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Sample records for mouse xenografts measured

  1. Comparison of planar, PET and well-counter measurements of total tumor radioactivity in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen J; Ton, Anita; Basuli, Falguni; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative small animal radionuclide imaging studies are often carried out with the intention of estimating the total radioactivity content of various tissues such as the radioactivity content of mouse xenograft tumors exposed to putative diagnostic or therapeutic agents. We show that for at least one specific application, positron projection imaging (PPI) and PET yield comparable estimates of absolute total tumor activity and that both of these estimates are highly correlated with direct well-counting of these same tumors. These findings further suggest that in this particular application, PPI is a far more efficient data acquisition and processing methodology than PET. Forty-one athymic mice were implanted with PC3 human prostate cancer cells transfected with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA (+)) and one additional animal (for a total of 42) with a control blank vector (PSMA (-)). All animals were injected with [(18)F] DCFPyl, a ligand for PSMA, and imaged for total tumor radioactivity with PET and PPI. The tumors were then removed, assayed by well counting for total radioactivity and the values between these methods intercompared. PET, PPI and well-counter estimates of total tumor radioactivity were highly correlated (R(2)>0.98) with regression line slopes near unity (0.95mouse xenograft tumor radioactivity can be measured with PET or PPI with an accuracy comparable to well counting if certain experimental and pharmacokinetic conditions are met. In this particular application, PPI is significantly more efficient than PET in making these measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of Glioblastoma Mouse Orthotopic Xenograft Models for Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Irtenkauf, Susan M; Sobiechowski, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura A; Nelson, Kevin K; Transou, Andrea D; Carlton, Enoch T; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor predominantly localized to the cerebral cortex. We developed a panel of patient-derived mouse orthotopic xenografts (PDOX) for preclinical drug studies by implanting cancer stem cells (CSC) cultured from fresh surgical specimens intracranially into 8-wk-old female athymic nude mice. Here we optimize the glioblastoma PDOX model by assessing the effect of implantation location on tumor growth, survival, and histologic characteristics. To trace the distribution of intracranial injections, toluidine blue dye was injected at 4 locations with defined mediolateral, anterioposterior, and dorsoventral coordinates within the cerebral cortex. Glioblastoma CSC from 4 patients and a glioblastoma nonstem-cell line were then implanted by using the same coordinates for evaluation of tumor location, growth rate, and morphologic and histologic features. Dye injections into one of the defined locations resulted in dye dissemination throughout the ventricles, whereas tumor cell implantation at the same location resulted in a much higher percentage of small multifocal ventricular tumors than did the other 3 locations tested. Ventricular tumors were associated with a lower tumor growth rate, as measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and decreased survival in 4 of 5 cell lines. In addition, tissue oxygenation, vasculature, and the expression of astrocytic markers were altered in ventricular tumors compared with nonventricular tumors. Based on this information, we identified an optimal implantation location that avoided the ventricles and favored cortical tumor growth. To assess the effects of stress from oral drug administration, mice that underwent daily gavage were compared with stress-positive and -negative control groups. Oral gavage procedures did not significantly affect the survival of the implanted mice or physiologic measurements of stress. Our findings document the importance of optimization of the implantation site for

  3. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  4. Establishment and Genomic Characterization of Mouse Xenografts of Human Primary Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Priolo, Carmen; Agostini, Michelle; Vena, Natalie; Ligon, Azra H.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Shin, Eyoung; Farsetti, Antonella; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Sicinska, Ewa; Loda, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen screening has led to earlier detection and surgical treatment of prostate cancer, favoring an increasing incidence-to-mortality ratio. However, about one third of tumors that are diagnosed when still confined to the prostate can relapse within 10 years from the first treatment. The challenge is therefore to identify prognostic markers of aggressive versus indolent tumors. Although several preclinical models of advanced prostate tumors are available, a model that recapitulates the genetic and growth behavior of primary tumors is still lacking. Here, we report a complete histopathological and genomic characterization of xenografts derived from primary localized low- and high-grade human prostate tumors that were implanted under the renal capsule of immunodeficient mice. We obtained a tumor take of 56% and show that these xenografts maintained the histological as well as most genomic features of the parental tumors. Serum prostate-specific antigen levels were measurable only in tumor xenograft-bearing mice, but not in those implanted with either normal prostate tissue or in tumors that likely regressed. Finally, we show that a high proliferation rate, but not the pathological stage or the Gleason grade of the original tumor, was a fundamental prerequisite for tumor take in mice. This mouse xenograft model represents a useful preclinical model of primary prostate tumors for their biological characterization, biomarker discovery, and drug testing. PMID:20167861

  5. Beware of contaminating mouse cells in human xenografts from nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Liu, A; Dougherty, C; Chen, X; Guzman, R; Nandi, S

    2000-01-01

    Human tumor xenografts in nude mice are widely utilized model system for the transplantation of human surgical specimens and human established cell lines. Gene expression studies are often carried out in these model systems. With an increasing use of PCR based analyses, the extreme sensitivity of this technique poses a serious challenge with regards to the extent of contaminating host mouse cells in the human tumor xenografts. These xenografts are never free of host cell contamination. We detected mouse estrogen receptor expression in several human tumor xenografts using RT-PCR demonstrating that precaution is necessary when utilizing PCR based analyses in human tumor xenografts. A cytologically based methodology which distinguishes human versus mouse cells will be more suitable for ER expression studies using human xenograft models. Both (1) in situ hybridization using human probe and (2) immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody directed against human cytokeratin have been used successfully to distinguish human cells versus host mouse cells in human xenografts in nude mice. Immunostaining of ER can then be utilized to determine the expression pattern of ER in the transplanted human cells.

  6. Frequent detection of infectious xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMLV) in human cultures established from mouse xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-An; Maitra, Anirban; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Rudin, Charles M; Peacock, Craig D; Karikari, Collins; Brekken, Rolf A; Stastny, Victor; Gao, Boning; Girard, Luc; Wistuba, Ignacio; Frenkel, Eugene; Minna, John D

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the frequency of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) presence in human cell lines established from mouse xenografts and to search for the evidence of horizontal viral spread to other cell lines. Results Six of 23 (26%) mouse DNA free xenograft cultures were strongly positive for MLV and their sequences had greater than 99% homology to known MLV strains. Four of five available supernatant fluids from these viral positive cultures were strongly positive for RT activity. Three of these supernatant fluids were studied to confirm the infectivity of the released virions for other human culture cells. Of the 78 non-xenograft derived cell lines maintained in the xenograft culture-containing facilities, 13 (17%) were positive for MLV, including XMRV, a virus strain first identified in human tissues. By contrast, all 50 cultures maintained in a xenograft culture-free facility were negative for viral sequences. Methodology We examined xenograft tumor cell lines from seven independent laboratories and 128 non-xenografted tumor cell lines. Cell line DNA was examined for mouse DNA contamination, and by 3 Taqman qPCR assays targeting the gag, env or pol regions of MLV. Sequencing was used for viral strain identification. Supernatant fluids were tested for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. Conclusions Human cultures derived after mouse xenografting frequently contain and release highly infectious xenotropic MLV viruses. Laboratories working with xenograft-derived human cultures should be aware of the risk of contamination with potentially biohazardous human-tropic mouse viruses and their horizontal spread to other cultures. PMID:21750403

  7. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing.

  8. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O.; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2014-01-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Methods Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect COX-2 probe and imaged according to package instructions. Results Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model provides an effective model for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P=0.03) with return to baseline levels by day 10 paralleling the re-epithelialization of the wound. Conclusions This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing. PMID:24373153

  9. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  10. Radiation Dose Uncertainty and Correction for a Mouse Orthotopic and Xenograft Irradiation Model

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Gregory N.; Altunbas, Cem; Morton, John J.; Eagles, Justin; Backus, Jennifer; Dzingle, Wayne; Raben, David; Jimeno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In animal irradiation models, reported dose can vary significantly from the actual doses delivered. We describe an effective method for in vivo dose verification. Materials and Methods Mice bearing commercially-available cell line or patient-derived tumor cell orthotopic or flank xenografts were irradiated using a 160 kVp, 25 mA X-ray source. Entrance dose was evaluated using optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) and exit dose was assessed using radiochromic film dosimetry. Results Tumor position within the irradiation field was validated using external fiducial markers. The average entrance dose in orthotopic tumors from 10 OSLDs placed on 2 different animal irradiation days was 514±37 cGy (range: 437–545). Exit dose measurements taken from 7 radiochromic films on two separate days were 341±21 cGy (a 34% attenuation). Flank tumor irradiation doses measured by OSLD were 368±9 cGy compared to exit doses of 330 cGy measured by radiochromic film. Conclusion Variations related to the irradiation model can lead to significant under or over- dosing in vivo which can affect tumor control and/or biologic endpoints that are dose dependent. We recommend that dose measurements be determined empirically based on the mouse model and irradiator used and dose compensation adjustments performed to ensure correct and appropriate doses. PMID:26689828

  11. [Inhibitory effect of valproic acid on xenografted Kasumi-1 tumor growth in nude mouse and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Tian, Xia; Shi, Gui-Rong; Jiang, Feng-Yun; Liu, Bao-Qin; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Zhao, Lei; Yan, Li-Na; Liang, Zhi-Qiang; Hao, Chang-Lai

    2011-07-01

    To investigate in vivo inhibitory effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on xenografted Kasumi-1 tumor in nude mice and its mechanism. Xenografted Kasumi-1 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneous inoculation of Kasumi-1 cells. Xenotransplanted nude mice were assigned into control or VPA treatment groups. Volume of the xenografted tumors was measured and compared between the two groups. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was applied to detection of tumor cell apoptosis. The gene expression of GM-CSF, HDAC1, Ac-H3 and survivin was studied with semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. ChIP method was used to assay the effects of VPA on acetylation of histone H3 within GM-CSF promoter region. (1) VAP significantly inhibited xenografted Kasumi-1 tumor growth. The calculated inhibition rate was 57.25%. (2) Morphologic study showed that VPA induced differentiation and apoptosis of Kasumi-1 tumor cells. The apoptosis index of VAP treatment group [(3.661 +/- 0.768)%] was significantly higher than that of control group [(0.267 +/- 0.110)%]. (3) Comparing to those in control group, the level of nuclear HDAC1 protein was significantly decreased, the Ac-H3 protein expression level was increased, the mRNA and protein expression levels of GM-CSF and acetylation of histone H3 were remarkably increased, and the gene expression level of survivin significantly decreased in VPA treatment group. VAP significantly inhibits xenografted Kasumi-1 tumor growth and induces tumor cell differentiation and apoptosis. The mechanism may be decrease of survivin gene expression, inhibition of nuclear expression of HDAC, promotion of histone protein acetylation level and acetylation of histone H3 within GM-CSF promoter region, and increase of GM-CSF transcription.

  12. Successful Xenograft of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Specimen from Human Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma into an Immunodeficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Young; Bae, Han Ik; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Hwan Ki; Cho, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft is the transfer of primary human tumors directly into an immunodeficient mouse. Patient-derived tumor xenograft plays an important role in the development and evaluation of new chemotherapeutic agents. We succeeded in generating a patient-derived tumor xenograft of a biliary tumor obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration from a patient who had an inoperable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. This patient-derived tumor xenograft will be a promising tool for individualized cancer therapy and can be used in developing new chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of biliary cancer in the future. PMID:26087785

  13. Germ cell differentiation in cryopreserved, immature, Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) testes xenografted onto mice.

    PubMed

    Pothana, Lavanya; Makala, Himesh; Devi, Lalitha; Varma, Vivek Phani; Goel, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Death of immature animals is one of the reasons for the loss of genetic diversity of rare and endangered species. Because sperm cannot be collected from immature males, cryobanking of testicular tissue combined with testis xenografting is a potential option for conservation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the establishment of spermatogenesis in cryopreserved immature testicular tissues from Indian spotted mouse deer (Moschiola indica) after ectopic xenografting onto immunodeficient nude mice. Results showed that testis tissues that were frozen in cryomedia containing either 10% DMSO with 80% fetal bovine serum (D10S80) or 20% DMSO with 20% fetal bovine serum (D20S20) had significantly more (P < 0.01) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeled positive interstitial cells when compared with fresh testis tissues (46.3 ± 3.4 and 51.9 ± 4.0 vs. 22.8 ± 2.0). Xenografted testicular tissues showed degenerated seminiferous tubules 24 weeks after grafting in testes that had been cryopreserved in D20S20; alternatively, pachytene spermatocytes were the most advanced germ cells in testes that were cryopreserved in D10S80. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining confirmed the proliferative status of spermatocytes, and the increases in tubular and lumen diameters indicated testicular maturation in xenografts. However, persistent anti-Müllerian hormone staining in Sertoli cells of xenografts revealed incomplete testicular maturation. This study reports that cryopreserved testis tissue that had been xenografted from endangered animals onto mice resulted in the establishment of spermatogenesis with initiation of meiosis. These findings are encouraging for cryobanking of testicular tissues from immature endangered animals to conserve their germplasm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cellular therapy in combination with cytokines improves survival in a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Susan B; Ahmad, Sarfraz; McGann, Hasina C; Banks, Robert K; Stavitzski, Nicole M; Srivastava, Milan; Ali, Ghazanfar; Finkler, Neil J; Edwards, John R; Holloway, Robert W

    2015-09-01

    Studies have shown enhanced survival of ovarian cancer patients in which the tumors are infiltrated with tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and natural killer cells showing the importance of immune surveillance and recognition in ovarian cancer. Therefore, in this study, we tested cellular immunotherapy and varying combinations of cytokines (IL-2 and/or pegylated-IFNα-2b) in a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. SKOV3-AF2 ovarian cancer cells were injected intra-peritoneally (IP) into athymic nude mice. On day 7 post-tumor cell injection, mice were injected IP with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC; 5 × 10(6) PBMC) and cytokine combinations [IL-2 ± pegylated-IFNα-2b (IFN)]. Cytokine injections were continued weekly for IFN (12,000 U/injection) and thrice weekly for IL-2 (4000 U/injection). Mice were euthanized when they became moribund due to tumor burden at which time tumor and ascitic fluid were measured and collected. Treatment efficacy was measured by improved survival at 8 weeks and overall survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. We observed that the mice tolerated all treatment combinations without significant weight loss or other apparent illness. Mice receiving PBMC plus IL-2 showed improved median survival (7.3 weeks) compared to mice with no treatment (4.2 weeks), IL-2 (3.5 weeks), PBMC (4.0 weeks), or PBMC plus IL-2 and IFN (4.3 weeks), although PBMC plus IL-2 was not statistically different than PBMC plus IFN (5.5 weeks, p > 0.05). We demonstrate that cytokine-stimulated cellular immune therapy with PBMC and IL-2 was well tolerated and resulted in survival advantage compared to untreated controls and other cytokine combinations in the nude-mouse model.

  15. Decomplementation with cobra venom factor prolongs survival of xenografted islets in a rat to mouse model

    PubMed Central

    OBERHOLZER, J; YU, D; TRIPONEZ, F; CRETIN, N; ANDEREGGEN, E; MENTHA, G; WHITE, D; BUEHLER, L; MOREL, P; LOU, J

    1999-01-01

    Although the involvement of complement in hyperacute rejection of xenotransplants is well recognized, its role in rejection of devascularized xenografts, such as pancreatic islets, is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether complement participates in the immunopathology of xeno-islet transplantation in a concordant rat to mouse model. Rat pancreatic islets were implanted under the kidney capsule of normal and cobra venom factor (CVF)-decomplementized diabetic C57BL/6 mice. Graft survival was monitored by blood glucose levels. Deposition of IgM and C3 on grafted islets in vivo or on isolated islets in vitro (after incubation with normal and decomplementized mouse serum), as well as CD4- and CD8-positive leucocyte infiltration of grafts, was checked by immunohistochemistry. In addition, complement-mediated cytotoxicity on rat islet cells was evaluated by a 3-(4,5-dimethythiazolyl)-2.5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) assay. A significant C3 deposition was found on grafted islets from the first day after transplantation in vivo, as well as on isolated islets after incubation with mouse serum in vitro. By MTT assay, complement-mediated cytotoxicity for islet cells was found. Decomplementation by CVF decreased C3 deposition on either isolated or grafted islets, delayed CD4- and CD8-positive leucocyte infiltration, led to significant inhibition of complement-mediated cytotoxicity for islet cells, and prolonged graft survival (mean survival time 21·3 versus 8·5 days; P <0·01). Our results indicate that decomplementation can prolong the survival time of devascularized xenografts across concordant species. The deposition of complement on transplanted islets may contribute to xenograft rejection by direct cytotoxicity and by promoting leucocyte infiltration. PMID:10447729

  16. Carbohydrate restriction and lactate transporter inhibition in a mouse xenograft model of human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Howard S.; Masko, Elizabeth M.; Poulton, Susan L.; Kennedy, Kelly M.; Pizzo, Salvatore V.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine if a no-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (NCKD) and lactate transporter inhibition can exert a synergistic effect on delaying prostate tumour growth in a xenograft mouse model of human prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS 120 nude athymic male mice (aged 6–8 weeks) were injected s.c. in the flank with 1.0 x 105 LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. Mice were randomized to one of four treatment groups: Western diet (WD, 35% fat, 16% protein, 49% carbohydrate) and vehicle (Veh) treatment; WD and mono-carboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1) inhibition via α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC) delivered through a mini osmotic pump; NCKD (84% fat, 16% protein, 0% carbohydrate) plus Veh ; or NCKD and MCT1 inhibition. Mice were fed and weighed three times per week and feed was adjusted to maintain similar body weights. Tumour size was measured twice weekly and the combined effect of treatment was tested via Kruskal – Wallis analysis of all four groups. Independent effects of treatment (NCKD vs. WD and CHC vs. Veh) on tumour volume were tested using linear regression analysis. All mice were killed on Day 53 (conclusion of pump ejection), and serum and tumour sections were analysed for various markers. Again, combined and independent effects of treatment were tested using Kruskal – Wallis and linear regression analysis, respectively. RESULTS There were no significant differences in tumour volumes among the four groups (P=0.09). When testing the independent effects of treatment, NCKD was significantly associated with lower tumour volumes at the end of the experiment (P=0.026), while CHC administration was not (P=0.981). However, CHC was associated with increased necrotic fraction (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Differences in tumour volumes were observed only in comparisons between mice fed a NCKD and mice fed a WD. MCT1 inhibition did not have a significant effect on tumour volume, although it was associated with increased necrotic fraction. PMID:22394625

  17. Inflammation precedes the development of human malignant mesotheliomas in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Hillegass, Jedd M.; Shukla, Arti; Lathrop, Sherrill A.; MacPherson, Maximilian B.; Beuschel, Stacie L.; Butnor, Kelly J.; Testa, Joseph R.; Pass, Harvey I.; Carbone, Michele; Steele, Chad; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos fibers cause chronic inflammation that may be critical to the development of malignant mesothelioma (MM). Two human MM cell lines (Hmeso, PPM Mill) were used in a SCID mouse xenograft model to assess time-dependent patterns of inflammation and tumor formation. After intraperitoneal (IP) injection of MM cells, mice were euthanized at 7, 14, and 30 days, and peritoneal lavage fluid (PLF) was examined for immune cell profiles and human and mouse cytokines. Increases in human MM-derived IL-6, IL-8, bFGF, and VEGF were observed in mice at 7 days postinjection of either MM line, and a striking neutrophilia was observed at all time points. Free-floating tumor spheroids developed in mice at 14 days, and both spheroids and adherent MM tumor masses occurred in all mice at 30 days. Results suggest that inflammation and cytokine production precede and may be critical to the development of MMs. PMID:20716277

  18. A novel intraperitoneal metastatic xenograft mouse model for survival outcome assessment of esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Niranjan; Li, Jun; Schwarz, Margaret A.; Schwarz, Roderich E.; von Holzen, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has become the dominant type of esophageal cancer in United States. The 5-year survival rate of EAC is below 20% and most patients present with locally advanced or widespread metastatic disease, where current treatment is largely ineffective. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Improvement of EAC patient outcome requires well-characterized animal models in which to evaluate novel therapeutics. In this study we aimed to establish a peritoneal dissemination xenograft mouse model of EAC that would support survival outcome analyses. To find the best candidate cell line from 7 human EAC cell lines of different origin named ESO26, OE33, ESO51, SK-GT-2, OE19, OACM5.1C and Flo-1 were injected intraperitoneally/subcutaneously into SCID mice. The peritoneal/xenograft tumor formation and mouse survival were compared among different groups. All cell lines injected subcutaneously formed tumors within 3 months at variable rates. All cell lines except OACM5.1C formed intraperitoneal tumors within 3 months at variable rates. Median animal survival with peritoneal dissemination was 108 days for ESO26 cells (5X106), 65 days for OE33 cells (5X106), 88 days for ESO51 cells (5X106), 76 days for SK-GT-2 cells (5X106), 55 days for OE19 cells (5X106), 45 days for OE19 cells (10X106) and 82 days for Flo-1 cells (5X106). Interestingly, only in the OE19 model all mice (7/7 for 5X106 and 5/5 for10X106) developed bloody ascites with liver metastasis after intraperitoneal injection. The median survival time of these animals was the shortest (45 days for 10X106 cells). In addition, median survival was significantly increased after paclitaxel treatment compared with the control group (57 days versus 45 days, p = 0.0034) along with a significant decrease of the relative subcutaneous tumor volume (p = 0.00011). Thus peritoneal dissemination mouse xenograft model for survival outcome assessment after intraperitoneal injection of OE19 cells will

  19. Development and rescue of human familial hypercholesterolaemia in a xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Wang, Lili; Legras, Xavier; Saha, Pradip K.; Chen, Leon; Bell, Peter; Pankowicz, Francis P.; Hill, Matthew C.; Barzi, Mercedes; Leyton, Claudia Kettlun; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Kruse, Robert L.; Himes, Ryan W.; Goss, John A.; Wilson, James M.; Chan, Lawrence; Lagor, William R.; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of lipid metabolism are a major cause of human morbidity, but no animal model entirely recapitulates human lipoprotein metabolism. Here we develop a xenograft mouse model using hepatocytes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia caused by loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Like familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, our familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice develop hypercholesterolaemia and a 'humanized‘ serum profile, including expression of the emerging drug targets cholesteryl ester transfer protein and apolipoprotein (a), for which no genes exist in mice. We go on to replace the missing LDLR in familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice using an adeno-associated virus 9-based gene therapy and restore normal lipoprotein profiles after administration of a single dose. Our study marks the first time a human metabolic disease is induced in an experimental animal model by human hepatocyte transplantation and treated by gene therapy. Such xenograft platforms offer the ability to validate human experimental therapies and may foster their rapid translation into the clinic. PMID:26081744

  20. Novel enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing NOG mouse for analyzing the microenvironment of xenograft tissues.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yuichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Ando, Yasuhiko; Katano, Ikumi; Nakamura, Masato; Suemizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between transplanted cells and host tissues is important for the growth and maintenance of transplanted cells. To analyze the mechanisms of these interactions, a systemic fluorescent protein-expressing mouse is a useful recipient. In this study, we generated a novel NOG strain, which strongly expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; PgkEGFP-NOG), especially in the liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and testis. Because the host tissues expressed EGFP, xenotransplanted human cancer cells were clearly identified as EGFP-negative colonies in PgkEGFP-NOG mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that EGFP-expressing stromal tissues formed a complicated tumor microenvironment within xenograft tissues. Moreover, a similar microenvironment was observed in human iPS cell-derived teratomas. Collectively, these results indicated that a suitable microenvironment is essential for the growth and maintenance of xenotransplanted cells and that PgkEGFP-NOG mice represent a useful animal model for analyzing the mechanisms of microenvironment formation.

  1. Proteomic identification of the lactate dehydrogenase A in a radioresistant prostate cancer xenograft mouse model for improving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Chang, Lei; Ni, Jie; Wasinger, Valerie; Beretov, Julia; Deng, Junli; Duan, Wei; Bucci, Joseph; Malouf, David; Gillatt, David; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Radioresistance is a major challenge for prostate cancer (CaP) metastasis and recurrence after radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify potential protein markers and signaling pathways associated with radioresistance using a PC-3 radioresistant (RR) subcutaneous xenograft mouse model and verify the radiosensitization effect from a selected potential candidate. PC-3RR and PC-3 xenograft tumors were established and differential protein expression profiles from two groups of xenografts were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. One selected glycolysis marker, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) was validated, and further investigated for its role in CaP radioresistance. We found that 378 proteins and 51 pathways were significantly differentially expressed between PC-3RR and PC-3 xenograft tumors, and that the glycolysis pathway is closely linked with CaP radioresistance. In addition, we also demonstrated that knock down of LDHA with siRNA or inhibition of LDHA activity with a LDHA specific inhibitor (FX-11), could sensitize PC-3RR cells to radiotherapy with reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, hypoxia, DNA repair ability and autophagy, as well as increased DNA double strand breaks and apoptosis. In summary, we identified a list of potential RR protein markers and important signaling pathways from a PC-3RR xenograft mouse model, and demonstrate that targeting LDHA combined with radiotherapy could increase radiosensitivity in RR CaP cells, suggesting that LDHA is an ideal therapeutic target to develop combination therapy for overcoming CaP radioresistance. PMID:27708237

  2. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  3. New mouse xenograft model modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts for human multi-drug resistance in cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, YAN; LIN, ZHIQIANG; FALLON, JOHN K.; ZHAO, QIANG; LIU, DAN; WANG, YONGJUN; LIU, FENG

    2015-01-01

    We developed an MDR tumor model that is modulated by tumor-associated fibroblasts. Studies on proliferation of tumor cell lines including paclitaxel-sensitive and resistant cell lines were performed. The expressions of P-gp and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antigen were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Quantitative P-gp analyses of different cell lines were accomplished by nanoUPLC-MS/MS. Tumor cell colony formation assay and established xenograft model was used to investigate the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. The mouse xenograft model was developed after co-inoculation with MDR tumor cells and NIH/3T3 fibroblast cells. There was no correlation between tumorigenesis in vivo and the growth rate of cells in vitro. The proliferation among different cell lines had no significant differences, but the P-gp expression and tumor growth in the xenograft model were fairly different. P-gp determination and α-SMA immunofluorescence staining clarified the relationship between P-gp expression, fibroblast levels and tumorigenesis. It was more difficult for tumor cells with higher P-gp levels to recruit fibroblasts in vivo, resulting in lower tumorigenesis due to the lack of structural and chemical support during tumor progression. In the established paclitaxel-resistant mouse xenograft model, no obvious antitumor effect was observed after Taxol treatment, but a significant decrease in tumor size for the group treated with gemcitabine sensitive to the model. The results show that the added fibroblasts do not disturb the applicability of the model in MDR. Therefore, this mouse xenograft MDR model could serve as an effective tool for MDR research. PMID:26352907

  4. Antitumor Activity of VB-111, a Novel Antiangiogenic Virotherapeutic, in Thyroid Cancer Xenograft Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Reddi, H. V.; Madde, P.; Cohen, Y. C.; Bangio, L.; Breitbart, E.; Harats, D.; Bible, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    VB-111 is an engineered antiangiogenic adenovirus that expresses Fas-c in angiogenic blood vessels and has previously been shown to have significant antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in Lewis lung carcinoma, melanoma, and glioblastoma models. To evaluate the efficacy of VB-111 in thyroid cancer, we conducted in vivo xenograft nude mouse studies using multiple thyroid cancer-derived cell lines models. VB-111 treatment resulted in 26.6% (P = 0.0596), 34.4% (P = 0.0046), and 37.6% (P = 0.0249) inhibition of tumor growth in follicular, papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer models, respectively. No toxicity was observed in any model. All tumor types showed a consistent and significant reduction of CD-31 staining (P < 0.05), reflecting a reduction of angiogenic activity in the tumors, consistent with the intended targeting of the virus. A phase 2 clinical trial of VB-111 in patients with advanced differentiated thyroid cancer is ongoing. PMID:22701765

  5. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  6. Novel LIMK2 Inhibitor Blocks Panc-1 Tumor Growth in a mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Roni; Haklai, Roni; Elad-Tzfadia, Galit; Wolfson, Haim J.; Carmeli, Shmuel; Kloog, Yoel

    2014-01-01

    LIM kinases (LIMKs) are important cell cytoskeleton regulators that play a prominent role in cancer manifestation and neuronal diseases. The LIMK family consists of two homologues, LIMK1 and LIMK2, which differ from one another in expression profile, intercellular localization, and function. The main substrate of LIMK is cofilin, a member of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) protein family. When phosphorylated by LIMK, cofilin is inactive. LIMKs play a contributory role in several neurodevelopmental disorders and in cancer growth and metastasis. We recently reported the development and validation of a novel LIMK inhibitor, referred to here as T56-LIMKi, using a combination of computational methods and classical biochemistry techniques. Here we report that T56-LIMKi inhibits LIMK2 with high specificity, and shows little or no cross-reactivity with LIMK1. We found that T56-LIMKi decreases phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin) levels and thus inhibits growth of several cancerous cell lines, including those of pancreatic cancer, glioma and schwannoma. Because the most promising in-vitro effect of T56-LIMKi was observed in the pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the inhibitor on a nude mouse Panc-1 xenograft model. T56-LIMKi reduced tumor size and p-cofilin levels in the Panc-1 tumors, leading us to propose T56-LIMKi as a candidate drug for cancer therapy. PMID:25593987

  7. Suppression of T cells results in long-term survival of mouse heart xenografts in C6-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Korsgren, O; van Rooijen, N; Tibell, A

    2001-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of cellular immune response in the absence of membrane attack complex (MAC) formation in the concordant mouse-to-rat heart xenografting. Hearts from BALB/c mice were transplanted into the neck vessels of C6-competent (C6(+)) and C6-deficient (C6(-)) PVG rats. Liposome-encapsulated dichloro-methylene diphosphonate (Lip-Cl2MDP) was administered at a dose of 10 ml/kg 2 days before transplantation and every 5 days thereafter. Cyclosporine (CsA) was administered intramuscularly (i.m.) at a dose of 15 mg/kg per day. The heart xenografts were harvested for immuno-histological analysis at the time of rejection and the functioning grafts were removed at 70 days after transplantation. In untreated C6(+) rats, xeno-grafts survived for 2.3 +/- 0.5 days. Treatment with CsA or Lip-Cl(2)MDP in C6(+) rats did not significantly affect graft survival (2.5 +/- 0.6 and 2.3 +/- 0.4 days, respectively). In untreated C6(-) rats, xenografts survived for 5.0 +/- 0.6 days. However, Lip-Cl(2)MDP in C6(-) rats resulted in a prolongation of graft survival to 11 +/- 2.3 days (P < 0.05 vs. untreated C6(-) rats), while treatment with CsA alone in these rats led to more than 70 days' survival in four out of six grafts (61 +/- 16 days). In untreated C6(+) rats, immunohistology showed a severe myocardial necrosis and thrombosis with a scarce cellular infiltrate in the rejected xenografts. By contrast, in untreated C6(-) rats, xenografts were heavily infiltrated by macrophages and T cells. The number of macrophages, but not T cells, was markedly reduced in Lip-Cl(2)MDP-treated rats. In CsA-treated C6(-) rats, the grafts harvested at 70 days after transplantation had a normal morphology, with a minimal cellular infiltrate. Our data indicate that MAC-mediated injury plays an essential role in concordant xenograft rejection. Once this mechanism has been prevented, suppression of T cells allows for long-term xenograft survival.

  8. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of a telodendrimer micellar paclitaxel nanoformulation in a mouse xenograft model of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenwu; Luo, Juntao; Jain, Teesta; Riggs, John W; Tseng, Harry P; Henderson, Paul T; Cherry, Simon R; Rowland, Douglas; Lam, Kit S

    2012-01-01

    Background A multifunctional telodendrimer-based micelle system was characterized for delivery of imaging and chemotherapy agents to mouse tumor xenografts. Previous optical imaging studies demonstrated qualitatively that these classes of nanoparticles, called nanomicelles, preferentially accumulate at tumor sites in mice. The research reported herein describes the detailed quantitative imaging and biodistribution profiling of nanomicelles loaded with a cargo of paclitaxel. Methods The telodendrimer was covalently labeled with 125I and the nanomicelles were loaded with 14C-paclitaxel, which allowed measurement of pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in the mice using microSPECT/CT imaging and liquid scintillation counting, respectively. Results The radio imaging data showed preferential accumulation of nanomicelles at the tumor site along with a slower clearance rate than paclitaxel formulated in Cremophor EL (Taxol®). Liquid scintillation counting confirmed that 14C-labeled paclitaxel sequestered in nanomicelles had increased uptake by tumor tissue and slower pharmacokinetics than Taxol. Conclusion Overall, the results indicate that nanomicelle-formulated paclitaxel is a potentially superior formulation compared with Taxol in terms of water solubility, pharmacokinetics, and tumor accumulation, and may be clinically useful for both tumor imaging and improved chemotherapy applications. PMID:22605931

  9. Chondrocytic differentiation of peripheral neuroectodermal tumor cell line in nude mouse xenograft.

    PubMed

    Goji, J; Sano, K; Nakamura, H; Ito, H

    1992-08-01

    We have established a cell line (KU-SN) from a peripheral neuroectodermal tumor originating in the left scapula of a 4-year-old girl. The original tumor was immunoreactive with antibodies for neurofilament proteins, neuron-specific enolase, vimentin, S100 protein, and beta 2-microglobulin. Dense core granules, 50-150 nm in diameter, were identified by electron microscopy. The cell line was established from tumor cells in metastatic lung fluid. KU-SN cells were immunoreactive with the antibodies for neurofilament proteins, vimentin, neuron-specific enolase, S100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, cytokeratin, and carcinoembryonic antigen. Besides these neuronal features, KU-SN cells express type 2 collagen and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. The addition of insulin-like growth factor 1 (100 ng/ml) increased the growth rate of KU-SN cells 2.1-fold over control. Some cells were positive for Alcian blue and alkaline phosphatase staining. Cytogenetic analysis of KU-SN cells disclosed a reciprocal chromosomal translocation [t(11,22)]. Northern blot analysis of KU-SN cells demonstrated amplified expression of the c-myc gene but not the N-myc gene. When tumor cells were transplanted into nude mice, cartilage was formed. The cartilage was immunoreactive with the antibody for HLA-ABC, indicating that it was derived from the tumor cells, not from mouse tissue. Chondrocytic differentiation was not observed in xenografts of Ewing's sarcoma cell lines SK-ES or RD-ES or the peripheral neuroectodermal tumor cell line SK-N-MC. These results indicate that KU-SN cells represent primitive neural crest cells having the potential for chondrocytic differentiation.

  10. In Silico cancer cell versus stroma cellularity index computed from species-specific human and mouse transcriptome of xenograft models: towards accurate stroma targeting therapy assessment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The current state of the art for measuring stromal response to targeted therapy requires burdensome and rate limiting quantitative histology. Transcriptome measures are increasingly affordable and provide an opportunity for developing a stromal versus cancer ratio in xenograft models. In these models, human cancer cells are transplanted into mouse host tissues (stroma) and together coevolve into a tumour microenvironment. However, profiling the mouse or human component separately remains problematic. Indeed, laser capture microdissection is labour intensive. Moreover, gene expression using commercial microarrays introduces significant and underreported cross-species hybridization errors that are commonly overlooked by biologists. Method We developed a customized dual-species array, H&M array, and performed cross-species and species-specific hybridization measurements. We validated a new methodology for establishing the stroma vs cancer ratio using transcriptomic data. Results In the biological validation of the H&M array, cross-species hybridization of human and mouse probes was significantly reduced (4.5 and 9.4 fold reduction, respectively; p < 2x10-16 for both, Mann-Whitney test). We confirmed the capability of the H&M array to determine the stromal to cancer cells ratio based on the estimation of cellularity index of mouse/human mRNA content in vitro. This new metrics enable to investigate more efficiently the stroma-cancer cell interactions (e.g. cellularity) bypassing labour intensive requirement and biases of laser capture microdissection. Conclusion These results provide the initial evidence of improved and cost-efficient analytics for the investigation of cancer cell microenvironment, using species-specificity arrays specifically designed for xenografts models. PMID:25079962

  11. Analysis of SRC oncogenic signaling in colorectal cancer by stable isotope labeling with heavy amino acids in mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Audrey; Vigy, Oana; Orsetti, Beatrice; Urbach, Serge; Roche, Serge

    2012-12-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase SRC is frequently deregulated in human colorectal cancer (CRC), and SRC increased activity has been associated with poor clinical outcomes. In nude mice engrafted with human CRC cells, SRC over-expression favors tumor growth and is accompanied by a robust increase in tyrosine phosphorylation in tumor cells. How SRC contributes to this tumorigenic process is largely unknown. We analyzed SRC oncogenic signaling in these tumors by means of a novel quantitative proteomic analysis. This method is based on stable isotope labeling with amino acids of xenograft tumors by the addition of [(13)C(6)]-lysine into mouse food. An incorporation level greater than 88% was obtained in xenograft tumors after 30 days of the heavy lysine diet. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of these tumors allowed the identification of 61 proteins that exhibited a significant increase in tyrosine phosphorylation and/or association with tyrosine phosphorylated proteins upon SRC expression. These mainly included molecules implicated in vesicular trafficking and signaling and RNA binding proteins. Most of these proteins were specific targets of SRC signaling in vivo, as they were not identified by analysis via stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) of the same CRC cells in culture. This suggests that oncogenic signaling induced by SRC in tumors significantly differs from that induced by SRC in cell culture. We next confirmed this notion experimentally with the example of the vesicular trafficking protein and SRC substrate TOM1L1. We found that whereas TOM1L1 depletion only slightly affected SRC-induced proliferation of CRC cells in vitro, it drastically decreased tumor growth in xenografted nude mice. We thus concluded that this vesicular trafficking protein plays an important role in SRC-induced tumor growth. Overall, these data show that SILAC analysis in mouse xenografts is a valuable approach for deciphering tyrosine kinase oncogenic

  12. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American

  13. Dextran-Conjugated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Antibody for In Vivo Melanoma Xenografted Mouse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Jeong, Min-Hee; Lee, Chang-Moon; Cheong, Su-Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Intact immunoglobulin G antibody has a relatively large molecule size of approximately 150 kDa that remains in the bloodstream for many weeks, which is a considerable disadvantage when it is used to carry radioactive materials for imaging. To lower background activity and increase the contrast of images, we investigated antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 antibody (DC101) conjugated dextran for VEGF receptor 2 imaging in tumor xenografted mice. DTPA-conjugated aminodextran was synthesized, reacted with sulfo-LC-SPDP, and then reacted with DC101. The binding affinity of DTPA-dextran-DC101 to Flk-1 was measured. The gamma imaging and biodistributions of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101, 99mTc-DTPA-DC101, and 125I-DC101 were studied in B16F10 melanoma xenografted mice. The dissociation values for DC101, DTPA-DC101, and DTPA-dextran-DC101 were 22.48, 3.05, and 14.74 pM, respectively. In gamma images, 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 showed weak liver uptake and rapid kidney elimination. In biodistribution results, the liver uptake of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 was similar with that of 99mTc-DTPA-DC101 at each time point. However, the blood activity of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 has shown significant differences, compared with 99mTc-DTPA-DC101 at all time points. The tumor accumulation of dextran-conjugated antibody was increased with time, whereas that of dextran nonconjugated antibody decreased. In particular, the pattern of tumor uptake of 99mTc-DTPA-dextran-DC101 was similar to that of 125I-DC101, so this was thought to reflect the kinetics of DC101, unlike the nonconjugated form. The results of this study suggested that introduction of dextran moiety to make 99mTc-radiolabeled DC101 imaging agent could provide better images with the impaired background and the steady increasing binding to the receptor. However, further studies are necessary to improve clinical pharmacokinetics, such as enhancement of tumor uptake and impaired renal uptake. PMID:22149589

  14. Resolution of psoriasis upon blockade of IL-15 biological activity in a xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, Louise S; Schuurman, Janine; Beurskens, Frank; Dam, Tomas N; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Skov, Lone; Rygaard, Jorgen; Voorhorst-Ogink, Marleen M; Gerritsen, Arnout F; van Dijk, Marc A; Parren, Paul W H I; Baadsgaard, Ole; van de Winkel, Jan G J

    2003-11-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin characterized by epidermal hyperplasia, dermal angiogenesis, infiltration of activated T cells, and increased cytokine levels. One of these cytokines, IL-15, triggers inflammatory cell recruitment, angiogenesis, and production of other inflammatory cytokines, including IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-17, which are all upregulated in psoriatic lesions. To investigate the role of IL-15 in psoriasis, we generated mAb's using human immunoglobulin-transgenic mice. One of the IL-15-specific antibodies we generated, 146B7, did not compete with IL-15 for binding to its receptor but potently interfered with the assembly of the IL-15 receptor alpha, beta, gamma complex. This antibody effectively blocked IL-15-induced T cell proliferation and monocyte TNF-alpha release in vitro. In a human psoriasis xenograft model, antibody 146B7 reduced the severity of psoriasis, as measured by epidermal thickness, grade of parakeratosis, and numbers of inflammatory cells and cycling keratinocytes. These results obtained with this IL-15-specific mAb support an important role for IL-15 in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  15. Anti-tumor activity of high-dose EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and sequential docetaxel in wild type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer cell nude mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Zhang, Qianqian; Fang, Shu; Han, Xiao; Wang, Zhehai

    2017-02-07

    Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is still a challenge. This study explored antitumor activity of high-dose icotinib (an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) plus sequential docetaxel against wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells-generated nude mouse xenografts. Nude mice were subcutaneously injected with wild-type EGFR NSCLC A549 cells and divided into different groups for 3-week treatment. Tumor xenograft volumes were monitored and recorded, and at the end of experiments, tumor xenografts were removed for Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Compared to control groups (negative control, regular-dose icotinib [IcoR], high-dose icotinib [IcoH], and docetaxel [DTX]) and regular icotinib dose (60 mg/kg) with docetaxel, treatment of mice with a high-dose (1200 mg/kg) of icotinib plus sequential docetaxel for 3 weeks (IcoH-DTX) had an additive effect on suppression of tumor xenograft size and volume (P < 0.05). Icotinib-containing treatments markedly reduced phosphorylation of EGFR, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase B (Akt), but only the high-dose icotinib-containing treatments showed an additive effect on CD34 inhibition (P < 0.05), an indication of reduced microvessel density in tumor xenografts. Moreover, high-dose icotinib plus docetaxel had a similar effect on mouse weight loss (a common way to measure adverse reactions in mice), compared to the other treatment combinations. The study indicate that the high dose of icotinib plus sequential docetaxel (IcoH-DTX) have an additive effect on suppressing the growth of wild-type EGFR NSCLC cell nude mouse xenografts, possibly through microvessel density reduction. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm the findings of this study.

  16. Establishment of a neuroblastoma mouse model by subcutaneous xenograft transplantation and its use to study metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q; Chen, C F; Dong, Q; Hou, L; Chen, X; Zhi, Y L; Li, X; Lu, H T; Zhang, H Y

    2015-12-08

    The aim of this study was to establish a metastatic human neuroblastoma (NB) mouse model by xenograft in order to study the metastatic mechanisms of NB. A human NB cell line was obtained from a 5-year-old patient and cultured in vitro. A suspension of these cells was subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice at the right flank next to the forelimb. The biological characteristics of the developed subcutaneous and metastatic tumors were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of the tumor marker neuron-specific enolase was determined by immunohistochemistry, and the invasive ability of metastatic tumors was examined by a Matrigel invasion assay. DNA microarray analyses were performed to examine the metastasis-related gene expression. Our results showed that tumors grew in 75% of the mice injected with NB cells and the rate of metastasis was 21%. The xenograft tumors retained the morphological and biological characteristics of the NB specimen from the pediatric patient. Neuron-specific enolase was highly expressed in both subcutaneous and metastatic tumors. The metastatic tumor cells possessed a higher invasive capability than the primary NB cells. The expression of 25 metastasis-related genes was found to be significantly altered in metastatic tumors compared to primary tumors, including RECK, MMP2, VEGF, MMP3, and CXCL12. In conclusion, we successfully established a human NB xenograft model with high tumor-bearing and metastatic rates in nude mice, providing an ideal animal model for the in vivo study of NB.

  17. First In-Mouse Development and Application of a Surgically Relevant Xenograft Model of Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Helland, Øystein; Popa, Mihaela; Vintermyr, Olav K.; Molven, Anders; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Bjørge, Line; McCormack, Emmet

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical models of epithelial ovarian cancer have not been exploited to evaluate the clinical standard combination therapy of surgical debulking with follow-up chemotherapy. As surgery is critical to patient survival, here we establish a combined surgical/chemotherapy xenograft model of epithelial ovarian cancer and demonstrate its translational relevance. Experimental Design SKOV-3luc+ ovary cancer cells were injected topically into the ovaries of immunodeficient mice. Disease development and effect of clinical standard treatment including hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy and removal of metastasis with follow up chemotherapy (carboplatin 12 mg/kg + paclitaxel 15 mg/kg) was evaluated by clinical parameters. Tumor burden was quantified by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results The xenograft ovarian tumors developed were poorly differentiated and multicystic and the disease disseminated into the peritoneal cavity. When compared to the controls with a mean survival time of 4.9 weeks, mice treated with surgery and chemotherapy, surgery or chemotherapy demonstrated significantly improved mean survival of 16.1 weeks (p = 0.0008), 12.7 weeks (p = 0.0008), or 10.4 weeks (p = 0.008), respectively. Conclusion Combined surgical intervention and adjuvant chemotherapy was demonstrated for the first time in an orthotopic xenograft model of ovarian cancer. Similar to observation in human studies the combined approach resulted in the longest medial survival time, advocating application of this strategy in future preclinical therapeutic development for this disease. PMID:24594904

  18. Early detection of human glioma sphere xenografts in mouse brain using diffusion MRI at 14.1 T.

    PubMed

    Porcari, P; Hegi, M E; Lei, H; Hamou, M-F; Vassallo, I; Capuani, S; Gruetter, R; Mlynarik, V

    2016-11-01

    Glioma models have provided important insights into human brain cancers. Among the investigative tools, MRI has allowed their characterization and diagnosis. In this study, we investigated whether diffusion MRI might be a useful technique for early detection and characterization of slow-growing and diffuse infiltrative gliomas, such as the proposed new models, LN-2669GS and LN-2540GS glioma sphere xenografts. Tumours grown in these models are not visible in conventional T2 -weighted or contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted MRI at 14.1 T. Diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging protocols were optimized for contrast by exploring long diffusion times sensitive for probing the microstructural alterations induced in the normal brain by the slow infiltration of glioma sphere cells. Compared with T2 -weighted images, tumours were properly identified in their early stage of growth using diffusion MRI, and confirmed by localized proton MR spectroscopy as well as immunohistochemistry. The first evidence of tumour presence was revealed for both glioma sphere xenograft models three months after tumour implantation, while no necrosis, oedema or haemorrhage were detected either by MRI or by histology. Moreover, different values of diffusion indices, such as mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy, were obtained in tumours grown from LN-2669GS and LN-2540GS glioma sphere lines. These observations highlighted diverse tumour microstructures for both xenograft models, which were reflected in histology. This study demonstrates the ability of diffusion MRI techniques to identify and investigate early stages of slow-growing, invasive tumours in the mouse brain, thus providing a potential imaging biomarker for early detection of tumours in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Metformin decreases the dose of chemotherapy for prolonging tumor remission in mouse xenografts involving multiple cancer cell types.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Heather A; Struhl, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Metformin, the first-line drug for treating diabetes, selectively kills the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) in genetically distinct types of breast cancer cell lines. In mouse xenografts, injection of metformin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin near the tumor is more effective than either drug alone in blocking tumor growth and preventing relapse. Here, we show that metformin is equally effective when given orally together with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and doxorubicin, indicating that metformin works together with a variety of standard chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, metformin has comparable effects on tumor regression and preventing relapse when combined with a four-fold reduced dose of doxorubicin that is not effective as a monotherapy. Finally, the combination of metformin and doxorubicin prevents relapse in xenografts generated with prostate and lung cancer cell lines. These observations provide further evidence for the CSC hypothesis for cancer relapse, an experimental rationale for using metformin as part of combinatorial therapy in a variety of clinical settings, and for reducing the chemotherapy dose in cancer patients.

  20. MR diffusion-weighted imaging-based subcutaneous tumour volumetry in a xenografted nude mouse model using 3D Slicer: an accurate and repeatable method

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zelan; Chen, Xin; Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and repeatable measurement of the gross tumour volume(GTV) of subcutaneous xenografts is crucial in the evaluation of anti-tumour therapy. Formula and image-based manual segmentation methods are commonly used for GTV measurement but are hindered by low accuracy and reproducibility. 3D Slicer is open-source software that provides semiautomatic segmentation for GTV measurements. In our study, subcutaneous GTVs from nude mouse xenografts were measured by semiautomatic segmentation with 3D Slicer based on morphological magnetic resonance imaging(mMRI) or diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI)(b = 0,20,800 s/mm2) . These GTVs were then compared with those obtained via the formula and image-based manual segmentation methods with ITK software using the true tumour volume as the standard reference. The effects of tumour size and shape on GTVs measurements were also investigated. Our results showed that, when compared with the true tumour volume, segmentation for DWI(P = 0.060–0.671) resulted in better accuracy than that mMRI(P < 0.001) and the formula method(P < 0.001). Furthermore, semiautomatic segmentation for DWI(intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.9999) resulted in higher reliability than manual segmentation(ICC = 0.9996–0.9998). Tumour size and shape had no effects on GTV measurement across all methods. Therefore, DWI-based semiautomatic segmentation, which is accurate and reproducible and also provides biological information, is the optimal GTV measurement method in the assessment of anti-tumour treatments. PMID:26489359

  1. Discrepancy Between Tumor Antigen Distribution and Radiolabeled Antibody Binding in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Il; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2017-04-01

    Biodistribution of antibodies is vital to successful immunoscintigraphy/immunotherapy, and it is assumed to be similar to antigen distribution. We measured and compared the binding pattern of radiolabeled antibody to tissue antigen distribution in a nude mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. We transplanted 10(7) FEM-XII human melanoma cells into the right flank of five nude mice. For the control, we transplanted 5 × 10(6) LS174T human colon cancer cells into the left flank. Two weeks later, 10 μCi of (131)I-labeled melanoma-associated 96.5 monoclonal antibody (targeting p97 antigen) was intravenously injected. Three days later, we sacrificed the mice and evaluated 96.5 antibody binding and concentration in the tumors by ex vivo quantitative autoradiography (QAR). Two months later, we incubated adjacent tumor tissue slices in various concentrations of (125)I-labeled 96.5 MoAb and evaluated the distribution/concentration of p97 antigen by in vitro QAR. p97 antigen distribution was homogeneous in the tumors (total antigen concentration [Bmax] = 17.36-38.36 pmol/g). In contrast, radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding was heterogenous between location within the tumor (estimated bound antigen concentration = 0.7-6.6 pmol/g). No quantifiable parameters were found to be related with radiolabeled antibody binding and tumor antigen distribution. Antibody-bound tumor antigen to total antigen ratios ranged between 2% and 38%. Heterogeneous features of target antibody binding were observed in contrast to relatively homogenous feature of tumor antigen. We did not identify any correlations between p97 antigen distribution and 96.5 antibody binding in melanoma tissue. Radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding patterns within melanoma cannot be predicted based on p97 antigen distribution in the tumor, which needs to be further studied with several other methods and more subjects in the future.

  2. Metabonomic studies of pancreatic cancer response to radiotherapy in a mouse xenograft model using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Hong; Li, Wen-Tao; Gu, Ya-Jia; Yang, Bao-Feng; Deng, Hui-Wen; Yu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Wei-Jun

    2013-07-14

    To investigate the metabolic profiles of xenograft pancreatic cancer before and after radiotherapy by high-resolution magic angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HRMAS (1)H NMR) combined with principal components analysis (PCA) and evaluate the radiotherapeutic effect. The nude mouse xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer was established by injecting human pancreatic cancer cell SW1990 subcutaneously into the nude mice. When the tumors volume reached 800 mm(3), the mice received various radiation doses. Two weeks later, tumor tissue sections were prepared for running the NMR measurements. (1)H NMR and PCA were used to determine the changes in the metabolic profiles of tumor tissues after radiotherapy. Metabolic profiles of normal pancreas, pancreatic tumor tissues, and radiation- treated pancreatic tumor tissues were compared. Compared with (1)H NMR spectra of the normal nude mouse pancreas, the levels of choline, taurine, alanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, lactate, and glutamic acid of the pancreatic cancer group were increased, whereas an opposite trend for phosphocholine, glycerophosphocholine, and betaine was observed. The ratio of phosphocholine to creatine, and glycerophosphocholine to creatine showed noticeable decrease in the pancreatic cancer group. After further evaluation of the tissue metabolic profile after treatment with three different radiation doses, no significant change in metabolites was observed in the (1)H NMR spectra, while the inhibition of tumor growth was in proportion to the radiation doses. However, PCA results showed that the levels of choline and betaine were decreased with the increased radiation dose, and conversely, the level of acetic acid was dramatically increased. The combined methods were demonstrated to have the potential for allowing early diagnosis and assessment of pancreatic cancer response to radiotherapy.

  3. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of EGFR overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma mouse xenograft.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Quan; Li, Zhao; Zhou, Juan; Joshi, Bishnu P; Li, Gaoming; Duan, Xiyu; Kuick, Rork; Owens, Scott R; Wang, Thomas D

    2016-06-01

    EGFR is a promising cell surface target for in vivo imaging that is highly overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a common cancer worldwide. Peptides penetrate easily into tumors for deep imaging, and clear rapidly from the circulation to minimize background. We aim to demonstrate use of an EGFR specific peptide to detect HCC xenograft tumors in mice with photoacoustic imaging. Nude mice implanted with human HCC cells that overexpress EGFR were injected intravenously with Cy5.5-labeled EGFR and scrambled control peptides respectively. Photoacoustic images collected from 0 to 24 h. Photoacoustic signal peaked in tumors at 3 h post-injection. Images from 0 to 1.8 cm beneath the skin revealed increased target-to-background (T/B) ratio from tumors. The T/B ratio was significantly greater for the EGFR versus control peptide. Clearance of signal was observed by ∼24 h. EGFR overexpression was validated with immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. A peptide specific for EGFR delivered systemically can detect HCC xenograft tumors in vivo with photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Video-based measuring of quality parameters for tricuspid xenograft heart valve implants.

    PubMed

    Condurache, Alexandru Paul; Hahn, Tobias; Scharfschwerdt, Michael; Mertins, Alfred; Aach, Til

    2009-12-01

    Defective heart valves are often replaced by implants in open-heart surgery. Both mechanical and biological implants are available. Among biological implants, xenograft ones-i.e., valves grafted from animals such as pigs, are widely used. Good implants should exhibit certain typical anatomical and functional characteristics to successfully replace the native tissue. Here, we describe a video-based system for measuring quality parameters of xenograft heart valve implants, including the area of the orifice and the fluttering of the valves' leaflets, i.e., their flaps (or cusps). Our system employs automatic methods that provide a precise and reproducible way to infer the quality of an implant. The automatic analysis of both a valve's orifice and the fluttering of its leaflets offers a more comprehensive quality assessment than current, mostly manual methods. We focus on valves with three leaflets, i.e., aortic, pulmonary, and tricuspid valves.

  5. Assessment of PET tracer uptake in hormone-independent and hormone-dependent xenograft prostate cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kukuk, Damaris; Reischl, Gerald; Raguin, Olivier; Wiehr, Stefan; Judenhofer, Martin S; Calaminus, Carsten; Honndorf, Valerie S; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Schönberger, Tanja; Duchamp, Olivier; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Pichler, Bernd J

    2011-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of (18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine (FLT), (18)F-FDG, (11)C-choline, and (18)F-fluoroethylcholine (FEC) in 2 hormone-independent (PC-3, DU145) and 2 hormone-dependent (CWR22, PAC120) prostate cancer xenograft mouse models were evaluated by PET and compared by immunohistochemistry. Further investigation was performed to determine whether PET can detect early changes in tumor metabolism after androgen ablation therapy through surgical castration. PET was performed on 4 consecutive days. In addition, the CWR22 and PAC120 tumor models were surgically castrated after the baseline measurement and imaged again after castration. The tracer uptake was analyzed using time-activity curves, percentage injected dose per volume (%ID/cm(3)), and tumor-to-muscle ratio (T/M). Regarding the hormone-independent prostate tumor models, (18)F-FLT showed the best T/M and highest %ID/cm(3) in PC-3 (2.97 ± 0.63 %ID/cm(3)) and DU145 (2.06 ± 0.75 %ID/cm(3)) tumors. (18)F-FDG seemed to be the tracer of choice for delineation of the PC-3 tumors but not for the DU145 tumors. Using (11)C-choline (PC-3: 1.33 ± 0.29 %ID/cm(3), DU145: 1.60 ± 0.27 %ID/cm(3)) and (18)F-FEC, we did not find any significant uptake in the tumors, compared with muscle tissue. Regarding the hormone-dependent prostate tumor models, the CWR22 model showed a highly significant (P < 0.01) decrease in tumor (18)F-FDG uptake from 4.11 ± 1.29 %ID/cm(3) to 2.19 ± 1.45 %ID/cm(3) after androgen ablation therapy. However, the (18)F-FLT, (11)C-choline, or (18)F-FEC tracers did not provide sufficient uptake or reliable information about therapy response in CWR22 tumors. The PAC120 model showed a significant increase in (18)F-FLT tumor uptake (P = 0.015) after androgen ablation therapy. The accumulation of (18)F-FEC (before: 2.32 ± 1.01 %ID/cm(3), after: 1.36 ± 0.39 %ID/cm(3)) was found to be the next highest after (18)F-FDG (before: 2.45 ± 0.93 %ID/cm(3), after: 2.18 ± 0.65 %ID/cm(3)) in PAC120 tumors before

  6. Intravesical administration of exogenous microRNA-145 as a therapy for mouse orthotopic human bladder cancer xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Teruo; Taniguchi, Kohei; Takahara, Kiyoshi; Iwatsuki, Ayako; Takai, Tomoaki; Komura, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Taizo; Saito, Kenkichi; Tanda, Naoki; Kouno, Junko; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi; Akao, Yukihiro; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that the level of microRNA (miR)-145 is attenuated in human bladder cancer cells. In this current study, we investigated whether intravesical administration of miR-145 could be a potential therapeutic strategy for controlling bladder cancer by using an orthotopic human bladder cancer xenograft model. Following transfection of 253J B-V cells with miR-145, the effects of the ectopic expression of miR-145 were examined by performing MTT, Western blotting analysis, Hoechst33342 staining, and wound healing assay in vitro. Also, a mouse orthotopic human bladder cancer model was established by inoculating 253J B-V cells into the bladder wall of mice. The anti-cancer effects of intravesical injections of miR-145 into these mice were then assessed. Transfection of 253J B-V cells with miR-145 induced apoptosis and suppression of cell migration in vitro. Western blotting showed that the levels of c-Myc, socs7, FSCN1, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and catenin δ-1 were decreased and that the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 signaling pathways were increased in compensatory fashion. In vivo, mice treated with miR-145 showed 76% inhibition of tumor growth, with a significant prolongation of animal survival (p = 0.0183 vs. control). Western blotting showed that both apoptosis and cell motility-related genes were significantly decreased as seen in vitro. Furthermore, PI3k/Akt and Erk1/2 signaling pathways, which were activated in a compensatory manner in vitro, were decreased in vivo. Intravesical administration of exogenous miR-145 was thus concluded to be a valid therapy for bladder cancer in this human bladder cancer xenograft model. PMID:26036261

  7. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  8. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  9. Endoglin: a novel target for therapeutic intervention in acute leukemias revealed in xenograft mouse models.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Keina M C; Baik, June; Oliveira, Vanessa K P; Beltrame, Miriam; Yamamoto, Ami; Theuer, Charles P; Figueiredo, Camila A V; Verneris, Michael R; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2017-05-04

    Endoglin (CD105), a receptor of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, has been reported to identify functional long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells, and has been detected in certain subtypes of acute leukemias. Whether this receptor plays a functional role in leukemogenesis remains unknown. We identified endoglin expression on the majority of blasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute B-lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Using a xenograft model, we find that CD105(+) blasts are endowed with superior leukemogenic activity compared with the CD105(-) population. We test the effect of targeting this receptor using the monoclonal antibody TRC105, and find that in AML, TRC105 prevented the engraftment of primary AML blasts and inhibited leukemia progression following disease establishment, but in B-ALL, TRC105 alone was ineffective due to the shedding of soluble CD105. However, in both B-ALL and AML, TRC105 synergized with reduced intensity myeloablation to inhibit leukemogenesis, indicating that TRC105 may represent a novel therapeutic option for B-ALL and AML. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. A Novel Synthetic Smoothened Antagonist Transiently Inhibits Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenografts in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Martin F.; Wilson, Steven R.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Holsworth, Daniel D.; Khvat, Alexander; Okun, Ilya; Petersen, Dirk; Krauss, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is over-activated in several solid tumors where it plays a central role in cell growth, stroma recruitment and tumor progression. In the Hh signaling pathway, the Smoothened (SMO) receptor comprises a primary drug target with experimental small molecule SMO antagonists currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Principal Findings Using Shh-Light II (Shh-L2) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) based screening formats on a “focused diversity” library we identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of the Hh pathway, MS-0022 (2-bromo-N-(4-(8-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)phenyl)benzamide). MS-0022 showed effective Hh signaling pathway inhibition at the level of SMO in the low nM range, and Hh pathway inhibition downstream of Suppressor of fused (SUFU) in the low µM range. MS-0022 reduced growth in the tumor cell lines PANC-1, SUIT-2, PC-3 and FEMX in vitro. MS-0022 treatment led to a transient delay of tumor growth that correlated with a reduction of stromal Gli1 levels in SUIT-2 xenografts in vivo. Significance We document the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and bioavailability of a novel small molecule SMO antagonist, MS-0022. Although MS-0022 primarily interferes with Hh signaling at the level of SMO, it also has a downstream inhibitory effect and leads to a stronger reduction of growth in several tumor cell lines when compared to related SMO antagonists. PMID:21698280

  11. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  12. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  13. Novel Effects of Simvastatin on Uterine Fibroids: In vitro and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Model Study

    PubMed Central

    BORAHAY, Mostafa A.; VINCENT, Kathleen; MOTAMEDI, Massoud; SBRANA, Elena; KILIC, Gokhan S.; AL-HENDY, Ayman; BOEHNING, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Objective Uterine leiomyomas represent a common gynecologic problem with no satisfactory long-term medical treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of simvastatin on uterine leiomyoma, both in vitro and in vivo. Study Design This is a laboratory-based experimental study. For in vitro studies, we used human and rat leiomyoma cells. For in vivo studies, we used immunodeficient mice supplemented with estrogen/progesterone pellets xenografted with human leiomyoma tissue explant. Results For in vitro studies, cells were treated with different concentrations of simvastatin for 48 hours. Simvastatin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in leiomyoma cells as measured by a fluorometric caspase-3 activity assay, and inhibited proliferation as demonstrated by an MTT assay (both were significant at 5 and 10 μM). In addition, simvastatin decreased Akt signaling pathway phosphorylation as examined using Western blot analysis. For in vivo studies, animals were treated for 28 days with simvastatin (20 μg/ gm body weight/ day) vs vehicle control. The treatment inhibited tumor growth as measured weekly using calipers and/ or ultrasound (P<.01). Finally, simvastatin decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 in xenograft tumor tissue as examined by immunohistochemistry (P=.02). Conclusion Simvastatin can be a promising treatment for uterine leiomyoma. Further studies, including pharmacokinetic and drug delivery studies, are required. PMID:25840272

  14. Celecoxib enhanced the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in chemo-resistant gastric cancer xenograft mouse models through a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Shen, Fu-Ming; Lv, Qian-Zhou

    2016-04-05

    Our previous study suggested that co-administration of celecoxib increased chemo-sensitivity of multidrug-resistant human gastric cancer SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin (DDP) in vitro. The present study was designed to investigate whether celecoxib had the similar activities in vivo. SGC-7901/DDP and SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models were established. At the end of the experiment, cisplatin treatment alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in SGC-7901 xenograft, as compared with that in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, suggesting that it maintained cisplatin sensitivity. When cisplatin and celecoxib were co-administrated, their antitumor activities were augmented in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft. The levels of Ki67 and PCNA after combination therapy were significantly decreased in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, as compared with those of cisplatin treatment alone. Moreover, examining the apoptotic index by TUNEL assay showed similar results. Further studies demonstrated the inhibitory effect of celecoxib on cyclooxygenase-2 and P-glycoprotein expression was the possible reason to increase sensitivity of SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin in vivo. However, the ratio of thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin F1α was elevated after celecoxib treatment in mice. This has been proposed to increase the risk of thrombogenesis. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celecoxib for reducing chemo-resistance in gastric cancer.

  15. Soy isoflavone extracts stimulate the growth of nude mouse xenografts bearing estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cells (MCF-7)☆

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Yang, Ye; Yu, Jing; Jin, Nianzu

    2012-01-01

    We explored the effects of different lifetime exposures to soy isoflavone extracts on the growth of estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) implanted into athymic mice of different ovarian statuses. The athymic mice, ovariectomized or not, were implanted with MCF-7 cells. Mice were fed with low, moderate and high doses of soy isoflavone extract, at dietary concentrations of 6.25, 12.5 and 25 g/kg, in different reproductive models, respectively. The expression of ki-67 was detected by immunohistochemistry. pS2 expression in tumors was analyzed by real-time PCR. Estrogen level in the serum was measured by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. Total genistein and daidzein levels in serum and urine were determined by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ES/MS/MS). In Group A, on week 4, nude mice were exposed to different doses of soy iosflavone extracts. In Group B, the experimental diets were given to the nude mice following ovariectomy and tumor implantation. In both groups, 6.25 and 12.5 g/kg soy isoflavone extracts stimulated the growth of MCF-7 xenografts, increased pS2 expression, proliferation and estrogen level in serum. In both Group B (postmenopausal mouse model) and Group C (premenopausal mouse model), soy isoflavone extracts at doses of 6.25 and 12.5 g/kg showed stimulatory effects on the growth of MCF-7 tumors. In conclusion, administration of soy isoflavone extracts at doses of 6.25 and 12.5 g/kg during adolescence or later in life stimulated tumor growth in both menopausal and postmenopausal mouse models. PMID:23554729

  16. Antitumor effect of para-toluenesulfonamide against lung cancer xenograft in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Gao, Yonghua; Guan, Weijie; Huang, Liyan; Xu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chenting; Chen, Xiuqing; Wu, Yizhuang; Zeng, Guangqiao

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are relatively insensitive and unsatisfactory. Para-toluenesulfonamide (PTS), a unique antitumor drug for local intratumoral injection, shows an efficacy of severely suppressing solid tumor growth with mild side effects in clinical trials. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PTS on lung cancer H460 cells in vivo in nude mice and its underlying mechanisms in vitro. Methods A lung cancer model for in vivo experiment was established in BALB/c nude mice using H460 cells to examine the effect of local injection of PTS on tumor suppression. We also assessed the injury to the normal tissue by subcutaneous injection of PTS. In vitro, PTS was diluted into different doses for study on its antitumor mechanisms. We evaluated the necrotic effect of PTS on H460 cells by PI and Hoechst 33342 staining. Cell viability and membrane permeability were also determined by using CCK-8 and LDH assays respectively. All these tests were conducted in comparison with traditional local injection of anhydrous ethanol. Results PTS was shown to significantly inhibit the growth of H460 tumor xenografts in nude mice by inducing necrosis of the tumor histologically. Its effect on tumor growth was significantly stronger than that of anhydrous ethanol. By contrast, the injured normal tissue by PTS injection was less than that by ethanol. In vitro, PTS still demonstrated excellent necrotizing effect on H460 cells when diluted to a lower concentration. Detailed analysis of PTS on H460 cells indicated that PTS had a better effect on attenuating the cell viability and increasing the cell membrane permeability than ethanol at the same level. Conclusions PTS exhibits excellent inhibition effect on the growth of lung cancer by necrotizing tumor in vivo and in vitro, reducing tumor cell viability and augmenting the membrane permeability in vitro, with only mild injury to normal tissue. The

  17. Recombinant methioninase effectively targets a Ewing's sarcoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Li, Shukuan; Han, Qinghong; Tan, Yuying; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Miyake, Kentaro; Singh, Arun S; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Lwin, Thinzar M; DeLong, Jonathan C; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-01

    Methionine dependence is due to the overuse of methionine for aberrant transmethylation reactions in cancer. Methionine dependence may be the only general metabolic defect in cancer. In order to exploit methionine dependence for therapy, our laboratory previously cloned L-methionine α-deamino-γ-mercaptomethane lyase [EC 4.4.1.11]). The cloned methioninase, termed recombinant methioninase, or rMETase, has been tested in mouse models of human cancer cell lines. Ewing's sarcoma is recalcitrant disease even though development of multimodal therapy has improved patients'outcome. Here we report efficacy of rMETase against Ewing's sarcoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. The Ewing's sarcoma was implanted in the right chest wall of nude mice to establish a PDOX model. Eight Ewing's sarcoma PDOX mice were randomized into untreated control group (n = 4) and rMETase treatment group (n = 4). rMETase (100 units) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) every 24 hours for 14 consecutive days. All mice were sacrificed on day-15, 24 hours after the last rMETase administration. rMETase effectively reduced tumor growth compared to untreated control. The methionine level both of plasma and supernatants derived from sonicated tumors was lower in the rMETase group. Body weight did not significantly differ at any time points between the 2 groups. The present study is the first demonstrating rMETase efficacy in a PDOX model, suggesting potential clinical development, especially in recalcitrant cancers such as Ewing's sarcoma.

  18. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Human RAD51 Potentiates Breast Cancer Cell Killing by Therapeutic Agents in Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double strand breaks. RAD51, a key homologous recombination protein, promotes the search for homology and DNA strand exchange between homologous DNA molecules. RAD51 is overexpressed in a variety of cancer cells. Downregulation of RAD51 by siRNA increases radio- or chemo-sensitivity of cancer cells. We recently developed a specific RAD51 small molecule inhibitor, B02, which inhibits DNA strand exchange activity of RAD51 in vitro. In this study, we used human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 to investigate the ability of B02 to inhibit RAD51 and to potentiate an anti-cancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents including doxorubicin, etoposide, topotecan, and cisplatin. We found that the combination of B02 with cisplatin has the strongest killing effect on the cancer cells. We then tested the effect of B02 and cisplatin on the MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation in mouse xenografts. Our results showed that B02 significantly enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin on tumor cells in vivo. Our current data demonstrate that use of RAD51-specific small molecule inhibitor represents a feasible strategy of a combination anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24971740

  19. Novel anti-ErbB3 monoclonal antibodies show therapeutic efficacy in xenografted and spontaneous mouse tumors.

    PubMed

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Marra, Emanuele; Luberto, Laura; Carlomosti, Fabrizio; De Vitis, Claudia; Noto, Alessia; Gunes, Zeynep; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Mancini, Rita; Alimandi, Maurizio; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2012-10-01

    The role of the ErbB3 receptor in signal transduction is to augment the signaling repertoire of active heterodimeric ErbB receptor complexes through activating the PI3K/AKT pathway, which in turn promotes survival and proliferation. ErbB3 has recently been proposed to be involved in acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), and is therefore a promising new drug cancer target. Since ErbB3 is a kinase defective receptor, it cannot be targeted by small molecule inhibitors, whereas monoclonal antibodies may offer a viable strategy for pharmacological intervention. In this study, we have utilized DNA electroporation (DNA-EP) to generate a set of novel hybridomas directed against human ErbB3, which have been characterized for their biochemical and functional properties and selected for their ability to negatively regulate the ErbB3-mediated signaling pathway. In vitro, the anti-ErbB3 antibodies modulate the growth rate of cancer cells of different origins. In vivo they show antitumoral properties in a xenograft model of human pancreatic tumor and in the ErbB2-driven carcinogenesis genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for mammary tumor, the BALB/neuT. Our data confirm that downregulating the ErbB3-mediated signals with the use of anti-ErbB3 monoclonal antibodies is both feasible and relevant for therapeutic purposes and provides new opportunities for novel anti-ErbB3 combinatory strategies for cancer treatment.

  20. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression.

  1. Microdistribution of specific rat monoclonal antibodies to mouse tissues and human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Falcioni, R; Wesley, J W

    1991-03-01

    Detailed evaluations of the microdistribution of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to normal tissue antigens were conducted in BALB/c mice. MoAb 273-34A, which binds to a target molecule on the lumenal surface of lung endothelial cells, localizes quickly and efficiently throughout the lung vasculature. MoAb 133-13A, which binds to an antigen on macrophage-like cells expressed in nearly equal amounts in lung, liver, and spleen, localizes most efficiently to spleen and less well to liver and lung. The microdistribution of MoAb 133-13A in liver and spleen is consistent with the antigen distribution in these organs, but in the lung a more diffuse microdistribution is observed, indicating poor access of MoAb to the antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tight endothelium (lung) represents a significant barrier to extravasation of MoAb into tissue while fenestrated (spleen) and sinusoidal (liver) endothelium are more easily penetrated. In human tumor bearing nu/nu mice, the microdistribution of MoAb to the beta 4 and alpha 6 subunits of integrin was studied. These MoAbs do not cross-react with murine integrins and thus are tumor-specific in the nu/nu mouse model. Localization of 125I-labeled MoAb 450-11A, which reacts with an intercellular domain of beta 4 integrin, is very weak and diffuse. All MoAbs to extracellular domains (mouse 450-9D, 450-30A1, and rat 439-9B) localize well to the tumor. Microdistribution of these MoAbs in the 3 different tumors is nonuniform with heavy distribution near the blood vessels, whereas antigen distribution as determined by immunoperoxidase shows a much more uniform pattern throughout the tumors. In experiments with 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B F(ab')2, the nonuniform pattern of distribution was not changed. Gross and microdistribution of different doses of 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B were studied. The percent of injected dose per g of MoAb in the tumor at 48 h did not vary

  2. Human nerve xenografting in nude mouse: Experimental study of graft revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, K.; Bour, C.; Merle, M.; Duprez, A. )

    1991-01-01

    In the nude mouse, the congenital absence of T lymphocytes makes it possible to implant human nerve grafts without rejection or iatrogenic modifications (by immunosuppression) of human and murine tissues. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves were harvested from human cadavers 1-18 hours after death. These nerve grafts were implanted using different techniques in nude mice. All the grafts were macroscopically and microscopically revascularized 3 days after implantation. The modifications in time of this vascularization could be studied with precision through the use of repeated biopsies. The absence of human blood group antigens on the neovessel endothelium suggested a murine origin for angiogenesis. In situ DNA hybridizations with human and mouse DNA confirmed this origin. The topography of the revascularization (maximal in the perineurium and endoneurium) and the almost complete absence of human cells other than Schwann cells in the grafts at the peak of angiogenesis (26 days after grafting) suggested that Schwann cells had a determining role in graft vascularization. The irradiation of the nerve grafts with a dose of 30 grays before implantation did not modify significantly their histologic appearance compared to the control group, whereas an irradiation of 60 grays led to massive lesions. The neurotization of murine axons led to chimerical structures of normal histologic appearance, with vascularization similar to that observed in nonneurotized nerves. Through chimerism (human Schwann cells, murine vessels and axons) this model makes it possible to dissociate the respective role of the host and of the nerve graft in angiogenesis and suggests the existence of growth factors produced by the human Schwann cells.

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells as a Biomarker of Response to Treatment in Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Torphy, Robert J.; Tignanelli, Christopher J.; Kamande, Joyce W.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Herrera Loeza, Silvia G.; Soper, Steven A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed from solid tumors into circulation and have been shown to be prognostic in the setting of metastatic disease. These cells are obtained through a routine blood draw and may serve as an easily accessible marker for monitoring treatment effectiveness. Because of the rapid progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), early insight into treatment effectiveness may allow for necessary and timely changes in treatment regimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate CTC burden as a biomarker of response to treatment with a oral phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor, BKM120, in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models of PDAC. PDX mice were randomized to receive vehicle or BKM120 treatment for 28 days and CTCs were enumerated from whole blood before and after treatment using a microfluidic chip that selected for EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) positive cells. This microfluidic device allowed for the release of captured CTCs and enumeration of these cells via their electrical impedance signatures. Median CTC counts significantly decreased in the BKM120 group from pre- to post-treatment (26.61 to 2.21 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.0207) while no significant change was observed in the vehicle group (23.26 to 11.89 CTCs/250 µL, p = 0.8081). This reduction in CTC burden in the treatment group correlated with tumor growth inhibition indicating CTC burden is a promising biomarker of response to treatment in preclinical models. Mutant enriched sequencing of isolated CTCs confirmed that they harbored KRAS G12V mutations, identical to the matched tumors. In the long-term, PDX mice are a useful preclinical model for furthering our understanding of CTCs. Clinically, mutational analysis of CTCs and serial monitoring of CTC burden may be used as a minimally invasive approach to predict and monitor treatment response to guide therapeutic regimens. PMID:24586805

  4. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Mallory, Samantha; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Li, Xiao-Nan; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Fung, Kar-Ming; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM), although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture) model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.05) and increase animal survival (p<0.05) in all OKN-007-treated mice compared to untreated animals. In a responsive cohort of treated animals, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.0001), increase survival (p<0.001), and increase diffusion (p<0.01) and perfusion rates (p<0.05). OKN-007 also significantly reduced lipid tumor metabolism in responsive animals [(Lip1.3 and Lip0.9)-to-creatine ratio (p<0.05)], as well as significantly decrease tumor cell proliferation (p<0.05) and microvessel density (p<0.05). Furthermore, in relationship to the PDGFRα pathway, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease SULF2 (p<0.05) and PDGFR-α (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) (p<0.05) immunoexpression, and significantly increase decorin expression (p<0.05) in responsive mice. This study indicates that OKN-007 may be an effective anti-cancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients. PMID:26248280

  5. OSI-930: a novel selective inhibitor of Kit and kinase insert domain receptor tyrosine kinases with antitumor activity in mouse xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Garton, Andrew J; Crew, Andrew P A; Franklin, Maryland; Cooke, Andrew R; Wynne, Graham M; Castaldo, Linda; Kahler, Jennifer; Winski, Shannon L; Franks, April; Brown, Eric N; Bittner, Mark A; Keily, John F; Briner, Paul; Hidden, Chris; Srebernak, Mary C; Pirrit, Carrie; O'Connor, Matthew; Chan, Anna; Vulevic, Bojana; Henninger, Dwight; Hart, Karen; Sennello, Regina; Li, An-Hu; Zhang, Tao; Richardson, Frank; Emerson, David L; Castelhano, Arlindo L; Arnold, Lee D; Gibson, Neil W

    2006-01-15

    OSI-930 is a novel inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases Kit and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), which is currently being evaluated in clinical studies. OSI-930 selectively inhibits Kit and KDR with similar potency in intact cells and also inhibits these targets in vivo following oral dosing. We have investigated the relationships between the potency observed in cell-based assays in vitro, the plasma exposure levels achieved following oral dosing, the time course of target inhibition in vivo, and antitumor activity of OSI-930 in tumor xenograft models. In the mutant Kit-expressing HMC-1 xenograft model, prolonged inhibition of Kit was achieved at oral doses between 10 and 50 mg/kg and this dose range was associated with antitumor activity. Similarly, prolonged inhibition of wild-type Kit in the NCI-H526 xenograft model was observed at oral doses of 100 to 200 mg/kg, which was the dose level associated with significant antitumor activity in this model as well as in the majority of other xenograft models tested. The data suggest that antitumor activity of OSI-930 in mouse xenograft models is observed at dose levels that maintain a significant level of inhibition of the molecular targets of OSI-930 for a prolonged period. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic evaluation of the plasma exposure levels of OSI-930 at these effective dose levels provides an estimate of the target plasma concentrations that may be required to achieve prolonged inhibition of Kit and KDR in humans and which would therefore be expected to yield a therapeutic benefit in future clinical evaluations of OSI-930.

  6. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  7. Efficacy of Tumor-Targeting Salmonella A1-R on a Melanoma Patient-Derived Orthotopic Xenograft (PDOX) Nude-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mako; Zhao, Ming; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Shurell, Elizabeth; Eilber, Fritz C.; Bouvet, Michael; Noda, Makoto; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-targeting Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium A1-R (Salmonella A1-R) had strong efficacy on a melanoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model. GFP-expressing Salmonella A1-R highly and selectively colonized the PDOX melanoma and significantly suppressed tumor growth (p = 0.021). The combination of Salmonella A1-R and cisplatinum (CDDP), both at low-dose, also significantly suppressed the growth of the melanoma PDOX (P = 0.001). Salmonella A1-R has future clinical potential for combination chemotherapy with CDDP of melanoma, a highly-recalcitrant cancer. PMID:27500926

  8. ELTD1, an effective anti-angiogenic target for gliomas: preclinical assessment in mouse GL261 and human G55 xenograft glioma models.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jadith; Pody, Richard; Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Evans, Blake; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Mallory, Samantha; Njoku, Charity; Dong, Yunzhou; Chen, Hong; Dong, Jiali; Lerner, Megan; Mian, Osamah; Tummala, Sai; Battiste, James; Fung, Kar-Ming; Wren, Jonathan D; Towner, Rheal A

    2017-02-01

    Despite current therapies, glioblastoma is a devastating cancer, and validation of effective biomarkers for it will enable better diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for this disease. We recently discovered a new biomarker for high-grade gliomas, ELTD1 (epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1) via bioinformatics, and validated that ELTD1 protein levels are significantly higher in human and rodent gliomas. The focus of this study was to assess the effect on tumor growth of an antibody against ELTD1 in orthotopic, GL261, and G55 xenograft glioma models. The effect of anti-ELTD1 antibody therapy was assessed by animal survival, MRI measured tumor volumes, MR angiography, MR perfusion imaging, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterization of microvessel density in mouse glioma models. Comparative treatments included anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and anti-c-Met antibody therapies, compared with untreated controls. Tumor volume and survival data in this study show that antibodies against ELTD1 inhibit glioma growth just as effectively or even more so compared with other therapeutic targets studied, including anti-VEGF antibody therapy. Untreated GL261 or G55 tumors were found to have significantly higher ELTD1 levels (IHC) compared with contralateral normal brain. The anti-angiogenic effect of ELTD1 antibody therapy was observed in assessment of microvessel density, as well as from MR angiography and perfusion measurements, which indicated that anti-ELTD1 antibody therapy significantly decreased vascularization compared with untreated controls. Either as a single therapy or in conjunction with other therapeutic approaches, anti-ELTD1 antibodies could be a valuable new clinical anti-angiogenic therapeutic for high-grade gliomas.

  9. Growth and Metastases of Human Lung Cancer Are Inhibited in Mouse Xenografts by a Transition State Analogue of 5′-Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Indranil; Locker, Joseph; Cassera, Maria B.; Belbin, Thomas J.; Merino, Emilio F.; Dong, Xinyuan; Hemeon, Ivan; Evans, Gary B.; Guha, Chandan; Schramm, Vern L.

    2011-01-01

    The S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) salvage enzyme 5′-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) has been implicated as both a cancer target and a tumor suppressor. We tested these hypotheses in mouse xenografts of human lung cancers. AdoMet recycling from 5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA) was blocked by inhibition of MTAP with methylthio-DADMe-Immucillin-A (MTDIA), an orally available, nontoxic, picomolar transition state analogue. Blood, urine, and tumor levels of MTA increased in response to MTDIA treatment. MTDIA treatment inhibited A549 (human non-small cell lung carcinoma) and H358 (human bronchioloalveolar non-small cell lung carcinoma cells) xenograft tumor growth in immunodeficient Rag2−/−γC−/− and NCr-nu mice. Systemic MTA accumulation is implicated as the tumor-suppressive metabolite because MTDIA is effective for in vivo treatment of A549 MTAP−/− and H358 MTAP+/+ tumors. Tumors from treated mice showed increased MTA and decreased polyamines but little alteration in AdoMet, methionine, or adenine levels. Gene expression profiles of A549 tumors from treated and untreated mice revealed only modest alterations with 62 up-regulated and 63 down-regulated mRNAs (≥3-fold). MTDIA antitumor activity in xenografts supports MTAP as a target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:21135097

  10. Lack of long-lasting effects of mitotane adjuvant therapy in a mouse xenograft model of adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doghman, Mabrouka; Lalli, Enzo

    2013-12-05

    Mitotane is a widely used drug in the therapy of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). It is important to set up preclinical protocols to study the possible synergistic effects of its association with new drugs for ACC therapy. We assessed the efficacy of different routes of administration of mitotane (i.p. and oral) in inhibiting growth of H295R ACC cell xenografts in an adjuvant setting. Both formulations of mitotane could inhibit H295R xenografts growth only at short times after carcinoma cells inoculation, even though plasma mitotane levels approached or fell within the therapeutic range in humans. Our results show that mitotane adjuvant therapy is inadequate to antagonize long-term growth of H295R cancer cells xenografts and that care should then be taken in the design of preclinical protocols to evaluate the performance of new drugs in association with mitotane.

  11. Beneficial effects of the transgenic expression of human sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 on pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Yeom, Hye-Jeong; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Lee, Eun Won; Cho, Bumrae; Lee, Han Sin; Kim, Su Jin; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-02-01

    Both human soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-Fc (sTNF-αR-Fc) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic pigs have been generated previously for xenotransplantation. Here, we investigated whether overexpression of sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 in pig islets prolongs islet xenograft survival. Adult porcine islets were isolated from human sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 transgenic and wild type pigs, and were transplanted into diabetic nude mice. Effects of the expression of both genes on islet apoptosis, chemokine expression, cellular infiltration, antibody production, and islet xenograft survival were analyzed. Human sTNF-αR-Fc transgenic pigs successfully expressed sTNF-αR-Fc in the islets; human HO-1 transgenic pigs expressed significant levels of HO-1 in the islets. Pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival was significantly prolonged in both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups compared with that in the wild type group. Both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups exhibited suppressed intragraft expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and decreased perigraft infiltration of immune cells. However, there was no difference in the anti-pig antibody levels between the groups. Apoptosis of islet cells during the early engraftment was suppressed only in the HO-1 group. Porcine islets from both sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 transgenic pigs prolonged xenograft survival by suppressing islet cell apoptosis or secondary inflammatory responses following islet death, indicating that these transgenic pigs might have applications in successful islet xenotransplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. XactMice: humanizing mouse bone marrow enables microenvironment reconstitution in a patient-derived xenograft model of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morton, J. Jason; Bird, Gregory; Keysar, Stephen B.; Astling, David P.; Lyons, Traci R; Anderson, Ryan T.; Glogowska, Magdalena J.; Estes, Patricia; Eagles, Justin R.; Le, Phuong N.; Gan, Gregory; McGettigan, Brett; Fernandez, Pamela; Padilla-Just, Nuria; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Song, John I.; Bowles, Daniel W.; Schedin, Pepper; Tan, Aik-Choon; Roop, Dennis R.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of cancer cell lines have led to the development of direct patient derived xenograft (PDX) models. However, the interplay between the implanted human cancer cells and recruited mouse stromal and immune cells alters the tumor microenvironment and limits the value of these models. To overcome these constraints, we have developed a technique to expand human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and use them to reconstitute the radiation-depleted bone marrow of a NOD/SCID/IL2rg−/− (NSG) mouse on which a patient’s tumor is then transplanted (XactMice). The human HSPCs produce immune cells that home into the tumor and help replicate its natural microenvironment. Despite previous passage on nude mice, the expression of epithelial, stromal, and immune genes in XactMice tumors aligns more closely to that of the patient tumor than to those grown in non-humanized mice – an effect partially facilitated by human cytokines expressed by both the HSPC progeny and the tumor cells. The human immune and stromal cells produced in the XactMice can help recapitulate the microenvironment of an implanted xenograft, reverse the initial genetic drift seen after passage on non-humanized mice, and provide a more accurate tumor model to guide patient treatment. PMID:25893296

  13. Monitoring breast tumor progression by photoacoustic measurements: a xenograft mice model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, Bola Sadashiva; Chandra, Subhash; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2015-10-01

    The current study reports the photoacoustic spectroscopy-based assessment of breast tumor progression in a nude mice xenograft model. The tumor was induced through subcutaneous injection of MCF-7 cells in female nude mice and was monitored for 20 days until the tumor volume reached 1000 mm3. The tumor tissues were extracted at three different time points (days 10, 15, and 20) after tumor inoculation and subjected to photoacoustic spectral recordings in time domain ex vivo at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The spectra were converted into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transformed tools of MATLAB® algorithms and further utilized to extract seven statistical features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance and standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each time point sample to assess the tumor growth with wavelet principal component analysis based logistic regression analysis performed on the data. The prediction accuracies of the analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 92.31, 87.5, and 95.2%, respectively. Also, receiver operator characteristics area under the curve analysis for day 10 versus day 15, day 15 versus day 20, and day 10 versus day 20 were found to be 0.95, 0.85, and 0.93, respectively. The ability of photoacoustic measurements in the objective assessment of tumor progression has been clearly demonstrated, indicating its clinical potential.

  14. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  15. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  16. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  17. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  18. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  19. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα Inhibitors as a New Alternative Therapy of Colorectal Cancer: Evidence in Human Tumor-Derived Cell Lines and Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    de la Cueva, Ana; Ramírez de Molina, Ana; Álvarez-Ayerza, Néstor; Ramos, Ma Angeles; Cebrián, Arancha; del Pulgar, Teresa Gómez; Lacal, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα), an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy. Methodology/Principal Findings ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS) and thymidine kinase (TK1) levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors. PMID:23762272

  20. Polyphenol-rich Avicennia marina leaf extracts induce apoptosis in human breast and liver cancer cells and in a nude mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Tu, Ming-Chin; Chang, Jia-Hua; Chen, Yen-Ju; Tu, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hsiu-Chen

    2016-06-14

    Avicennia marina is the most abundant and common mangrove species and has been used as a traditional medicine for skin diseases, rheumatism, ulcers, and smallpox. However, its anticancer activities and polyphenol contents remain poorly characterized. Thus, here we investigated anticancer activities of secondary A. marina metabolites that were purified by sequential soxhlet extraction in water, ethanol, methanol, and ethyl acetate (EtOAc). Experiments were performed in three human breast cancer cell lines (AU565, MDA-MB-231, and BT483), two human liver cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7), and one normal cell line (NIH3T3). The chemotherapeutic potential of A. marina extracts was evaluated in a xenograft mouse model. The present data show that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves have the highest phenolic and flavonoid contents and anticancer activities and, following column chromatography, the EtOAc fractions F2-5, F3-2-9, and F3-2-10 showed higher cytotoxic effects than the other fractions. 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR profiles indicated that the F3-2-10 fraction contained avicennones D and E. EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves also suppressed xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in nude mice, suggesting that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves may provide a useful treatment for breast cancer.

  1. Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf extract inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumors in nude mouse xenografts and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells

    PubMed Central

    You, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Min-Sook; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Eun; Kim, Yong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The present study was conducted to examine the inhibitory effect of loquat leaves on MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and invasion. MATERIALS/METHODS Female athymic nude mice were given a subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation of MDA-MB-231 cells and randomly grouped to receive a s.c. injection of either 500 mg/kg ethanol, water extract or vehicle five times a week. Tumor growth, mitotic rate and necrosis were examined. MDA-MB-231 cells were cultured with DMSO or with various concentrations of loquat water or ethanol extract. Proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were examined. RESULTS Tumor growth of xenograft nude mouse was significantly reduced by loquat extracts. The results of mitotic examination revealed that loquat extracts reduced tumor cell division. Both ethanol and water extracts significantly inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation. The protein expression of ErbB3 was significantly down-regulated by loquat leaf extracts. Loquat leaf extracts increased apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells following 24 hour incubation and the ethanol extract was more potent in inducing apoptosis than the water extract. Furthermore, loquat extracts inhibited adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. MMP activity was significantly inhibited by loquat extracts. CONCLUSION Our results show that extracts of loquat inhibit the growth of tumor in MDA-MB-231 xenograft nude mice and the invasion of human breast cancer cells, indicating the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and invasion. PMID:27087896

  2. Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) leaf extract inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumors in nude mouse xenografts and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    You, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Min-Sook; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Eun; Kim, Yong-Jae; Kim, Hyeon-A

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the inhibitory effect of loquat leaves on MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and invasion. Female athymic nude mice were given a subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation of MDA-MB-231 cells and randomly grouped to receive a s.c. injection of either 500 mg/kg ethanol, water extract or vehicle five times a week. Tumor growth, mitotic rate and necrosis were examined. MDA-MB-231 cells were cultured with DMSO or with various concentrations of loquat water or ethanol extract. Proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity were examined. Tumor growth of xenograft nude mouse was significantly reduced by loquat extracts. The results of mitotic examination revealed that loquat extracts reduced tumor cell division. Both ethanol and water extracts significantly inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation. The protein expression of ErbB3 was significantly down-regulated by loquat leaf extracts. Loquat leaf extracts increased apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells following 24 hour incubation and the ethanol extract was more potent in inducing apoptosis than the water extract. Furthermore, loquat extracts inhibited adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. MMP activity was significantly inhibited by loquat extracts. Our results show that extracts of loquat inhibit the growth of tumor in MDA-MB-231 xenograft nude mice and the invasion of human breast cancer cells, indicating the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and invasion.

  3. Polyphenol-rich Avicennia marina leaf extracts induce apoptosis in human breast and liver cancer cells and in a nude mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ming-Chin; Chang, Jia-Hua; Chen, Yen-Ju; Tu, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hsiu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Avicennia marina is the most abundant and common mangrove species and has been used as a traditional medicine for skin diseases, rheumatism, ulcers, and smallpox. However, its anticancer activities and polyphenol contents remain poorly characterized. Thus, here we investigated anticancer activities of secondary A. marina metabolites that were purified by sequential soxhlet extraction in water, ethanol, methanol, and ethyl acetate (EtOAc). Experiments were performed in three human breast cancer cell lines (AU565, MDA-MB-231, and BT483), two human liver cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7), and one normal cell line (NIH3T3). The chemotherapeutic potential of A. marina extracts was evaluated in a xenograft mouse model. The present data show that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves have the highest phenolic and flavonoid contents and anticancer activities and, following column chromatography, the EtOAc fractions F2-5, F3-2-9, and F3-2-10 showed higher cytotoxic effects than the other fractions. 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR profiles indicated that the F3-2-10 fraction contained avicennones D and E. EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves also suppressed xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in nude mice, suggesting that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves may provide a useful treatment for breast cancer. PMID:27078842

  4. Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Xenografts Improve Cognitive Decline and Reduce the Amyloid Burden in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Noorwali, Abdulwahab; Atta, Hazem; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. The search for new treatments is made more urgent given its increasing prevalence resulting from the aging of the global population. Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to both study and potentially treat neurodegenerative diseases. Several investigators reported a beneficial effect of different types of stem or progenitor cells on the pathology and cognitive function in AD models. Mouse models are one of the most important research tools for finding new treatment for AD. We aimed to explore the possible therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell xenografts in a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. Methods APP/PS1 Tg AD model mice received human umbilical cord stem cells, directly injected into the carotid artery. To test the efficacy of the umbilical cord stem cells in this AD model, behavioral tasks (sensorimotor and cognitive tests) and immunohistochemical quantitation of the pathology was performed. Results Treatment of the APP/PS1 AD model mice, with human umbilical cord stem cells, produced a reduction of the amyloid beta burden in the cortex and the hippocampus which correlated with a reduction of the cognitive loss. Conclusion Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells appear to reduce AD pathology in a transgenic mouse model as documented by a reduction of the amyloid plaque burden compared to controls. This amelioration of pathology correlates with improvements on cognitive and sensorimotor tasks. PMID:27719629

  5. FR255734, a humanized, Fc-Silent, Anti-CD28 antibody, improves psoriasis in the SCID mouse-psoriasis xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Kundu-Raychaudhuri, Smriti; Tamura, Kouichi; Masunaga, Taro; Kubo, Kaori; Hanaoka, Kaori; Jiang, Wen-Yue; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Herzenberg, Leonard A

    2008-08-01

    In psoriasis, CD28/B7 costimulatory molecules are well characterized. Here, using the severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse-psoriasis xenograft model, we report therapeutic efficacy of a humanized anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody (FR255734; Astellas Pharmaceuticals Inc., Tokyo, Japan). Transplanted psoriasis plaques on the SCID mouse were treated weekly for 4 weeks with intraperitoneal injections of FR255734 at 10, 3, and 1-mg kg(-1) doses. Groups treated with doses of 10 and 3 mg kg(-1) had significant thinning of the epidermis and reduced HLA-DR-positive lymphocytic infiltrates. The length of the rete pegs changed from 415.2+/-59.6 to 231.4+/-40.4 microm (P<0.005) in the 10-mg kg(-1) group, and from 323.4+/-69.6 to 237.5+/-73.6 microm in the 3-mg kg(-1) group (P=0.002). Positive controls treated with CTLA4-Ig and cyclosporine had significant histological improvement, whereas plaques treated with saline and isotype controls (human and mouse IgG2) remained unchanged. In vitro studies have shown that FR255734 effectively blocked T-cell proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine production. These observations warrant studies to evaluate the efficacy of FR255734 in human autoimmune diseases.

  6. Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Xenografts Improve Cognitive Decline and Reduce the Amyloid Burden in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Boutajangout, Allal; Noorwali, Abdulwahab; Atta, Hazem; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. The search for new treatments is made more urgent given its increasing prevalence resulting from the aging of the global population. Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to both study and potentially treat neurodegenerative diseases. Several investigators reported a beneficial effect of different types of stem or progenitor cells on the pathology and cognitive function in AD models. Mouse models are one of the most important research tools for finding new treatment for AD. We aimed to explore the possible therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell xenografts in a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. APP/PS1 Tg AD model mice received human umbilical cord stem cells, directly injected into the carotid artery. To test the efficacy of the umbilical cord stem cells in this AD model, behavioral tasks (sensorimotor and cognitive tests) and immunohistochemical quantitation of the pathology was performed. Treatment of the APP/PS1 AD model mice, with human umbilical cord stem cells, produced a reduction of the amyloid beta burden in the cortex and the hippocampus which correlated with a reduction of the cognitive loss. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells appear to reduce AD pathology in a transgenic mouse model as documented by a reduction of the amyloid plaque burden compared to controls. This amelioration of pathology correlates with improvements on cognitive and sensorimotor tasks.

  7. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  8. Embryonic mouse STO cell-derived xenografts express hepatocytic functions in the livers of nonimmunosuppressed adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Joseph, Brigid; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guest, I; Xu, Meng; Sell, Stewart; Son, Kyung-Hwa; Koch, Katherine S; Leffert, Hyam L

    2005-02-01

    Cells derived from embryonic mouse STO cell lines differentiate into hepatocytes when transplanted into the livers of nonimmunosuppressed dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV)-negative F344 rats. Within 1 day after intrasplenic injection, donor cells moved rapidly into the liver and were found in intravascular and perivascular sites; by 1 month, they were intrasinusoidal and also integrated into hepatic plates with approximately 2% efficiency and formed conjoint bile canaliculi. Neither donor cell proliferation nor host inflammatory responses were observed during this time. Detection of intrahepatic mouse COX1 mitochondrial DNA and mouse albumin mRNA in recipient rats indicated survival and differentiation of donor cells for at least 3 months. Mouse COX1 targets were also detected intrahepatically 4-9 weeks after STO cell injection into nonimmunosuppressed wild-type rats. In contrast to STO-transplanted rats, mouse DNA or RNA was not detectable in untreated or mock-transplanted rats or in rats injected with donor cell DNA. In cultured STO donor cells, DPPIV and glucose-6-phosphatase activities were observed in small clusters; in contrast, mouse major histocompatibility complex class I H-2Kq, H-2Dq, and H-2Lq and class II I-Aq markers were undetectable in vitro before or after interferon gamma treatment. Together with H-2K allele typing, which confirmed the Swiss mouse origin of the donor cells, these observations indicate that mouse-derived STO cell lines can differentiate along hepatocytic lineage and engraft into rat liver across major histocompatibility barriers.

  9. [Compound K suppresses myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a mouse model bearing CT26 colorectal cancer xenograft].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Li, Yalin; Wang, Wuzhou; Zhou, Meijuan; Cao, Zhaohui

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effect of ginseng-derived compound K (C-K) on apoptosis, immunosuppressive activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) from mice bearing colorectal cancer xenograft. Flow-sorted bone marrow MDSCs from Balb/c mice bearing CT26 tumor xenograft were treated with either C-K or PBS for 96 h and examined for apoptosis with Annexin V/7-AAD, Cox-2 and Arg-1 expressions using qRT-PCR, and supernatant IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 levels with ELISA. C-K- or PBS-treated MDSCs were subcutaneously implanted along with CT26 tumor cells in WT Balb/c mice, and the tumor size and morphology were evaluated 21 days later. C-K treatment significantly increased the percentages of early and late apoptotic MDSCs in vitro (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively), decreased the expressions of immunosuppression-related genes Cox-2 (P<0.05) and Arg-1 (P<0.01), and suppressed the production of IL-1β (P<0.05), IL-6 (P<0.01), and IL-17 (P<0.05) by the MDSCs . Compared with PBS-pre-treated cells, C-K-pretreated MDSCs showed significantly attenuated activity in promoting CT26 tumor growth in mice (P<0.01). C-K can suppress the immunosuppresive effect of MDSCs to inhibit tumor cell proliferation in mice, which suggests a new strategy of tumor therapy by targeting MDSCs.

  10. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for monitoring CDK4/cyclin D kinase activity in melanoma cell extracts, mouse xenografts and skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; González-Vera, Juan A; Henri, Pauline; Meunier, Laurent; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Morris, May C

    2016-11-15

    Melanoma constitutes the most aggressive form of skin cancer, which further metastasizes into a deadly form of cancer. The p16(INK4a)-Cyclin D-CDK4/6-pRb pathway is dysregulated in 90% of melanomas. CDK4/Cyclin D kinase hyperactivation, associated with mutation of CDK4, amplification of Cyclin D or loss of p16(INK4a) leads to increased risk of developing melanoma. This kinase therefore constitutes a key biomarker in melanoma and an emerging pharmacological target, however there are no tools enabling direct detection or quantification of its activity. Here we report on the design and application of a fluorescent peptide biosensor to quantify CDK4 activity in melanoma cell extracts, skin biopsies and melanoma xenografts. This biosensor provides sensitive means of comparing CDK4 activity between different melanoma cell lines and further responds to CDK4 downregulation by siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors. By affording means of monitoring CDK4 hyperactivity consequent to cancer-associated molecular alterations in upstream signaling pathways that converge upon this kinase, this biosensor offers an alternative to immunological identification of melanoma-specific biomarkers, thereby constituting an attractive tool for diagnostic purposes, providing complementary functional information to histological analysis, of particular utility for detection of melanoma onset in precancerous lesions. This is indeed the first fluorescent peptide biosensor which has been successfully implemented to monitor kinase activity in skin samples and melanoma tumour xenografts. Moreover by enabling to monitor response to CDK4 inhibitors, this biosensor constitutes an attractive companion assay to identify compounds of therapeutic relevance for melanoma.

  11. Synthetic siRNA targeting the breakpoint of EWS/Fli-1 inhibits growth of Ewing sarcoma xenografts in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Takigami, Iori; Ohno, Takatoshi; Kitade, Yukio; Hara, Akira; Nagano, Akihito; Kawai, Gou; Saitou, Mitsuru; Matsuhashi, Aya; Yamada, Kazunari; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2011-01-01

    The EWS/Fli-1 fusion gene, a product of the translocation t(11;22, q24;q12), is detected in 85% of Ewing sarcomas and primitive neuroectodermal tumors. It is thought to be a transcriptional activator that plays a significant role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we developed a novel EWS/Fli-1 blockade system using RNA interference and tested its application for inhibiting the proliferation of Ewing sarcoma cells in vitro and the treatment of mouse tumor xenografts in vivo. We designed and synthesized a small interfering RNA (siRNA) possessing an aromatic compound at the 3'-end targeting the breakpoint of EWS/Fli-1. As this sequence is present only in tumor cells, it is a potentially relevant target. We found that the siRNA targeting EWS/Fli-1 significantly suppressed the expression of EWS/Fli-1 protein sequence specifically and also reduced the expression of c-Myc protein in Ewing sarcoma cells. We further demonstrated that inhibition of EWS/Fli-1 expression efficiently inhibited the proliferation of the transfected cells but did not induce apoptotic cell death. In addition, the siRNA possessing the aromatic compound at the 3'-end was more resistant to nucleolytic degradation than the unmodified siRNA. Administration of the siRNA with atelocollagen significantly inhibited the tumor growth of TC-135, a Ewing sarcoma cell line, which had been subcutaneously xenografted into mice. Moreover, modification of the 3'-end with an aromatic compound improved its efficiency in vivo. Our data suggest that specific downregulation of EWS/Fli-1 by RNA interference is a possible approach for the treatment of Ewing sarcoma.

  12. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  13. Meta-[{sup 211}At]astatobenzylguanidine (MABG): In vivo evaluation in an athymic mouse human neuroblastoma xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyanathan, G.; Friedman, H.S.; Keir, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Because of the short range and high linear energy transfer of {sup 211}At {alpha}-particles, the MIBG analogue MABG might be useful for the therapy of micrometastatic neuroblastoma and previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that under single-cell conditions, the cytotoxicity of MABG is > 1000 times higher than [{sup 131}I]MIBG. A paired label protocol was used to compare the tissue distribution of MABG and [{sup 131}I]MIBG in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma xenografts from 1-24 hr after injection. In tumor, significantly higher (p < 0.05) uptake was observed for MABG (3.8 {plus_minus} 0.8%ID/g vs 3.1 {plus_minus} 0.7%ID/g at 8 hr). Pretreatment with desipramine reduced tumor uptake of MABG by 43%, suggesting that accumulation was related to the uptake-1 mechanism. Significantly higher uptake of MABG also was observed in normal tissue targets. For example, at 8 hr, heart uptake of MABG was 6.0 {plus_minus} 0.9 % ID/g compared with 4.5 {plus_minus} 0.8%ID/g for [{sup 131}I]MIBG. Two strategies were investigated to increase the tumor-to-hear uptake ratio. Pretreatment of mice with unlabeled MIBG (4 mg/kg) increased MABG tumor uptake by 1.5-fold while reducing uptake in several normal tissues including heart. The vesicular uptake blocker tetrabenazine (TBZ; 20 mg/kg), reduced MABG hear uptake by 30% of control values with not significant decrease in tumor levels. We conclude that MABG deserves further evaluation as a potential agent for the treatment of neuroblastoma, particularly in combination with strategies to minimize radiation dose to normal target tissues.

  14. Anti-Tumor Effect of Adipose Tissue Derived-Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Interferon-β and Treatment with Cisplatin in a Xenograft Mouse Model for Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors. PMID:24040358

  15. Systemic siRNA Delivery via Peptide-Tagged Polymeric Nanoparticles, Targeting PLK1 Gene in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Meenakshi; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles were developed from a series of chemical reactions using chitosan, polyethylene glycol, and a cell-targeting peptide (CP15). The nanoparticles were complexed with PLK1-siRNA. The optimal siRNA loading was achieved at an N : P ratio of 129.2 yielding a nanoparticle size of >200 nm. These nanoparticles were delivered intraperitoneally and tested for efficient delivery, cytotoxicity, and biodistribution in a mouse xenograft model of colorectal cancer. Both unmodified and modified chitosan nanoparticles showed enhanced accumulation at the tumor site. However, the modified chitosan nanoparticles showed considerably, less distribution in other organs. The relative gene expression as evaluated showed efficient delivery of PLK1-siRNA (0.5 mg/kg) with 50.7 ± 19.5% knockdown (P = 0.031) of PLK1 gene. The in vivo data reveals no systemic toxicity in the animals, when tested for systemic inflammation and liver toxicity. These results indicate a potential of using peptide-tagged nanoparticles for systemic delivery of siRNA at the targeted tumor site. PMID:24159333

  16. Anti-tumor effect of adipose tissue derived-mesenchymal stem cells expressing interferon-β and treatment with cisplatin in a xenograft mouse model for canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors.

  17. Targeting αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins inhibits pulmonary metastasis in an intratibial xenograft osteosarcoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Gvozdenovic, Ana; Boro, Aleksandar; Meier, Daniela; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Born, Walter; Muff, Roman; Fuchs, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is an aggressive bone cancer that has a high propensity for metastasis to the lungs. Patients with metastatic disease face a very poor prognosis. Therefore, novel therapeutics, efficiently suppressing the metastatic process, are urgently needed. Integrins play a pivotal role in tumor cell adhesion, motility and metastasis. Here, we evaluated αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrin inhibition with cilengitide as a novel metastasis-suppressive therapeutic approach in osteosarcoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins expression in a tissue microarray of tumor specimens collected from osteosarcoma patients revealed that αvβ5 integrin is mainly found on tumor cells, whereas αvβ3 is predominantly expressed by stromal cells. In vitro functional assays demonstrated that cilengitide dose-dependently inhibited de novo adhesion, provoked detachment and inhibited migration of osteosarcoma cell lines. Cilengitide induced a decline in cell viability, blocked the cell cycle in the G1 phase and caused anoikis by activation of the Hippo pathway. In a xenograft orthotopic mouse model cilengitide minimally affected intratibial primary tumor growth but, importantly, suppressed pulmonary metastasis. The data demonstrate that targeting αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins in osteosarcoma should be considered as a novel therapeutic option for patients with metastatic disease. PMID:27409827

  18. Antitumor effect of FGFR inhibitors on a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft mouse model endogenously expressing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ding, Xiwei; Wang, Shaoqing; Moser, Catherine D; Shaleh, Hassan M; Mohamed, Essa A; Chaiteerakij, Roongruedee; Allotey, Loretta K; Chen, Gang; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; McNulty, Melissa S; Ndzengue, Albert; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Knudson, Ryan A; Greipp, Patricia T; Clark, Karl J; Torbenson, Michael S; Kipp, Benjamin R; Zhou, Jie; Barrett, Michael T; Gustafson, Michael P; Alberts, Steven R; Borad, Mitesh J; Roberts, Lewis R

    2016-09-28

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly lethal cancer with limited therapeutic options. Recent genomic analysis of cholangiocarcinoma has revealed the presence of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) fusion proteins in up to 13% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). FGFR fusions have been identified as a novel oncogenic and druggable target in a number of cancers. In this study, we established a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft (PDX) mouse model bearing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein from a metastatic lung nodule of an iCCA patient. Using this PDX model, we confirmed the ability of the FGFR inhibitors, ponatinib, dovitinib and BGJ398, to modulate FGFR signaling, inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma tumors harboring FGFR2 fusions. In addition, BGJ398 appeared to be superior in potency to ponatinib and dovitinib in this model. Our findings provide a strong rationale for the investigation of FGFR inhibitors, particularly BGJ398, as a therapeutic option for cholangiocarcinoma patients harboring FGFR2 fusions.

  19. Bioluminescence imaging of leukemia cell lines in vitro and in mouse xenografts: effects of monoclonal and polyclonal cell populations on intensity and kinetics of photon emission

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the utility of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using firefly luciferase in monoclonal and polyclonal populations of leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods Monoclonal and polyclonal human lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cell lines transduced with firefly luciferase were used for BLI. Results Kinetics and dynamics of bioluminescence signal were cell line dependent. Luciferase expression decreased significantly over time in polyclonal leukemia cells in vitro. Transplantation of polyclonal luciferase-tagged cells in mice resulted in inconsistent signal intensity. After selection of monoclonal cell populations, luciferase activity was stable, equal kinetic and dynamic of bioluminescence intensity and strong correlation between cell number and light emission in vitro were observed. We obtained an equal development of leukemia burden detected by luciferase activity in NOD-scid-gamma mice after transplantation of monoclonal populations. Conclusion The use of monoclonal leukemia cells selected for stable and equal luciferase activity is recommended for experiments in vitro and xenograft mouse models. The findings are highly significant for bioluminescence imaging focused on pre-clinical drug development. PMID:23343252

  20. Antitumor effect of FGFR inhibitors on a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft mouse model endogenously expressing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Ding, Xiwei; Wang, Shaoqing; Moser, Catherine D.; Shaleh, Hassan M.; Mohamed, Essa A.; Chaiteerakij, Roongruedee; Allotey, Loretta K.; Chen, Gang; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; McNulty, Melissa S.; Ndzengue, Albert; Knudson, Ryan A.; Greipp, Patricia T.; Clark, Karl J.; Torbenson, Michael S.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Zhou, Jie; Barrett, Michael T.; Gustafson, Michael P.; Alberts, Steven R.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Roberts, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly lethal cancer with limited therapeutic options. Recent genomic analysis of cholangiocarcinoma has revealed the presence of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) fusion proteins in up to 13% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). FGFR fusions have been identified as a novel oncogenic and druggable target in a number of cancers. In this study, we established a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft (PDX) mouse model bearing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein from a metastatic lung nodule of an iCCA patient. Using this PDX model, we confirmed the ability of the FGFR inhibitors, ponatinib, dovitinib and BGJ398, to modulate FGFR signaling, inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma tumors harboring FGFR2 fusions. In addition, BGJ398 appeared to be superior in potency to ponatinib and dovitinib in this model. Our findings provide a strong rationale for the investigation of FGFR inhibitors, particularly BGJ398, as a therapeutic option for cholangiocarcinoma patients harboring FGFR2 fusions. PMID:27216979

  1. The effect of single agent oral fusaric acid (FA) on the growth of subcutaneously xenografted SCC-1 cells in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ruda, James M; Beus, Kirt S; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Wilson, Ronald P; Stack, Brendan C

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether oral administration of fusaric acid (FA) inhibits tumor growth in an animal model of head and neck cancer (HNSCC). In vivo murine model, two arm controlled study. Thirty-eight (38) 5-week-old athymic nude mice were randomly assigned to a fusaric acid treatment group (1 mg/mL) (n = 19) or a sterile saline group (n = 19). A left, lateral flank subcutaneous injection of 2.0 x 10(6) UM-SCC-1 cells were administered to all mice on day 1. Both groups were gavaged daily with either 0.25 mLs of oral FA or sterile saline throughout the experiment (32 days). Latency to a measurable tumor (> or =65 mm3), and tumor volumes were recorded after tumor xenografting. Tumor weights were recorded at the conclusion of the experiment. Tumor volume growth curves were modeled as polynomial functions of time with treatment interaction effects. Survivorship functions for time to measurable tumor were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator. Survival analysis showed mice treated with FA developed measurable tumors after a significantly longer interval post-xenografting than control mice (p = 0.00451). By Day 9, all mice in the control group had developed measurable tumors in comparison to only 78% of mice in the FA group. Likewise, estimated growth curves for both groups suggested that mice receiving FA demonstrated significantly slower tumor growth rates throughout the entire study period (p < 0.0001). At the conclusion of the experiment, tumor weights from both the control and FA groups were also significantly different (p = 0.0142). Single agent oral fusaric acid (1 mg/mL) is an inhibitor of UM-SCC-1 in a murine model. As an orally active agent, it may have a potential role in the treatment of human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

  2. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  3. DICER governs characteristics of glioma stem cells and the resulting tumors in xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Alamsahebpour, Amir; Burrell, Kelly; Li, Mira; Karabork, Merve; Ekinci, Can; Koch, Elizabeth; Solaroglu, Ihsan; Chang, Jeffery T.; Wouters, Bradly; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-01-01

    The RNAse III endonuclease DICER is a key regulator of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and is frequently decreased in a variety of malignancies. We characterized the role of DICER in glioblastoma (GB), specifically demonstrating its effects on the ability of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) to form tumors in a mouse model of GB. DICER silencing in GSCs reduced their stem cell characteristics, while tumors arising from these cells were more aggressive, larger in volume, and displayed a higher proliferation index and lineage differentiation. The resulting tumors, however, were more sensitive to radiation treatment. Our results demonstrate that DICER silencing enhances the tumorigenic potential of GSCs, providing a platform for analysis of specific relevant miRNAs and development of potentially novel therapies against GB. PMID:27421140

  4. Preliminary evaluation of 1′-[18F]fluoroethyl-β-D-lactose ([18F]FEL) for detection of pancreatic cancer in nude mouse orthotopic xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Paolillo, Vincenzo; Young, Daniel; Wen, XiaoXia; Logsdon, Craig D.; De Palatis, Louis; Alauddin, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Early detection of pancreatic cancer could save many thousands of lives. Non-invasive diagnostic imaging, including PET with [18F]FDG, have inadequate resolution for detection of small (2–3 mm) pancreatic tumors. We demonstrated the efficacy of PET imaging with an 18F-labeled lactose derivative, [18F]FEDL, that targets HIP/PAP, a biomarker that is overexpressed in the peritumoral pancreas. We developed another analogue, 1-[18F]fluoroethyl lactose ([18F]FEL), which is simpler to synthesize, for the same application. We conducted a preliminary evaluation of the new probe and its efficacy in detecting orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice. Methods Xenografts were developed in nude mice by injecting L3.6pl/GL+ pancreatic carcinoma cells into the pancreas of each mouse. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI); accuracy of BLI tumor size estimates was verified by MRI in two representative mice. When the tumor size reached approximately 2–3 mm, the animals were injected with [18F]FEL (3.7 MBq) and underwent static PET/CT scans. Blood samples were collected at 2, 5, 10, 20 and 60 min after [18F]FEL injection to track blood clearance. Following imaging, animals were sacrificed and their organs and tumors/pancreatic tissue were collected and counted on a gamma counter. Pancreas, including tumor, was frozen, sliced and used for autoradiography and immunohistochemical analysis of HIP/PAP expression. Results Tumor growth was rapid, as observed by BLI and MRI. Blood clearance of [18F]FEL was bi-exponential, with half-lives of approximately 3.5 min and 40 min. Mean accumulation of [18F]FEL in the peritumoral pancreatic tissue was 1.29±0.295 %ID/g, and that in the normal pancreas of control animals was 0.090±0.101 %ID/g. [18F]FEL was cleared predominantly by the kidneys. Comparative analysis of autoradiographic images and immunostaining results demonstrated a correlation between [18F]FEL binding and HIP/PAP expression. Conclusion

  5. Local tumor control following single dose irradiation of human melanoma xenografts: Relationship to cellular radiosensitivity and influence of an immune response by the athymic mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.

    1989-06-15

    The potential usefulness of untreated congenitally athymic adult mice as hosts for human tumors in radiocurability studies was investigated using five human melanoma xenograft lines (E.E., E.F., G.E., M.F., V.N.). The tumor radiocurability was found to differ considerably among the lines; the radiation doses required to achieve local control of 50% of the tumors irradiated (TCD50 values) ranged from 29.6 +/- 2.1 (SE) to 67.9 +/- 3.5 Gy. Since the clinical relevance of experimentally determined TCD50 values depends on to what extent they are modified by a host immune response, a possible immune reactivity against the melanomas was investigated by comparing the radiocurability data with cell survival data measured in vitro after irradiation in vivo and by performing quantitative tumor transplantability studies. The radiocurability and the cell survival data were found to agree well for the E.F., G.E., and M.F. melanomas. Moreover, the number of tumor cells required to achieve tumors in 50% of the inoculation sites (TD50 values) in untreated and in whole-body irradiated mice were similar, suggesting that the TCD50 values measured for these lines were not significantly influenced by a host immune response. On the other hand, the E.E. and V.N. melanomas showed significantly lower TCD50 values in vivo than predicted theoretically from the in vitro cell survival data and a significantly lower number of tumor cells required to achieve tumors in 50% of the inoculation sites in whole-body irradiated than in untreated mice, suggesting that the radiocurability of these two lines was enhanced due to an immune response by the host. Athymic mice may thus express a significant immune reactivity against some human tumor xenograft lines but not against others.

  6. Target therapy of multiple myeloma by PTX-NPs and ABCG2 antibody in a mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jun; Zhan, Xi; Shi, Fangfang; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Luo, Shouhua; Zhang, Tianzhu; Zhang, Yu; Ming, Ji; Gu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains to be an incurable disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with paclitaxel (PTX) conjugated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on MM progressed from cancer stem cells (CSCs)in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse model. Mice were injected with MM CSCs as marked by CD138−CD34− phenotypes through tail veins. The developed MM mice were examined by micro-computer tomography scanning, ultrasonography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. These mice were then intravenously treated with different combinations of NPs, PTX, McAb, PTX-NPs and melphalan/prednisone once a week for four weeks. The injected mice developed characteristic MM-associated syndromes, including lytic bone lesions, renal damages and proteinuria. All the treated mice showed decrease in bone lesions, renal damages and anemia but increase in apoptosis compared with the mice treated with NPs only. In particular, the treatment with ABCG2 McAb plus PTX-NPs induced the strongest therapeutic response and had an efficacy even better than that of melphalan/prednisone, a conventional regimen for MM patients. These data suggest that PTX-NPs with ABCG2 McAb can be developed into potential treatment regimens for patients with relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:26314844

  7. Target therapy of multiple myeloma by PTX-NPs and ABCG2 antibody in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiping; Xiong, Fei; Dou, Jun; Xue, Jun; Zhan, Xi; Shi, Fangfang; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Luo, Shouhua; Zhang, Tianzhu; Zhang, Yu; Ming, Ji; Gu, Ning

    2015-09-29

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains to be an incurable disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with paclitaxel (PTX) conjugated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on MM progressed from cancer stem cells (CSCs) in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse model. Mice were injected with MM CSCs as marked by CD138-CD34- phenotypes through tail veins. The developed MM mice were examined by micro-computer tomography scanning, ultrasonography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis. These mice were then intravenously treated with different combinations of NPs, PTX, McAb, PTX-NPs and melphalan/prednisone once a week for four weeks. The injected mice developed characteristic MM-associated syndromes, including lytic bone lesions, renal damages and proteinuria. All the treated mice showed decrease in bone lesions, renal damages and anemia but increase in apoptosis compared with the mice treated with NPs only. In particular, the treatment with ABCG2 McAb plus PTX-NPs induced the strongest therapeutic response and had an efficacy even better than that of melphalan/prednisone, a conventional regimen for MM patients. These data suggest that PTX-NPs with ABCG2 McAb can be developed into potential treatment regimens for patients with relapsed/refractory MM.

  8. Anti-tumor activity of fenretinide complexed with human serum albumin in lung cancer xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Durante, Sandra; Orienti, Isabella; Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Tesei, Anna; Pignatta, Sara; Falconi, Mirella

    2014-07-15

    Sufficient knowledge regarding cellular and molecular basis of lung cancer progression and metastasis would help in the development of novel and effective strategies for the treatment of lung cancer. 4HPR is a synthetic retinoid with potential anti-tumor activity but is still limited because of its poor bioavailability. The use of albumin as a complexing agent for a hydrophobic drug is expected to improve the water solubility and consequently their bioavailability.This study investigated the antitumor activity of a novel complex between albumin and 4-HPR in a mouse model of human lung cancer and focuses on role and mechanism of Cav-1 mainly involved in regulating cancer and ACSVL3 mainly connected with tumor growth. Their expressions were assayed by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR, to demonstrate the reduction of the tumor growth following the drug treatment. Our results showed a high antitumor activity of 4HPR-HSA by reduction of the volume of tumor mass and the presence of a high level of apoptotic cell by TUNEL assay. The downregulation of Cav-1 and ACSVL3 suggested a reduction of tumor growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated the great potential of 4HPR-HSA in the treatment of lung cancer. More data about the mechanism of drug delivery the 4HPR-HSA are necessary.

  9. Garcinol sensitizes human head and neck carcinoma to cisplatin in a xenograft mouse model despite downregulation of proliferative biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Wang, Fan; Ong, Tina H.; Loo, Ser Yue; Swamy, Mahadeva M.M.; Mandal, Somnath; Kumar, Alan Prem; Goh, Boon Cher; Kundu, Tapas; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Wang, Ling Zhi; Hui, Kam Man; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Platinum compounds such as cisplatin and carboplatin are frequently used as the first-line chemotherapy for the treatment of the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the present study, we investigated whether garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone can chemosensitize HNSCC to cisplatin. We found that garcinol inhibited the viability of a panel of diverse HNSCC cell lines, enhanced the apoptotic effect of cisplatin, suppressed constitutive as well as cisplatin-induced NF-κB activation, and downregulated the expression of various oncogenic gene products (cyclin D1, Bcl-2, survivin and VEGF). In vivo study showed that administration of garcinol alone (0.5 mg/kg body weight, i.p. five times/week) significantly suppressed the growth of the tumor, and this effect was further increased by cisplatin. Both the markers of proliferation index (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were downregulated in tumor tissues by the combination of cisplatin and garcinol. The pharmacokinetic results of garcinol indicated that good systemic exposure was achievable after i.p. administration of garcinol at 0.5 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg with mean peak concentration (Cmax) of 1825.4 and 6635.7 nM in the mouse serum, respectively. Overall, our results suggest that garcinol can indeed potentiate the effects of cisplatin by negative regulation of various inflammatory and proliferative biomarkers. PMID:25762616

  10. Correlation of tissue-plasma partition coefficients between normal tissues and subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines in mouse as a prediction tool of drug penetration in tumors.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Salphati, Laurent; Liederer, Bianca M

    2013-04-01

    Understanding drug distribution and accumulation in tumors would be informative in the assessment of efficacy in targeted therapy; however, existing methods for predicting tissue drug distribution focus on normal tissues and do not incorporate tumors. The main objective of this study was to describe the relationships between tissue-plasma concentration ratios (Kp ) of normal tissues and those of subcutaneous xenograft tumors under nonsteady-state conditions, and establish regression equations that could potentially be used for the prediction of drug levels in several human tumor xenografts in mouse, based solely on a Kp value determined in a normal tissue (e.g., muscle). A dataset of 17 compounds was collected from the literature and from Genentech. Tissue and plasma concentration data in mouse were obtained following oral gavage or intraperitoneal administration. Linear regression analyses were performed between Kp values in several normal tissues (muscle, lung, liver, or brain) and those in human tumor xenografts (CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, PC3, U-87, MCF-7-neo-Her2, or BT474M1.1). The tissue-plasma ratios in normal tissues reasonably correlated with the tumor-plasma ratios in CL6, EBC-1, HT-29, U-87, BT474M1.1, and MCF-7-neo-Her2 xenografts (r(2) in the range 0.62-1) but not with the PC3 xenograft. In general, muscle and lung exhibited the strongest correlation with tumor xenografts, followed by liver. Regression coefficients from brain were low, except between brain and the glioblastoma U-87 xenograft (r(2) in the range 0.62-0.94). Furthermore, reasonably strong correlations were observed between muscle and lung and between muscle and liver (r(2) in the range 0.67-0.96). The slopes of the regressions differed depending on the class of drug (strong vs. weak base) and type of tissue (brain vs. other tissues and tumors). Overall, this study will contribute to our understanding of tissue-plasma partition coefficients for tumors and facilitate the use of physiologically

  11. Antitumor activity of (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol in a rat C6 glioma xenograft model in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Dossou, Katina S S; Wnorowski, Artur; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Paris, Arnaud; Moaddel, Ruin; Cloix, Jean-François; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-12-01

    (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through cell-type specific modulation of β2-adrenergic receptor and/or cannabinoid receptor function. Here, we report an investigation into antitumor activity of MNF in rat C6 glioma cells. The potent antiproliferative action of MNF in these cells (IC50 of ∼1 nmol/L) was refractory to pharmacological inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor while a synthetic inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 significantly blocked MNF activity. The antitumor activity of MNF was then assessed in a C6 glioblastoma xenograft model in mice. Three days after subcutaneous implantation of C6 cells into the lower flank of nude mice, these animals were subjected to i.p. injections of saline or MNF (2 mg/kg) for 19 days and tumor volumes were measured over the course of the experiment. Gene expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot assays were performed on the tumors after treatment. Significant reduction in mean tumor volumes was observed in mice receiving MNF when compared with the saline-treated group. We identified clusters in expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, as well as molecular markers for glioblastoma that were significantly downregulated in tumors of MNF-treated mice as compared to saline-injected controls. The efficacy of MNF against C6 glioma cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by marked reduction in the expression of cell cycle regulator proteins. This study is the first demonstration of MNF-dependent chemoprevention of a glioblastoma xenograft model and may offer a potential mechanism for its anticancer action in vivo.

  12. Antitumor activity of (R,R’)-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol in a rat C6 glioma xenograft model in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Dossou, Katina S S; Wnorowski, Artur; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Paris, Arnaud; Moaddel, Ruin; Cloix, Jean-François; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-01-01

    (R,R’)-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through cell-type specific modulation of β2-adrenergic receptor and/or cannabinoid receptor function. Here, we report an investigation into antitumor activity of MNF in rat C6 glioma cells. The potent antiproliferative action of MNF in these cells (IC50 of ∼1 nmol/L) was refractory to pharmacological inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor while a synthetic inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 significantly blocked MNF activity. The antitumor activity of MNF was then assessed in a C6 glioblastoma xenograft model in mice. Three days after subcutaneous implantation of C6 cells into the lower flank of nude mice, these animals were subjected to i.p. injections of saline or MNF (2 mg/kg) for 19 days and tumor volumes were measured over the course of the experiment. Gene expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot assays were performed on the tumors after treatment. Significant reduction in mean tumor volumes was observed in mice receiving MNF when compared with the saline-treated group. We identified clusters in expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, as well as molecular markers for glioblastoma that were significantly downregulated in tumors of MNF-treated mice as compared to saline-injected controls. The efficacy of MNF against C6 glioma cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by marked reduction in the expression of cell cycle regulator proteins. This study is the first demonstration of MNF-dependent chemoprevention of a glioblastoma xenograft model and may offer a potential mechanism for its anticancer action in vivo. PMID:25505565

  13. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells and inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft mouse model of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiong; Li, Zhuoneng; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Fan; Xu, Ruo-Jun; Cai, Yi-Zhong

    2009-08-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs) are important functional constituents in red-colored fruits of L. barbarum (Guo Qi Zi, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as Goji berry or wolfberry). The influence of LBP on human prostate cancer cells was systematically investigated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro effects of LBP on two cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145) were examined by using trypan blue exclusion staining, single-cell gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and immunohistochemical assay (assessment of Bcl-2 and Bax expression). The in vivo effect of LBP on PC-3 cells was assessed in the nude mouse xenograft tumor model. The in vitro results showed that LBP can dose- and time-dependently inhibit the growth of both PC-3 and DU-145 cells. LBP caused the breakage of DNA strands of PC-3 and DU-145 cells; the tail frequency and tail length were significantly higher than that of control cells. LBP also markedly induced PC-3 and DU-145 cell apoptosis, with the highest apoptosis rates at 41.5% and 35.5%, respectively. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression following LBP treatments decreased significantly with a dose-effect relationship, which suggested that LBP can regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax to induce apoptosis of PC-3 and DU-145 cells. The in vivo experimental results indicate that LBP might significantly inhibit PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Both the tumor volume and weight of the LBP treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  14. Highly efficient IL-21 and feeder cell-driven ex vivo expansion of human NK cells with therapeutic activity in a xenograft mouse model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Granzin, Markus; Stojanovic, Ana; Miller, Matthias; Childs, Richard; Huppert, Volker; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are promising antitumor effector cells, but the generation of sufficient NK cell numbers for adoptive immunotherapy remains challenging. Therefore, we developed a method for highly efficient ex vivo expansion of human NK cells. Ex vivo expansion of NK cells in medium containing IL-2 and irradiated clinical-grade feeder cells (EBV-LCL) induced a 22-fold NK cell expansion after one week that was significantly increased to 53-fold by IL-21. Repeated stimulation with irradiated EBV-LCL and IL-2 and addition of IL-21 at the initiation of the culture allowed sustained NK cell proliferation with 10(11)-fold NK cell expansion after 6 weeks. Compared to naive NK cells, expanded NK cells upregulated TRAIL, NKG2D, and DNAM-1, had superior cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines in vitro and produced more IFNγ and TNF-α upon PMA/Iono stimulation. Most importantly, adoptive transfer of NK cells expanded using feeder cells, IL-2 and IL-21 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in a melanoma xenograft mouse model, which was greater than with NK cells activated with IL-2 alone. Intriguingly, adoptively transferred NK cells maintained their enhanced production of IFNγ and TNF-α upon ex vivo restimulation, although they rapidly lost their capacity to degranulate and mediate tumor cytotoxicity after the in vivo transfer. In conclusion, we developed a protocol for ex vivo NK cell expansion that results in outstanding cell yields. The expanded NK cells possess potent antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and could be utilized at high numbers for adoptive immunotherapy in the clinic.

  15. Highly efficient IL-21 and feeder cell-driven ex vivo expansion of human NK cells with therapeutic activity in a xenograft mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Granzin, Markus; Stojanovic, Ana; Miller, Matthias; Childs, Richard; Huppert, Volker; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are promising antitumor effector cells, but the generation of sufficient NK cell numbers for adoptive immunotherapy remains challenging. Therefore, we developed a method for highly efficient ex vivo expansion of human NK cells. Ex vivo expansion of NK cells in medium containing IL-2 and irradiated clinical-grade feeder cells (EBV-LCL) induced a 22-fold NK cell expansion after one week that was significantly increased to 53-fold by IL-21. Repeated stimulation with irradiated EBV-LCL and IL-2 and addition of IL-21 at the initiation of the culture allowed sustained NK cell proliferation with 1011-fold NK cell expansion after 6 weeks. Compared to naive NK cells, expanded NK cells upregulated TRAIL, NKG2D, and DNAM-1, had superior cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines in vitro and produced more IFNγ and TNF-α upon PMA/Iono stimulation. Most importantly, adoptive transfer of NK cells expanded using feeder cells, IL-2 and IL-21 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in a melanoma xenograft mouse model, which was greater than with NK cells activated with IL-2 alone. Intriguingly, adoptively transferred NK cells maintained their enhanced production of IFNγ and TNF-α upon ex vivo restimulation, although they rapidly lost their capacity to degranulate and mediate tumor cytotoxicity after the in vivo transfer. In conclusion, we developed a protocol for ex vivo NK cell expansion that results in outstanding cell yields. The expanded NK cells possess potent antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and could be utilized at high numbers for adoptive immunotherapy in the clinic. PMID:27757317

  16. FXR Controls the Tumor Suppressor NDRG2 and FXR Agonists Reduce Liver Tumor Growth and Metastasis in an Orthotopic Mouse Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Schüler, Julia; Schulz, Andreas; Schlüter, Thomas; Kinzel, Olaf; Abel, Ulrich; Kremoser, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is expressed predominantly in tissues exposed to high levels of bile acids and controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis. FXR−/− mice develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and show an increased prevalence for intestinal malignancies, suggesting a role of FXR as a tumor suppressor in enterohepatic tissues. The N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor gene, which is downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma and many other malignancies. We show reduced NDRG2 mRNA in livers of FXR−/− mice compared to wild type mice and both, FXR and NDRG2 mRNAs, are reduced in human HCC compared to normal liver. Gene reporter assays and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation data support that FXR directly controls NDRG2 transcription via IR1-type element(s) identified in the first introns of the human, mouse and rat NDRG2 genes. NDRG2 mRNA was induced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in livers of mice and the magnitude of induction of NDRG2 mRNA in three different human hepatoma cell lines was increased when ectopically expressing human FXR. Growth and metastasis of SK-Hep-1 cells was strongly reduced by non-steroidal FXR agonists in an orthotopic liver xenograft tumor model. Ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep1 cells reduced tumor growth and metastasis potential of corresponding cells and increased the anti-tumor efficacy of FXR agonists, which may be partly mediated via increased NDRG2 expression. FXR agonists may show a potential in the prevention and/or treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma, a devastating malignancy with increasing prevalence and limited therapeutic options. PMID:23056173

  17. Kv1.3 in Psoriatic Disease: PAP-1, a small molecule inhibitor of Kv1.3 is effective in the SCID mouse psoriasis - xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Kundu-Raychaudhuri, Smriti; Chen, Yi-Je; Wulff, Heike; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2015-01-01

    Kv1.3 channels regulate the activation/proliferation of effector memory T cells and thus play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Using a combination of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and electrophysiology methods we observed a significant enrichment of activated Kv1.3+ memory T cells in psoriasis plaques and synovial fluid from patients with psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis (PsA) compared to non-lesional psoriatic skin, normal skin or peripheral blood lympho-mononuclear cells. In in vitro studies performed with lesional mononuclear cells or T cells derived from skin and joints of psoriatic disease, the small molecule Kv1.3 blocker PAP-1 dose-dependently inhibited proliferation and suppressed IL-2 and IFN-γ production. To further substantiate the pathologic role of Kv1.3highTEM cells in psoriatic disease we tested whether PAP-1 is able to improve psoriatic disease pathology in the SCID mouse-psoriasis skin xenograft model. Following four weeks of daily treatment with 2% PAP-1 ointment we noticed about 50% reduction in the epidermal thickness (rete peg length) and the number of CD3+ lymphocytes/mm2 of dermis decreased by 85%. Vehicle treated and untreated plaques in contrast remained unchanged and showed no reduction in epidermis thickness and infiltrating CD3+ T cells and HLA-DR+ T cells. Based on these results we propose the development of Kv1.3 targeted topical immunotherapy for psoriasis and possibly for other inflammatory skin conditions, where effector memory T cells are involved in the pathogenesis. PMID:25175978

  18. Three-dimensional MR mapping of angiogenesis with alpha5beta1(alpha nu beta3)-targeted theranostic nanoparticles in the MDA-MB-435 xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Anne H; Caruthers, Shelton D; Zhang, Huiying; Williams, Todd A; Robertson, J David; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2008-12-01

    Our objectives were 1) to characterize angiogenesis in the MDA-MB-435 xenograft mouse model with three-dimensional (3D) MR molecular imaging using alpha(5)beta(1)(RGD)- or irrelevant RGS-targeted paramagnetic nanoparticles and 2) to use MR molecular imaging to assess the antiangiogenic effectiveness of alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))- vs. alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted fumagillin (50 mug/kg) nanoparticles. Tumor-bearing mice were imaged with MR before and after administration of either alpha(5)beta(1)(RGD) or irrelevant RGS-paramagnetic nanoparticles. In experiment 2, mice received saline or alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))- or alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted fumagillin nanoparticles on days 7, 11, 15, and 19 posttumor implant. On day 22, MRI was performed using alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))-targeted paramagnetic nanoparticles to monitor the antiangiogenic response. 3D reconstructions of alpha(5)beta(1)(RGD)-signal enhancement revealed a sparse, asymmetrical pattern of angiogenesis along the tumor periphery, which occupied <2.0% tumor surface area. alpha(5)beta(1)-targeted rhodamine nanoparticles colocalized with FITC-lectin corroborated the peripheral neovascular signal. alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))-fumagillin nanoparticles decreased neovasculature to negligible levels relative to control; alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted fumagillin nanoparticles were less effective (P>0.05). Reduction of angiogenesis in MDA-MB-435 tumors from low to negligible levels did not decrease tumor volume. MR molecular imaging may be useful for characterizing tumors with sparse neovasculature that are unlikely to have a reduced growth response to targeted antiangiogenic therapy.

  19. Evaluating dynamic contrast-enhanced and photoacoustic CT to assess intra-tumor heterogeneity in xenograft mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Reinecke, Dan; Dzemidzic, Mario; Liang, Yun; Kruger, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate photoacoustic CT spectroscopy (PCT-S) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) ability to measure parameters - oxygen saturation and vascular physiology - associated with the intra-tumor oxygenation status. Material and Methods: Breast (VEGF165 enhance MCF-7) and ovarian (SKOV3x) cancer cells were implanted into the fat pads and flanks of immune deficient mice and allowed to grow to a diameter of 8-15 mm. CT was used to determine physiological parameters by acquiring a sequence of scans over a 10 minute period after an i.v. injection of a radio-opaque contrast agent (Isovue). These time-dependent contrast-enhanced curves were fit to a two-compartmental model determining tumor perfusion, fractional plasma volume, permeability-surface area produce, and fractional interstitial volume on a voxel-by-voxel basis. After which, the tumors were imaged using photoacoustic CT (Optosonics, Inc., Indianapolis, IN 46202). The near infrared spectra (700-910 nm) within the vasculature was fit to linear combination of measured oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin blood samples to obtain oxygen saturation levels (SaO II). Results: The PCT-S scanner was first calibrated using different samples of oxygenated blood, from which a statistical error ranging from 2.5-6.5% was measured and a plot of the hemoglobin dissociation curve was consistent with empirical formula. In vivo determination of tumor vasculature SaO II levels were measurably tracked, and spatially correlated to the periphery of the tumor. Tumor depend variations in SaO II - 0.32 (ovarian) and 0.60 (breast) - and in vascular physiology - perfusion, 1.03 and 0.063 mL/min/mL, and fractional plasma volume, 0.20 and 0.07 - were observed. Conclusion: Combined, PCT-S and CED-CT has the potential to measure intra-tumor levels of tumor oxygen saturation and vascular physiology, key parameters associated with hypoxia.

  20. Metabolic response of LLC xenografted mice to oxythiamine, as measured by [¹H] NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Lan, W X; Bo, L; Niu, C; Zhou, J J; Zhu, H L

    2015-09-21

    Oxythiamine (OT) has been proven to be a potential anticancer drug. With the help of NMR-based metabonomics, we studied the metabolic changes within tumor-bearing mice with different levels of OT administration using a C57BL/6 mouse Lewis lung carcinoma tumor transplantation model. We administered different concentrations of OT (75, 150, 300, and 600 mg∙kg(-1)∙day(-1)) to the mice orally for 2 weeks, recorded animal weights and tumor volumes, sacrificed the animals, and collected blood and tumor mass samples for nuclear magnetic resonance determination. Compared with the findings for the control (untreated) group, the tumor weights and volumes of the 150, 300, and 600 mg∙kg-1∙day-1 groups decreased with no difference among these OT groups. A large metabolite difference was observed in plasma metabolites between the blank and control groups, which indicated the success of the tumor-bearing model. The metabolites in tumor associated with thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs) underwent considerable change between the OT and control groups, exhibiting concentration dependence and enzyme specificity. The restriction of TDEs by OT may be a major mechanism underlying its anticancer effect. The role of OT as a potential anticancer drug and a dehydrogenase inhibitor should therefore be taken into consideration in future tumor research.

  1. Effects of nicotinamide and carbogen on oxygenation in human tumor xenografts measured with luminescense based fiber-optic probes.

    PubMed

    Bussink, J; Kaanders, J H; Strik, A M; van der Kogel, A J

    2000-10-01

    In head and neck cancer, addition of both carbogen breathing and nicotinamide to accelerated fractionated radiotherapy showed increased loco-regional control rates. An assay based on the measurement of changes in tumor pO(2) in response to oxygenation modification could be helpful for selecting patients for these new treatment approaches. The fiber-optic oxygen-sensing device, OxyLite, was used to measure changes in pO(2), at a single position in tumors, after treatment with nicotinamide and carbogen in three human xenograft tumor lines with different vascular architecture and hypoxic patterns. Pimonidazole was used as a marker of hypoxia and was analyzed with a digital image processing system. At the position of pO(2) measurement, half of the tumors showed a local increase in pO(2) after nicotinamide administration. Steep increases in pO(2) were measured in most tumors during carbogen breathing although the increase was less pronounced in tumor areas with a low pre-treatment pO(2). A trend towards a faster local response to carbogen breathing for nicotinamide pre-treated tumors was found in all three lines. There were significant differences in hypoxic fractions, based on pimonidazole binding, between the three tumor lines. There was no correlation between hypoxic marker binding and the response to carbogen breathing. Temporal changes in local pO(2) can be measured with the OxyLite. This system was used to quantitate the effects of oxygen modifying treatments. Rapid increases in pO(2) during carbogen breathing were observed in most tumor areas. The locally measured response to nicotinamide was smaller and more variable. Bio-reductive hypoxic cell marker binding in combination with OxyLite pO(2) determination gives spatial information about the distribution patterns of tumor hypoxia at the microscopic level together with the possibility to continuously measure changes in pO(2) in specific tumor areas.

  2. Anti-CCR4 monoclonal antibody enhances antitumor immunity by modulating tumor-infiltrating Tregs in an ovarian cancer xenograft humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, De-Kuan; Peterson, Eric; Sun, Jiusong; Goudie, Calum; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Liu, Joyce F.; Matulonis, Ursula; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are recruited to tumor sites where they can suppress antitumor immunity. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed at high levels on functional CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs and production of the CCR4 ligand CCL22 by tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages is associated with Treg recruitment to the tumor site. Here, we tested IgG1 and IgG4 isotypes of human anti-CCR4 mAb2-3 for their in vitro activity and in vivo capacity in a NSG mouse model bearing CCL22-secreting ovarian cancer (OvCA) xenograft to modulate Tregs and restore antitumor activity. Both mAb2-3 isotypes blocked in vitro chemoattraction of Tregs to CCL22-secreting OvCA cells. However, they differed in their in vivo mode of action with IgG1 causing Treg depletion and IgG4 blocking migration to the tumors. Primary T cells that were primed with OvCA-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) demonstrated INFγ secretion that could be enhanced through Treg depletion by mAb2-3. Humanized mice reconstructed with allogeneic tumor-primed T cells (TP-T) were used to evaluate the restoration of OvCA immunity by depletion or blockade of Tregs with mAb2-3. We observed that IgG1 was more potent than IgG4 in inhibiting tumor growth. Mechanism studies demonstrated that mAb2-3 treatment lead to inhibition of IL-2 binding to its receptor. Further studies showed that mAb2-3 induced CD25 shedding (sCD25) from Tregs which lead to a decrease in IL-2-dependent survival. Together, the results demonstrate that mAb2-3 is an agonist antibody that can restore anti-OvCA immunity through modulation of Treg activity. PMID:27141347

  3. Human mammary fibroblasts stimulate invasion of breast cancer cells in a three-dimensional culture and increase stroma development in mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Charlotta J; Moreira, José; Lukanidin, Eugene M; Ambartsumian, Noona S

    2010-08-19

    Tumour phenotype is regulated in a complex fashion as a result of interactions between malignant cells and the tumour stroma. Fibroblasts are the most abundant and perhaps most active part of the tumour stroma. A better understanding of the changes that occur in fibroblasts in response to the presence of malignant cells may lead to the development of new strategies for cancer treatment. We explored the effects of fibroblasts on the growth and invasion of mammary carcinoma tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. In order to analyse secreted factors that affect invasive abilities of breast cancer cells we co-cultured human mammary fibroblasts (HMF3s) and cancer cells (MCF7S1) in three-dimensional (3D) growth conditions devoid of heterogeneous cell-cell contact. To study the possible influence of fibroblasts on MCF7S1 cancer cell growth in vivo we co-injected HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells in Balb/c nu/nu mice. In 3D co-culture both HMF3s and MCF7S1 cells demonstrated enhanced invasion into a Matrigel matrix. This was correlated with enhanced expression of the metastasis promoting S100A4 protein in fibroblasts, stimulation of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, and enhanced secretion of a range of different cytokines. Orthotopic injection of oestrogen-dependent MCF7S1 cancer cells together with fibroblasts showed stimulation of tumour growth in mice without an external oestrogen supply. The resulting tumours were characterized by increased development of extracellular matrix, as well as an increase of murine S100A4 concentration and activity of MMP-2 in the tumour interstitial fluid. Stimulation of the invasive phenotype of tumour cells in 3D co-cultures with fibroblasts could be correlated with increased production of S100A4 and MMP-2. We propose that enhanced development of mouse host-derived tumour stroma in a MCF7S1 co-injection xenograft model leads to oestrogen independency and is triggered by the initial presence of human fibroblasts.

  4. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and thymidine kinase inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells in cellular and xenograft mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Yi, B-R; Lee, H J; Jeung, E-B; Kim, S U; Choi, K-C

    2012-06-01

    As human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs) are capable of multiple lineage differentiation, extensive self-renewal and tumor targeting, they may be valuable for clinical anticancer therapies. In this study, we used hAFSCs as vehicles for targeted delivery of therapeutic suicide genes to breast cancer cells. hAFSCs were engineered to produce AF2.CD-TK cells in order to express two suicide genes encoding bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) that convert non-toxic prodrugs, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and mono-phosphorylate ganciclovir (GCV-MP), into cytotoxic metabolites, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and triphosphate ganciclovir (GCV-TP), respectively. In cell viability test in vitro, AF2.CD-TK cells inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in the presence of the 5-FC or GCV prodrugs, or a combination of these two reagents. When the mixture of 5-FC and GCV was treated together, an additive cytotoxic effect was observed in the cell viability. In animal experiments using female BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting MDA-MB-231 cells, treatment with AF2.CD-TK cells in the presence of 5-FC and GCV significantly reduced tumor volume and weight to the same extent seen in the mice treated with 5-FU. Histopathological and fluorescent staining assays further showed that AF2.CD-TK cells were located exactly at the site of tumor formation. Furthermore, breast tissues treated with AF2.CD-TK cells and two prodrugs maintained their normal structures (for example, the epidermis and reticular layers) while breast tissue structures in 5-FU-treated mice were almost destroyed by the potent cytotoxicity of the drug. Taken together, these results indicate that AF2.CD-TK cells can serve as excellent vehicles in a novel therapeutic cell-based gene-directed prodrug system to selectively target breast malignancies.

  5. Coinfection of human foreskin fragments with multiple human papillomavirus types (HPV-11, -40, and -LVX82/MM7) produces regionally separate HPV infections within the same athymic mouse xenograft.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, N D; Koltun, W A; Cladel, N M; Budgeon, L R; Reed, C A; Kreider, J W; Welsh, P A; Patrick, S D; Yang, H

    1997-01-01

    The athymic mouse xenograft system was used to prepare infectious stocks of two additional anogenital tissue-targeting human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in a manner similar to that for the development of infectious stocks of HPV-11. An anal condyloma from a transplant patient was used as material for extraction of infectious virus, and human foreskin fragments were incubated with the virus suspension and transplanted subrenally into athymic mice. Partial viral sequencing indicated that two rare HPV types (HPV-40 and HPVLVX82/MM7) were concurrently present in both the patient condyloma and the foreskin xenografts, and passage of both types was achieved as a mixed infection with HPV-40 predominating. Xenografts that developed from simultaneous infection of human foreskin fragments with HPV-11, -40, and -LVX82/MM7 virions produced regionally separate areas of HPV-11 and -40 infection as determined by in situ hybridization. In addition, in situ hybridization with HPV-40 and HPVLVX82/MM7 DNA probes demonstrated that both of these HPV types were present as adjacent but separate infections within the same anal condyloma of the transplant patient. These studies indicate that multiple HPV types can simultaneously infect genital tissue and that each HPV type predominantly maintains regional separation within the same papilloma. PMID:9311811

  6. Optical Imaging with HER2-targeted Affibody Molecules can monitor Hsp90 treatment response in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Stephanie M.W.Y.; Elias, Sjoerd G.; Chan, Carmel T.; Miao, Zheng; Cheng, Zhen; De, Abhijit; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine if optical imaging can be used for in vivo therapy response monitoring as an alternative to radionuclide techniques. For this we evaluated the known Her2 response to 17-DMAG treatment, a Hsp90 inhibitor. Experimental design After in vitro 17-DMAG treatment response evaluation of MCF7 parental cells and two HER2 transfected clones (Clone A medium, B high Her2 expression), we established human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice (only parental and clone B) for in vivo evaluation. Mice received 120 mg/kg of 17-DMAG in 4 doses at 12 hour intervals i.p. (n=14), or PBS as carrier control (n=9). Optical images were obtained both pre-treatment (day 0) and post-treatment (day 3, 6, and 9), always 5 hours post-injection of 500 pmol of anti-Her2 Affibody-AlexaFluor680 via tail vein (with pre-injection background subtraction). Day 3 and 9 in vivo optical imaging signal was further correlated with ex vivo Her2 levels by western blot after sacrifice. Results Her2 expression decreased with 17-DMAG dose in vitro. In vivo optical imaging signal was reduced by 22.5% in Clone B (p=0.003) and by 9% in MCF7 parental tumors (p=0.23) at 3 days after 17-DMAG treatment; optical imaging signal recovered in both tumor types at day 6–9. In the carrier group no signal reduction was observed. Pearson correlation of in vivo optical imaging signal with ex vivo Her2 levels ranged from 0.73 to 0.89. Conclusion Optical imaging with an affibody can be used to non-invasively monitor changes in Her2 expression in vivo as a response to treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor, with results similar to response measurements in PET imaging studies. PMID:22235098

  7. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  8. Applications of immunoPET: Using 124I-anti-PSCA A11 minibody for imaging disease progression and response to therapy in mouse xenograft models of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, Scott M.; Tavare, Richard; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Rochefort, Matthew M.; Salazar, Felix B.; Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Reiter, Robert E.; Wu, Anna M.

    2014-10-17

    Here, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is highly expressed in local prostate cancers and prostate cancer bone metastases and its expression correlates with androgen receptor activation and a poor prognosis. Here in this study, we investigate the potential clinical applications of immunoPET with the anti-PSCA A11 minibody, an antibody fragment optimized for use as an imaging agent. We compare A11 minibody immunoPET to 18F-Fluoride PET bone scans for detecting prostate cancer bone tumors and evaluate the ability of the A11 minibody to image tumor response to androgen deprivation. Osteoblastic, PSCA expressing, LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts were imaged with serial 124I-anti-PSCA A11 minibody immunoPET and 18F-Fluoride bone scans. Mice bearing LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with either vehicle or MDV-3100 and imaged with A11 minibody immunoPET/CT scans pre- and post-treatment. Ex vivo flow cytometry measured the change in PSCA expression in response to androgen deprivation. A11 minibody demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity over 18F-Fluoride bone scans for detecting LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts at all time points. Finally, LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts showed downregulation of PSCA when treated with MDV-3100 which A11 minibody immunoPET was able to detect in vivo.

  9. Applications of immunoPET: Using 124I-anti-PSCA A11 minibody for imaging disease progression and response to therapy in mouse xenograft models of prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Knowles, Scott M.; Tavare, Richard; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; ...

    2014-10-17

    Here, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is highly expressed in local prostate cancers and prostate cancer bone metastases and its expression correlates with androgen receptor activation and a poor prognosis. Here in this study, we investigate the potential clinical applications of immunoPET with the anti-PSCA A11 minibody, an antibody fragment optimized for use as an imaging agent. We compare A11 minibody immunoPET to 18F-Fluoride PET bone scans for detecting prostate cancer bone tumors and evaluate the ability of the A11 minibody to image tumor response to androgen deprivation. Osteoblastic, PSCA expressing, LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts were imaged with serial 124I-anti-PSCA A11more » minibody immunoPET and 18F-Fluoride bone scans. Mice bearing LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with either vehicle or MDV-3100 and imaged with A11 minibody immunoPET/CT scans pre- and post-treatment. Ex vivo flow cytometry measured the change in PSCA expression in response to androgen deprivation. A11 minibody demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity over 18F-Fluoride bone scans for detecting LAPC-9 intratibial xenografts at all time points. Finally, LAPC-9 subcutaneous xenografts showed downregulation of PSCA when treated with MDV-3100 which A11 minibody immunoPET was able to detect in vivo.« less

  10. Effects of Anti-repulsive Guidance Molecule C (RGMc/Hemojuvelin) Antibody on Hepcidin and Iron in Mouse Liver and Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Torti, SV; Lemler, E; Mueller, BK; Popp, A; Torti, FM

    2017-01-01

    Objective Hepcidin is a peptide hormone produced by the liver that regulates systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin is also synthesized by tumors, where it contributes to tumor growth by increasing the tumoral retention of iron. Targeted reduction of hepcidin may therefore be useful in reducing tumor growth. H5F9-AM8 is an antibody in preclinical development for the anemia of chronic disease that reduces hepcidin synthesis by binding to RGMc, a co-receptor involved in the transcriptional induction of hepcidin by BMP6. We explored the ability of H5F9-AM8 to act as an anti-tumor agent. Methods Effects of anti-hemojuvelin antibody on hepcidin synthesis were assessed by qRTPCR in tissue culture and in tumor xenografts and livers of mice treated with H5F9-AM8 or saline. Tumor growth was assessed using caliper measurements. Serum iron was measured colorimetrically and tissue iron was measured using western blotting and inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Results In tissue culture, the anti-hemojuvelin antibody H5F9-AM8 significantly reduced BMP6-stimulated hepcidin synthesis in HepG2 and other cancer cells. In mice, H5F9-AM8 reduced hepcidin in the liver and increased serum iron, total liver iron, and liver ferritin. Although hepcidin in tumors was also significantly decreased, H5F9-AM8 did not reduce tumor iron content, ferritin, or tumor growth. Conclusion Anti-hemojuvelin antibody successfully reduces hepcidin in both tumors and livers but has different effects in these target organs: it reduces iron content and ferritin in the liver, but does not reduce iron content or ferritin in tumors, and does not inhibit tumor growth. These results suggest that despite their ability to induce hepcidin in tumors, the anti-tumor efficacy of systemic, non-targeted hepcidin antagonists may be limited by their ability to simultaneously elevate plasma iron. Tumor-specific hepcidin inhibitors may be required to overcome the limitations of drugs that target the synthesis of both

  11. Coffee inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B in prostate cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Mitake, Maiko; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to prostate cancer and the transcription factor Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is constitutively active in most such cancers. We examine the effects of coffee on NF-κB and on the regulation of selected genes in human-derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and in PC3 xenografts in athymic nude mice. PC3 cells stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase reporter were used both in vitro and for xenografts. NF-κB activity was measured by reporter assays, DNA binding and in vivo imaging. Gene expression was measured in PC3 cells, xenografts and tumor microenvironment by low-density arrays. Western blotting of activated caspases was used to quantify apoptosis. Coffee inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity and DNA-binding in PC3 cells. Furthermore, coffee increased apoptosis and modulated expression of a number of inflammation- and cancer-related genes in TNFα-treated PC3 cells. In vivo imaging revealed a 31% lower NF-κB-luciferase activation in the xenografts of the mice receiving 5% coffee compared to control mice. Interestingly, we observed major changes in gene expression in the PC3 cells in xenografts as compared to PC3 cells in vitro. In PC3 xenografts, genes related to inflammation, apoptosis and cytoprotection were down-regulated in mice receiving coffee, and coffee also affected the gene expression in the xenograft microenvironment. Our data demonstrate that coffee inhibits NF-κB activity in PC3 cells in vitro and in xenografts. Furthermore, coffee modulates transcription of genes related to prostate cancer and inflammation. Our results are the first to suggest mechanistic links between coffee consumption and prostate cancer in an experimental mouse model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin) and Fulvestrant (Falsodex), as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunshu; Jia, Yijun; Ding, Longlong; Bai, Fang; Ge, Meixin; Lin, Qing; Wu, Kejin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin) and fulvestrant (falsodex) either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue. Methods Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined. Results Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI<1 and DRI>1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P<0.05). Interestingly, fulvestrant, in combination with trastuzumab, did not significantly alter the rate of apoptosis (in comparison with fulvestrant alone), in the BT-474 cell line (P>0.05). Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05), and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05) and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1) expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a

  13. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  14. Evaluating the Anticancer Properties of Liposomal Copper in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer: Formulation, In Vitro, In Vivo, Histology and Tissue Distribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zeng, San; Lin, Tien-Min; Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Lyman, Doug; Steffen, Dana; Xiong, May P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although copper (Cu) complexes have been investigated as anticancer agents, there has been no description of Cu itself as a cancer killing agent. A stealth liposomal Cu formulation (LpCu) was studied in vitro and in vivo. Methods LpCu was evaluated in prostate cancer origin PC-3 cells by a metabolic cytotoxicity assay, by monitoring reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by flow cytometry. LpCu efficacy was evaluated in vivo using intratumoral and intravenous injections into mice bearing PC-3 xenograft tumors. Toxicology was assessed by performing hematological and blood biochemistry assays, and tissue histology and Cu distribution was investigated by elemental analysis. Results LpCu and free Cu salts displayed similar levels of cell metabolic toxicity and ROS. Flow cytometry indicated that the mechanisms of cell death were both apoptosis and necrosis. Animals injected i.t. with 3.5 mg/kg or i.v. with 3.5 and 7.0 mg/kg LpCu exhibited significant tumor growth inhibition. Kidney and eye were the main organs affected by Cu-mediated toxicities, but spleen and liver were the major organs of Cu deposition. Conclusions LpCu was effective at reducing tumor burden in the xenograft prostate cancer model. There was histological evidence of Cu toxicity in kidneys and eyes of animals treated at the maximum tolerated dose of LpCu 7.0 mg/kg. PMID:24848339

  15. ASXL1 mutation correction by CRISPR/Cas9 restores gene function in leukemia cells and increases survival in mouse xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Valletta, Simona; Dolatshad, Hamid; Bartenstein, Matthias; Yip, Bon Ham; Bello, Erica; Gordon, Shanisha; Yu, Yiting; Shaw, Jacqueline; Roy, Swagata; Scifo, Laura; Schuh, Anna; Pellagatti, Andrea; Fulga, Tudor A.; Verma, Amit; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent somatic mutations of the epigenetic modifier and tumor suppressor ASXL1 are common in myeloid malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and are associated with poor clinical outcome. CRISPR/Cas9 has recently emerged as a powerful and versatile genome editing tool for genome engineering in various species. We have used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to correct the ASXL1 homozygous nonsense mutation present in the CML cell line KBM5, which lacks ASXL1 protein expression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ASXL1 homozygous correction resulted in protein re-expression with restored normal function, including down-regulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 target genes. Significantly reduced cell growth and increased myeloid differentiation were observed in ASXL1 mutation-corrected cells, providing new insights into the role of ASXL1 in human myeloid cell differentiation. Mice xenografted with mutation-corrected KBM5 cells showed significantly longer survival than uncorrected xenografts. These results show that the sole correction of a driver mutation in leukemia cells increases survival in vivo in mice. This study provides proof-of-concept for driver gene mutation correction via CRISPR/Cas9 technology in human leukemia cells and presents a strategy to illuminate the impact of oncogenic mutations on cellular function and survival. PMID:26623729

  16. ASXL1 mutation correction by CRISPR/Cas9 restores gene function in leukemia cells and increases survival in mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Valletta, Simona; Dolatshad, Hamid; Bartenstein, Matthias; Yip, Bon Ham; Bello, Erica; Gordon, Shanisha; Yu, Yiting; Shaw, Jacqueline; Roy, Swagata; Scifo, Laura; Schuh, Anna; Pellagatti, Andrea; Fulga, Tudor A; Verma, Amit; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-12-29

    Recurrent somatic mutations of the epigenetic modifier and tumor suppressor ASXL1 are common in myeloid malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and are associated with poor clinical outcome. CRISPR/Cas9 has recently emerged as a powerful and versatile genome editing tool for genome engineering in various species. We have used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to correct the ASXL1 homozygous nonsense mutation present in the CML cell line KBM5, which lacks ASXL1 protein expression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ASXL1 homozygous correction resulted in protein re-expression with restored normal function, including down-regulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 target genes. Significantly reduced cell growth and increased myeloid differentiation were observed in ASXL1 mutation-corrected cells, providing new insights into the role of ASXL1 in human myeloid cell differentiation. Mice xenografted with mutation-corrected KBM5 cells showed significantly longer survival than uncorrected xenografts. These results show that the sole correction of a driver mutation in leukemia cells increases survival in vivo in mice. This study provides proof-of-concept for driver gene mutation correction via CRISPR/Cas9 technology in human leukemia cells and presents a strategy to illuminate the impact of oncogenic mutations on cellular function and survival.

  17. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  18. Anti-CD45 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy using Bismuth-213: High Rates of Complete Remission and Long-Term Survival in a Mouse Myeloid Leukemia Xenograft Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Back, Tom; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Park, Steven I; Frayo, Shani; Axtman, Amanda; Orgun, Nural; Orozoco, Johnnie; Shenoi, Jaideep; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, Ajay K; Green, Damian J; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Press, Oliver W

    2011-07-21

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) using an anti-CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate and DOTA-biotin labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored as a strategy to decrease relapse and toxicity. α-emitting radionuclides exhibit high cytotoxicity coupled with a short path-length, potentially increasing the therapeutic index and making them an attractive alternative to β-emitting radionuclides for patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Accordingly, we have used 213Bi in mice with human leukemia xenografts. Results demonstrated excellent localization of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin to tumors with minimal uptake into normal organs. After 10 minutes, 4.5 ± 1.1% of the injected dose of 213Bi was delivered per gram of tumor. α imaging demonstrated uniform radionuclide distribution within tumor tissue 45 minutes after 213Bi-DOTA-biotin injection. Radiation absorbed doses were similar to those observed using a β-emitting radionuclide (90Y) in the same model. We conducted therapy experiments in a xenograft model using a single-dose of 213Bi-DOTA-biotin given 24 hours after anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate. Among mice treated with anti-CD45 Ab-SA conjugate followed by 800 μCi of 213Bi- or 90Y-DOTA-biotin, 80% and 20%, respectively, survived leukemia-free for >100 days with minimal toxicity. These data suggest that anti-CD45 PRIT using an α-emitting radionuclide may be highly effective and minimally toxic for treatment of AML.

  19. α-Mangostin: a dietary antioxidant derived from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. inhibits pancreatic tumor growth in xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-08-10

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of α-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. The chemotherapeutic effect of α-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). α-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. α-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, α-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-κB/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. α-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). α-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of α-mangostin (6 mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with α-mangostin. α-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant α-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of α-mangostin against human PC.

  20. Cetuximab Inhibits T790M-Mediated Resistance to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor in a Lung Adenocarcinoma Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Petra; Stewart, Erin; Pham, Nhu-An; Mascaux, Celine; Panchal, Devang; Li, Ming; Kim, Lucia; Sakashita, Shingo; Wang, Dennis; Sykes, Jenna; Friess, Thomas; Shepherd, Frances A; Liu, Geoffrey; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2016-09-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain T790M (amino acid substitution at position 790 in EGFR from threonine [T] to methionine [M]) mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) results in resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We used a patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) model containing an EGFR exon 19 deletion/T790M mutation to assess response to the EGFR-directed antibody cetuximab. Changes in the EGFR signaling pathway and ligand expression after treatment were investigated. PDX were randomized into control and treatment arms. Pharmacodynamic studies were performed at 2 and 24 hours and at 4 days after a single administration of cetuximab, erlotinib, or dacomitinib. Changes in the EGFR signaling pathway were assessed using Western blot analysis, and baseline mRNA expression of EGFR ligands using microarray analysis. Relative changes after treatment were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The xenograft showed a dramatic response to cetuximab. A complete reduction of total EGFR and phosphorylated EGFR occurred after cetuximab treatment. The PDX had increased baseline levels of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) compared with other PDX models with or without EGFR mutations. Amphiregulin was significantly reduced 2 hours after treatment with cetuximab. Compared with control mice, cetuximab- and EGFR-TKI-treated mice had significantly reduced HB-EGF gene expression at 2 hours, however, by day 4 the level of HB-EGF expression was higher. The effect of cetuximab compared with EGFR TKI on HB-EGF gene expression levels differed significantly at 2 and 24 hours but not at 4 days. We showed a dramatic tumor response with cetuximab in an exon 19 deletion/T790M EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma PDX model, which suggests a role for the autocrine feedback loop in the mutant EGFR signaling pathway. Further investigation using cetuximab in NSCLC with T790M mutation is warranted. Copyright

  1. Determination of Rottlerin, a Natural Protein Kinases C Inhibitor, in Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Mouse Xenografts by RP-HPLC Method

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Lifeng; Lugea, Aurelia; Moro, Aune; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Eibl, Guido; Pandol, Stephen J.; Go, Vay-Liang W

    2014-01-01

    Rottlerin is a natural polyphenolic ketone isolated from the pericarps of Mallotus phillippinensis. In previous studies we showed that parenteral administration of rottlerin reduced tumor growth in murine xenograft models of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and validated method for the quantitative determination of rottlerin in plasma and tumor tissues of mice fed a rottlerin diet. A xenograft model of pancreatic cancer was prepared by injection of 2×106 HPAF-II cells subcutaneously into nude mice. One week before tumor implantation, mice were randomly allocated to standard diet (AIN76A) and standard diet supplement with 0.012% rottlerin (n=6 per group). Mice were sacrificed after 6 weeks on diets. Rottlerin was extracted from the plasma and tissues using protein precipitation-extraction and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC-DAD method. The same HPLC method was also applied to determine rottlerin levels in conditioned culture media and in cell lysates from HPAF-II cells exposed to 25 µM concentration of rottlerin. A substantial amount of rottlerin was detected in tumor (2.11 ± 0.25 nmol/g tissue) and plasma (2.88 ± 0.41 µM) in mice fed rottlerin diet. In addition, significant levels of rottlerin (57.4 ± 5.4 nmol/mg protein) were detected in cell lysates from rottlerin-treated HPAF-II cells. These data indicate that rottlerin is efficiently absorbed in cells and tissues both in vivo and in vitro and suggest a strong potential for rottlerin as a preventive or adjuvant supplement for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24482742

  2. Antitumor activity of a dual epidermal growth factor receptor and ErbB2 kinase inhibitor MP-412 (AV-412) in mouse xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Akihiro; Ohya, Junichi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujita, Fumiko; Koike, Masako; Fujita, Masahide

    2009-08-01

    Although epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors are effective for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the emergence of mutations resistant to these inhibitors, such as T790M, has become a clinical problem. Recently, ErbB2 mutations have also been identified in a small number of NSCLC patients. Therefore, novel therapies to overcome these mutations are desirable. We describe the antitumor activity of MP-412 (AV-412), a dual EGFR/ErbB2 kinase inhibitor, against three lung cancer models with EGFR and ErbB2 mutations and also against various human xenografts with overexpression of these receptors. MP-412 inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream signaling in NCI-H1650 and NCI-H1975 cell lines, which harbor the E746-A750 deletion and L858R + T790M point mutations, respectively, in EGFR. MP-412 inhibited the growth of these cell lines in vitro and in vivo, whereas the precedent kinase inhibitors lapatinib, erlotinib, and gefitinib were ineffective against NCI-H1975 cells in vivo. Furthermore, MP-412 inhibited ErbB2 signaling in the NCI-H1781 cell line, which harbors the G776V,C insertion in ErbB2, and correlated with its antiproliferation activity. When its antitumor spectrum was further explored in several cancer types overexpressing EGFR or ErbB2, MP-412 showed potent activity in KPL-4 and DU145 xenografts, in which lapatinib was ineffective. MP-412 also inhibited tumor models in which conventional chemotherapies were less effective. These results suggest that MP-412 is a potent dual inhibitor with the potential for treating solid cancers that overexpress EGFR or ErbB2, including NSCLC cells harboring mutations resistant to the first generation of kinase inhibitors.

  3. A non-invasive approach to monitor chronic lymphocytic leukemia engraftment in a xenograft mouse model using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI).

    PubMed

    Valdora, Francesca; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Morabito, Fortunato; Massucco, Carlotta; Emionite, Laura; Boccardo, Simona; Basso, Luca; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Salvi, Sandra; Rosa, Francesca; Gentile, Massimo; Ravina, Marco; Pace, Daniele; Castronovo, Angela; Cilli, Michele; Truini, Mauro; Calabrese, Massimo; Neri, Antonino; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele; Fais, Franco; Baio, Gabriella; Ferrarini, Manlio

    2016-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most prevalent leukemia among adults. Despite its indolent nature, CLL remains an incurable disease. Herein we aimed to monitor CLL disease engraftment and, progression/regression in a xenograft CLL mouse model using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI). Spleen contrast enhancement, quantified as percentage change in signal intensity upon USPIO administration, demonstrated a difference due to a reduced USPIO uptake, in the spleens of mice injected with CLL cells (NSG-CLL, n=71) compared to controls (NSG-CTR, n=17). These differences were statistically significant both after 2 and 4weeks from CLL cells injection. In addition comparison of mice treated with rituximab with untreated controls for changes in spleen iron uptake confirmed that it is possible to monitor treatment efficacy in this mouse model of CLL using USPIO-enhanced MRI. Further applications could include the preclinical in vivo monitoring of new therapies and the clinical evaluation of CLL patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition on the growth of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro and tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model by Se-containing polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chengfu; Wang, Changdong; Wang, Junjie; Kumar, Vikas; Anwar, Firoz; Xiao, Fangxiang; Mushtaq, Gohar; Liu, Yufei; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Yuan, Ding

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death among Women. Current therapies for breast cancer have adverse side-effects. Selenium (Se)-containing polysaccharides have multiple health benefits to humans. Pyracantha fortuneana (P. fortuneana) contains rich Se polysaccharides. We hypothesized that Se-containing polysaccharides from P. fortuneana possess anticancer activity on breast cancer via inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis. This study aimed to assess the anticancer effect of Se-containing polysaccharides from P. fortuneana and the underlying mechanisms. Se-containing polysaccharides were purified. Their properties and monosaccharide compositions were analyzed. Their effects on cell growth, expression of cycle proteins, apoptosis and apoptosis-related protein, and tumor growth in mouse xenograft model were examined. This extract contained 93.7% (w/w) of carbohydrate, 2.1% (w/w) of uronic acid and 3.7μg/g of Se, and was considered as Se-conjugated polysaccharides (Se-PFPs). In vitro studies showed that treatment of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) MDA-MB-231 cells with Se-PFPs (1) inhibited cell growth dose-dependently by arresting cells at G2 phase via inhibiting CDC25C-CyclinB1/CDC2 pathway; (2) caused apoptosis associated with increased p53, Bax, Puma and Noxa, decreased Bcl2, increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio and increased activities of caspases 3/9, suggesting its effect on p53-mediated cytochrome c-caspase pathway. Treatment of nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231-derived xenograft tumors with Se-PFPs significantly reduced tumor growth without altering body weight, confirming its antitumor activity without toxic side effects. Se-PFPs enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxic effects. It is concluded that Se-containing polysaccharides from P. fortuneana potently inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of TNBC cells and can be potential anticancer agent for TNBC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. α-Mangostin: A Dietary Antioxidant Derived from the Pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. Inhibits Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Xenograft Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ala; Fischer, Joseph W.; Singh, Ashok; Zhong, Weixiong; Shekhani, Mohammed Ozair; Meske, Louise; Havighurst, Thomas; Kim, KyungMann; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth most leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. In this study, we provide evidence of chemotherapeutic effects of α-mangostin, a dietary antioxidant isolated from the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana L. against human PC. Results: The chemotherapeutic effect of α-mangostin was determined using four human PC cells (PL-45, PANC1, BxPC3, and ASPC1). α-Mangostin resulted in a significant inhibition of PC cells viability without having any effects on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. α-Mangostin showed a dose-dependent increase of apoptosis in PC cells. Also, α-mangostin inhibited the expression levels of pNF-κB/p65Ser552, pStat3Ser727, and pStat3Tyr705. α-Mangostin inhibited DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator 3 (Stat3). α-Mangostin inhibited the expression levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), cyclin D1, and gp130; however, increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) was observed in PC cells. In addition, i.p. administration of α-mangostin (6 mg/kg body weight, 5 days a week) resulted in a significant inhibition of both primary (PL-45) and secondary (ASPC1) human PC cell-derived orthotopic and ectopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. No sign of toxicity was observed in any of the mice administered with α-mangostin. α-Mangostin treatment inhibited the biomarkers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) in the xenograft tumor tissues. Innovation: We present, for the first time, that dietary antioxidant α-mangostin inhibits the growth of PC cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of α-mangostin against human PC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 682–699. PMID:24295217

  6. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Jessica; Urban, Cordula; Thayer, Derek; Charron, Heather; Valim, Niksa; Tata, Darrell B; Schiff, Rachel; Blumenthal, Robert; Joshi, Amit; Puri, Anu

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC). We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) (Ex/Em410/670 nm) together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm) as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes) resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads on the ribcage of mice. For biodistribution experiments, trace amounts of a near infrared lipid probe DiR (Ex/Em745/840 nm) were included in the liposomes. Liposomes were injected intravenously and laser treatments (90 mW, 0.9 cm diameter, for an exposure duration ranging from 5–8 minutes) were done 4 hours postinjection (only one tumor per mouse was treated, keeping the second flank tumor as control). Calcein release occurred as indicated by an increase in calcein fluorescence from laser treated tumors only. The animals were observed for up to 15 days postinjection and tumor volume and luciferase expression was measured. A

  7. Kinematic modeling and its implication in longitudinal chemotherapy study of tumor physiology: ovarian xenograft mouse model and contrast-enhanced dynamic CT (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that dynamic CT provides the necessary sensitivity to quantify tumor physiology and differences in chemotherapeutic response. A compartmental mouse model utilizing measured contrast-enhanced dynamic CT scans is used to simulate systematic and statistical errors associated with tumor physiology: perfusion, permeability (PS), fractional plasma volume (fp), and fractional interstitial volume. The solute utilized is a small molecular weight radio-opaque contrast agent (isovue). For such an intravascular-interstitial medium, the kinematics simplifies to a two compartmental diffusive dominated set of coupled differential equations. Each combination of physiological parameters is repeatedly simulated fifteen times from which statistical errors calculated. The fractional change relative to the true value (systematic error) and standard deviation (statistical error) are plotted as a function of PS, fp, scanner temporal resolution and noise, and contrast media injection rates. By extrapolating from experimental data found in literature, a relative change in PS and fp of approximately 40% is required. Thus, the longitudinal response of two chemotherapeutic drugs under investigation - proteasome and IMPDH inhibitors - are hypothesized to induce different physiological responses. The first set of simulations varies PS from 0.05 to 0.40 mL/min/mL and fp from 0.01 to 0.07 mL/mL while holding all other physiological parameters constant. Errors in PS remain below 3% while statistical errors for fp increase significantly as the volume decreases toward 1-2%: errors remain less than 6% for fp>0.03 while increasing to above 15% for fp<0.02. The second set of simulations are performed quantifying the relationship between scanner temporal resolution and contrast media injection rate for various tumor permeabilities. For the majority of cases, the errors remain below 5%. As PS approaches perfusion, a total error less than 6% can be maintained

  8. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B.; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  9. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  10. Tumor dosimetry for I-131 trastuzumab therapy in a Her2+ NCI N87 xenograft mouse model using the Siemens SYMBIA E gamma camera with a pinhole collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Sub; Kim, Jin Su; Deuk Cho, Kyung; Kang, Joo Hyun; Moo Lim, Sang

    2015-07-01

    We performed imaging and therapy using I-131 trastuzumab and a pinhole collimator attached to a conventional gamma camera for human use in a mouse model. The conventional clinical gamma camera with a 2-mm radius-sized pinhole collimator was used for monitoring the animal model after administration of I-131 trastuzumab The highest and lowest radiation-received organs were osteogenic cells (0.349 mSv/MBq) and skin (0.137 mSv/MBq), respectively. The mean coefficients of variation (%CV) of the effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.091 and 0.093 mSv/MBq respectively. We showed the feasibility of the pinholeattached conventional gamma camera for human use for the assessment of dosimetry. Mouse dosimetry and prediction of human dosimetry could be used to provide data for the safety and efficacy of newly developed therapeutic schemes.

  11. Additional effects of engineered stem cells expressing a therapeutic gene and interferon-β in a xenograft mouse model of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-07-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in women worldwide. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of neural stem cell-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (NDEPT) designed to more selectively target endometrial cancer. For this, we employed two different types of neural stem cells (NSCs), HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells. Cytosine deaminase (CD) can convert the non-toxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), into a toxic agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which inhibits DNA synthesis. IFN-β is a powerful cytotoxic cytokine that is released by activated immune cells or lymphocytes. In an animal model xenografted with endometrial Ishikawa cancer cells, the stem cells stained with CM-DiI were injected into nearby tumor masses and 5-FC was delivered by intraperitoneal injection. Co-expression of CD and IFN-β significantly inhibited the growth of cancer (~50-60%) in the presence of 5-FC. Among migration-induced factors, VEGF gene was highly expressed in endometrial cancer cells. Histological analysis showed that the aggressive nature of cancer was inhibited by 5-FC in the mice treated with the therapeutic stem cells. Furthermore, PCNA expression was more decreased in HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β treated mice rather than HB1.F3.CD treated mice. To confirm the in vitro combined effects of 5-FU and IFN-β, 5-FU was treated in Ishikawa cells. 5-FU increased the IFN-β/receptor 2 (IFNAR2) and BXA levels, indicating that 5-FU increased sensitivity of endometrial cancer cells to IFN-β, leading to apoptosis of cancer cells. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the efficacy of therapeutic stem cell-based immune therapy involving the targeted expression of CD and IFN-β genes at endometrial cancer sites.

  12. Improving In Vivo High-Resolution CT Imaging of the Tumour Vasculature in Xenograft Mouse Models through Reduction of Motion and Bone-Streak Artefacts

    PubMed Central

    Kersemans, Veerle; Kannan, Pavitra; Beech, John S.; Bates, Russell; Irving, Benjamin; Gilchrist, Stuart; Allen, Philip D.; Thompson, James; Kinchesh, Paul; Casteleyn, Christophe; Schnabel, Julia; Partridge, Mike; Muschel, Ruth J.; Smart, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical in vivo CT is commonly used to visualise vessels at a macroscopic scale. However, it is prone to many artefacts which can degrade the quality of CT images significantly. Although some artefacts can be partially corrected for during image processing, they are best avoided during acquisition. Here, a novel imaging cradle and tumour holder was designed to maximise CT resolution. This approach was used to improve preclinical in vivo imaging of the tumour vasculature. Procedures A custom built cradle containing a tumour holder was developed and fix-mounted to the CT system gantry to avoid artefacts arising from scanner vibrations and out-of-field sample positioning. The tumour holder separated the tumour from bones along the axis of rotation of the CT scanner to avoid bone-streaking. It also kept the tumour stationary and insensitive to respiratory motion. System performance was evaluated in terms of tumour immobilisation and reduction of motion and bone artefacts. Pre- and post-contrast CT followed by sequential DCE-MRI of the tumour vasculature in xenograft transplanted mice was performed to confirm vessel patency and demonstrate the multimodal capacity of the new cradle. Vessel characteristics such as diameter, and branching were quantified. Results Image artefacts originating from bones and out-of-field sample positioning were avoided whilst those resulting from motions were reduced significantly, thereby maximising the resolution that can be achieved with CT imaging in vivo. Tumour vessels ≥ 77 μm could be resolved and blood flow to the tumour remained functional. The diameter of each tumour vessel was determined and plotted as histograms and vessel branching maps were created. Multimodal imaging using this cradle assembly was preserved and demonstrated. Conclusions The presented imaging workflow minimised image artefacts arising from scanner induced vibrations, respiratory motion and radiopaque structures and enabled in vivo CT imaging

  13. Dose-biomarker-response modeling of the anticancer effect of ethaselen in a human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Suo-fu; Li, Jian; Ji, Shuang-min; Zeng, Hui-hui; Lu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is a component of several redox-sensitive signaling cascades that mediate important biological processes such as cell survival, maturation, growth, migration and inhibition of apoptosis. The expression levels of TrxR1 in some human carcinoma cell lines are nearly 10 times higher than those in normal cells. Ethaselen is a novel antitumor candidate that exerts potent inhibition on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by targeting TrxR. In this study we explored the relationship between the ethaselen dose and TrxR activity level and the relationship between TrxR degradation and tumor apoptosis in a human lung carcinoma A549 xenograft model. BALB/c nude mice implanted with human NSCLC cell line A54 were administered ethaselen (36, 72, 108 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or vehicle for 10 d. The tumor size and TrxR activity levels in tumor tissues were daily recorded and detected. Based on the experimental data, NONMEM 7.2 was used to develop an integrated dose-biomarker-response model for describing the quantitative relationship between ethaselen dose and tumor eradication effects. The time course of TrxR activity levels was modeled using an indirect response model (IDR model), in which the influence of the tumor growth rates on Kin with the linear correction factor γ1 (0.021 d/mm). The drug binding-inhibition effects on Kout was described using a sigmoidal Emax model with Smax (5.95), SC50 (136 mg/kg) and Hill's coefficient γ2 (2.29). The influence of TrxR activity inhibition on tumor eradication was characterized by an Emax model with an Emax (130 mm3/d) and EC50 (0.0676). This model was further validated using a visual predictive check (VPC) and was used to predict the efficacy of different doses. In conclusion, the properties and characteristics of ethaselen acting on TrxR degradation and subsequently resulting in tumor apoptosis are characterized by the IDR model and integrated dose-biomarker-response model with high goodness-of-fit and great

  14. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen M.; Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A.; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C.; Parks, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  15. Benzophenone-1 stimulated the growth of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells by cell cycle regulation via an estrogen receptor alpha-mediated signaling pathway in cellular and xenograft mouse models.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Ah; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Hye-Rim; Yi, Bo-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-03-08

    2,4-Dihydroxybenzophenone (benzophenone-1; BP-1) is an UV stabilizer primarily used to prevent polymer degradation and deterioration in quality due to UV irradiation. Recently, BP-1 has been reported to bioaccumulate in human bodies by absorption through the skin and has the potential to induce health problems including endocrine disruption. In the present study, we examined the xenoestrogenic effect of BP-1 on BG-1 human ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs) and relevant xenografted animal models in comparison with 17-β estradiol (E2). In in vitro cell viability assay, BP-1 (10(-8)-10(-5)M) significantly increased BG-1 cell growth the way E2 did. The mechanism underlying the BG-1 cell proliferation was proved to be related with the up-regulation of cyclin D1, a cell cycle progressor, by E2 or BP-1. Both BP-1 and E2 induced cell growth and up-regulation of cyclin D1 were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, suggesting that BP-1 may mediate the cancer cell proliferation via an ER-dependent pathway like E2. On the other hand, the expression of p21, a regulator of cell cycle progression at G1 phase, was not altered by BP-1 though it was down-regulated by E2. In xenograft mouse models transplanted with BG-1 cells, BP-1 or E2 treatment significantly increased the tumor mass formation compared to a vehicle (corn oil) within 8 weeks. In histopathological analysis, the tumor sections of E2 or BP-1 group displayed extensive cell formations with high density and disordered arrangement, which were supported by the increased number of BrdUrd positive nuclei and the over-expression of cyclin D1 protein. Taken together, these results suggest that BP-1 is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that exerts xenoestrogenic effects by stimulating the proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer via ER signaling pathway associated with cell cycle as did E2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurements of radon activity concentration in mouse tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Yuu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kataoka, Takahiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the biokinetics of inhaled radon, radon activity concentrations in mouse tissues and organs were determined after mice had been exposed to about 1 MBq/m(3) of radon in air. Radon activity concentrations in mouse blood and in other tissues and organs were measured with a liquid scintillation counter and with a well-type HP Ge detector, respectively. Radon activity concentration in mouse blood was 0.410 ± 0.016 Bq/g when saturated with 1 MBq/m(3) of radon activity concentration in air. In addition, average partition coefficients obtained were 0.74 ± 0.19 for liver, 0.46 ± 0.13 for muscle, 9.09 ± 0.49 for adipose tissue, and 0.22 ± 0.04 for other organs. With these results, a value of 0.414 for the blood-to-air partition coefficient was calculated by means of our physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The time variation of radon activity concentration in mouse blood during exposure to radon was also calculated. All results are compared in detail with those found in the literature.

  17. 2′-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel conjugate nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lei; Schorzman, Allison N; Ma, Ping; Madden, Andrew J; Zamboni, William C; Benhabbour, Soumya Rahima; Mumper, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    A nanoparticle (NP) formulation with 2′-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel (Br-16-PX) conjugate was developed in these studies for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lipophilic paclitaxel conjugate Br-C16-PX was synthesized and incorporated into lipid NPs where the 16-carbon chain enhanced drug entrapment in the drug delivery system and improved in vivo pharmacokinetics. The electron-withdrawing bromine group was used to facilitate the conversion of Br-C16-PX to paclitaxel at the tumor site. The developed system was evaluated in luciferase-expressing A549 cells in vitro and in an orthotopic NSCLC mouse model. The results demonstrated that the Br-C16-PX NPs had a higher maximum tolerated dose (75 mg/kg) than Taxol® (19 mg/kg) and provided significantly longer median survival (88 days versus 70 days, P<0.05) in the orthotopic NSCLC model. An improved pharmacokinetic profile was observed for the Br-C16-PX NPs at 75 mg/kg compared to Taxol at 19 mg/kg. The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC)0–96 h of Br-C16-PX from the NPs was 91.7-fold and 49.6-fold greater than Taxol in plasma and tumor-bearing lungs, respectively, which provided sustained drug exposure and higher antitumor efficacy in the NP-treated group. PMID:25114529

  18. Analysis of the functions of glycoproteins E and I and their promoters during VZV replication in vitro and in skin and T-cell xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan; Reichelt, Mike; Moffat, Jennifer F; Sommer, Marvin; Zerboni, Leigh; Berarducci, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The two VZV glycoproteins, gE and gI, are encoded by genes that are designated open reading frames, ORF67 and ORF68, located in the short unique region of the VZV genome. These proteins have homologs in the other alphaherpesviruses. Like their homologues, VZV gE and gI exhibit prominent co-localization in infected cells and form heterodimers. However, VZV gE is much larger than its homologues because it has a unique N-terminal domain, consisting of 188 amino acids that are not present in these other gene products. VZV gE also differs from the related gE proteins, in that it is essential for viral replication. Targeted mutations of gE that are compatible with VZV replication in cultured cells have varying phenotypes in skin and T-cell xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis in vivo. While gI is dispensable for growth in cultured cells in vitro, this glycoprotein is essential for VZV infection of differentiated human skin and T cells in vivo. The promoter regions of gE and gI are regulated by the cellular transactivator, specificity protein factor 1 (Sp1) in combination with the major VZV transactivator in reporter construct experiments and some Sp1 promoter elements are important for VZV virulence in vivo. Further analysis of VZV gE and gI functions and their interactions with other viral and host cell proteins are important areas for studies of VZV replication and pathogenesis.

  19. Targeting of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Wanek, P.M.; Poggenburg, J.K.; Klein, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein, and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. 111In-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCuries (microCi) of tumor activity per gram per 100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The proportion of tumor dose found in normal organs is less than 10%, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, and polyclonal rabbit antiferritin, which defines a tumor-associated antigen, demonstrate positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. When compared to the 111In-radiolabeled antibody, 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 demonstrates comparable tumor targeting and percentages of tumor dose found in normal organs. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Seven days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, average absorbed doses of 3770, 980, 353, and 274 cGy were observed in tumor, liver, contralateral control site, and total body, respectively.

  20. Improvement of Parameter Estimations in Tumor Growth Inhibition Models on Xenografted Animals: Handling Sacrifice Censoring and Error Caused by Experimental Measurement on Larger Tumor Sizes.

    PubMed

    Pierrillas, Philippe B; Tod, Michel; Amiel, Magali; Chenel, Marylore; Henin, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of censoring due to animal sacrifice on parameter estimates and tumor volume calculated from two diameters in larger tumors during tumor growth experiments in preclinical studies. The type of measurement error that can be expected was also investigated. Different scenarios were challenged using the stochastic simulation and estimation process. One thousand datasets were simulated under the design of a typical tumor growth study in xenografted mice, and then, eight approaches were used for parameter estimation with the simulated datasets. The distribution of estimates and simulation-based diagnostics were computed for comparison. The different approaches were robust regarding the choice of residual error and gave equivalent results. However, by not considering missing data induced by sacrificing the animal, parameter estimates were biased and led to false inferences in terms of compound potency; the threshold concentration for tumor eradication when ignoring censoring was 581 ng.ml(-1), but the true value was 240 ng.ml(-1).

  1. Demonstration of the activation of prodrug CB 1954 using human DT-diaphorase mutant Q104Y-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells and mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Wu, K; Eng, E; Knox, R; Chen, S

    2001-01-01

    assays that show that Q104Y is significantly more active than the wild-type DT-diaphorase in the activation of CB 1954. Finally, the in vivo activation of CB 1954 was demonstrated with a nude mouse model using Q104Y-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells. These studies reveal that DT-diaphorase can activate CB 1954, and human Q104Y mutant enzyme is more active than the wild-type enzyme in the intracellular reductive activation of CB 1954.

  2. ESR measurement of radical clearance in lung of whole mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, K.; Utsumi, H.; Hamada, A. )

    1991-06-14

    Clearance of the nitroxide radicals, hydroxy-TEMPO and carboxy-PROxYL, in whole-mouse lung was directly measured by in vivo ESR. After injecting a nitroxide radical, distribution of the nitroxide radical all over the lung was confirmed by ESR imaging. The ESR signal of hydroxy-TEMPO was reduced in the lung and the clearance obeyed first-order kinetics, whereas the signal of carboxy-PROxYL remained constant. Comparison of the clearance rates of live and dead mice indicated the presence of 2 different clearance systems in the lung: loss of its paramagnetism in the lung, and transfer from alveolar to the blood circulation system.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime FRET non-invasive imaging of breast cancer xenografts provides a measure of target engagement in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET) is a unique non-invasive imaging platform to monitor and quantify in vivo target engagement in pre-clinical studies. FLIM FRET is a valuable tool in targeted drug delivery due to its nanoscale-range molecular resolution that detects near-infrared labeled ligand binding to dimerized receptors followed by their uptake into cancer cells in vivo. Various imaging platforms, including PET, lack the ability to directly discriminate between unbound and internalized ligands. Since transferrin receptor (TfR) level is significantly elevated in cancer cells compared to non-cancerous cells, transferrin (Tf) has been successfully used in molecular imaging and targeted anti-cancer drug delivery. The dimeric nature of TfR allows for the quantification of Tf internalization into cancer cells by measuring FLIM FRET between receptor-bound Tf donor and acceptor NIR fluorophore pairs, based on the reduction of donor fluorophore lifetime in live mice. We analyzed tumor morphology, the level of expression of TfR, estrogen receptor (ER) and Tf accumulation in human breast cancer tumor xenografts. We found a remarkable heterogeneity of breast cancer tumors regarding their size, cell density, TfR and ER expression and Tf uptake. The results of this study confirm a strong correlation between in vivo NIR FLIM FRET and ex vivo evaluation of Tf uptake into tumor tissues, thus validating FD% as a robust measure of the target engagement of TfR-Tf in tumor cells in vivo.

  4. An inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor function does not affect the ability of human papillomavirus 11 to form warts in the xenografted immunodeficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Tanya; Howett, Mary K; Welsh, Patricia A; Patrick, Susan D; Neely, Elizabeth B; Flanagan, Neil; Pollack, Vincent A; Pustilnik, Leslie R; Moyer, Jim; Perros, Manos

    2007-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) has been shown to be induced and activated in cells infected with HPV, suggesting that it may play a physiological role in viral replication or in the formation or maintenance of warts. To investigate this possibility, human foreskin tissue was infected with HPV11 and transplanted onto the renal capsule and the dermis of immunodeficient mice. The animals were treated orally or topically with the potent EGFr inhibitor CP-545130, with treatment starting either immediately following graft attachment, or following a 70 day period to allow development of warts. The rate of appearance of warts, wart size and number were monitored. In addition, we measured intra-lesional HPV replication levels and examined the morphology of the graft tissues. Analysis of the results showed no significant difference between placebo and compound-treated groups, despite high levels of compound present in the graft tissue. We conclude that EGFr kinase activity is not required for the development and maintenance of HPV-11-induced warts in this model.

  5. A patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model of a cisplatinum-resistant osteosarcoma lung metastasis that was sensitive to temozolomide and trabectedin: implications for precision oncology.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kentaro; Murakami, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Kei; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Kentaro; Zhang, Yong; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Yanagawa, Jane; Russell, Tara A; Singh, Arun S; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Elliott, Irmina; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-09-22

    In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of trabectedin (TRAB) and temozolomide (TEM) compared to cisplatinum (CDDP) on a patient-derived orthotopic xenogrraft (PDOX) of a lung-metastasis from an osteosarcoma of a patient who failed CDDP therapy. Osteosarcoma resected from the patient was implanted orthotopically in the distal femur of mice to establish PDOX models which were randomized into the following groups when tumor volume reached approximately 100 mm(3): G1, control without treatment; G2, CDDP (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, TRAB (0.15 mg/kg, intravenous injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G4, TEM (25 mg/kg, oral, daily, for 14 days). Tumor size and body weight were measured with calipers and a digital balance, respectively, twice a week. On day 14 after initiation of treatment, TEM and TRAB, but not CDDP, significantly inhibited tumor volume compared to untreated control: control (G1): 814.5±258.8 mm(3); CDDP (G2): 608.6±126.9 mm(3); TRAB (G3): 286.6±133.0 mm(3); TEM (G4): 182.9±69.1 mm(3). CDDP vs. control, p=0.07; TRAB vs. control, p=0.0004; TEM vs. control p =0.0002; TRAB vs. CDDP, p =0.0002; TEM vs. CDDP, p =0.00003. The results of the present study show that a PDOX model of an osteosarcoma lung-metastasis that recurred after adjuvant CDDP-treatment has identified potentially, highly-effective drugs for this recalcitrant disease, while accurately maintaining the CDDP resistance of the tumor in the patient, thereby demonstrating the potential of the osteosarcoma PDOX model for precision oncology.

  6. Intrauterine Telemetry to Measure Mouse Contractile Pressure In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Cara C.; Pierce, Stephanie L.; Grotegut, Chad A.; England, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    A complex integration of molecular and electrical signals is needed to transform a quiescent uterus into a contractile organ at the end of pregnancy. Despite the discovery of key regulators of uterine contractility, this process is still not fully understood. Transgenic mice provide an ideal model in which to study parturition. Previously, the only method to study uterine contractility in the mouse was ex vivo isometric tension recordings, which are suboptimal for several reasons. The uterus must be removed from its physiological environment, a limited time course of investigation is possible, and the mice must be sacrificed. The recent development of radiometric telemetry has allowed for longitudinal, real-time measurements of in vivo intrauterine pressure in mice. Here, the implantation of an intrauterine telemeter to measure pressure changes in the mouse uterus from mid-pregnancy until delivery is described. By comparing differences in pressures between wild type and transgenic mice, the physiological impact of a gene of interest can be elucidated. This technique should expedite the development of therapeutics used to treat myometrial disorders during pregnancy, including preterm labor. PMID:25867820

  7. Anticancer activity of taraxerol acetate in human glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model via induction of autophagy and apoptotic cell death, cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jing-Fang; Song, Ying-Fang; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Zhao-Cong; Chen, Hong-Jie; Wang, Shou-Sen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer and apoptotic effects of taraxerol acetate in U87 human glioblastoma cells. The effects on cell cycle phase distribution, cell cycle-associated proteins, autophagy, DNA fragmentation and cell migration were assessed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay, and phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy was utilized to determine the viability and apoptotic morphological features of the U87 cells. Flow cytometry using propidium iodide and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate demonstrated the effect of taraxerol acetate on the cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate the effect of the taraxerol acetate on cell cycle‑associated proteins and autophagy‑linked LC3B‑II proteins. The results demonstrated that taraxerol acetate induced dose‑ and time‑dependent cytotoxic effects in the U87 cells. Apoptotic induction following taraxerol acetate treatment was observed and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 7.3% in the control cells, to 16.1, 44.1 and 76.7% in the 10, 50 and 150 µM taraxerol acetate‑treated cells, respectively. Furthermore, taraxerol acetate treatment led to sub‑G1 cell cycle arrest with a corresponding decrease in the number of S‑phase cells. DNA fragments were observed as a result of the gel electrophoresis experiment following taraxerol acetate treatment. To investigate the inhibitory effects of taraxerol acetate on the migration of U87 cell, a wound healing assay was conducted. The number of cells that migrated to the scratched area decreased significantly following treatment with taraxerol acetate. In addition, taraxerol acetate inhibited tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Administration of 0.25 and 0.75 µg/g taraxerol acetate reduced the tumor weight from 1.2 g in the phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS)‑treated group (control) to 0.81 and 0.42

  8. Suppression of the growth of human colorectal cancer cells by therapeutic stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-β via their tumor-tropic effect in cellular and xenograft mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Park, Min-Ah; Lee, Hye-Rim; Kang, Nam-Hee; Choi, Kelvin J; Kim, Seung U; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-06-01

    Genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) exhibit a potent therapeutic efficacy via their strong tumor tropism toward cancer cells. In this study, we introduced the human parental neural stem cells, HB1.F3, with the human interferon beta (IFN-β) gene which is a typical cytokine gene that has an antitumor effect and the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene from Escherichia coli (E. coli) that could convert the non-toxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), to a toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Two types of stem cells expressing the CD gene (HB1.F3.CD cells) and both the CD and human IFN-β genes (HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β) were generated. The present study was performed to examine the migratory and therapeutic effects of these GESTECs against the colorectal cancer cell line, HT-29. When co-cultured with colorectal cancer cells in the presence of 5-FC, HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells exhibited the cytotoxicity on HT-29 cells via the bystander effect. In particular, HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells showed the synergistic cytotoxic activity of 5-FU and IFN-β. We also confirmed the migration ability of HB1.F3.CD and HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells toward HT-29 cells by a modified migration assay in vitro, where chemoattractant factors secreted by HT-29 cells attracted the GESTECs. In a xenograft mouse model, the volume of tumor mass was decreased up to 56% in HB1.F3.CD injected mice while the tumor mass was greatly inhibited about 76% in HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β injected mice. The therapeutic treatment by these GESTECs is a novel strategy where the combination of the migration capacity of stem cells as a vector for therapeutic genes towards colorectal cancer and a synergistic antitumor effect of CD and IFN-β genes can selectively target this type of cancer.

  9. Effective molecular targeting of CDK4/6 and IGF-1R in a rare FUS-ERG fusion CDKN2A-deletion doxorubicin-resistant Ewing's sarcoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Singh, Arun S; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; James, Aaron W; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; DeLong, Jonathan C; Zhang, Yong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Russell, Tara; Eckardt, Mark A; Yanagawa, Jane; Federman, Noah; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-07-26

    Ewing's sarcoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy. In the present study, tumor from a patient with a Ewing's sarcoma with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/B (CDKN2A/B) loss and FUS-ERG fusion was implanted in the right chest wall of nude mice to establish a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. The aim of the present study was to determine efficacy of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitors on the Ewing's sarcoma PDOX. The PDOX models were randomized into the following groups when tumor volume reached 50 mm3: G1, untreated control; G2, doxorubicin (DOX) (intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, CDK4/6 inhibitor (palbociclib, PD0332991, per oral (p.o.), daily, for 14 days); G4, IGF-1R inhibitor (linsitinib, OSI-906, p.o., daily, for 14 days). Tumor growth was significantly suppressed both in G3 (palbociclib) and in G4 (linsitinib) compared to G1 (untreated control) at all measured time points. In contrast, DOX did not inhibit tumor growth at any time point, which is consistent with the failure of DOX to control tumor growth in the patient. The results of the present study demonstrate the power of the PDOX model to identify effective targeted molecular therapy of a recalcitrant DOX-resistant Ewing's sarcoma with specific genetic alterations. The results of this study suggest the potential of PDOX models for individually-tailored, effective targeted therapy for recalcitrant cancer.

  10. CABOZANTINIB IS EFFECTIVE IN A SUBSET OF XENOGRAFT GBM TUMORS AND AFFECTS MULTIPLE SIGNALING PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C.; Arnold, Kimberly; Mueller, Claudius; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Poisson, Laila M.; Irtenkauf, Susan; Hasselbach, Laura

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (blind field). METHODS: Neurospheres enriched in CSCs were cultured from resected GBM tumors. Sensitivity to cabozantinib was determined in vitro. Cells were treated (IC40) in triplicate, and cell lysates were analyzed by reverse phase protein microarrays (RPPAs). GBM CSCs were implanted intracranially into nude mice. Cabozantinib was administered by oral gavage at a dose of 60 mg/kg for 4 weeks (5 days/week) as a single agent or in combination with 40 mg/kg TMZ. Tumor growth and response to treatment were monitored by non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using the Xenogen IVIS System (Caliper Life Sciences), and overall survival. RESULTS: Sensitivity to cabozantinib treatment varied for the different GBM CSCs. From 70 proteins and phosphoproteins measured, 29 distributed among several signaling pathways were significantly altered after treatment in both resistant and sensitive GBM CSCs, including Met, Ret, AKT, MAPK/ERK. Cabozantinib single agent treatment reduced GBM tumor growth and increased mouse survival in two xenograft lines. Cabozantinib monotherapy reduced tumor size, as measured by BLI, but had no significant effect on overall survival for another xenograft line, however, the combination treatment resulted in sensitization of these xenografts to TMZ treatment. RPPA confirmed downregulation of the described targets for XL184, including activated Met, VEGFR2 and Ret (in vitro). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the clinical experience, both sensitive and resistant GBMs are represented in our CSC xenografts. More extensive evaluation will likely identify baseline biomarkers which might be valuable in identifying potentially sensitive sub-populations for subsequent clinical trials. RPPA and next-gen sequencing (NGS) on terminal tumors is underway. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Tumor Biology.

  11. A xenograft animal model of human arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a type of high-flow vascular malformations that most commonly occurs in the head and neck. They are present at birth but are usually clinically asymptomatic until later in life. The pathogenesis of AVMs remains unclear and therapeutic approaches to AVMs are unsatisfied. In order to provide a tool for studying the pathogenesis and therapies of this disease, we established and studied a xenograft animal model of human AVMs. Methods Fresh human AVMs specimens harvested from 4 patients were sectioned (5x5x5 mm) and xenografted subcutaneously in 5 immunologically naïve nude mice (Athymic Nude-Foxn1nu). Each mouse had four pieces specimens in four quadrants along the back. The grafts were observed weekly for volume, color and texture. The grafts were harvested at every 30 days intervals for histologic examination. All grafts (n = 20) were sectioned and stained for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Comparative pathologic evaluation of the grafts and native AVMs were performed by two blinded pathologists. Immunohistochemical examination of human-specific nuclear antigen, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and Ki-67 was performed. Results Clinical characteristics and pathologic diagnosis of native human derived AVMs were confirmed. 85% (n = 17) of AVM xenografts survived although the sizes decreased after implantation. Histological examination demonstrated numerous small and medium-size vessels and revealed structural characteristics matching the native AVMs tissue.76.5% (n = 13) of the surviving xenografts were positive for Ki-67 and human-specific nuclear antigen suggesting survival of the human derived tissue, 52.9% (n = 9) were positive for VEGFR-2. Conclusions This preliminary xenograft animal model suggests that AVMs can survive in the nude mouse. The presence of human-specific nuclear antigen, VEGFR-2, and Ki-67 demonstrates the stability of native tissue qualities within the

  12. Aqueous Flow Measured by Fluorophotometry in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Toris, Carol B; Fan, Shan; Johnson, Thomas V; Camras, Lucinda J; Hays, Cassandra L; Liu, Hong; Ishimoto, Bruce M

    2016-07-01

    A fluorophotometer designed to measure aqueous flow in murine eyes was tested with artificial fluorescein chambers and in live mice with different anesthesia regimens, aqueous flow suppressants, and an anterior chamber cannulation method. Two hours following topical fluorescein application, one group of CD-1 mice was anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine, 2,2,2-tribromoethanol, or ketamine alone. Cornea and anterior chamber fluorescein concentrations were measured periodically for 60 to 90 minutes by fluorophotometric scans to calculate aqueous flow. Later, a subgroup of mice underwent aqueous flow measurement by anterior chamber cannulation. A third group was treated with timolol, dorzolamide, and vehicle in a crossover manner 1 hour prior to fluorophotometric scans. Aqueous flow with ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (0.09 ± 0.05 μL/min, mean ± SD, n = 24) was slower than with tribromoethanol or ketamine alone (P < 0.001). Timolol reduced aqueous flow from 0.20 ± 0.07 μL/min to 0.07 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.001) under tribromoethanol anesthesia and from 0.14 ± 0.03 μL/min to 0.10 ± 0.02 μL/min (P = 0.004) under ketamine anesthesia but not under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Dorzolamide reduced aqueous flow from 0.09 ± 0.03 to 0.06 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.04) under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Aqueous flow by anterior chamber cannulation (0.20 ± 0.13 μL/min) was greater (P = 0.05) than by fluorophotometry (0.09 ± 0.07 μL/min). A new noninvasive fluorophotometric method detected effects of general anesthesia and known aqueous suppressants on aqueous flow in mice. Aqueous flow measured by fluorophotometry was slower than by cannulation, and was technically easier with less variability. The mouse fluorophotometer is useful for repeated measurements of aqueous flow in the murine eye making crossover and longitudinal studies possible.

  13. Aqueous Flow Measured by Fluorophotometry in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Toris, Carol B.; Fan, Shan; Johnson, Thomas V.; Camras, Lucinda J.; Hays, Cassandra L.; Liu, Hong; Ishimoto, Bruce M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A fluorophotometer designed to measure aqueous flow in murine eyes was tested with artificial fluorescein chambers and in live mice with different anesthesia regimens, aqueous flow suppressants, and an anterior chamber cannulation method. Methods Two hours following topical fluorescein application, one group of CD-1 mice was anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine, 2,2,2-tribromoethanol, or ketamine alone. Cornea and anterior chamber fluorescein concentrations were measured periodically for 60 to 90 minutes by fluorophotometric scans to calculate aqueous flow. Later, a subgroup of mice underwent aqueous flow measurement by anterior chamber cannulation. A third group was treated with timolol, dorzolamide, and vehicle in a crossover manner 1 hour prior to fluorophotometric scans. Results Aqueous flow with ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (0.09 ± 0.05 μL/min, mean ± SD, n = 24) was slower than with tribromoethanol or ketamine alone (P < 0.001). Timolol reduced aqueous flow from 0.20 ± 0.07 μL/min to 0.07 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.001) under tribromoethanol anesthesia and from 0.14 ± 0.03 μL/min to 0.10 ± 0.02 μL/min (P = 0.004) under ketamine anesthesia but not under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Dorzolamide reduced aqueous flow from 0.09 ± 0.03 to 0.06 ± 0.03 μL/min (P = 0.04) under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Aqueous flow by anterior chamber cannulation (0.20 ± 0.13 μL/min) was greater (P = 0.05) than by fluorophotometry (0.09 ± 0.07 μL/min). Conclusions A new noninvasive fluorophotometric method detected effects of general anesthesia and known aqueous suppressants on aqueous flow in mice. Aqueous flow measured by fluorophotometry was slower than by cannulation, and was technically easier with less variability. The mouse fluorophotometer is useful for repeated measurements of aqueous flow in the murine eye making crossover and longitudinal studies possible. PMID:27447085

  14. Gene therapy for human nasopharyngeal carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated transfer of human p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Su-Ping; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hua; Wu, Bin; Han, Ying; Wang, Li-Sheng; Wu, Chu-Tse

    2008-10-01

    Incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains high in endemic regions. Prevention of tumor recurrences and metastases is a crucial approach to improve therapeutic outcome in NPC patients. In this study, we investigated the effects of the cotransfer of the tumor suppressor gene, p53, in combination with the immunostimulatory genes, GM-CSF and B7-1, on tumor regression and subsequent tumor recurrence. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus carrying human wild-type p53, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and B7-1 genes (Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1), which mediated high-level expression of these three genes in NPC CNE-1 cells. Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 infection inhibited the growth of CNE-1 cells and induced tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro. In CNE-1 xenograft tumor models in huPBL-nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, an intratumoral injection of Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 resulted in a reduced tumor burden, compared to normal saline (NS) and Ad-p53 controls. Tumors in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group displayed diffuse necrosis and infiltration of human T-cells. Further, the tumor occurrence of CNE-1 cell rechallenge largely decreased after the primary tumor was intratumorally injected with Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 in the HuPBL-NOD/SCID mice model. Only 2 of 8 (25%) animals in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group had developed measurable tumors, which demonstrated extensive necrosis and much more human T-cell infiltration, compared to 5 of 7 (71%) in the NS and Ad-p53 groups. Therefore, the adenovirus-mediated introduction of p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes could improve local control and prevent the recurrence or metastases of NPC tumors, which suggests a potential therapeutic value in NPC treatment.

  15. Zebrafish Xenograft: An Evolutionary Experiment in Tumour Biology.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Rachael A; Trieu, Nhu P V; Crawford, Bryan D

    2017-09-05

    Though the cancer research community has used mouse xenografts for decades more than zebrafish xenografts, zebrafish have much to offer: they are cheap, easy to work with, and the embryonic model is relatively easy to use in high-throughput assays. Zebrafish can be imaged live, allowing us to observe cellular and molecular processes in vivo in real time. Opponents dismiss the zebrafish model due to the evolutionary distance between zebrafish and humans, as compared to mice, but proponents argue for the zebrafish xenograft's superiority to cell culture systems and its advantages in imaging. This review places the zebrafish xenograft in the context of current views on cancer and gives an overview of how several aspects of this evolutionary disease can be addressed in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish are missing homologs of some human proteins and (of particular interest) several members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases, which are known for their importance in tumour biology. This review draws attention to the implicit evolutionary experiment taking place when the molecular ecology of the xenograft host is significantly different than that of the donor.

  16. Xenograft model for therapeutic drug testing in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin A; Akpeng, Belinda; Pai, Sara I; Best, Simon R A

    2015-02-01

    Identifying effective treatment for papillomatosis is limited by a lack of animal models, and there is currently no preclinical model for testing potential therapeutic agents. We hypothesized that xenografting of papilloma may facilitate in vivo drug testing to identify novel treatment options. A biopsy of fresh tracheal papilloma was xenografted into a NOD-scid-IL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) mouse. The xenograft began growing after 5 weeks and was serially passaged over multiple generations. Each generation showed a consistent log-growth pattern, and in all xenografts, the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that the squamous architecture of the original papilloma was maintained in each generation. In vivo drug testing with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly for 3 weeks) showed a dramatic therapeutic response compared to saline control. We report here the first successful case of serial xenografting of a tracheal papilloma in vivo with a therapeutic response observed with drug testing. In severely immunocompromised mice, the HPV genome and squamous differentiation of the papilloma can be maintained for multiple generations. This is a feasible approach to identify therapeutic agents in the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. In vivo bioluminescence imaging using orthotopic xenografts towards patient's derived-xenograft Medulloblastoma models.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Ferrucci, Veronica; DE Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar neoplasia of the central nervous system. Four molecular subgrups have been identified (MBWNT, MBSHH, MBgroup3 and MBgroup4) with distinct genetics and clinical outcome. Among these, MBgroup3-4 are highly metastatic with the worst prognosis. The current standard therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Thus, specific treatments adapted to cure those different molecular subgroups are needed. The use of orthotopic xenograft models, together with the non-invasive in vivo biolumiscence imaging (BLI) technology, is emerging during preclinical studies to test novel therapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. Orthotopic MB xenografts were performed by injection of Daoy-luc cells, that had been previously infected with lentiviral particles to stably express luciferase gene, into the fourth right ventricle of the cerebellum of ten nude mice. For the implantation, specific stereotactic coordinates were used. Seven days after the implantation the mice were imaged by acquisitions of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using IVIS 3D Illumina Imaging System (Xenogen). Tumor growth was evaluated by quantifying the bioluminescence signals using the integrated fluxes of photons within each area of interest using the Living Images Software Package 3.2 (Xenogen-Perkin Elmer). Finally, histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumorigenic cells into the cerebellum of the mice. We describe a method to use the in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) showing the potential to be used to investigate the potential antitumorigenic effects of a drug for in vivo medulloblastoma treatment. We also discuss other studies in which this technology has been applied to obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of medulloblastoma using orthotopic xenograft mouse models. There is a need to develop patient's derived-xenograft (PDX) model systems to test novel drugs for medulloblastoma treatment within each molecular sub

  18. Differential effects of human interferon alpha and interferon gamma on xenografted human thyroid tissue in severe combined immunodeficient mice and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Enomoto, T; Fornasier, V; Resetkova, E; Volpé, R

    1997-03-01

    We have studied the in vivo effects of human interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) administration on human thyroid tissue xenografted into two mouse strains: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and nude mice. Human lymphocytes survive in SCID mice but are lysed in nude mice. Thyroid tissues from Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or paranodular [normal, (N)] tissue was xenografted into SCID mice (0.8 g/mouse) pretreated with anti-asialo GM-1 antiserum and radiation and also into nude mice. One week after xenografting, SCID and nude mice were divided into three groups. Group A was treated with IFN-alpha intraperitoneally (2,000 units/mouse) three times weekly; group B was treated with IFN-gamma similarly; group C was treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only (control). Autologous human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were added to mice receiving N xenografts. Blood was taken every 2 weeks for levels of IgG and thyroid antibodies (TAb). After 6 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed, and xenograft thyrocyte histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression were measured. In addition, thyrocyte cultures were stimulated in vitro with 200 units/ml of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma or PBS (control). SCID mice xenografted with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in group A showed a significantly higher TAb production than group C, whereas in group B, TAb production was not statistically increased compared to control (group C). SCID mice xenografted with N did not produce TAb in any group, nor did nude mice xenografted with AITD. Thyrocyte HLA-DR expression was markedly increased in group A and B in SCID mice xenografted with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and N tissue compared to group C. In contrast, only group B (IFN-gamma) showed an increase in thyrocyte HLA-DR in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, only IFN-gamma (not IFN-alpha) stimulated

  19. HS-1793, a resveratrol analogue, downregulates the expression of hypoxia-induced HIF-1 and VEGF and inhibits tumor growth of human breast cancer cells in a nude mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Sung, Bokyung; Kim, Jin-Ah; Kang, Yong Jung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Hwang, Na-Lam; Suh, Hongsuk; Choi, Yung Hyun; Im, Eunok; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2017-08-01

    A synthetic analogue of resveratrol, 4-(6-hydroxy-2-naphtyl)-1,3-benzenediol (HS-1793), with improved photosensitivity and stability profiles, has been recently reported to exert anticancer activity on various cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism of action and in vivo efficacy of HS-1793 in breast cancer cells have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of HS-1793 on hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which drives angiogenesis and the growth of solid tumors, in addition to the in vivo therapeutic effects of HS-1793 on breast cancer cells. HS-1793 was found to inhibit hypoxia (1.0% oxygen)-induced HIF-1α expression at the protein level, and its inhibitory effect was more potent than that of resveratrol in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, HS-1793 reduced the secretion and mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a key mediator of HIF-1-driven angiogenesis, without affecting cell viability. To evaluate the anticancer effects of HS-1793 in vivo, triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts were established in nude mice. HS-1793 significantly suppressed the growth of breast cancer tumor xenografts, without any apparent toxicity. Additionally, decreases in Ki-67, a proliferation index marker, and CD31, a biomarker of microvessel density, were observed in the tumor tissue. Expression of HIF-1 and VEGF was also downregulated in xenograft tumors treated with HS-1793. These in vivo results reinforce the improved anticancer activity of HS-1793 when compared with that of resveratrol. Overall, the present study suggests that the synthetic resveratrol analogue HS-1793 is a potent antitumor agent that inhibits tumor growth via the regulation of HIF-1, and demonstrates significant therapeutic potential for solid cancers.

  20. Nicotine Promotes Cholangiocarcinoma Growth in Xenograft Mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Allyson K; Jensen, Kendal; Hall, Chad; O'Brien, April; Ehrlich, Laurent; White, Tori; Meng, Fanyin; Zhou, Tianhao; Greene, John; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Invernizzi, Pietro; Dostal, David E; Lairmore, Terry; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S

    2017-05-01

    Nicotine, the main addictive substance in tobacco, is known to play a role in the development and/or progression of a number of malignant tumors. However, nicotine's involvement in the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma is controversial. Therefore, we studied the effects of nicotine on the growth of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro and the progression of cholangiocarcinoma in a mouse xenograft model. The predominant subunit responsible for nicotine-mediated proliferation in normal and cancer cells, the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), was more highly expressed in human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines compared with normal human cholangiocytes. Nicotine also stimulated the proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and promoted α7-nAChR-dependent activation of proliferation and phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase in Mz-ChA-1 cells. In addition, nicotine and PNU282987 (α7-nAChR agonist) accelerated the growth of the cholangiocarcinoma tumors in our xenograft mouse model and increased fibrosis, proliferation of the tumor cells, and phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase activation. Finally, α7-nAChR was expressed at significantly higher levels in human cholangiocarcinoma compared with normal human control liver samples. Taken together, results of this study suggest that nicotine acts through α7-nAChR and plays a novel role in the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma. Furthermore, nicotine may act as a mitogen in cholestatic liver disease processes, thereby facilitating malignant transformation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiosensitizing effect of misonidazole in acute and fractionated irradiation of a human osteosarcoma xenograft. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.; Brustad, T.

    1980-09-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of misonidazole (Ro-07-0582) in acute and fractionated irradiation of a human osteosarcoma grown in the athymic mutant nude mouse was studied. Tumor regrowth delay was used as a measure of response. The enhancement ratio of misonidazole was found to be 1.45 for an actue dose of 12.50 Gy and 1.25 for four fractions of 3.75 Gy, delivered over four consecutive days. It is concluded that the present osteosarcoma xenograft reoxygenated inadequately during the three day period which elapsed from the first to the fourth fraction of 3.75 Gy.

  2. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells and suppresses PC-3 solid tumor growth in a tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mui Li; Fung, Shin Yee; Chung, Ivy; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Cheah, Swee Hung; Tan, Nget Hong

    2014-01-01

    King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom L-amino acid oxidase (OH-LAAO), a heat stable enzyme, has been shown to exhibit very potent anti-proliferative activity against human breast and lung tumorigenic cells but not in their non-tumorigenic counterparts. We further examine its in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity in a human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) model. OH-LAAO demonstrated potent cytotoxicity against PC-3 cells with IC50 of 0.05 µg/mL after 72 h incubation in vitro. It induced apoptosis as evidenced with an increase in caspase-3/7 cleavages and an increase in annexin V-stained cells. To examine its in vivo anti-tumor activity, we treated PC-3 tumor xenograft implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient NU/NU (nude) mice with 1 µg/g OH-LAAO given intraperitoneally (i.p.). After 8 weeks of treatment, OH-LAAO treated PC-3 tumors were markedly inhibited, when compared to the control group (P <0.05). TUNEL staining analysis on the tumor sections showed a significantly increase of apoptotic cells in the LAAO-treated animals. Histological examinations of the vital organs in these two groups showed no significant differences with normal tissues, indicating no obvious tissue damage. The treatment also did not cause any significant changes on the body weight of the mice during the duration of the study. These observations suggest that OH-LAAO cytotoxic effects may be specific to tumor xenografts and less to normal organs. Given its potent anti-tumor activities shown in vitro as well as in vivo, the king cobra venom LAAO can potentially be developed to treat prostate cancer and other solid tumors.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of the anti-tumor effects of the natural isoflavone genistein in two xenograft mouse models monitored by [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab small animal PET

    PubMed Central

    Honndorf, Valerie S.; Wiehr, Stefan; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schmitt, Julia; Kreft, Luisa; Quintanilla-Martinez, Letitia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Reischl, Gerald; Maurer, Andreas; Boldt, Karsten; Schwarz, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Pichler, Bernd J.

    2016-01-01

    The natural phytoestrogen genistein is known as protein kinase inhibitor and tumor suppressor in various types of cancers. We studied its antitumor effect in two different xenograft models using positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo combined with ex vivo histology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic fingerprinting. Procedures A431 and Colo205 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle or genistein (500 mg/kg/d) over a period of 12 days. Imaging was performed with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F] FLT). In a second study A431 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle, genistein (500 mg/kg/d), cetuximab (1mg/3d) or a combination of the compounds and imaged using [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab. Data were compared to histology and principal components analysis (PCA) of NMR fingerprinting data. Results Genistein reduced tumor growth significantly in both xenografts. [18F] FLT uptake was consistent in both models and corresponded to histological findings and also PCA whereas [18F]FDG and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab were not suitable for therapy monitoring. Conclusions As mono-therapy the natural isoflavone genistein has a powerful therapeutic effect in vivo on A431 and Colo205 tumors. [18F]FLT has superior consistency compared to the other tested tracers in therapy monitoring, while the treatment effect could be shown on the molecular level by histology and metabolic fingerprinting. PMID:27070087

  4. Targeting and therapy of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Edwards, J.A.; Kopher, K.A.; Wanek, P.M.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Klein, J.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. IIIIn-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCi of tumor activity/g/100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of 100 microCi radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate the deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The dose found in normal organs is less than 20% of that in the tumor, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, demonstrates positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 and ZME018, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters. Average absorbed doses of 3770 +/- 445 (SEM) and 645 +/- 48 cGy in tumor, 353 +/- 41 and 222 +/- 13 cGy in a contralateral control i.m. site, 980 +/- 127 and 651 +/- 63 cGy in liver, and 275 +/- 14 and 256 +/- 18 cGy in total body were observed 7 days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 and ZME018, respectively. Calculations of absorbed dose by the medical internal radiation dose method confirmed thermoluminescent dosimeter absorbed dose measurements.

  5. Quercetin Aglycone Is Bioavailable in Murine Pancreas and Pancreatic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifeng; Angst, Eliane; Park, Jenny L.; Moro, Aune; Dawson, David W.; Reber, Howard A.; Eibl, Guido; Hines, O. Joe; Go, Vay-Liang W.; Lu, Qing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Quercetin is a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic and other cancers. This study was to examine the distribution of quercetin in plasma, lung, liver, pancreas and pancreatic cancer xenografts in a murine in vivo model and the uptake of quercetin in pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells in cellular in vitro model. Mice were randomly allocated to control diet, 0.2 and 1% quercetin diet groups utilizing the AIN93G-based diet (n=12 per group) for 6 weeks. In addition, 6 mice from each group were injected weekly with chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine (120 mg/kg mouse, i.p.). MiaPaCa cells were collected from culture medium after cells were exposed to 30 µM of quercetin for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hrs. Levels of quercetin and 3-O’-methyl-quercetin in mice tissues and MiaPaCa-2 cells were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography following enzymatic hydrolysis and then extraction. Our study showed that quercetin is accumulated in pancreatic cancer cells, and is absorbed in the circulating system, tumors and tissues of pancreas, liver and lung in vivo. A higher proportion of total quercetin found in tumors and pancreas are aglycones. Gemcitabine co-treatment with quercetin reduced absorption of quercetin in mice circulatory system and liver. Results from the study provide important information on the interpretation of chemo-therapeutic efficacy of quercetin. PMID:20499918

  6. Measuring Complexity of Mouse Brain Morphological Changes Using GeoEntropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-fiqi, Heba Z.; Pham, Tuan D.; Hattori, Haroldo T.; Crane, Denis I.

    2010-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on research into human neurodegenerative diseases, an effective computing approach for the analysis of complex brain morphological changes would represent a significant technological innovation. The availability of mouse models of such disorders provides an experimental system to test novel approaches to brain image analysis. Here we utilize a mouse model of a neurodegenerative disorder to model changes to cerebellar morphology during the postnatal period, and have applied the GeoEntropy algorithm to measure the complexity of morphological changes.

  7. Small-sample inference for incomplete longitudinal data with truncation and censoring in tumor xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming; Fang, Hong-Bin; Tian, Guo-Liang; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    In cancer drug development, demonstrating activity in xenograft models, where mice are grafted with human cancer cells, is an important step in bringing a promising compound to humans. A key outcome variable is the tumor volume measured in a given period of time for groups of mice given different doses of a single or combination anticancer regimen. However, a mouse may die before the end of a study or may be sacrificed when its tumor volume quadruples, and its tumor may be suppressed for some time and then grow back. Thus, incomplete repeated measurements arise. The incompleteness or missingness is also caused by drastic tumor shrinkage (<0.01 cm3) or random truncation. Because of the small sample sizes in these models, asymptotic inferences are usually not appropriate. We propose two parametric test procedures based on the EM algorithm and the Bayesian method to compare treatment effects among different groups while accounting for informative censoring. A real xenograft study on a new antitumor agent, temozolomide, combined with irinotecan is analyzed using the proposed methods.

  8. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  9. Casticin Induced Apoptosis in A375.S2 Human Melanoma Cells through the Inhibition of NF-[Formula: see text]B and Mitochondria-Dependent Pathways In Vitro and Inhibited Human Melanoma Xenografts in a Mouse Model In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Yin-Wen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jing-Pin; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yu, Chien-Chih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Ho, Heng-Chien; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-01-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone occurring in natural plants, has been shown to have anticancer activities. In the present study, we aims to investigate the anti-skin cancer activity of casticin on melanoma cells in vitro and the antitumor effect of casticin on human melanoma xenografts in nu/nu mice in vivo. A flow cytometric assay was performed to detect expression of viable cells, cell cycles, reactive oxygen species production, levels of [Formula: see text] and caspase activity. A Western blotting assay and confocal laser microscope examination were performed to detect expression of protein levels. In the in vitro studies, we found that casticin induced morphological cell changes and DNA condensation and damage, decreased the total viable cells, and induced G2/M phase arrest. Casticin promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreased the level of [Formula: see text], and promoted caspase-3 activities in A375.S2 cells. The induced G2/M phase arrest indicated by the Western blotting assay showed that casticin promoted the expression of p53, p21 and CHK-1 proteins and inhibited the protein levels of Cdc25c, CDK-1, Cyclin A and B. The casticin-induced apoptosis indicated that casticin promoted pro-apoptotic proteins but inhibited anti-apoptotic proteins. These findings also were confirmed by the fact that casticin promoted the release of AIF and Endo G from mitochondria to cytosol. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) assay showed that casticin inhibited the NF-[Formula: see text]B binding DNA and that these effects were time-dependent. In the in vivo studies, results from immuno-deficient nu/nu mice bearing the A375.S2 tumor xenograft indicated that casticin significantly suppressed tumor growth based on tumor size and weight decreases. Early G2/M arrest and mitochondria-dependent signaling contributed to the apoptotic A375.S2 cell demise induced by casticin. In in vivo experiments, A375.S2 also efficaciously suppressed tumor volume in a

  10. Xenograft Model for Identifying Chemotherapeutic Agents against Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pawellek, A.; Hewlett, G.; Kreuter, J.; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H.; Weber, O.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the establishment and characterization of a mouse xenograft transplantation model for the study of papillomavirus infection of bovine skin. Calf scrotal skin was inoculated with bovine papillomavirus type 2 before grafting it to the dorsum of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The grafted skin contained epidermis, dermis, and a thin layer of fat. After 5 months the induced warts not only showed histological features of papillomavirus infections but also tested positive for viral DNA and papillomavirus capsid antigen. The formation of infectious virions was demonstrated by inoculation of new transplants with crude extract from the induced warts as well as in a cell culture focus assay. Topical application of bromovinyl-2′-deoxyuridine led to a reduction in viral DNA content in the developing wart. This small-animal xenograft model should be useful for characterizing antiviral compounds and providing an understanding of the regulation of papillomavirus infections. PMID:11257010

  11. Complex formation between human prostate-specific antigen and protease inhibitors in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Hekim, Can; Riipi, Tero; Zhu, Lei; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    When secreted from the prostate, most of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is free and enzymatically active. Upon reaching circulation, active PSA is inactivated by complex formation with protease inhibitors. To justify the use of mouse models for evaluation of the function of PSA and for studies on therapeutic modalities based on modulation of PSA activity, it is important to know whether PSA complexation is similar in mouse and man. To characterize the circulating forms of PSA in mouse, we used subcutaneous LNCaP and 22RV1 human prostate cancer cell xenograft tumor models. We also added PSA directly to mouse serum. Free and total PSA were measured by immunoassay, and PSA complexes were extracted by immunopurification followed by SDS-PAGE, in-gel trypsin digestion and identification of signature peptides by mass spectrometry. In mice bearing xenograft tumors, 68% of the immunoreactive PSA occurred in complex, and when added to mouse serum, over 70% of PSA forms complexes that comprises alpha(2)-macroglobulin and members of the alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) family. In mouse plasma, PSA forms complexes similar to those in man, but the major immunoreactive complex contains AAT rather than alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, which is the main complex forming serpin in man. The complex formation of PSA produced by xenograft tumor models in mice is similar to that of human prostate tumors with respect to the complexation of PSA. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with anti-angiogenesis therapy on a pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) and cell line mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Maawy, Ali; Miwa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Mako; Yano, Shuya; Sato, Sho; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R treatment following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy on VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer. A pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) that was VEGF-positive and an orthotopic VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer cell line (MiaPaCa-2-GFP) as well as a VEGF-negative cell line (Panc-1) were tested. Nude mice with these tumors were treated with gemcitabine (GEM), bevacizumab (BEV), and S. typhimurium A1-R. BEV/GEM followed by S. typhimurium A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight compared to BEV/GEM treatment alone in the PDOX and MiaPaCa-2 models. Neither treatment was as effective in the VEGF-negative model as in the VEGF-positive models. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium A1-R following anti-angiogenic therapy is effective on pancreatic cancer including the PDOX model, suggesting its clinical potential.

  13. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H(2)S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H(2)S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC(50)s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G(0)/G(1) cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  14. Efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with anti-angiogenesis therapy on a pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) and cell line mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Maawy, Ali; Miwa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Mako; Yano, Shuya; Sato, Sho; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R treatment following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy on VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer. A pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) that was VEGF-positive and an orthotopic VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer cell line (MiaPaCa-2-GFP) as well as a VEGF-negative cell line (Panc-1) were tested. Nude mice with these tumors were treated with gemcitabine (GEM), bevacizumab (BEV), and S. typhimurium A1-R. BEV/GEM followed by S. typhimurium A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight compared to BEV/GEM treatment alone in the PDOX and MiaPaCa-2 models. Neither treatment was as effective in the VEGF-negative model as in the VEGF-positive models. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium A1-R following anti-angiogenic therapy is effective on pancreatic cancer including the PDOX model, suggesting its clinical potential. PMID:25402324

  15. Measuring the lung function in the mouse: the challenge of size

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Charles G; Bates, Jason HT

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of the effects of drugs, mediators and infectious agents on various models of lung disease, as well as assessment of lung function in the intact mouse has the potential for significantly advancing our knowledge of lung disease. However, the small size of the mouse presents significant challenges for the assessment of lung function. Because of compromises made between precision and noninvasiveness, data obtained may have an uncertain bearing on the mechanical response of the lung. Nevertheless, considerable recent progress has been made in developing valid and useful measures of mouse lung function. These advances, resulting in our current ability to measure sophisticated indices of lung function in laboratory animals, are likely to lead to important insights into the mechanisms of lung disease. PMID:12783622

  16. Gonadal status of male recipient mice influences germ cell development in immature buffalo testis tissue xenograft.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Niranjan; Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Thathi, Revanth; Suman, Sanjay Kumar; Jose, Jedy; Goel, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Growth and development of immature testis xenograft from various domestic mammals has been shown in mouse recipients; however, buffalo testis xenografts have not been reported to date. In this study, small fragments of testis tissue from 8-week-old buffalo calves were implanted subcutaneously onto the back of immunodeficient male mouse recipients, which were either castrated or left intact (non-castrated). The xenografts were retrieved and analyzed 12 and 24 weeks later. The grafted tissue survived and grew in both types of recipient with a significant increase in weight and seminiferous tubule diameter. Recovery of grafts from intact recipients 24 weeks post-grafting was significantly lower than that from the castrated recipients. Seminal vesicle indices and serum testosterone levels were lower in castrated recipients at both collection time points in comparison to the intact recipients and non-grafted intact mouse controls. Pachytene spermatocytes were the most advanced germ cells observed in grafts recovered from castrated recipients 24 weeks post-grafting. Complete spermatogenesis, as indicated by the presence of elongated spermatids, was present only in grafts from intact recipients collected 24 weeks post-grafting. However, significant number of germ cells with DNA damage was also detected in these grafts as indicated by TUNEL assay. The complete germ cell differentiation in xenografts from intact recipients may be attributed to efficient Sertoli cell maturation. These results suggest that germ cell differentiation in buffalo testis xenograft can be completed by altering the recipient gonadal status.

  17. Matrigel alters the pathophysiology of orthotopic human breast adenocarcinoma xenografts with implications for nanomedicine evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shuhendler, Adam J; Prasad, Preethy; Cai, Ping; Hui, Kelvin K W; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Rauth, Andrew M; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2013-08-01

    Matrigel, a mouse sarcoma-derived basement membrane protein mixture, is frequently used to facilitate human tumor xenograft growth in rodents. Despite its known effects on tumor growth and metastasis, its impact on tumor pathophysiology and preclinical evaluation of nanomedicines in tumor xenografts has not been reported previously. Herein bilateral MDA435 tumors were established orthotopically with (Mat+) or without (Mat-) co-injection of Matrigel. Tumor perfusion, morphology and nanoparticle retention were evaluated. As compared to Mat- tumors, Mat+tumors exhibited enhanced vascular perfusion and lymphatic flow, greater blood vessel and lymphatic growth within the tumor core, and more deformation and collapse of lymphatics in tumor-associated lymph nodes. These changes were accompanied by reduced nanoparticle retention in Mat+tumors. The results suggest that Matrigel is not a passive medium for tumor growth, but rather significantly alters long-term tumor architecture. These findings have significant implications for the evaluation of therapeutic nanomedicine in xenograft mouse models. Matrigel is utilized in facilitating human tumor xenograft growth in rodents. The authors demonstrate that Matrigel is not a passive medium for tumor growth; instead it significantly alters long-term tumor architecture, with major implications in the evaluation of therapeutic nanomedicine in xenograft mouse models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Computerized mouse pupil size measurement for pupillary light reflex analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Tan, Jinglu; Zhang, Keqing; Lei, Bo

    2008-06-01

    Accurate measurement of pupil size is essential for pupillary light reflex (PLR) analysis in clinical diagnosis and vision research. Low pupil-iris contrast, corneal reflection, artifacts and noises in infrared eye imaging pose challenges for automated pupil detection and measurement. This paper describes a computerized method for pupil detection or identification. After segmentation by a region-growing algorithm, pupils are detected by an iterative randomized Hough transform (IRHT) with an elliptical model. The IRHT iteratively suppresses the effects of extraneous structures and noise, yielding reliable measurements. Experimental results with 72 images showed a mean absolute difference of 3.84% between computerized and manual measurements. The inter-run variation for the computerized method (1.24%) was much smaller than the inter-observer variation for the manual method (7.45%), suggesting a higher level of consistency of the former. The computerized method could facilitate PLR analysis and other non-invasive functional tests that require pupil size measurements.

  19. Metastatic recurrence in a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse model is inhibited by neoadjuvant chemotherapy in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery with an anti-CA 19-9-conjugated fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Katz, Matthew H G; Fleming, Jason B; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with gemcitabine (GEM) in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) on a pancreatic cancer patient derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. A PDOX model was established from a CA19-9-positive, CEA-negative tumor from a patient who had undergone a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Mice were randomized to 4 groups: bright light surgery (BLS) only; BLS+NAC; FGS only; and FGS+NAC. An anti-CA19-9 or anti-CEA antibody conjugated to DyLight 650 was administered intravenously via the tail vein of mice with the pancreatic cancer PDOX 24 hours before surgery. The PDOX was brightly labeled with fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9, but not with a fluorophore-conjugated anti-CEA antibody. FGS was performed using the fluorophore-conjugated anti-CA19-9 antibody. FGS had no benefit over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. NAC in combination with BLS did not convey an advantage over BLS to prevent metastatic recurrence. However, FGS+NAC significantly reduced the metastatic recurrence frequency to one of 8 mice, compared to FGS only after which metastasis recurred in 6 out of 8 mice, and BLS+NAC with metastatic recurrence in 7 out of 8 mice (p = 0.041). Thus NAC in combination with FGS can reduce or even eliminate metastatic recurrence of pancreatic cancer sensitive to NAC. The present study further emphasizes the power of the PDOX model which enables metastasis to occur and thereby identify the efficacy of NAC in combination with FGS on metastatic recurrence.

  20. Intra-arterial administration of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R regresses a cisplatin-resistant relapsed osteosarcoma in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; Murakami, Takashi; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Miyake, Kentaro; Nelson, Scott D; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; Yanagawa, Jane; Russell, Tara A; Singh, Arun S; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Miwa, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-06-18

    Previously, a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model was established with a lung metastasis from an osteosarcoma patient which developed after adjuvant cisplatinum (CDDP) treatment. In this model, we previously demonstrated the efficacy of trabectedin (TRAB) and temozolomide (TEM) compared with CDDP. In the present report, osteosarcoma tissue was implanted orthotopically in the distal femur of mice which were randomized into the following groups when tumor volume reached approximately 100 mm(3); On day 14 after initiation of treatment, all but CDDP significantly inhibited tumor volume growth compared with untreated controls. Control (G1): 793.7 ± 215.0 mm(3); CDDP (G2): 588.1 ± 176.9 mm(3); Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) intravenous (i.v.) (G3): 269.7 ± 72.7 mm(3); S. typhimurium A1-R intra-arterial (i.a.) (G4): 70.2 ± 18.9 mm(3) (CDDP: p = 0.056; S. typhimurium A1-R i.v.: p = 0.0001; S. typhimurium A1-R i.a.: p = 0.00003, all vs. untreated controls). i.a. administration of S. typhimurium A1-R was significantly more effective than either CDDP (p = 0.00007), or i.v. administration of S. typhimurium A1-R (p = 0.00007) and significantly regressed the tumor volume compared with day 0 (p = 0.001). The new model of i.a. administration of S. typhimurium A1-R has great promise for the treatment of recalcitrant osteosarcoma.

  1. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L.; Oldknow, Karla J.; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1−/− and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1−/−). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality. PMID:25280470

  2. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L; Oldknow, Karla J; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-12-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1(-/-) and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1(-/-)). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality.

  3. Measurement of local cerebral blood flow with (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, T.M.; Lucignani, G.; Crane, A.M.; Jehle, J.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-02-01

    Local cerebral blood flow was measured in the mouse by means of the (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine method. This method has been previously used in the monkey, dog, cat, and rat, but its application to small mammals such as the mouse requires special attention to potential sources of error. The small size of the mouse brain requires special attention to the rapid removal and freezing of the brain to minimize effects of postmortem diffusion of tracer in the tissue. Because of the relatively low diameter/length ratios of the catheters needed for arterial sampling in small animals, substantial errors can occur in the determination of the time course of the (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine concentration in the arterial blood unless corrections for lag time and dead space washout in the catheter are properly applied. Local cerebral blood flow was measured in seven awake mice with appropriate care to minimize these sources of error. The values were found to vary from 48 ml/100 g/min in the corpus callosum to 198 ml/100 g/min in the inferior colliculus. The results demonstrate that the (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine method can be used to measure local cerebral blood flow in the mouse and that the values in that species are, in general, somewhat higher than those in the rat.

  4. Integrated Bottom-Up and Top-Down Proteomics of Patient-Derived Breast Tumor Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ntai, Ioanna; LeDuc, Richard D; Fellers, Ryan T; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Davies, Sherri R; Rumsey, Jeanne; Early, Bryan P; Thomas, Paul M; Li, Shunqiang; Compton, Philip D; Ellis, Matthew J C; Ruggles, Kelly V; Fenyö, David; Boja, Emily S; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, R Reid; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-01-01

    Bottom-up proteomics relies on the use of proteases and is the method of choice for identifying thousands of protein groups in complex samples. Top-down proteomics has been shown to be robust for direct analysis of small proteins and offers a solution to the "peptide-to-protein" inference problem inherent with bottom-up approaches. Here, we describe the first large-scale integration of genomic, bottom-up and top-down proteomic data for the comparative analysis of patient-derived mouse xenograft models of basal and luminal B human breast cancer, WHIM2 and WHIM16, respectively. Using these well-characterized xenograft models established by the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, we compared and contrasted the performance of bottom-up and top-down proteomics to detect cancer-specific aberrations at the peptide and proteoform levels and to measure differential expression of proteins and proteoforms. Bottom-up proteomic analysis of the tumor xenografts detected almost 10 times as many coding nucleotide polymorphisms and peptides resulting from novel splice junctions than top-down. For proteins in the range of 0-30 kDa, where quantitation was performed using both approaches, bottom-up proteomics quantified 3,519 protein groups from 49,185 peptides, while top-down proteomics quantified 982 proteoforms mapping to 358 proteins. Examples of both concordant and discordant quantitation were found in a ∼60:40 ratio, providing a unique opportunity for top-down to fill in missing information. The two techniques showed complementary performance, with bottom-up yielding eight times more identifications of 0-30 kDa proteins in xenograft proteomes, but failing to detect differences in certain posttranslational modifications (PTMs), such as phosphorylation pattern changes of alpha-endosulfine. This work illustrates the potency of a combined bottom-up and top-down proteomics approach to deepen our knowledge of cancer biology, especially when

  5. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of ARQ 501 (beta-lapachone) in plasma and tumors from nu/nu mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Savage, R E; Hall, T; Bresciano, K; Bailey, J; Starace, M; Chan, T C K

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive and specific LC-MS/MS method employing positive electrospray ionization for the determination of ARQ 501 (beta-lapachone) in (nu/nu) mouse plasma and tumor tissue is described. Samples were processed using protein precipitation with acetonitrile. A d6 analog of ARQ 501 was used as the internal standard (IS). The analytes were separated using a Zorbax SB8 column (30 mm x 2.1 mm i.d. 5 microm particle size) and analyzed in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using mass transitions of 243>159 and 249>159 m/z for ARQ 501 and d6-ARQ 501, respectively. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) for ARQ 501 was 3.0 ng/mL. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 3.0-2000 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient better than 0.99. Intra- and inter-batch precisions were within 8.4% for plasma and 11.8% for tumor samples. Accuracy expressed as percentage relative error (%R.E.) ranged from -9.0 to 7.7 for both plasma and tumor samples. Recovery was between 106 and 113% for both ARQ 501 and its d6 analog. Plasma pharmacokinetic data of ARQ 501 in mouse from intraperitoneal (IP) dosing at 60 mg/kg obtained using this validated method is presented along with tumor concentration data. The C(max), AUC(0-infinity), t(1/2), Cl/F, and V(d)/F were determined to be 4016 ng/mL, 4392 h ng/mL, 3.9 h, 13.7 L/h/kg, and 76.5 L/kg, respectively. Tumor tissue concentrations were in the range 1-2 microM for approximately 2 h post-dose.

  6. CAPACITANCE MEASUREMENTS OF REGULATED EXOCYTOSIS IN MOUSE TASTE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Zorec, Robert; Kinnamon, Sue C.

    2010-01-01

    Exocytosis, consisting of the merger of vesicle and plasma membrane, is a common mechanism used by different types of nucleated cells to release their vesicular contents. Taste cells possess vesicles containing various neurotransmitters to communicate with adjacent taste cells and afferent nerve fibers. However, whether these vesicles engage in exocytosis upon a stimulus is not known. Since vesicle membrane merger with the plasma membrane is reflected in plasma membrane area fluctuations, we measured membrane capacitance (Cm), a parameter linearly related to membrane surface area. To investigate whether taste cells undergo regulated exocytosis, we used the compensated tight-seal whole-cell recording technique to monitor depolarization-induced changes in Cm in the different types of taste cells. To identify taste cell types, mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the TRPM5 promoter or from the GAD67 promoter were used to discriminate Type II and Type III taste cells, respectively. Moreover, the cell types were also identified by monitoring their voltage-current properties. The results demonstrate that only Type III taste cells show significant depolarization-induced increases in Cm, which were correlated to the voltage-activated calcium currents. The results suggest that Type III, but neither Type II nor Type I cells exhibit depolarization-induced regulated exocytosis to release transmitter and activate gustatory afferent nerve fibers. PMID:21048127

  7. Non-contact measurement of linear external dimensions of the mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Wisard, Jeffrey; Chrenek, Micah A.; Wright, Charles; Dalal, Nupur; Pardue, Machelle T.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Biometric analyses of quantitative traits in eyes of mice can reveal abnormalities related to refractive or ocular development. Due to the small size of the mouse eye, highly accurate and precise measurements are needed to detect meaningful differences. We sought a non-contact measuring technique to obtain highly accurate and precise linear dimensions of the mouse eye. Laser micrometry was validated with gauge block standards. Simple procedures to measure eye dimensions on three axes were devised. Mouse eyes from C57BL/6J and rd10 on a C57BL/6J background were dissected and extraocular muscle and fat removed. External eye dimensions of axial length (anterior-posterior (A-P) axis) and equatorial diameter (superior-inferior (S-I) and nasal-temporal (N-T) axes) were obtained with a laser micrometer. Several approaches to prevent or ameliorate evaporation due to room air were employed. The resolution of the laser micrometer was less than 0.77 microns, and it provided accurate and precise non-contact measurements of eye dimensions on three axes. External dimensions of the eye strongly correlated with eye weight. The N-T and S-I dimensions of the eye correlated with each other most closely from among the 28 pair-wise combinations of the several parameters that were collected. The equatorial axis measurements correlated well from the right and left eye of each mouse. The A-P measurements did not correlate or correlated poorly in each pair of eyes. The instrument is well suited for the measurement of enucleated eyes and other structures from most commonly used species in experimental vision research and ophthalmology. PMID:20067806

  8. Xenografting of testis tissue from bison calf donors into recipient mice as a strategy for salvaging genetic material.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Sepideh; Honaramooz, Ali

    2011-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate the long-term outcome of testis tissue xenografting from neonatal bison calves as a model for closely related rare or endangered ungulates. Testis tissue was collected postmortem from two newborn bison calves (Bison bison bison) and small fragments of the tissue were grafted under the back skin of immunodeficient recipient mice (n = 15 mice; eight fragments/mouse). Single xenograft samples were removed from representative recipient mice every 2 mo after grafting (for up to 16 mo). The retrieved xenografts were evaluated for seminiferous tubular density, tubular diameter, seminiferous tubular morphology, and identification of the most advanced germ cell type. Overall, 69% of the grafted testis fragments were recovered as xenografts. Xenografts weight increased (P < 0.02) approximately four-fold by 2 mo and 10-fold by 16 mo post-grafting. In testis xenografts, gradual maturational changes were evident, manifested as the first detection of the following at the times specified: seminiferous tubule expansion, 2 mo; spermatocytes, 6 mo; round spermatids, 12 mo; and elongated spermatids, 16 mo. Furthermore, there were differences between the two donor calves regarding the efficiency of spermatogenesis in xenografts. The timing of complete spermatogenesis approximately corresponded to the reported timing of sexual maturation in bison. This study demonstrated, apparently for the first time, that testis tissue xenografting from neonatal bison donors into recipient mice resulted in testicular maturation and complete development of spermatogenesis in the grafts.

  9. Endpoint measures in the mdx mouse relevant for muscular dystrophy pre-clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yvonne M.; Rader, Erik P.; Crawford, Robert W.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of mobility influences the quality of life for patients with neuromuscular diseases. Common measures of mobility and chronic muscle damage are the six-minute walk test and serum creatine kinase. Despite extensive pre-clinical studies of therapeutic approaches, characterization of these measures is incomplete. To address this, a six-minute ambulation assay, serum creatine kinase, and myoglobinuria were investigated for the mdx mouse, a dystrophinopathy mouse model commonly used in pre-clinical studies. Mdx mice ambulated shorter distances than normal controls, a disparity accentuated after mild exercise. An asymmetric pathophysiology in mdx mice was unmasked with exercise, and peak measurements of serum creatine kinase and myoglobinuria were identified. Our data highlights the necessity to consider asymmetric pathology and timing of biomarkers when testing potential therapies for muscular dystrophy. PMID:22154712

  10. Measuring the Stiffness of Ex Vivo Mouse Aortas Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yong Ho; Liu, Shu-Lin; Byfield, Fitzroy J; Janmey, Paul A; Assoian, Richard K

    2016-10-19

    Arterial stiffening is a significant risk factor and biomarker for cardiovascular disease and a hallmark of aging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile analytical tool for characterizing viscoelastic mechanical properties for a variety of materials ranging from hard (plastic, glass, metal, etc.) surfaces to cells on any substrate. It has been widely used to measure the stiffness of cells, but less frequently used to measure the stiffness of aortas. In this paper, we will describe the procedures for using AFM in contact mode to measure the ex vivo elastic modulus of unloaded mouse arteries. We describe our procedure for isolation of mouse aortas, and then provide detailed information for the AFM analysis. This includes step-by-step instructions for alignment of the laser beam, calibration of the spring constant and deflection sensitivity of the AFM probe, and acquisition of force curves. We also provide a detailed protocol for data analysis of the force curves.

  11. Nanomicellar TGX221 blocks xenograft tumor growth of prostate cancer in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruibao; Zhao, Yunqi; Huang, Yan; Yang, Qiuhong; Zeng, Xing; Jiang, Wencong; Liu, Jihong; Thrasher, J. Brantley; Forrest, M. Laird; Li, Benyi

    2014-01-01

    Background Combination of androgen ablation along with early detection and surgery has made prostate cancer highly treatable at the initial stage. However, this cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death among American men due to castration-resistant progression, suggesting that novel therapeutic agents are urgently needed for this life-threaten condition. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p110β is a major cellular signaling molecule and has been identified as a critical factor in prostate cancer progression. In a recent report, we established a nanomicelle-based strategy to deliver p110β-specific inhibitor TGX221 to prostate cancer cells by conjugating the surface of nanomicelles with a RNA aptamer against prostate membrane specific antigen (PSMA) present in all clinical prostate cancers. In this study, we tested this nanomicellar TGX221 for its in vivo anti-tumor effect in mouse xenograft models. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LAPC-4, LNCaP, C4-2 and 22RV1 were used to establish subcutaneous xenograft tumors in nude mice. Paraffin sections from xenograft tumor specimens were used in immunohistochemistry assays to detect AKT phosphorylation, cell proliferation marker Ki67 and PCNA, as well as BrdU incorporation. Quantitative PCR assay was conducted to determine PSA gene expression in xenograft tumors. Results Although systemic delivery of unconjugated TGX221 significantly reduced xenograft tumor growth in nude mice compared to solvent control, the nanomicellar TGX221 conjugates completely blocked tumor growth of xenografts derived from multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Further analyses revealed that AKT phosphorylation and cell proliferation indexes were dramatically reduced in xenograft tumors received nanomicellar TGX221 compared to xenograft tumors received unconjugated TGX221 treatment. There was no noticeable side effect by gross observation or at microscopic level of organ tissue section. Conclusion These data strongly suggest that prostate

  12. The HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG exhibits potent antitumor activity for pheochromocytoma in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunze; Zhu, Qi; Chen, Dongning; Shen, Zhoujun; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Zhu, Yu

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) in the malignant pheochromocytoma using a xenograft mouse model. Treatment with 17-AAG induced a marked reduction in the volume and weight of PC12 pheochromocytoma cell tumor xenografts in mice. Furthermore, 17-AAG also significantly inhibited the expression of HSP90 and its client proteins. Our results validated HSP90 as an important target in pheochromocytoma and provided rationale for the testing of HSP90 inhibitors as a promising therapeutic agent in the antitumor therapy of pheochromocytoma.

  13. Neonatal immune-tolerance in mice does not prevent xenograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Mattis, Virginia B.; Wakeman, Dustin R.; Tom, Colton; Dodiya, Hemraj B.; Yeung, Sylvia Y.; Tran, Andrew H.; Bernau, Ksenija; Ornelas, Loren; Sahabian, Anais; Reidling, Jack; Sareen, Dhruv; Thompson, Leslie M.; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the efficacy of human stem cell transplantation in rodent models is complicated by the significant immune rejection that occurs. Two recent reports have shown conflicting results using neonatal tolerance to xenografts in rats. Here we extend this approach to mice and assess whether neonatal tolerance can prevent the rapid rejection of xenografts. In three strains of neonatal immune-intact mice, using two different brain transplant regimes and three independent stem cell types, we conclusively show that there is rapid rejection of the implanted cells. We also address specific challenges associated with the generation of humanized mouse models of disease. PMID:24440640

  14. Measurement of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in mouse primary neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sofia M; Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Danial, Nika N

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of microplate-based assays that measure extracellular fluxes in intact, living cells has revolutionized the field of cellular bioenergetics. Here, we describe a method for real time assessment of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in primary mouse cortical neurons and astrocytes. This method requires the Extracellular Flux Analyzer Instrument (XF24, Seahorse Biosciences), which uses fluorescent oxygen sensors in a microplate assay format.

  15. Establishing Prostate Cancer Patient Derived Xenografts: Lessons Learned From Older Studies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Pamela J; Russell, Peter; Rudduck, Christina; Tse, Brian W-C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Raghavan, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the progression of prostate cancer to androgen-independence/castrate resistance and development of preclinical testing models are important for developing new prostate cancer therapies. This report describes studies performed 30 years ago, which demonstrate utility and shortfalls of xenografting to preclinical modeling. Methods We subcutaneously implanted male nude mice with small prostate cancer fragments from transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) from 29 patients. Successful xenografts were passaged into new host mice. They were characterized using histology, immunohistochemistry for marker expression, flow cytometry for ploidy status, and in some cases by electron microscopy and response to testosterone. Two xenografts were karyotyped by G-banding. Results Tissues from 3/29 donors (10%) gave rise to xenografts that were successfully serially passaged in vivo. Two, (UCRU-PR-1, which subsequently was replaced by a mouse fibrosarcoma, and UCRU-PR-2, which combined epithelial and neuroendocrine features) have been described. UCRU-PR-4 line was a poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinoma derived from a patient who had undergone estrogen therapy and bilateral castration after his cancer relapsed. Histologically, this comprised diffusely infiltrating small acinar cell carcinoma with more solid aggregates of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The xenografted line showed histology consistent with a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and stained positively for prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and the cytokeratin cocktail, CAM5.2, with weak staining for prostate specific antigen (PSA). The line failed to grow in female nude mice. Castration of three male nude mice after xenograft establishment resulted in cessation of growth in one, growth regression in another and transient growth in another, suggesting that some cells had retained androgen sensitivity. The karyotype (from passage 1) was 43

  16. Measuring the multi-frequency electrical impedance of the mouse gastrocnemius muscle using a tetrapolar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Fogerson, P. M.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance methods can be used to evaluate and monitor neuromuscular disease states. Recently, we have applied tetrapolar surface electrical impedance methods to the gastrocnemius muscle of the rat for this purpose and substantial changes in the impedance parameters after sciatic nerve crush can be identified. In order to be able to study additional animal models of nerve and muscle disease, however, it would highly desirable to be able to perform such impedance measurements in the mouse. Yet the small size of the mouse presents a substantial technical challenge. In this study, we evaluate a basic approach for performing such measurements. A series of thin, stainless steel strip electrodes affixed to the gastrocnemius and interfaced via a separate connector to the Imp SFB7® (Impedimed, Inc), provided an effective means for obtaining impedance data in the 20-500 kHz range. After two weeks, test-retest reproducibility was good, with intra-class correlation coefficients as high 0.84 and variability as low as 12.86 ± 6.18% in the 15 mice studied. Using this approach, it may now be possible to study impedance changes in a variety of mouse models of neuromuscular disease, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  17. A single-islet microplate assay to measure mouse and human islet insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Truchan, Nathan A; Brar, Harpreet K; Gallagher, Shannon J; Neuman, Joshua C; Kimple, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    One complication to comparing β-cell function among islet preparations, whether from genetically identical or diverse animals or human organ donors, is the number of islets required per assay. Islet numbers can be limiting, meaning that fewer conditions can be tested; other islet measurements must be excluded; or islets must be pooled from multiple animals/donors for each experiment. Furthermore, pooling islets negates the possibility of performing single-islet comparisons. Our aim was to validate a 96-well plate-based single islet insulin secretion assay that would be as robust as previously published methods to quantify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from mouse and human islets. First, we tested our new assay using mouse islets, showing robust stimulation of insulin secretion 24 or 48 h after islet isolation. Next, we utilized the assay to quantify mouse islet function on an individual islet basis, measurements that would not be possible with the standard pooled islet assay methods. Next, we validated our new assay using human islets obtained from the Integrated Islet Distribution Program (IIDP). Human islets are known to have widely varying insulin secretion capacity, and using our new assay we reveal biologically relevant factors that are significantly correlated with human islet function, whether displayed as maximal insulin secretion response or fold-stimulation of insulin secretion. Overall, our results suggest this new microplate assay will be a useful tool for many laboratories, expert or not in islet techniques, to be able to precisely quantify islet insulin secretion from their models of interest.

  18. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse - theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R

    2013-01-01

    The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterization of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequelae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation, and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available - one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyzer, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers/analyzer. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use analysis of covariance with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors.

  19. Measuring Energy Metabolism in the Mouse – Theoretical, Practical, and Analytical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The mouse is one of the most important model organisms for understanding human genetic function and disease. This includes characterization of the factors that influence energy expenditure and dysregulation of energy balance leading to obesity and its sequelae. Measuring energy metabolism in the mouse presents a challenge because the animals are small, and in this respect it presents similar challenges to measuring energy demands in many other species of small mammal. This paper considers some theoretical, practical, and analytical considerations to be considered when measuring energy expenditure in mice. Theoretically total daily energy expenditure is comprised of several different components: basal or resting expenditure, physical activity, thermoregulation, and the thermic effect of food. Energy expenditure in mice is normally measured using open flow indirect calorimetry apparatus. Two types of system are available – one of which involves a single small Spartan chamber linked to a single analyzer, which is ideal for measuring the individual components of energy demand. The other type of system involves a large chamber which mimics the home cage environment and is generally configured with several chambers/analyzer. These latter systems are ideal for measuring total daily energy expenditure but at present do not allow accurate decomposition of the total expenditure into its components. The greatest analytical challenge for mouse expenditure data is how to account for body size differences between individuals. This has been a matter of some discussion for at least 120 years. The statistically most appropriate approach is to use analysis of covariance with individual aspects of body composition as independent predictors. PMID:23504620

  20. [Heart Transplantation;Allograft and Xenograft].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Norihide

    2017-01-01

    Prior to starting clinical cardiac allotransplantation, cardiac xenotransplantation was performed in human in 1960s. In 1964, Hardy performed cardiac transplantation using a chimpanzee heart and Bailey performed cardiac transplantation using a baboon heart to an infant with hypoplastic left heart. The use of cyclosporine has greatly improved the outcome of clinical cardiac transplantation and cardiac allotransplantation became an established treatment strategy for the patients with end-stage heart failure. Although concordant cardiac xenotransplantation from a primate to a human may be successfully performed using current immunosuppressive regimen, a primate heart is not a good candidate for cardiac xenograft due to animal light issues and its size. Therefore, many investigators have tried to extend the survival period in discordant xenograft from pig to primate, but no prolonged surviving orthotropic cardiac xenograft has been established yet. In this review, experiments of concordant and discordant cardiac xenografts which were performed by the authors were introduced.

  1. Preventing T cell rejection of pig xenografts.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Laura; Ford, Mandy L; Newell, Kenneth A; Adams, Andrew B

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation is a potential solution to the limited supply of donor organs. While early barriers to xenograft acceptance, such as hyperacute rejection, are now largely avoided through genetic engineering, the next frontier in successful xenograft survival will require prevention of T cell-mediated rejection. Most successful immunosuppressive regimens in xenotransplantation utilize T cell depletion with antibody therapy. Additionally, the use of T cell costimulatory blockade - specifically blockade of the CD40-CD154 pathway - shows promise with several reports of long-term xenograft survival. Additional therapies, such as transgenic expression of T cell coinhibitory molecules or transfer of immunomodulatory cells to promote tolerance, may be necessary to achieve reliable long-term xenograft acceptance. Further studies in pre-clinical models are essential in order to optimize these regimens prior to trials in patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A high bandwidth fully implantable mouse telemetry system for chronic ECG measurement.

    PubMed

    Russell, David M; McCormick, Daniel; Taberner, Andrew J; Malpas, Simon C; Budgett, David M

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of a novel system that enables the wireless transmission of high-bandwidth physiological data from a freely moving mouse. The system employs inductive power transfer (IPT) to continuously power a battery-less transmitter using an array of overlapping planar coils placed under the animal. This arrangement provides a minimum of 20 mW at all locations and orientations across the mouse cage by selecting a coil which will sufficiently power the transmitter. Coil selection is performed by feedback control across the 2.4 GHz wireless link. A device was constructed utilizing this novel IPT system and was used to capture high-fidelity electrocardiogram (ECG) signal sampled at 2 kHz in mice. Various attributes of the ECG signal such as QT, QRS, and PR intervals could be obtained with a high degree of accuracy. This system potentially provides lifetime continuous high bandwidth measurement of physiological signals from a fully implanted telemeter in a freely moving mouse.

  3. Non-invasive measurement of melanin-derived radicals in living mouse tail using X-band EPR

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yukihiro; Ueno, Megumi; Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Fujisaki, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to measure in vivo generation of melanin-derived radicals non-invasively, as a quantifiable index of radio-biological effect. Melanin-derived radicals in a living intact mouse tail tip were non-invasively measured in very simple way using an X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer. Colored mouse strains, C57BL/6NCr, BDF1, and C3H/He, have clear EPR signal corresponding to melanin-derived radicals in the tail tip; however, albino mouse strains, BALB/cCr, ddY, ICR, have no EPR signals. An X-ray fraction of 2 Gy/day (1 Gy/min) was repeatedly irradiated to a C3H/He mouse tail skin every Monday to Friday for 4 weeks. In comparison to before starting irradiation, the C3H/He mouse tail skin became darker, like a suntan. The melanin-derived radicals in C3H/He mouse tail skin were increased in association with X-ray fractions. Melanin-derived radicals in mouse tail skin can be readily and chronologically measurable by using X-band EPR spectrometer, and can be a marker for a radiobiological effect in the skin. PMID:27895382

  4. Measurement of the Dynamic Shear Modulus of Mouse Brain Tissue In Vivo By Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Atay, Stefan M.; Kroenke, Christopher D.; Sabet, Arash; Bayly, Philip V.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) technique was used to estimate the dynamic shear modulus of mouse brain tissue in vivo. The technique allows visualization and measurement of mechanical shear waves excited by lateral vibration of the skull. Quantitative measurements of displacement in three dimensions (3-D) during vibration at 1200 Hz were obtained by applying oscillatory magnetic field gradients at the same frequency during an MR imaging sequence. Contrast in the resulting phase images of the mouse brain is proportional to displacement. To obtain estimates of shear modulus, measured displacement fields were fitted to the shear wave equation. Validation of the procedure was performed on gel characterized by independent rheometry tests and on data from finite element simulations. Brain tissue is, in reality, viscoelastic and nonlinear. The current estimates of dynamic shear modulus are strictly relevant only to small oscillations at a specific frequency, but these estimates may be obtained at high frequencies (and thus high deformation rates), non-invasively throughout the brain. These data complement measurements of nonlinear viscoelastic properties obtained by others at slower rates, either ex vivo or invasively. PMID:18412500

  5. Refractive index measurement of the mouse crystalline lens using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranjay; Lacy, Kip D.; Tan, Christopher C.; Park, Han na; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest for using mouse models in refractive development and myopia research. The crystalline lens is a critical optical component of the mouse eye that occupies greater than 50% of the ocular space, and significant increases in thickness with age. However, changes in refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens are less known. In this study, we examined the changes in thickness and refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens for two different strains, wild-type (WT) and a nyx mutant (nob) over the course of normal visual development or after form deprivation. Refractive index and lens thickness measurements were made on ex vivo lens using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Comparison of refractive index measurements on 5 standard ball lenses using the SD-OCT and their known refractive indices (manufacturer provided) indicated good precision (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.998 and Bland-Altman coefficient of repeatability, 0.116) of the SD-OCT to calculate mouse lens refractive index ex vivo. During normal visual development, lens thickness increased significantly with age for three different cohorts of mice, aged 4 (average thickness from both eyes; WT: 1.78 ± 0.03, nob: 1.79 ± 0.08 mm), 10 (WT: 2.02 ± 0.05, nob: 2.01 ± 0.04 mm) and 16 weeks (WT: 2.12 ± 0.06, nob: 2.09 ± 0.06 mm, p<0.001). Lens thickness was not significantly different between the two strains at any age (p=0.557). For mice with normal vision, refractive index for isolated crystalline lenses in nob mice was significantly greater than WT mice (mean for all ages; WT: 1.42 ± 0.01, nob: 1.44 ± 0.001, p<0.001). After 4 weeks of form deprivation to the right eye using a skull-mounted goggling apparatus, a thinning of the crystalline lens was observed in both right and left eyes of goggled animals compared to their naïve controls (average from both the right and the left eye) for both strains (p=0.052). In form deprived

  6. DHEA increases epithelial markers and decreases mesenchymal proteins in breast cancer cells and reduces xenograft growth.

    PubMed

    Colín-Val, Zaira; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Mendoza-Milla, Criselda; Gómez, Erika Olivia; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2017-10-15

    Breast cancer is one of the most common neoplasias and the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its high mortality rate is linked to a great metastatic capacity associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During this process, a decrease in epithelial proteins expression and an increase of mesenchymal proteins are observed. On the other hand, it has been shown that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the most abundant steroid in human plasma, inhibits migration of breast cancer cells; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, the in vitro effect of DHEA on the expression pattern of some EMT-related proteins, such as E-cadherin (epithelial), N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail (mesenchymal) was measured by Western blot and immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells with invasive, metastatic and mesenchymal phenotype. Also, the in vivo effect of DHEA on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice (nu(-)/nu(-)) and on expression of the same epithelial and mesenchymal proteins in generated tumors was evaluated. We found that DHEA increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail expression both in MD-MB-231 cells and in the formed tumors, possibly by DHEA-induced reversion of mesenchymal phenotype. These results were correlated with a tumor size reduction in mouse xenografts following DHEA administration either a week earlier or concurrent with breast cancer cells inoculation. In conclusion, DHEA could be useful in the treatment of breast cancer with mesenchymal phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Androgen Regulated Genes in Human Prostate Xenografts in Mice: Relation to BPH and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Love, Harold D.; Booton, S. Erin; Boone, Braden E.; Breyer, Joan P.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P.; Shappell, Scott B.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues. PMID:20027305

  8. Xenograft Studies of Fatty Acid Synthesis Inhibition as Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    higher level of malonyl-CoA than liver from tumor bearing mice. Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Xenograft measurements represent...extracted into ether. The organic solution was dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and evaporated to a gummy solid, which was dissolved in methylene...individually crystallized from boiling hexanes. 3. Distribution of jH-C75] in MCF7xenograft bearing nude mice. C75 is widely distributed in tumor and

  9. Electrophysiological Measurement of Cannabinoid-Mediated Synaptic Modulation in Acute Mouse Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Báldi, Rita; Ghose, Dipanwita; Grueter, Brad A.

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are a class of bioactive lipids that mediate retrograde synaptic modulation at central and peripheral synapses. The highly lipophilic nature of eCBs and the pharmacological tools available to interrogate this system require unique methodological consideration, especially when applied to ex vivo systems such as electrophysiological analysis in acute brain slices. Here we discuss protocols for measuring cannabinoid and eCB-mediated synaptic signaling in mouse brain slices including analysis of short-term, long-term, and tonic eCB signaling modes, and the unique considerations for working with eCBs and TRPV1/cannabinoid ligands in acute brain slices. PMID:27063786

  10. Measurement and modeling of 4D live mouse heart volumes from CT time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Arthur W.; Badea, Cristian T.; Pomerantz, Stuart M.; Mistry, Nilesh; Nave, Démian; Johnson, G. Allan

    2007-01-01

    In vivo quantitative studies of cardiac function in mouse models provide information about cardiac pathophysiology in more detail than can be obtained in humans. Quantitative measurements of left ventricular (LV) volume at multiple contractile phases are particularly important. However, the mouse heart's small size and rapid motion present challenges for precise measurement in live animals. Researchers at Duke University's Center for In Vivo Microscopy (CIVM) have developed noninvasive time-gated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) techniques providing the temporal and spatial resolutions required for in vivo characterization of cardiac structure and function. This paper describes analysis of the resulting reconstructions to produce volume measurements and corresponding models of heart motion. We believe these are the most precise noninvasive estimates of in vivo LV volume currently available. Our technique uses binary mixture models to directly recover volume estimates from reconstructed datasets. Unlike methods using segmentation followed by voxel counting, this approach provides statistical error estimates and maintains good precision at high noise levels. This is essential for long term multiple session experiments that must simultaneously minimize contrast agent and x-ray doses. The analysis tools are built into the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center's Volume Browser (PSC-VB) that provides networked multi-site data sharing and collaboration including analysis and visualization functions.

  11. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptome in Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Zhu, Yinjie; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Junyi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Zhaomin; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor model is a powerful technology in evaluating anti-cancer drugs and facilitating personalized medicines. Multiple research centers and commercial companies have put huge efforts into building PDX mouse models. However, PDX models have not been widely available and their molecular features have not been systematically characterized. In this study, we provided a comprehensive survey of PDX transcriptome by integrating analysis of 58 patients involving 8 different tumors. The median correlation coefficient between patients and xenografts is 0.94, which is higher than that between patients and cell line panel or between patients with the same tumor. Major differential gene expressions in PDX occur in the engraftment of human tumor tissue into mice, while gene expressions are relatively stable over passages. 48 genes are frequently differentially expressed in PDX mice of multiple cancers. They are enriched in extracellular matrix and immune response, and some are reported as targets for anticancer drugs. A simulation study showed that expression change between PDX and patient tumor (6%) would result in acceptable change in drug sensitivity (3%). Our findings demonstrate that PDX mice represent the gene-expression and drug-response features of primary tumors effectively, and it is recommended to monitoring the overall expression profiles and drug target genes in clinical application. PMID:25951608

  12. Native MAG-1 antibody almost destroys human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Pang, Roy H L; Gao, Guohong; Memoli, Vincent A; Cole, Bernard F

    2011-06-01

    A native form of mouse monoclonal IgG1 antibody called MAG-1, which recognizes an epitope on provasopressin, has been found to shrink and produce extensive necrosis of human breast tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice. We examined the ability of (90)Yttrium-labeled and native MAG-1 to affect the growth in nu/nu mice of cancer xenografts that were estrogen-responsive (from MCF-7 cells) and triple-negative (from MDA-MB231 cells). The growth rates of treated cells were compared to those receiving saline vehicle and those receiving (90)Yttrium-labeled and native forms of the ubiquitous antibody, MOPC21. Short-term treatments (4 doses over 6 days) not only with (90)Yttrium-MAG-1 but also native MAG-1 produced large reductions in size of rapidly growing tumors of both types, while both (90)Yttrium- MOPC21 and native MOPC21 had no effect. Native and (90)Yttrium-MAG-1 effects were similar, and arrested tumors recommenced growing soon after treatments stopped. Increasing native MAG-1 treatment to single dosing for 16 consecutive days shrank tumors of both types with no regrowth apparent over a 20-day post-treatment period of observation. Pathological examination of such tumors revealed they had undergone very extensive (>66%) necrosis.

  13. Determining epithelial contribution to in vivo mesenchymal tumour expression signature using species-specific microarray profiling analysis of xenografts.

    PubMed

    Purdom, E; Restall, C; Busuttil, R A; Schluter, H; Boussioutas, A; Thompson, E W; Anderson, R L; Speed, T P; Haviv, I

    2013-02-01

    Gene expression profiling using microarrays and xenograft transplants of human cancer cell lines are both popular tools to investigate human cancer. However, the undefined degree of cross hybridization between the mouse and human genomes hinders the use of microarrays to characterize gene expression of both the host and the cancer cell within the xenograft. Since an increasingly recognized aspect of cancer is the host response (or cancer-stroma interaction), we describe here a bioinformatic manipulation of the Affymetrix profiling that allows interrogation of the gene expression of both the mouse host and the human tumour. Evidence of microenvironmental regulation of epithelial mesenchymal transition of the tumour component in vivo is resolved against a background of mesenchymal gene expression. This tool could allow deeper insight to the mechanism of action of anti-cancer drugs, as typically novel drug efficacy is being tested in xenograft systems.

  14. Patient-derived orthotopic xenografts: better mimic of metastasis than subcutaneous xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-08-01

    The majority of human solid tumours do not metastasize when grown subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice; this includes patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. However, orthotopic implantation of intact tumour tissue can lead to metastasis that mimics that seen in patients. These patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) models have a long history and might better recapitulate human tumours than PDX models.

  15. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic models that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limiting amounts of primary tumor material. A frequently used model is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice and involves injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice, and subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated can then be used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. This unit describes detailed procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for potential use in basic research or translational studies. PMID:25737157

  16. Measurement of Basilar Membrane, Reticular Lamina, and Tectorial Membrane Vibrations in the Intact Mouse Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan

    2011-11-01

    A scanning low-coherence heterodyne interferometer (SLHI) was developed for measuring the microstructural vibration inside the cochlear partition of the intact living cochlea of mice. The sensitivity, frequency response, and dynamic range of the SLHI are comparable with those of a sensitive laser interferometer but the SLHI has a higher spatial resolution along the optical axis. The magnitude and phase of sound-induced vibrations were measured as a function of the focal position along the optical axis. Our data show that the SLHI has sufficient sensitivity, dynamic range, and temporal and spatial resolution to measure sub-nanometer vibrations of the basilar membrane, reticular lamina, and tectorial membrane in the intact living mouse cochlea. High spatial and temporal resolution, compact heterodyne design, and scanning capability make this interferometer an ideal tool to study molecular mechanisms of hearing in normal and genetically-modified mice.

  17. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy.

  18. Noninvasive measurement of potassium efflux as an early indicator of cell death in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, J R; Liu, L; Smith, P J; Keefe, D L

    2000-09-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) occurs in nearly all cell types examined, including mammalian oocytes and embryos, where it may underlie some forms of infertility in humans. Although the molecular machinery participating in apoptosis have been intensely investigated, the accompanying physiological changes have not received similar attention. In this study, a novel electrophysiology technique has been employed to monitor real-time perturbations in the physiology of mouse embryos undergoing apoptosis evoked by hydrogen peroxide, diamide, and staurosporine. Despite differences in their mode of action, these agents evoked a similar early change in cellular physiology; namely, a pronounced, transient, potassium efflux through tetraethylammonium-sensitive potassium channels accompanied by cell shrinkage. Mouse zygotes exposed to 200 microM H(2)O(2) exhibited potassium efflux that elevated the potassium concentration of the media surrounding embryos by 1.4 +/- 0.1 microM. Pretreatment with tetraethylammonium inhibited this increase (0.2 +/- 0.1 microM). Our results indicate that potassium efflux through potassium channels and concurrent cell shrinkage are early indicators of cell death in embryos and that noninvasive measurements of potassium pathophysiology may identify embryos undergoing cell death prior to the manifestation of other morphological or molecular hallmarks of cell death.

  19. Generation of patient-derived xenografts from fine needle aspirates or core needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Roife, David; Kang, Ya'an; Wang, Li; Fang, Bingliang; Swisher, Stephen G; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Pretzsch, Shanna; Dinney, Colin P; Katz, Matthew H G; Fleming, Jason B

    2017-05-01

    Patient-derived xenografts have recently become a powerful tool for cancer research and may be used to guide personalized therapy. Thus far, patient-derived xenografts have been grown from tumor tissue obtained after operative resection; however, many cancer patients never undergo operative intervention for a variety of reasons. We hypothesized that xenograft tumors could be grown from smaller volumes of patient tissue, such as those obtained during diagnostic biopsies. Surgical specimens were obtained after resection of primary or metastatic lesions of the following cancers: pancreatic carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer, bladder (urothelial) carcinoma, and melanoma. At least 10 cases of each cancer were included in this study. To mimic clinical biopsies, small fragments of the surgical specimens were biopsied with a 22-gauge needle, and the needle contents were injected subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice. The tumor fragment from which the biopsy was taken was also implanted subcutaneously in the contralateral side of the same mouse as a control. Success rates of the traditional method of xenograft implantation ranged from 27.3%-70%. Success rates of the fine needle aspirate technique ranged from 0%-36.4%. An attempt to engraft a percutaneous core needle liver biopsy of a metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma also was successful. We have found that it is possible to engraft fine needle aspirates and core biopsies of solid tumors in order to generate patient-derived xenografts. This may open up xenografting to a wider cancer patient population than previously possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of Two Xenograft Materials Used in Sinus Lift Procedures: Material Characterization and In Vivo Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Fernández, María Piedad; Mazón, Patricia; Gehrke, Sergio A; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; De Aza, Piedad N

    2017-06-07

    Detailed information about graft material characteristic is crucial to evaluate their clinical outcomes. The present study evaluates the physico-chemical characteristics of two xenografts manufactured on an industrial scale deproteinized at different temperatures (non-sintered and sintered) in accordance with a protocol previously used in sinus lift procedures. It compares how the physico-chemical properties influence the material's performance in vivo by a histomorphometric study in retrieved bone biopsies following maxillary sinus augmentation in 10 clinical cases. An X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the typical structure of hydroxyapatite (HA) for both materials. Both xenografts were porous and exhibited intraparticle pores. Strong differences were observed in terms of porosity, crystallinity, and calcium/phosphate. Histomorphometric measurements on the bone biopsies showed statistically significant differences. The physic-chemical assessment of both xenografts, made in accordance with the protocol developed on an industrial scale, confirmed that these products present excellent biocompatibilitity, with similar characteristics to natural bone. The sintered HA xenografts exhibited greater osteoconductivity, but were not completely resorbable (30.80 ± 0.88% residual material). The non-sintered HA xenografts induced about 25.92 ± 1.61% of new bone and a high level of degradation after six months of implantation. Differences in the physico-chemical characteristics found between the two HA xenografts determined a different behavior for this material.

  1. Comparison of Two Xenograft Materials Used in Sinus Lift Procedures: Material Characterization and In Vivo Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez Fernández, María Piedad; Mazón, Patricia; Gehrke, Sergio A.; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; De Aza, Piedad N.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed information about graft material characteristic is crucial to evaluate their clinical outcomes. The present study evaluates the physico-chemical characteristics of two xenografts manufactured on an industrial scale deproteinized at different temperatures (non-sintered and sintered) in accordance with a protocol previously used in sinus lift procedures. It compares how the physico-chemical properties influence the material’s performance in vivo by a histomorphometric study in retrieved bone biopsies following maxillary sinus augmentation in 10 clinical cases. An X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the typical structure of hydroxyapatite (HA) for both materials. Both xenografts were porous and exhibited intraparticle pores. Strong differences were observed in terms of porosity, crystallinity, and calcium/phosphate. Histomorphometric measurements on the bone biopsies showed statistically significant differences. The physic-chemical assessment of both xenografts, made in accordance with the protocol developed on an industrial scale, confirmed that these products present excellent biocompatibilitity, with similar characteristics to natural bone. The sintered HA xenografts exhibited greater osteoconductivity, but were not completely resorbable (30.80 ± 0.88% residual material). The non-sintered HA xenografts induced about 25.92 ± 1.61% of new bone and a high level of degradation after six months of implantation. Differences in the physico-chemical characteristics found between the two HA xenografts determined a different behavior for this material. PMID:28772984

  2. A Renewable Tissue Resource of Phenotypically Stable, Biologically and Ethnically Diverse, Patient-derived Human Breast Cancer Xenograft (PDX) Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Claerhout, Sofie; Pratt, Aleix; Dobrolecki, Lacey E.; Petrovic, Ivana; Lai, Qing; Landis, Melissa D.; Wiechmann, Lisa; Schiff, Rachel; Giuliano, Mario; Wong, Helen; Fuqua, Suzanne W.; Contreras, Alejandro; Gutierrez, Carolina; Huang, Jian; Mao, Sufeng; Pavlick, Anne C.; Froehlich, Amber M.; Wu, Meng-Fen; Tsimelzon, Anna; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Chen, Edward S.; Zuloaga, Pavel; Shaw, Chad A.; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Perou, Charles M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Chang, Jenny C.; Lewis, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer research is hampered by difficulties in obtaining and studying primary human breast tissue, and by the lack of in vivo preclinical models that reflect patient tumor biology accurately. To overcome these limitations, we propagated a cohort of human breast tumors grown in the epithelium-free mammary fat pad of SCID/Beige and NOD/SCID/IL2γ-receptor null (NSG) mice, under a series of transplant conditions. Both models yielded stably transplantable xenografts at comparably high rates (~21% and ~19%, respectively). Of the conditions tested, xenograft take rate was highest in the presence of a low-dose estradiol pellet. Overall, 32 stably transplantable xenograft lines were established, representing 25 unique patients. Most tumors yielding xenografts were “triple-negative” (ER-PR-HER2+) (n=19). However, we established lines from three ER-PR-HER2+ tumors, one ER+PR-HER2−, one ER+PR+HER2− and one “triple-positive” (ER+PR+HER2+) tumor. Serially passaged xenografts show biological consistency with the tumor of origin, are phenotypically stable across multiple transplant generations at the histologic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and genomic levels, and show comparable treatment responses as those observed clinically. Xenografts representing 12 patients, including two ER+ lines, showed metastasis to the mouse lung. These models thus serve as a renewable, quality-controlled tissue resource for preclinical studies investigating treatment response and metastasis. PMID:23737486

  3. T-cell number and subtype influence the disease course of primary chronic lymphocytic leukaemia xenografts in alymphoid mice

    PubMed Central

    Oldreive, Ceri E.; Skowronska, Anna; Davies, Nicholas J.; Parry, Helen; Agathanggelou, Angelo; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Rudzki, Zbigniew; Cronin, Laura; Vrzalikova, Katerina; Murray, Paul; Odintsova, Elena; Pratt, Guy; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Moss, Paul; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells require microenvironmental support for their proliferation. This can be recapitulated in highly immunocompromised hosts in the presence of T cells and other supporting cells. Current primary CLL xenograft models suffer from limited duration of tumour cell engraftment coupled with gradual T-cell outgrowth. Thus, a greater understanding of the interaction between CLL and T cells could improve their utility. In this study, using two distinct mouse xenograft models, we investigated whether xenografts recapitulate CLL biology, including natural environmental interactions with B-cell receptors and T cells, and whether manipulation of autologous T cells can expand the duration of CLL engraftment. We observed that primary CLL xenografts recapitulated both the tumour phenotype and T-cell repertoire observed in patients and that engraftment was significantly shorter for progressive tumours. A reduction in the number of patient T cells that were injected into the mice to 2-5% of the initial number or specific depletion of CD8+ cells extended the limited xenograft duration of progressive cases to that characteristic of indolent disease. We conclude that manipulation of T cells can enhance current CLL xenograft models and thus expand their utility for investigation of tumour biology and pre-clinical drug assessment. PMID:26398941

  4. Therapeutic regulation of systemic inflammation in xenograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Hayato; Liu, Hong; Li, Tao; Zhang, Zhongquiang; Gao, Bingsi; Hara, Hidetaka; Wijkstrom, Martin; Long, Cassandra; Saari, Ryan; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B

    2017-03-12

    Inflammation is known to preclude tolerance after transplantation. We have previously shown that systemic inflammation in xenograft recipients (SIXR) precedes activation of coagulation in the absence of T cell responses. Accordingly, SIXR may amplify innate and adaptive immune responses against xenografts after pig-to-primate xenotransplantation, even with efficient immunosuppressive therapy. We evaluated the impact of anti-inflammatory agents on pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in pig artery patch and heart xenograft recipients. Baboons received an artery patch (Group1, n=8) or heart (Group2, n=4) from genetically engineered pigs. All baboons received lymphodepletion with thymoglobulin (ATG) and costimulation blockade-based immunosuppression (anti-CD40 and/or CTLA4Ig). In Group1, baboons received either (i) no anti-inflammatory agents (n=2), (ii) cobra venom factor (CVF, n=2), (iii) α1-antitrypsin (AAT, n=2), or (iv) interleukin (IL)-6 receptor antagonist (IL-6RA, n=2). In Group2, all baboon received corticosteroids, either without (n=2) or with (n=2) IL-6RA. Serum IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and sCD40L levels were measured by Luminex. Fibrinogen, D-dimers, and C-reactive protein (C-RP) were also measured. Recipient baboon T cell proliferation was evaluated by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) before and after transplantation. Pig and baboon tissue factor (TF) mRNA levels in heart xenografts were measured by RT-PCR. In no recipient was a marked increase in T cell response to pig cells observed after transplantation. In Groups 1 and 2, post-transplantation levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-17 remained comparable to or lower than pre-transplant levels, except in one heart recipient that succumbed to CMV infection. In Group1, when no anti-inflammatory agent was administered, post-transplant levels of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 were elevated. After CVF, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 remained low. After IL-6RA, IL-6 and MCP-1 were elevated

  5. Measuring Deformation in the Mouse Optic Nerve Head and Peripapillary Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cathy; Midgett, Dan; Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary E.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Jefferys, Joan L.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo explant system using multiphoton microscopy and digital volume correlation to measure the full-field deformation response to intraocular pressure (IOP) change in the peripapillary sclera (PPS) and in the optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytic structure. Methods Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-glutamate transporter-GLT1 (GLT1/GFP) mouse eyes were explanted and imaged with a laser-scanning microscope under controlled inflation. Images were analyzed for regional strains and changes in astrocytic lamina and PPS shape. Astrocyte volume fraction in seven control GLT1/GFP mice was measured. The level of fluorescence of GFP fluorescent astrocytes was compared with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) labeled astrocytes using immunohistochemistry. Results The ONH astrocytic structure remained stable during 3 hours in explants. Control strain—globally, in the central one-half or two-thirds of the astrocytic lamina—was significantly greater in the nasal-temporal direction than in the inferior-superior or anterior-posterior directions (each P ≤ 0.03, mixed models). The PPS opening (perimeter) in normal eye explants also became wider nasal-temporally than superior-inferiorly during inflation from 10 to 30 mm Hg (P = 0.0005). After 1 to 3 days of chronic IOP elevation, PPS area was larger than in control eyes (P = 0.035), perimeter elongation was 37% less than controls, and global nasal-temporal strain was significantly less than controls (P = 0.007). Astrocyte orientation was altered by chronic IOP elevation, with processes redirected toward the longitudinal axis of the optic nerve. Conclusions The explant inflation test measures the strain response of the mouse ONH to applied IOP. Initial studies indicate regional differences in response to both acute and chronic IOP elevation within the ONH region. PMID:28146237

  6. Immunological characterization of human vaginal xenografts in immunocompromised mice: development of a small animal model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kish, T M; Budgeon, L R; Welsh, P A; Howett, M K

    2001-12-01

    A small animal model for the in vivo study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 and other fastidious infectious agents in human host target tissues is critical for the advancement of therapeutic and preventative strategies. Our laboratory has developed a human vaginal xenograft model that histologically recapitulates features of the human vaginal epithelial barrier. Vaginal xenografts were surgically implanted into C.B.-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid) (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid/scid (NOD/SCID) mice, with and without human peripheral blood mononuclear cell reconstitution. Immunohistochemical staining of vaginal xenografts demonstrated that in the SCID strain healed vaginal xenografts did not retain intrinsic human immune cells at baseline levels, whereas the NOD/SCID strain supported retention of intrinsic human immune cell populations within the xenografts for at least 2 months after engraftment. In peripheral blood mononuclear cell-reconstituted NOD/SCID mice with vaginal xenografts, flow cytometric analyses detected human immune cell populations in the peripheral blood and immunohistochemical methods detected infiltration of human CD45+ cells in the mouse spleens and vaginal xenografts for at least 2 months after reconstitution. This optimized NOD/SCID human vaginal xenograft model may provide a unique small animal in vivo system for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 transmission and infection.

  7. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-09-25

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of mouse skeletal muscle to measure denervation atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiangyang; Zhang, Gang; Morrison, Brett; Mori, Susumu; Sheikh, Kazim A.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the potential of different MRI measures to detect and quantify skeletal muscle changes with denervation in two mouse models of denervation/neurogenic atrophy. Acute complete denervation and chronic partial denervation were examined in calf muscles after sciatic nerve axotomy and in transgenic SOD1G93A mice, respectively. Serial T2, diffusion tensor, and high resolution anatomical images were acquired, and compared to behavioral, histological, and electrophysiological data. Increase in muscle T2 signal was first detected after sciatic nerve axotomy. Progressive muscle atrophy could be monitored with MRI-based volume measurements, which correlated strongly with postmortem muscle mass measurements. Significant increase in muscle fractional anisotropy and decreases in secondary and tertiary eigenvalues obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were observed after denervation. In SOD1G93A animals, muscle denervation was detected by elevated muscle T2 and atrophy in the medial gastrocnemius at 10 weeks. Changes in T2 and muscle volume were first observed in medial gastrocnemius and later in other calf muscles. Alterations in secondary and tertiary eigenvalues obtained from DTI were first observed in tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius muscles at age 12 weeks. We propose that MRI of skeletal muscle is a sensitive surrogate outcome measure of denervation atrophy in animal models of neuromuscular disorders, with potential applicability in preclinical therapeutic screening studies in rodents. PMID:18571650

  9. Treatment of human colon cancer xenografts with TRA-8 anti-death receptor 5 antibody alone or in combination with CPT-11.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Patsy G; LoBuglio, Albert F; Zinn, Kurt R; Kim, Hyunki; Nan, Li; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Wenquan; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2008-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy of TRA-8, a mouse monoclonal antibody that binds to the DR5 death receptor for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (also called Apo2L), alone and in combination with CPT-11, against human colon cancer cells and xenografts. DR5 expression was assessed on human colon cancer cell lines using flow cytometry, and cellular cytotoxicity after TRA-8 treatment, alone and in combination with SN-38, was determined by measuring cellular ATP levels. Tumor growth inhibition and regression rates of well-established subcutaneous COLO 205, SW948, HCT116, and HT-29 colon cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice treated with TRA-8 or CPT-11 alone and in combination were determined. (99m)Tc-TRA-8 was used to examine tumor localization of TRA-8 in animals bearing each of the four xenografts. In addition, whole-body biodistribution and imaging was carried out in COLO 205-bearing animals using in vivo single-photon emission computed tomography imaging and tissue counting. DR5 expression was highest on HCT116, intermediate on SW948 and COLO 205 cells, and lowest on HT-29 cells. COLO 205 cells were the most sensitive to TRA-8-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, SW948 and HCT116 cell lines were moderately sensitive, and HT-29 cells were resistant. Combination treatment with TRA-8 and SN-38 produced additive to synergistic cytotoxicity against all cell lines compared with either single agent. The levels of apoptosis in all cell lines, including HT-29, were increased by combination treatment with SN-38. In vivo, combination therapy with TRA-8 and CPT-11 was superior to either single-agent regimen for three of the xenografts: COLO 205, SW948, and HCT116. COLO 205 tumors were most responsive to therapy with 73% complete regressions after combination therapy. HT-29 cells derived no antitumor efficacy from TRA-8 therapy. Tumor xenografts established from the four colon cancer cell lines had comparable

  10. Treatment of Human Colon Cancer Xenografts with TRA-8 Anti-death Receptor 5 Antibody Alone or in Combination with CPT-11

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Patsy G.; LoBuglio, Albert F.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Kim, Hyunki; Nan, Li; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Wenquan; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy of TRA-8, a mouse monoclonal antibody that binds to the DR5 death receptor for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L), alone and in combination with CPT-11 against human colon cancer cells and xenografts. Experimental Design DR5 expression was assessed on human colon cancer cell lines using flow cytometry, and cellular cytotoxicity following TRA-8 treatment, alone and in combination with SN-38 was determined by measuring cellular ATP levels. Tumor growth inhibition and regression rates of well-established s.c. COLO 205, SW948, HCT116 and HT-29 colon cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice treated with TRA-8 or CPT-11 alone and in combination were determined. 99mTc-TRA-8 was utilized to examine tumor localization of TRA-8 in animals bearing each of the 4 xenografts. In addition, whole body biodistribution and imaging was carried out in COLO 205 bearing animals using in vivo SPECT imaging and tissue counting. Results DR5 expression was highest on HCT116, intermediate on SW948 and COLO 205 cells, and lowest on HT-29 cells. COLO 205 cells were the most sensitive to TRA-8-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, SW948 and HCT116 cell lines were moderately sensitive, and HT-29 cells were resistant. Combination treatment with TRA-8 and SN-38 produced additive to synergistic cytotoxicity against all cell lines compared to either single agent. The levels of apoptosis in all cell lines, including HT-29, were increased by combination treatment with SN-38. In vivo, combination therapy with TRA-8 and CPT-11 was superior to either single agent regimen for three of the xenografts; COLO 205, SW948, and HCT116. COLO 205 tumors were most responsive to therapy with 73% complete regressions following combination therapy. HT-29 cells derived no anti-tumor efficacy from TRA-8 therapy. Tumor xenografts established from the 4 colon cancer cell lines had comparable specific

  11. Optical imaging of the intrinsic signal as a measure of cortical plasticity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Cang, Jianhua; Kalatsky, Valery A; Löwel, Siegrid; Stryker, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    The responses of cells in the visual cortex to stimulation of the two eyes changes dramatically following a period of monocular visual deprivation (MD) during a critical period in early life. This phenomenon, referred to as ocular dominance (OD) plasticity, is a widespread model for understanding cortical plasticity. In this study, we designed stimulus patterns and quantification methods to analyze OD in the mouse visual cortex using optical imaging of intrinsic signals. Using periodically drifting bars restricted to the binocular portion of the visual field, we obtained cortical maps for both contralateral (C) and ipsilateral (I) eyes and computed OD maps as (C - I)/(C + I). We defined the OD index (ODI) for individual animals as the mean of the OD map. The ODI obtained from an imaging session of less than 30 min gives reliable measures of OD for both normal and monocularly deprived mice under Nembutal anesthesia. Surprisingly, urethane anesthesia, which yields excellent topographic maps, did not produce consistent OD findings. Normal Nembutal-anesthetized mice have positive ODI (0.22 +/- 0.01), confirming a contralateral bias in the binocular zone. For mice monocularly deprived during the critical period, the ODI of the cortex contralateral to the deprived eye shifted negatively towards the nondeprived, ipsilateral eye (ODI after 2-day MD: 0.12 +/- 0.02, 4-day: 0.03 +/- 0.03, and 6- to 7-day MD: -0.01 +/- 0.04). The ODI shift induced by 4-day MD appeared to be near maximal, consistent with previous findings using single-unit recordings. We have thus established optical imaging of intrinsic signals as a fast and reliable screening method to study OD plasticity in the mouse.

  12. Patient-derived xenografts of gastrointestinal cancers are susceptible to rapid and delayed B-lymphoproliferation.

    PubMed

    Dieter, Sebastian M; Giessler, Klara M; Kriegsmann, Mark; Dubash, Taronish D; Möhrmann, Lino; Schulz, Erik R; Siegl, Christine; Weber, Sarah; Strakerjahn, Hendrik; Oberlack, Ava; Heger, Ulrike; Gao, Jianpeng; Hartinger, Eva-Maria; Oppel, Felix; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Ha, Nati; Brors, Benedikt; Lasitschka, Felix; Ulrich, Alexis; Strobel, Oliver; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Schneider, Martin; Weichert, Wilko; Ehrenberg, K Roland; Glimm, Hanno; Ball, Claudia R

    2017-03-15

    Patient-derived cancer xenografts (PDX) are widely used to identify and evaluate novel therapeutic targets, and to test therapeutic approaches in preclinical mouse avatar trials. Despite their widespread use, potential caveats of PDX models remain considerably underappreciated. Here, we demonstrate that EBV-associated B-lymphoproliferations frequently develop following xenotransplantation of human colorectal and pancreatic carcinomas in highly immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl) /SzJ (NSG) mice (18/47 and 4/37 mice, respectively), and in derived cell cultures in vitro. Strikingly, even PDX with carcinoma histology can host scarce EBV-infected B-lymphocytes that can fully overgrow carcinoma cells during serial passaging in vitro and in vivo. As serial xenografting is crucial to expand primary tumor tissue for biobanks and cohorts for preclinical mouse avatar trials, the emerging dominance of B-lymphoproliferations in serial PDX represents a serious confounding factor in these models. Consequently, repeated phenotypic assessments of serial PDX are mandatory at each expansion step to verify "bona fide" carcinoma xenografts.

  13. Purification and measurement of secretory IgA in mouse milk.

    PubMed

    Parr, E L; Bozzola, J J; Parr, M B

    1995-03-27

    An important factor limiting better understanding of the protective role of sIgA at mucosal surfaces is the limited availability of the purified immunoglobulin. Among other things, purified sIgA is needed for use as a standard in measurements of the concentration of this immunoglobulin in mucosal secretions, particularly in mice, where several models of mucosal infections are available. We describe here a simple method by which one can obtain a mean of 3.5 ml of milk per mouse without a breast pump. Immunoblotting studies after native PAGE demonstrated that the milk contained mainly 420 kDa dimeric sIgA and higher polymeric forms of sIgA; only a trace of monomeric IgA was present. Similar immunoblotting studies after SDS-PAGE revealed that a portion of the sIgA was dissociated by this treatment. The 420 kDa sIgA was purified by salt fractionation, gel filtration, and affinity chromatography, and the purity of the final product was demonstrated by immunoblot analysis of biotinylated polypeptides after reduction of biotinylated protein. The concentration of 420 kDa sIgA in whey was measured by densitometry of immunoblot bands, using the purified 420 kDa sIgA as a standard, and found to be 1.0 +/- 0.3 mg/ml.

  14. Bone marrow CFU-GM and human tumor xenograft efficacy of three antitumor nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Rebecca G; Roth, Stephanie; Kurtzberg, Leslie S; Rouleau, Cecile; Yao, Min; Crawford, Jennifer; Krumbholz, Roy; Lovett, Dennis; Schmid, Steven; Teicher, Beverly A

    2009-05-01

    Nucleoside analogs are rationally designed anticancer agents that disrupt DNA and RNA synthesis. Fludarabine and cladribine have important roles in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Clofarabine is a next generation nucleoside analog which is under clinical investigation. The bone marrow toxicity, tumor cell cytotoxicity and human tumor xenograft activity of fludarabine, cladribine and clofarabine were compared. Mouse and human bone marrow were subjected to colony forming (CFU-GM) assays over a 5-log concentration range in culture. NCI-60 cell line screening data were compared. In vivo, a range of clofarabine doses was compared with fludarabine for efficacy in several human tumor xenografts. The IC90 concentrations for fludarabine and cladribine for mouse CFU-GM were >30 and 0.93 microM, and for human CFU-GM were 8 and 0.11 microM, giving mouse to human differentials of >3.8- and 8.5-fold. Clofarabine produced IC90s of 1.7 microM in mouse and 0.51 microM in human CFU-GM, thus a 3.3-fold differential between species. In the NCI-60 cell line screen, fludarabine and cladribine showed selective cytotoxicity toward leukemia cell lines while for clofarabine there was no apparent selectivity based upon origin of the tumor cells. In vivo, clofarabine produced a dose-dependent increase in tumor growth delay in the RL lymphoma, the RPMI-8226 multiple myeloma, and HT-29 colon carcinoma models. The PC3 prostate carcinoma was equally responsive to clofarabine and fludarabine. Bringing together bone marrow toxicity data, tumor cell line cytotoxicity data, and human tumor xenograft efficacy provides valuable information for the translation of preclinical findings to the clinic.

  15. [Osteostimulating effect of bone xenograft on bone tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Balin, V N; Balin, D V; Iordanishvili, A K; Musikin, M I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of experimental case-control study performed in 28 dogs divided in 2 groups was to assess local tissue reactions on bone xenograft transplantation; dynamics of bone remodeling and formation at the site of bone defect wall contacting with bone xenograft; dynamics and mechanisms of xenograft remodeling. Transplantation of xenograft in conventional bone defects did not cause inflammatory of destructive reactions because of high biocompatibility of the material. At transplantation site active fibrous bone trabeculae formation filling the spaces between xenograft participles was observed. On the 90th day newly formed bone showed lammelar structure. Simultaneously from the 42d day the invasion of cell elements from recipient bed into the material was seen leading to xenograft resorption. The observed dynamics may be assessed as gradual substitution of xenograft with newly formed host bone structures.

  16. Immune response to bovine pericardium implanted into α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout mice: feasibility as an animal model for testing efficacy of anticalcification treatments of xenografts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheul; Ahn, Hyuk; Kim, Soo Hwan; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Yong Jin

    2012-07-01

    Glutaraldehyde (GA)-fixed xenografts are prone to calcification after implantation in humans and there is evidence that immune reaction to the Galα1,3-Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (α-Gal) antigen may play a part in this process. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the immune response of α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (α-Gal KO) mice to bovine pericardium and to evaluate the effect of various anticalcification treatments on bovine pericardium using mouse subcutaneous implantation model. Bovine pericardial tissues were divided into eight groups according to the method of anticalcification treatments. Prepared tissues were subcutaneously implanted into the α-Gal KO and wild-type mice for 2 months, and anti-α-Gal antibodies were measured at 2 weeks and 2 months after implantation. Explanted tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry and calcium contents of the explanted tissues were measured. Titres of IgM and IgG antibodies in the α-Gal KO mice increased significantly according to the duration of implantation, whereas titres of IgM and IgG antibodies in the wild-type mice increased until 2 weeks after implantation without further increase thereafter. Titres of IgG antibodies measured at 2 months after implantation were significantly higher in the α-Gal KO mice than in the wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed macrophages surrounding the pericardial tissues irrespective of the mouse type into which the tissues implanted, whereas T-cells could only be observed in the tissues implanted into the α-Gal KO mice. Except the high-concentration GA-treated group, calcium contents of anticalcification-treated groups were all significantly lower or tended to be lower than that of the control group, irrespective of the mouse type. Calcium contents of the control group were significantly higher in the α-Gal KO mice than in the wild-type mice. Bovine pericardium implanted into the α-Gal KO mice caused significant increase in anti-α-Gal antibodies, showed

  17. In Vivo Measurements of T2 Relaxation Time of Mouse Lungs during Inspiration and Expiration

    PubMed Central

    Hockings, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The interest in measurements of magnetic resonance imaging relaxation times, T1, T2, T2*, with intention to characterize healthy and diseased lungs has increased recently. Animal studies play an important role in this context providing models for understanding and linking the measured relaxation time changes to the underlying physiology or disease. The aim of this work was to study how the measured transversal relaxation time (T2) in healthy lungs is affected by normal respiration in mouse. Method T2 of lung was measured in anaesthetized freely breathing mice. Image acquisition was performed on a 4.7 T, Bruker BioSpec with a multi spin-echo sequence (Car-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) in both end-expiration and end-inspiration. The echo trains consisted of ten echoes of inter echo time 3.5 ms or 4.0 ms. The proton density, T2 and noise floor were fitted to the measured signals of the lung parenchyma with a Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares three-parameter fit. Results T2 in the lungs was longer (p<0.01) at end-expiration (9.7±0.7 ms) than at end-inspiration (9.0±0.8 ms) measured with inter-echo time 3.5 ms. The corresponding relative proton density (lung/muscle tissue) was higher (p<0.001) during end-expiration, (0.61±0.06) than during end-inspiration (0.48±0.05). The ratio of relative proton density at end-inspiration to that at end-expiration was 0.78±0.09. Similar results were found for inter-echo time 4.0 ms and there was no significant difference between the T2 values or proton densities acquired with different interecho times. The T2 value increased linearly (p< 0.001) with proton density. Conclusion The measured T2 in-vivo is affected by diffusion across internal magnetic susceptibility gradients. In the lungs these gradients are modulated by respiration, as verified by calculations. In conclusion the measured T2 was found to be dependent on the size of the alveoli. PMID:27936061

  18. Xenografting of testicular tissue pieces: 12 years of an in vivo spermatogenesis system.

    PubMed

    Arregui, Lucía; Dobrinski, Ina

    2014-11-01

    Spermatogenesis is a dynamic and complex process that involves endocrine and testicular factors. During xenotransplantation of testicular tissue fragments into immunodecifient mice, a functional communication between host brain and donor testis is established. This interaction allows for the progression of spermatogenesis and recovery of fertilisation-competent spermatozoa from a broad range of mammalian species. In the last few years, significant progress has been achieved in testis tissue xenografting that improves our knowledge about the factors determining the success of grafting. The goal of this review is to provide up to date information about the role of factors such as donor age, donor species, testis tissue preservation or type of recipient mouse on the efficiency of this technique. Applications are described and compared with other techniques with similar purposes. Recent work has demonstrated that testicular tissue xenografting is used as a model to study gonadotoxicity of drugs and to obtain sperm from valuable young males. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  19. In vivo radiolocalization of antiosteogenic sarcoma monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Sakahara, H.; Hosoi, S.; Yamamuro, T.; Higashi, S.; Mikawa, H.; Endo, K.; Toyama, S.

    1984-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies Ost6 and Ost7 (mouse Immunoglobulin G1) to human osteogenic sarcoma were isolated from ascitic fluid and labeled with radioiodine. After injection into athymic nu/nu mice with s.c. xenografts of human osteogenic sarcoma, the uptake of radioactivity in tumors, visceral organs, and blood was determined. Five days after injection, Ost6 and Ost7 showed preferential accumulation in tumors (tumor:blood ratio, 4.3). Furthermore, with testicular and bladder tumors, both unreactive with Ost7, there was no localization of radiolabeled Ost7 in xenograft growths. When Ost7 was labeled with /sup 131/I, its accumulation into human osteogenic sarcoma could be clearly visualized by whole-body gamma-scintigraphy without computer-assisted data processing.

  20. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  1. Orthotopic xenografts of human melanoma and colonic and ovarian carcinoma in sheep to evaluate radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. H.; Rose, A. H.; Glancy, R. J.; Penhale, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Extrapolation to humans from experimental radioimmunotherapy in nude mouse xenograft models is confounded by large relative tumour size and small volume of distribution in mice allowing tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibodies unattainable in patients. Our large animal model of human tumours in cyclosporin-immunosuppressed sheep demonstrated tumour uptake of targeted radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies comparable with uptakes reported in clinical trials. Sheep immunosuppression with daily intravenous cyclosporin augmented by oral ketoconazole maintained trough blood levels of cyclosporin within the range 1000-1500 ng ml(-1). Human tumour cells were transplanted orthotopically by inoculation of 10(7) cells: SKMEL melanoma subcutaneously; LS174T and HT29 colon carcinoma into bowel, peritoneum and liver; and JAM ovarian carcinoma into ovary and peritoneum. Tumour xenografts grew at all sites within 3 weeks of inoculation, preserving characteristic morphology without evidence of necrosis or host rejection. Lymphatic metastasis was demonstrated in regional nodes draining xenografts of melanoma and ovarian carcinoma. Colonic LS1 74T xenografts produced mucin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The anti-CEA IgG1 monoclonal antibody A5B7 was radiolabelled with iodine-131 and administered intravenously to sheep. Peak uptake at 5 days in orthotopic human tumour transplants in gut was 0.027% DI g(-1) (percentage of injected dose per gram) and 0.034% DI g(-1) in hepatic metastases with tumour to blood ratios of 2-2.5. Non-specific tumour uptake in melanoma was 0.003% DI g(-1). Uptake of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in human tumours in our large animal model is comparable with that observed in patients and may be more realistic than nude mice xenografts for prediction of clinical efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9716032

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  3. Human microdosing and mice xenograft data of AGM-130 applied to estimate efficacious doses in patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Wan-Su; Park, Gab-Jin; Han, Seunghoon; Ban, Sooho; Park, Moon-Young; Kim, San-Ho; Kim, Seon-Myung; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung Sik; Shin, Young G; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-08-01

    AGM-130 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that exhibits dose-dependent efficacy in xenograft mouse models. During preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) studies, mice and rats showed comparable PK parameters while dogs showed unusually high clearance (CL), which has made human PK prediction challenging. To address this discrepancy, we performed a human microdosing PK and developed a mouse PK/PD model in order to guide the first-in-human studies. A microdose of AGM-130 was given via intravenous injection to healthy subjects. Efficacy data obtained using MCF-7 breast cancer cells implanted in mice was analyzed using pre-existing tumor growth inhibition models. We simulated a human PK/PD profile with the PK parameters obtained from the microdose study and the PD parameters estimated from the xenograft PK/PD model. The human CL of AGM-130 was 3.08 L/h/kg, which was comparable to CL in mice and rats. The time-courses of tumor growth in xenograft model was well described by a preexisting model. Our simulation indicated that the human doses needed for 50 and 90% inhibition of tumor growth were about 100 and 400 mg, respectively. This is the first report of using microdose PK and xenograft PK/PD model to predict efficacious doses before the first-in-human trial in cancer patients. In addition, this work highlights the importance of integration of all of information in PK/PD analysis and illustrates how modeling and simulation can be used to add value in the early stages of drug development.

  4. Preclinical transgenic and patient-derived xenograft models recapitulate the radiological features of human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Boult, Jessica K R; Apps, John R; Hölsken, Annett; Hutchinson, J Ciaran; Carreno, Gabriela; Danielson, Laura S; Smith, Laura M; Bäuerle, Tobias; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Virasami, Alex K; Koers, Alexander; Arthurs, Owen J; Jacques, Thomas S; Chesler, Louis; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Robinson, Simon P

    2017-05-08

    To assess the clinical relevance of transgenic and patient-derived xenograft models of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) using serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high resolution post-mortem microcomputed tomography (μ-CT), with correlation with histology and human ACP imaging. The growth patterns and radiological features of tumors arising in Hesx1(Cre/+) ;Ctnnb1(lox(ex3)/+) transgenic mice, and of patient-derived ACP xenografts implanted in the cerebral cortex, were monitored longitudinally in vivo with anatomical and functional MRI, and by ex vivo μ-CT at study end. Pathological correlates with hematoxylin and eosin stained sections were investigated. Early enlargement and heterogeneity of Hesx1(Cre/+) ;Ctnnb1(lox(ex3)/+) mouse pituitaries was evident at initial imaging at 8 weeks, which was followed by enlargement of a solid tumor, and development of cysts and hemorrhage. Tumors demonstrated MRI features that recapitulated those of human ACP, specifically, T1 -weighted signal enhancement in the solid tumor component following Gd-DTPA administration, and in some animals, hyperintense cysts on FLAIR and T1 -weighted images. Ex vivo μ-CT correlated with MRI findings and identified smaller cysts, which were confirmed by histology. Characteristic histological features, including wet keratin and calcification, were visible on μ-CT and verified by histological sections of patient-derived ACP xenografts. The Hesx1(Cre/+) ;Ctnnb1(lox(ex3)/+) transgenic mouse model and cerebral patient-derived ACP xenografts recapitulate a number of the key radiological features of the human disease and provide promising foundations for in vivo trials of novel therapeutics for the treatment of these tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Brain Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Dynamic measurement of the calcium buffering properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Carlo; Sztretye, Monika; Figueroa, Lourdes; Allen, Paul D; Ríos, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The buffering power, B, of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), ratio of the changes in total and free [Ca2+], was determined in fast-twitch mouse muscle cells subjected to depleting membrane depolarization. Changes in total SR [Ca2+] were measured integrating Ca2+ release flux, determined with a cytosolic [Ca2+] monitor. Free [Ca2+]SR was measured using the cameleon D4cpv-Casq1. In 34 wild-type (WT) cells average B during the depolarization (ON phase) was 157 (SEM 26), implying that of 157 ions released, 156 were bound inside the SR. B was significantly greater when BAPTA, which increases release flux, was present in the cytosol. B was greater early in the pulse – when flux was greatest – than at its end, and greater in the ON than in the OFF. In 29 Casq1-null cells, B was 40 (3.6). The difference suggests that 75% of the releasable calcium is normally bound to calsequestrin. In the nulls the difference in B between ON and OFF was less than in the WT but still significant. This difference and the associated decay in B during the ON were not artifacts of a slow SR monitor, as they were also found in the WT when [Ca2+]SR was tracked with the fast dye fluo-5N. The calcium buffering power, binding capacity and non-linear binding properties of the SR measured here could be accounted for by calsequestrin at the concentration present in mammalian muscle, provided that its properties were substantially different from those found in solution. Its affinity should be higher, or KD lower than the conventionally accepted 1 mm; its cooperativity (n in a Hill fit) should be higher and the stoichiometry of binding should be at the higher end of the values derived in solution. The reduction in B during release might reflect changes in calsequestrin conformation upon calcium loss. PMID:23148320

  6. Measurement of strain distributions in mouse femora with 3D-digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lianxiang; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Sheng; Samala, Praveen R.; Su, Min; Yokota, Hiroki

    2007-08-01

    Bone is a mechanosensitive tissue that adapts its mass, architecture and mechanical properties to external loading. Appropriate mechanical loads offer an effective means to stimulate bone remodeling and prevent bone loss. A role of in situ strain in bone is considered essential in enhancement of bone formation, and establishing a quantitative relationship between 3D strain distributions and a rate of local bone formation is important. Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) can achieve whole-field, non-contacting measurements of microscopic deformation for high-resolution determination of 3D strain distributions. However, the current system does not allow us to derive accurate strain distributions because of complex surface contours inherent to biological samples. Through development of a custom-made piezoelectric loading device as well as a new DSPI-based force calibration system, we built an advanced DSPI system and integrated local contour information to deformation data. Using a mouse femur in response to a knee loading modality as a model system, we determined 3D strain distributions and discussed effectiveness and limitations of the described system.

  7. Quantitative immuno-positron emission tomography imaging of HER2-positive tumor xenografts with an iodine-124 labeled anti-HER2 diabody.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew K; Doss, Mohan; Shaller, Calvin; Narayanan, Deepa; Marks, James D; Adler, Lee P; González Trotter, Dinko E; Adams, Gregory P

    2005-02-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides an effective means of both diagnosing/staging several types of cancer and evaluating efficacy of treatment. To date, the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved radiotracer for oncologic PET is (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose, which measures glucose accumulation as a surrogate for malignant activity. Engineered antibody fragments have been developed with the appropriate targeting specificity and systemic elimination properties predicted to allow for effective imaging of cancer based on expression of tumor associated antigens. We evaluated a small engineered antibody fragment specific for the HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase (C6.5 diabody) for its ability to function as a PET radiotracer when labeled with iodine-124. Our studies revealed HER2-dependent imaging of mouse tumor xenografts with a time-dependent increase in tumor-to-background signal over the course of the experiments. Radioiodination via an indirect method attenuated uptake of radioiodine in tissues that express the Na/I symporter without affecting the ability to image the tumor xenografts. In addition, we validated a method for using a clinical PET/computed tomography scanner to quantify tumor uptake in small-animal model systems; quantitation of the tumor targeting by PET correlated with traditional necropsy-based analysis at all time points analyzed. Thus, diabodies may represent an effective molecular structure for development of novel PET radiotracers.

  8. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Wright, Gus A.; Safe, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2 transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5+ stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. PMID:25977509

  9. A bioassay to measure energy metabolism in mouse colonic crypts, organoids, and sorted stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Davidson, Laurie A; Callaway, Evelyn S; Wright, Gus A; Safe, Stephen; Chapkin, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that targeting cancer cell energy metabolism might be an effective therapeutic approach for selective ablation of malignancies. Using a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we have demonstrated that select environmental agents can alter colonic mitochondrial function by increasing respiration-induced proton leak, thereby inducing apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk. To further probe bioenergetics in primary intestinal cells, we developed methodology that can be modified and adapted to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic crypts, the basic functional unit of the colon, and colonic organoids, an ex vivo 3D culture of colonic crypts. Furthermore, in combination with the MoFlo Astrios High-Speed Cell Sorter, we were able to measure the bioenergetic profiles of colonic adult stem and daughter cells from Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) transgenic mice. We examined the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a full arylhydrocarbon receptor agonist, known to affect gastrointestinal function and cancer risk, on the bioenergetic profiles of intestinal epithelial cells. Mouse colonic crypts, organoids, or sorted single cells were seeded onto Matrigel-precoated Seahorse XF24 microplates for extracellular flux analysis. Temporal analyses revealed distinct energy metabolic profiles in crypts and organoids challenged with TCDD. Furthermore, sorted Lgr5(+) stem cells exhibited a Warburg-like metabolic profile. This is noteworthy because perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the earliest step toward colon tumorigenesis. We propose that our innovative methodology may facilitate future in vivo/ex vivo metabolic studies using environmental agents affecting colonocyte energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Proteogenomic integration reveals therapeutic targets in breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-lin; Li, Shunqiang; Mertins, Philipp; Cao, Song; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Ruggles, Kelly V.; Mani, D. R.; Clauser, Karl R.; Tanioka, Maki; Usary, Jerry; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Xie, Ling; Yoon, Christopher; Qiao, Jana W; Wrobel, John; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Snider, Jacqueline E.; Hoog, Jeremy; Singh, Purba; Niu, Beifung; Guo, Zhanfang; Sun, Sam Qiancheng; Sanati, Souzan; Kawaler, Emily; Wang, Xuya; Scott, Adam; Ye, Kai; McLellan, Michael D.; Wendl, Michael C.; Malovannaya, Anna; Held, Jason M.; Gillette, Michael A.; Fenyö, David; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Davies, Sherri R.; Perou, Charles M.; Ma, Cynthia; Reid Townsend, R.; Chen, Xian; Carr, Steven A.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Ding, Li

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have enabled extensive analysis of cancer proteomes. Here, we employed quantitative proteomics to profile protein expression across 24 breast cancer patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. Integrated proteogenomic analysis shows positive correlation between expression measurements from transcriptomic and proteomic analyses; further, gene expression-based intrinsic subtypes are largely re-capitulated using non-stromal protein markers. Proteogenomic analysis also validates a number of predicted genomic targets in multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. However, several protein/phosphoprotein events such as overexpression of AKT proteins and ARAF, BRAF, HSP90AB1 phosphosites are not readily explainable by genomic analysis, suggesting that druggable translational and/or post-translational regulatory events may be uniquely diagnosed by MS. Drug treatment experiments targeting HER2 and components of the PI3K pathway supported proteogenomic response predictions in seven xenograft models. Our study demonstrates that MS-based proteomics can identify therapeutic targets and highlights the potential of PDX drug response evaluation to annotate MS-based pathway activities. PMID:28348404

  11. Mifepristone improves chemo-radiation response in glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have investigated the ability of Mifepristone, an anti-progestin and anti-glucocorticoid drug, to modulate the antitumor effect of current standard clinical treatment in glioblastoma xenografts. Methods The effect of radiation alone or combined with Mifepristone and Temozolamide was evaluated on tumor growth in glioblastoma xenografts, both in terms of preferentially triggering tumor cell death and inhibiting angiogenesis. Tumor size was measured once a week using a caliper and tumor metabolic-activity was carried out by molecular imaging using a microPET/CT scanner. The effect of Mifepristone on the expression of angiogenic factors after concomitant radio-chemotherapy was determined using a quantitative real-time PCR analysis of VEGF gene expression. Results The analysis of the data shows a significant antitumoral effect by the simultaneous administration of radiation-Mifepristone-Temozolamide in comparison with radiation alone or radiation-Temozolamide. Conclusion Our results suggest that Mifepristone could improve the efficacy of chemo-radiotherapy in Glioblastoma. The addition of Mifepristone to standard radiation-Temozolamide therapy represents a potential approach as a chemo-radio-sensitizer in treating GBMs, which have very limited treatment options. PMID:23530939

  12. Multi-parameter measurement of the permeability transition pore opening in isolated mouse heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Raluca; Neeley, Chris K; Karamanlidis, Georgios; Hawkins, Brian J

    2012-09-07

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) is a non specific channel that forms in the inner mitochondrial membrane to transport solutes with a molecular mass smaller than 1.5 kDa. Although the definitive molecular identity of the pore is still under debate, proteins such as cyclophilin D, VDAC and ANT contribute to mtPTP formation. While the involvement of mtPTP opening in cell death is well established(1), accumulating evidence indicates that the mtPTP serves a physiologic role during mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis(2), bioenergetics and redox signaling( 3). mtPTP opening is triggered by matrix Ca(2+) but its activity can be modulated by several other factors such as oxidative stress, adenine nucleotide depletion, high concentrations of Pi, mitochondrial membrane depolarization or uncoupling, and long chain fatty acids(4). In vitro, mtPTP opening can be achieved by increasing Ca(2+) concentration inside the mitochondrial matrix through exogenous additions of Ca(2+) (calcium retention capacity). When Ca(2+) levels inside mitochondria reach a certain threshold, the mtPTP opens and facilitates Ca(2+) release, dissipation of the proton motive force, membrane potential collapse and an increase in mitochondrial matrix volume (swelling) that ultimately leads to the rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane and irreversible loss of organelle function. Here we describe a fluorometric assay that allows for a comprehensive characterization of mtPTP opening in isolated mouse heart mitochondria. The assay involves the simultaneous measurement of 3 mitochondrial parameters that are altered when mtPTP opening occurs: mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling (uptake and release, as measured by Ca(2+) concentration in the assay medium), mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial volume. The dyes employed for Ca(2+) measurement in the assay medium and mitochondrial membrane potential are Fura FF, a membrane impermeant, ratiometric indicator which undergoes a shift in

  13. Monitoring Serial Changes in Circulating Human Breast Cancer Cells in Mruine Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Repollet, Madeline; Luker, Kathryn E.; Brown, Martha; Rae, James M.; Dontu, Gabriela; Schott, Anne F.; Wicha, Max; Doyle, Gerald V.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Luker, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are emerging as a powerful prognostic and predictive biomarker in several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate. Studies of CTC in metastasis and further development of CTC as a biomarker in cancer have been limited by the inability to repetitively monitor CTC in mouse models of cancer. We have validated a method to enumerate CTC in blood samples obtained from living mice using a modified version of an in vitro diagnostic system for quantifying CTC in patients. Different routes of blood collection were tested to identify a method to reproducibly recover CTC from tumor-bearing mice without interference from contaminating normal murine epithelial cells. CTC are present in blood samples from mice bearing orthotopic xenografts of several different breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancer cells from patient biopsies. We also show that this technology can be used for serial monitoring of CTC in mouse xenograft models of human breast cancer. These results establish a new method for studying CTC in mouse models of epithelial cancer, providing the foundation for studies of molecular regulation of CTC in cancer and CTC as biomarker for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:18632603

  14. Transforming growth factor-β signalling controls human breast cancer metastasis in a zebrafish xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Drabsch, Yvette; He, Shuning; Zhang, Long; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; ten Dijke, Peter

    2013-11-07

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway is known to control human breast cancer invasion and metastasis. We demonstrate that the zebrafish xenograft assay is a robust and dependable animal model for examining the role of pharmacological modulators and genetic perturbation of TGF-β signalling in human breast tumour cells. We injected cancer cells into the embryonic circulation (duct of cuvier) and examined their invasion and metastasis into the avascular collagenous tail. Various aspects of the TGF-β signalling pathway were blocked by chemical inhibition, small interfering RNA (siRNA), or small hairpin RNA (shRNA). Analysis was conducted using fluorescent microscopy. Breast cancer cells with different levels of malignancy, according to in vitro and in vivo mouse studies, demonstrated invasive and metastatic properties within the embryonic zebrafish model that nicely correlated with their differential tumourigenicity in mouse models. Interestingly, MCF10A M2 and M4 cells invaded into the caudal hematopoietic tissue and were visible as a cluster of cells, whereas MDA MB 231 cells invaded into the tail fin and were visible as individual cells. Pharmacological inhibition with TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitors or tumour specific Smad4 knockdown disturbed invasion and metastasis in the zebrafish xenograft model and closely mimicked the results we obtained with these cells in a mouse metastasis model. Inhibition of matrix metallo proteinases, which are induced by TGF-β in breast cancer cells, blocked invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells. The zebrafish-embryonic breast cancer xenograft model is applicable for the mechanistic understanding, screening and development of anti-TGF-β drugs for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  15. Measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in mouse models within 4 days and without prior food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Remmelink, Esther; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs; Loos, Maarten

    2016-11-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by deficits in cognitive flexibility. Modeling cognitive flexibility in mice enables the investigation of mechanisms underlying these deficits. The majority of currently available behavioral tests targeting this cognitive domain are reversal learning tasks that require scheduled food restriction, extended training periods and labor-intensive, and stress-inducing animal handling. Here, we describe a novel 4-day (4-d) continuously running task measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in an automated home cage (CognitionWall DL/RL task) that largely eliminates these limitations. In this task, mice can earn unlimited number of food rewards by passing through the correct hole of the three-holed CognitionWall. To assess the validity and sensitivity of this novel task, the performance of C57BL/6J mice, amyloid precursor protein/presenilin1 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice, α-calmodulin kinase-II (αCaMKII) T305D knock-in mice, and mice with an orbitofrontal cortex lesion were examined. We found that C57BL/6J mice reach stable performance levels within the 4 d of the task, while experiencing only slight reductions in weight and no major effects on circadian rhythm. The task detected learning deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic and αCaMKII T305D mutant mice. Additionally, we established that the orbitofrontal cortex underlies reversal learning performance in our task. Because of its short duration and the absence of food deprivation and concurrent weight loss, this novel automated home-cage task substantially improves comprehensive preclinical assessment of cognitive functions in mouse models of psychiatric and neurological disorders and also enables analysis during specific developmental stages.

  16. Measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in mouse models within 4 days and without prior food deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Smit, August B.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by deficits in cognitive flexibility. Modeling cognitive flexibility in mice enables the investigation of mechanisms underlying these deficits. The majority of currently available behavioral tests targeting this cognitive domain are reversal learning tasks that require scheduled food restriction, extended training periods and labor-intensive, and stress-inducing animal handling. Here, we describe a novel 4-day (4-d) continuously running task measuring discrimination- and reversal learning in an automated home cage (CognitionWall DL/RL task) that largely eliminates these limitations. In this task, mice can earn unlimited number of food rewards by passing through the correct hole of the three-holed CognitionWall. To assess the validity and sensitivity of this novel task, the performance of C57BL/6J mice, amyloid precursor protein/presenilin1 transgenic (APP/PS1) mice, α-calmodulin kinase-II (αCaMKII) T305D knock-in mice, and mice with an orbitofrontal cortex lesion were examined. We found that C57BL/6J mice reach stable performance levels within the 4 d of the task, while experiencing only slight reductions in weight and no major effects on circadian rhythm. The task detected learning deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic and αCaMKII T305D mutant mice. Additionally, we established that the orbitofrontal cortex underlies reversal learning performance in our task. Because of its short duration and the absence of food deprivation and concurrent weight loss, this novel automated home-cage task substantially improves comprehensive preclinical assessment of cognitive functions in mouse models of psychiatric and neurological disorders and also enables analysis during specific developmental stages. PMID:27918287

  17. Structural and functional measurements of fertilized mouse oocytes with combined high-resolution OCT and inverted microscope (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Karol; Ajduk, Anna; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Szkulmowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive imaging methodology for 3D structural and functional measurements of fertilized mouse oocytes. In contrary to methods used for mouse zygote imaging so far OCT provides 3D data without z axis movement of sample or objective lens. Furthermore, complex scanning protocols used in this study give access to different scales of repetition times and thus may become a tool for investigation of a different dynamic processes. Additionally, proposed scanning approach via variety of statistic operations can be used to enhance the quality of structural images. OCT system capabilities are presented and compared to standard microscopy. With a single 3D measurements one can extract 3D structure of the oocytes as well as en-face images that correspond to both bright and dark field microscopy. As an example of dynamic oocyte imaging pronuclei motion during development is presented. Limitations and possibilities of the new system are discussed.

  18. In vivo measurement of intrauterine pressure by telemetry: a new approach for studying parturition in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Stephanie L.; Kutschke, William; Cabeza, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic and knockout mouse models have proven useful in the study of genes necessary for parturition—including genes that affect the timing and/or progression of labor contractions. However, taking full advantage of these models will require a detailed characterization of the contractile patterns in the mouse uterus. Currently the best methodology for this has been measurement of isometric tension in isolated muscle strips in vitro. However, this methodology does not provide a real-time measure of changes in uterine pressure over the course of pregnancy. Recent advances have opened the possibility of using radiotelemetric devices to more accurately and comprehensively study intrauterine pressure in vivo. We tested the effectiveness of this technology in the mouse, in both wild-type (WT) mice and a mouse model of defective parturition (SK3 channel-overexpressing mice), after surgical implant of telemetry transmitters into the uterine horn. Continuous recordings from day 18 of pregnancy through delivery revealed that WT mice typically deliver during the 12-h dark cycle after 19.5 days postcoitum. In these mice, intrauterine pressure gradually increases during this cycle, to threefold greater than that measured during the 12-h cycle before delivery. SK3-overexpressing mice, by contrast, exhibited lower intrauterine pressure over the same period. These results are consistent with the outcome of previous in vitro studies, and they indicate that telemetry is an accurate method for measuring uterine contraction, and hence parturition, in mice. The use of this technology will lead to important novel insights into changes in intrauterine pressure during the course of pregnancy. PMID:20460604

  19. Multimodality imaging methods for assessing retinoblastoma orthotopic xenograft growth and development.

    PubMed

    Corson, Timothy W; Samuels, Brian C; Wenzel, Andrea A; Geary, Anna J; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Hanenberg, Helmut; Bailey, Barbara J; Rogers, Pamela I; Pollok, Karen E; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Territo, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of the pediatric ocular tumor retinoblastoma are paving the way for development of targeted therapies. Robust model systems such as orthotopic xenografts are necessary for testing such therapeutics. One system involves bioluminescence imaging of luciferase-expressing human retinoblastoma cells injected into the vitreous of newborn rat eyes. Although used for several drug studies, the spatial and temporal development of tumors in this model has not been documented. Here, we present a new model to allow analysis of average luciferin flux ([Formula: see text]) through the tumor, a more biologically relevant parameter than peak bioluminescence as traditionally measured. Moreover, we monitored the spatial development of xenografts in the living eye. We engineered Y79 retinoblastoma cells to express a lentivirally-delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein-luciferase fusion protein. In intravitreal xenografts, we assayed bioluminescence and computed [Formula: see text], as well as documented tumor growth by intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT), brightfield, and fluorescence imaging. In vivo bioluminescence, ex vivo tumor size, and ex vivo fluorescent signal were all highly correlated in orthotopic xenografts. By OCT, xenografts were dense and highly vascularized, with well-defined edges. Small tumors preferentially sat atop the optic nerve head; this morphology was confirmed on histological examination. In vivo, [Formula: see text] in xenografts showed a plateau effect as tumors became bounded by the dimensions of the eye. The combination of [Formula: see text] modeling and in vivo intraocular imaging allows both quantitative and high-resolution, non-invasive spatial analysis of this retinoblastoma model. This technique will be applied to other cell lines and experimental therapeutic trials in the future.

  20. Multimodality Imaging Methods for Assessing Retinoblastoma Orthotopic Xenograft Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Corson, Timothy W.; Samuels, Brian C.; Wenzel, Andrea A.; Geary, Anna J.; Riley, Amanda A.; McCarthy, Brian P.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Bailey, Barbara J.; Rogers, Pamela I.; Pollok, Karen E.; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Territo, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of the pediatric ocular tumor retinoblastoma are paving the way for development of targeted therapies. Robust model systems such as orthotopic xenografts are necessary for testing such therapeutics. One system involves bioluminescence imaging of luciferase-expressing human retinoblastoma cells injected into the vitreous of newborn rat eyes. Although used for several drug studies, the spatial and temporal development of tumors in this model has not been documented. Here, we present a new model to allow analysis of average luciferin flux () through the tumor, a more biologically relevant parameter than peak bioluminescence as traditionally measured. Moreover, we monitored the spatial development of xenografts in the living eye. We engineered Y79 retinoblastoma cells to express a lentivirally-delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein-luciferase fusion protein. In intravitreal xenografts, we assayed bioluminescence and computed , as well as documented tumor growth by intraocular optical coherence tomography (OCT), brightfield, and fluorescence imaging. In vivo bioluminescence, ex vivo tumor size, and ex vivo fluorescent signal were all highly correlated in orthotopic xenografts. By OCT, xenografts were dense and highly vascularized, with well-defined edges. Small tumors preferentially sat atop the optic nerve head; this morphology was confirmed on histological examination. In vivo, in xenografts showed a plateau effect as tumors became bounded by the dimensions of the eye. The combination of modeling and in vivo intraocular imaging allows both quantitative and high-resolution, non-invasive spatial analysis of this retinoblastoma model. This technique will be applied to other cell lines and experimental therapeutic trials in the future. PMID:24901248

  1. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  2. Speed of leukemia development and genetic diversity in xenograft models of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Poglio, Sandrine; Lewandowski, Daniel; Calvo, Julien; Caye, Aurélie; Gros, Audrey; Laharanne, Elodie; Leblanc, Thierry; Landman-Parker, Judith; Baruchel, André; Soulier, Jean; Ballerini, Paola; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Pflumio, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) develops through accumulation of multiple genomic alterations within T-cell progenitors resulting in clonal heterogeneity among leukemic cells. Human T-ALL xeno-transplantation in immunodeficient mice is a gold standard approach to study leukemia biology and we recently uncovered that the leukemia development is more or less rapid depending on T-ALL sample. The resulting human leukemia may arise through genetic selection and we previously showed that human T-ALL development in immune-deficient mice is significantly enhanced upon CD7+/CD34+ leukemic cell transplantations. Here we investigated the genetic characteristics of CD7+/CD34+ and CD7+/CD34− cells from newly diagnosed human T-ALL and correlated it to the speed of leukemia development. We observed that CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− T-ALL cells that promote leukemia within a short-time period are genetically similar, as well as xenograft-derived leukemia resulting from both cell fractions. In the case of delayed T-ALL growth CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− cells were either genetically diverse, the resulting xenograft leukemia arising from different but branched subclones present in the original sample, or similar, indicating decreased fitness to mouse micro-environment. Altogether, our work provides new information relating the speed of leukemia development in xenografts to the genetic diversity of T-ALL cell compartments. PMID:27191650

  3. Human skeletal muscle xenograft as a new preclinical model for muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanfan; King, Oliver D.; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Takako I.; Ward, Christopher W.; Kerr, Jaclyn P.; Liu, Naili; Emerson, Charles P.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Partridge, Terence A.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutics requires good animal models of disease. Disorders for which good animal models do not exist have very few drugs in development or clinical trial. Even where there are accepted, albeit imperfect models, the leap from promising preclinical drug results to positive clinical trials commonly fails, including in disorders of skeletal muscle. The main alternative model for early drug development, tissue culture, lacks both the architecture and, usually, the metabolic fidelity of the normal tissue in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of human to mouse xenografts as a preclinical model of myopathy. Human skeletal muscle biopsies transplanted into the anterior tibial compartment of the hindlimbs of NOD-Rag1null IL2rγnull immunodeficient host mice regenerate new vascularized and innervated myofibers from human myogenic precursor cells. The grafts exhibit contractile and calcium release behavior, characteristic of functional muscle tissue. The validity of the human graft as a model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is demonstrated in disease biomarker studies, showing that gene expression profiles of xenografts mirror those of the fresh donor biopsies. These findings illustrate the value of a new experimental model of muscle disease, the human muscle xenograft in mice, as a feasible and valid preclinical tool to better investigate the pathogenesis of human genetic myopathies and to more accurately predict their response to novel therapeutics. PMID:24452336

  4. Measurement of intraventricular pressure and cardiac performance in the intact closed-chest anesthetized mouse.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, J N; Robbins, J

    1997-03-01

    To fully utilize the potential of newly developed mouse models with specific genetic mutations, it is necessary to study the functional consequences of genetic manipulation in the fully intact animal. To this end, the purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a methodology for the study of myocardial performance in the fully intact, closed-chest mouse. Left ventricular function was evaluated in euthyroid, hypothyroid, and hyperthyroid mice, animals with well-documented alterations in myocardial function. The mice were anesthetized and instrumented with polyethylene catheters in the right femoral artery and vein and with a Millar MIKRO-TIP transducer in the left ventricle via the right carotid artery. Structural and functional evidence suggested that the instrumentation procedure did not cause myocardial damage, valvular insufficiency, or aortic obstruction. Isovolumic indexes of myocardial contractility derived from the left ventricular pressure pulse and its first derivative demonstrated a 40% increase in contractility in the hyperthyroid animals and a 40% decrease in contractility in the hypothyroid animals. Similar differences in the indexes of relaxation were observed. Furthermore, isoproterenol dose-response relationships of these contractile parameters were blunted in the hypothyroid animals and augmented in the hyperthyroid animals compared with euthyroid control animals. Given the small size of the mouse and the high frequency of the cardiac cycle, these data demonstrate the feasibilty of combining a high-fidelity, microtip manometer with a high-speed data-acquisition system to obtain faithful recordings of cardiac performance in the fully intact mouse.

  5. Quantitative Aging Pattern in Mouse Urine Vapor as Measured by Gas-Liquid Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Arthur B.; Dirren, Henri; Sheets, Alan; Miquel, Jaime; Lundgren, Paul R.

    1975-01-01

    We have discovered a quantitative aging pattern in mouse urine vapor. The diagnostic power of the pattern has been found to be high. We hope that this pattern will eventually allow quantitative estimates of physiological age and some insight into the biochemistry of aging.

  6. Meiotic activity in orthotopic xenografts derived from human postpubertal testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Van Saen, D; Goossens, E; Bourgain, C; Ferster, A; Tournaye, H

    2011-02-01

    Grafting of frozen-thawed testicular tissue has been suggested as a novel fertility preservation method for patients undergoing gonadotoxic treatments. However, this technique still needs further optimization before any clinical application. So far, grafting of human testicular tissue has only been performed to the back skin of nude mice and has shown spermatogonial stem-cell survival and occasionally differentiation up to primary spermatocytes. In this study, orthotopic grafting to mouse testes was evaluated as an alternative, and the effect of freezing and the donor's age was studied. Human testicular tissue was obtained from two prepubertal (aged 3 and 5) and two postpubertal (aged 12 and 13) boys. Both fresh and frozen-thawed testicular tissue was grafted to the testis of immuno-deficient nude mice. Four and nine months after transplantation, testes were analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Four and nine months after transplantation, spermatogonial stem cells were observed in all tissue grafts. Germ cell survival was found to be higher in xenografts from the older boys when compared with that from younger donors. Furthermore, no differentiation was observed in the xenografts from younger patients, but the grafts of two older donors showed differentiation up to the primary spermatocyte level, with the presence of secondary spermatocytes in the oldest donor 9 months after transplantation. This xenografting study shows that intratesticular grafting results in high germ cell survival. In grafts derived from the older boys, meiotic activity was maintained in the xenografts for at least 9 months. Although difficult to conduct due to the scarcity of the tissue, more comparative research is needed to elucidate an optimal grafting strategy.

  7. Tumor-associated primo vascular system is derived from xenograft, not host.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ashraful; Thomas, Shelia D; Sedoris, Kara J; Slone, Stephen P; Alatassi, Houda; Miller, Donald M

    2013-02-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS), which is composed of very small primo-vessels (PV) and primo-nodes (PN), has recently emerged as a third component of circulatory system. Here, we report the presence of a tumor derived PVS in murine xenografts of human histiocytic lymphoma (U937) in close proximity to the tumor. Within this system, PNs are small (~500-600 μM diameter) membranous sac-like structures which contain numerous small cells which can be demonstrated by DAPI staining. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining of the peri-tumoral PVS shows the presence of loose structures lined by fibroblasts but filled with dense fibers, cells, lacunae and nerve-like structures. The origin and type of cells within the PVS was characterized by immunostaining with antibodies for CD68, CD45 and lysozyme. The results of these studies reveal that the PVS of the xenograft originates from the human U937 tumor cells. qRT-PCR analysis of mRNA isolated from PVS cells reveals a striking predominance of human, rather than mouse, sequences. Of particular interest, human stem cell specific transcription factors were overexpressed, most notably KLF4, an upstream regulator of NANOG which maintains the pluripotent and undifferentiated state of stem cells. These results suggest that the cells present within the PVS are derived from the human xenograft and suggests that the primo-vessels associated with the xenografted tumor may provide a safe haven for a select population of cancer stem cells. Further understanding of the biological properties of these cells may allow the development of new anti-cancer interventions.

  8. [Effects of compound Zhe-Bei granule (CZBG) combined with doxorubicin on expression of membrane transport proteins in K562/A02 cell xenografts].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Yun; Zheng, Zhi; Hou, Li; Jiang, Miao; Dong, Qing; Tian, Shao-Dan; Ma, Wei; Chen, Ju; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xin-Yi

    2010-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the effects of compound Zhe-Bei granule (CZBG) combined with doxorubicin on expressions of P-gp, MRP, LRP in K562/A02 cell xenografts. Tumor xenograft model were established by injecting the multidrug resistant cell line K562/A02 in the axillary flank of BALB/c-nu-nu mice. CZBG-intragastric administration and doxorubicin-intraperitoneal injection in combination were given to the BALB/c-nu nude mice. The tumor xenografts were made into slice after the dissection, and the expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts in mice were investigated by immunohistochemical technique. The integral optical density (IOD) of P-gp, MRP, LRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts were measured by Image Pro Plus 6.0. The results showed that as compared with the doxorubicin alone, the combination of the doxorubicin and CZBG with high, middle and low dosage could decrease IOD of P-gp, MRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts with statistical significance (p < 0.05). The LRP expression in K562/A02 tumor xenografts was not observed in five groups. It is concluded that the combination of CZBG with doxorubicin decreases the expressions of P-gp, MRP in K562/A02 tumor xenografts of mice.

  9. The effect of gas exchange on multiple-breath nitrogen washout measures of ventilation inhomogeneity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Dharmakumara, Mahesh; Prisk, G Kim; Royce, Simon G; Tawhai, Merryn; Thompson, Bruce R

    2014-11-01

    Inert-gas washout measurements using oxygen, in the lungs of small animals, are complicated by the continuous process of oxygen consumption (V̇o2). The multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) technique uses the alveolar slope to determine measures of ventilation inhomogeneity in the acinar (Sacin) and conducting (Scond) airway regions, as well as overall inhomogeneity, as determined by the lung clearance index (LCI). We hypothesized that measured ventilation inhomogeneity in the mouse lung while it is alive is in fact an artifact due to the high V̇o2 in proportion to alveolar gas volume (Va), and not ventilation inhomogeneity per se. In seven male C57BL/6 mice, MBNW was performed alive and postmortem to derive measures with and without the effect of gas exchange, respectively. These results were compared with those obtained from an asymmetric multibranch point mathematical model of the mouse lung. There was no statistical difference in Sacin and LCI between alive and postmortem results (Sacin alive = 0.311 ± 0.043 ml(-1) and Sacin postmortem = 0.338 ± 0.032 ml(-1), LCI alive = 7.0 ± 0.1 and LCI postmortem = 7.0 ± 0.1). However, there was a significant decrease in Scond from 0.086 ± 0.005 ml(-1) alive to 0.006 ± 0.002 ml(-1) postmortem (P < 0.01). Model simulations replicated these results. Furthermore, in the model, as V̇o2 increased, so did the alveolar slope. These findings suggests that the MBNW measurement of Scond in the mouse lung is confounded by the effect of gas exchange, a result of the high V̇o2-to-Va ratio in this small animal, and not due to inhomogeneity within the airways.

  10. Effects of complement suppression on xenograft survival in hyperacute rejection.

    PubMed

    Mukai, S; Orihashi, K; Sueda, T; Kajihara, H; Matsuura, Y

    1999-03-01

    To examine the significance of complement in discordant cardiac xenograft rejection, morphological changes in the rejection reaction were investigated following administration of FUT-175 (FUT), an anticomplement reagent. Guinea pigs were the cardiac donors, and Wistar rats were the recipients. Four groups of rats were constituted as follows: Group 0 was the control group. FUT of 40 mg/kg was injected intraperitoneally in group I. It was followed by continuous intravenous infusion (20 and 40 mg/kg/hr) in groups II and III. In one series, the effects of FUT on complement suppression was examined. In the FUT groups of rats (groups I to III), the serum levels of CH50 and ACH50 were measured at 0, 1, 2 and 4 hr following injection of FUT. In the second series of rats with identical treatments, the graft heart beating time following cardiac transplantation was measured. Cardiac transplantation into untreated rats was also performed as a control (group 0). In another series, the graft hearts in the FUT groups were extracted after 15, 30, 60 and 90 min of coronary reperfusion for morphological examination with scanning electron microscopy. The complement levels decreased significantly in the FUT-treated rats in a dose-dependent manner. Although the graft heart beating times in the FUT-treated groups were significantly longer than in group 0 (103, 106, and 112 min versus 14.7 min, p < 0.01), there was no significant difference in the graft heart beating time or in the morphological changes among the three FUT groups. Our results suggest the presence of factors other than complements contribute to the cardiac xenograft rejection.

  11. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-05-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. Intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence properties of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were characterized, and their distributions in mouse cornea in vivo were measured by 3D MPM imaging. Both moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin had similar multiphoton spectra, while moxifloxacin had stronger fluorescence than gatifloxacin. MPM imaging of mouse cornea in vivo showed (1) moxifloxacin had good penetration through the superficial corneal epithelium, while gatifloxacin had relatively poor penetration, (2) both ophthalmic solutions had high intracellular distribution. In vivo MPM results were consistent with previous studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MPM as a method for in vivo direct measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in the cornea.

  12. X-ray fluorescence microscopic measurement of elemental distribution in the mouse retina with age.

    PubMed

    Grubman, Alexandra; Guennel, Philipp; Vessey, Kirstan A; Jones, Michael W M; James, Simon A; de Jonge, Martin D; White, Anthony R; Fletcher, Erica L

    2016-10-01

    The biologically important metals such as zinc, copper and iron play key roles in retinal function, yet no study has mapped the spatio-temporal distribution of retinal biometals in healthy or diseased retina. We investigated a natural mouse model of retinal degeneration, the Cln6(nclf) mouse. As dysfunctional metabolism of biometals is observed in the brains of these animals and deregulated metal homeostasis has been linked to retinal degeneration, we focused on mapping the elemental distribution in the healthy and Cln6(nclf) mouse retina with age. Retinal and RPE elemental homeostasis was mapped in Cln6(nclf) and C57BL6/J mice from 1 to 8 months of age using X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron. In the healthy retina, we detected a progressive loss of phosphorus in the outer nuclear layer and significant reduction in iron in the inner segments of the photoreceptors. Further investigation revealed a unique elemental signature for each retinal layer, with high areal concentrations of iron and sulfur in the photoreceptor segments and calcium, phosphorus, zinc and potassium enrichment predominantly in the nuclear layers. The analysis of retinae from Cln6(nclf) mice did not show significant temporal changes in elemental distributions compared to age matched controls, despite significant photoreceptor cell loss. Our data therefore demonstrates that retinal layers have unique elemental composition. Elemental distribution is, with few exceptions, stably maintained over time in healthy and Cln6(nclf) mouse retina, suggesting conservation of elemental distribution is critical for basic retinal function with age and is not modulated by processes underlying retinal degeneration.

  13. A conditional mouse model for measuring the frequency of homologous recombination events in vivo in the absence of essential genes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Claybon, Alison B; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2011-09-01

    The ability to detect and repair DNA damage is crucial to the prevention of various diseases. Loss of function of genes involved in these processes is known to result in significant developmental defects and/or predisposition to cancer. One such DNA repair mechanism, homologous recombination, has the capacity to repair a wide variety of lesions. Knockout mouse models of genes thought to be involved in DNA repair processes are frequently lethal, making in vivo studies very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, we set out to develop an in vivo conditional mouse model system to facilitate investigations into the involvement of essential genes in homologous recombination. To test our model, we measured the frequency of spontaneous homologous recombination using the pink-eyed unstable mouse model, in which we conditionally excised either Blm or full-length Brca1 (breast cancer 1, early onset). These two genes are hypothesized to have opposing roles in homologous recombination. In summary, our in vivo data supports in vitro studies suggesting that BLM suppresses homologous recombination, while full-length BRCA1 promotes this process.

  14. Antitumor effect of Kanglaite® injection in human pancreatic cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kanglaite® injection (KLT), with a main ingredient of Coix seed oil (a traditional Chinese medicine), has been widely used for cancer treatment in China. KLT has an inhibitory effect on many kinds of tumors and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling promotes cell survival, proliferation, and progression in cancer cells. Therefore, targeting this pathway may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for human cancers. Methods Here, we examined the effects of KLT on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice, and assessed its therapeutic potential. Growth and apoptosis of tumor xenografts were examined, and the expression levels of genes and proteins involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were measured by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Results Our results revealed that KLT dramatically inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer xenografts and induced apoptosis simultaneously. Furthermore, it downregulated the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR. Conclusions These results suggest that KLT can suppress growth and induce apoptosis of pancreatic cancer xenografts. Moreover, KLT can downregulate the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR to modulate the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:25005526

  15. Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Du, Zhiyun; Ma, Shijing; Liu, Yue; Li, Dongli; Huang, Huarong; Jiang, Sen; Cheng, Shupeng; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention. PMID:27217750

  16. Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Du, Zhiyun; Ma, Shijing; Liu, Yue; Li, Dongli; Huang, Huarong; Jiang, Sen; Cheng, Shupeng; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention.

  17. Measuring oxygen tension modulation, induced by a new pre-radiotherapy therapeutic, in a mammary window chamber mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-03-01

    Tumor regions under hypoxic or low oxygen conditions respond less effectively to many treatment strategies, including radiation therapy. A novel investigational therapeutic, NVX-108 (NuvOx Pharma), has been developed to increase delivery of oxygen through the use of a nano-emulsion of dodecofluoropentane. By raising pO2 levels prior to delivering radiation, treatment efficacy may be improved. To aid in evaluating the novel drug, oxygen tension was quantitatively measured, spatially and temporally, to record the effect of administrating NVX-108 in an orthotopic mammary window chamber mouse model of breast cancer. The oxygen tension was measured through the use of an oxygen-sensitive coating, comprised of phosphorescent platinum porphyrin dye embedded in a polystyrene matrix. The coating, applied to the surface of the coverslip of the window chamber through spin coating, is placed in contact with the mammary fat pad to record the oxygenation status of the surface tissue layer. Prior to implantation of the window chamber, a tumor is grown in the SCID mouse model by injection of MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat pad. Two-dimensional spatial distributions of the pO2 levels were obtained through conversion of measured maps of phosphorescent lifetime. The resulting information on the spatial and temporal variation of the induced oxygen modulation could provide valuable insight into the optimal timing between administration of NVX-108 and radiation treatment to provide the most effective treatment outcome.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  19. Time-resolved blood flow measurement in the in vivo mouse model by optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Julia; Mueller, Gregor; Meissner, Sven; Cimalla, Peter; Homann, Hanno; Morawietz, Henning; Koch, Edmund

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that phase-resolved Doppler optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is very suitable to quantify the pulsatile blood flow within a vasodynamic measurement in the in vivo mouse model. For this, an OFDI-system with a read-out rate of 20 kHz and a center wavelength of 1320 nm has been used to image the time-resolved murine blood flow in 300 μμm vessels. Because OFDI is less sensitive to fringe washout due to axial sample motion, it is applied to analyze the blood flow velocities and the vascular dynamics in six-week-old C57BL/6 mice compared to one of the LDLR knockout strain kept under sedentary conditions or with access to voluntary wheel running. We have shown that the systolic as well as the diastolic phase of the pulsatile arterial blood flow can be well identified at each vasodynamic state. Furthermore, the changes of the flow velocities after vasoconstriction and -dilation were presented and interpreted in the entire physiological context. With this, the combined measurement of time-resolved blood flow and vessel diameter provides the basis to analyze the vascular function and its influence on the blood flow of small arteries of different mouse strains in response to different life styles.

  20. Resistance of established porcine islet xenografts to humoral rejection by hyperimmune sera.

    PubMed

    Gourlay, W A; O'Neil, J J; Hancock, W W; Monaco, A P; Maki, T

    1999-09-27

    Although preformed natural antibodies cause hyperacute rejection of primarily vascularized xenografts, tissue grafts such as skin or islets are revascularized by in-growth of host capillaries and therefore might be resistant to circulating antibodies. We examined the effect of hyperimmune serum and primed T cells on the survival of long-term porcine islet xenografts in diabetic nude mice. Porcine islets were transplanted beneath the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic BALB/c athymic mice. Hyperimmune serum and sensitized splenocytes were prepared by repeated immunization of BALB/c mice with porcine lymph node cells. Splenic T cells were enriched by nylon wool column separation. Tissues were examined by immunohistology using murine- and porcine-specific monoclonal antibodies. Porcine islets survived in nude mice for > 100 days with high levels of circulating porcine C-peptide and maintenance of normoglycemia. Injection of the hyperimmune sera (IgG) into normoglycemic nude mice bearing porcine islets for > 70 days failed to induce rejection despite the continued presence of circulating anti-porcine cytotoxic antibody. Injection of sensitized T cells caused acute rejection of long-term (>140 days) porcine islets, whereas injection of naive T cells had no effect. Histologically, porcine islets removed from mice treated with hyperimmune serum showed no staining for IgG. Long-surviving porcine islet grafts showed strong staining for interleukin (IL)-10 and a lesser amount of IL-4 but no staining for IL-2 or interferon-gamma. Although fresh porcine islets were positive for swine leukocyte antigen class 1 antigen and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 but negative for mouse platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule and ICAM-2, long-surviving porcine islets showed positive endothelial staining for mouse platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule and ICAM-2. Established islet xenografts are resistant to hyperimmune serum as a result of a lack of target

  1. Recombinant Mouse-Human Chimeric Antibodies as Calibrators in Immunoassays That Measure Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, John; Hoff-Velk, Jane; Golden, Alan; Brashear, Jeff; Robinson, John; Rapp, Margaret; Klass, Michael; Ostrow, David H.; Mandecki, Wlodek

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the feasibility of using recombinant antibodies containing murine variable regions and human constant regions as calibrators or controls in immunoassays. As a model system, we chose the Abbott IMx Toxo immunoglobulin M (IgM) and Toxo IgG assays designed to detect antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii. Two mouse monoclonal antibodies were selected based on their reactivity to the T. gondii antigens P30 and P66. Heavy- and light-chain variable-region genes were cloned from both hybridomas and transferred into immunoglobulin expression vectors containing human kappa and IgG1 or IgM constant regions. The constructs were stably transfected into Sp2/0-Ag14 cells. In the IMx Toxo IgG assay, immunoreactivity of the anti-P30 chimeric IgG1 antibody paralleled that of the positive human plasma-derived assay calibrators. Signal generated with the anti-P66 chimeric IgG1 antibody was observed to plateau below the maximal reactivity observed for the assay calibrator. Examination of the IgM chimeric antibodies in the IMx Toxo IgM assay revealed that both the anti-P30 and anti-P66 antibodies matched the assay index calibrator manufactured with human Toxo IgM-positive plasma. When evaluated with patient samples, the correlation between results obtained with the chimeric antibody calibrators and the positive human plasma calibrators was ≥0.985. These data demonstrate that chimeric mouse-human antibodies are a viable alternative to high-titer positive human plasma for the manufacture of calibrators and controls for diagnostic assays. PMID:9574691

  2. A Walnut-Enriched Diet Reduces the Growth of LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Hardman, W. Elaine; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Qi, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether a standard mouse diet (AIN-76A) supplemented with walnuts reduced the establishment and growth of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in nude (nu/nu) mice. The walnut-enriched diet reduced the number of tumors and the growth of the LNCaP xenografts; 3 of 16 (18.7%) of the walnut-fed mice developed tumors; conversely, 14 of 32 mice (44.0%) of the control diet-fed animals developed tumors. Similarly, the xenografts in the walnut-fed animals grew more slowly than those in the control diet mice. The final average tumor size in the walnut-diet animals was roughly one-fourth the average size of the prostate tumors in the mice that ate the control diet. PMID:23758186

  3. Targeted delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to cancer xenografts via the nanoparticle of nano-diamino-tetrac.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Yalcin, Murat; Darwish, Noureldien He; Debreli Coskun, Melis; Keating, Kelly A; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2017-01-01

    The tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) component of nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT) is chemically bonded via a linker to a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle that can encapsulate anticancer drugs. Tetrac targets the plasma membrane of cancer cells at a receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of NDAT delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to, respectively, pancreatic and breast cancer orthotopic nude mouse xenografts. Intra-tumoral drug concentrations were 5-fold (paclitaxel; P<0.001) and 2.3-fold (doxorubicin; P<0.01) higher than with conventional systemic drug administration. Tumor volume reductions reflected enhanced xenograft drug uptake. Cell viability was estimated by bioluminescent signaling in pancreatic tumors and confirmed an increased paclitaxel effect with drug delivery by NDAT. NDAT delivery of chemotherapy increases drug delivery to cancers and increases drug efficacy.

  4. Targeted delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to cancer xenografts via the nanoparticle of nano-diamino-tetrac

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Yalcin, Murat; Darwish, Noureldien HE; Debreli Coskun, Melis; Keating, Kelly A; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2017-01-01

    The tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) component of nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT) is chemically bonded via a linker to a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle that can encapsulate anticancer drugs. Tetrac targets the plasma membrane of cancer cells at a receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of NDAT delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to, respectively, pancreatic and breast cancer orthotopic nude mouse xenografts. Intra-tumoral drug concentrations were 5-fold (paclitaxel; P<0.001) and 2.3-fold (doxorubicin; P<0.01) higher than with conventional systemic drug administration. Tumor volume reductions reflected enhanced xenograft drug uptake. Cell viability was estimated by bioluminescent signaling in pancreatic tumors and confirmed an increased paclitaxel effect with drug delivery by NDAT. NDAT delivery of chemotherapy increases drug delivery to cancers and increases drug efficacy. PMID:28243091

  5. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct Microscale Measurement of Mouse Oocyte Membrane Permeability to Water and Ethylene Glycol at Subzero Temperatures Using Cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, X

      BACKGROUND: Investigation of cell osmotic behavior at subzero temperatures is of critical importance to the optimization of cooling procedures for cryopreservation. Based on established thermodynamic models, plasma membrane permeability coefficients for water and cryoprotectant agent (CPA) (Lcpa, Pp) and their activation energies (Ea(Lp), Ea(Pcpa)) are essential to predict the change of cell volume and composition of intracellular solutions corresponding to different cooling procedures. However, currently available methods to measure Lp at subzero temperatures suffer from technical difficulties due to ice formation and there are no generalized methods to measure Pcpa at subzero temperatures. The present study aims to investigate cell osmotic behavior at subzero temperatures without ice formation. In the study cells were directly injected into super-cooled CPA solutions mounted on a cryomicroscope, and the corresponding osmotic properties were measured. Using ethylene glycol (EG), the value of PEG for mouse (CD-1) metaphase II oocytes at 0, -5, -10 degree C was determined to be 8.451.20, 7.430.91, 6.401.10, x10-6 cm/min, respectively, and Ea(PEG) was calculated to be 3.9 kCal/mol. Lp in the presence of EG (Lp(EG)) at 0, -5, -10 , -15 degree C was determined to be 7.0 1.15, 4.90 1.20, 2.44 0.31, 1.200.24, x 10(-2) µm/min/atm, respectively, and Ea(Lp) was calculated to be 15.5 kCal/mol. Comparing these values with those previously measured at superzero temperatures, we concluded that for mouse oocytes, the Arrhenius relationship for Lp(EG) is consistent at superzero and subzero temperatures, but the values of PEG at subzero temperatures are much lower than the extrapolated values from the Arrhenius relationship at superzero temperatures, possibly caused by membrane phase transition at low temperatures.

  7. E7080 (lenvatinib), a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, demonstrates antitumor activities against colorectal cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wiegering, Armin; Korb, Doreen; Thalheimer, Andreas; Kämmerer, Ulrike; Allmanritter, Jan; Matthes, Niels; Linnebacher, Michael; Schlegel, Nicolas; Klein, Ingo; Ergün, Süleyman; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Otto, Christoph

    2014-11-01

    Clinical prognosis of metastasized colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is still not at desired levels and novel drugs are needed. Here, we focused on the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor E7080 (Lenvatinib) and assessed its therapeutic efficacy against human CRC cell lines in vitro and human CRC xenografts in vivo. The effect of E7080 on cell viability was examined on 10 human CRC cell lines and human endothelial cells (HUVEC). The inhibitory effect of E7080 on VEGF-induced angiogenesis was studied in an ex vivo mouse aortic ring angiogenesis assay. In addition, the efficacy of E7080 against xenografts derived from CRC cell lines and CRC patient resection specimens with mutated KRAS was investigated in vivo. A relatively low cytotoxic effect of E7080 on CRC cell viability was observed in vitro. Endothelial cells (HUVEC) were more susceptible to the incubation with E7080. This is in line with the observation that E7080 demonstrated an anti-angiogenic effect in a three-dimensional ex vivo mouse aortic ring angiogenesis assay. E7080 effectively disrupted CRC cell-mediated VEGF-stimulated growth of HUVEC in vitro. Daily in vivo treatment with E7080 (5 mg/kg) significantly delayed the growth of KRAS mutated CRC xenografts with decreased density of tumor-associated vessel formations and without tumor regression. This observation is in line with results that E7080 did not significantly reduce the number of Ki67-positive cells in CRC xenografts. The results suggest antiangiogenic activity of E7080 at a dosage that was well tolerated by nude mice. E7080 may provide therapeutic benefits in the treatment of CRC with mutated KRAS.

  8. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1997-06-01

    We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

  9. Systematic review of the relationship between amyloid-β levels and measures of transgenic mouse cognitive deficit in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, Avery M; Ammar, Zeena M; Lee, Robert H; Mitchell, Cassie S

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is believed to directly affect memory and learning in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is widely suggested that there is a relationship between Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels and cognitive performance. In order to explore the validity of this relationship, we performed a meta-analysis of 40 peer-reviewed, published AD transgenic mouse studies that quantitatively measured Aβ levels in brain tissue after assessing cognitive performance. We examined the relationship between Aβ levels (Aβ40, Aβ42, or the ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40) and cognitive function as measured by escape latency times in the Morris water maze or exploratory preference percentage in the novel object recognition test. Our systematic review examined five mouse models (Tg2576, APP, PS1, 3xTg, APP(OSK)-Tg), gender, and age. The overall result revealed no statistically significant correlation between quantified Aβ levels and experimental measures of cognitive function. However, enough of the trends were of the same sign to suggest that there probably is a very weak qualitative trend visible only across many orders of magnitude. In summary, the results of the systematic review revealed that mice bred to show elevated levels of Aβ do not perform significantly worse in cognitive tests than mice that do not have elevated Aβ levels. Our results suggest two lines of inquiry: 1) Aβ is a biochemical "side effect" of the AD pathology; or 2) learning and memory deficits in AD are tied to the presence of qualitatively "high" levels of Aβ but are not quantitatively sensitive to the levels themselves.

  10. Laparoscopic Rectopexy with Urinary Bladder Xenograft Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aradhana; Afshar, Rami; Gardner, Amy; Ackerman, Ellen; Brandt, Jared; Sasse, Kent C.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Rectal prolapse is often repaired laparoscopically, frequently with the use of reinforcement material. Both synthetic and biologically derived materials reduce recurrence rate compared to primary suture repair. Synthetic mesh introduces potential complications such as mesh erosion, fibrosis, and infection. Urinary bladder matrix (UBM) represents a biologically derived material for reinforcement of rectal prolapse repair with the potential to improve durability without risks of synthetic materials. The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness, durability, and functional result of laparoscopic rectopexy using urinary bladder matrix xenograft reinforcement at three years follow up. Methods: The 20 cases presented describe rectal prolapse repair by means of laparoscopic rectopexy with presacral UBM reinforcement. Patients were followed up for an average of 3 years and assessed with interviews, physical examination, manometry, and the fecal incontinence severity index (FISI). Results: Each repair was completed laparoscopically. UBM exhibited favorable handling characteristics when sutured to the sacrum and the lateral rectal walls. One patient underwent laparoscopic drainage of a postoperative abscess; no other complications occurred. In 3 years of follow-up, there have been no full-thickness recurrences, erosions, reoperations, or long-term complications. Two patients exhibited a small degree of mucosal prolapse on follow-up physical examination that did not require surgery. Three-year FISI scores averaged 8 (range, 0–33 of a possible 61), indicating low fecal incontinence symptomatology. Follow-up anorectal manometry was performed in 9 patients, showing mixed results. Conclusion: Surgeons may safely use laparoscopic rectopexy with UBM reinforcement for repair of rectal prolapses. In this series, repairs with UBM grafts have been durable at 3-year follow-up and may be an alternative to synthetic mesh reinforcement of rectal

  11. Measuring antigen presentation in mouse brain endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Howland, Shanshan W; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain endothelial cells cross-present parasite antigen during mouse experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Here we describe a 2-d protocol to detect cross-presentation by isolating the brain microvessels and incubating them with a reporter cell line that expresses lacZ upon detection of the relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complex. After X-gal staining, a typical positive result consists of hundreds of blue spots, compared with fewer than 20 spots from a naive brain. The assay is generalizable to other disease contexts by using reporter cells that express appropriate specific T cell receptors. Also described is the protocol for culturing endothelial cells from brain microvessels isolated from naive mice. After 7-10 d, an in vitro cross-presentation assay can be performed by adding interferon-γ, antigen (e.g., Plasmodium berghei-infected red blood cells) and reporter cells in sequence over 3 d. This is useful for comparing different antigen forms or for probing the effects of various interventions.

  12. Measuring the dynamic mechanical response of hydrated mouse bone by nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Swadener, J. Gregory; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Courtland, Hayden-William; Jepsen, Karl J.; Goldman, Haviva M.

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach to characterizing hydrated bone’s viscoelastic behavior at the lamellar length scales using dynamic indentation techniques. We studied the submicron-level viscoelastic response of bone tissue from two different inbred mouse strains, A/J and B6, with known differences in whole bone and tissue-level mechanical properties. Our results show that bone having a higher collagen content or a lower mineral-to-matrix ratio demonstrates a trend towards a larger viscoelastic response. When normalized for anatomical location relative to biological growth patterns in the antero-medial (AM) cortex, bone tissue from B6 femora, known to have a lower mineral-to-matrix ratio, is shown to exhibit a significantly higher viscoelastic response compared to A/J tissue. Newer bone regions with a higher collagen content (closer to the endosteal edge of the AM cortex) showed a trend towards a larger viscoelastic response. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of this technique to be used to study local composition-property relationships in bone. Further, this technique of viscoelastic nanoindentation mapping of the bone surface at these submicron length scales is shown to be highly advantageous in studying sub-surface features, such as porosity, of wet hydrated biological specimens, which are difficult to identify using other methods. PMID:21094478

  13. Cyclophilin A Enhances Cell Proliferation and Xenografted Tumor Growth of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenhua; Xin, Yan; Xiao, Yuping; Li, Wenhui; Sun, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Recently Cyclophilin A (CypA) was identified as a candidate target protein in gastric carcinoma. However, the role of CypA in gastric cancer (GC) has not been investigated extensively so far. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression pattern of CypA in human GC, and to explore the effects of suppressed CypA expression on cell proliferation and xenografted tumor growth of gastric cancer. In the present study, we detected the expression pattern of CypA in human GC by immunohistochemistry analysis. Further, the RNAi method was used to silence CypA, and colony formation assay, growth curves, cell cycle and mouse xenograft were analysed. An elevated expression of CypA in GC tissues compared with normal gastric mucosa was observed, especially in TNM stage-I and intestinal type of tumor. CypA was overexpressed in most GC cell lines and endogenous expression of CypA correlated with cell growth phenotypes. Transient suppression of CypA reduced the proliferation of BGC-823 and SGC-7901 GC cell lines. Exogenous CypA promoted the proliferation of NCI-N87 GC cells in a concentration dependent manner. Further study revealed that stable CypA silencing inhibited the proliferation, prevented cell cycle and reduced autophagy of BGC-823 GC cells in vitro through suppressing the ERK1/2 signal pathway. Stable CypA silencing also inhibited the growth of xenografted tumor of BGC-823 GC cell in nude mice. These results indicate a special function mode for CypA of playing more important roles in the early stage of gastric tumorigenesis and suggest CypA as a new molecular target of diagnosis and treatment for GC patients.

  14. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  15. Peptidomimetic Src/pretubulin inhibitor KX-01 alone and in combination with paclitaxel suppresses growth, metastasis in human ER/PR/HER2-negative tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Ali, Alaa; Jones, Ryan K; Marsden, Carolyn G; Sheng, Mei; Carrier, Latonya; Bu, Yahao; Hangauer, David; Rowan, Brian G

    2012-01-01

    Src kinase is elevated in breast tumors that are ER/PR negative and do not overexpress HER2 but clinical trials with Src inhibitors have demonstrated little activity. The present study evaluated preclinical efficacy of a novel peptidomimetic compound, KX-01 (KX2-391), that exhibits dual action as a Src and pretubulin inhibitor. KX-01 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with paclitaxel in MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-157, and MDA-MB-468 human ER/PR/HER2-negative breast cancer cells. Treatments were evaluated by growth/apoptosis, isobologram analysis, migration/invasion assays, tumor xenograft volume, metastasis, and measurement of Src, FAK, microtubules, Ki67, and microvessel density. KX-01 inhibited cell growth in vitro and in combination with paclitaxel resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. KX-01 resulted in a dose dependent inhibition of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-157 tumor xenografts (1 and 5 mg/kg, BID). KX-01 inhibited activity of Src and downstream mediator FAK in tumors that was coincident with reduced proliferation and angiogenesis, and increased apoptosis. KX01 also resulted in microtubule disruption in tumors. Combination of KX-01 with paclitaxel resulted in significant regression of MDA-MB-231 tumors and reduced metastasis to mouse lung and liver. KX-01 is a potently active Src/pretubulin inhibitor that inhibits breast tumor growth and metastasis. As ER/PR/HER2-negative patients are candidates for paclitaxel therapy, combination with KX-01 may potentiate antitumor efficacy in management of this aggressive breast cancer subtype. PMID:22784709

  16. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-07-21

    To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. A subcutaneous xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was established in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into mirtazapine group (10 mg/kg per day), fluoxetine group (10 mg/kg per day) and control group (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P < 0.05). Compared to the control group, food intake was significantly suppressed from d 21 to 42 and weight loss was promoted from d 35 to 42 in the fluoxetine group (t = 2.52, P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in body weight of the mice after removal of tumors among the three groups. The body weight of mice was the heaviest (13.66 +/- 1.55 g) in the mirtazapine group and the lightest (11.39 +/- 1.45 g) in the fluoxetine group (F( (2,12) ) = 11.43, P < 0.01). The behavioral test on d 7 showed that the horizontal and vertical activities were significantly increased in the mirtazapine group compared with the fluoxetine and control groups (F( (2,18) ) = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 +/- 2.1 vs 7.1 +/- 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no

  17. Compatibility drives female preference and reproductive success in the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) more strongly than male testosterone measures.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Erin D; Holschbach, Mary A; Marler, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Female assessment of male attractiveness and how preferred qualities impact reproductive success is central to the study of mate choice. Male attractiveness may depend on traits beneficial to the reproductive success (RS) of any female, termed 'universal quality', and/or on behavioral and biological interactions between potential mates that reflect 'compatibility'. The steroid hormone testosterone (T) often underlies male attractiveness in rodents and is associated with enhanced paternal care in the monogamous and biparental California mouse (Peromyscus californicus). We hypothesized that (1) T-characteristics are universally attractive to female California mice and that (2) if reproductive success is higher for females mated with preferred males, then females mated with males preferred by other females will also have higher reproductive success. Alternatively, we speculated that pair compatibility, based on emergent pair qualities, is important for a species with coordinated offspring care. We assessed individual T-characteristics in three ways: (1) T-response to GnRH challenges (2) baseline T-level and (3) T-response to a female. Testosterone-response did not predict female preference, but females spent more time investigating males with higher baseline T (accounting for only 9.6% of the variation in investigation time). None of the T-measures was associated with RS. Females paired with males they preferred produced litters more quickly and had higher RS than females paired with their non-preferred males. Naïve females who did not undergo preference tests had equivalent RS regardless of whether their mate was preferred or non-preferred by another female. These data suggest that higher male T elicits investigation, but female preference in the California mouse is more strongly linked with compatibility because individual preference was a better predictor of RS than any T measure.

  18. Measurement of generation-dependent proliferation rates and death rates during mouse erythroid progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, Vahe; Wang, Weijia; Audet, Julie

    2012-05-01

    Herein, we describe an experimental and computational approach to perform quantitative carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) cell-division tracking in cultures of primary colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) cells, a hematopoietic progenitor cell type, which is an important target for the treatment of blood disorders and for the manufacture of red blood cells. CFSE labeling of CFU-Es isolated from mouse fetal livers was performed to examine the effects of stem cell factor (SCF) and erythropoietin (EPO) in culture. We used a dynamic model of proliferation based on the Smith-Martin representation of the cell cycle to extract proliferation rates and death rates from CFSE time-series. However, we found that to accurately represent the cell population dynamics in differentiation cultures of CFU-Es, it was necessary to develop a model with generation-specific rate parameters. The generation-specific rates of proliferation and death were extracted for six generations (G(0) -G(5) ) and they revealed that, although SCF alone or EPO alone supported similar total cell outputs in culture, stimulation with EPO resulted in significantly higher proliferation rates from G(2) to G(5) and higher death rates in G(2) , G(3) , and G(5) compared with SCF. In addition, proliferation rates tended to increase from G(1) to G(5) in cultures supplemented with EPO and EPO + SCF, while they remained lower and more constant across generations with SCF. The results are consistent with the notion that SCF promotes CFU-E self-renewal while EPO promotes CFU-E differentiation in culture.

  19. Therapeutic effect against human xenograft tumors in nude mice by the third generation microtubule stabilizing epothilones.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Chao; Zhang, Xiuguo; Zhong, Zi-Yang; Li, Yong; Feng, Li; Eng, Sara; Myles, David R; Johnson, Robert; Wu, Nian; Yin, Ye Ingrid; Wilson, Rebecca M; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2008-09-02

    The epothilones represent a promising class of natural product-based antitumor drug candidates. Although these compounds operate through a microtubule stabilization mechanism similar to that of taxol, the epothilones offer a major potential therapeutic advantage in that they retain their activity against multidrug-resistant cell lines. We have been systematically synthesizing and evaluating synthetic epothilone congeners that are not accessible through modification of the natural product itself. We report herein the results of biological investigations directed at two epothilone congeners: iso-fludelone and iso-dehydelone. Iso-fludelone, in particular, exhibits a number of properties that render it an excellent candidate for preclinical development, including biological stability, excellent solubility in water, and remarkable potency relative to other epothilones. In nude mouse xenograft settings, iso-fludelone was able to achieve therapeutic cures against a number of human cancer cell lines, including mammarian-MX-1, ovarian-SK-OV-3, and the fast-growing, refractory, subcutaneous neuroblastoma-SK-NAS. Strong therapeutic effect was observed against drug-resistant lung-A549/taxol and mammary-MCF-7/Adr xenografts. In addition, iso-fludelone was shown to exhibit a significant therapeutic effect against an intracranially implanted SK-NAS tumor.

  20. Statistical evaluation and experimental design of a psoriasis xenograft transplantation model treated with cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Alifrangis, Lene; Andersen, Søren; Dam, Tomas Norman

    2011-05-01

    Psoriasis xenograft transplantation models where human skin is transplanted onto immune-deficient mice are generally accepted in psoriasis research. Over the last decade, they have been widely employed to screen for new therapeutics with a potential anti-psoriatic effect. However, experimental designs differ in several parameters. Especially, the number of donors and grafts per experimental design varies greatly; numbers that are directly related to the probability of detecting statistically significant drug effects. In this study, we performed a statistical evaluation of the effect of cyclosporine A, a recognized anti-psoriatic drug, to generate a statistical model employable to simulate different scenarios of experimental designs and to calculate the associated statistical study power, defined as the probability of detecting a statistically significant anti-psoriatic drug treatment effect. Results showed that to achieve a study power of 0.8, at least 20 grafts per treatment group and a minimum of five donors should be included in the chosen experimental setting. To our knowledge, this is the first time that study power calculations have been performed to evaluate treatment effects in a psoriasis xenograft transplantation model. This study was based on a defined experimental protocol, thus other parameters such as drug potency, treatment protocol, mouse strain and graft size should, also, be taken into account when designing an experiment. We propose that the results obtained in this study may lend a more quantitative support to the validity of results obtained when exploring new potential anti-psoriatic drug effects.

  1. Colony-stimulating factor-1 antisense treatment suppresses growth of human tumor xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Abraham, Dietmar; Paulus, Patrick; Abri, Hojatollah; Hofmann, Michael; Grossschmidt, Karl; Schäfer, Romana; Stanley, E Richard; Hofbauer, Reinhold

    2002-09-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) foster cellular invasion by disrupting extracellular matrix barriers and thereby facilitate tumor development. MMPs are synthesized by both cancer cells and adjacent stromal cells, primarily macrophages. The production of macrophages is regulated by colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). Tissue CSF-1 expression increased significantly in embryonic and colon cancer xenografts. We, therefore, hypothesized that blocking CSF-1 may suppress tumor growth by decelerating macrophage-mediated extracellular matrix breakdown. Cells expressing CSF-1 and mice xenografted with CSF-1 receptor (c-fms)- and CSF-1-negative malignant human embryonic or colon cancer cells were treated with mouse CSF-1 antisense oligonucleotides. Two weeks of CSF-1 antisense treatment selectively down-regulated CSF-1 mRNA and protein tissue expression in tumor lysates. CSF-1 blockade suppressed the growth of embryonic tumors to dormant levels and the growth of the colon carcinoma by 50%. In addition, tumor vascularity and the expression of MMP-2 and angiogenic factors were reduced. Six-month survival was observed in colon carcinoma mice only after CSF-1 blockade, whereas controls were all dead at day 65. These results suggest that human embryonic and colon cancer cells up-regulate host CSF-1 and MMP-2 expression. Because the cancer cells used were CSF-1 negative, CSF-1 antisense targeted tumor stromal cell CSF-1 production. CSF-1 blockade could be a novel strategy in treatment of solid tumors.

  2. Functional imaging of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts using spectral CT: how does iodine concentration correlate with standardized uptake value of 18FDG-PET-CT?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shudong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yerong; Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Kemin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the correlation between iodine concentration (IC) for the quantitative analysis of spectral CT and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography–CT (18FDG PET–CT) as an indicator of therapeutic response to interstitial brachytherapy in transplanted human pancreatic carcinomas in BALB/c-nu mice. Methods: Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into immunodeficient BALB/c-nu mice. 30 mice bearing SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 15; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 15, 0 mCi). After 2 weeks of treatment, spectral CT and 18FDG micro-PET–CT scan were performed. IC values and SUVmax in the lesions were measured. IC normalized to the muscle tissue is indicated as nIC. The relationships between the nIC and SUVmax of the transplantation tumours were analysed. Results: 2 weeks after treatment, the nIC in three-phase scans and SUVmax of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The nIC values of the three-phase scans have certain positive correlation with the SUVmax values (r = 0.69, p < 0.05; r = 0.73 and p < 0.05; r = 0.80, p < 0.05 in the 10-, 25- and 60-s phase, respectively). Conclusion: Spectral CT could serve as a valuable imaging modality, as our results suggest that nIC correlates with SUVmax of 18FDG PET–CT for evaluating the therapeutic effect of 125I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. Advances in knowledge: Spectral CT offers opportunities to assess the therapeutic response of pancreatic cancer. This study supports the conclusion that nIC values in spectral CT could also serve as a valuable functional imaging parameter for early monitoring and evaluation of the therapeutic response of 125I interstitial brachytherapy mouse models

  3. A 90Y-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody exhibits antitumour activity against hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts during ROBO1-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background ROBO1 is a membrane protein that functions in axon guidance. ROBO1 contributes to tumour metastasis and angiogenesis and may have potential as a target protein of immunotherapy because ROBO1 is specifically expressed at high levels in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we examined biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using a radioisotope-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hepatocellular carcinoma models. Methods ROBO1-positive HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft nude mice were used in this study. We conjugated anti-ROBO1 MAb with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and the conjugates were labelled with 111In and 90Y. To study biodistribution, the 111In-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected into HepG2 xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate any antitumour effect, a RIT study was performed, and the 90Y-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected via the tail vein. Tumour volume, mouse weight, and blood cell count were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumours and organs of mice were collected, and a histopathological analysis was carried out. Results The tumour uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 MAb in HepG2 xenograft mice was 15.0% ± 0.69% injected dose per gram at 48 h after injection. Immunotherapy with cold-anti-ROBO1 MAb (70 μg) did not cause a significant antitumour effect. RIT with 6.7 MBq of 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb caused significant tumour growth suppression. Transient body weight loss and bone-marrow suppression were observed. Histopathological analyses of tumours revealed the fatal degeneration of tumour cells, significant reduction of the Ki-67 index, and an increase of the apoptosis index. Normal organs showed no significant injury, but a transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen and in the sternal bone marrow. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive hepatocellular

  4. Functional imaging of interstitial brachytherapy in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts using spectral CT: how does iodine concentration correlate with standardized uptake value of (18)FDG-PET-CT?

    PubMed

    Hu, Shudong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yerong; Huang, Wei; Song, Qi; Lin, Xiaozhu; Liu, Yu; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between iodine concentration (IC) for the quantitative analysis of spectral CT and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT ((18)FDG PET-CT) as an indicator of therapeutic response to interstitial brachytherapy in transplanted human pancreatic carcinomas in BALB/c-nu mice. Xenograft models were created by subcutaneous injection of SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell suspensions into immunodeficient BALB/c-nu mice. 30 mice bearing SW1990 human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts were randomly separated into two groups: experimental (n = 15; 1.0 mCi) and control (n = 15, 0 mCi). After 2 weeks of treatment, spectral CT and (18)FDG micro-PET-CT scan were performed. IC values and SUVmax in the lesions were measured. IC normalized to the muscle tissue is indicated as nIC. The relationships between the nIC and SUVmax of the transplantation tumours were analysed. 2 weeks after treatment, the nIC in three-phase scans and SUVmax of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The nIC values of the three-phase scans have certain positive correlation with the SUVmax values (r = 0.69, p < 0.05; r = 0.73 and p < 0.05; r = 0.80, p < 0.05 in the 10-, 25- and 60-s phase, respectively). Spectral CT could serve as a valuable imaging modality, as our results suggest that nIC correlates with SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT for evaluating the therapeutic effect of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy in a pancreatic carcinoma xenograft. Spectral CT offers opportunities to assess the therapeutic response of pancreatic cancer. This study supports the conclusion that nIC values in spectral CT could also serve as a valuable functional imaging parameter for early monitoring and evaluation of the therapeutic response of (125)I interstitial brachytherapy mouse models because the nIC correlates with the SUVmax of (18)FDG PET-CT.

  5. Genetically inbred Balb/c mice differ from outbred Swiss Webster mice on discrete measures of sociability: relevance to a genetic mouse model of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Luis F; Burket, Jessica A; Herndon, Amy L; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2011-12-01

    The Balb/c mouse is proposed as a model of human disorders with prominent deficits of sociability, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) that may involve pathophysiological disruption of NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission. A standard procedure was used to measure sociability in 8-week-old male genetically inbred Balb/c and outbred Swiss Webster mice. Moreover, because impaired sociability may influence the social behavior of stimulus mice, we also measured the proportion of total episodes of social approach made by the stimulus mouse while test and stimulus mice were allowed to interact freely. Three raters with good inter-rater agreement evaluated operationally defined measures of sociability chosen because of their descriptive similarity to deficits of social behavior reported in persons with ASDs. The data support previous reports that the Balb/c mouse is a genetic mouse model of impaired sociability. The data also show that the behavior of the social stimulus mouse is influenced by the impaired sociability of the Balb/c strain. Interestingly, operationally defined measures of sociability did not necessarily correlate with each other within mouse strain and the profile of correlated measures differed between strains. Finally, "stereotypic" behaviors (i.e. rearing, grooming and wall climbing) recorded during the session of free interaction between the test and social stimulus mice were more intensely displayed by Swiss Webster than Balb/c mice, suggesting that the domains of sociability and "restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior" are independent of each other in the Balb/c strain.

  6. OMR-arena: automated measurement and stimulation system to determine mouse visual thresholds based on optomotor responses.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Friedrich; Kretschmer, Viola; Kunze, Vincent P; Kretzberg, Jutta

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of the optomotor response is a common way to determine thresholds of the visual system in animals. Particularly in mice, it is frequently used to characterize the visual performance of different genetically modified strains or to test the effect of various drugs on visual performance. Several methods have been developed to facilitate the presentation of stimuli using computer screens or projectors. Common methods are either based on the measurement of eye movement during optokinetic reflex behavior or rely on the measurement of head and/or body-movements during optomotor responses. Eye-movements can easily and objectively be quantified, but their measurement requires invasive fixation of the animals. Head movements can be observed in freely moving animals, but until now depended on the judgment of a human observer who reported the counted tracking movements of the animal during an experiment. In this study we present a novel measurement and stimulation system based on open source building plans and software. This system presents appropriate 360° stimuli while simultaneously video-tracking the animal's head-movements without fixation. The on-line determined head gaze is used to adjust the stimulus to the head position, as well as to automatically calculate visual acuity. Exemplary, we show that automatically measured visual response curves of mice match the results obtained by a human observer very well. The spatial acuity thresholds yielded by the automatic analysis are also consistent with the human observer approach and with published results. Hence, OMR-arena provides an affordable, convenient and objective way to measure mouse visual performance.

  7. Interrogating open issues in cancer precision medicine with patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Annette T; Alférez, Denis G; Amant, Frédéric; Annibali, Daniela; Arribas, Joaquín; Biankin, Andrew V; Bruna, Alejandra; Budinská, Eva; Caldas, Carlos; Chang, David K; Clarke, Robert B; Clevers, Hans; Coukos, George; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Eckhardt, S Gail; Gonzalez-Suarez, Eva; Hermans, Els; Hidalgo, Manuel; Jarzabek, Monika A; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Kemper, Kristel; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Medico, Enzo; Norum, Jens Henrik; Palmer, Héctor G; Peeper, Daniel S; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Piris-Gimenez, Alejandro; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Rueda, Oscar M; Seoane, Joan; Serra, Violeta; Soucek, Laura; Vanhecke, Dominique; Villanueva, Alberto; Vinolo, Emilie; Bertotti, Andrea; Trusolino, Livio

    2017-04-01

    Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) have emerged as an important platform to elucidate new treatments and biomarkers in oncology. PDX models are used to address clinically relevant questions, including the contribution of tumour heterogeneity to therapeutic responsiveness, the patterns of cancer evolutionary dynamics during tumour progression and under drug pressure, and the mechanisms of resistance to treatment. The ability of PDX models to predict clinical outcomes is being improved through mouse humanization strategies and the implementation of co-clinical trials, within which patients and PDXs reciprocally inform therapeutic decisions. This Opinion article discusses aspects of PDX modelling that are relevant to these questions and highlights the merits of shared PDX resources to advance cancer medicine from the perspective of EurOPDX, an international initiative devoted to PDX-based research.

  8. Pairwise Comparison of 89Zr- and 124I-labeled cG250 Based on Positron Emission Tomography Imaging and Non-Linear Immunokinetic Modeling: In Vivo Carbonic Anhydrase IX Receptor Binding and Internalization in Mouse Xenografts of Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Punzalan, Blesida; Doran, Michael G.; Evans, Michael J.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Lewis, Jason S.; Zanzonico, Pat; Larson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The positron-emitting tomography (PET) tracer, 124I-cG250, directed against carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) shows promise for pre-surgical diagnosis of clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) [1, 2]. The radiometal zirconium-89 (89Zr), however, may offer advantages as a surrogate PET nuclide over 124I in terms of greater tumor uptake and retention [3]. In the current report, we have developed a non-linear immunokinetic model to facilitate a quantitative comparison of absolute uptake and antibody turnover between 124I-cG250 and 89Zr- cG250 using a human cRCC xenograft tumor model in mice. We believe that his unique model better relates quantitative imaging data to the salient biologic features of tumor antibody-antigen binding and turnover. Methods We conducted experiments with 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 using a human ccRCC cell line (SK-RC-38) to characterize the binding affinity and internalization kinetics of the two tracers in vitro. Serial-PET imaging was performed in mice bearing sub-cutaneous cRCC tumors to simultaneously detect and quantify time-dependent tumor uptake in vivo. Using the known specific activities of the two tracers, the equilibrium rates of antibody internalization and turnover in the tumor were derived from the PET images using non-linear compartmental modeling. Results The two tracers demonstrate virtually identical tumor-cell binding and internalization but with markedly different retentions in vitro. Superior PET images were obtained using 89Zr-cG250, owing to the more prolonged trapping of the radiolabel in the tumor and simultaneous wash-out from normal tissues. Estimates of cG250-CAIX complex turnover were 1.35–5.51 × 1012 molecules per hour per gram of tumor (20% of receptors internalized per hour), and the ratio of 124I/89Zr atoms released per unit time by tumor was 17.5. Conclusions Pairwise evaluation of 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 provided the basis for a non-linear immunokinetic model which yielded quantitative information about

  9. Quantitative methods of measuring the sensitivity of the mouse sperm morphology assay

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.H.; Bennett, D.E.; Kranzler, D.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1982-09-01

    In this study murine sperm were subjected to graded doses of X irradiation (0 to 120 rad) to determine whether quantitative measurements made on enlarged photographs of the sperm heads are related to radiation dose. We found that the Mahalanobis distance statistic, when used to measure distance in a multivariate space from a control group of measurements, could be used to classify sperm as normal or abnormal. The percent classified as abnormal by this method was found to be linearly related to dose. The results suggest that sensitivity of the murine sperm assay can be improved by selecting an optimal set of measurements. This improvement can reduce the doubling dose from approximately 70 rad to 10 to 15 rad while keeping the percentage of abnormal sperm in control mice at 3%, equal to the current visual method.

  10. High-resolution 3D volumetry versus conventional measuring techniques for the assessment of experimental lymphedema in the mouse hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Florian S.; Körbel, Christina; Gassert, Laura; Müller, Andreas; Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Giovanoli, Pietro; Laschke, Matthias W.; Menger, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment characterized by chronic limb swelling with interstitial inflammation. The rodent hindlimb is a widely used model for the evaluation of novel lymphedema treatments. However, the assessment of limb volume in small animals is challenging. Recently, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been introduced for rodent limb volumetry. In the present study we evaluated the validity of microcomputed tomography (μCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in comparison to conventional measuring techniques. For this purpose, acute lymphedema was induced in the mouse hindlimb by a modified popliteal lymphadenectomy. The 4-week course of this type of lymphedema was first assessed in 6 animals. In additional 12 animals, limb volumes were analyzed by μCT, 9.4 T MRI and 30 MHz ultrasound as well as by planimetry, circumferential length and paw thickness measurements. Interobserver correlation was high for all modalities, in particular for μCT analysis (r = 0.975, p < 0.001). Importantly, caliper-measured paw thickness correlated well with μCT (r = 0.861), MRI (r = 0.821) and ultrasound (r = 0.800). Because the assessment of paw thickness represents a time- and cost-effective approach, it may be ideally suited for the quantification of rodent hindlimb lymphedema. PMID:27698469

  11. Comparative study of subtalar arthrodesis after calcaneal frature malunion with autologous bone graft or freeze-dried xenograft.

    PubMed

    Henning, Carlo; Poglia, Gabriel; Leie, Murilo Anderson; Galia, Carlos Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Calcaneal fracture malunion may evolve into arthrosis and severe foot deformities. The aim of this study was to identify differences in bony union following corrective subtalar arthrodesis with interposition of autologous tricortical bone graft or freeze-dried bovine xenograft. We prospectively evaluated 12 patients who underwent subtalar arthrodesis, six patients received autografts and 6 received freeze-dried bovine xenografts. After a mean followup of 58 weeks, the patients were clinical assessed using AOFAS scale and the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and for final radiographic parameters measurement. Two blind raters evaluated the length of time required for solid union of the arthrodesis and graft integration by retrospective radiographic examination. In the autograft group, AOFAS score improved from a preoperative average of 37 to 64 points postoperatively (p = 0.02) and mean VAS score improved from 4.7 to 1.9 (p = 0.028). In the xenograft group, AOFAS score improved from 38 to 74 points (p = 0.02) and VAS from 5.5 to 2.7 (p = 0.046). Solid union was achieved in all cases in the autograft group at an average of 5.3 weeks and in five cases in the xenograft group at 8.8 weeks (p = 0.077). Graft integration occurred after an average of 10.7 weeks in the autograft group and 28.8 weeks in the xenograft group (p = 0.016). With the numbers available, no significant difference could be detected in the length of time required for solid union of subtalar arthrodesis between groups, although time to integration of freeze-dried bovine xenografts was statistically higher. Clinical and functional improvement was observed in both groups.

  12. pO{sub 2} Fluctuation Pattern and Cycling Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma and Melanoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Christine; Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Galappathi, Kanthi; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Blood perfusion in tumors is spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in local fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}) and tissue regions showing cycling hypoxia. In this study, we investigated whether the pO{sub 2} fluctuation pattern and the extent of cycling hypoxia differ between tumor types showing high (e.g., cervical carcinoma xenograft) and low (e.g., melanoma xenograft) fractions of connective tissue-associated blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Two cervical carcinoma lines (CK-160 and TS-415) and two melanoma lines (A-07 and R-18) transplanted into BALB/c nu/nu mice were included in the study. Tissue pO{sub 2} was measured simultaneously in two positions in each tumor by using a two-channel OxyLite fiber-optic oxygen-sensing device. The extent of acute and chronic hypoxia was assessed by combining a radiobiological and a pimonidazole-based immunohistochemical assay of tumor hypoxia. Results: The proportion of tumor regions showing pO{sub 2} fluctuations, the pO{sub 2} fluctuation frequency in these regions, and the relative amplitude of the pO{sub 2} fluctuations were significantly higher in the melanoma xenografts than in the cervical carcinoma xenografts. Cervical carcinoma and melanoma xenografts did not differ significantly in the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells or the fraction of chronically hypoxic cells. However, the ratio between fraction of acutely hypoxic cells and fraction of chronically hypoxic cells was significantly higher in melanoma than in cervical carcinoma xenografts. Conclusions: Temporal heterogeneity in blood flow and tissue pO{sub 2} in tumors may depend on tumor histology. Connective tissue surrounding microvessels may stabilize blood flow and pO{sub 2} and, thus, protect tumor tissue from cycling hypoxia.

  13. Effects of ATRA combined with citrus and ginger-derived compounds in human SCC xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background NF-κB is a survival signaling transcription factor complex involved in the malignant phenotype of many cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The citrus coumarin, auraptene (AUR), and the ethno-medicinal ginger (Alpinia galanga) phenylpropanoid, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), were previously shown to suppress 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced mouse skin tumor promotion. The goal of the present study was to determine whether AUR and ACA are effective either alone or in combination with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) for suppressing SCC tumor growth. Methods We first determined the effects of orally administered ACA (100 mg/kg bw) and AUR (200 mg/kg bw) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-κB activation in NF-κB-RE-luc (Oslo) luciferase reporter mice. Dietary administration of AUR and ACA ± ATRA was next evaluated in a xenograft mouse model. Female SCID/bg mice were fed diets containing the experimental compounds, injected with 1 × 106 SRB12-p9 cells s.c., palpated and weighed twice a week for 28 days following injection. Results Both ACA and AUR suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation in the report mice. In the xenograft model, AUR (1000 ppm) and ACA (500 ppm) modestly suppressed tumor volume. However, in combination with ATRA at 5, 10, and 30 ppm, ACA 500 ppm significantly inhibited tumor volume by 56%, 62%, and 98%, respectively. The effect of ATRA alone was 37%, 33%, and 93% inhibition, respectively. AUR 1000 ppm and ATRA 10 ppm were not very effective when administered alone, but when combined, strongly suppressed tumor volume by 84%. Conclusions Citrus AUR may synergize the tumor suppressive effects of ATRA, while ACA may prolong the inhibitory effects of ATRA. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether these combinations may be useful in the control of human SCC. PMID:20659317

  14. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  15. Intraductal Delivery of Adenoviruses Targets Pancreatic Tumors in Transgenic Ela-myc Mice and Orthotopic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Camacho-Sánchez, Juan Miguel; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p<0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors. PMID:23328228

  16. Prolonging hormone sensitivity in prostate cancer xenografts through dual inhibition of AR and mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Schayowitz, A; Sabnis, G; Goloubeva, O; Njar, V C O; Brodie, A M H

    2010-01-01

    Background: To determine the mechanisms associated with loss of androgen dependency and disease progression in prostate cancer (PCa), we investigated the relationship between the androgen receptor (AR) and mTOR pathways and the impact of inhibiting both pathways in androgen-dependent and castration-resistant PCa models. Experimental design: Androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and castration-resistant PCa (HP-LNCaP) cells were grown as tumours in SCID mice. Once tumours reached 500 mm3, animals were grouped and injected subcutaneous with vehicle, our novel anti-androgen/androgen synthesis inhibitor, VN/124-1, bicalutamide, and everolimus. Tumour volumes were measured biweekly. The PSA and protein analyses were performed after completion of the treatment. Results: The addition of everolimus to bicalutamide treatment of resistant tumours significantly reduced tumour growth rates and tumour volumes. Anti-androgen treatment also increased protein expression of multiple signal transduction pathways earlier than vehicle-treated control xenografts. VN/124-1 plus everolimus acted in concert to reduce tumour growth rates in our castration-resistant xenograft model. Conclusions: This study suggests that dual inhibition of AR and mTOR in castration-resistant xenograft models can restore sensitivity of tumours to anti-androgen therapy. Furthermore, after bicalutamide failure, dual inhibition with VN/124-1 and everolimus was the most effective treatment. PMID:20842117

  17. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts. PMID:26732545

  18. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  19. Intracellular Doppler Signatures of Platinum Sensitivity Captured by Biodynamic Profiling in Ovarian Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Sun, Hao; Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Matei, Daniela; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are replacing conventional two-dimensional (2D) cultures for applications in cancer drug development. However, direct comparisons of in vitro 3D models relative to in vivo models derived from the same cell lines have not been reported because of the lack of sensitive optical probes that can extract high-content information from deep inside living tissue. Here we report the use of biodynamic imaging (BDI) to measure response to platinum in 3D living tissue. BDI combines low-coherence digital holography with intracellular Doppler spectroscopy to study tumor drug response. Human ovarian cancer cell lines were grown either in vitro as 3D multicellular monoculture spheroids or as xenografts in nude mice. Fragments of xenografts grown in vivo in nude mice from a platinum-sensitive human ovarian cell line showed rapid and dramatic signatures of induced cell death when exposed to platinum ex vivo, while the corresponding 3D multicellular spheroids grown in vitro showed negligible response. The differences in drug response between in vivo and in vitro growth have important implications for predicting chemotherapeutic response using tumor biopsies from patients or patient-derived xenografts.

  20. 68Ga-Chloride PET Reveals Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenografts in Rats—Comparison with FDG

    PubMed Central

    Ujula, Tiina; Salomäki, Satu; Autio, Anu; Luoto, Pauliina; Tolvanen, Tuula; Lehikoinen, Pertti; Viljanen, Tapio; Sipilä, Hannu; Härkönen, Pirkko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to compare 68Ga-chloride with 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) for the imaging of pancreatic xenografts. Procedures Rats with subcutaneous human pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts were evaluated in vivo by dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo by measuring radioactivity of excised tissues and by digital autoradiography of tumor cryosections. Results Both tracers were capable of delineating all subcutaneous tumors from surrounding tissues by PET. The standardized uptake values of tumors by PET were 0.9 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD) for 68Ga-chloride (n = 13) and 1.8 ± 1.2 for FDG (n = 11). Ex vivo studies showed tumor-to-muscle ratio of 4.0 ± 0.3 for 68Ga-chloride (n = 4) and 7.9 ± 3.2 for FDG (n = 4). Conclusions 68Ga-chloride delineated subcutaneously implanted pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts by PET, but the uptake was lower than FDG. Further studies to clarify the value of 68Ga-chloride for PET imaging of tumors are warranted. PMID:19798536

  1. Noninvasive Radiofrequency Field Destruction of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenografts Treated with Targeted Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Zhu, Cihui; Massey, Katheryn L.; Thompson, C. Shea; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Hamir, Amir N.; Curley, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers with few effective treatments. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are potentially therapeutic because of the safety demonstrated thus far and their physio-chemical characteristics. We utilized the astounding heating rates of AuNPs in nonionizing radiofrequency (RF) radiation to investigate human pancreatic xenograft destruction in a murine model. Experimental Design Weekly, Panc-1 and Capan-1 human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in immunocompromised mice were exposed to an RF field 36 hours after treatment (intraperitoneal) with cetuximab or PAM4 antibody conjugated AuNPs, respectively. Tumor sizes were measured weekly while necrosis and cleaved caspase-3 were investigated with H&E staining and immunofluorescence, respectively. In addition, AuNP internalization and cytotoxicity were investigated in vitro with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. Results Panc-1 cells demonstrated increased apoptosis with decreased viability after treatment with cetuximab conjugated AuNPs and RF field exposure (p = 0.00005). Differences in xenograft volumes were observed within 2 weeks of initiating therapy. Cetuximab-conjugated and PAM4-conjugated AuNPs demonstrated RF field-induced destruction of Panc-1 and Capan-1 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts after six weeks of weekly treatment (p = 0.004 and p = 0.035, respectively). There was no evidence of injury to murine organs. Cleaved caspase-3 and necrosis were both increased in treated tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates a potentially novel cancer therapy by non-invasively inducing intracellular hyperthermia with targeted AuNPs in an RF field. While the therapy is dependent on the specificity of the targeting antibody, normal tissues were without toxicity despite systemic therapy and whole body RF field exposure. PMID:21138869

  2. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  3. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery.

  4. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  5. The Growth of SGC-7901 Tumor Xenografts Was Suppressed by Chinese Bayberry Anthocyanin Extract through Upregulating KLF6 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xia-nan; Xie, Wen-hua; Zheng, Yi-xiong; Cao, Jin-ping; Cao, Pei-rang; Chen, Qing-jun; Li, Xian; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of anthocyanins extracted from Chinese bayberry fruit (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.), a nude mouse tumor xenograft model was established. Treatments with C3G (cyanidin-3-glucoside, an anthocyanin) significantly suppressed the growth of SGC-7901 tumor xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant increase in p21 expression, indicating that the cell cycle of tumor xenografts was inhibited. qPCR screening showed that C3G treatment up-regulated the expression of the KLF6 gene, which is an important tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers. Western blot showed that C3G treatments markedly increased KLF6 and p21 protein levels, inhibited CDK4 and Cyclin D1 expression, but did not notably change the expression of p53. These results indicated that KLF6 up-regulates p21 in a p53-independent manner and significantly reduces tumor proliferation. This study provides important information for the possible mechanism of C3G-induced antitumor activity against gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo. PMID:27690088

  6. Dissection of stromal and cancer cell-derived signals in melanoma xenografts before and after treatment with DMXAA

    PubMed Central

    Henare, K; Wang, L; Wang, L-Cs; Thomsen, L; Tijono, S; Chen, C-Jj; Winkler, S; Dunbar, P R; Print, C; Ching, L-M

    2012-01-01

    Background: The non-malignant cells of the tumour stroma have a critical role in tumour biology. Studies dissecting the interplay between cancer cells and stromal cells are required to further our understanding of tumour progression and methods of intervention. For proof-of-principle of a multi-modal approach to dissect the differential effects of treatment on cancer cells and stromal cells, we analysed the effects of the stromal-targeting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid on melanoma xenografts. Methods: Flow cytometry and multi-colour immunofluorescence staining was used to analyse leukocyte numbers in xenografts. Murine-specific and human-specific multiplex cytokine panels were used to quantitate cytokines produced by stromal and melanoma cells, respectively. Human and mouse Affymetrix microarrays were used to separately identify melanoma cell-specific and stromal cell-specific gene expression. Results: 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid activated pro-inflammatory signalling pathways and cytokine expression from both stromal and cancer cells, leading to neutrophil accumulation and haemorrhagic necrosis and a delay in tumour re-growth of 26 days in A375 melanoma xenografts. Conclusion: 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid and related analogues may potentially have utility in the treatment of melanoma. The experimental platform used allowed distinction between cancer cells and stromal cells and can be applied to investigate other tumour models and anti-cancer agents. PMID:22415295

  7. Transalveolar osmotic and diffusional water permeability in intact mouse lung measured by a novel surface fluorescence method.

    PubMed

    Carter, E P; Matthay, M A; Farinas, J; Verkman, A S

    1996-09-01

    A surface fluorescence method was developed to measure transalveolar transport of water, protons, and solutes in intact perfused lungs. Lungs from c57 mice were removed and perfused via the pulmonary artery (approximately 2 ml/min). The airspace was filled via the trachea with physiological saline containing a membrane-impermeant fluorescent indicator (FITC-dextran or aminonapthalene trisulfonic acid, ANTS). Because fluorescence is detected only near the lung surface due to light absorption by lung tissue, the surface fluorescence signal is directly proportional to indicator concentration. Confocal microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal arises from fluorophores in alveoli just beneath the pleural surface. Osmotic water permeability (Pf) was measured from the time course of intraalveolar FITC-dextran fluorescence in response to changes in perfusate osmolality. Transalveolar Pf was 0.017 +/- 0.001 cm/s at 23 degrees C, independent of the solute used to induce osmosis (sucrose, NaCl, urea), independent of osmotic gradient size and direction, weakly temperature dependent (Arrhenius activation energy 5.3 kcal/mol) and inhibited by HgCl2. Pf was not affected by cAMP activation but was decreased by 43% in lung exposed to hyperoxia for 5 d. Diffusional water permeability (Pd) and Pf were measured in the same lung from intraalveolar ANTS fluorescence, which increased by 1.8-fold upon addition of 50% D2O to the perfusate, Pd was 1.3 x 10(-5) cm/s at 23 degrees C. Transalveolar proton transport was measured from FITC-dextran fluorescence upon switching perfusate pH between 7.4 and 5.6; alveolar pH half-equilibrated in 1.9 and 1.0 min without and with HCO3-, respectively. These results indicate high transalveolar water permeability in mouse lung, implicating the involvement of molecular water channels, and establish a quantitative surface fluorescence method to measure water and solute permeabilities in intact lung.

  8. The Angiogenic Secretome in VEGF overexpressing Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Dore-Savard, Louis; Lee, Esak; Kakkad, Samata; Popel, Aleksander S.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    The plasticity of cancer cells and the fluidity of the tumor microenvironment continue to present major challenges in the comprehensive understanding of cancer that is essential to design effective treatments. The tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) encompasses the secretome and holds the key to several of the phenotypic characteristics of cancer. Difficulties in sampling this fluid have resulted in limited characterization of its components. Here we have sampled TIF from triple negative and estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast tumor xenografts with or without VEGF overexpression. Angiogenesis-related factors were characterized in the TIF and plasma, to understand the relationship between the TIF and plasma secretomes. Clear differences were observed between the TIF and plasma angiogenic secretomes in triple negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts compared to ER-positive MCF-7 xenografts with or without VEGF overexpression that provide new insights into TIF components and the role of VEGF in modifying the angiogenic secretome. PMID:27995973

  9. Label free measurement of retinal blood cell flux, velocity, hematocrit and capillary width in the living mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Torres, A.; Joseph, A.; Schallek, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring blood cell dynamics within the capillaries of the living eye provides crucial information regarding the health of the microvascular network. To date, the study of single blood cell movement in this network has been obscured by optical aberrations, hindered by weak optical contrast, and often required injection of exogenous fluorescent dyes to perform measurements. Here we present a new strategy to non-invasively image single blood cells in the living mouse eye without contrast agents. Eye aberrations were corrected with an adaptive optics camera coupled with a fast, 15 kHz scanned beam orthogonal to a capillary of interest. Blood cells were imaged as they flowed past a near infrared imaging beam to which the eye is relatively insensitive. Optical contrast of cells was optimized using differential scatter of blood cells in the split-detector imaging configuration. Combined, these strategies provide label-free, non-invasive imaging of blood cells in the retina as they travel in single file in capillaries, enabling determination of cell flux, morphology, class, velocity, and rheology at the single cell level. PMID:27867728

  10. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  11. Measurement of hypocretin/orexin content in the mouse brain using an enzyme immunoassay: the effect of circadian time, age and genetic background.

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Wisor, J; Shiba, T; Taheri, S; Yanai, K; Wurts, S; Lin, X; Vitaterna, M; Takahashi, J; Lovenberg, T W; Koehl, M; Uhl, G; Nishino, S; Mignot, E

    2002-12-01

    The hypocretins (1 and 2) have emerged as key regulators of sleep and wakefulness. We developed a high-throughput enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure total brain hypocretin levels from large numbers of mice. Hypocretin levels were not altered by circadian time or age. However, significant differences in one or both hypocretin peptides were observed between different mouse strains. We studied hypocretin levels in knockout and transgenic mouse models with obesity, circadian gene mutations or monoaminergic defects. Compared to controls, only histamine receptor knockouts had lower hypocretin levels. This was most pronounced in H1 receptor knockouts suggesting the existence of a positive feedback loop between hypocretin and histaminergic neurons.

  12. Measurement of light transmission and fluence rate in mouse brain in vivo(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macklin, John J.; Graves, Austin R.; Stujenske, Joseph M.; Hantman, Adam W.; Bittner, Katie C.

    2017-02-01

    Optogenetic experiments require light delivery, typically using fiber optics, to light-gated ion channels genetically targeted to specific brain regions. Understanding where light is—and isn't—in an illuminated brain can be a confounding factor in designing experiments and interpreting results. While the transmission of light, i.e. survival of forward-directed and forward-scattered light, has been extensively measured in vitro, light scattering can be significantly different in vivo due to blood flow and other factors. To measure irradiance in vivo, we constructed a pipette photodetector tipped with fluorescent quantum dots that function as a light transducer. The quantum dot fluorescence is collected by a waveguide and sent to a fiber-coupled spectrometer. The device has a small photo-responsive area ( 10 um x 15 um), enabling collection of micron-resolution irradiance profiles, and can be calibrated to determine irradiance with detection limits of 0.001 mW/mm2. The photodetector has the footprint of a micro-injection pipette, so can be inserted into almost any brain region with minimal invasiveness. With this detector, we determined transverse and axial irradiance profiles in mice across multiple brain regions at 5 source wavelengths spanning the visible spectrum. This profile data is compared to in vitro measurements obtained on tissue slices, and provides a means to derive scattering coefficients for specific brain regions in vivo. The detector is straightforward to fabricate and calibrate, is stable in air storage > 9 months, and can be easily installed in an electrophysiology setup, thereby enabling direct measurement of light spread under conditions used in optogenetics experiments.

  13. High microvascular endothelial water permeability in mouse lung measured by a pleural surface fluorescence method.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, E P; Olveczky, B P; Matthay, M A; Verkman, A S

    1998-01-01

    Transport of water between the capillary and airspace compartments in lung encounters serial barriers: the alveolar epithelium, interstitium, and capillary endothelium. We previously reported a pleural surface fluorescence method to measure net capillary-to-airspace water transport. To measure the osmotic water permeability across the microvascular endothelial barrier in intact lung, the airspace was filled with a water-immiscible fluorocarbon. The capillaries were perfused via the pulmonary artery with solutions of specified osmolalites containing a high-molecular-weight fluorescent dextran. An increase in perfusate osmolality produced a prompt decrease in surface fluorescence due to dye dilution in the capillaries, followed by a slower return to initial fluorescence as capillary and lung interstitial osmolality equilibrate. A mathematical model was developed to determine the osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pf) of lung microvessels from the time course of pleural surface fluorescence. As predicted, the magnitude of the prompt change in surface fluorescence increased with decreased pulmonary artery perfusion rate and increased osmotic gradient size. With raffinose used to induce the osmotic gradient, Pf was 0.03 cm/s at 23 degrees C and was reduced 54% by 0.5 mM HgCl2. Temperature dependence measurements gave an Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) of 5.4 kcal/mol (12-37 degrees C). The apparent Pf induced by the smaller osmolytes mannitol and glycine was 0.021 and 0.011 cm/s (23 degrees C). Immunoblot analysis showed approximately 1.4 x 10(12) aquaporin-1 water channels/cm2 of capillary surface, which accounted quantitatively for the high Pf. These results establish a novel method for measuring osmotically driven water permeability across microvessels in intact lung. The high Pf, low Ea, and mercurial inhibition indicate the involvement of molecular water channels in water transport across the lung endothelium. PMID:9545071

  14. Differential modulation of nicotine-induced gemcitabine resistance by GABA receptor agonists in pancreatic cancer cell xenografts and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein An; Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Dagnon, Koami; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2014-09-27

    Pancreatic cancer is frequently resistant to cancer therapeutics. Smoking and alcoholism are risk factors and pancreatic cancer patients often undergo nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and treatment for alcohol dependence. Based on our report that low dose nicotine within the range of NRT causes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer, our current study has tested the hypothesis that GABA or the selective GABA-B-R agonist baclofen used to treat alcohol dependence reverse nicotine-induced gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer. Using mouse xenografts from the gemcitabine--sensitive pancreatic cancer cell line BXPC-3, we tested the effects of GABA and baclofen on nicotine-induced gemcitabine resistance. The levels of cAMP, p-SRC, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB and cleaved caspase-3 in xenograft tissues were determined by ELISA assays. Expression of the two GABA-B receptors, metalloproteinase-2 and 9 and EGR-1 in xenograft tissues was monitored by Western blotting. Mechanistic studies were conducted in vitro, using cell lines BXPC-3 and PANC-1 and included analyses of cAMP production by ELISA assay and Western blots to determine protein expression of GABA-B receptors, metalloproteinase-2 and 9 and EGR-1. Our data show that GABA was as effective as gemcitabine and significantly reversed gemcitabine resistance induced by low dose nicotine in xenografts whereas baclofen did not. These effects of GABA were accompanied by decreases in cAMP, p-CREB, p-AKT, p-Src, p-ERK metalloproteinases-9 and -2 and EGR-1 and increases in cleaved caspase-3 in xenografts whereas baclofen had the opposite effects. In vitro exposure of cells to single doses or seven days of nicotine induced the protein expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and EGR-1 and these responses were blocked by GABA. Baclofen downregulated the protein expression of GABA-B-Rs in xenograft tissues and in cells exposed to baclofen for seven days in vitro. This response was accompanied by inversed baclofen effects from inhibition of

  15. Bovine xenograft failures in pediatric foot reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Cameron K; Nunley, James A; Viens, Nicholas A; Lark, Robert K

    2013-06-01

    Structural bone grafting serves an important and necessary role during pediatric foot reconstruction. Different bone grafts have been used for such reconstructions including corticocancellous autografts, allografts, and synthetic grafts. Bovine xenografts represent a novel option with multiple potential advantages; however, there are limited clinical data on the efficacy and success of such grafts. This retrospective case series was performed to review the anecdotally recognized high failure rate of bovine xenograft transplantation in pediatric foot reconstruction at a tertiary institution. Ten pediatric patients with 13 feet underwent reconstructive procedures involving implantation of bovine xenografts for various foot deformities. The mean age at time of surgery was 14.1 years with an average clinical follow-up of 21.6 months. All patients received lateral column lengthening with additional various other reconstructive procedures performed by 3 separate orthopaedic surgeons in a similar step-wise manner. Clinical outcomes were obtained through a retrospective chart review of standard preoperative and postoperative clinical and radiographic data. Seven of 13 (53.8%) bovine xenografts implanted resulted in clinical symptoms of failure with corresponding radiographic failed graft incorporation. The most common presenting symptom was foot pain with activity and each failure was easily identified on plain radiographs by lucency surrounding the graft sites. All 7 failures required a subsequent revision surgery to remove the bovine graft followed by placement of human iliac crest allograft. After revision surgery, each patient reported subjective improvement in pain and return to daily activity with radiographic evidence of complete incorporation of the graft. Bovine xenografts used as structural grafts in pediatric foot reconstruction resulted in unacceptably high rates of failure and the need for further revision surgery. For this reason, surgeons should be cautioned

  16. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0 h, 24 h and 48 h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24 h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0 h) and fully differentiated (48 h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population. PMID:26963790

  17. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-07-15

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0h, 24h and 48h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0h) and fully differentiated (48h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population.

  18. A rapid, valid and inexpensive assay for measuring epiphyseal plates in mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Interlichia, Jillian P; Williams, Nolann G; Rodgers, Buel D

    2010-04-01

    One of the most accurate indices of changes in somatic tissue growth rate in rodents is the width of tibial epiphyseal plates as unlike most mammals, rodent growth plates never ossify. Unfortunately, the original procedure to measure tibial epiphyseal plate width (TEPW) was developed for rats and yields poor results with mice. This paper demonstrates a simple method for silver staining growth plates that can be used to inexpensively and quickly measure the TEPW of mice. Poor visualization due to overstaining and the shattering of growth plates necessitated several revisions to the original protocol. These include exposing the growth plate prior to acetone dehydration, reducing the silver nitrate concentration from 2% to 1.5% and staining time from 2 min to 10 s and finally, the use of reflective light rather than transmissive light when imaging. The optimized protocol was then validated by generating an age-dependent TEPW growth curve that matched changes in tibia length. A total of 120 tibias were processed in a combined time of less than one day and for less than $30. By contrast, histological processing in the university's core facility would have cost $1440 and taken approximately three weeks. Thus, the revised protocol is vastly more cost effective, reliable and can be performed considerably quicker with minimal training.

  19. Procedural learning as a measure of functional impairment in a mouse model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Linden, Jérôme; Van de Beeck, Lise; Plumier, Jean-Christophe; Ferrara, André

    2016-07-01

    Basal ganglia stroke is often associated with functional deficits in patients, including difficulties to learn and execute new motor skills (procedural learning). To measure procedural learning in a murine model of stroke (30min right MCAO), we submitted C57Bl/6J mice to various sensorimotor tests, then to an operant procedure (Serial Order Learning) specifically assessing the ability to learn a simple motor sequence. Results showed that MCAO affected the performance in some of the sensorimotor tests (accelerated rotating rod and amphetamine rotation test) and the way animals learned a motor sequence. The later finding seems to be caused by difficulties regarding the chunking of operant actions into a coherent motor sequence; the appeal for food rewards and ability to press levers appeared unaffected by MCAO. We conclude that assessment of motor learning in rodent models of stroke might improve the translational value of such models.

  20. Optical measurement of mouse strain differences in cerebral blood flow using indocyanine green

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye-Min; Sohn, Inkyung; Kim, Seunggyu; Kim, Daehwan; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Chan

    2015-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice have more cerebral arterial branches and collaterals than BALB/c mice. We measured and compared blood flow dynamics of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in these two strains, using noninvasive optical imaging with indocyanine green (ICG). Relative maximum fluorescence intensity (Imax) and the time needed for ICG to reach Imax in the MCA of C57BL/c were lower than that in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the mean transit time was significantly lower in C57BL/6 than in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that the higher number of arterial branches and collaterals in C57BL/6 mice yields a lower blood flow per cerebral artery. PMID:25833343

  1. Resveratrol Is Rapidly Metabolized in Athymic (Nu/Nu) Mice and Does Not Inhibit Human Melanoma Xenograft Tumor Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Richard M.; Cook, Carla P.; Meadows, Gary G.; Fu, Ya-Min; McLaughlin, Jerry L.; Rankin, Gary O.

    2006-01-01

    Resveratrol has been shown to have anticarcinogenic activity. We previously found that resveratrol inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in 2 human melanoma cell lines. In this study we determined whether resveratrol would inhibit human melanoma xenograft growth. Athymic mice received control diets or diets containing 110 μmol/L or 263 μmol/L resveratrol, 2 wk prior to subcutaneous injection of the tumor cells. Tumor growth was measured during a 3-wk period. Metabolism of resveratrol was assayed by bolus gavage of 75 mg/kg resveratrol in tumor-bearing and nontumor-bearing mice. Pellets containing 10–100 mg resveratrol were implanted into the mice, next to newly palpated tumors, and tumor growth determined. We also determined the effect of a major resveratrol metabolite, piceatannol, on experimental lung metastasis. Resveratrol, at any concentration tested, did not have a statistically significant effect on tumor growth. The higher levels of resveratrol tested (0.006% in food or 100 mg in slow-release pellets) tended to stimulate tumor growth (P = 0.08–0.09). Resveratrol and its major metabolites, resveratrol glucuronide and piceatannol, were found in serum, liver, skin, and tumor tissue. Piceatannol did not affect the in vitro growth of a murine melanoma cell line, but significantly stimulated the number of lung metastases when these melanoma cells were directly injected into the tail vein of the mouse. These results suggest that resveratrol is not likely to be useful in the treatment of melanoma and that the effects of phytochemicals on cell cultures may not translate to the whole animal system. PMID:16988123

  2. Molecular Imaging and Quantitation of EphA2 Expression in Xenograft Models with 89Zr-DS-8895a.

    PubMed

    Burvenich, Ingrid J G; Parakh, Sagun; Gan, Hui K; Lee, Fook-Thean; Guo, Nancy; Rigopoulos, Angela; Lee, Sze-Ting; Gong, Sylvia; O'Keefe, Graeme J; Tochon-Danguy, Henri; Kotsuma, Masakatsu; Hasegawa, Jun; Senaldi, Giorgio; Scott, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Subtype A2 of the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular tyrosine kinase (EphA2) cell surface receptor is expressed in a range of epithelial cancers. This study evaluated the molecular imaging of EphA2 expression in vivo in mouse tumor models using SPECT/MR and PET/MR and a humanized anti-EphA2 antibody, DS-8895a. DS-8895a was labeled with (111)In, (125)I, and (89)Zr and assessed for radiochemical purity, immunoreactivity (Lindmo analysis), antigen-binding affinity (Scatchard analysis), and serum stability in vitro. In vivo biodistribution, imaging, and pharmacokinetic studies were performed with SPECT/MR and PET/MR. A dose-escalation study was also performed to determine EphA2 receptor saturability through tissue and imaging quantitative analysis. All conjugates demonstrated good serum stability and specific binding to EphA2-expressing cells in vitro. In vivo biodistribution studies showed high uptake of (111)In-CHX-A″-DTPA-DS-8895a and (89)Zr-Df-Bz-NCS-DS-8895a in EphA2-expressing xenograft models, with no specific uptake in normal tissues. In comparison, retention of (125)I-DS-8895a in tumors was lower because of internalization of the radioconjugate and dehalogenation. These results were confirmed by SPECT/MR and PET/MR. EphA2 receptor saturation was observed at the 30 mg/kg dose. Molecular imaging of tumor uptake of DS-8895a allows noninvasive measurement of EphA2 expression in tumors in vivo and determination of receptor saturation. (89)Zr-Df-Bz-NCS-DS-8895a is suited for human bioimaging trials on the basis of superior imaging characteristics and will inform DS-8895a dose assessment and patient response evaluation in clinical trials. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Automated measurement of mouse social behaviors using depth sensing, video tracking, and machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Weizhe; Kennedy, Ann; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P.; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Navonne, Santiago G.; Perona, Pietro; Anderson, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A lack of automated, quantitative, and accurate assessment of social behaviors in mammalian animal models has limited progress toward understanding mechanisms underlying social interactions and their disorders such as autism. Here we present a new integrated hardware and software system that combines video tracking, depth sensing, and machine learning for automatic detection and quantification of social behaviors involving close and dynamic interactions between two mice of different coat colors in their home cage. We designed a hardware setup that integrates traditional video cameras with a depth camera, developed computer vision tools to extract the body “pose” of individual animals in a social context, and used a supervised learning algorithm to classify several well-described social behaviors. We validated the robustness of the automated classifiers in various experimental settings and used them to examine how genetic background, such as that of Black and Tan Brachyury (BTBR) mice (a previously reported autism model), influences social behavior. Our integrated approach allows for rapid, automated measurement of social behaviors across diverse experimental designs and also affords the ability to develop new, objective behavioral metrics. PMID:26354123

  4. Automated measurement of mouse social behaviors using depth sensing, video tracking, and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weizhe; Kennedy, Ann; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Navonne, Santiago G; Perona, Pietro; Anderson, David J

    2015-09-22

    A lack of automated, quantitative, and accurate assessment of social behaviors in mammalian animal models has limited progress toward understanding mechanisms underlying social interactions and their disorders such as autism. Here we present a new integrated hardware and software system that combines video tracking, depth sensing, and machine learning for automatic detection and quantification of social behaviors involving close and dynamic interactions between two mice of different coat colors in their home cage. We designed a hardware setup that integrates traditional video cameras with a depth camera, developed computer vision tools to extract the body "pose" of individual animals in a social context, and used a supervised learning algorithm to classify several well-described social behaviors. We validated the robustness of the automated classifiers in various experimental settings and used them to examine how genetic background, such as that of Black and Tan Brachyury (BTBR) mice (a previously reported autism model), influences social behavior. Our integrated approach allows for rapid, automated measurement of social behaviors across diverse experimental designs and also affords the ability to develop new, objective behavioral metrics.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of leukocytes, vascularization and matrix metalloproteinases in human menstrual xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; He, Bin; Xu, Xiangbo; Wang, Jiedong

    2011-02-17

    In our previous study, menstrual-like changes in mouse were provoked through the pharmacologic withdrawal of progesterone with mifepristone following induction of decidualization. However, mouse is not a natural menstruation animal, and the menstruation model using external stimuli may not truly reflect the occurrence and development of the human menstrual process. Therefore, we established a model of menstruation based on human endometrial xenotransplantation. In this model, human endometrial tissues were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice that were ovarectomized and supplemented with estrogen and progestogen by silastic implants with a scheme imitating the endocrinological milieu of human menstrual cycle. Morphology, hormone levels, and expression of vimentin and cytokeratin markers were evaluated to confirm the menstrual-like changes in this model. With 28 days of hormone treatment, transplanted human endometrium survived and underwent proliferation, differentiation and disintegration, similar to human endometrium in vivo. Human CD45+ cells showed a peak of increase 28 days post-transplantation. Three days after progesterone withdrawal, mouse CD45+ cells increased rapidly in number and were significantly greater than human CD45+ cell counts. Mouse CD31+ blood vascular-like structures were detected in both transplanted and host tissues. After progesterone withdrawal, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 2, and 9 were increased. In summary, we successfully established a human endometrial xenotransplantation model in SCID mice, based on the results of menstrual-like changes in which MMP-1, 2 and 9 are involved. We showed that leukocytes are originated from in situ proliferation in human xenografts and involved in the occurrence of menstruation. This model will help to further understand the occurrence, growth, and differentiation of the endometrium and the underlying mechanisms of menstruation.

  6. In vitro measurements of extracellular L-glutamate level in region CA3 of mouse hippocampal slices under chemical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Hiromi; Deguchi, Yukari; Kanazawa, Ena; Kawai, Jun; Nozawa, Keiichiro; Shoji, Atsushi; Sugawara, Masao

    2010-01-01

    The concentration level of extracellular L-glutamate released from region CA3 of mouse hippocampal slices under tetraethylammonium (TEA) chloride and KCl stimulation was measured with independent methods, i.e., a capillary-based enzyme sensor, a patch sensor, and an enzyme-based imaging method. The L-glutamate level was compared with those at regions CA1 and DG. It was found that the enhanced concentration level at CA3 by TEA stimulation is very similar to that at CA1, but it is much lower than that at DG. The order of the regional distribution of L-glutamate, i.e., DG > CA1 ≈ CA3, was the same as that obtained by K(+) stimulation. However, in the presence of an uptake inhibitor, DL-TBOA, KCl stimulation showed the strongest L-glutamate flux at CA1, while TEA stimulation exhibited the strongest flux at CA3. The usefulness of the present approach for knowing the extracellular L-glutamate level in acute hippocampal slices is discussed.

  7. Mouse fitness measures reveal incomplete functional redundancy of Hox paralogous group 1 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Saffarini, Raed B.; Ramoz, Leda L.; Morrison, Linda C.; Baker, Shambralyn; Laverty, Sean M.; Tvrdik, Petr; Capecchi, Mario R.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2017-01-01

    Here we assess the fitness consequences of the replacement of the Hoxa1 coding region with its paralog Hoxb1 in mice (Mus musculus) residing in semi-natural enclosures. Previously, this Hoxa1B1 swap was reported as resulting in no discernible embryonic or physiological phenotype (i.e., functionally redundant), despite the 51% amino acid sequence differences between these two Hox proteins. Within heterozygous breeding cages no differences in litter size nor deviations from Mendelian genotypic expectations were observed in the outbred progeny; however, within semi-natural population enclosures mice homozygous for the Hoxa1B1 swap were out-reproduced by controls resulting in the mutant allele being only 87.5% as frequent as the control in offspring born within enclosures. Specifically, Hoxa1B1 founders produced only 77.9% as many offspring relative to controls, as measured by homozygous pups, and a 22.1% deficiency of heterozygous offspring was also observed. These data suggest that Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 have diverged in function through either sub- or neo-functionalization and that the HoxA1 and HoxB1 proteins are not mutually interchangeable when expressed from the Hoxa1 locus. The fitness assays conducted under naturalistic conditions in this study have provided an ultimate-level assessment of the postulated equivalence of competing alleles. Characterization of these differences has provided greater understanding of the forces shaping the maintenance and diversifications of Hox genes as well as other paralogous genes. This fitness assay approach can be applied to any genetic manipulation and often provides the most sensitive way to detect functional differences. PMID:28380068

  8. Stereological measurement of porto-central gradients in gene expression in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, Jan M; Gieling, Roben G; Markman, Marry M; Hagoort, Jaco; Lamers, Wouter H

    2004-02-01

    The liver is thought to consist of lobules, numerous repeating, randomly oriented units. Within these lobules, genes are expressed in gradients along the porto-central axis, which spans the distance between portal and central veins. We have developed a robust stereological method to map all points in an image to their position on this porto-central axis. This approach is based on the distribution of well-characterized periportal and pericentral enzymes, which are visualized on sections preceding and following the section of interest. Because expression of the model genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and ornithine aminotransferase declines gradually with increasing distance from the portal vein and central vein, respectively, these genes can be used to prepare images with topographical information without any assumption about the shape of the hepatic unit, or about the direction or shape of the gradient to be determined. The "relative distance" image is a 2-dimensional image that accurately maps the relative position of hepatocytes on the porto-central axis in 3-dimensional space. It is superimposed on the serial section under investigation to relate local staining density to position on the porto-central axis and obtain the gene expression gradient. The method was used to determine the expression gradient of 2 periportal and 2 pericentral enzymes and their response to fasting. The "total distance" image was used to measure the length of the porto-central axis, which was approximately 210 microm in mice and found to decrease 13% after 1 day of starvation. The method can be applied to any tissue component that can be stained quantitatively.

  9. An orthotopic xenograft model with survival hindlimb amputation allows investigation of the effect of tumor microenvironment on sarcoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Seth D; Hayashi, Masanori; Albert, Catherine M; Jackson, Kyle W; Loeb, David M

    2015-10-01

    Overall survival rates for pediatric high-grade sarcoma have improved greatly in the past few decades, but prevention and treatment of distant metastasis remain the most compelling problems facing these patients. Traditional preclinical mouse models have not proven adequate to study the biology and treatment of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis. To address this deficit, we developed an orthotopic implantation/amputation model in which patient-derived sarcoma xenografts are surgically implanted into mouse hindlimbs, allowed to grow, then subsequently amputated and the animals observed for development of metastases. NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ-null mice were implanted with either histologically intact high grade sarcoma patient-derived xenografts or cell lines in the pretibial space and affected limbs were amputated after tumor growth. In contrast to subcutaneous flank tumors, we were able to consistently detect spontaneous distant spread of the tumors using our model. Metastases were seen in 27-90 % of animals, depending on the xenograft, and were repeatable and predictable. We also demonstrate the utility of this model for studying the biology of metastasis and present preliminary new insights suggesting the role of arginine metabolism and macrophage phenotype polarization in creating a tumor microenvironment that facilitates metastasis. Subcutaneous tumors express more arginase than inducible nitric oxide synthase and demonstrate significant macrophage infiltration, whereas orthotopic tumors express similar amounts of inducible nitric oxide synthase and arginase and have only a scant macrophage infiltrate. Thus, we present a model of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis that mimics the clinical situation and is amenable to studying the biology of the entire metastatic cascade.

  10. Tumor-targeted gene therapy using Adv-AFP-HRPC/IAA prodrug system suppresses growth of hepatoma xenografted in mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, M; Liu, J; Chen, D-E; Rao, Y; Tang, Z-J; Ho, W-Z; Dong, C-Y

    2012-02-01

    Clinical efficacy of current therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment is limited. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is non-toxic for mammalian cells. Oxidative decarboxylation of IAA by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) leads to toxic effects of IAA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a novel gene-targeted enzyme prodrug therapy with IAA on hepatoma growth in vitro and in vivo mouse hepatoma models. We generated a plasmid using adenovirus to express HRP isoenzyme C (HRPC) with the HCC marker, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), as the promoter (pAdv-AFP-HRPC). Hepatocellular cells were infected with pAdv-AFP-HRPC and treated with IAA. Cell death was detected using MTT assay. Hepatoma xenografts were developed in mice by injection of mouse hepatoma cells. The size and weight of tumors and organs were evaluated. Cell death in tumors was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections. HRPC expression in tissues was detected using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction. IAA stimulated death of hepatocellular cells infected with pAdv-AFP-HRPC, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but not in control cells. Growth of hepatoma xenografts, including the size and weight, was inhibited in mice treated with pAdv-AFP-HRPC and IAA, compared with that in control group. pAdv-AFP-HRPC/IAA treatment induced cell death in hepatoma xenografts in mice. HRPC gene expressed only in hepatoma, but not in other normal organs of mice. pAdv-AFP-HRPC/IAA treatment did not cause any side effects on normal organs. These findings suggest that pAdv-AFP-HRPC/IAA enzyme/prodrug system may serve as a strategy for HCC therapy.

  11. Next generation patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dong; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuwei; Wu, Rebecca; Watahiki, Akira; Dong, Xin; Cheng, Hongwei; Wyatt, Alexander W; Collins, Colin C; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for more effective therapeutic approaches for prostate cancer. Research in this area, however, has been seriously hampered by a lack of clinically relevant, experimental in vivo models of the disease. This review particularly focuses on the development of prostate cancer xenograft models based on subrenal capsule grafting of patients’ tumor tissue into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. This technique allows successful development of transplantable, patient-derived cancer tissue xenograft lines not only from aggressive metastatic, but also from localized prostate cancer tissues. The xenografts have been found to retain key biological properties of the original malignancies, including histopathological and molecular characteristics, tumor heterogeneity, response to androgen ablation and metastatic ability. As such, they are highly clinically relevant and provide valuable tools for studies of prostate cancer progression at cellular and molecular levels, drug screening for personalized cancer therapy and preclinical drug efficacy testing; especially when a panel of models is used to cover a broader spectrum of the disease. These xenograft models could therefore be viewed as next-generation models of prostate cancer. PMID:24589467

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  13. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, William C.; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; Chu, Berbie; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Sampayo, Rocío; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2015-12-12

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER+ adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent with “luminal B” intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44High subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44Low cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER+ cancers. This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development.

  14. Isolation of Plasma Membrane Vesicles from Mouse Placenta at Term and Measurement of System A and System β Amino Acid Transporter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kusinski, L.C.; Jones, C.J.P.; Baker, P.N.; Sibley, C.P.; Glazier, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Placental amino acid transport is essential for optimal fetal growth and development, with a reduced fetal provision of amino acids being implicated as a potential cause of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Understanding placental insufficiency related FGR has been aided by the development of mouse models that have features of the human disease. However, to take maximal advantage of these, methods are required to study placental function in the mouse. Here, we report a method to isolate plasma membrane vesicles from mouse placenta near-term and have used these to investigate two amino acid transporters, systems A and β, the activities of which are reduced in human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles from FGR pregnancies. Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated at embryonic day 18 by a protocol involving homogenisation, MgCl2 precipitation and centrifugation. Vesicles were enriched 11.3 ± 0.5-fold in alkaline phosphatase activity as compared to initial homogenate, with minimal intracellular organelle contamination as judged by marker analyses. Cytochemistry revealed alkaline phosphatase was localised between trophoblast layers I and II, with intense reaction product deposited on the maternal-facing plasma membrane of layer II, suggesting that vesicles were derived from this trophoblast membrane. System A and system β activity in mouse placental vesicles, measured as Na+-dependent uptake of 14C-methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB) and 3H-taurine respectively confirmed localisation of these transporters to the maternal-facing plasma membrane of layer II. Comparison to human placental MVM showed that system A activity was comparable at initial rate between species whilst system β activity was significantly lower in mouse. This mirrored the lower expression of TAUT observed in mouse placental vesicles. We conclude that syncytiotrophoblast layer II-derived plasma membrane vesicles can be isolated and used to examine transporter function. PMID:19954844

  15. Cardiac function and perfusion dynamics measured on a beat-by-beat basis in the live mouse using ultra-fast 4D optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Steven J.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The fast heart rate (~7 Hz) of the mouse makes cardiac imaging and functional analysis difficult when studying mouse models of cardiovascular disease, and cannot be done truly in real-time and 3D using established imaging modalities. Optoacoustic imaging, on the other hand, provides ultra-fast imaging at up to 50 volumetric frames per second, allowing for acquisition of several frames per mouse cardiac cycle. In this study, we combined a recently-developed 3D optoacoustic imaging array with novel analytical techniques to assess cardiac function and perfusion dynamics of the mouse heart at high, 4D spatiotemporal resolution. In brief, the heart of an anesthetized mouse was imaged over a series of multiple volumetric frames. In another experiment, an intravenous bolus of indocyanine green (ICG) was injected and its distribution was subsequently imaged in the heart. Unique temporal features of the cardiac cycle and ICG distribution profiles were used to segment the heart from background and to assess cardiac function. The 3D nature of the experimental data allowed for determination of cardiac volumes at ~7-8 frames per mouse cardiac cycle, providing important cardiac function parameters (e.g., stroke volume, ejection fraction) on a beat-by-beat basis, which has been previously unachieved by any other cardiac imaging modality. Furthermore, ICG distribution dynamics allowed for the determination of pulmonary transit time and thus additional quantitative measures of cardiovascular function. This work demonstrates the potential for optoacoustic cardiac imaging and is expected to have a major contribution toward future preclinical studies of animal models of cardiovascular health and disease.

  16. Contribution of titin and extracellular matrix to passive pressure and measurement of sarcomere length in the mouse left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles S; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    It remains to be established to what degree titin and the extracellular matrix (ECM) contribute to passive pressure in the left ventricle (LV). Thus, we aimed to elucidate the contribution of major molecular determinants of passive pressure in the normal mouse LV. Furthermore, we determined the working sarcomere length (SL) range of the LV to bridge our findings to earlier work in skinned muscle fibers. We utilized Frank-Starling type protocols to obtain diastolic pressure-volume relationships (PVR) in Langendorff perfused isolated LVs. To quantify the molecular contribution of titin and ECM, we innovated on methods of fiber mechanics to chemically permeabilize intact LVs and measure a fully passive PVR. To differentially dissect the contributions of the ECM and titin, we utilized myofilament extraction techniques in permeabilized LVs, measuring passive PVRs at each stage in the protocol. Myofilament extraction suggests that titin contributes ~80% of passive pressures in the heart. Langendorff perfusion was also used to chemically fix passive and BaCl2 activated hearts at specific volumes to determine that the maximal working SL range of the midwall LV fibers is approximately 1.8-2.2 μm. A model of the passive SL-Volume relationship was then used to estimate the pressure-SL relationships, indicating that the ECM contribution does not exceed titin's contribution until large volumes with SLs>~2.2μm. In conclusion, within physiological volumes titin is the dominant contributor to LV passive pressure, and ECM-based pressures dominates at larger volumes. PMID:21255582

  17. miR-143 Overexpression Impairs Growth of Human Colon Carcinoma Xenografts in Mice with Induction of Apoptosis and Inhibition of Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Borralho, Pedro M.; Simões, André E. S.; Gomes, Sofia E.; Lima, Raquel T.; Carvalho, Tânia; Ferreira, Duarte M. S.; Vasconcelos, Maria H.; Castro, Rui E.; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in human cancer and involved in the (dys)regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and death. Specifically, miRNA-143 (miR-143) is down-regulated in human colon cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the role of miR-143 overexpression on the growth of human colon carcinoma cells xenografted in nude mice (immunodeficient mouse strain: N: NIH(s) II-nu/nu). Methodology/Principal Findings HCT116 cells with stable miR-143 overexpression (Over-143) and control (Empty) cells were subcutaneously injected into the flanks of nude mice, and tumor growth was evaluated over time. Tumors arose ∼ 14 days after tumor cell implantation, and the experiment was ended at 40 days after implantation. miR-143 was confirmed to be significantly overexpressed in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts, by TaqMan® Real-time PCR (p<0.05). Importantly, Over-143 xenografts displayed slower tumor growth compared to Empty xenografts from 23 until 40 days in vivo (p<0.05), with final volumes of 928±338 and 2512±387 mm3, respectively. Evaluation of apoptotic proteins showed that Over-143 versus Empty xenografts displayed reduced Bcl-2 levels, and increased caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage (p<0.05). In addition, the incidence of apoptotic tumor cells, assessed by TUNEL, was increased in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts (p<0.01). Finally, Over-143 versus Empty xenografts displayed significantly reduced NF-κB activation and ERK5 levels and activation (p<0.05), as well as reduced proliferative index, evaluated by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry (p<0.01). Conclusions Our results suggest that reduced tumor volume in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts may result from increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation induced by miR-143. This reinforces the relevance of miR-143 in colon cancer, indicating an important role in the control of in vivo tumor progression, and suggesting that miR-143 may constitute a putative novel

  18. Establishment and characterisation of patient-derived xenografts as paraclinical models for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Hyunki; Sim, Moon Hee; Kim, Ka-Kyung; Lee, Gunho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; An, Ji Yeong; Hyung, Woo Jin; Kim, Choong-Bai; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model is emerging as a promising translational platform to duplicate the characteristics of tumours. However, few studies have reported detailed histological and genomic analyses for model fidelity and for factors affecting successful model establishment of gastric cancer. Here, we generated PDX tumours surgically-derived from 62 gastric cancer patients. Fifteen PDX models were successfully established (24.2%, 15/62) and passaged to maintain tumours in immune-compromised mice. Diffuse type and low tumour cell percentage were negatively correlated with success rates (p = 0.005 and p = 0.025, respectively), while reducing ex vivo and overall procedure times were positively correlated with success rates (p = 0.003 and p = 0.01, respectively). The histology and genetic characteristics of PDX tumour models were stable over subsequent passages. Lymphoma transformation occurred in five cases (33.3%, 5/15), and all were in the NOG mouse, with none in the nude mouse. Together, the present study identified Lauren classification, tumour cell percentages, and ex vivo times along with overall procedure times, as key determinants for successful PDX engraftment. Furthermore, genetic and histological characteristics were highly consistent between primary and PDX tumours, which provide realistic paraclinical models, enabling personalised development of treatment options for gastric cancer. PMID:26926953

  19. Neuroblastoma patient-derived orthotopic xenografts reflect the microenvironmental hallmarks of aggressive patient tumours.

    PubMed

    Braekeveldt, Noémie; Wigerup, Caroline; Tadeo, Irene; Beckman, Siv; Sandén, Caroline; Jönsson, Jimmie; Erjefält, Jonas S; Berbegall, Ana P; Börjesson, Anna; Backman, Torbjörn; Øra, Ingrid; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa; Gisselsson, David; Påhlman, Sven; Bexell, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of high-risk childhood neuroblastoma is a clinical challenge which has been hampered by a lack of reliable neuroblastoma mouse models for preclinical drug testing. We have previously established invasive and metastasising patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDXs) from high-risk neuroblastomas that retained the genotypes and phenotypes of patient tumours. Given the important role of the tumour microenvironment in tumour progression, metastasis, and treatment responses, here we analysed the tumour microenvironment of five neuroblastoma PDXs in detail. The PDXs resembled their parent tumours and retained important stromal hallmarks of aggressive lesions including rich blood and lymphatic vascularisation, pericyte coverage, high numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumour-associated macrophages, and extracellular matrix components. Patient-derived tumour endothelial cells occasionally formed blood vessels in PDXs; however, tumour stroma was, overall, of murine origin. Lymphoid cells and lymphatic endothelial cells were found in athymic nude mice but not in NSG mice; thus, the choice of mouse strain dictates tumour microenvironmental components. The murine tumour microenvironment of orthotopic neuroblastoma PDXs reflects important hallmarks of aggressive and metastatic clinical neuroblastomas. Neuroblastoma PDXs are clinically relevant models for preclinical drug testing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Antitumor Activity of Garcinol in Human Prostate Cancer Cells and Xenograft Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Chiou, Li-Yu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2015-10-21

    Garcinol, which is isolated from fruit rinds of Garcinia indica, is a polyisoprenylated benzophenone. It has been studied for its antitumor activity by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting autophagy in human prostate cancer cells. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased when garcinol was applied to PC-3 cells indicating a presence of apoptosis. Meanwhile, procaspases-9 and -3 were suppressed with attenuating PARP and DFF-45. Autophagy was inhibited through activating p-mTOR and p-PI3 Kinase/AKT by garcinol, which as a result induced the cells to apoptosis directly. In addition, the apoptosis effect of garcinol in a xenograft mouse model was also tested, suggesting a consistent result with PC-3 cell model. The tumor size was reduced more than 80 percent after the mouse accepted the garcinol treatment. Garcinol was demonstrated to have a strong antitumor activity through inhibiting autophagy and inducing apoptosis, which was discovered for the first time. Based on these findings, our data suggests that garcinol deserves further investigation as a potent chemopreventive agent.

  1. Procedure for Horizontal Transfer of Patient-Derived Xenograft Tumors to Eliminate Corynebacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher; Bagby, Stacey; Reisinger, Julie; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Pitts, Todd; Keysar, Stephen; Arcaroli, John; Leszczynski, Jori

    2017-02-16

    Human patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors, propagated in immunodeficient mice, are rapidly growing in use as amodelfor cancer research. Horizontal transfer between mice, without in vitro cell culture, allows these tumors to retainmany of their unique characteristics from their individual patient of origin. However, the immunodeficient mouse strainsused to grow these tumors are susceptible to numerous opportunistic pathogens, including Corynebacterium bovis. At ourinstitution, 2 in vivo tumor banks of PDX tumors had been maintained within nude mouse colonies enzootically infectedwith C. bovis. Elimination of C. bovis from these colonies required the aseptic harvest and horizontal transfer of tumor tissue between infected and naïve recipient mice without cross-contamination. Out of necessity, we developed a standard operating procedure using enhancements to traditional aseptic surgical technique with concurrent application of both procedural and physical barriers to prevent C. bovis transmission. By using these methods, all 61 unique PDX tumor models were successfullyharvested from C. bovis-infected mice and transferred into recipient mice without transmission of infection. Our datademonstrate that, in situations where C. bovis-free colonies can be established and maintained, this procedure can successfullybe used to eliminate C. bovis from an in vivo tumor bank of valuable PDX tumors.

  2. Procedure for Horizontal Transfer of Patient-Derived Xenograft Tumors to Eliminate Corynebacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher A; Bagby, Stacey M; Reisinger, Julie A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Pitts, Todd M; Keysar, Stephen B; Arcaroli, John J; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2017-03-01

    Human patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors, propagated in immunodeficient mice, are rapidly growing in use as a model for cancer research. Horizontal transfer between mice, without in vitro cell culture, allows these tumors to retain many of their unique characteristics from their individual patient of origin. However, the immunodeficient mouse strains used to grow these tumors are susceptible to numerous opportunistic pathogens, including Corynebacterium bovis. At our institution, 2 in vivo tumor banks of PDX tumors had been maintained within nude mouse colonies enzootically infected with C. bovis. Elimination of C. bovis from these colonies required the aseptic harvest and horizontal transfer of tumor tissue between infected and naïve recipient mice without cross-contamination. Out of necessity, we developed a standard operating procedure using enhancements to traditional aseptic surgical technique with concurrent application of both procedural and physical barriers to prevent C. bovis transmission. By using these methods, all 61 unique PDX tumor models were successfully harvested from C. bovis-infected mice and transferred into recipient mice without transmission of infection. Our data demonstrate that, in situations where C. bovis-free colonies can be established and maintained, this procedure can successfully be used to eliminate C. bovis from an in vivo tumor bank of valuable PDX tumors.

  3. Dynamics of circulating gamma delta T cell activity in an immunocompetent mouse model of high-grade glioma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human gamma delta T cells are potent effectors against glioma cell lines in vitro and in human/mouse xenograft models of glioblastoma, however, this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent mouse model. In this report, we established GL261 intracranial gliomas in syngeneic WT C57BL/6 m...

  4. Real time in vivo imaging and measurement of serine protease activity in the mouse hippocampus using a dedicated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor imaging device.

    PubMed

    Ng, David C; Tamura, Hideki; Tokuda, Takashi; Yamamoto, Akio; Matsuo, Masamichi; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ohta, Jun

    2006-09-30

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the application of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imaging technology for studying the mouse brain. By using a dedicated CMOS image sensor, we have successfully imaged and measured brain serine protease activity in vivo, in real-time, and for an extended period of time. We have developed a biofluorescence imaging device by packaging the CMOS image sensor which enabled on-chip imaging configuration. In this configuration, no optics are required whereby an excitation filter is applied onto the sensor to replace the filter cube block found in conventional fluorescence microscopes. The fully packaged device measures 350 microm thick x 2.7 mm wide, consists of an array of 176 x 144 pixels, and is small enough for measurement inside a single hemisphere of the mouse brain, while still providing sufficient imaging resolution. In the experiment, intraperitoneally injected kainic acid induced upregulation of serine protease activity in the brain. These events were captured in real time by imaging and measuring the fluorescence from a fluorogenic substrate that detected this activity. The entire device, which weighs less than 1% of the body weight of the mouse, holds promise for studying freely moving animals.

  5. SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION IN XENOGRAFT RECIPIENTS PRECEDES ACTIVATION OF COAGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ezzelarab, MB; Ekser, B; Azimzadeh, A; Lin, CC; Zhao, Y; Rodriguez, R; Echeverri, GJ; Iwase, H; Long, C; Hara, H; Ayares, D; Pierson, RN; Thomson, AW; Cooper, DKC

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulation of coagulation is considered a major barrier against successful pig organ xenotransplantation in nonhuman primates. Inflammation is known to promote activation of coagulation. The role of pro-inflammatory factors as well as the relationship between inflammation and activation of coagulation in xenograft recipients is poorly understood. Methods Baboons received kidney (n=3), heart (n=4) or artery patch (n=8) xenografts from α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GTKO) pigs or GTKO pigs additionally transgenic for human complement regulatory protein CD46 (GTKO/CD46). Immunosuppression (IS) was based on either CTLA4-Ig or anti-CD154 costimulation blockade. Three artery patch recipients did not receive IS. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and coagulation parameters were evaluated in the circulation after transplantation. In artery patch recipients, monocytes and dendritic cells (DC) were monitored in peripheral blood. Expression of tissue factor (TF) and CD40 on monocytes and DC were assessed by flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (C-RP) levels in the blood and C-RP deposition in xenografts as well as native organs were evaluated. Baboon and pig C-RP mRNA in heart and kidney xenografts were evaluated. Results In heart and kidney xenograft recipients, the levels of INFγ, TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-8 were not significantly higher after transplantation. However, MCP-1 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher after transplantation, particularly in kidney recipients. Elevated C-RP levels preceded activation of coagulation in heart and kidney recipients, where high levels of C-RP were maintained until the time of euthanasia in both heart and kidney recipients. In artery patch recipients, INFγ, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-8 and MCP-1 were elevated with no IS, while IL-6 was not. With IS, INFγ, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-8 and MCP-1 were reduced, but IL-6 was elevated. Elevated IL-6 levels were observed as early as 2 weeks in artery patch recipients. While IS was

  6. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  7. Sustained Improvement in Right Ventricular Chamber Dimensions 10 Years Following Xenograft Pulmonary Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Schubmehl, Heidi B; Swartz, Michael F; Atallah-Yunes, Nader; Wittlieb-Weber, Carol; Pratt, Rebecca E; Alfieris, George M

    2017-01-01

    The goals following pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) are to optimize right ventricular hemodynamics and minimize the need for subsequent reoperations on the right ventricular outflow tract. We hypothesized PVR using a xenograft valved conduit would result in superior freedom from reoperation with sustained improvement in right ventricular chamber dimensions. Xenograft valved conduits placed in patients aged >16 years were reviewed from 2000 to 2010 to allow for a 5-year minimum follow-up. Preoperative, one-year, and the most recent echocardiograms quantified right ventricular chamber dimensions, corresponding Z scores, and prosthetic valve function. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies compared preoperative and follow-up right ventricular volumes. A total of 100 patients underwent PVR at 24 (19-34) years. Freedom from reintervention was 100% at 10 years. At most recent follow-up, only one patient had greater than mild pulmonary insufficiency. The one-year (17.3 ± 7.2 mm Hg; P < .01) and most recent follow-up (18.6 ± 9.8 mm Hg; P < .01) Doppler-derived right ventricular outflow tract gradients remained significantly lower than preoperative measurements (36.7 ± 27.0 mm Hg). Similarly, right ventricular basal diameter, basal longitudinal diameter, and the corresponding Z scores remained lower at one year and follow-up from preoperative measurements. From 34 MRI studies, the right ventricular end-diastolic indexed volume (161.7 ± 58.5 vs 102.9 ± 38.3; P < .01) and pulmonary regurgitant fraction (38.0% ± 15.9% vs 0.8% ± 3.3%; P < .01) were significantly lower at 7.1 ± 3.4 years compared to the preoperative levels. Use of a xenograft valved conduit for PVR results in excellent freedom from reoperation with sustained improvement in right ventricular dimensions at an intermediate-term follow-up.

  8. Patient-derived xenograft models of colorectal cancer in pre-clinical research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kai M.; Xue, Aiqun; Mittal, Anubhav; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Smith, Ross; Hugh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    AIMS We sought to objectively assess the internal and external validity of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models as a platform in pre-clinical research into colorectal cancer (CRC). Metastatic disease is the most common cause of death from CRC, and despite significant research, the results of current combination chemotherapy and targeted therapies have been underwhelming for most of this patient group. One of the key factors limiting the success of translational CRC research is the biologically inaccurate models in which new therapies are developed. METHODS We used the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) checklist and SYRCLE (Systematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation) guidelines to search Ovid MEDLINE and Embase databases up to July 2015 to identify studies involving PDX models of CRC where the model had been validated across multiple parameters. Data was extracted including host mouse strain, engraftment rate, site of engraftment, donor tumour source and development of metastases in the model. RESULTS Thirteen articles satisfied the inclusion criteria. There was significant heterogeneity amongst the included studies, but overall the median engraftment rate was high (70%) and PDX models faithfully recapitulated the characteristics of their patient tumours on the microscopic, genetic and functional levels. CONCLUSIONS PDX models of CRC have a reasonable internal validity and a high external validity. Developments in xenografting technology are broadening the applications of the PDX platform. However, the included studies could be improved by standardising reporting standards and closed following the ARRIVE (Animals in Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines. PMID:27517155

  9. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  10. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Kiyoshi; Inamoto, Teruo; Minami, Koichiro; Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean ± SD 6.9 ± 1.5 vs 12.7 ± 4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa.

  11. Comparative oncological studies of feline bronchioloalveolar lung carcinoma, its derived cell line and xenograft.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Deborah A; Hiti, Alan L; McNiel, Elizabeth A; Ye, Yin; Alpaugh, Mary L; Barsky, Sanford H

    2002-07-01

    Although certain neoplasms are unique to man, others occur across species. One such neoplasm is bronchioloalveolar lung carcinoma (BAC), a neoplasm of the Type II pneumocyte that affects humans, sheep, and small animals (dogs and cats). Human BAC occurs largely in nonsmokers. Sheep BAC is caused by the jaagsiekte retrovirus and is endemic and contagious. Feline BAC is neither endemic nor contagious and occurs sporadically and spontaneously in older purebred cats. In these respects, feline BAC is more closely similar to human BAC than sheep BAC (jaagsiekte) is. To study feline BAC further, we established the first immortal cell line (SPARKY) and transplantable scid mouse xenograft (Sparky-X) from a malignant pleural effusion of a 12-year-old Persian male with autopsy-confirmed BAC. SPARKY exhibited a Type II pneumocyte phenotype characterized by surfactant and thyroid-transcription factor-1 immunoreactivities and lamellar bodies. SPARKY's karyotype was aneuploid (66 chromosomes: 38, normal cat) and showed evidence of genomic instability analogous to human lung cancers. p53 showed a homozygous G to T transversion at codon 167, the feline equivalent of human codon 175, one of the many hot spots mutated in the lung cancers of smokers. H-ras and K-ras were not altered. By reverse transcription-PCR, SPARKY lacked expression of retroviral JSRVgag transcripts that were present in the lungs of sheep BAC (jaagsiekte). Unlike human BAC xenografts, SPARKY-X retained its unique lepidic BAC growth pattern even though it was grown in murine s.c. tissues. This property may be related to the ability of SPARKY-X to up-regulate its surfactant genes (SP-A, SP-B, and SP-D). These studies of feline BAC may allow insights into the human disease that are not possible by studying human BAC directly.

  12. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  13. CysLT1R Antagonists Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Xenograft Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21WAF/Cip1 (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells. PMID:24039952

  14. Two-Dimensional Cochlear Micromechanics Measured In Vivo Demonstrate Radial Tuning within the Mouse Organ of Corti

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D.; Xia, Anping; Kim, Jinkyung; Grillet, Nicolas; Applegate, Brian E.; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity and frequency discrimination of mammalian hearing underlie the ability to understand complex speech in noise. This requires force generation by cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) to amplify the basilar membrane traveling wave; however, it is unclear how amplification is achieved with sharp frequency tuning. Here we investigated the origin of tuning by measuring sound-induced 2-D vibrations within the mouse organ of Corti in vivo. Our goal was to determine the transfer function relating the radial shear between the structures that deflect the OHC bundle, the tectorial membrane and reticular lamina, to the transverse motion of the basilar membrane. We found that, after normalizing their responses to the vibration of the basilar membrane, the radial vibrations of the tectorial membrane and reticular lamina were tuned. The radial tuning peaked at a higher frequency than transverse basilar membrane tuning in the passive, postmortem condition. The radial tuning was similar in dead mice, indicating that this reflected passive, not active, mechanics. These findings were exaggerated in TectaC1509G/C1509G mice, where the tectorial membrane is detached from OHC stereocilia, arguing that the tuning of radial vibrations within the hair cell epithelium is distinct from tectorial membrane tuning. Together, these results reveal a passive, frequency-dependent contribution to cochlear filtering that is independent of basilar membrane filtering. These data argue that passive mechanics within the organ of Corti sharpen frequency selectivity by defining which OHCs enhance the vibration of the basilar membrane, thereby tuning the gain of cochlear amplification. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Outer hair cells amplify the traveling wave within the mammalian cochlea. The resultant gain and frequency sharpening are necessary for speech discrimination, particularly in the presence of background noise. Here we measured the 2-D motion of the organ of Corti in mice and found

  15. Quantitative volumetric imaging of normal, neoplastic and hyperplastic mouse prostate using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Pan, Chunliu; Wood, Ronald; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Yeh, Shuyuan; Sha, Kai; Krolewski, John J; Nastiuk, Kent L

    2015-09-21

    -guided implantation of orthotopic tumor xenografts and monitoring of subsequent tumor growth from ~10 to ~750 mm(3) volume. High frequency ultrasound imaging allows precise determination of normal, neoplastic and hyperplastic mouse prostate. Low cost and small image size allows incorporation of this imaging modality inside clean animal facilities, and thereby imaging of immunocompromised models. 3D reconstruction for volume determination is easily mastered, and both small and large relative changes in volume are accurately visualized. Ultrasound imaging does not rely on penetration of exogenous imaging agents, and so may therefore better measure poorly vascularized or necrotic diseased tissue, relative to bioluminescent imaging (IVIS). Our method is precise and reproducible with very low inter- and intra-observer variability. Because it is non-invasive, mouse models of prostatic disease states can be imaged serially, reducing inter-animal variability, and enhancing the power to detect small volume changes following therapeutic intervention.

  16. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Potential Utility in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Katherine M; Riedlinger, Gregory M; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Ganesan, Shridar; Pine, Sharon R

    2017-01-01

    Traditional preclinical studies of cancer therapeutics have relied on the use of established human cell lines that have been adapted to grow in the laboratory and, therefore, may deviate from the cancer they were meant to represent. With the emphasis of cancer drug development shifting from non-specific cytotoxic agents to rationally designed molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapy comes the need for better models with predictive value regarding therapeutic activity and response in clinical trials. Recently, the diversity and accessibility of immunodeficient mouse strains has greatly enhanced the production and utility of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models for many tumor types, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Combined with next-generation sequencing, NSCLC PDX mouse models offer an exciting tool for drug development and for studying targeted therapies while utilizing patient samples with the hope of eventually aiding in clinical decision-making. Here, we describe NSCLC PDX mouse models generated by us and others, their ability to reflect the parental tumors' histomorphological characteristics, as well as the effect of clonal selection and evolution on maintaining genomic integrity in low-passage PDXs compared to the donor tissue. We also raise vital questions regarding the practical utility of PDX and humanized PDX models in predicting patient response to therapy and make recommendations for addressing those questions. Once collaborations and standardized xenotransplantation and data management methods are established, NSCLC PDX mouse models have the potential to be universal and invaluable as a preclinical tool that guides clinical trials and standard therapeutic decisions.

  17. Vasculature analysis of patient derived tumor xenografts using species-specific PCR assays: evidence of tumor endothelial cells and atypical VEGFA-VEGFR1/2 signalings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor endothelial transdifferentiation and VEGFR1/2 expression by cancer cells have been reported in glioblastoma but remain poorly documented for many other cancer types. Methods To characterize vasculature of patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDXs), largely used in preclinical anti-angiogenic assays, we designed here species-specific real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays. Human and mouse PECAM1/CD31, ENG/CD105, FLT1/VEGFR1, KDR/VEGFR2 and VEGFA transcripts were analyzed in a large series of 150 PDXs established from 8 different tumor types (53 colorectal, 14 ovarian, 39 breast and 15 renal cell cancers, 6 small cell and 5 non small cell lung carcinomas, 13 cutaneous melanomas and 5 glioblastomas) and in two bevacizumab-treated non small cell lung carcinomas xenografts. Results As expected, mouse cell proportion in PDXs -evaluated by quantifying expression of the housekeeping gene TBP- correlated with all mouse endothelial markers and human VEGFA RNA levels. More interestingly, we observed human PECAM1/CD31 and ENG/CD105 expression in all tumor types, with higher rate in glioblastoma and renal cancer xenografts. Human VEGFR expression profile varied widely depending on tumor types with particularly high levels of human FLT1/VEGFR1 transcripts in colon cancers and non small cell lung carcinomas, and upper levels of human KDR/VEGFR2 transcripts in non small cell lung carcinomas. Bevacizumab treatment induced significant low expression of mouse Pecam1/Cd31, Eng/Cd105, Flt1/Vegfr1 and Kdr/Vefr2 while the human PECAM1/CD31 and VEGFA were upregulated. Conclusions Taken together, our results strongly suggest existence of human tumor endothelial cells in all tumor types tested and of both stromal and tumoral autocrine VEGFA-VEGFR1/2 signalings. These findings should be considered when evaluating molecular mechanisms of preclinical response and resistance to tumor anti-angiogenic strategies. PMID:24625025

  18. Novel system using microliter order sample volume for measuring arterial radioactivity concentrations in whole blood and plasma for mouse PET dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Seki, Chie; Hashizume, Nobuya; Yamada, Takashi; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Nishimoto, Takahiro; Hatano, Kentaro; Kitamura, Keishi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to develop a new system, named CD-Well, for mouse PET dynamic study. CD-Well allows the determination of time-activity curves (TACs) for arterial whole blood and plasma using 2-3 µL of blood per sample; the minute sample size is ideal for studies in small animals. The system has the following merits: (1) measures volume and radioactivity of whole blood and plasma separately; (2) allows measurements at 10 s intervals to capture initial rapid changes in the TAC; and (3) is compact and easy to handle, minimizes blood loss from sampling, and delay and dispersion of the TAC. CD-Well has 36 U-shaped channels. A drop of blood is sampled into the opening of the channel and stored there. After serial sampling is completed, CD-Well is centrifuged and scanned using a flatbed scanner to define the regions of plasma and blood cells. The length measured is converted to volume because the channels have a precise and uniform cross section. Then, CD-Well is exposed to an imaging plate to measure radioactivity. Finally, radioactivity concentrations are computed. We evaluated the performance of CD-Well in in vitro measurement and in vivo 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and [11C]2-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane studies. In in vitro evaluation, per cent differences (mean±SE) from manual measurement were 4.4±3.6% for whole blood and 4.0±3.5% for plasma across the typical range of radioactivity measured in mouse dynamic study. In in vivo studies, reasonable TACs were obtained. The peaks were captured well, and the time courses coincided well with the TAC derived from PET imaging of the heart chamber. The total blood loss was less than 200 µL, which had no physiological effect on the mice. CD-Well demonstrates satisfactory performance, and is useful for mouse PET dynamic study.

  19. Exclusion of Complex Paraannular Aortic Abscess With the Freestyle Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Guihaire, Julien; Kloeckner, Martin; Deleuze, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Destructive aortic valve endocarditis is a serious condition that can result in aortoventricular disjunction. The appropriate surgical approach for severe excavating lesions remains a matter of debate. Homografts, prosthetic valves associated with a pericardial patch for annulus repair, and prosthetic valve conduits can be used. We report the technical issue of subcoronary inclusion of the full root Freestyle xenograft for complicated aortic endocarditis extending to the left ventricular outflow tract.

  20. 184AA3: a xenograft model of ER+ breast adenocarcinoma

    DOE PAGES

    Hines, William C.; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; ...

    2015-12-12

    Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER+ adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent withmore » “luminal B” intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44High subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44Low cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER+ cancers. This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing, and drug development.« less

  1. 184AA3: A Xenograft Model of ER+ Breast Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hines, William C.; Kuhn, Irene; Thi, Kate; Chu, Berbie; Stanford-Moore, Gaelen; Sampayo, Rocío; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Bissell, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite the prevalence and significant morbidity resulting from estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast adenocarcinomas, there are only a few models of this cancer subtype available for drug development, and arguably none for studying etiology. Those models that do exist have questionable clinical relevance. Methods Given our goal of developing luminal models, we focused on six cell lines derived by minimal mutagenesis from normal human breast cells, and asked if any could generate clinically relevant xenografts, which we then extensively characterized. Results Xenografts of one cell line, 184AA3, consistently formed ER+ adenocarcinomas that had a high proliferative rate and other features consistent with “luminal B” intrinsic subtype. Squamous and spindle cell/mesenchymal differentiation was absent, in stark contrast to other cell lines that we examined or others have reported. We explored intratumoral heterogeneity produced by 184AA3 by immunophenotyping xenograft tumors and cultured cells, and characterized marker expression by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. A CD44High subpopulation was discovered, yet their tumor forming ability was far less than CD44Low cells. Single cell cloning revealed the phenotypic plasticity of 184AA3, consistent with the intratumoral heterogeneity observed in xenografts. Characterization of ER expression in cultures revealed ER protein and signaling is intact, yet when estrogen was depleted in culture, and in vivo, it did not impact cell or tumor growth, analogous to therapeutically resistant ER+ cancers. Conclusions This model is appropriate for studies of the etiology of ovarian hormone independent adenocarcinomas, for identification of therapeutic targets, predictive testing and drug development. PMID:26661596

  2. Antiangiogenic effect of propranolol on the growth of the neuroblastoma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Xiao, Xianmin; Zheng, Shan; Zheng, Jicui; Zhu, Haitao; Ji, Yi; Yang, Shaobo

    2013-12-01

    Propranolol has been reported to display an antiangiogenic effect on infantile hemangiomas and also some adult cancers. Little is known, however, about whether propranolol has such effect on pediatric malignancies. Nude mice bearing BE(2) C neuroblastoma xenografts were injected intraperitoneally with propranolol and divided into groups of PROP-2 (n=11), -5 (n=11), and -10 (n=10) according to the treating dosages of 2, 5, and 10 mg kg(-1) day(-1), respectively. The tumor volume and body weight were recorded every other day. All mice were sacrificed on day 9, and the levels of angiogenic factors were measured in harvested xenografts by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The tumor volume and weight of PROP-2 (0.72±0.28 cm(3), 0.59±0.21 g) and PROP-5 (0.81±0.35 cm(3), 0.61±0.25 g) were significantly decreased when compared with those of CTL (1.22±0.58 cm(3), 0.93±0.15 g; P<0.01). The tumor microvessel density (MVD) scores that PROP-2, -5, and -10 groups had (49.28±17.53, 52.45±17.11, and 51.09±13.18 pixels per picture, respectively) were lower than those from the control group (65.29±17.33 pixels per picture, P<0.01). Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels were significantly lower in the groups with propranolol treated dosage of 5 and 10 mg kg(-1)day(-1) than in the control group. Propranolol can exhibit an inhibitory effect on the tumor growth and angiogenic factors expression in neuroblastoma xenografts, which may provide some knowledge to the role of β-blockers in the management of NB. © 2013.

  3. DCE-MRI Detects Early Vascular Response in Breast Tumor Xenografts Following Anti-DR5 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunki; Folks, Karri D.; Guo, Lingling; Stockard, Cecil R.; Fineberg, Naomi S.; Grizzle, William E.; George, James F.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Morgan, Desiree E.; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measured the early vascular changes after administration of TRA-8, bevacizumab, or TRA-8 combined with bevacizumab in breast tumor xenografts. Procedures Groups 1–4 of nude mice bearing human breast carcinoma were injected with phosphate-buffered saline, TRA-8, bevacizumab, and TRA-8 + bevacizumab on day0, respectively. DCE-MRI was performed on days0, 1, 2, and 3, and thereafter tumors were collected for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUT nick end labeling and CD31 staining. Results DCE-MRI measured a significant Ktrans change within 3 days after TRA-8 therapy that correlated with tumor growth arrest, whichwas not shown with statistical significance by histopathology at these early time points posttreatment. The Ktrans changes followed quadratic polynomial curves. Conclusion DCE-MRI detected significantly lower Ktrans levels in breast tumor xenografts following TRA-8 monotherapy or combined therapy with bevacizumab. PMID:20383593

  4. Pathology of Human Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Xenografts in NSG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powers, James F.; Pacak, Karel; Tischler, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    A major impediment to the development of effective treatments for metastatic or unresectable pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has been the absence of valid models for pre-clinical testing. Attempts to establish cell lines or xenografts from human pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas have previously been unsuccessful. NOD-scid gamma (NSG) mice are a recently developed strain lacking functional B-cells, T-cells and NK cells. We report here that xenografts of primary human paragangliomas will take in NSG mice while maintaining their architectural and immunophenotypic characteristics as expressed in the patients. In contrast to grafts of cell lines and of most common types of primary tumors, the growth rate of grafted paragangliomas is very slow, accurately representing the growth rate of most pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas even in metastases in humans. Although the model is therefore technically challenging, primary patient derived xenografts of paragangliomas in NSG mice provide a potentially valuable new tool that could prove especially valuable for testing treatments aimed at eradicating the small tumor deposits that are often numerous in patients with metastatic paraganglioma. PMID:27709415

  5. Development of Patient Derived Xenograft Models of Overt Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Ribes, Marta; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches are being evaluated to improve the historically limited value of studying transplanted primary tumors derived by injection of cells from established cell lines for predicting subsequent cancer therapy outcomes in patients and clinical trials. These approaches include use of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of spontaneous tumors, or patient tumor tissue derived xenografts (PDXs). Almost all such therapy studies utilizing such models involve treatment of established primary tumors. An alternative approach we have developed involves transplanted human tumor xenografts derived from established cell lines to treat mice with overt visceral metastases after primary tumor resection. The rationale is to mimic the more challenging circumstance of treating patients with late stage metastatic disease. These metastatic models entail prior in vivo selection of heritable, phenotypically stable variants with increased aggressiveness for spontaneous metastasis; they were derived by orthotopic injection of tumor cells followed by primary tumor resection and serial selection of distant spontaneous metastases, from which variant cell lines having a more aggressive heritable metastatic phenotype were established. We attempted to adopt this strategy for breast cancer PDXs. We studied five breast cancer PDXs, with the emphasis on two, called HCI-001 and HCI-002, both derived from triple negative breast cancer patients. However significant technical obstacles were encountered. These include the inherent slow growth rates of PDXs, the rarity of overt spontaneous metastases (detected in only 3 of 144 mice), very high rates of tumor regrowths at the primary tumor resection site, the failure of the few human PDX metastases isolated to manifest a more aggressive metastatic phenotype upon re-transplantation into new hosts, and the formation of metastases which were derived from de novo mouse thymomas arising in aged SCID mice that we used for the experiments. We

  6. Development of a phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system to measure mouse organ of Corti vibrations in two cochlear turns

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Zhang, Yuan; Jacques, Steven; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2015-12-31

    In this study, we have developed a phase-sensitive Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system to simultaneously measure the in vivo inner ear vibrations in the hook area and second turn of the mouse cochlea. This technical development will enable measurement of intra-cochlear distortion products at ideal locations such as the distortion product generation site and reflection site. This information is necessary to un-mix the complex mixture of intra-cochlear waves comprising the DPOAE and thus leads to the non-invasive identification of the local region of cochlear damage.

  7. Exploration of Energy Metabolism in the Mouse Using Indirect Calorimetry: Measurement of Daily Energy Expenditure (DEE) and Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Carola W; Reitmeir, Peter; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2015-09-01

    Current comprehensive mouse metabolic phenotyping involves studying energy balance in cohorts of mice via indirect calorimetry, which determines heat release from changes in respiratory air composition. Here, we describe the measurement of daily energy expenditure (DEE) and basal metabolic rate (BMR) in mice. These well-defined metabolic descriptors serve as meaningful first-line read-outs for metabolic phenotyping and should be reported when exploring energy expenditure in mice. For further guidance, the issue of appropriate sample sizes and the frequency of sampling of metabolic measurements is also discussed.

  8. Development of a phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system to measure mouse organ of Corti vibrations in two cochlear turns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Zhang, Yuan; Petrie, Tracy; Jacques, Steven; Wang, Ruikang; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we have developed a phase-sensitive Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography system to simultaneously measure the in vivo inner ear vibrations in the hook area and second turn of the mouse cochlea. This technical development will enable measurement of intra-cochlear distortion products at ideal locations such as the distortion product generation site and reflection site. This information is necessary to un-mix the complex mixture of intra-cochlear waves comprising the DPOAE and thus leads to the non-invasive identification of the local region of cochlear damage.

  9. The effects of propofol on the growth behavior of hepatoma xenografts in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Na; Cao, Quanjun; Cui, Xuejie; Zhou, Qiaoling; Yang, Chengxiang

    2017-06-01

    Studies on the effects of propofol on the growth of hepatoma xenografts in Balb/c mice. In an effort to establish a hepatoma-xenograft model of BALB/C mice, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells SMMC-7721 were inoculated subcutaneously into BALB/C mice. Forty mice were randomly divided into five different groups (n=8): control group (C group), Intralipid group (Y group), low dose (50mg/kg) propofol group (P1 group), medium dose (100mg/kg) propofol group (P2 group) and high dose (150mg/kg) propofol group (P3 group). The tumor volume was measured before treatment and every 3days after treatment (T0d-T18d, T0 represents time point before treatment, T3d-T18d represent time points every 3days after treatment for a total of 18 days). All mice were sacrificed 19days after drug withdrawal. The tumor masses were extracted, weighed, and the tumor inhibition rate of propofol was calculated. The protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the xenografted tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining. No statistical significance in the tumor volume at T0d (before treatment), T3d (3days after treatment), and T6d (6days after treatment) among the five groups (P>0.05) could be determined. Compared to group C, the tumor volumes in the P1, P2, and P3 groups were found to be significantly decreased in size upon increasing the propofol dosages (P<0.05). There was no statistical significance at time points T9d-T18d in group Y compared to group C (P>0.05). The tumor weights in the P1, P2, and P3 groups were found to be significantly lower as the propofol dosages increased (P<0.05), with no statistical significance determined in group Y (P>0.05). MMP-2 and VEGF protein levels were found to be significantly lower in the P1, P2, and P3 groups as the propofol dosages increased (P<0.05), with no statistical significance in group Y (P>0.05). Within a certain range, propofol was found to inhibit tumor growth and expression of MMP

  10. Soma-to-germline transmission of RNA in mice xenografted with human tumour cells: possible transport by exosomes.

    PubMed

    Cossetti, Cristina; Lugini, Luana; Astrologo, Letizia; Saggio, Isabella; Fais, Stefano; Spadafora, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian laws provide the universal founding paradigm for the mechanism of genetic inheritance through which characters are segregated and assorted. In recent years, however, parallel with the rapid growth of epigenetic studies, cases of inheritance deviating from Mendelian patterns have emerged. Growing studies underscore phenotypic variations and increased risk of pathologies that are transgenerationally inherited in a non-Mendelian fashion in the absence of any classically identifiable mutation or predisposing genetic lesion in the genome of individuals who develop the disease. Non-Mendelian inheritance is most often transmitted through the germline in consequence of primary events occurring in somatic cells, implying soma-to-germline transmission of information. While studies of sperm cells suggest that epigenetic variations can potentially underlie phenotypic alterations across generations, no instance of transmission of DNA- or RNA-mediated information from somatic to germ cells has been reported as yet. To address these issues, we have now generated a mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells stably expressing EGFP-encoding plasmid. We find that EGFP RNA is released from the xenografted human cells into the bloodstream and eventually in spermatozoa of the mice. Tumor-released EGFP RNA is associated with an extracellular fraction processed for exosome purification and expressing exosomal markers, in all steps of the process, from the xenografted cancer cells to the spermatozoa of the recipient animals, strongly suggesting that exosomes are the carriers of a flow of information from somatic cells to gametes. Together, these results indicate that somatic RNA is transferred to sperm cells, which can therefore act as the final recipients of somatic cell-derived information.

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Dinaciclib (SCH727965) inhibits pancreatic cancer growth and progression in murine xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Savita; Karikari, Collins; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Rasheed, Zeshaan; Ottenhof, Niki A; Dadon, Tikva; Alvarez, Hector; Fendrich, Volker; Rajeshkumar, NV; Matsui, William; Brossart, Peter; Hidalgo, Manuel; Bannerji, Rajat

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies, and potent therapeutic options are lacking. Inhibition of cell cycle progression through pharmacological blockade of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) has been suggested as a potential treatment option for human cancers with deregulated cell cycle control. Dinaciclib (SCH727965) is a novel small molecule multi-CDK inhibitor with low nanomolar potency against CDK1, CDK2, CDK5 and CDK9 that has shown favorable toxicity and efficacy in preliminary mouse experiments, and has been well tolerated in Phase I clinical trials. In the current study, the therapeutic efficacy of SCH727965 on human pancreatic cancer cells was tested using in vitro and in vivo model systems. Treatment with SCH727965 significantly reduced in vitro cell growth, motility and colony formation in soft agar of MIAPaCa-2 and Pa20C cells. These phenotypic changes were accompanied by marked reduction of phosphorylation of Retinoblastoma (Rb) and reduced activation of RalA. Single agent therapy with SCH727965 (40 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly) for 4 weeks significantly reduced subcutaneous tumor growth in 10/10 (100%) of tested low-passage human pancreatic cancer xenografts. Treatment of low passage pancreatic cancer xenografts with a combination of SCH727965 and gemcitabine was significantly more effective than either agent alone. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified overrepresentation of the Notch and Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGFβ) signaling pathways in the xenografts least responsive to SCH727965 treatment. Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SCH727965 alone or in combination is a highly promising novel experimental therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer. PMID:21768779

  12. Effect of dietary selenium and cancer cell xenograft on peripheral T and B lymphocytes in adult nude mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Holmstrom, Alexandra; Li, Xiangdong; Wu, Ryan T Y; Zeng, Huawei; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2012-05-01

    Selenium (Se) is known to regulate tumorigenesis and immunity at the nutritional and supranutritional levels. Because the immune system provides critical defenses against cancer and the athymic, immune-deficient NU/J nude mice are known to gradually develop CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, we investigated whether B and T cell maturation could be modulated by dietary Se and by tumorigenesis in nude mice. Fifteen homozygous nude mice were fed a Se-deficient, Torula yeast basal diet alone (Se-) or supplemented with 0.15 (Se+) or 1.0 (Se++) mg Se/kg (as Na(2)SeO(4)) for 6 months, followed by a 7-week time course of PC-3 prostate cancer cell xenograft (2 × 10(6) cells/site, 2 sites/mouse). Here, we show that peripheral B cell levels decreased in nude mice fed the Se -  or Se++ diet and the CD4(+) T cell levels increased in mice fed the Se++ diet. During the PC-3 cell tumorigenesis, dietary Se status did not affect peripheral CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in nude mice whereas mice fed with the Se++ diet appeared to exhibit greater peripheral CD25(+)CD4(+) T cells on day 9. Dietary Se status did not affect spleen weight in nude mice 7 weeks after the xenograft. Spleen weight was associated with frequency of peripheral CD4(+), but not CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, dietary Se at the nutritional and supranutritional levels regulates peripheral B and T cells in adult nude mice before and after xenograft with PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

  13. Labeling of breast cancer patient-derived xenografts with traceable reporters for tumor growth and metastasis studies

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Colton; Kwok, Letty; Finlay-Schultz, Jessica; Sartorius, Carol A; Cittelly, Diana M

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for stable labeling of patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) with lentiviral particles expressing green-fluorescent protein and luciferase reporters. This method allows for tracking the growth of PDXs at the primary site, as well as detecting spontaneous and experimental metastases using in vivo imaging systems. The use of preclinical models to study tumor biology and response to treatment is central to cancer research. Long-established human cell lines, and many transgenic mouse models, often fail to recapitulate the key aspects of human malignancies. Thus, alternative models that better represent the heterogeneity of patients’ tumors and their metastases are being developed. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in which surgically resected tumor samples are engrafted into immunocompromised mice have become an attractive alternative as they can be transplanted through multiple generations, and more efficiently reflect tumor heterogeneity than xenografts derived from human cancer cell lines. A limitation to the use of PDXs is that they are difficult to transfect or transduce to introduce traceable reporters or to manipulate gene expression. The current protocol describes methods to transduce dissociated tumor cells from PDXs with high transduction efficiency, and the use of labeled PDXs for experimental models of breast cancer metastases. The protocol also demonstrates the use of labeled PDXs in experimental metastasis models to study the organ-colonization process of the metastatic cascade. Metastases to different organs can be easily visualized and quantified using bioluminescent imaging in live animals, or GFP expression during dissection and in excised organs. These methods provide a powerful tool to extend the use of multiple types of PDXs to metastasis research. PMID:27929464

  14. Evaluation of the NOD/SCID xenograft model for glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids such as prednisolone and dexamethasone are critical drugs used in multi-agent chemotherapy protocols used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and response to glucocorticoids is highly predictive of outcome. The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model of ALL is a clinically relevant model in which the mice develop a systemic leukemia which retains the fundamental biological characteristics of the original disease. Here we report a study evaluating the NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model to investigate glucocorticoid-induced gene expression. Cells from a glucocorticoid-sensitive xenograft derived from a child with B-cell precursor ALL were inoculated into NOD/SCID mice. When highly engrafted the mice were randomized into groups of 4 to receive dexamethasone 15 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection or vehicle control. Leukemia cells were harvested from mice spleens at 0, 8, 24 or 48 hours thereafter, and gene expression analyzed on Illumina WG-6_V3 chips, comparing all groups to time 0 hours. Results The 8 hour dexamethasone-treated timepoint had the highest number of significantly differentially expressed genes, with fewer observed at the 24 and 48 hour timepoints, and with minimal changes seen across the time-matched controls. When compared to publicly available datasets of glucocorticoid-induced gene expression from an in vitro cell line study and from an in vivo study of patients with ALL, at the level of pathways, expression changes in the 8 hour xenograft samples showed a similar response to patients treated with glucocorticoids. Replicate analysis revealed that at the 8 hour timepoint, a dataset with high signal and differential expression, using data from 3 replicates instead of 4 resulted in excellent recovery scores of > 0.9. However at other timepoints with less signal very poor recovery scores were obtained with 3 replicates. Conclusions The NOD/SCID xenograft mouse model provides a reproducible experimental system in which to

  15. In Vivo Mouse Bioluminescence Tomography with Radionuclide-Based Imaging Validation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yujie; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Bao, Qinan; Stout, David; Herschman, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bioluminescence imaging, especially planar bioluminescence imaging, has been extensively applied in in vivo preclinical biological research. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has the potential to provide more accurate imaging information due to its 3D reconstruction compared with its planar counterpart. Methods In this work, we introduce a positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclide imaging-based strategy to validate the BLT results. X-ray computed tomography, PET, spectrally resolved bioluminescence imaging, and surgical excision were performed on a tumor xenograft mouse model expressing a bioluminescent reporter gene. Results With different spectrally resolved measured data, the BLT reconstructions were acquired based on the third-order simplified spherical harmonics (SP3) approximation and the diffusion approximation (DA). The corresponding tomographic images were obtained for validation of bioluminescence source reconstruction. Conclusion Our results show the strength of PET imaging compared with other validation methods for BLT and improved source localization accuracy based on the SP3 approximation compared with the diffusion approximation. PMID:20464517

  16. Dynamic (18)F-FDG-PET for monitoring treatment effect following anti-angiogenic therapy in triple-negative breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kristian, Alexandr; Revheim, Mona Elisabeth; Qu, Hong; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M; Engebråten, Olav; Seierstad, Therese; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic (18)F-FDG PET allows the study of glucose distribution in tissues as a function of time and space. Using pharmacokinetics, the temporal uptake pattern of (18)F-FDG may be separated into components reflecting perfusion and metabolism. Bevacizumab is an angiogenesis inhibitor which prevents the growth of new blood vessels, and may potentially lead to normalization of the blood circulation in the tumor. The purpose of the study was to explore the use of dynamic PET as a tool for monitoring treatment effect, reflected by changes in perfusion and metabolism. Twelve athymic nude mice, bearing the bilateral triple-negative human breast cancer xenograft MAS98.12 were treated with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg i.p.). Dynamic PET data was acquired prior to and 24 and 72 hours after treatment for 1 hour after injection of 10 MBq (18)F-FDG and fitted with a FDG two-tissue compartment model. The changes in the rate constants k1, k3, MRFDG and the vascular fraction νB were assessed. To evaluate the effect of treatment regimes, 30 mice, randomized in 5 groups, received either vehicle (0.9% NaCl), bevacizumab (5 mg/kg i.p.), doxorubicin (8 mg/kg i.v.) or bevacizumab and doxorubicin either together, or doxorubicin 24 hours after bevacizumab treatment. Tumor volume was measured twice a week. The perfusion-related rate parameter k1 and the metabolic rate constant k3 decreased significantly 24 hours after treatment. This decrease was followed by an increase, albeit non-significant, at 72 hours post treatment. Doxorubicin given 24 hours after bevacizumab showed less antitumor effect compared to concomitant treatment. Dynamic PET can detect changes in tumor perfusion and metabolism following anti-angiogenic therapy in mouse xenograft models. Longitudinal dynamic PET, used to assess the efficacy of anti-angiogenic treatment, can identify the time frame of potential tumor vasculature re-normalization and allow optimal timing of supplementary therapy (radiation or chemotherapy).

  17. Effects of PHA-665752 and cetuximab combination treatment on in vitro and murine xenograft growth of human colorectal cancer cells with KRAS or BRAF mutations.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi-Tao; Yang, Dong-Hai; Zhao, Zhaolong; Bi, Xiao-Hui; Han, Wei-Hua; Feng, Bo; Zhi, Jie; Gu, Bin; Duan, Zhihui; Wu, Jian-Hua; Ju, Ying-Chao; Wang, Ming-Xia; Li, Zhong-Xin

    2017-03-30

    It remains unknown whether blockade of c-Met signaling and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling is effective in suppressing the growth of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of the c-Met inhibitor PHA-665752 alone and in combination with cetuximab on the growth of human CRC cells in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Human CRC cell lines (Caco2, HCT-116, and HT-29) and mice bearing HCT-116 xenografts were treated with cetuximab in the absence or presence of PHA-665752. Cell viability and apoptosis were examined using the MTT and TUNEL assays, respectively. Vimentin was measured by immunohistochemistry as a marker for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Western blotting was used to determine signaling protein expression levels. The MTT assay showed that the growth of Caco2, HCT-116, and HT-29 cells was inhibited by PHA-665752 in a dose-dependent manner, but only Caco2 cell growth was suppressed by cetuximab. Combination treatment with PHA-665752 and cetuximab inhibited the proliferation of Caco2 cells and RAS mutant CRC cell lines. However, relative to the PHA-665752-alone treatment group, HT-29 cells with a BRAF mutation showed no noticeable effect. The mean tumor volume in mice treated wit