus or minus 0.1 mum/h/8 cm2 (SEM) to 0.50 plus or minus 0.1 muM/h with glucose (2 times 10-3 M) AND FROM 1.32 PLUS OR MINUS TO 0.47 PLUS OR MINUS 0.1 MUM/h without glucose. A similar reduction (61 per cent) was observed in the presence of 1 per cent C92. Dinitrophenol (10-4 M), cyanide (10-3 M), and deoxyglucose (10-2 M) inhibited the HCO3- flux by 39 per cent, 37 per cent, and 38 per cent, respectively. The combination of any of these inhibitors with N2 caused the same inhibition as N2 alone. In bladders depleted of substrate, pyruvate (5 times 10-3 M) increased the HCO3- flux from 0.36 plus or minus 0.05 to 0.58 plus or minus 0.01 muM/h (P smaller than 0.005); the increment was abolished by deoxygenation. The results indicate that the bulk of the downhill HCO3- flow in this system is dependent on metabolic energy derived primarily from oxidative sources, and that this energy-dependent flow approximates the electroneutral component of HCO3- secretion that is coupled to Cl- absorption. PMID:235565

  13. Placenta previa percreta with urinary bladder and ureter invasion.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, E; Tan, O; Kurtaran, V; Dilbaz, B; Haberal, A

    2003-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman, with one previous cesarean delivery and two uterine curettage due to incomplete abortion, was admitted to the labor ward with the diagnosis of partial placenta previa at 35 weeks of gestation. Repeat cesarean section was performed due to profuse vaginal bleeding. Placenta previa percreta invading the bladder trigone was confirmed with cystotomy. As bilateral hypogastric artery ligation and supracervical hysterectomy performed were not successful in stopping the profuse bleeding, the abdomen was packed with laparotomy pads. Dilatation of the left ureter was noticed on the second postoperative day. Relaparotomy was performed to remove the pads, and placental invasion of the distal left ureter was noticed. Ureteroneocystostomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the double-J-catheter was removed two months later.

  14. Ultrastructural diagnostic markers of the urinary bladder precancer.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, A M

    1989-03-01

    A morphological analysis of 346 biopsy specimens from 140 patients with chronic cystitis permits one to evaluate the proliferative forms of the disease, the cases with atypical hyperplasia of the urothelium or metaplasia of the squamous cells with acanthosis and hyperkeratosis of the group at risk, belonging to bladder precancer. The early ultrastructural signs of urothelial atypia are determined, among them the thickening of the glycocalyx layer (up to 30-60 nm) irregularly covering the entire surface of atypical cells, the disappearance of vesicular apparatus and AUM, the widening of the intercellular spaces. It was found that the squamous epithelium, formed by atypical cytodifferentiation of urothelium, is inadequate for performing the barrier function inherent in normal urothelium.

  15. Urinary Biomarkers for Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Roger; Gore, John L; Buckley, David; Fu, Rongwei; Gustafson, Katie; Griffin, Jessica C; Grusing, Sara; Selph, Shelley

    2015-12-15

    Urinary biomarkers may be a useful alternative or adjunct to cystoscopy for diagnosis of bladder cancer. To systematically review the evidence on the accuracy of urinary biomarkers for diagnosis of bladder cancer in adults who have signs or symptoms of the disease or are undergoing surveillance for recurrent disease. Ovid MEDLINE (January 1990 through June 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists. 57 studies that evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of quantitative or qualitative nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22), qualitative or quantitative bladder tumor antigen (BTA), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), fluorescent immunohistochemistry (ImmunoCyt [Scimedx]), and Cxbladder (Pacific Edge Diagnostics USA) using cystoscopy and histopathology as the reference standard met inclusion criteria. Case-control studies were excluded. Dual extraction and quality assessment of individual studies. Overall strength of evidence (SOE) was also assessed. Across biomarkers, sensitivities ranged from 0.57 to 0.82 and specificities ranged from 0.74 to 0.88. Positive likelihood ratios ranged from 2.52 to 5.53, and negative likelihood ratios ranged from 0.21 to 0.48 (moderate SOE for quantitative NMP22, qualitative BTA, FISH, and ImmunoCyt; low SOE for others). For some biomarkers, sensitivity was higher for initial diagnosis of bladder cancer than for diagnosis of recurrence. Sensitivity increased with higher tumor stage or grade. Studies that directly compared the accuracy of quantitative NMP22 and qualitative BTA found no differences in diagnostic accuracy (moderate SOE); head-to-head studies of other biomarkers were limited. Urinary biomarkers plus cytologic evaluation were more sensitive than biomarkers alone but missed about 10% of bladder cancer cases. Restricted to English-language studies; no search for studies published only as abstracts; statistical heterogeneity present in most analyses; few

  16. [Physics of materials and female stress urinary continence: New concepts: I) Elasticity under bladder].

    PubMed

    Guerquin, B

    2015-09-01

    Improving the understanding of the adaptation to stress of urinary continence. A transversal analysis between physics of materials and the female anatomy. Laws of physics of the materials and of their viscoelastic behavior are applied to the anatomy of the anterior vaginal wall. The anterior vaginal wall may be divided into two segments of different viscoelastic behavior, the vertical segment below the urethra and the horizontal segment below the bladder. If the urethra gets crushed on the first segment according to the hammock theory, the crushing of the bladder on the second segment is, on the other hand, damped by its important elasticity. The importance of this elasticity evokes an unknown function: damping under the bladder that moderates and delays the increase of intravesical pressure. This damping function below the bladder is increased in the cystocele, which is therefore a continence factor; on the other hand, it is impaired in obesity, which is therefore a factor of SUI. It is necessary to include in the theory of stress continence, the notion of a damping function below the bladder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Trajectories of urinary incontinence in childhood and bladder and bowel symptoms in adolescence: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Jon; Grzeda, Mariusz T; von Gontard, Alexander; Wright, Anne; Joinson, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify different patterns (trajectories) of childhood urinary incontinence and examine which patterns are associated with bladder and bowel symptoms in adolescence. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting General community. Participants The starting sample included 8751 children (4507 men and 4244 women) with parent-reported data on frequency of bedwetting and daytime wetting for at least three of five time points (4½, 5½, 6½, 7½ and 9½ years—hereafter referred to as 4–9 years). Study children provided data on a range of bladder and bowel symptoms at age 14 (data available for 5899 participants). Outcome measures Self-reported bladder and bowel symptoms at 14 years including daytime wetting, bedwetting, nocturia, urgency, frequent urination, low voided volume, voiding postponement, passing hard stools and low stool frequency. Results We extracted 5 trajectories of urinary incontinence from 4 to 9 years using longitudinal latent class analysis: (1) normative development of daytime and night-time bladder control (63.0% of the sample), (2) delayed attainment of bladder control (8.6%), (3) bedwetting alone (no daytime wetting) (15.6%), (4) daytime wetting alone (no bedwetting) (5.8%) and (5) persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting to age 9) (7.0%). The persistent wetting class generally showed the strongest associations with the adolescent bladder and bowel symptoms: OR for bedwetting at 14 years=23.5, 95% CI (15.1 to 36.5), daytime wetting (6.98 (4.50 to 10.8)), nocturia (2.39 (1.79 to 3.20)), urgency (2.10 (1.44 to 3.07)) and passing hard stools (2.64 (1.63 to 4.27)) (reference category=normative development). The association with adolescent bedwetting was weaker for children with bedwetting alone (3.69 (2.21 to 6.17)). Conclusions Trajectories of childhood urinary incontinence are differentially associated with adolescent bladder and bowel symptoms. Children exhibiting persistent bedwetting with daytime wetting had the

  18. TGF-β/MAPK signaling mediates the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on urinary control and interstitial cystitis after urinary bladder transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ya; Song, Ya-Jun; Song, Bo; Huang, Chi-Bing; Ling, Qing; Yu, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the role of the transforming growth factor-β/mitogen activated protein kinase (TGF-β/MAPK) signaling pathway in the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on urinary control and interstitial cystitis in a rat model of urinary bladder transplantation. Methods: A urinary bladder transplantation model was established using Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were assigned to normal (blank control), negative control (phosphate-buffered saline injection), BMSCs (BMSC injection), sp600125 (MAPK inhibitor injection), or protamine sulfate (protamine sulfate injection) groups. Immunohistochemistry, urodynamic testing, hematoxylin-eosin staining, Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and MTT assay were used to assess BMSC growth, the kinetics of bladder urinary excretion, pathological changes in bladder tissue, bladder tissue ultrastructure, the expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and the effects of antiproliferative factor on cell proliferation. Results: Compared with normal, negative control, BMSCs, and sp600125 groups, rats in the PS group exhibited decreased discharge volume, maximal micturition volume, contraction interval, and bladder capacity but increased residual urine volume, bladder pressure, bladder peak pressure, expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and growth inhibition rate. Levels of inflammatory cytokines and the growth inhibition rate were positively correlated with the expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that the TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway mediates the beneficial effects of BMSCs on urinary control and interstitial cystitis. PMID:28386345

  19. Hydrogen sulfide mediates hypoxia-induced relaxation of trout urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Ryan A; Doellman, Meredith M; Head, Sally K; Olson, Kenneth R

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a recently identified gasotransmitter that may mediate hypoxic responses in vascular smooth muscle. H2S also appears to be a signaling molecule in mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle, but its existence and function in non-mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle have not been examined. In the present study we examined H2S production and its physiological effects in urinary bladder from steelhead and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and evaluated the relationship between H2S and hypoxia. H2S was produced by trout bladders, and its production was sensitive to inhibitors of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. H2S produced a dose-dependent relaxation in unstimulated and carbachol pre-contracted bladders and inhibited spontaneous contractions. Bladders pre-contracted with 80 mmol l(-1) KCl were less sensitive to H2S than bladders contracted with either 80 mmol l(-1) KC2H3O2 (KAc) or carbachol, suggesting that some of the H2S effects are mediated through an ion channel. However, H2S relaxation of bladders was not affected by the potassium channel inhibitors, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridine, and glybenclamide, or by chloride channel/exchange inhibitors 4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt, tamoxifen and glybenclamide, or by the presence or absence of extracellular HCO3-. Inhibitors of neuronal mechanisms, tetrodotoxin, strychnine and N-vanillylnonanamide were likewise ineffective. Hypoxia (aeration with N2) also relaxed bladders, was competitive with H2S for relaxation, and it was equally sensitive to KCl, and unaffected by neuronal blockade or the presence of extracellular HCO3-. Inhibitors of H2S synthesis also inhibited hypoxic relaxation. These experiments suggest that H2S is a phylogenetically ancient gasotransmitter in non-mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle and that it serves as an oxygen sensor/transducer, mediating the effects of hypoxia.

  20. Urinary incontinence due to the presence of necrotic adult Schistosoma haematobium parasite in the bladder following travel to Egypt.

    PubMed

    Papoutsoglou, N; Tappe, D; Demmer, P; Kocot, A; Riedmiller, H

    2012-07-01

    A case of seronegative urinary Schistosomiasis is reported in a 68-year-old Caucasian male presenting with urgency of micturition and incontinence several months after bathing in a chlorinated pool of a first class hotel in Egypt. The symptoms were initiated by a necrotic adult Schistosoma haematobium parasite found in the urinary bladder following a cystoscopic examination. The purpose of this report is to describe this probable and uncommon source of Schistosomiasis, to demonstrate that Schistosoma parasites can also be found in the urinary bladder and to emphasize the importance of travel history.

  1. Increased susceptibility of estrogen-induced bladder outlet obstruction in a novel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tam, Neville Ngai-Chung; Zhang, Xiang; Xiao, Hong; Song, Dan; Levin, Linda; Meller, Jarek; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2015-05-01

    Disorders of the prostate and lower urinary tract are common in elderly men. We investigated the role of metallothionein-1 (MT1) in prostate carcinogenesis by generating a prostate-specific, MT1-expressing mouse. Unexpectedly, genomic analyses revealed that a 12.1-kb genomic region harboring several conserved noncoding elements was unintentionally deleted, upstream of the transgene integration site in the mouse, which we named it 12.1ΔMT1. Male 12.1ΔMT1 mice chronically treated with testosterone (T) plus 17β-estradiol (E2) to induce prostate cancer exhibited no evidence of precancerous or cancerous lesions. Instead, most of them exhibited a bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) phenotype not observed in treated wild-type (WT) mice. Thus, we hypothesized that 12.1ΔMT1 is a novel model for studying the hormonal requirement for BOO induction. Adult male 12.1ΔMT1 and WT mice were treated with T, E2, bisphenol A (BPA), T+E2, or T+BPA for up to 6 months. Histologic and immunohistochemical analysis of the prostate, bladder, and urethra were performed. No significant prostate pathologies were observed in WT or 12.1ΔMT1 mice treated with any of the hormone regimens. As expected, prostatic regression occurred in all E2-treated animals (WT and 12.1ΔMT1). Of great interest, despite a small prostate, 100% of E2-treated 12.1ΔMT1 mice, but only 40% of E2-treated WT mice, developed severe BOO (P<0.01). In contrast, T+E2 treatment was less effective than E2 treatment in inducing severe BOO in 12.1ΔMT1 mice (68%, P<0.05) and was completely ineffective in WT animals. Similarly, T, BPA, and T+BPA treatments did not induce BOO in either WT or 12.1ΔMT1 mice. The BOO pathology includes a thinner detrusor wall, narrowing of bladder neck and urethral lumen, and basal cell hyperplasia in the bladder body and urethra. These findings indicate that 12.1ΔMT1 mice exhibit enhanced susceptibility to E2-induced BOO that is independent of prostate enlargement but that is attenuated by the

  2. Unique properties of muscularis mucosae smooth muscle in guinea pig urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Layne, Jeffrey J.; Pearson, Jessica M.; Sarkissian, Hagop; Nelson, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    The muscularis mucosae, a type of smooth muscle located between the urothelium and the urinary bladder detrusor, has been described, although its properties and role in bladder function have not been characterized. Here, using mucosal tissue strips isolated from guinea pig urinary bladders, we identified spontaneous phasic contractions (SPCs) that appear to originate in the muscularis mucosae. This smooth muscle layer exhibited Ca2+ waves and flashes, but localized Ca2+ events (Ca2+ sparks, purinergic receptor-mediated transients) were not detected. Ca2+ flashes, often in bursts, occurred with a frequency (∼5.7/min) similar to that of SPCs (∼4/min), suggesting that SPCs are triggered by bursts of Ca2+ flashes. The force generated by a single mucosal SPC represented the maximal force of the strip, whereas a single detrusor SPC was ∼3% of maximal force of the detrusor strip. Electrical field stimulation (0.5–50 Hz) evoked force transients in isolated detrusor and mucosal strips. Inhibition of cholinergic receptors significantly decreased force in detrusor and mucosal strips (at higher frequencies). Concurrent inhibition of purinergic and cholinergic receptors nearly abolished evoked responses in detrusor and mucosae. Mucosal SPCs were unaffected by blocking small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels with apamin and were unchanged by blocking large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels with iberiotoxin (IbTX), indicating that SK and BK channels play a much smaller role in regulating muscularis mucosae SPCs than they do in regulating detrusor SPCs. Consistent with this, BK channel current density in myocytes from muscularis mucosae was ∼20% of that in detrusor myocytes. These findings indicate that the muscularis mucosae in guinea pig represents a second smooth muscle compartment that is physiologically and pharmacologically distinct from the detrusor and may contribute to the overall contractile properties of the urinary bladder. PMID:21632849

  3. Obesity-initiated metabolic syndrome promotes urinary voiding dysfunction in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiqi; Babcook, Melissa A.; Shukla, Sanjeev; Shankar, Eswar; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Guiming; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Flask, Chris A.; Lu, Lan; Daneshgari, Firouz; MacLennan, Gregory T.; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accumulating evidences suggests that obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) contribute towards lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) through alterations in the phenotype of bladder and prostate gland. Clinical studies indicate a link between MetS and LUTS. Nevertheless, there is lack of suitable animal model(s) which could illustrate an association linking obesity to LUTS. We examined the lower urinary tract function in an obesity-initiated MetS mouse model. METHODS Male C57BL/6N wild-type and obese B6.V-Lepob/J maintained on regular diet for 28 weeks were subjected to the assessment of body weight (BW), body length (BL), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), blood glucose (BG), plasma insulin (INS), plasma leptin (LEP), total cholesterol (CHO), free fatty acid (FFA) and measurement of urinary functions. Whole animal peritoneal and subcutaneous adipose tissue measurements as well as prostate and bladder volumes were analyzed by MRI followed by histological evaluation. These parameters were used to draw correlations between MetS and LUTS. RESULTS Obesity parameters such as BW, WC, and BMI were significantly higher in B6.V-Lepob/J mice compared to C57BL/6N mice (p<0.01). Higher levels of total CHO and FFA were noted in B6.V-Lepob/J mice than C57BL/6N mice (p<0.05). These results were concurrent with frequency, lower average urine volume and other urinary voiding dysfunctions in B6.V-Lepob/J mice. MRI assessments demonstrate marked increase in body fat and prostate volume in these mice. Compared to C57BL/6N mice, histological analysis of the prostate from B6.V-Lepob/J mice showed increased proliferation, gland crowding and infiltration of immune cells in the stroma; whereas the bladder urothelium was slightly thicker and appears more proliferative in these mice. The regression and correlation analysis indicate that peritoneal fat (R=0.853; p<0.02), CHO (R=0.729; p<0.001), BG (R=0.712; p<0.001) and prostate volume (R=0.706; p<0.023) strongly correlate

  4. Correlation of bladder wall thickness and treatment success in types of urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Akselim, Burak; Doğanay, Melike; Özcan, Nilay; Akselim, Sinem; Cavkaytar, Sabri

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between mean bladder wall thickness (BWT) and treatment success in patients diagnosed with urinary incontinence, based on urodynamic test results. In this prospective study, patient urinary incontinence type was identified using urodynamic tests. Patients (N = 125) were categorized into three groups: urodynamic stress incontinence (SUI), detrusor over-activity (DO) and mixed urinary incontinence. Measurements from the bladder dome, anterior wall and trigone were averaged to calculate BWT. Student's t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare pre-treatment BWT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine optimal cut-off values for BWT to predict treatment success. Mean pre-treatment BWT significantly differed between success and non-success groups for each urinary incontinence type (p value for the SUI, DO and MUI groups was 0.043, 0.001 and 0.002 respectively). Using ROC curves to anticipate the treatment success, a threshold was calculated for mean pre-treatment BWT; 5.05 mm for SUI (sensitivity 74 %, specificity 66 %, positive predictive value [PPV] 85 %, negative predictive value [NPV] 50 %), 4.98 mm for DO (sensitivity 73 %, specificity 92 %, PPV 95 %, NPV 63 %) and 5.31 mm for mixed type (sensitivity 88 %, specificity 73 %, PPV 79 %, NPV 85 %). The study results suggest a significant relationship between the pre-treatment BWT and the success of urinary incontinence treatment. The mean BWT may be used as a benchmark in assessing the responsiveness to treatment of urinary incontinence types.

  5. Proliposomal Intravesical Paclitaxel for Treatment of Low-Grade, Stage Ta, Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Bladder Cancer Cell Transitional; Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Urinary Bladder; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Urologic Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urinary Bladder Diseases; Urologic Diseases

  6. Characteristics of stimulation of H+ transport by aldosterone in turtle urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Awqati, Q; Norby, L H; Mueller, A; Steinmetz, P R

    1976-01-01

    Aldosterone stimulates not only Na+ absorption but also urinary acidification. In this investigation the effects of aldosterone on H+ transport are examined in vitro in turtle bladder, a urinary membrane in which several of the factors controlling H+ transport have been defined. H+ transport was increased in bladder halves exposed to aldosterone compared to control halves. Stimulation of H+ secretion was observed as early as 1 h after addition of aldosterone and occurred before that of Na+ transport. In bladders depleted of endogenous substrate addition of glucose increased H+ transport more in aldosterone-treated halves (10.0+/-1.3 nmol/min) than in control halves (6.8+/-2.3). Addition of pyruvate failed to increase H+ transport (--0.3+/-0.7) in control halves but caused significant increments (2.4+/-0.5) in aldosterone-treated halves. In aldosterone-treated bladders glucose caused larger increments (16.5+/-2.7) in H+ transport than pyruvate (9.3+/-2.0) when halves of the same bladders were compared. Na+ transport, however, was equally increased by the two substrates. Despite the differences in time course and substrate requirements between the stimulation of H+ and Na+ transport, both increases were abolished by actinomycin-D. To examine the effect of aldosterone on the force of the H+ pump, protonmotive force, the pH gradient that would nullify the transport rate was determined with and without aldosterone. Aldosterone did not alter protonmotive force but significantly increased the slope of the H+ transport rate on the applied pH gradient. It is concluded that aldosterone stimulates H+ transport independently of Na+ transport. It increases the responsiveness of the transport rate to glucose and to a lesser extent pyruvate, an effect probably secondary to the increased transport rate. Equivalent circuit analysis indicates that aldosterone facilitates the flow of protons through the active transport pathway but does not increase the force of the pump. PMID:956370

  7. The promotion of functional urinary bladder regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Matthew I.; Fuller, Natalie J.; Meisner, Jay W.; Hofer, Matthias D.; Webber, Matthew J.; Chow, Lesley W.; Prasad, Sheba; Thaker, Hatim; Yue, Xuan; Menon, Vani S.; Diaz, Edward C.; Stupp, Samuel I.; Cheng, Earl Y.; Sharma, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    Current attempts at tissue regeneration utilizing synthetic and decellularized biologic-based materials have typically been met in part by innate immune responses in the form of a robust inflammatory reaction at the site of implantation or grafting. This can ultimately lead to tissue fibrosis with direct negative impact on tissue growth, development, and function. In order to temper the innate inflammatory response, anti-inflammatory signals were incorporated through display on self-assembling peptide nanofibers to promote tissue healing and subsequent graft compliance throughout the regenerative process. Utilizing an established urinary bladder augmentation model, the highly pro-inflammatory biologic scaffold (decellularized small intestinal submucosa) was treated with anti-inflammatory peptide amphiphiles (AIF-PAs) or control peptide amphiphiles and used for augmentation. Significant regenerative advantages of the AIF-PAs were observed including potent angiogenic responses, limited tissue collagen accumulation, and the modulation of macrophage and neutrophil responses in regenerated bladder tissue. Upon further characterization, a reduction in the levels of M2 macrophages was observed, but not in M1 macrophages in control groups, while treatment groups exhibited decreased levels of M1 macrophages and stabilized levels of M2 macrophages. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production was decreased while anti-inflammatory cytokines were up-regulated in treatment groups. This resulted in far fewer incidences of tissue granuloma and bladder stone formation. Finally, functional urinary bladder testing revealed greater bladder compliance and similar capacities in groups treated with AIF-PAs. Data demonstrate that AIF-PAs can alleviate galvanic innate immune responses and provide a highly conducive regenerative milieu that may be applicable in a variety of clinical settings. PMID:25145852

  8. Development of a wearable microwave bladder monitor for the management and treatment of urinary incontinence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krewer, F.; Morgan, F.; Jones, E.; Glavin, M.; O'Halloran, M.

    2014-05-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as the inability to stop the flow of urine from the bladder. In the US alone, the annual societal cost of incontinence-related care is estimated at 12.6 billion dollars. Clinicians agree that those suffering from urinary incontinence would greatly benefit from a wearable system that could continually monitor the bladder, providing continuous feedback to the patient. While existing ultrasound-based solutions are highly accurate, they are severely limited by form-factor, battery size, cost and ease of use. In this study the authors propose an alternative bladder-state sensing system, based on Ultra Wideband (UWB) Radar. As part of an initial proof-of-concept, the authors developed one of the first dielectrically and anatomically-representative Finite Difference Time Domain models of the pelvis. These models (one male and one female) are derived from Magnetic Resonance images provided by the IT'IS Foundation. These IT'IS models provide the foundation upon which an anatomically-plausible bladder growth model was constructed. The authors employed accurate multi-pole Debye models to simulate the dielectric properties of each of the pelvic tissues. Two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations were completed for a range of bladder volumes. Relevant features were extracted from the FDTD-derived signals using Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and then classified using a k-Nearest-Neighbour and Support Vector Machine algorithms (incorporating the Leave-one-out cross-validation approach). Additionally the authors investigated the effects of signal fidelity, noise and antenna movement relative to the target as potential sources of error. The results of this initial study provide strong motivation for further research into this timely application, particularly in the context of an ageing population.

  9. The protective effect of Moringa oleifera leaves against cyclophosphamide-induced urinary bladder toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Taha, Nevine R; Amin, Hanan Ali; Sultan, Asrar A

    2015-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP), an alkylating antineoplastic agent is widely used in the treatment of solid tumors and B-cell malignant disease. It is known to cause urinary bladder damage due to inducing oxidative stress. Moringa oleifera (Mof) is commonly known as drumstick tree. Moringa leaves have been reported to be a rich source of β-carotene, protein, vitamin C, calcium, and potassium. It acts as a good source of natural antioxidants; due to the presence of various types of antioxidant compounds such as ascorbic acid, flavonoids, phenolics and carotenoids. The aim of this work was to test the possible antioxidant protective effects of M. oleifera leaves against CP induced urinary bladder toxicity in rats. Female Wister albino rats were divided into 4 groups. Group I served as control, received orally normal saline, group II received a single dose CP 100mg/kg intraperitoneally, group III and VI both received orally hydroethanolic extract of Mof; 500 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg respectively daily for a week, 1h before and 4h after CP administration. Rats were sacrificed 24h after CP injection. The bladder was removed, sectioned, and subjected to light, transition electron microscopic studies, and biochemical studies (measuring the parameter of lipid peroxidation; malondialdehyde along with the activities of the antioxidant enzyme reduced glutathione). The bladders of CP treated rats showed ulcered mucosa, edematous, hemorrhagic, and fibrotic submucosa by light microscopy. Ultrastructure observation showed; losing large areas of uroepithelium, extended intercellular gaps, junction complexes were affected as well as damage of mitochondria in the form of swelling and destruction of cristae. Biochemical analysis showed significant elevation of malondialdhyde, while reduced glutathione activity was significantly lowered. From the results obtained in this work, we can say that Moringa leaves play an important role in ameliorating and protecting the bladder from CP toxicity.

  10. Fesoterodine for the treatment of urinary incontinence and overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent condition, affecting males and females. The prevalence increases with age. Behavioral therapy and antimuscarinic therapy remain the first-line therapies for management of OAB. Despite improvements in symptoms, persistence with antimuscarinic therapy has remained low. Multiple factors including patient expectations, adverse effects and cost may affect persistence. Fesoterodine is one of the newest antimuscarinic agent approved for the management of OAB. It is unique in that it shares the same active metabolite as tolterodine, 5-hydoxymethyltolterodine (5-HMT); however, this conversion is established via ubiquitous esterases and not via the cytochrome P450 system, thus providing a faster and more efficient conversion to 5-HMT. Fesoterodine is available in 2 doses, 4 mg and 8 mg. Clinical trials have established a dose response relationship in efficacy parameters as well as improvements in quality of life. As with all antimuscarinics, dry mouth and constipation are the more common side effects. A combination of medical therapy and behavioral therapy improves the overall outcome in management of OAB. Dose flexibility may help improve efficacy outcomes and patient education on the management of common adverse effects may improve tolerability with these agents. PMID:19956551

  11. Bladder instillation of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide alters the muscle contractions in rat urinary bladder via a protein kinase C-related pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.I.; Chen, W.J.; Liu, S.H. . E-mail: shliu@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-10-15

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli is a common cause of urinary tract infection. We determined the effects of intravesical instillation of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on muscle contractions, protein kinase C (PKC) translocation, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in rat urinary bladder. The contractions of the isolated rat detrusor muscle evoked by electrical field stimulations were measured short-term (1 h) or long-term (24 h) after intravesical instillation of LPS. One hour after LPS intravesical instillation, bladder PKC-{alpha} translocation from cytosolic fraction to membrane fraction and endothelial (e)NOS protein was elevated, and detrusor muscle contractions were significantly increased. PKC inhibitors chelerythrine and Ro32-0432 inhibited this LPS-enhanced contractile response. Application of PKC activator {beta}-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate enhanced the muscle contractions. Three hours after intravesical instillation of LPS, iNOS mRNA was detected in the bladder. Immunoblotting study also demonstrated that the induction of iNOS proteins is detected in bladder in which LPS was instilled. 24 h after intravesical instillation of LPS, PKC-{alpha} translocation was impaired in the bladder; LPS did not affect PKC-{delta} translocation. Muscle contractions were also decreased 24 h after LPS intravesical instillation. Aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor, blocked the decrease in PKC-{alpha} translocation and detrusor contractions induced by LPS. These results indicate that there are different mechanisms involved in the alteration of urinary bladder contractions after short-term and long-term treatment of LPS; an iNOS-regulated PKC signaling may participate in causing the inhibition of muscle contractions in urinary bladder induced by long-term LPS treatment.

  12. Management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in dogs: a review.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, Christopher M; Knapp, Deborah W

    2015-08-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), also referred to as urothelial carcinoma, is the most common form of urinary bladder cancer in dogs, affecting tens of thousands of dogs worldwide each year. Canine TCC is usually a high grade invasive cancer. Problems associated with TCC include urinary tract obstruction, distant metastases in >50% of affected dogs, and clinical signs that are troubling both to the dogs and to their owners. Risk factors for TCC include exposure to older types of flea control products and lawn chemicals, obesity, female sex, and a very strong breed-associated risk. This knowledge is allowing pet owners to take steps to reduce the risk of TCC in their dog. The diagnosis of TCC is made by histopathology of tissue biopsies obtained by cystoscopy, surgery, or catheter. Percutaneous aspirates and biopsies should be avoided due to the risk of tumor seeding. TCC is most commonly located in the trigone region of the bladder precluding complete surgical resection. Medical treatment is the mainstay for TCC therapy in dogs. Although TCC is not usually curable in dogs, multiple drugs have activity against it. Approximately 75% of dogs respond favorably to TCC treatment and can enjoy several months to a year or more of good quality life. Many promising new therapies for TCC are emerging and with the close similarity between TCC in dogs and high grade invasive bladder cancer in humans, new treatment strategies found to be successful in canine studies are expected to help dogs and to be subsequently translated to humans.

  13. Urinary incontinence in women treated by ischemic compression over the bladder area: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hains, Guy; Hains, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Bussières, André

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if ischemic compression therapy over the bladder area results in clinically important changes among female patients with stress and mixed (stress and urge) incontinence. Methods One group of patients (n = 24) received ischemic compression therapy directed over the bladder area (experimental group). The control group (n = 9) received ischemic compression therapy directed toward structures of the hip joint. Changes in urinary incontinence symptoms were monitored using a 2-part questionnaire: the urogenital distress inventory and the incontinence impact questionnaire. Patients' perceived amelioration (improvement) was quantified using a scale divided from 0% to 100%. Results Mean scores for the first questionnaire (urogenital distress inventory + incontinence impact questionnaire, 19 questions) were 23.3 vs 25.3 at baseline and 10.2 vs 22.2 after 15 treatments for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 6.9 at 30 days after the last treatment and 11.3 at the 6-month follow-up. The perceived percentages of amelioration after 15 treatments were 69% vs 32% for the experimental and control group, respectively. The experimental group scores were 73% at 30 days after the last treatment and 60% at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions In this study, ischemic compression directed toward elicited trigger points over bladder area was found to be an effective treatment of patients presenting symptoms of urinary incontinence. Improvement in symptoms was still present in follow-up at 6 months. PMID:19674707

  14. Urinary bladder cancer in dogs, a naturally occurring model for cancer biology and drug development.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Deborah W; Ramos-Vara, José A; Moore, George E; Dhawan, Deepika; Bonney, Patty L; Young, Kirsten E

    2014-01-01

    Each year more than 65,000 people are diagnosed with urinary bladder cancer, and more than 14,000 people die from the disease in the United States. Studies in relevant animal models are essential to improve the management of bladder cancer. Naturally occurring bladder cancer in dogs very closely mimics human invasive bladder cancer, specifically high-grade invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC; also referred to as invasive urothelial carcinoma) in cellular and molecular features; biological behavior, including sites and frequency of metastasis; and response to therapy. Canine bladder cancer complements experimentally induced rodent tumors in regard to animal models of bladder cancer. Results of cellular and molecular studies and -omics analyses in dogs are expected to lead to improved detection of TCC and preneoplastic lesions, earlier intervention, better prediction of patient outcome, and more effective TCC management overall. Studies in dogs are being used to help define heritable risks (through very strong breed-associated risk) and environment risks and to evaluate prevention and treatment approaches that benefit humans as well as dogs. Clinical treatment trials in pet dogs with TCC are considered a win-win scenario by clinician scientists and pet owners. The individual dog benefits from effective treatment, the results are expected to help other dogs, and the findings are expected to ultimately help humans with TCC. This article provides an overview of canine TCC, a summary of the similarities and differences between canine and human invasive TCC, and examples of the types of valuable translational research that can be done using dogs with naturally occurring TCC.

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: Systematic review of clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeremy W; Carballido, Estrella M; Ahmed, Ahmed; Farhan, Bilal; Dutta, Rahul; Smith, Cody; Youssef, Ramy F

    2016-09-01

    To highlight the current understanding of the epidemiology, clinicopathological characteristics, and management of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder, as it accounts for 2-5% of bladder tumours, with a focus on non-bilharzial-associated SCC (NB-SCC). The standard treatment for bladder SCC remains radical cystectomy (RC). We present an updated clinical profile of bladder SCC and a review of NB-SCC therapeutic approaches, including RC, neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Using search terms relating to SCC, urinary bladder, and treatment modalities, we performed a search of the PubMed and Embase databases to identify NB-SCC treatment approaches and outcomes. Peer-reviewed English language reports from 1975 to present assessing SCC management were included. Two authors independently screened and extracted the data. Of the 806 articles screened, 10 met the pre-defined inclusion criteria. RC was performed in seven of the 10 studies. Although radiotherapy alone yielded poor outcomes, preoperative radiotherapy and RC were associated with improved survival. There is little evidence supporting the use of chemotherapy in NB-SCC, and its efficacy in relation to RC is not known. Based on current literature, there is insufficient evidence to provide a treatment recommendation for NB-SCC. Whilst RC is the standard of care, the role of preoperative radiotherapy should be revisited and compared to RC alone. Additional studies incorporating multimodal approaches, contemporary radiation techniques, and systemic therapies are warranted. Immunotherapy as a treatment for bladder SCC has yet to be investigated.

  16. Receptive properties of myelinated primary afferents innervating the inflamed urinary bladder of the cat.

    PubMed

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M

    1993-02-01

    1. The present study has investigated the receptive properties of myelinated mechanoreceptive primary afferents innervating the inflamed urinary bladder of the cat. In 15 experiments, 20 units were recorded from the dorsal and 3 from the ventral root S2. Before inflammation the afferents had no resting activity and responded consistently to increases of intravesical pressure evoked by isotonic distension or isovolumetric contractions. All units were studied before and after the onset of an acute inflammation induced by intraluminal injection of mustard (1-2.5%) or turpentine oil (50%), which are known to induce an acute cystitis. 2. Eleven out of 14 units tested with mustard oil and 5/9 units tested with turpentine oil were activated at short latency. The response could not be explained by a concomitant increase of intraluminal pressure resulting from the intravesical injection of the irritant. This suggests that a large proportion of mechanosensitive afferents has an additional chemosensitivity. 3. After removal of the irritants and with empty bladder, all afferent units exhibited irregular ongoing activity with intermittent high-frequency bursts. Such ongoing activity was entirely absent in myelinated afferents supplying the noninflamed bladder. The median rate of ongoing activity was significantly higher after mustard oil (1.65 imp/s) than after turpentine oil treatment (0.05 imp/s) 1 h after chemical stimulation. Post-hoc analysis revealed that afferents that developed high levels of ongoing activity had steeper stimulus response functions to changes of intravesical pressure before inflammation. 4. The stimulus-response function of vesical afferents changed characteristically in the inflamed bladder. Within 30 min of mustard oil treatment, the responses of some units to bladder filling was transiently enhanced, but later the units desensitized to this stimulus. However, there was no significant change of the stimulus-response function of six afferents studied

  17. Expression and function of CCL2/CCR2 in rat micturition reflexes and somatic sensitivity with urinary bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arms, Lauren; Girard, Beatrice M; Malley, Susan E; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2013-07-01

    Chemokines are proinflammatory mediators of the immune response, and there is growing evidence for chemokine/receptor signaling involvement in pronociception. Bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be bladder-related with at least one urinary symptom. We have explored the expression and functional roles of CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and its high-affinity receptor, CCR2, in micturition reflex function and somatic sensitivity in rats with urinary bladder inflammation induced by cyclophosphamide (CYP) treatment of varying duration (4 h, 48 h, chronic). Real-time quantitative RT-PCR, ELISAs, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated significant (P ≤ 0.01) increases in CCL2 and CCR2 expression in the urothelium and in Fast Blue-labeled bladder afferent neurons in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia with CYP-induced cystitis. Intravesical infusion of RS504393 (5 μM), a specific CCR2 antagonist, reduced voiding frequency and increased bladder capacity and void volume in rats with CYP-induced cystitis (4 h), as determined with open outlet, conscious cystometry. In addition, CCR2 blockade, at the level of the urinary bladder, reduced referred somatic sensitivity of the hindpaw and pelvic region in rats with CYP treatment, as determined with von Frey filament testing. We provide evidence of functional roles for CCL2/CCR2 signaling at the level of the urinary bladder in reducing voiding frequency and somatic sensitivity following CYP-induced cystitis (4 h). These studies suggest that chemokines/receptors may be novel targets with therapeutic potential in the context of urinary bladder inflammation.

  18. Staphylococcus saprophyticus ATCC 15305 is internalized into human urinary bladder carcinoma cell line 5637.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Florian; Kleine, Britta; Anders, Agnes; Kaase, Martin; Sakinç, Türkân; Schmitz, Inge; Gatermann, Sören

    2008-08-01

    Invasion of bacteria into nonphagocytic host cells is an important pathogenicity factor for escaping the host defence system. Gram-positive organisms, for example Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, are invasive in nonphagocytic cells, and this mechanism is discussed as an important part of the infection process. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus can cause acute and recurrent urinary tract infections as well as bloodstream infections. Staphylococcus saprophyticus shows strong adhesion to human urinary bladder carcinoma and Hep2 cells and expresses the 'Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix molecule' (MSCRAMM)-protein SdrI with collagen-binding activity. MSCRAMMs are responsible for adhesion and collagen binding in S. aureus and are discussed as an important pathogenicity factor for invasion. To investigate internalization in S. aureus, several fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) assays have been described recently. We used a previously described FACS assay, with slight modifications, in addition to an antibiotic protection assay and transmission electron microscopy to show that S. saprophyticus ATCC 15305 and the wild-type strain 7108 were internalized into the human urinary bladder carcinoma cell line 5637. The discovery of the internalization of S. saprophyticus may be an important step for understanding the pathogenicity of recurrent infections caused by this organism.

  19. Quantitative Changes in Cerebral Perfusion during Urinary Urgency in Women with Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Arya, Nisha G; Weissbart, Steven J; Xu, Sihua; Bhavsar, Rupal; Rao, Hengyi

    2017-01-01

    To quantitatively measure changes in cerebral perfusion in select regions of interest in the brain during urinary urgency in women with overactive bladder (OAB) using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Twelve women with OAB and 10 controls underwent bladder filling and rated urinary urgency (scale 0-10). ASL fMRI scans were performed (1) in the low urgency state after voiding and (2) high urgency state after drinking oral fluids. Absolute regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in select regions of interest was compared between the low and high urgency states. There were no significant differences in rCBF between the low and high urgency states in the control group. In the OAB group, rCBF (mean ± SE, ml/100 g/min) increased by 10-14% from the low to the high urgency state in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (44.56 ± 0.59 versus 49.52 ± 1.49, p < 0.05), left ACC (49.29 ± 0.85 versus 54.02 ± 1.46, p < 0.05), and left insula (50.46 ± 1.72 versus 54.99 ± 1.09, p < 0.05). Whole-brain analysis identified additional areas of activation in the right insula, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and pons/midbrain area. Urinary urgency is associated with quantitative increase in cerebral perfusion in regions of the brain associated with processing emotional response to discomfort.

  20. Therapeutic modulation of urinary bladder function: multiple targets at multiple levels.

    PubMed

    Michel, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    Storage dysfunction of the urinary bladder, specifically overactive bladder syndrome, is a condition that occurs frequently in the general population. Historically, pathophysiological and treatment concepts related to overactive bladder have focused on smooth muscle cells. Although these are the central effector, numerous anatomic structures are involved in their regulation, including the urothelium, afferent and efferent nerves, and the central nervous system. Each of these structures involves receptors for—and the urothelium itself also releases—many mediators. Moreover, hypoperfusion, hypertrophy, and fibrosis can affect bladder function. Established treatments such as muscarinic antagonists, β-adrenoceptor agonists, and onabotulinumtoxinA each work in part through their effects on the urothelium and afferent nerves, as do α1-adrenoceptor antagonists in the treatment of voiding dysfunction associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia; however, none of these treatments are specifically targeted to the urothelium and afferent nerves. It remains to be explored whether future treatments that specifically act at one of these structures will provide a therapeutic advantage.

  1. Characteristics of hydrogen ion transport in urinary bladder of water turtle.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, P R

    1967-10-01

    The mechanism of acidification by the urinary bladder of the water turtle was studied in an in vitro system which permitted control and measurement of electrical and concentration driving forces. The rate of hydrogen ion secretion was measured by means of a pH stat technique in the absence of exogenous carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. Transport of hydrogen ion into the solution bathing the mucosal surface of the bladder was associated with the appearance of alkali in the serosal compartment. The mean rate of hydrogen ion secretion in the absence of electrical and concentration gradients across the bladder was 0.96 mumole/hr. The secretion rate was only slightly greater in the presence of the spontaneous potential difference. The maximal hydrogen ion gradient that could be generated by the bladder was 3.33 pH units in the presence of the spontaneous voltage and 3.02 pH units in the short-circuited state. Hydrogen ion secretion was markedly reduced by acetazolamide and anaerobiosis, which indicated that under our experimental conditions acidification depended on the production and enzymatic hydration of metabolic carbon dioxide. On the basis of the stoichiometry of the pH changes across the membrane under different conditions, it is suggested that the active transport mechanism for hydrogen ion is located near the mucosal surface of the epithelial cell and that the alkali generated in back of the pump moves passively into the serosal fluid along an electrochemical gradient.

  2. Two mathematical models explain the variation in cystometrograms of obstructed urinary bladders.

    PubMed

    Damaser, M S; Lehman, S L

    1996-12-01

    Overdistension of the urinary bladder, secondary to outlet obstruction, causes cellular changes in the bladder wall, including hypertrophy of the smooth muscle cells, which increase bladder mass. To investigate the effects of increased mass on the cystometrogram (CMG), we have developed two mathematical models. In the first model, we assume that mass is added such that the largest bladder volume at zero transmural pressure, the zero pressure volume (ZPV), is constant, It predicts increased pressures and decreased compliance in the CMG. In the second model, we assume that both mass and ZPV increase proportionally. It predicts unchanged pressures, increased compliance, and increased capacity in the CMG. These results allow use to divide animal experiments in the literature into two groups. Cystometrograms performed on animals that have had outlet obstruction induced by a cuff method, inducing a small increase in mass, belong to the first group: hypertrophy with no change in ZPV. Cystometrograms performed on animals that have had outlet obstruction induced by a ligature method, inducing a large increase in mass, belong to the second group: hypertrophy with increased ZPV. We conclude that increased ZPV results from a more severe obstruction which is indicated by the increased capacity and compliance.

  3. Nephrogenic Adenoma of the Urinary Bladder: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nephrogenic adenoma of the urinary bladder (NAUB) is a rare lesion associated with nonspecific symptoms and could inadvertently be misdiagnosed. Aim. To review the literature. Methods. Various internet search engines were used. Results. NAUB is a benign tubular and papillary lesion of the bladder, is more common in men and adults, and has been associated with chronic inflammation/irritation, previous bladder surgery, diverticula, renal transplantation, and intravesical BCG; recurrences and malignant transformations have been reported. Differential diagnoses include clear cell adenocarcinoma, endocervicosis, papillary urothelial carcinoma, prostatic adenocarcinoma of bladder, and nested variant of urothelial carcinoma; most NAUBs have both surface papillary and submucosal tubular components; both the papillae and tubules tend to be lined by a single layer of mitotically inactive bland cells which have pale to clear cytoplasm. Diagnosis may be established by using immunohistochemistry (positive staining with racemase; PAX2; keratins stain positive with fibromyxoid variant), electron microscopy, DNA analysis, and cytological studies. Treatment. Endoscopic resection is the treatment but recurrences including sporadic malignant transformation have been reported. Conclusions. There is no consensus on best treatment. A multicentre study is required to identify the treatment that would reduce the recurrence rate, taking into consideration that intravesical BCG is associated with NAUB. PMID:27347540

  4. Adult urinary bladder tumors with rabdomyosarcomatous differentiation: Clinical, pathological and immunohistochemical studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adult rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in the urinary bladder is rare, and is the subject of case reports and small series. It consists of sheets of small round blue cells with high nuclear cytoplasmic ratio, brisk mitosis and apoptosis. In this study, we reported one case of pure rhabdomyosarcoma and two cases of urothelial carcinomas with extensive rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. In addition, their immunohistochemical profile was compared to that of small cell carcinoma of the bladder. Our study showed that sufficient sampling was critical for the diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma with extensive rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. As adult RMS in the bladder and urothelial carcinoma with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation shared morphological features with small cell carcinoma of the bladder, appropriate immunohistochemical stains were necessary in the differential diagnosis. We showed both rhabdomyosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcomatous areas of the urothelial carcinoma were positive for myogenin, negative for cytokeratin and chromogranin stains. In contrast, small cell carcinoma was positive for cytokeratin, and 7 out of 9 cases were also positive for chromogranin. Both rhabdomyosarcoma and small cell carcinoma could be positive for synaptophysin, a potential pitfall to avoid. In addition, all of the tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation were negative for FKHR rearrangement. PMID:21762516

  5. Intraluminal urethral brachytherapy for recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder in urethral stump.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Bikramjit; Ghorai, Suman; Ray, Somapriya Basu; Kar, Sanjay Kumar

    2013-03-01

    We report a unique case of successfully performed intraluminal brachytherapy for low volume urethral mucosal recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma urinary bladder, initially treated by transurethral resection of bladder tumor, followed by radical cystectomy. Since the patient was unwilling to undergo any other operational interventions, intraluminal brachytherapy of urethra was attempted. Fluroscopy guided intraluminal HDR brachytherapy using Lumencath(®) catheter under local anesthesia, and remote afterloading system (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was performed. A fraction dose of 7 Gy in seven weekly fractions was prescribed at 0.5 cm from the single applicator. The result was promising in terms of local control and symptomatic relief. Therefore, intraluminal brachytherapy in low volume superficial local disease in urethra may play a potential role, and should be applied when repeated surgery is not feasible due to technical or medical reasons.

  6. Intraluminal urethral brachytherapy for recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder in urethral stump

    PubMed Central

    Ghorai, Suman; Ray, Somapriya Basu; Kar, Sanjay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    We report a unique case of successfully performed intraluminal brachytherapy for low volume urethral mucosal recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma urinary bladder, initially treated by transurethral resection of bladder tumor, followed by radical cystectomy. Since the patient was unwilling to undergo any other operational interventions, intraluminal brachytherapy of urethra was attempted. Fluroscopy guided intraluminal HDR brachytherapy using Lumencath® catheter under local anesthesia, and remote afterloading system (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was performed. A fraction dose of 7 Gy in seven weekly fractions was prescribed at 0.5 cm from the single applicator. The result was promising in terms of local control and symptomatic relief. Therefore, intraluminal brachytherapy in low volume superficial local disease in urethra may play a potential role, and should be applied when repeated surgery is not feasible due to technical or medical reasons. PMID:23634154

  7. Tumefactive intramural gossypiboma of the urinary bladder mimicking an invasive adnexal malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shivi; Verma, Ashish; Jain, Madhu; Trivedi, Sameer; Shukla, Ram C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A surgical swab retained in the body after surgery is known as ‘Gossypiboma’. The purpose of this report is to highlight an intramural vesical gossypiboma mimicking an invasive adnexal malignancy. A 28-year-old multiparous, with open-tubal ligation three years ago, presented with painless hematuria and a nontender mass on vaginal examination. USG suggested ‘pelvic endometriosis’ infiltrating into the bladder and cystoscopy showed no intraluminal extension of the mass. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) misdiagnosed it as invasive malignancy of the fallopian tube. Exploratory laparotomy found it to be an intramural vesical gossypiboma. A pelvic gossypiboma infiltrating into the wall of the urinary bladder may easily be misinterpreted as an invasive pelvic malignancy on imaging and may make one consider unwarranted radical surgery. PMID:25969644

  8. Severe systemic toxicity and urinary bladder cytotoxicity and regenerative hyperplasia induced by arsenite in arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase knockout mice. A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Yokohira, Masanao; Arnold, Lora L.; Pennington, Karen L.; Suzuki, Shugo; Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Herbin-Davis, Karen; Thomas, David J.; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2010-07-15

    Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes reactions which convert inorganic arsenic to methylated metabolites. This study determined whether the As3mt null genotype in the mouse modifies cytotoxic and proliferative effects seen in urinary bladders of wild type mice after exposure to inorganic arsenic. Female wild type C57BL/6 mice and As3mt KO mice were divided into 3 groups each (n = 8) with free access to a diet containing 0, 100 or 150 ppm of arsenic as arsenite (As{sup III}). During the first week of As{sup III} exposure, As3mt KO mice exhibited severe and lethal systemic toxicity. At termination, urinary bladders of both As3mt KO and wild type mice showed hyperplasia by light microscopy. As expected, arsenic-containing granules were found in the superficial urothelial layer of wild type mice. In As3mt KO mice these granules were present in all layers of the bladder epithelium and were more abundant and larger than in wild type mice. Scanning electron microscopy of the bladder urothelium of As3mt KO mice treated with 100 ppm As{sup III} showed extensive superficial necrosis and hyperplastic changes. In As3mt KO mice, livers showed severe acute inflammatory changes and spleen size and lymphoid areas were decreased compared with wild type mice. Thus, diminished arsenic methylation in As3mt KO mice exacerbates systemic toxicity and the effects of As{sup III} on the bladder epithelium, showing that altered kinetic and dynamic behavior of arsenic can affect its toxicity.

  9. Allicin ameliorates kidney function and urinary bladder sensitivity in cyclosporine A-treated rats.

    PubMed

    El-Kashef, D H; El-Kenawi, A E; Suddek, G M; Salem, H A

    2016-09-05

    Cyclosporine-A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug which has been used to prevent rejection after organ transplantation and to treat certain autoimmune diseases. However, its therapeutic use is limited by nephrotoxicity. In this study, the modulator effect of allicin on the oxidative nephrotoxicity of CsA in rats was investigated. Furthermore, the effect of allicin on CsA-induced hypersensitivity of urinary bladder rings to acetylcholine (ACh) was estimated. Rats were divided into three groups, control, CsA (15 mg/kg, subcutaneously), and CsA/allicin (50 mg/kg, orally). At the end of the study, all rats were killed and then blood, urine samples, and kidneys were taken. CsA administration caused a severe nephrotoxicity which was evidenced by elevated kidney/body weight ratio, serum creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, and urinary protein with a concomitant reduction in serum albumin and Cr clearance as compared with control. A significant increase in renal contents of malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha with a significant decrease in renal reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase activities, and nitric oxide (NOx) content was detected upon CsA administration. Exposure to CsA increased the sensitivity of isolated urinary bladder rings to ACh. Histological analysis revealed that CsA caused tubular necrosis and moderate diffuse tubular atrophy. Allicin protected kidney tissue against the oxidative damage and the nephrotoxic effect of CsA and significantly reduced the responses of isolated bladder rings to ACh. Our study indicates that allicin administration has the potential to protect against CsA-induced renal injury by reducing oxidative stress and inflammation and restoring NOx level.

  10. New genetic variants of LATS1 detected in urinary bladder and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saadeldin, Mona K.; Shawer, Heba; Mostafa, Ahmed; Kassem, Neemat M.; Amleh, Asma; Siam, Rania

    2015-01-01

    LATS1, the large tumor suppressor 1 gene, encodes for a serine/threonine kinase protein and is implicated in cell cycle progression. LATS1 is down-regulated in various human cancers, such as breast cancer, and astrocytoma. Point mutations in LATS1 were reported in human sarcomas. Additionally, loss of heterozygosity of LATS1 chromosomal region predisposes to breast, ovarian, and cervical tumors. In the current study, we investigated LATS1 genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in 28 Egyptian patients with either urinary bladder or colon cancers. The LATS1 gene was amplified and sequenced and the expression of LATS1 at the RNA level was assessed in 12 urinary bladder cancer samples. We report, the identification of a total of 29 variants including previously identified SNPs within LATS1 coding and non-coding sequences. A total of 18 variants were novel. Majority of the novel variants, 13, were mapped to intronic sequences and un-translated regions of the gene. Four of the five novel variants located in the coding region of the gene, represented missense mutations within the serine/threonine kinase catalytic domain. Interestingly, LATS1 RNA steady state levels was lost in urinary bladder cancerous tissue harboring four specific SNPs (16045 + 41736 + 34614 + 56177) positioned in the 5′UTR, intron 6, and two silent mutations within exon 4 and exon 8, respectively. This study identifies novel single-base-sequence alterations in the LATS1 gene. These newly identified variants could potentially be used as novel diagnostic or prognostic tools in cancer. PMID:25628642

  11. QUALITY OF CARE IN BLADDER CANCER: TRENDS IN URINARY DIVERSION FOLLOWING RADICAL CYSTECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Gore, John L.; Litwin, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Quality-of-care indicators have not yet been defined for patients with bladder cancer. Nonetheless, certain aspects of bladder cancer care can be evaluated to quantify the quality of care delivered. We sought to determine trends in continent urinary diversion to evaluate the adoption of this more optimal reconstruction. Methods Subjects who underwent radical cystectomy for a primary diagnosis of bladder cancer were identified from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample. We identified covariates independently associated with utilization of continent urinary diversion after radical cystectomy using multivariate logistic regression modeling. We then examined trends in diversion type based on patient and hospital characteristics and examined the impact of hospital volume on use of continent reconstruction. Results Our weighted sample included 5,075 subjects (14.3%) who underwent continent urinary diversion and 30,295 subjects (85.7%) who underwent an ileal conduit. Independent correlates of continent diversion included younger age, male gender, having private insurance, and undergoing surgery at an urban teaching hospital. Hospitals performing continent diversions on more than 40% of their cystectomies had a yearly cystectomy volume of 0.8 surgeries. Subjects treated at high-volume hospitals trended toward lower rates of comorbid conditions. Conclusions We identified substantial disparities in continent diversion which, based on yearly trends, are unlikely to improve in the near future. Continent reconstructions are not the exclusive domain of high-volume cystectomy centers. Yet efforts to increase rates of this complex reconstruction must concentrate on technique dissemination and better definition of the quality-of-life detriments incurred by cystectomy patients. PMID:19020881

  12. The Role of Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Urinary Bladder Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Natalie J.; Hannick, Jessica H.; Ahmad, Nida; Sharma, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with CD34+ hematopoietic/stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) can function as surrogate urinary bladder cells to synergistically promote multi-faceted bladder tissue regeneration. However, the molecular pathways governing these events are unknown. The pleiotropic effects of Wnt5a and Cyr61 are known to affect aspects of hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and muscle and nerve regeneration. Within this study, the effects of Cyr61 and Wnt5a on bladder tissue regeneration were evaluated by grafting scaffolds containing modified human bone marrow derived MSCs. These cell lines were engineered to independently over-express Wnt5a or Cyr61, or to exhibit reduced expression of Cyr61 within the context of a nude rat bladder augmentation model. At 4 weeks post-surgery, data demonstrated increased vessel number (~250 vs ~109 vessels/mm2) and bladder smooth muscle content (~42% vs ~36%) in Cyr61OX (over-expressing) vs Cyr61KD (knock-down) groups. Muscle content decreased to ~25% at 10 weeks in Cyr61KD groups. Wnt5aOX resulted in high numbers of vessels and muscle content (~206 vessels/mm2 and ~51%, respectively) at 4 weeks. Over-expressing cell constructs resulted in peripheral nerve regeneration while Cyr61KD animals were devoid of peripheral nerve regeneration at 4 weeks. At 10 weeks post-grafting, peripheral nerve regeneration was at a minimal level for both Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines. Blood vessel and bladder functionality were evident at both time-points in all animals. Results from this study indicate that MSC-based Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines play pivotal roles with regards to increasing the levels of functional vasculature, influencing muscle regeneration, and the regeneration of peripheral nerves in a model of bladder augmentation. Wnt5aOX constructs closely approximated the outcomes previously observed with the co-transplantation of MSCs with CD34+ HSPCs and may be specifically targeted as an

  13. INCREASED TRPV4 EXPRESSION IN URINARY BLADDER AND LUMBOSACRAL DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA IN MICE WITH CHRONIC OVEREXPRESSION OF NGF IN UROTHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Beatrice M.; Merrill, Liana; Malley, Susan; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family member 4 (TRPV4) expression has been demonstrated in urothelial cells and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and roles in normal micturition reflexes as well as micturition dysfunction have been suggested. TRP channel expression and function is dependent upon target tissue expression of growth factors. These studies expand upon the target tissue dependence of TRPV4 expression in the urinary bladder and lumbosacral DRG using a recently characterized transgenic mouse model with chronic overexpression of nerve growth factor (NGF-OE) in the urothelium. Immunohistochemistry with image analyses, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and western blotting were used to determine TRPV4 protein and transcript expression in the urinary bladder (urothelium + suburothelium, detrusor) and lumbosacral DRG from littermate wildtype (WT) and NGF-OE mice. Antibody specificity controls were performed in TRPV4-/- mice. TRPV4 transcript and protein expression was significantly (p ≤ 0.001) increased in the urothelium + suburothelium and suburothelial nerve plexus of the urinary bladder and in small- and medium-sized lumbosacral (L1, L2, L6-S1) DRG cells from NGF-OE mice compared to littermate WT mice. NGF-OE mice exhibit significant (p ≤ 0.001) increases in NGF transcript and protein in the urothelium + suburothelium and lumbosacral DRG. These studies demonstrate regulation of TRPV4 expression by NGF in lower urinary tract tissues. Ongoing studies are characterizing the functional roles of TRPV4 expression in the sensory limb (DRG, urothelium) of the micturition reflex. PMID:23690258

  14. Unusual Displacement of Urinary Bladder by a Dilated Rectosigmoid Colon on Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Mehrosadat; Kalhor, Leila; Ghaedian, Tahereh

    2017-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy with chief complaint of chronic pelvic pain was referred to our nuclear medicine department for bone scintigraphy. The images showed a focus of radiotracer activity in the right side of pelvic cavity, which is further confirmed as urinary bladder by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and delayed images. Because of high possibility of mass effect in pelvic cavity, pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and it revealed an unusual dilatation of rectosigmoid colon with no evidence of pelvic mass.

  15. Small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    GHERVAN, LIVIU; ZAHARIE, ANDREEA; ENE, BOGDAN; ELEC, FLORIN I.

    2017-01-01

    Small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a very rare pathology, but with a very aggressive behavior and disappointing prognosis. The literature concerning this type of cancer is scarce and physicians may encounter difficulty trying to manage it. Most articles involve the study of case series, without definite results due to the small number of patients. The present article aims at gathering the most significant articles and results in order to offer a broad perspective on the existing literature concerning this pathology. PMID:28246491

  16. The bladder is not sterile: History and current discoveries on the urinary microbiome.

    PubMed

    Thomas-White, Krystal; Brady, Megan; Wolfe, Alan J; Mueller, Elizabeth R

    2016-03-01

    In the human body, there are 10 bacterial cells for every one human cell. This fact highlights the importance of the National institutes of Health's initiative to map the human microbiome. The Human Microbiome Project was the first large-scale mapping of the human microbiome of 5 body sites: GI tract, mouth, vagina, skin and nasal cavity using culture-independent methods. The bladder was not originally tested because it was considered to be sterile and there were complexities regarding sample collection. Over the last couple years our team along with other investigators have shown that a urinary microbiome exists and for most individuals it plays a protective role.

  17. The P2Y2 receptor sensitizes mouse bladder sensory neurons and facilitates purinergic currents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaowei; Molliver, Derek C; Gebhart, G.F.

    2010-01-01

    Sensitization of bladder afferents is an underlying contributor to the development and maintenance of painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Extracellular purines and pyrimidines (e.g., ATP and UTP), released during bladder distension or from damaged cells after tissue insult, are thought to play an important role in bladder physiological and pathological states by actions at ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors. In the present study, we examined the ability of P2Y receptors to sensitize and modulate P2X mediated-responses in mouse bladder sensory neurons. UTP (a P2Y2 and P2Y4 agonist) increased excitability of bladder neurons by depolarizing resting membrane potential, increasing action potential firing, and facilitating responses to suprathreshold current injection as well as to P2X agonist application. These effects of UTP on bladder neuron excitability were blocked by the P2Y2 receptor antagonist suramin. UTP also facilitated bladder neuron homomeric P2X2 sustained currents and homomeric P2X3 fast currents. The facilitatory effect of UTP on P2X2 sustained currents was mediated by a G protein-coupled P2Y2 receptor/PKC pathway whereas the effect of UTP on P2X3 fast currents was G protein-independent. We also examined P2X and P2Y receptor expression in bladder neurons. P2Y2 and P2Y4 transcripts were detected in ~50% and ~20% of bladder neurons, respectively. Approximately 50% of P2X2- and P2X3-positive bladder neurons expressed P2Y2 transcripts, whereas ≤25% of the same bladder neurons expressed P2Y4 transcripts. These results \\ort involvement of P2Y2 receptors in bladder sensation, suggesting an important contribution to bladder neuron excitability and hypersensitivity. PMID:20147562

  18. Arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid in drinking water did not affect DNA damage repair in urinary bladder transitional cells or micronuclei in bone marrow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a recognized human skin, lung, and urinary bladder carcinogen, and may act as a cocarcinogen in the urinary bladder (with cigarette smoking) and skin (with UV light exposure). Possible modes of action of arsenic carcinogenesis/cocarcinogenesis include induction of DNA ...

  19. Transcriptomic dose-and-time-course indicators of early key events in a cytotoxicity-mediated mode of action for rodent urinary bladder tumorigenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTOMIC DOSE- AND TIME-COURSE INDICATORS OF EARLY KEY EVENTS IN A CYTOTOXICITY-MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION FOR RODENT URINARY BLADDER TUMORIGENESISDiuron is a substituted urea compound used globally as an herbicide. Urinary bladder tumors were induced in rats after chronic die...

  20. Arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid in drinking water did not affect DNA damage repair in urinary bladder transitional cells or micronuclei in bone marrow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a recognized human skin, lung, and urinary bladder carcinogen, and may act as a cocarcinogen in the urinary bladder (with cigarette smoking) and skin (with UV light exposure). Possible modes of action of arsenic carcinogenesis/cocarcinogenesis include induction of DNA ...

  1. Transcriptomic dose-and-time-course indicators of early key events in a cytotoxicity-mediated mode of action for rodent urinary bladder tumorigenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTOMIC DOSE- AND TIME-COURSE INDICATORS OF EARLY KEY EVENTS IN A CYTOTOXICITY-MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION FOR RODENT URINARY BLADDER TUMORIGENESISDiuron is a substituted urea compound used globally as an herbicide. Urinary bladder tumors were induced in rats after chronic die...

  2. Detection of bovine papillomavirus type 14 DNA sequences in urinary bladder tumors in cattle.

    PubMed

    Roperto, Sante; Munday, John S; Corrado, Federica; Goria, Maria; Roperto, Franco

    2016-07-15

    Bovine papillomavirus type 14 (BPV-14) is a novel Deltapapillomavirus (δPV) which is most closely related to BPV-1, -2, and -13, well-known members of the δPV genus. So far BPV-14 has been detected in cutaneous neoplastic lesions in cattle and in feline sarcoids. As BPV-14 may share biological and pathological properties with BPV-1, -2 and -13, it has been hypothesized that, like other δPVs, BPV-14 could be associated with bovine bladder neoplasia. In this study, 50 tumors of the urinary bladder of cattle were diagnosed. DNA was extracted from all tumor samples as well as from 25 normal bladder samples and submitted to BPV-14 L1 PCR and subsequent amplicon sequencing analysis. BPV-14 L1 DNA sequences of specific 195bp amplicons were obtained from 17 of 50 (34%) tumor DNA isolates; no BPV-14 DNA was detected from 25 normal samples. Amplicons revealed a 99% homology with the corresponding BPV-14 L1 DNA region (GenBank accession number KP276343.1). Co-infections by two or three δPV types were also seen. This study reveals the presence of BPV-14 DNA alone or in combination with other δPV DNA in bovine bladder tumors alone and suggests that BPV-14 could also be involved in bladder neoplasia as its E5 oncoprotein has the potential to induce cell proliferation. Furthermore, this is the first study to show the presence of BPV-14 in Europe, suggesting that BPV-14, like other δPVs, has a worldwide distribution.

  3. Minilaparotomy radical cystoprostatectomy (Minilap RCP) in the surgical management of urinary bladder carcinoma: early experience.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Sudhir; Raghunath, S K; Khanna, Samir; Jain, Deepak; Kaul, Rakesh; Kumar, Prem; Chhabra, Rakesh; Bhushan, Kirti

    2008-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of minilaparotomy for radical cystoprostatectomy (RCP) and urinary diversion in the management of urinary bladder carcinoma. A total of 45 consecutive patients with muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer underwent RCP and urinary diversion [32, 12 and 1 patients with pitchers pot orthotopic neobladder (NB), ileal conduit (IC) and sigma rectal pouch respectively], between May 2006 and June 2007, using 8-12 cm infraumbilical midline vertical incision from pubic symphysis, were prospectively analyzed for technical feasibility, operative time, blood loss, intraoperative and postoperative complications and return of bowel function. All the patients were males with average age of 59.65 years (44-79 years) and average body mass index of 23.97(17.7-29.5). The length of the incision was 8, 10 and 12 cm in 4, 39 and 2 patients, respectively. The average number of lymph nodes removed on the right and left side was 14 and 16, respectively. The average blood loss was 1046 ml (595-2100 ml). Return of bowel sounds was observed on an average by second postoperative day (1-5 days). Average postoperative stay was 14 days (range 10-24 days) for NB and 7 days (6-8 days) for IC patients. One (2.22%) patient died on the 18th postoperative day due to septicemia and acute renal failure. Minilaparotomy RCP is technically feasible without compromising the oncological principles. Complete removal of urachus and adequate clearance of pelvic lymph nodes is not difficult with the small incision. Early restoration of bowel function, early postoperative recovery and good cosmesis seem to be the main advantages.

  4. Factors implicated in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladders: some revered, few forgotten, others ignored.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Pawan; Madersbacher, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    To comprehensively review factors implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, and to stimulate research, especially in the somewhat ignored and forgotten areas of this important clinical subject. In addition to reviewing relevant articles on pubmed, some important articles from previous times which were not available online were also procured and reviewed. Intrinsic defence mechanisms including protective flora, anti-adherence mechanisms, urothelial, and immunological responses to bacterial binding and the blood supply to the urinary bladder may be impaired in patients with neurogenic bladders. Further, bacterial washout mechanisms may be compromised as a result of inefficient voiding, reflux, and altered hydrokinetics. Finally, catheterization itself contributes to urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders. In order to address the issue of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, multiple factors need to be looked into and corrected. Further research is required, especially in the area of compromised host defence mechanisms. An individualized approach, which attempts to optimize each factor is recommended. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Del Sordo, Rachele; Bellezza, Guido; Colella, Renato; Mameli, Maria Grazia; Sidoni, Angelo; Cavaliere, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare histologic variant of adenocarcinoma. Generally, this neoplasm occurs in middle age and the clinical presentation does not differ from the most frequent transitional cell carcinomas. The prognosis is frequently poor as at diagnosis it is often in an advanced phase. It is essential to distinguish this carcinoma from metastases, as different therapeutic strategies are often necessary. We present 5 cases of primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and we used a panel of histochemical and immunohistochemical markers for differential diagnosis from secondary carcinoma in an attempt to elucidate the histogenetic derivation of this neoplasia.

  6. A simple fluid-mechanical model for the prediction of the stress-strain relation of the male urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, I; Rogg, B

    2007-01-01

    The non-linear, viscoelastic behavior of the male urinary bladder complicates the formulation of suitable stress-strain relations for the quasi-static filling process and the unsteady voiding process. In particular, the voiding process-which, in addition, is affected by contraction of muscles leading to generation of bladder wall tension-makes it difficult to obtain quantitative results. In the present study, a simple model is developed that uses certain urological data from cystometry and uroflowmetry to determine the stress-strain relations of the bladder wall during both filling and voiding.

  7. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Praneeth, Kokkula; Rathore, Yashwant; Waran, Vignesh; Singh, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI). On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair. PMID:26917927

  8. ATP is released from rabbit urinary bladder epithelial cells by hydrostatic pressure changes--a possible sensory mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, D R; Kennedy, I; Burton, T J

    1997-01-01

    1. The responses of rabbit urinary bladder to hydrostatic pressure changes and to electrical stimulation have been investigated using both the Ussing chamber and a superfusion apparatus. These experiments enabled us to monitor changes in both ionic transport across the tissue and cellular ATP release from it. 2. The urinary bladder of the rabbit maintains an electrical potential difference across its wall as a result largely of active sodium transport from the urinary (mucosal) to the serosal surface. 3. Small hydrostatic pressure differences produced by removal of bathing fluid from one side of the tissue caused reproducible changes in both potential difference and short-circuit current. The magnitude of these changes increases as the volume of fluid removed increases. 3. Amiloride on the mucosal (urinary), but not the serosal, surface of the membrane reduces the transepithelial potential difference and short-circuit current with an IC50 of 300 nM. Amiloride reduces the size of, but does not abolish, transepithelial potential changes caused by alterations in hydrostatic pressure. 4. Field electrical stimulation of strips of bladder tissue produces a reproducible release of ATP. Such release was demonstrated to occur largely from urothelial cells and is apparently non-vesicular as it increases in the absence of calcium and is not abolished by tetrodotoxin. 5. It is proposed that ATP is released from the urothelium as a sensory mediator for the degree of distension of the rabbit urinary bladder and other sensory modalities. PMID:9423189

  9. Large diverticulum of the urinary bladder: A rare cause of deep vein thrombosis with consecutive pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Oliver; Torzewski, Jan; Reichenbach-Klinke, Ekkehard; Zenk, Christine

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted with progressive dyspnea; he also had benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). An angio computed tomography scan showed pulmonary embolism with thrombi in both main pulmonary arteries. By duplex ultrasonography, we detected a thrombus in the right vena femoralis superficialis and vena femoralis communis. Simultaneously, we also noticed a large diverticulum on the right side of the urinary bladder and urinary stasis II of the left kidney. We consider the BPH as the trigger for a secondary diverticulum of the urinary bladder. As a result of its large dimensions, mechanical compression of the deep right pelvic veins resulted in thrombosis which finally caused the pulmonary embolism. With respect to the urinary stasis II, surgical excavation of the diverticulum with infravesical desobstruction was planned. The potentially lethal course of large diverticula may require surgery. PMID:26029307

  10. Increased Urinary Adenosine Triphosphate in Patients With Bladder Outlet Obstruction Due to Benign Prostate Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, Miguel; Silva, Isabel; Oliveira, José Carlos; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-11-01

    Diagnosis of bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) in patients with lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms is challenging without using invasive urodynamic tests. Recently, we showed in vitro that urothelial strips from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) release more ATP than controls. Here, we tested whether urinary ATP can be used as a wall tension transducer non-invasive biomarker to detect BOO in patients with BPH. 79 male patients with BOO and 22 asymptomatic controls were recruited prospectively. Patients were asked to complete the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire and to void at normal desire into a urinary flowmeter; the postvoid residual volume was determined by suprapubic ultrasonography. Urine samples from all individuals were examined for ATP, creatinine, and lactate dehydrogenase. BOO patients had significantly higher (P < 0.001) urinary ATP normalized by the voided volume (456 ± 36 nmol) than age-matched controls (209 ± 35 nmol). Urinary ATP amounts increased with the voided volume, but the slope of this rise was higher in BOO patients than in controls. A negative correlation was detected between urinary ATP and flow rate parameters, namely maximal flow rate (r = -0.310, P = 0.005), Siroky flow-volume normalization (r = -0.324, P = 0.004), and volume-normalized flow rate index (r = -0.320, P = 0.012). We found no correlation with LUT symptoms IPSS score. Areas under the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves were 0.91 (95%CI 0.86-0.96, P < 0.001) for ATP alone and 0.88 (95%CI 0.81-0.94, P < 0,001) when adjusted to urinary creatinine. Patients with BOO release higher amounts of ATP into the urine than the control group. The high area under the ROC curve suggests that urinary ATP can be a high-sensitive non-invasive biomarker of BOO, which may have a discriminative value of detrusor competence when comparing BPH patients with low urinary flow rates. Prostate 76

  11. Novel technique of sampling the urinary bladder for urothelial carcinoma specimens.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kien T; Ball, Christopher G; Swift, Joanne; A Flood, Trevor; Belanger, Eric C

    2015-05-01

    Sampling of the urinary bladder (UB) in radical cystectomy specimens is usually performed by obtaining sections through the lesions taken in rather random planes. The technique is hindered by the difficulty in identifying the anatomical relationship of the tumor with the remaining urinary bladder. Fifty radical cystectomy specimens were bisected in the horizontal plane at the middle portion of the UB then fixed without tissue stretching in 10% buffered formalin for at least 24 hours. The UBs were serially sectioned in parallel horizontal planes from the UB neck to the dome into rings of 3 to 10 mm thickness. The sections were orderly arranged and photographed. At least one ring of tissue was entirely submitted along with areas of interest or representative areas. Our proposed technique of transverse sections results in a mild increase in the number of sections submitted for microscopic examination. The advantages of our methods are (a) consistency and ease of sampling that help the microscopic-macroscopic correlation, (b) suitability for gross examination and for determining depth of invasion and largest tumor diameter, (c) improved identification of satellite lesions, and (d) suitability for neoplastic mapping and suitability for reexamination. The technique was validated by comparing with results of current technique. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. The relationship between urinary infection, cystoscopic appearance, and pathology of the bladder in man

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, F. P.; Banerjee, R.; Panchamia, P.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of bladder histology were made in patients with recurrent urinary infection or symptoms of cystitis, with a view to establishing its relationship to symptoms, cystoscopic appearance, and bacilluria. Bladder biopsies were taken from the patients and compared with control material obtained at necropsy. Acute inflammatory changes were inconstant and sometimes sparse. Chronic inflammatory changes were often marked, and were ranked by severity into four grades. There was a statistically significant correlation between the more severe grades and the finding of bacilluria, which was not dependent on sex or age. The grades in patients with recurrent non-bacterial dysuria (`urethritis') lay between those of the controls and the infected patients, and were statistically different from both. There was no correlation between these grades and either symptoms or the finding of trigonal hyperaemia during cystoscopy. However, heavy lymphocytic infiltration, and particularly germinal follicle formation, frequently resulted in macroscopic tubercle-like nodules which were visible on cystoscopy. Such germinal follicles may contribute to local antibacterial defences by their production of immunoglobulins, and may explain the high antibacterial antibody titres sometimes found in the sera of subjects with infection confined to the lower urinary tract. Images PMID:4855039

  13. Total retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder-cuff resection for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhenqiang; Li, Longkun; Wang, Xiangwei; Chen, Wei; Jia, Weisheng; He, Fan; Shen, Chongxing; Ye, Gang

    2014-12-01

    Open nephroureterectomy (ONU) and bladder cuff resection (ONU-BCR) has been the gold standard of surgical treatment for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (UUT-TCC). The aim of this study is to introduce a modified total retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (LNU) with bladder-cuff resection (LNU-BCR) method for treating UUT-TCC and compare its clinical efficacy with ONU-BCR. Sixty-five patients with UUT-TCC, who underwent ONU-BCR (n = 36) or LNU-BCR (n = 29) between January 2008 and June 2012, were analyzed in this retrospective study. Perioperative data as well as incidence of disease recurrence at the primary site or distant metastasis was compared in patients with at least 6 months follow-up. As compared with patients with ONU-BCR, the patients with LNU-BCR had significantly shorter operative time, lower estimated blood loss, shorter time to oral intake, lower analgesic dose, shorter duration of analgesic use, shorter duration of incision drainage tube, shorter time to ambulation out of bed and reduced postoperative hospital stay (all, p < .05). No significant difference in postoperative complications or incidence of bladder carcinoma recurrence and distant metastasis during the follow-up period was observed. The modified LNU-BCR represents an effective and safe alternative technique to ONU-BCR with the advantages of reduced invasiveness, bleeding and hospitalization.

  14. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE URINARY BLADDER OF THE TOAD, BUFO MARINUS

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Kwon

    1963-01-01

    The urinary bladder of the toad (Bufo marinus) was studied with both the light and the electron microscope. The bladder wall consists of epithelium, submucosa, and serosa. In the epithelium, four different cell types were recognized on the basis of their fine structure and staining properties with several different dyes. These four were designated as granular cells, mitochondria-rich cells, mucous cells, and basal cells. In addition, migratory cells of a different type were found in the basal region of the epithelium. The luminal surface of the epithelial cells presents irregular microvilli and is coated by PAS-positive material which has been further investigated by histochemical procedures and radioautography. Included is a description of the fine structural details of cell membranes, cell junctions, and intracellular components. The submucosa consists of a delicate stroma of fibroblasts and collagen fibers and also contains blood and lymph vessels, unmyelinated nerves, migratory cells, and smooth muscle cells. The serosa consists of a single layer of serosal (mesothelial) cells which form an uninterrupted covering of the viscus. Possible pathways of sodium and water transport across the bladder wall are discussed. PMID:14020969

  15. Urinary bladder matrix promotes site appropriate tissue formation following right ventricle outflow tract repair

    PubMed Central

    Remlinger, Nathaniel T; Gilbert, Thomas W; Yoshida, Masahiro; Guest, Brogan N; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Weaver, Michelle L; Wagner, William R; Brown, Bryan N; Tobita, Kimimasa; Wearden, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    The current prevalence and severity of heart defects requiring functional replacement of cardiac tissue pose a serious clinical challenge. Biologic scaffolds are an attractive tissue engineering approach to cardiac repair because they avoid sensitization associated with homograft materials and theoretically possess the potential for growth in similar patterns as surrounding native tissue. Both urinary bladder matrix (UBM) and cardiac ECM (C-ECM) have been previously investigated as scaffolds for cardiac repair with modest success, but have not been compared directly. In other tissue locations, bone marrow derived cells have been shown to play a role in the remodeling process, but this has not been investigated for UBM in the cardiac location, and has never been studied for C-ECM. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effectiveness of an organ-specific C-ECM patch with a commonly used ECM scaffold for myocardial tissue repair of the right ventricle outflow tract (RVOT), and to examine the role of bone marrow derived cells in the remodeling response. A chimeric rat model in which all bone marrow cells express green fluorescent protein (GFP) was generated and used to show the ability of ECM scaffolds derived from the heart and bladder to support cardiac function and cellular growth in the RVOT. The results from this study suggest that urinary bladder matrix may provide a more appropriate substrate for myocardial repair than cardiac derived matrices, as shown by differences in the remodeling responses following implantation, as well as the presence of site appropriate cells and the formation of immature, myocardial tissue. PMID:23974174

  16. TRPA1 mediates bladder hyperalgesia in a mouse model of cystitis.

    PubMed

    DeBerry, Jennifer J; Schwartz, Erica S; Davis, Brian M

    2014-07-01

    Urinary bladder pain is a primary symptom associated with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. We used systemic injections of cyclophosphamide (CYP), an alkylating antineoplastic agent, to induce cystitis and examine the roles of 2 channels previously demonstrated to be required for inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia: transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin-1 (TRPA1). Injection of CYP (100 mg/kg, i.p.) every other day for 5 days was accompanied by bladder edema and urothelial ulceration, but without significant plasma extravasation or infiltration of neutrophils. Toluidine blue staining showed a significant increase in the number of degranulated bladder mast cells after CYP treatment. Despite this mild pathology, CYP-treated mice exhibited bladder hyperalgesia 1 day after the final injection that persisted 7 days later. Although many previous studies of visceral hyperalgesia have reported changes in dorsal root ganglion neuron TRPV1 expression and/or function, we found no change in bladder afferent TRPV1 expression or sensitivity on the basis of the percentage of bladder afferents responsive to capsaicin, including at submaximal concentrations. In contrast, the percentage of bladder afferents expressing functional TRPA1 protein (i.e., those responsive to mustard oil) increased ∼2.5-fold 1 day after CYP treatment, and remained significantly elevated 7 days later. Moreover, bladder hyperalgesia was reversed by acute treatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (300 mg/kg, i.p.). Our results indicate that CYP-induced bladder hyperalgesia can be induced without robust inflammation or changes in primary afferent TRPV1. However, significant changes were observed in TRPA1 expression, and blockade of TRPA1 alleviated CYP-induced bladder hyperalgesia.

  17. Urine Stasis Predisposes to Urinary Tract Infection by an Opportunistic Uropathogen in the Megabladder (Mgb) Mouse.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Brian; Mohamed, Ahmad Z; Li, Birong; Wilhide, Michael E; Ingraham, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    Urinary stasis is a risk factor for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Homozygous mutant Megabladder (Mgb-/-) mice exhibit incomplete bladder emptying as a consequence of congenital detrusor aplasia. We hypothesize that this predisposes Mgb-/- mice to spontaneous and experimental UTI. Mgb-/-, Mgb+/-, and wild-type female mice underwent serial ultrasound and urine cultures at 4, 6, and 8 weeks to detect spontaneous UTI. Urine bacterial isolates were analyzed by Gram stain and speciated. Bladder stones were analyzed by x-ray diffractometry. Bladders and kidneys were subject to histologic analysis. The pathogenicity of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS) isolated from Mgb-/- urine was tested by transurethral administration to culture-negative Mgb-/- or wild-type animals. The contribution of urinary stasis to CONS susceptibility was evaluated by cutaneous vesicostomy in Mgb-/- mice. Mgb-/- mice develop spontaneous bacteriuria (42%) and struvite bladder stones (31%) by 8 weeks, findings absent in Mgb+/- and wild-type controls. CONS was cultured as a solitary isolate from Mgb-/- bladder stones. Bladders and kidneys from mice with struvite stones exhibit mucosal injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. These pathologic features of cystitis and pyelonephritis are replicated by transurethral inoculation of CONS in culture-negative Mgb-/- females, whereas wild-type animals are less susceptible to CONS colonization and organ injury. Cutaneous vesicostomy prior to CONS inoculation significantly reduces the quantity of CONS recovered from Mgb-/- urine, bladders, and kidneys. CONS is an opportunistic uropathogen in the setting of urinary stasis, leading to enhanced UTI incidence and severity in Mgb-/- mice.

  18. Urinary prostaglandin E₂ was increased in patients with suprapontine brain diseases, and associated with overactive bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hiroki; Akino, Hironobu; Ito, Hideaki; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Nomura, Tadao; Yokoyama, Osamu

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the association between the urinary levels of prostaglandins (PGE(2) and PGF(2α)), nerve growth factor (NGF) and substance P, and overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in patients with suprapontine brain diseases. The subjects were 114 patients in the chronic phase of a brain disease and 27 healthy controls with no brain disease or lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The OAB symptoms were assessed with the OAB symptom score and the subjects were then classified into 5 groups: healthy control, patients without LUTS, increased bladder sensation (IBS), OAB dry, and OAB wet. Urinary mediator concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and normalized to the urinary creatinine concentration, and then compared among the 5 groups. The urinary PGE(2) level was significantly higher in patients with brain diseases than in healthy controls, even in the patients without any OAB symptoms, and compared with patients without LUTS, a significant increase in the urinary PGE(2) was observed in patients with OAB dry or wet (P = .004 or .015, respectively). The PGF(2α) level showed a significant increase in OAB wet compared with patients without LUTS (P = .001). The urinary levels of NGF and substance P were not significantly associated with OAB as a result of this type of brain disease. The urinary PGE(2) level was putatively elevated in patients with suprapontine brain diseases and associated with the presence of OAB. The PGF(2α) level may also be associated with OAB. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracellular Uropathogenic E. coli Exploits Host Rab35 for Iron Acquisition and Survival within Urinary Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dikshit, Neha; Bist, Pradeep; Fenlon, Shannon N.; Pulloor, Niyas Kudukkil; Chua, Christelle En Lin; Scidmore, Marci A.; Carlyon, Jason A.; Tang, Bor Luen; Chen, Swaine L.; Sukumaran, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are common and morbid infections with limited therapeutic options. Previous studies have demonstrated that persistent intracellular infection of bladder epithelial cells (BEC) by UPEC contributes to recurrent UTI in mouse models of infection. However, the mechanisms employed by UPEC to survive within BEC are incompletely understood. In this study we aimed to understand the role of host vesicular trafficking proteins in the intracellular survival of UPEC. Using a cell culture model of intracellular UPEC infection, we found that the small GTPase Rab35 facilitates UPEC survival in UPEC-containing vacuoles (UCV) within BEC. Rab35 plays a role in endosomal recycling of transferrin receptor (TfR), the key protein responsible for transferrin–mediated cellular iron uptake. UPEC enhance the expression of both Rab35 and TfR and recruit these proteins to the UCV, thereby supplying UPEC with the essential nutrient iron. Accordingly, Rab35 or TfR depleted cells showed significantly lower intracellular iron levels and reduced ability to support UPEC survival. In the absence of Rab35, UPEC are preferentially trafficked to degradative lysosomes and killed. Furthermore, in an in vivo murine model of persistent intracellular infection, Rab35 also colocalizes with intracellular UPEC. We propose a model in which UPEC subverts two different vesicular trafficking pathways (endosomal recycling and degradative lysosomal fusion) by modulating Rab35, thereby simultaneously enhancing iron acquisition and avoiding lysosomal degradation of the UCV within bladder epithelial cells. Our findings reveal a novel survival mechanism of intracellular UPEC and suggest a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention against recurrent UTI. PMID:26248231

  20. Quantitative Changes in Cerebral Perfusion during Urinary Urgency in Women with Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Weissbart, Steven J.; Xu, Sihua; Bhavsar, Rupal; Rao, Hengyi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively measure changes in cerebral perfusion in select regions of interest in the brain during urinary urgency in women with overactive bladder (OAB) using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Methods Twelve women with OAB and 10 controls underwent bladder filling and rated urinary urgency (scale 0–10). ASL fMRI scans were performed (1) in the low urgency state after voiding and (2) high urgency state after drinking oral fluids. Absolute regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in select regions of interest was compared between the low and high urgency states. Results There were no significant differences in rCBF between the low and high urgency states in the control group. In the OAB group, rCBF (mean ± SE, ml/100 g/min) increased by 10–14% from the low to the high urgency state in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (44.56 ± 0.59 versus 49.52 ± 1.49, p < 0.05), left ACC (49.29 ± 0.85 versus 54.02 ± 1.46, p < 0.05), and left insula (50.46 ± 1.72 versus 54.99 ± 1.09, p < 0.05). Whole-brain analysis identified additional areas of activation in the right insula, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and pons/midbrain area. Conclusions Urinary urgency is associated with quantitative increase in cerebral perfusion in regions of the brain associated with processing emotional response to discomfort. PMID:28904950

  1. Histopathology of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mesenchymal tumours of the rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Kunze, E.; Ruschitzka, F.; Schwalbe, K.

    1990-01-01

    The present study reports the induction, histopathology, immunocytochemistry, growth pattern and proliferative behaviour of mesenchymal tumours of the urinary bladder of rats induced by a single intravesical dose (5 mg/kg/body weight) of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). In 14 of 283 female Wistar rats (incidence: 4.9%). 16 non-epithelial tumours had developed after an experimental period of 14 months. The most common histological type induced was of fibrohistiocytic origin (eight benign-appearing and three malignant fibrous histiocytomas). Furthermore, two pure histiocytomas (one benign and one malignant) and three capillary and cavernous haemangiomas were produced. Since no metastases occurred and no clear-cut distinction between a merely expansive and a truly invasive growth was possible, the diagnosis of malignancy was based on the degree of cellular atypia and the mitotic activity. The benign-appearing fibrous histiocytomas showed a mean mitotic index of 0.06% and the malignant fibrous histiocytomas of 0.34%. The mitotic activity of the malignant histiocytoma was threefold (0.78%) as high as in the benign-appearing histiocytoma (0.25%). There exist close morphological similarities between the induced mesenchymal tumours in the rat and those occurring in the human bladder. Although the spectrum of histological types of mesenchymal tumours seen in the rat bladder was narrower than that encountered in man, MNU seems suitable for further studying the histogenesis, histopathology and biology of experimentally induced non-epithelial bladder neoplasms to gain information for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of human disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:2164825

  2. Changes in nerve-mediated contractility of the lower urinary tract in a mouse model of premature ageing

    PubMed Central

    Triguero, D; Lafuente-Sanchis, A; Garcia-Pascual, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A high incidence of lower urinary tract disorders is associated with ageing. In the senescent-accelerated prone (SAMP8) mouse strain and the senescent-accelerated resistant (SAMR1) strain, we compared smooth muscle contractility in responses to intrinsic neurotransmitters, both in the bladder and urethra. Experimental Approach We analysed micturition frequency, the changes in muscle tension induced by electrical field stimulation or agonist administration, the density of nerves (adrenergic, cholinergic and nitrergic) and interstitial cells (ICs), as well as cGMP accumulation in bladder and urethral preparations. Key Results Senescent mice of the SAMP8 strain displayed increased micturition frequency and excitatory contractility of neurogenic origin in the bladder. While cholinergic nerve density remained unchanged, there was a mild sensitization to ACh in male mice. Potentiation in the detrusor may be also provoked by the stronger contribution of ATP, together with reduced adrenergic innervation in males and COX-derived prostanoid production in females. The greater excitatory contractility in the urethra was probably due to the sensitization to noradrenaline, in conjunction with attenuated nitrergic relaxation. There were also fewer neuronal NOS immunoreactive (ir) nerves and vimentin-positive ICs, although the sildenafil-and diethylamine-NONOate-induced relaxations and cGMP-ir remained unchanged. Conclusions and Implications Premature senescent mice exhibit bladder and urethral hyperexcitability, coupled with reduced urethral relaxation of neurogenic origin, which could model the impaired urinary function in elderly humans. We propose that senescence-accelerated mice provide a useful tool to analyse the basic mechanisms of age-related changes in bladder and urethral function. PMID:24372152

  3. Prostaglandins as mediators of acidification in the urinary bladder of Bufo marinus

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, L.W.; Yorio, T. )

    1990-05-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether prostaglandins (PG) play a role in H+ and NH4+ excretion in the urinary bladder of Bufo marinus. Ten paired hemibladders from normal toads were mounted in chambers. One was control and the other hemibladder received PGE2 in the serosal medium (10(-5) M). H+ excretion was measured by change in pH in the mucosal fluid and reported in units of nmol (100 mg tissue)-1 (min)-1. NH4+ excretion was measured colorimetrically and reported in the same units. The control group H+ excretion was 8.4 +/- 1.67, while the experimental group was 16.3 +/- 2.64 (P less than 0.01). The NH4+ excretion in the experimental and control group was not significantly different. Bladders from toads in a 48-hr NH4+Cl acidosis (metabolic) did not demonstrate this response to PGE2 (P greater than 0.30). Toads were put in metabolic acidosis by gavaging with 10 ml of 120 mM NH4+Cl 3 x day for 2 days. In another experiment, we measured levels of PG in bladders from control (N) and animals placed in metabolic acidosis (MA). Bladders were removed from the respective toad, homogenized, extracted, and PG separated using high-pressure liquid chromatography and quantified against PG standards. The results are reported in ng (mg tissue)-1. PGE2 fraction in N was 1.09 +/- 0.14 and in MA was 3.21 +/- 0.63 (P less than 0.01). PGF1 alpha, F2 alpha and I2 were not significantly different in N and MA toads. Bladders were also removed from N and MA toads, and incubated in Ringer's solution containing (3H)arachidonic acid (0.2 microCi/ml) at 25 degrees C for 2 hr. Bladders were then extracted for PG and the extracts separated by thin layer chromatography. PG were identified using standards and autoradiography, scraped from plates, and counted in a scintillation detector. The results are reported in cpm/mg tissue x hr +/- SEM.

  4. Linezolid bladder irrigation as adjunctive treatment for a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hill, David M; Wood, G Christopher; Hickerson, William L

    2015-02-01

    To describe the first reported successful use of adjunctive linezolid bladder irrigation. An 89-year-old woman with 10% TBSA burns developed septic shock and anuric acute kidney insufficiency. She acquired a urinary tract infection caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm). Based on clinical status, a linezolid bladder irrigation was initiated in addition to high-dose intravenous linezolid and demonstrated microbiological cure with 7 days of treatment. Linezolid is primarily hepatically cleared and has no labeled indication for urinary tract infections. Anuria adds an additional complication of potentially reduced urinary drug concentrations. Bladder irrigation offers the benefit of achieving high local drug concentrations, but there are no data regarding such a route for linezolid. This case report is the first demonstrating the use, stability, safety, and efficacy of linezolid as a continuous bladder irrigation. Linezolid use as a bladder irrigation may be a feasible route of administration in anuric, critically ill patients with VREfm and few antimicrobial options. Further studies are warranted. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Influence of chitosan and polycarbophil on permeation of a model hydrophilic drug into the urinary bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Grabnar, I; Bogataj, M; Mrhar, A

    2003-04-30

    Influence of dispersions of mucoadhesive polymers chitosan and polycarbophil on permeability properties of urinary bladder was investigated in vitro on isolated porcine urinary bladder. Pipemidic acid as a model hydrophilic drug was used. Its distribution in the bladder wall was determined from actual tissue concentrations by a method based on sectioning of frozen tissue and extraction of tissue slices. Pipemidic acid tissue concentration versus tissue depth profiles were evaluated by a diffusion model assuming constant diffusion coefficient. Increase in bladder wall permeability was observed in the presence of both polymers. Apparent permeability (mean+/-S.D.) of urinary bladder wall was increased 2.7+/-2.9 and 2.8+/-2.0 times for chitosan, and 2.3+/-2.0 and 4.3+/-4.2 times for polycarbophil at 0.5 and 1.0%, w/v polymer concentration, respectively. This increase is a consequence of the increased permeability of urothelium. These findings support investigations on application of chitosan and polycarbophil in development of mucoadhesive intravesical drug delivery systems. Experimental model may be applied to evaluate the results of experiments with drugs used in intravesical therapy.

  6. Topographies and isoforms of the progesterone receptor in female human, rat and mouse bladder.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Thomas; Rietjens, Roma; Voets, Thomas; Everaerts, Wouter; De Ridder, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Steroid hormones such as progesterone are known to influence bladder function. Progesterone effects are mediated by the progesterone receptor (PR) but no detailed studies of PR in bladder exist. We have investigated the presence, topography and subtypes of PR in mouse, rat and human bladder. Fresh tissue samples were obtained from cystectomies in female humans, rats and mice (n = 7 per group). Tissue samples were processed for immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF) and western blot (WB) and, for each species, a panel of specific PR antibody clones was used. Interpretation of IHC/IF was carried out by light/fluorescent microscopy and of WB via standard WB software. IHC/IF in female human bladder showed PR on the interstitial cells in the lamina propria and between detrusor smooth muscle cells, whereas in female rat and mouse bladder, PR was only found on the urothelium. WB in human bladder showed a 78-kD and a 60-kDa band, respectively, corresponding to a modified PR isoform A and PR isoform C. WB in rat and mice bladder showed a 60 kDa band and a 37 kDa band, respectively corresponding with PR isoform C and an unknown isoform. This is the first detailed investigation of the precise location and presence of several isoforms of PR in bladder, together with a comparison of these data between human, rat and mouse. Our study has revealed complex PR families in bladders from the various species studied and demonstrates obvious inter-species differences in PR topography and isoforms.

  7. The effects of Glivec on the urinary bladder excitation of rats with suprasacral or sacral spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jianping; Zhang, Yongge; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Jiang; Song, Bo; Li, Longkun

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects of the c-kit blocker imatinib mesylate (Glivec) on the bladders of animals with suprasacral cord injury (SSCI) and sacral cord injury (SCI). We randomized 60 female Sprague-Dawley rats into control, sham, SSCI (T8/9 transection), and SCI (S1-3 transection) groups. Six weeks later, we evaluated the effects of stepwise Glivec administrations on urinary bladder contraction using cystometry and the detrusor strip stretch-test. We investigated spontaneous calcium transients of kit-positive interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) with the preloaded Ca(2+) indicator fluo-3AM. The expression levels of c-kit and the number of ICCs in those bladders were determined using Western blot and fluorescence staining analyses, respectively. Bladder capacity and compliance were decreased in SSCI bladders and increased in SCI bladders (P<0.05). The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of detrusor strips, the frequency and relative fluorescence intensity of the spontaneous Ca(2+) waves, and c-kit expression in the bladder were significantly increased in the SSCI group and decreased in the SCI group compared with the control and sham groups (P<0.05). The dose-dependent effects of Glivec also confirmed consistent functional variations in bladder activity. The expressions and effects of Glivec were enhanced in SSCI bladders and inhibited in SCI bladders, which may indicate potential roles of ICCs for the c-kit signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of SSCI and SCI bladder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Orthotopic urinary diversion after radical cystectomy in treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Jovan, Hadži-Djokić; Vladan, Andrejević; Tomislav, Pejčić; Miodrag, Aćimović; Uroš, Babić; Miodrag, Stanić; Zoran, Džamić

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment of invasive carcinoma of the bladder in males includes total cystectomy removal of the prostate, seminal vesicles, and the distal parts of the urethers and the pelvic lymph node dissection as well. At this moment it is not possible to recommend a particular type of urinary diversion, but today in clinical practice commonly used derivative are ileal orthotopic neobladder as the continent one and ileal conduit as non-continent urinary diversion. Continent urinary diversion after radical cystectomy are the result of the application of technological innovation in surgery, but also knowledge, imagination and skill of well trained urologist. This type of operation significantly improves the quality of life in patients who underwent radical cystectomy, and the proposal is to operate whenever there is a possibility for this type of procedure. Also it is very important, during surgery to respect oncological principles, of complete removal of tumorous tissue and that the functional principle of ensur- ing that the patients have daytime and also nighttime continence later on after the surgery.

  9. An exploratory study for bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Preeti; Gupta, Anupam; Reddi, V. Senthil Kumar; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This is an exploratory study, which aimed to analyze urodynamic findings in patients who are on atypical antipsychotics and present with urinary incontinence (UI) in order to understand the mechanisms of antipsychotic-emergent UI. Patients and Methods: Eight patients (34 ± 7.6 years; five males and three females) diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, who were on risperidone, olanzapine, or clozapine monotherapy and having UI were recruited. Urodynamic study was performed in all patients. Results: Six out of eight (75%) patients had abnormal urodynamic findings. Three of them had detrusor overactivity (DO) without detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD); two had DO with DSD; and one had hypoactive detrusor with nonrelaxing sphincter during void phase. The common urinary symptoms were urgency, enuresis, and straining to void urine. Significant postvoid residual urine was found in two patients. Conclusion: The evidence of bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent UI is similar to that present in patients with neurological disorders. Urinary complaints in patients on antipsychotics thus need to be evaluated and managed systematically using the protocol followed for neurological conditions. PMID:28197002

  10. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CANCER-RELATED MOLECULAR NETWORKS IN HUMAN AND RAT URINARY BLADDER CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) is classified as a known human carcinogen with primary targets of urinary bladder (UB), skin and lung. The most prevalent source of As exposure in humans is drinking water contaminated with inorganic As (iAs), and millions of people worldwide are exposed to drinking ...

  11. Transcriptional profile of diurnon-induces toxicity on the urinary bladder of male wistar rats to inform mode of action

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide that induces rat urinary bladder urothelial tumors at high dietary levels (2500 ppm). The specific mode of action and molecular alterations triggered by diuron, however, have not been clarified. Th...

  12. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CANCER-RELATED MOLECULAR NETWORKS IN HUMAN AND RAT URINARY BLADDER CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) is classified as a known human carcinogen with primary targets of urinary bladder (UB), skin and lung. The most prevalent source of As exposure in humans is drinking water contaminated with inorganic As (iAs), and millions of people worldwide are exposed to drinking ...

  13. Transcriptional profile of diurnon-induces toxicity on the urinary bladder of male wistar rats to inform mode of action

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide that induces rat urinary bladder urothelial tumors at high dietary levels (2500 ppm). The specific mode of action and molecular alterations triggered by diuron, however, have not been clarified. Th...

  14. Postoperative Urinary Retention is an Independent Predictor of Short-Term and Long-Term Future Bladder Outlet Procedure in Men.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Robert H; Vedachalam, Srikanth; Shah, Arpeet S; Kothari, Anai N; Kuo, Paul C; Gupta, Gopal N; Turk, Thomas M T

    2017-06-15

    Postoperative urinary retention is a common complication across surgical specialties. To our knowledge no literature to date has examined postoperative urinary retention as a predictor of long-term receipt of surgery for bladder outlet obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the records of inpatients who underwent nonurological surgery in California between 2008 and 2010. Postoperative urinary retention during the index admission was identified, as was receipt of a bladder outlet procedure (transurethral prostate resection, prostate photoselective vaporization or suprapubic prostatectomy) at a subsequent encounter. Patients were matched using propensity scoring of demographics, comorbidities and surgery type. Adjusted Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to determine the cumulative incidence of subsequent bladder outlet procedures by patient group, including group 1-age 60 years or greater and postoperative urinary retention, group 2-age 60 years or greater and no postoperative urinary retention, group 3-age less than 60 years and postoperative urinary retention, and group 4-age less than 60 years and no postoperative urinary retention. Of 769,141 eligible male patients postoperative urinary retention developed in 8,051 (1.1%). Following hospital discharge 1,855 patients (0.24%) underwent a bladder outlet procedure. Those treated with a bladder outlet procedure were significantly more likely to have experienced postoperative urinary retention during the index admission (6.3% vs 1.0%, p <0.001). On matched analysis the bladder outlet procedure rate at 3 years was 7.1%, 2.2%, 0.8% and 0.0% in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. In men 60 years old or older postoperative urinary retention identified those with an increased incidence of bladder outlet procedures within 3 years. Men younger than 60 years had a low rate of subsequent bladder outlet procedures regardless of a postoperative urinary retention diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association

  15. Bovine papillomavirus type 2 infects the urinary bladder of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and plays a crucial role in bubaline urothelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Ozkul, Ayhan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Maiolino, Paola; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Marcus, Ioan; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Roperto, Franco

    2013-02-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) has been shown to infect and play a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes grazed on pastures with ferns from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey. BPV-2 DNA has been found in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder. Furthermore, this virus may be a normal inhabitant of the urinary bladder since BPV-2 DNA has also been detected in clinically normal buffaloes. The viral activation by fern immunosuppressant or carcinogen may trigger the urothelial cell transformation. The E5 oncoprotein was solely detected in urothelial tumours and appeared to be co-localized with the overexpressed and phosphorylated platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptor in a double-colour immunofluorescence assay. Our results indicate that the E5-PDGF β receptor interaction also occurs in spontaneous tumours of the bubaline urinary bladder, revealing an additional role of BPV-2 in bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes.

  16. [A case of small cell carcinoma in the urinary bladder responding to gemcitabine/cisplatin combination therapy as neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shirato, Akitomi; Shimamoto, Kenji; Ozawa, Akira; Tanji, Nozomu; Yokoyama, Masayoshi

    2006-12-01

    We report a case of primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. A 79-year-old man with the chief complaints of macrohematuria and pollakisuria was admitted to our hospital. Cystoscopy and computed tomography (CT) revealed a non-papillary broad-based bladder tumor. Histological diagnosis was small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, and he underwent 3 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy including gemcitabine and cisplatin with a preoperative diagnosis of cT3bN0M0. After the chemotherapy, cystoscopy and CT showed complete remission. Total cystectomy with ileal conduit was performed following 3 courses of chemotherapy. Microscopic examination revealed that the small cell carcinoma had disappeared and the converted squamous cell carcinoma remained only in a small part of the specimens. The patient was carefully followed for 10 months after operation, with no tumor recurrence.

  17. Forced diuresis and dual-phase 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT scan for restaging of urinary bladder cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harkirat, S; Anand, SS; Jacob, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Context: The results of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging carried out with the current standard techniques for assessment of urinary tract cancers have been reported to be less than satisfactory because of the urinary excretion of the tracer. Aims: To investigate the role of dual-phase FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive cancers of the urinary bladder, with delayed imaging after forced diuresis and oral hydration as the scanning protocol. Settings and Design: FDG-PET has been considered to be of limited value for the detection of urinary tract cancers because of interference by the FDG excreted in urine. We investigated the efficacy of delayed FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive bladder cancer, with imaging performed after intravenous (IV) administration of a potent diuretic and oral hydration. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with invasive cancer of the urinary bladder were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I (22 patients) included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had not undergone cystectomy and group II (seven patients) included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had undergone cystectomy and urinary diversion procedure. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs 60 min after IV injection of 370 mega-Becquerel (MBq) of FDG. Additional delayed images were acquired 60-90 min after IV furosemide and oral hydration. PET/CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/CT images and the findings were recorded. The imaging findings were confirmed by cystoscopy, biopsy or follow-up PET/CT. Results: The technique was successful in achieving adequate washout of urinary FDG and overcame the problems posed by the excess FDG in the urinary tract. Hypermetabolic lesions could be easily detected by PET and precisely localized to the bladder wall, perivesical region and pelvic lymph nodes. PET/CT delayed images were able to demonstrate 16

  18. Bladder volume at onset of vesicoureteral reflux is an independent risk factor for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Siobhan E; Arlen, Angela M; Storm, Douglas W; Kieran, Kathleen; Cooper, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Improved identification of children with vesicoureteral reflux at risk for recurrent febrile urinary tract infection may impact management decisions. We hypothesized that reflux occurring earlier during bladder filling increases the duration of exposure of the kidneys to bacteria, and, therefore, increases the risk of pyelonephritis. Children with vesicoureteral reflux and detailed voiding cystourethrogram data were identified. Bladder volume at onset of reflux was normalized for age. Demographics, reflux grade, laterality, presence/absence of bladder-bowel dysfunction and breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections were assessed. Median followup was 24 months (IQR 12 to 52). A total of 208 girls and 47 boys were analyzed with a mean ± SD age at diagnosis of 3.1 ± 2.6 years. On univariate analysis history of febrile urinary tract infection (HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.33-2.85, p = 0.01), dilating vesicoureteral reflux (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.05-2.42, p = 0.03) and bladder-bowel dysfunction (HR 1.66, 95% CI 0.99-2.75, p = 0.05) were associated with an increased risk of breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection. Median bladder volume at onset of reflux in children with breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection was significantly less (33.1%) than in those without infection (49.5%, p = 0.003). Reflux onset at 35% predicted bladder capacity or less was associated with a significantly increased risk of breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection on multivariate analysis (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.05-2.38, p = 0.03). Children with early filling vesicoureteral reflux are at increased risk for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infection independent of reflux grade. Bladder volume at onset of reflux should be recorded during cystograms since it provides additional prognostic information about the risk of pyelonephritis and resolution, and may assist with counseling and clinical decision making. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by

  19. Electrical properties of smooth muscle in the guinea-pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Bramich, N J; Brading, A F

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of transmural nerve stimulation were examined on preparations of detrusor smooth muscle from guinea-pig urinary bladder using intracellular recording techniques. Most recordings were made from preparations in which spontaneous and evoked action potentials had been inhibited by nifedipine (10 microM), a dihydropyridine that blocks L-type Ca2+ channels. 2. Supramaximal stimuli evoked excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) which could be divided into three basic types. Type 1 EJPs had short latencies (< 30 ms) and fast rise times (< 60 ms). Type 2 EJPs consisted of two components: a small depolarization that was followed by a second depolarization with a faster rise time. In a third type of cell, at high strengths of stimulation, EJPs resembled type 1 EJPs but at lower strengths of stimulation were similar in time course to type 2 EJPs. 3. All EJPs were abolished by tetrodotoxin (1 microM) and reduced by omega-conotoxin (0.1 microM), but were unaffected by hexamethonium (0.1 mM), suggesting that they result from the release of transmitter from post-ganglionic nerve fibres. All responses persisted in the presence of atropine (1 microM) but were abolished following the desensitization of P2-purinoceptors with alpha, beta-methylene ATP (m-ATP; 10 microM). 4. Spontaneous excitatory junction potentials (SEJPs) were also recorded from most cells. SEJPs were similar in appearance to fast single-component EJPs; however, in general they had a briefer time course. SEJPs persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM). 5. The electrical properties of urinary bladder smooth muscle were also examined. Voltage changes induced by point current injection into cells had fast rates of rise and decay (time constant, 5-20 ms). The input resistance of cells ranged between 12 and 108 M omega. When recordings were taken from cells near the point of current injection, resultant electrotonic potentials could be detected in only a small proportions of cells. 6. The results

  20. Urothelial Dysfunction and Increased Suburothelial Inflammation of Urinary Bladder Are Involved in Patients with Upper Urinary Tract Urolithiasis – Clinical and Immunohistochemistry Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the urothelial dysfunction and inflammation of urinary bladder in patients with upper urinary tract (UUT) urolithiasis through the results of cystoscopic hydrodistension and immunohistochemistry study. Methods Ninety-one patients with UUT urolithiasis underwent cystoscopic hydrodistension before the stone surgery. Immunofluorescence staining of E-cadherin, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), tryptase (mast cell activation), and TUNEL (urothelial apoptosis) were performed in 42 patients with glomerulations after hydrodistension, 10 without glomerulations, and 10 controls. Results Of the 91 patients, 62 (68.2%) developed glomerulations after hydrodistension. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) were present in 53.8% patients, in whom significantly smaller maximal anesthetic bladder capacity (MBC) was noted. Patients with middle or lower 1/3 ureteral stones had a significantly higher glomerulation rate (88.6% vs. 55.4%, p<0.01) and lower MBC (618.4±167.6 vs. 701.2±158.4 ml, p = 0.027) than those with upper 1/3 ureteral or renal stones. Patients with UUT urolithiasis had significantly lower expression of E-cadherin (26.2±14.8 vs. 42.4±16.7) and ZO-1 (5.16±4.02 vs. 11.02±5.66); and higher suburothelial mast cell (13.3±6.8 vs. 1.3±1.2) and apoptotic cell (2.6±2.5 vs. 0.1±0.3) numbers than in controls (all p<0.01). Conclusions Urothelial dysfunction and increased suburothelial inflammation and apoptosis are highly prevalent in the bladders of UUT urolithiasis patients, indicating inflammation cross-talk between UUT and urinary bladder. Patients with UUT urolithiaisis concomitant with LUTS had a smaller MBC, which may explain the presence of irritative bladder symptoms. PMID:25329457

  1. Ethanol-extracted propolis enhances BBN-initiated urinary bladder carcinogenesis via non-mutagenic mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Li; Gi, Min; Fujioka, Masaki; Doi, Kenichiro; Yamano, Shotaro; Tachibana, Hirokazu; Fang, He; Kakehashi, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2015-09-01

    Ethanol-extracted propolis (EEP) is used for medical, dietetic and cosmetic purposes. In this study, the effects of EEP on urinary bladder carcinogenesis, its underlying mechanism and in vivo genotoxicity were investigated. In experiment 1, rats were treated with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) for 2 or 4 weeks followed by dietary administration of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5 or 1% EEP for 4 or 32 weeks, respectively. At week 6, the mRNA levels of top2a, cyclin D1 and survivin were significantly elevated in the 0.5 and 1% EEP groups. At week 36, the incidence and multiplicity of urothelial carcinomas and total tumors were markedly elevated in all EEP groups. In experiment 2, rats were fed basal diet or the 1% EEP diet for 13 weeks without carcinogen initiation. Increases in urinary precipitate, cell proliferation and incidence of simple hyperplasia were observed in the 1% EEP group. In experiment 3, dietary administration of 2.5% EEP to gpt delta rats for 13 weeks did not induce any obvious mutagenicity in the urinary bladder urothelium. Taken together, EEP enhanced BBN-initiated rat urinary bladder carcinogenesis in a non-genotoxic manner through increasing formation of urinary precipitate, enhancing cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis during the early stages of carcinogenesis.

  2. ROS generation via NOX4 and its utility in the cytological diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via NADPH oxidase (NOX) contributes to various types of cancer progression. In the present research, we examined the pathobiological role of NADPH oxidase (NOX)4-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the urinary bladder, and demonstrated the utility of ROS labeling in urine cytology. Methods NOX4 gene was silenced in vivo and in vitro by NOX4 siRNA transfection with or without atlocollagen. Cell cycle and measurement of ROS were analyzed by flowcytometry. Orthotopic implantation animal model was used in vivo experiment. NOX4 expression in urothelial carcinoma cells was observed by immunohistochemical analysis using surgical specimens of human bladder cancer. Urine cytology was performed after treatment with ROS detection reagents in addition to Papanicolaou staining. Results NOX4 was overexpressed in several UC cell lines and the NOX inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium reduced intracellular ROS and induced p16-dependent cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Moreover, silencing of NOX4 by siRNA significantly reduced cancer cell growth in vivo as assessed in an orthotopic mouse model. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated high expression of NOX4 in low grade/non-invasive and high grade/invasive UC including precancerous lesions such as dysplasia but not in normal urothelium. Then, we assessed the usefulness of cytological analysis of ROS producing cells in urine (ROS-C). Urine samples obtained from UC cases and normal controls were treated with fluorescent reagents labeling the hydrogen peroxide/superoxide anion and cytological atypia of ROS positive cells were analyzed. As a result, the sensitivity for detection of low grade, non-invasive UC was greatly increased (35% in conventional cytology (C-C) vs. 75% in ROS-C), and the specificity was 95%. Through ROS-C, we observed robust improvement in the accuracy of follow-up urine cytology for cases with previously diagnosed UC

  3. Recurrence of childhood nephrogenic adenoma in urinary bladder developed four years after previous surgery despite intravesical sodium hyaluronate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Özçift, Burak; Kaçar, Ayper; Tiryaki, Hüseyin Tuğrul

    2016-01-01

    Nephrogenic adenoma (NA) is a rarely seen benign metaplastic lesion of the urinary tract. Its etiology is uncertain, but induced by chronic inflammation, irritation, and trauma. NA is located in the urinary tract, most commonly in the bladder. NA usually presents with hematuria and lower urinary tract symptoms. In the literature it is mostly seen in adults but about 30 cases of NA’s have been reported in children. Treatment of intravesical lesions consists of transurethral resection (TUR) and fulguration and rarely partial or total cystectomy may be required in ineffective TUR. Recurrence rate is high during long-term follow-up. The intravesical application of sodium hyaluronate produces a protective effect on the glycosaminoglycan layer and delays or prevents its recurrence. We report a case of recurrent NA of the bladder in a pediatric male patient who was presented four years after previous surgery despite intravesical sodium hyaluronate therapy. PMID:27909627

  4. Validation of the diagnostic utility of urinary midkine for the detection of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Vu Van, Dana; Heberling, Ulrike; Wirth, Manfred P; Fuessel, Susanne

    2016-11-01

    As it has been demonstrated previously that midkine (also known as neurite growth-promoting factor 2) protein levels in urine of bladder cancer (BCa) patients are increased compared to healthy controls, the present study validated the diagnostic utility of midkine in an independent patient cohort and compared the observed values with voided urine cytology (VUC), which is the current reference standard for non-invasive diagnosis of BCa. Voided urine samples were prospectively collected from 92 BCa patients and 70 control subjects. Protein levels of midkine were assessed using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and normalized to urinary creatinine. The diagnostic performance of urinary midkine was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curves. The best combinations of sensitivities and specificities were determined by Youden's Index. Midkine concentrations were significantly elevated in urine samples from BCa patients compared to controls (P<0.001; Mann-Whitney U Test). The level of midkine was associated with disease progression, with the highest concentrations in urine specimens of patients with pT1 and ≥pT2a, as well as high-grade tumors (P<0.001; Mann-Whitney U test). Sensitivities of urinary midkine and VUC were 69.7 and 87.6%, respectively. The corresponding specificities for midkine and VUC were 77.9 and 87.7%, respectively. The combined use of VUC and midkine improved the sensitivity to 93.3%, but reduced the specificity to 66.2%. Despite its reduced discriminatory power for low-grade and low-stage BCa, urinary midkine can be utilized for the identification of high-grade pT1 and ≥pT2a tumors. This means that midkine may potentially be suitable for the identification of patients with high risk BCa.

  5. Urinary oncofetal ED-A fibronectin correlates with poor prognosis in patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Shanna A; Loomans, Holli A; Ketova, Tatiana; Andl, Claudia D; Clark, Peter E; Zijlstra, Andries

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN) contributes to the structural integrity of tissues as well as the adhesive and migratory functions of cells. While FN is abundantly expressed in adult tissues, the expression of several alternatively spliced FN isoforms is restricted to embryonic development, tissue remodeling and cancer. These FN isoforms, designated ED-A and ED-B, are frequently expressed by cancer cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts and newly forming blood vessels. Using a highly sensitive collagen-based indirect ELISA, we evaluated the correlation of urinary ED-A and ED-B at time of cystectomy with overall survival in patients with high-grade bladder cancer (BCa). Detectable levels of total FN as well as ED-A and ED-B were found in urine from 85, 73 and 51 % of BCa patients, respectively. The presence of urinary ED-A was a significant independent predictor of 2-year overall survival (OS) after adjusting for age, tumor stage, lymph node stage, and urinary creatinine by multivariable Logistic Regression (p = 0.029, OR = 4.26, 95 % CI 1.16-15.71) and improved accuracy by 3.6 %. Furthermore, detection of ED-A in the urine was a significant discriminator of survival specifically in BCa patients with negative lymph node status (Log-Rank, p = 0.006; HR = 5.78, 95 % CI 1.39-24.13). Lastly, multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that urinary ED-A was an independent prognostic indicator of 5-year OS rate for patients with BCa (p = 0.04, HR = 2.20, 95 % CI 1.04-4.69). Together, these data suggest that cancer-derived, alternatively spliced FN isoforms can act as prognostic indicators and that additional studies are warranted to assess the clinical utility of ED-A in BCa.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of CART-containing cells in urinary bladder of rats with renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Janiuk, I; Kasacka, I

    2015-04-13

    Recent biological advances make it possible to discover new peptides associated with hypertension. The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a known factor in appetite and feeding behaviour. Various lines of evidence suggest that this peptide participates not only in control of feeding behaviour but also in the regulation of the cardiovascular and sympathetic systems and blood pressure. The role of CART in blood pressure regulation led us to undertake a study aimed at analysing quantitative changes in CART-containing cells in urinary bladders (UB) of rats with renovascular hypertension. We used the Goldblatt model of arterial hypertension (two-kidney, one clip) to evaluate quantitative changes. This model provides researchers with a commonly used tool to analyse the renin-angiotensin system of blood pressure control and, eventually, to develop drugs for the treatment of chronic hypertension. The study was performed on sections of urinary bladders of rats after 3-, 14-, 28-, 42 and 91 days from hypertension induction. Immunohistochemical identification of CART cells was performed on paraffin for the UBs of all the study animals. CART was detected in the endocrine cells, especially numerous in the submucosa and muscularis layers, with a few found in the transitional epithelium and only occasionally in serosa. Hypertension significantly increased the number of CART-positive cells in the rat UBs. After 3 and 42 days following the procedure, statistically significantly higher numbers of CART-positive cells were identified in comparison with the control animals. The differences between the hypertensive rats and the control animals concerned not only the number density of CART-immunoreactive cells but also their localization. After a 6-week period, each of the rats subjected to the renal artery clipping procedure developed stable hypertension. CART appeared in numerous transitional epithelium cells. As this study provides novel findings, the question

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of CART-Containing Cells in Urinary Bladder of Rats with Renovascular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Janiuk, I.; Kasacka, I.

    2015-01-01

    Recent biological advances make it possible to discover new peptides associated with hypertension. The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a known factor in appetite and feeding behaviour. Various lines of evidence suggest that this peptide participates not only in control of feeding behaviour but also in the regulation of the cardiovascular and sympathetic systems and blood pressure. The role of CART in blood pressure regulation led us to undertake a study aimed at analysing quantitative changes in CART-containing cells in urinary bladders (UB) of rats with renovascular hypertension. We used the Goldblatt model of arterial hypertension (two-kidney, one clip) to evaluate quantitative changes. This model provides researchers with a commonly used tool to analyse the renin-angiotensin system of blood pressure control and, eventually, to develop drugs for the treatment of chronic hypertension. The study was performed on sections of urinary bladders of rats after 3-, 14-, 28-, 42 and 91 days from hypertension induction. Immunohistochemical identification of CART cells was performed on paraffin for the UBs of all the study animals. CART was detected in the endocrine cells, especially numerous in the submucosa and muscularis layers, with a few found in the transitional epithelium and only occasionally in serosa. Hypertension significantly increased the number of CART-positive cells in the rat UBs. After 3 and 42 days following the procedure, statistically significantly higher numbers of CART-positive cells were identified in comparison with the control animals. The differences between the hypertensive rats and the control animals concerned not only the number density of CART-immunoreactive cells but also their localization. After a 6-week period, each of the rats subjected to the renal artery clipping procedure developed stable hypertension. CART appeared in numerous transitional epithelium cells. As this study provides novel findings, the question

  8. [Criteria of efficacy of adjuvant immunotherapy of surface cancer of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Medvedev, V L; Budnik, N V

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of prognostic significance of interleukine-8 (L-8) urine levels was made in 12 patients with verified surface cancer of the urinary bladder (SCUB) on adjuvant intravesical immunotherapy. Quantitative enzyme immunoassay identified IL-8 in the urine before intravesical injection of BCG vaccine and 6 hours later. A total of 192 urine samples were studied ("Multiskan-Jems", 405 nm). Adjuvant immunotherapy raises an L-8 level in the urine of the patients. After 8-week immunotherapy IL-8 elevated from 169.4 pg/ml to 326 pg/ml. Four patients with minimal difference in IL-8 urine levels (120 pg/ml, on the average) before and 6 hours after intravesical injection of BCG vaccine developed recurrence. Thus, quantitative assessment of IL-8 in urine of SCUB patients given intravesical BCG therapy can serve as one of prognostic criteria of adjuvant immunotherapy efficacy.

  9. Type IV Sacrococcygeal Teratoma Displacing the Urinary Bladder: Unique Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eftekharzadeh, Sahar; Keihani, Sorena; Fareghi, Mehdi; Alamsahebpour, Alireza; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Type IV sacrococcygeal teratoma is a rare pediatric tumor that is confined to the presacral area with no external component. The signs and symptoms often arise due to mass effect and compression of adjacent organs. Urinary retention is an uncommon presenting symptom in these patients. A wide spectrum of imaging findings may be encountered in cases with sacrococcygeal teratoma because of variability of tumor size and components. We hereby present a unique magnetic resonance urography finding in a type IV sacrococcygeal teratoma which caused bladder displacement. A meticulous and complete resection of tumor with special attention to the pelvic plexus led to preservation of normal voiding function and normal bowel function in this patient. PMID:27413571

  10. Phyllodes tumour of the urinary bladder: A report of a unique case.

    PubMed

    Tchrakian, N; Browne, E; Shanks, J H; Flynn, R; Crowther, S

    2017-08-14

    Phyllodes tumours (PT) of the male urogenital tract are rare; to date, fewer than one hundred cases have been described in the prostate, and under fifteen in the seminal vesicle.(1) They display histologic features and clinical behaviour similar to PTs of the female breast; the lesions may be cured by surgical resection, but a large proportion exhibit local recurrence, and cases of direct invasion into adjacent organs and widespread metastasis have been reported.(2) Although no single morphologic feature is reliably predictive of prognosis, a combined assessment may be used for grading and prognostication, as in the breast.(2) We encountered a primary urinary bladder PT which, to our knowledge, is the first such case described in a human. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of gap junction protein connexin 43 in bovine urinary bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Corteggio, A; Florio, J; Roperto, F; Borzacchiello, G

    2011-01-01

    The aetiopathogenesis of urinary bladder tumours in cattle involves prolonged ingestion of bracken fern and infection by bovine papillomavirus types 1 or 2 (BPV-1/2). The oncogenic activity of BPV is largely associated with the major oncoprotein E5. Gap junctions are the only communicating junctions found in animal tissues and are composed of proteins known as connexins. Alterations in connexin expression have been associated with oncogenesis. The present study investigated biochemically and immunohistochemically the expression of connexin 43 in samples of normal (n=2), dysplastic (n=3) and neoplastic (n=23) bovine urothelium. The tumours included 10 carcinomas in situ, five papillary urothelial carcinomas and eight invasive urothelial carcinomas. Normal and dysplastic urothelium had membrane expression of connexin 43, but this was reduced in samples of carcinoma in situ. Papillary urothelial carcinomas showed moderate cytoplasmic and membrane labelling, while invasive carcinoma showed loss of connexin 43 expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The bladder is not sterile: History and current discoveries on the urinary microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-White, Krystal; Brady, Megan; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    In the human body, there are 10 bacterial cells for every one human cell. This fact highlights the importance of the National institutes of Health’s initiative to map the human microbiome. The Human Microbiome Project was the first large-scale mapping of the human microbiome of 5 body sites: GI tract, mouth, vagina, skin and nasal cavity using culture-independent methods. The bladder was not originally tested because it was considered to be sterile and there were complexities regarding sample collection. Over the last couple years our team along with other investigators have shown that a urinary microbiome exists and for most individuals it plays a protective role. PMID:27182288

  13. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder: An underutilized staging and grading modality

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vijayant Govinda; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Lal, Anupam; Kakkar, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as a modality to predict T stage of cancer of urinary bladder (CAUB) and to predict the grade of the tumor preoperatively. Material and methods 110 patients with CAUB presenting to the Department of Urology at our institution between July 2014 and December 2015 underwent CEUS prior to endoscopic resection and the CEUS findings were compared with histopathology results. Results CEUS had a sensitivity of 75, 65 and 90% and specificity of 95, 85 and 92% in detecting Ta, T1 and muscle invasion respectively. CEUS had a sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 85% in detecting the grade of the lesion. Conclusions CEUS is a good alternative for T staging and grading of CAUB preoperatively. It is uniquely advantageous in detecting clots or necrosis and in patients with low eGFR where other imaging modalities are contraindicated. PMID:28127451

  14. Activation of unmyelinated afferent fibres by mechanical stimuli and inflammation of the urinary bladder in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Koltzenburg, M

    1990-01-01

    1. We examined the functional properties of unmyelinated primary afferent neurones innervating the pelvic viscera in twenty-five anaesthetized cats. The axons were isolated from the intact dorsal root and the intact or chronically de-efferented ventral root of the segment S2. All units were electrically identified with electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve. 2. The responses of the neurones were studied with natural stimulation of the urinary bladder using innocuous and noxious increases of intravesical pressure and at the onset of an acute artificial inflammation induced by intraluminal injection of mustard or turpentine oil. 3. Out of 297 unmyelinated afferent units isolated from the dorsal root, seven were excited by an increase of the intravesical pressure during contractions and distension of the urinary bladder. These units were silent when the bladder was empty and had thresholds of 30-50 mmHg which are presumed to be noxious. Further increases of the intravesical pressure were accurately encoded by the discharge rate of the fibres. Out of sixty-eight unmyelinated afferent units isolated from the ventral root none was activated by these stimuli. 4. Intraluminal injection of mustard oil excited mechanosensiti