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Sample records for mph1 requires mismatch

  1. Yeast MPH1 gene functions in an error-free DNA damage bypass pathway that requires genes from Homologous recombination, but not from postreplicative repair.

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, K Anke; Rudolph, Christian; Ulrich, Helle D; Kramer, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    The MPH1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a member of the DEAH family of proteins, had been identified by virtue of the spontaneous mutator phenotype of respective deletion mutants. Genetic analysis suggested that MPH1 functions in a previously uncharacterized DNA repair pathway that protects the cells from damage-induced mutations. We have now analyzed genetic interactions of mph1 with a variety of mutants from different repair systems with respect to spontaneous mutation rates and sensitivities to different DNA-damaging agents. The dependence of the mph1 mutator phenotype on REV3 and REV1 and the synergy with mutations in base and nucleotide excision repair suggest an involvement of MPH1 in error-free bypass of lesions. However, although we observed an unexpected partial suppression of the mph1 mutator phenotype by rad5, genetic interactions with other mutations in postreplicative repair imply that MPH1 does not belong to this pathway. Instead, mutations from the homologous recombination pathway were found to be epistatic to mph1 with respect to both spontaneous mutation rates and damage sensitivities. Determination of spontaneous mitotic recombination rates demonstrated that mph1 mutants are not deficient in homologous recombination. On the contrary, in an sgs1 background we found a pronounced hyperrecombination phenotype. Thus, we propose that MPH1 is involved in a branch of homologous recombination that is specifically dedicated to error-free bypass. PMID:15126389

  2. Biochemical studies of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1 helicase on junction-containing DNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young-Hoon; Munashingha, Palinda Ruvan; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Seo, Yeon-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1 is a 3–5′ DNA helicase, required for the maintenance of genome integrity. In order to understand the ATPase/helicase role of Mph1 in genome stability, we characterized its helicase activity with a variety of DNA substrates, focusing on its action on junction structures containing three or four DNA strands. Consistent with its 3′ to 5′ directionality, Mph1 displaced 3′-flap substrates in double-fixed or equilibrating flap substrates. Surprisingly, Mph1 displaced the 5′-flap strand more efficiently than the 3′ flap strand from double-flap substrates, which is not expected for a 3–5′ DNA helicase. For this to occur, Mph1 required a threshold size (>5 nt) of 5′ single-stranded DNA flap. Based on the unique substrate requirements of Mph1 defined in this study, we propose that the helicase/ATPase activity of Mph1 play roles in converting multiple-stranded DNA structures into structures cleavable by processing enzymes such as Fen1. We also found that the helicase activity of Mph1 was used to cause structural alterations required for restoration of replication forks stalled due to damaged template. The helicase properties of Mph1 reported here could explain how it resolves D-loop structure, and are in keeping with a model proposed for the error-free damage avoidance pathway. PMID:22090425

  3. Differential regulation of the anti-crossover and replication fork regression activities of Mph1 by Mte1

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Papusha, Alma; Choi, Koyi; Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Kumar, Sandeep; Niu, Hengyao; Kaur, Hardeep; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Donnianni, Roberto A.; Lu, Lucy; Lichten, Michael; Zhao, Xiaolan; Ira, Grzegorz; Sung, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We identified Mte1 (Mph1-associated telomere maintenance protein 1) as a multifunctional regulator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1, a member of the FANCM family of DNA motor proteins important for DNA replication fork repair and crossover suppression during homologous recombination. We show that Mte1 interacts with Mph1 and DNA species that resemble a DNA replication fork and the D loop formed during recombination. Biochemically, Mte1 stimulates Mph1-mediated DNA replication fork regression and branch migration in a model substrate. Consistent with this activity, genetic analysis reveals that Mte1 functions with Mph1 and the associated MHF complex in replication fork repair. Surprisingly, Mte1 antagonizes the D-loop-dissociative activity of Mph1–MHF and exerts a procrossover role in mitotic recombination. We further show that the influence of Mte1 on Mph1 activities requires its binding to Mph1 and DNA. Thus, Mte1 differentially regulates Mph1 activities to achieve distinct outcomes in recombination and replication fork repair. PMID:26966246

  4. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales.

  5. Heteroduplex DNA position defines the roles of the Sgs1, Srs2, and Mph1 helicases in promoting distinct recombination outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mitchel, Katrina; Lehner, Kevin; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of the Sgs1, Mph1, and Srs2 DNA helicases during mitotic double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast were investigated using a gap-repair assay. A diverged chromosomal substrate was used as a repair template for the gapped plasmid, allowing mismatch-containing heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) formed during recombination to be monitored. Overall DSB repair efficiencies and the proportions of crossovers (COs) versus noncrossovers (NCOs) were determined in wild-type and helicase-defective strains, allowing the efficiency of CO and NCO production in each background to be calculated. In addition, the products of individual NCO events were sequenced to determine the location of hDNA. Because hDNA position is expected to differ depending on whether a NCO is produced by synthesis-dependent-strand-annealing (SDSA) or through a Holliday junction (HJ)-containing intermediate, its position allows the underlying molecular mechanism to be inferred. Results demonstrate that each helicase reduces the proportion of CO recombinants, but that each does so in a fundamentally different way. Mph1 does not affect the overall efficiency of gap repair, and its loss alters the CO-NCO by promoting SDSA at the expense of HJ-containing intermediates. By contrast, Sgs1 and Srs2 are each required for efficient gap repair, strongly promoting NCO formation and having little effect on CO efficiency. hDNA analyses suggest that all three helicases promote SDSA, and that Sgs1 and Srs2 additionally dismantle HJ-containing intermediates. The hDNA data are consistent with the proposed role of Sgs1 in the dissolution of double HJs, and we propose that Srs2 dismantles nicked HJs.

  6. Mte1 interacts with Mph1 and promotes crossover recombination and telomere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sonia; Altmannova, Veronika; Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Henriksen, Peter; Gallina, Irene; Yang, Xuejiao; Choudhary, Chunaram; Luke, Brian; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-01-01

    Mph1 is a member of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins that play key roles in genome maintenance processes underlying Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome in humans. Here, we identify Mte1 as a novel interactor of the Mph1 helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vitro, Mte1 (Mph1-associated telomere maintenance protein 1) binds directly to DNA with a preference for branched molecules such as D loops and fork structures. In addition, Mte1 stimulates the helicase and fork regression activities of Mph1 while inhibiting the ability of Mph1 to dissociate recombination intermediates. Deletion of MTE1 reduces crossover recombination and suppresses the sensitivity of mph1Δ mutant cells to replication stress. Mph1 and Mte1 interdependently colocalize at DNA damage-induced foci and dysfunctional telomeres, and MTE1 deletion results in elongated telomeres. Taken together, our data indicate that Mte1 plays a role in regulation of crossover recombination, response to replication stress, and telomere maintenance. PMID:26966248

  7. Binding of the Fkh1 Forkhead Associated Domain to a Phosphopeptide within the Mph1 DNA Helicase Regulates Mating-Type Switching in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhangli; Cherney, Rachel; Choi, Koyi; Denu, John; Zhao, Xiaolan; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fkh1 protein has roles in cell-cycle regulated transcription as well as a transcription-independent role in recombination donor preference during mating-type switching. The conserved FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by juxtaposing two distant regions on chromosome III to promote their recombination. A model posits that this Fkh1-mediated long-range chromosomal juxtaposition requires an interaction between the FHA domain and a partner protein(s), but to date no relevant partner has been described. In this study, we used structural modeling, 2-hybrid assays, and mutational analyses to show that the predicted phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain of Fkh1 interacted with multiple partner proteins. The Fkh1 FHA domain was important for its role in cell-cycle regulation, but no single interaction partner could account for this role. In contrast, Fkh1’s interaction with the Mph1 DNA repair helicase regulated donor preference during mating-type switching. Using 2-hybrid assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and fluorescence anisotropy, we mapped a discrete peptide within the regulatory Mph1 C-terminus required for this interaction and identified two threonines that were particularly important. In vitro binding experiments indicated that at least one of these threonines had to be phosphorylated for efficient Fkh1 binding. Substitution of these two threonines with alanines (mph1-2TA) specifically abolished the Fkh1-Mph1 interaction in vivo and altered donor preference during mating-type switching to the same degree as mph1Δ. Notably, the mph1-2TA allele maintained other functions of Mph1 in genome stability. Deletion of a second Fkh1-interacting protein encoded by YMR144W also resulted in a change in Fkh1-FHA-dependent donor preference. We have named this gene FDO1 for Forkhead one interacting protein involved in donor preference. We conclude that a phosphothreonine-mediated protein-protein interface between Fkh1-FHA and Mph1 contributes

  8. Processing of DNA structures via DNA unwinding and branch migration by the S. cerevisiae Mph1 protein.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Prakash, Rohit; Saro, Dorina; Longerich, Simonne; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick

    2011-10-10

    The budding yeast Mph1 protein, the putative ortholog of human FANCM, possesses a 3' to 5' DNA helicase activity and is capable of disrupting the D-loop structure to suppress chromosome arm crossovers in mitotic homologous recombination. Similar to FANCM, genetic studies have implicated Mph1 in DNA replication fork repair. Consistent with this genetic finding, we show here that Mph1 is able to mediate replication fork reversal, and to process the Holliday junction via DNA branch migration. Moreover, Mph1 unwinds 3' and 5' DNA Flap structures that bear key features of the D-loop. These biochemical results not only provide validation for a role of Mph1 in the repair of damaged replication forks, but they also offer mechanistic insights as to its ability to efficiently disrupt the D-loop intermediate.

  9. MTE1 Functions with MPH1 in Double-Strand Break Repair.

    PubMed

    Yimit, Askar; Kim, TaeHyung; Anand, Ranjith P; Meister, Sarah; Ou, Jiongwen; Haber, James E; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2016-05-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks occur upon exposure of cells to ionizing radiation and certain chemical agents or indirectly through replication fork collapse at DNA damage sites. If left unrepaired, double-strand breaks can cause genome instability and cell death, and their repair can result in loss of heterozygosity. In response to DNA damage, proteins involved in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination relocalize into discrete nuclear foci. We identified 29 proteins that colocalize with recombination repair protein Rad52 in response to DNA damage. Of particular interest, Ygr042w/Mte1, a protein of unknown function, showed robust colocalization with Rad52. Mte1 foci fail to form when the DNA helicase gene MPH1 is absent. Mte1 and Mph1 form a complex and are recruited to double-strand breaks in vivo in a mutually dependent manner. MTE1 is important for resolution of Rad52 foci during double-strand break repair and for suppressing break-induced replication. Together our data indicate that Mte1 functions with Mph1 in double-strand break repair.

  10. Rad5-dependent DNA repair functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FANCM protein homolog Mph1.

    PubMed

    Daee, Danielle L; Ferrari, Elisa; Longerich, Simonne; Zheng, Xiao-feng; Xue, Xiaoyu; Branzei, Dana; Sung, Patrick; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-08-03

    Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) covalently link complementary DNA strands, block DNA replication, and transcription and must be removed to allow cell survival. Several pathways, including the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, can faithfully repair ICLs and maintain genomic integrity; however, the precise mechanisms of most ICL repair processes remain enigmatic. In this study we genetically characterized a conserved yeast ICL repair pathway composed of the yeast homologs (Mph1, Chl1, Mhf1, Mhf2) of four FA proteins (FANCM, FANCJ, MHF1, MHF2). This pathway is epistatic with Rad5-mediated DNA damage bypass and distinct from the ICL repair pathways mediated by Rad18 and Pso2. In addition, consistent with the FANCM role in stabilizing ICL-stalled replication forks, we present evidence that Mph1 prevents ICL-stalled replication forks from collapsing into double-strand breaks. This unique repair function of Mph1 is specific for ICL damage and does not extend to other types of damage. These studies reveal the functional conservation of the FA pathway and validate the yeast model for future studies to further elucidate the mechanism of the FA pathway.

  11. Yeast Mph1 helicase dissociates Rad51-made D-loops: implications for crossover control in mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Rohit; Satory, Dominik; Dray, Eloïse; Papusha, Almas; Scheller, Jürgen; Kramer, Wilfried; Krejci, Lumir; Klein, Hannah; Haber, James E; Sung, Patrick; Ira, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotes possess mechanisms to limit crossing over during homologous recombination, thus avoiding possible chromosomal rearrangements. We show here that budding yeast Mph1, an ortholog of human FancM helicase, utilizes its helicase activity to suppress spontaneous unequal sister chromatid exchanges and DNA double-strand break-induced chromosome crossovers. Since the efficiency and kinetics of break repair are unaffected, Mph1 appears to channel repair intermediates into a noncrossover pathway. Importantly, Mph1 works independently of two other helicases-Srs2 and Sgs1-that also attenuate crossing over. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, we find targeting of Mph1 to double-strand breaks in cells. Purified Mph1 binds D-loop structures and is particularly adept at unwinding these structures. Importantly, Mph1, but not a helicase-defective variant, dissociates Rad51-made D-loops. Overall, the results from our analyses suggest a new role of Mph1 in promoting the noncrossover repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

  12. Wastewater treatment models in teaching and training: the mismatch between education and requirements for jobs.

    PubMed

    Hug, Thomas; Benedetti, Lorenzo; Hall, Eric R; Johnson, Bruce R; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Nopens, Ingmar; Rieger, Leiv; Shaw, Andrew; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    As mathematical modeling of wastewater treatment plants has become more common in research and consultancy, a mismatch between education and requirements for model-related jobs has developed. There seems to be a shortage of skilled people, both in terms of quantity and in quality. In order to address this problem, this paper provides a framework to outline different types of model-related jobs, assess the required skills for these jobs and characterize different types of education that modelers obtain "in school" as well as "on the job". It is important to consider that education of modelers does not mainly happen in university courses and that the variety of model related jobs goes far beyond use for process design by consulting companies. To resolve the mismatch, the current connection between requirements for different jobs and the various types of education has to be assessed for different geographical regions and professional environments. This allows the evaluation and improvement of important educational paths, considering quality assurance and future developments. Moreover, conclusions from a workshop involving practitioners and academics from North America and Europe are presented. The participants stressed the importance of non-technical skills and recommended strengthening the role of realistic modeling experience in university training. However, this paper suggests that all providers of modeling education and support, not only universities, but also software suppliers, professional associations and companies performing modeling tasks are called to assess and strengthen their role in training and support of professional modelers.

  13. DNA mismatch repair proteins are required for efficient herpes simplex virus 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Mohni, Kareem N; Mastrocola, Adam S; Bai, Ping; Weller, Sandra K; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that replicates in the nucleus of its human host cell and is known to interact with many cellular DNA repair proteins. In this study, we examined the role of cellular mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in the virus life cycle. Both MSH2 and MLH1 are required for efficient replication of HSV-1 in normal human cells and are localized to viral replication compartments. In addition, a previously reported interaction between MSH6 and ICP8 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and extended to show that UL12 is also present in this complex. We also report for the first time that MLH1 associates with ND10 nuclear bodies and that like other ND10 proteins, MLH1 is recruited to the incoming genome. Knockdown of MLH1 inhibits immediate-early viral gene expression. MSH2, on the other hand, which is generally thought to play a role in mismatch repair at a step prior to that of MLH1, is not recruited to incoming genomes and appears to act at a later step in the viral life cycle. Silencing of MSH2 appears to inhibit early gene expression. Thus, both MLH1 and MSH2 are required but appear to participate in distinct events in the virus life cycle. The observation that MLH1 plays an earlier role in HSV-1 infection than does MSH2 is surprising and may indicate a novel function for MLH1 distinct from its known MSH2-dependent role in mismatch repair.

  14. MPH1, a yeast gene encoding a DEAH protein, plays a role in protection of the genome from spontaneous and chemically induced damage.

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, J; Schürer, A; Rudolph, C; Hettwer, S; Kramer, W

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized the MPH1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. mph1 mutants display a spontaneous mutator phenotype. Homologs were found in archaea and in the EST libraries of Drosophila, mouse, and man. Mph1 carries the signature motifs of the DEAH family of helicases. Selected motifs were shown to be necessary for MPH1 function by introducing missense mutations. Possible indirect effects on translation and splicing were excluded by demonstrating nuclear localization of the protein and splicing proficiency of the mutant. A mutation spectrum did not show any conspicuous deviations from wild type except for an underrepresentation of frameshift mutations. The mutator phenotype was dependent on REV3 and RAD6. The mutant was sensitive to MMS, EMS, 4-NQO, and camptothecin, but not to UV light and X rays. Epistasis analyses were carried out with representative mutants from various repair pathways (msh6, mag1, apn1, rad14, rad52, rad6, mms2, and rev3). No epistatic interactions were found, either for the spontaneous mutator phenotype or for MMS, EMS, and 4-NQO sensitivity. mph1 slightly increased the UV sensitivity of mms2, rad6, and rad14 mutants, but no effect on X-ray sensitivity was observed. These data suggest that MPH1 is not part of a hitherto known repair pathway. Possible functions are discussed. PMID:10880470

  15. Sgs1 and Mph1 Helicases Enforce the Recombination Execution Checkpoint During DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jain, Suvi; Sugawara, Neal; Mehta, Anuja; Ryu, Taehyun; Haber, James E

    2016-06-01

    We have previously shown that a recombination execution checkpoint (REC) regulates the choice of the homologous recombination pathway used to repair a given DNA double-strand break (DSB) based on the homology status of the DSB ends. If the two DSB ends are synapsed with closely-positioned and correctly-oriented homologous donors, repair proceeds rapidly by the gene conversion (GC) pathway. If, however, homology to only one of the ends is present, or if homologies to the two ends are situated far away from each other or in the wrong orientation, REC blocks the rapid initiation of new DNA synthesis from the synapsed end(s) and repair is carried out by the break-induced replication (BIR) machinery after a long pause. Here we report that the simultaneous deletion of two 3'→5' helicases, Sgs1 and Mph1, largely abolishes the REC-mediated lag normally observed during the repair of large gaps and BIR substrates, which now get repaired nearly as rapidly and efficiently as GC substrates. Deletion of SGS1 and MPH1 also produces a nearly additive increase in the efficiency of both BIR and long gap repair; this increase is epistatic to that seen upon Rad51 overexpression. However, Rad51 overexpression fails to mimic the acceleration in repair kinetics that is produced by sgs1Δ mph1Δ double deletion.

  16. Sgs1 and Mph1 Helicases Enforce the Recombination Execution Checkpoint During DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Suvi; Sugawara, Neal; Mehta, Anuja; Ryu, Taehyun; Haber, James E.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that a recombination execution checkpoint (REC) regulates the choice of the homologous recombination pathway used to repair a given DNA double-strand break (DSB) based on the homology status of the DSB ends. If the two DSB ends are synapsed with closely-positioned and correctly-oriented homologous donors, repair proceeds rapidly by the gene conversion (GC) pathway. If, however, homology to only one of the ends is present, or if homologies to the two ends are situated far away from each other or in the wrong orientation, REC blocks the rapid initiation of new DNA synthesis from the synapsed end(s) and repair is carried out by the break-induced replication (BIR) machinery after a long pause. Here we report that the simultaneous deletion of two 3′→5′ helicases, Sgs1 and Mph1, largely abolishes the REC-mediated lag normally observed during the repair of large gaps and BIR substrates, which now get repaired nearly as rapidly and efficiently as GC substrates. Deletion of SGS1 and MPH1 also produces a nearly additive increase in the efficiency of both BIR and long gap repair; this increase is epistatic to that seen upon Rad51 overexpression. However, Rad51 overexpression fails to mimic the acceleration in repair kinetics that is produced by sgs1Δ mph1Δ double deletion. PMID:27075725

  17. Computed MISTR Requirement Changes and Parts Support - Analysis of a Mismatch.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-09

    the increased requirement of any item in the sample. Fourth, the D062 transaction register used by the ALCs EOQ IMSs to control their assets will be...checked and telephone calls to the appropriate Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) IMSs will be made to see if the MISTR item requirement changes (pen or...EOQ parts shortage. Those items that reflect pen or pencil reduction in require- ment will be searched for EOQ parts surpluses through the EOQ IMSs . It

  18. On Business-Driven IT Security Management and Mismatches between Security Requirements in Firms, Industry Standards and Research Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirth, Christian

    Industry managers have long recognized the vital importance of information security for their businesses, but at the same time they perceived security as a technology-driven rather then a business-driven field. Today, this notion is changing and security management is shifting from technology- to business-oriented approaches. Whereas there is evidence of this shift in the literature, this paper argues that security standards and academic work have not yet taken it fully into account. We examine whether this disconnect has lead to a misalignment of IT security requirements in businesses versus industry standards and academic research. We conducted 13 interviews with practitioners from 9 different firms to investigate this question. The results present evidence for a significant gap between security requirements in industry standards and actually reported security vulnerabilities. We further find mismatches between the prioritization of security factors in businesses, standards and real-world threats. We conclude that security in companies serves the business need of protecting information availability to keep the business running at all times.

  19. SPATIAL MISMATCH OR RACIAL MISMATCH?*

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstein, Judith K.; Neumark, David; McInerney, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    We contrast the spatial mismatch hypothesis with what we term the racial mismatch hypothesis – that the problem is not a lack of jobs, per se, where blacks live, but a lack of jobs where blacks live into which blacks are hired. We first report new evidence on the spatial mismatch hypothesis, using data from Census Long-Form respondents. We construct direct measures of the presence of jobs in detailed geographic areas, and find that these job density measures are related to employment of black male residents in ways that would be predicted by the spatial mismatch hypothesis – in particular that spatial mismatch is primarily an issue for low-skilled black male workers. We then look at mismatch along not only spatial lines but racial lines as well, by estimating the effects of job density measures that are disaggregated by race. We find that it is primarily black job density that influences black male employment, whereas white job density has little if any influence on their employment. The evidence implies that space alone plays a relatively minor role in low black male employment rates. PMID:19727422

  20. Mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-10-30

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism.

  1. Mismatch Repair in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Requires the Mutl Homologous Gene Pms1: Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schar, P.; Baur, M.; Schneider, C.; Kohli, J.

    1997-01-01

    Homologues of the bacterial mutS and mutL genes involved in DNA mismatch repair have been found in organisms from bacteria to humans. Here, we describe the structure and function of a newly identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene that encodes a predicted amino acid sequence of 794 residues with a high degree of homology to MutL related proteins. On the basis of its closer relationship to the eukaryotic ``PMS'' genes than to the ``MLH'' genes, we have designated the S. pombe homologue pms1. Disruption of the pms1 gene causes a significant increase of spontaneous mutagenesis as documented by reversion rate measurements. Tetrad analyses of crosses homozygous for the pms1 mutation reveal a reduction of spore viability from >92% to 80% associated with a low proportion (~50%) of meioses producing four viable spores and a significant, allele-dependent increase of the level of post-meiotic segregation of genetic marker allele pairs. The mutant phenotypes are consistent with a general function of pms1 in correction of mismatched base pairs arising as a consequence of DNA polymerase errors during DNA synthesis, or of hybrid DNA formation between homologous but not perfectly complementary DNA strands during meiotic recombination. PMID:9258673

  2. The mismatched nucleotides in the 5'-terminal hairpin of minute virus of mice are required for efficient viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, E; Sahli, R; Hirt, B; Beard, P

    1995-01-01

    The 5'-terminal sequence in the DNA of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) is a palindrome. It can form a hairpin, the stem of which is entirely base-paired except for three consecutive unpaired nucleotides which form a bubble. Since this structure is well conserved among different parvoviruses, we examined its importance for viral replication by generating MVM mutants with alterations in this region. A clone of MVMp DNA which contained the entire 3' end and more than half of the 5' palindrome was made. Although it lacked the sequence information to form a wild-type bubble, this DNA was infectious. On transfection into A9 fibroblasts, it gave rise to a virus (MVMs) which had a bubble in its 5' palindrome. The bubble consisted of four mismatched nucleotides in the same location as the unpaired nucleotides of the wild-type palindrome. Apparently, neighboring plasmid sequences were incorporated into the viral DNA, enabling formation of the mismatch. This observation suggested that a bubble is critical for growth of MVM but that its sequence is not. To find out whether MVM lacking a bubble in the 5' palindrome is viable, we made a second clone in which the plasmid sequences incorporated in MVMs were removed. Transfection of this DNA gave rise to a virus (MVMx) in which the nucleotides unpaired in the wild-type hairpin are now fully base-paired. Although MVMx can be propagated, it is defective in comparison with wild-type MVMp; it exhibited about a 50-fold-lower ratio of plaque-forming units to DNA content. In mixed infections, MVMp consistently outgrew the bubbleless MVMx. The rate of accumulation of DNA replication intermediates was lower for MVMx than for the wild-type virus. Quantitative analysis of the 5' termini of replicative form DNA suggested that the ability of MVMx to convert hairpin 5' termini to extended termini is impaired. In contrast, the virus with the altered bubble, MVMs, behaved like the wild-type MVMp in all the assays. We conclude that MVM

  3. A Mutation in a Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Gene (Rad3) Required for Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription Increases the Efficiency of Mismatch Correction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Johnson, A. L.; Johnston, L. H.; Siede, W.; Friedberg, E. C.; Ramachandran, K.; Kunz, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    RAD3 functions in DNA repair and transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and particular rad3 alleles confer a mutator phenotype, possibly as a consequence of defective mismatch correction. We assessed the potential involvement of the Rad3 protein in mismatch correction by comparing heteroduplex repair in isogenic rad3-1 and wild-type strains. The rad3-1 allele increased the spontaneous mutation rate but did not prevent heteroduplex repair or bias its directionality. Instead, the efficiency of mismatch correction was enhanced in the rad3-1 strain. This surprising result prompted us to examine expression of yeast mismatch repair genes. We determined that MSH2, but not MLH1, is transcriptionally regulated during the cell-cycle like PMS1, and that rad3-1 does not increase the transcript levels for these genes in log phase cells. These observations suggest that the rad3-1 mutation gives rise to an enhanced efficiency of mismatch correction via a process that does not involve transcriptional regulation of mismatch repair. Interestingly, mismatch repair also was more efficient when error-editing by yeast DNA polymerase δ was eliminated. We discuss our results in relation to possible mechanisms that may link the rad3-1 mutation to mismatch correction efficiency. PMID:8889512

  4. Qualifications Mismatch and Skills Mismatch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of "over-qualification" (i.e. holding a qualification which is above that required to gain entry to the job being done) and "skills under-utilisation" (i.e. being in a job which does not make use of the knowledge and skills possessed) in the United Kingdom and to…

  5. Size mismatch in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Kyota; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Size mismatch is an unique and inevitable but critical issue in live donor liver transplantation. Unmatched metabolic demand of recipient as well as physiologic mismatch aggravates the damage to liver graft, inevitably leading to graft failure on recipient. Also, an excessive resection of liver graft for better recipient outcome in live donor liver transplant may jeopardize the healthy donor well-being and even put donor life in danger. There is a fine balance between resected graft volume required to meet the recipient's metabolic demand and residual graft volume required for donor safety. The obvious clinical necessity of finding that balance has prompted a clinical need and promoted the improvement of knowledge and development of management strategies for size-mismatched transplants. The development of the size-matching methodology has significantly improved graft outcome and recipient survival in live donor liver transplants. On the other hand, the effect of size mismatch in cadaveric transplants has never been observed as being so pronounced. The importance of matching of the donor recipient size has been unrecognized in cadaveric liver transplant. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current most updated knowledge on the subject, particularly addressing the definition and complications of size-mismatched cadaveric liver transplant, as well as management strategies. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  6. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  7. Detecting scale violations in absence of mismatch requires music-syntactic analysis: a further look at the early right anterior negativity (ERAN).

    PubMed

    Kalda, Tiina; Minati, Ludovico

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether infrequent scale violations in a sequence of in-key notes are detected when the deviants are matched for frequency of occurrence and preceding intervals with the control notes. We further investigated whether the detectability of scale violations is modulated by the presence of melodic context and by the level of musical training. Event related potentials were recorded from 14 musicians and 13 non-musicians. In non-musicians, the out-of-key notes elicited an early right anterior negativity (ERAN), which appeared prominently over right frontal sites only when presented within structured sequences; no effects were found when the out-of-key notes were presented within scrambled sequences. In musicians, the out-of-key notes elicited a similar bilateral ERAN in structured and scrambled sequences. Our findings suggest that scale information is processed at the level of music-syntactic analysis, and that the detection of deviants does not require activation of auditory sensory memory by mismatch effects. Scales are perceived as a broader context, not just as online interval relations. Additional melodic context information appears necessary to support the representation of scale deviants in non-musicians, but not in musically-trained individuals, likely as a consequence of stronger pre-existing representations.

  8. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  9. A Jobs Mismatch. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marina, Brenda L. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the article "A Jobs Mismatch", Jaschik has compiled the findings of a new report that was released by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The Georgetown University report claims that there is a severe shortage of college graduates in America, and that this shortage has the United States on a…

  10. Formal Education, Mismatch and Wages after Transition: Assessing the Impact of Unobserved Heterogeneity Using Matching Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamo, Ana; Messina, Julian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the incidence and consequences of the mismatch between formal education and the educational requirements of jobs in Estonia during the years 1997-2003. We find large wage penalties associated with the phenomenon of educational mismatch. Moreover, the incidence and wage penalty of mismatches increase with age. This suggests that…

  11. Formal Education, Mismatch and Wages after Transition: Assessing the Impact of Unobserved Heterogeneity Using Matching Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamo, Ana; Messina, Julian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the incidence and consequences of the mismatch between formal education and the educational requirements of jobs in Estonia during the years 1997-2003. We find large wage penalties associated with the phenomenon of educational mismatch. Moreover, the incidence and wage penalty of mismatches increase with age. This suggests that…

  12. Recognition of GT mismatches by Vsr mismatch endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Keith R.; Allinson, Sarah L.; Sahagun-Krause, Heidi; Brown, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The Vsr mismatch endonuclease recognises the sequence CTWGG (W = A or T) in which the underlined thymine is paired with guanine and nicks the DNA backbone on the 5′-side of the mispaired thymine. By using base analogues of G and T we have explored the functional groups on the mismatch pair which are recognised by the enzyme. Removal of the thymine 5-methyl group causes a 60% reduction in activity, while removing the 2-amino group of guanine reduces cleavage by 90%. Placing 2-aminopurine or nebularine opposite T generates mismatches which are cut at a much lower rate (0.1%). When either base is removed, generating a pseudoabasic site (1′,2′-dideoxyribose), the enzyme still produces site-specific cleavage, but at only 1% of the original rate. Although TT and CT mismatches at this position are cleaved at a low rate (~1%), mismatches with other bases (such as GA and AC) and Watson–Crick base pairs are not cleaved by the enzyme. There is also no cleavage when the mismatched T is replaced with difluorotoluene. PMID:10871403

  13. Recognition of GT mismatches by Vsr mismatch endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Fox, K R; Allinson, S L; Sahagun-Krause, H; Brown, T

    2000-07-01

    The Vsr mismatch endonuclease recognises the sequence CTWGG (W = A or T) in which the underlined thymine is paired with guanine and nicks the DNA backbone on the 5'-side of the mispaired thymine. By using base analogues of G and T we have explored the functional groups on the mismatch pair which are recognised by the enzyme. Removal of the thymine 5-methyl group causes a 60% reduction in activity, while removing the 2-amino group of guanine reduces cleavage by 90%. Placing 2-amino-purine or nebularine opposite T generates mis-matches which are cut at a much lower rate (0.1%). When either base is removed, generating a pseudoabasic site (1', 2'-dideoxyribose), the enzyme still produces site-specific cleavage, but at only 1% of the original rate. Although TT and CT mismatches at this position are cleaved at a low rate (approximately 1%), mismatches with other bases (such as GA and AC) and Watson-Crick base pairs are not cleaved by the enzyme. There is also no cleavage when the mismatched T is replaced with difluorotoluene.

  14. Mismatch repair proteins: key regulators of genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Surtees, J A; Argueso, J L; Alani, E

    2004-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) systems are central to maintaining genome stability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. MMR proteins play a fundamental role in avoiding mutations, primarily by removing misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. MMR proteins also act during genetic recombination in steps that include repairing mismatches in heteroduplex DNA, modulating meiotic crossover control, removing 3' non-homologous tails during double-strand break repair, and preventing recombination between divergent sequences. In this review we will, first, discuss roles for MMR proteins in repairing mismatches that occur during recombination, particularly during meiosis. We will also explore how studying this process has helped to refine models of double-strand break repair, and particularly to our understanding of gene conversion gradients. Second, we will examine the role of MMR proteins in repressing homeologous recombination, i.e. recombination between divergent sequences. We will also compare the requirements for MMR proteins in preventing homeologous recombination to the requirements for these proteins in mismatch repair.

  15. Mismatch repair in heteroduplex DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wildenberg, J; Meselson, M

    1975-01-01

    DNA with base pair mismatches was prepared by annealing mixtures of genetically marked DNA from bacteriophage lambda. This heteroduplex DNA was used to transfect bacteria under conditions minimizing recombination. Genetic analysis of the progeny phages indicates that: (i) Mismatch repair occurs, usually giving rise to a DNA molecule with one chain with the genotype arising from repair and one parental chain. (ii) The frequency of repair of a given mismatch to wild type depends on the marker, ranging from 3 to 20%. (iii) Excision tracts may extend several hundred nucleotides but are usually shorter than about 2000 nucleotides. (iv) In Rec-mediated bacteriophage crosses, recombination of markers closer than about 10-3 nucleotide pairs frequently occurs by mismatch repair within heteroduplex DNA. (V) The average amount of heteroduplex DNA formed in a Rec-mediated recombination event is a few thousand nucleotide pairs. PMID:1094458

  16. Replication infidelity via a mismatch with Watson-Crick geometry.

    PubMed

    Bebenek, Katarzyna; Pedersen, Lars C; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    In describing the DNA double helix, Watson and Crick suggested that "spontaneous mutation may be due to a base occasionally occurring in one of its less likely tautomeric forms." Indeed, among many mispairing possibilities, either tautomerization or ionization of bases might allow a DNA polymerase to insert a mismatch with correct Watson-Crick geometry. However, despite substantial progress in understanding the structural basis of error prevention during polymerization, no DNA polymerase has yet been shown to form a natural base-base mismatch with Watson-Crick-like geometry. Here we provide such evidence, in the form of a crystal structure of a human DNA polymerase λ variant poised to misinsert dGTP opposite a template T. All atoms needed for catalysis are present at the active site and in positions that overlay with those for a correct base pair. The mismatch has Watson-Crick geometry consistent with a tautomeric or ionized base pair, with the pH dependence of misinsertion consistent with the latter. The results support the original idea that a base substitution can originate from a mismatch having Watson-Crick geometry, and they suggest a common catalytic mechanism for inserting a correct and an incorrect nucleotide. A second structure indicates that after misinsertion, the now primer-terminal G • T mismatch is also poised for catalysis but in the wobble conformation seen in other studies, indicating the dynamic nature of the pathway required to create a mismatch in fully duplex DNA.

  17. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  18. Dynamics of DNA Mismatch Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Julie; Lin, Yuyen; Rasnik, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair protects the genome from spontaneous mutations by recognizing errors, excising damage, and re-synthesizing DNA in a pathway that is highly conserved. Mismatch recognition is accomplished by the MutS family of proteins which are weak ATPases that bind specifically to damaged DNA, but the specific molecular mechanisms by which these proteins recognize damage and initiate excision are not known. Previous structural investigations have implied that protein-induced conformational changes are central to mismatch recognition. Because damage detection is a highly dynamic process in which conformational changes of the protein-DNA complexes occur on a time scale of a few seconds, it is difficult to obtain meaningful kinetic information with traditional ensemble techniques. In this work, we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study the conformational dynamics of fluorescently labeled DNA substrates in the presence of the mismatch repair protein MutS from E. coli and its human homolog MSH2/MSH6. Our studies allow us to obtain quantitative kinetic information about the rates of binding and dissociation and to determine the conformational states for each protein-DNA complex.

  19. Educational Mismatch and Self-Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Roche, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on educational mismatch concentrates on estimating its labor market consequences but with a focus on wage and salary workers. This paper examines the far less studied influence of mismatch on the self-employed. Using a sample of workers in science and engineering fields, results show larger earnings penalties for mismatch among…

  20. The structural impact of DNA mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D.; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  1. Educational Mismatch between Graduates' Possessed Skills and Market Demands in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzair-ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Noreen, Zahida

    2013-01-01

    Educational mismatch in skills that graduates possess and market requires creates barriers for organizations as well as for job seekers. The study was conducted to find out the educational mismatch between graduates possessed skills and market demands. Convenient sampling was carried out and data were collected from 200 graduates of economics…

  2. University Graduates' Skills Mismatches in Central Asia: Employers' Perspectives from Post-Soviet Tajikistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonbekova, Dilrabo

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines employers' perspectives about university graduates' skills and preparation for employment in post-Soviet Tajikistan. It explores the mismatch between the skills university graduates acquire and the skills required in the job market, and addresses some of the underlying reasons for the perceived skills mismatch. Thematic…

  3. Supply and Demand Mismatches in Training: Can Anything Be Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Claudio de Moura; de Andrade, Antonio Cabral

    1990-01-01

    Vocational training often fails to provide what employers need and students want. To correct supply/demand mismatches requires improving feedback from employers, increasing the flow of information, bringing schools closer to businesses, rewarding institutions for successful employment of graduates, and providing incentives for entrepreneurs. (SK)

  4. Visual assessment of perfusion-diffusion mismatch is inadequate to select patients for thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Søren; Foster, Sarah J; Desmond, Patricia M; Parsons, Mark W; Butcher, Kenneth S; Barber, P Alan; Levi, Christopher R; Bladin, Christopher F; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    For MR perfusion-diffusion mismatch to be clinically useful as a means of selecting patients for thrombolysis, it needs to occur in real time at the MRI console. Visual mismatch assessment has been used clinically and in trials but has not been systematically validated. We compared the accuracy of visually rating console-generated images with offline volumetric measurements using data from the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET). Perfusion time-to-peak (TTP) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) (as generated by commercial MRI console software) and T(max) perfusion maps (which required offline calculation) were visually rated. Perfusion-diffusion mismatch, defined as a ratio of perfusion:diffusion lesion volume of >1.2, was independently scored by 1 expert and 2 inexperienced raters blinded to calculated volumes and clinical information. Visual mismatch was compared with region-of-interest-based volumetric calculation, which was used as the gold standard. Volumetric calculation demonstrated perfusion-diffusion mismatch in 85/99 patients. Visual TTP-DWI mismatch was correctly classified by the experienced rater in 82% of the cases (sensitivity: 0.86; specificity: 0.54) compared to 73% for the inexperienced raters (sensitivity: 0.75; specificity: 0.57). The interrater reliability for TTP-DWI mismatch was moderate (kappa = 0.50). Visual T(max)-DWI mismatch performed better (agreement - 93 and 87%, sensitivity - 95 and 88%, specificity - 77 and 82% for the experienced and inexperienced raters, respectively). The assessment of visual TTP-DWI mismatch at the MRI console is insufficiently reliable for use in clinical trials. Differences in perfusion analysis technique and visual inaccuracies combine to make visual TTP-DWI mismatch substantially different to volumetric T(max)-DWI mismatch. Automated software that applies perfusion thresholds may improve the reproducibility of real-time mismatch assessment. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Cognitive evoked potentials. Perspectives for mismatch negativity].

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G

    2009-01-01

    The techniques of cognitive evoked potentials are considered long and technically complex, which is why their use in clinical practice is not very widespread in spite of their potential utility. Recent advances in registering and analysis, together with improvement of the software managing these signals, have appreciably reduced these problems. Mismatch negativity stands out as the most promising of all the cognitive potentials due to its special characteristics regarding its generation requisites and its proven clinical utility. The fact that it can be generated without care requirements makes it especially useful for evaluating subjects with a low level of consciousness; it serves for predicting when they will emerge from a coma, amongst other uses. The incorporation of this technique into the arsenal of neurophysiological techniques for evaluating the state of these subjects will bring a substantial improvement in the evaluation of cases whose management in clinical practice is extremely complex.

  6. Calculation of wind speeds required to damage or destroy buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Henry

    Determination of wind speeds required to damage or destroy a building is important not only for the improvement of building design and construction but also for the estimation of wind speeds in tornadoes and other damaging storms. For instance, since 1973 the U.S. National Weather Service has been using the well-known Fujita scale (F scale) to estimate the maximum wind speeds of tornadoes [Fujita, 1981]. The F scale classifies tornadoes into 13 numbers, F-0 through F-12. The wind speed (maximum gust speed) associated with each F number is given in Table 1. Note that F-6 through F-12 are for wind speeds between 319 mi/hr (mph) and the sonic velocity (approximately 760 mph; 1 mph = 1.6 km/kr). However, since no tornadoes have been classified to exceed F-5, the F-6 through F-12 categories have no practical meaning [Fujita, 1981].

  7. ASPECTS (Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score) Assessment of the Perfusion-Diffusion Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Lassalle, Louis; Turc, Guillaume; Tisserand, Marie; Charron, Sylvain; Roca, Pauline; Lion, Stephanie; Legrand, Laurence; Edjlali, Myriam; Naggara, Olivier; Meder, Jean-François; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Rapid and reliable assessment of the perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)/diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch is required to promote its wider application in both acute stroke clinical routine and trials. We tested whether an evaluation based on the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) reliably identifies the PWI/DWI mismatch. A total of 232 consecutive patients with acute middle cerebral artery stroke who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (PWI and DWI) were retrospectively evaluated. PWI-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS were determined blind from manually segmented PWI and DWI volumes. Mismatch-ASPECTS was defined as the difference between PWI-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS (a high score indicates a large mismatch). We determined the mismatch-ASPECTS cutoff that best identified the volumetric mismatch, defined as VolumeTmax>6s/VolumeDWI≥1.8, a volume difference≥15 mL, and a VolumeDWI<70 mL. Inter-reader agreement was almost perfect for PWI-ASPECTS (κ=0.95 [95% confidence interval, 0.90-1]), and DWI-ASPECTS (κ=0.96 [95% confidence interval, 0.91-1]). There were strong negative correlations between volumetric and ASPECTS-based assessments of DWI lesions (ρ=-0.84, P<0.01) and PWI lesions (ρ=-0.90, P<0.01). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a mismatch-ASPECTS ≥2 best identified a volumetric mismatch, with a sensitivity of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98) and a specificity of 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.89). The mismatch-ASPECTS method can detect a true mismatch in patients with acute middle cerebral artery stroke. It could be used for rapid screening of patients with eligible mismatch, in centers not equipped with ultrafast postprocessing software. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Valence band anticrossing in highly mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberi, Kirstin Mclean

    Semiconductor alloys offer the ability to tune certain material parameters such as the band gap or carrier effective mass through precise control of the alloy composition, allowing them to be optimized for specific device requirements. While many alloys demonstrate near linear composition dependencies in these properties, those containing isoelectronic anion species that are significantly mismatched in electronegativity or ionization energy, known as highly mismatched alloys (HMA), exhibit substantial deviation from this trend. Here, the optical and electrical properties of HMAs containing dilute concentrations of large metallic anions are investigated in the context of a valence band anticrossing (VBAC) theory. Minority species with low ionization energies often introduce localized p-states near the valence band edge of the host semiconductor. Hybridization of these localized states with the extended p-states of the host may be described by a 12 x 12 Hamiltonian and produces a splitting of the alloy valence band into E+ and E - states. Photomodulated reflectance studies coupled with the VBAC theory confirm that the band gap bowing observed in GaSbxAs1-x and GaBixAs1-x is caused by an upward movement of the valence band edge as a result of the anticrossing interaction between the E+ and E- states. The valence band restructuring also adversely affects hole transport in these alloys through an increase in the heavy hole effective mass and the addition of an alloy disorder scattering mechanism. Finally, the VBAC theory has been extended to group IV HMAs as well as to the dilute magnetic semiconductor Ga1-x MnxAs, both of which exhibit strong hole localization at the minority species sites.

  9. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  10. Rad51-mediated double-strand break repair and mismatch correction of divergent substrates

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith; Beach, Annette; Li, Kevin; Haber, James

    2017-01-01

    The RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases execute the critical step in homologous recombination (HR): the search for homologous DNA to serve as the template during DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair1–7. Although budding yeast Rad51 has been extensively characterized in vitro3,4,6–9, the stringency of its search and sensitivity to mismatched sequences in vivo remain poorly defined. We analyzed Rad51-dependent break-induced replication (BIR) where the invading DSB end and its donor template share 108 bp homology and the donor carries different densities of single-bp mismatches (Fig. 1a). With every 8th bp mismatched, repair was ~14% compared to completely homologous sequences. With every 6th bp mismatched, repair was >5%. Thus completing BIR in vivo overcomes the apparent requirement for at least 6–8 consecutive paired bases inferred from in vitro studies6,8. When recombination occurs without a protruding nonhomologous 3′ tail, mismatch repair protein Msh2 does not discourage homeologous recombination. However, when the DSB end contains a 3′ protruding nonhomologous tail, Msh2 promotes rejection of mismatched substrates. Mismatch correction of strand invasion heteroduplex DNA is strongly polar, favoring correction close to the DSB end. Nearly all mismatch correction depends on the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase δ, although Msh2-Mlh1 and Exo1 influence the extent of correction. PMID:28405019

  11. Rad51-mediated double-strand break repair and mismatch correction of divergent substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ranjith; Beach, Annette; Li, Kevin; Haber, James

    2017-04-20

    The Rad51 (also known as RecA) family of recombinases executes the critical step in homologous recombination: the search for homologous DNA to serve as a template during the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although budding yeast Rad51 has been extensively characterized in vitro, the stringency of its search and sensitivity to mismatched sequences in vivo remain poorly defined. Here, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we analysed Rad51-dependent break-induced replication in which the invading DSB end and its donor template share a 108-base-pair homology region and the donor carries different densities of single-base-pair mismatches. With every eighth base pair mismatched, repair was about 14% of that of completely homologous sequences. With every sixth base pair mismatched, repair was still more than 5%. Thus, completing break-induced replication in vivo overcomes the apparent requirement for at least 6-8 consecutive paired bases that has been inferred from in vitro studies. When recombination occurs without a protruding nonhomologous 3' tail, the mismatch repair protein Msh2 does not discourage homeologous recombination. However, when the DSB end contains a 3' protruding nonhomologous tail, Msh2 promotes the rejection of mismatched substrates. Mismatch correction of strand invasion heteroduplex DNA is strongly polar, favouring correction close to the DSB end. Nearly all mismatch correction depends on the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase-δ, although the repair proteins Msh2, Mlh1 and Exo1 influence the extent of correction.

  12. Mismatch Receptive Fields in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zmarz, Pawel; Keller, Georg B

    2016-11-23

    In primary visual cortex, a subset of neurons responds when a particular stimulus is encountered in a certain location in visual space. This activity can be modeled using a visual receptive field. In addition to visually driven activity, there are neurons in visual cortex that integrate visual and motor-related input to signal a mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow. Here we show that these mismatch neurons have receptive fields and signal a local mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow in restricted regions of visual space. These mismatch receptive fields are aligned to the retinotopic map of visual cortex and are similar in size to visual receptive fields. Thus, neurons with mismatch receptive fields signal local deviations of actual visual flow from visual flow predicted based on self-motion and could therefore underlie the detection of objects moving relative to the visual flow caused by self-motion. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. Entanglement verification with detection efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanbao; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    Entanglement is a necessary condition for secure quantum key distribution (QKD). When there is an efficiency mismatch between various detectors used in the QKD system, it is still an open problem how to verify entanglement. Here we present a method to address this problem, given that the detection efficiency mismatch is characterized and known. The method works without assuming an upper bound on the number of photons going to each threshold detector. Our results suggest that the efficiency mismatch affects the ability to verify entanglement: the larger the efficiency mismatch is, the smaller the set of entangled states that can be verified becomes. When there is no mismatch, our method can verify entanglement even if the method based on squashing maps [PRL 101, 093601 (2008)] fails.

  14. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  15. The Association Between Broad Antigen HLA Mismatches, Eplet HLA Mismatches and Acute Rejection After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Do Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Wong, Germaine; Chapman, Jeremy R.; McDonald, Stephen P.; Coates, Patrick T.; Watson, Narelle; Russ, Graeme R.; D'Orsogna, Lloyd; Lim, Wai Hon

    2016-01-01

    Background Epitope matching, which evaluates mismatched amino acids within antigen-antibody interaction sites (eplets), may better predict acute rejection than broad antigen matching alone. We aimed to determine the association between eplet mismatches and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Methods The association between eplet mismatches, broad antigen mismatches and acute rejection was assessed using adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression. Model discrimination for acute rejection was evaluated using the area under receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Of the 3,499 kidney transplant recipients from 2006 to 2011, the average (SD) number of broad antigen and eplet mismatches were 3.4 (1.7) and 22.8 (12.2), respectively. Compared with 0 to 2 eplet mismatches, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for acute rejection among those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-3.52; P = 0.001). The adjusted area under the curve for broad antigen mismatches was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.56-0.61), similar to that for eplet mismatches (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.56-0.61; P = 0.365). In recipients who were considered as low immunological risk (0-2 broad antigen HLA-ABDR mismatch), those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches experienced an increased risk of rejection compared to those with less than 20 mismatches (adjusted HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.11-3.08; P = 0.019). Conclusions Increasing number of eplet mismatches is associated with acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Consideration of eplet HLA mismatches may improve risk stratification for acute rejection in a selected group of kidney transplant candidates. PMID:27990485

  16. A new acoustic mismatch theory for Kapitsa resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2010-10-01

    This paper generalizes the well-known acoustic mismatch theory of Kapitsa interface thermal resistance by taking into consideration a broad class of thermal vibrations that were excluded from that theory by the imposition of the Sommerfeld radiation condition, which is required for the theory of sound but is not relevant for the analysis of heat transport. This extension preserves the main ideas of the acoustic mismatch theory but provides much more reasonable estimates for the interface resistance. The predictions of the new theory are compared with various published experimental results for the thermal resistance between liquid helium at low temperatures and several different metals (Ag, Au, Cu, Pb and Pt). The computations are straightforward and require only well-known material parameters. The predictions agree with the experiments to within their stated range of accuracy.

  17. Impact of ABO blood group mismatch in alemtuzumab-based reduced-intensity conditioned haematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Brierley, C K; Littlewood, T J; Peniket, A J; Gregg, R; Ward, J; Clark, A; Parker, A; Malladi, R; Medd, P

    2015-07-01

    The impact of ABO incompatibility on clinical outcomes following haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) remains controversial. This retrospective study assessed the effect of ABO mismatch on transplant outcomes and transfusion requirements in 594 patients undergoing reduced-intensity conditioned (RIC) HSCT with alemtuzumab in three UK transplant centres. We found no significant effects of minor, major or bidirectional ABO mismatch on overall survival, relapse-free survival, nonrelapse mortality or relapse incidence. Although the rate of acute GVHD was unaffected by ABO mismatch, the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was higher in patients with minor and major mismatch compared with those who were ABO matched (hazard ratio (HR) 1.74, P=0.032 for minor, HR 1.69 P=0.0036 for major mismatch). Red cell and platelet transfusion requirements in the first 100 days post transplant did not differ by ABO mismatch. In this large UK series, ABO mismatch in RIC HSCT has no clinically significant effect on survival outcomes but appears to modify susceptibility to extensive chronic GVHD.

  18. Lattice QCD with mismatched fermi surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2014-04-25

    We study two flavor fermions with mismatched chemical potentials in quenched lattice QCD. We first consider a large isospin chemical potential, where a charged pion is condensed, and then introduce a small mismatch between the chemical potentials of the up quark and the down antiquark. We find that the homogeneous pion condensate is destroyed by the mismatch of the chemical potentials. We also find that the two-point correlation function shows spatial oscillation, which indicates an inhomogeneous ground state, although it is not massless but massive in the present simulation setup.

  19. A practical assessment of magnetic resonance diffusion-perfusion mismatch in acute stroke: observer variation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Kane, I; Hand, P J; Rivers, C; Armitage, P; Bastin, M E; Lindley, R; Dennis, M; Wardlaw, J M

    2009-11-01

    MR diffusion/perfusion mismatch may help identify patients for acute stroke treatment, but mixed results from clinical trials suggest that further evaluation of the mismatch concept is required. To work effectively, mismatch should predict prognosis on arrival at hospital. We assessed mismatch duration and associations with functional outcome in acute stroke. We recruited consecutive patients with acute stroke, recorded baseline clinical variables, performed MR diffusion and perfusion imaging and assessed 3-month functional outcome. We assessed practicalities, agreement between mismatch on mean transit time (MTT) or cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps, visually and with lesion volume, and the relationship of each to functional outcome. Of 82 patients starting imaging, 14 (17%) failed perfusion imaging. Overall, 42% had mismatch (56% at <6 h; 41% at 12-24 h; 23% at 24-48 h). Agreement for mismatch by visual versus volume assessment was fair using MTT (kappa 0.59, 95% CI 0.34-0.84) but poor using CBF (kappa 0.24, 95% CI 0.01-0.48). Mismatch by either definition was not associated with functional outcome, even when the analysis was restricted to just those with mismatch. Visual estimation is a reasonable proxy for mismatch volume on MTT but not CBF. Perfusion is more difficult for acute stroke patients than diffusion imaging. Mismatch is present in many patients beyond 12 h after stroke. Mismatch alone does not distinguish patients with good and poor prognosis; both can do well or poorly. Other factors, e.g. reperfusion, may influence outcome more strongly, even in patients without mismatch.

  20. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  1. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    PubMed Central

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour. PMID:24619446

  2. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L Scott; Lukacs, Paul M; Mitchell, Michael S

    2014-05-07

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  3. A teleofunctional account of evolutionary mismatch.

    PubMed

    Cofnas, Nathan

    When the environment in which an organism lives deviates in some essential way from that to which it is adapted, this is described as "evolutionary mismatch," or "evolutionary novelty." The notion of mismatch plays an important role, explicitly or implicitly, in evolution-informed cognitive psychology, clinical psychology, and medicine. The evolutionary novelty of our contemporary environment is thought to have significant implications for our health and well-being. However, scientists have generally been working without a clear definition of mismatch. This paper defines mismatch as deviations in the environment that render biological traits unable, or impaired in their ability, to produce their selected effects (i.e., to perform their proper functions in Neander's sense). The machinery developed by Millikan in connection with her account of proper function, and with her related teleosemantic account of representation, is used to identify four major types, and several subtypes, of evolutionary mismatch. While the taxonomy offered here does not in itself resolve any scientific debates, the hope is that it can be used to better formulate empirical hypotheses concerning the effects of mismatch. To illustrate, it is used to show that the controversial hypothesis that general intelligence evolved as an adaptation to handle evolutionary novelty can, contra some critics, be formulated in a conceptually coherent way.

  4. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  5. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-01

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO2 laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n0, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  6. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-31

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n{sub 0}, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  7. Educational Mismatches and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Both Vertical and Horizontal Mismatches in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pholphirul, Piriya

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Educational mismatches constitute negative impacts on labor markets in most countries, Thailand is no exception. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the degree of educational mismatch in Thailand and its impacts on labor market outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: This study analyzes data obtained from Thailand's Labor Force Survey…

  8. Non-canonical actions of mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Crouse, Gray F.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the mismatch repair (MMR) system are proteins that recognize mismatches in DNA. Such mismatches can be mispairs involving normal or damaged bases or insertion/deletion loops due to strand misalignment. When such mispairs are generated during replication or recombination, MMR will direct removal of an incorrectly paired base or block recombination between nonidentical sequences. However, when mispairs are recognized outside the context of replication, proper strand discrimination between old and new DNA is lost, and MMR can act randomly and mutagenically on mispaired DNA. Such non-canonical actions of MMR are important in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, expansion of triplet repeats, and potentially in mutations arising in nondividing cells. MMR involvement in damage recognition and signaling is complex, with the end result likely dependent on the amount of DNA damage in a cell. PMID:26698648

  9. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, María V; Monti, Mariela R; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2016-03-04

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3' end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5' end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases mortality after myeloablative unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stephanie J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Hai-Lin; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Dehn, Jason; Fernandez Viña, Marcelo; Gratwohl, Alois; Gupta, Vikas; Hanna, Rabi; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kassim, Adetola A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Mueller, Carlheinz; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Prasad, Vinod; Robinson, James; Saber, Wael; Schultz, Kirk R.; Shaw, Bronwen; Storek, Jan; Wood, William A.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We examined current outcomes of unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to determine the clinical implications of donor-recipient HLA matching. Adult and pediatric patients who had first undergone myeloablative-unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome between 1999 and 2011 were included. All had high-resolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Of the total (n = 8003), cases were 8/8 (n = 5449), 7/8 (n = 2071), or 6/8 (n = 483) matched. HLA mismatch (6-7/8) conferred significantly increased risk for grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft vs host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall mortality compared with HLA-matched cases (8/8). Type (allele/antigen) and locus (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) of mismatch were not associated with overall mortality. Among 8/8 matched cases, HLA-DPB1 and -DQB1 mismatch resulted in increased acute GVHD, and HLA-DPB1 mismatch had decreased relapse. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 allele mismatch was associated with higher TRM compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch or HLA-DPB1 match and increased overall mortality compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch in 8/8 (and 10/10) matched cases. Full matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 is required for optimal unrelated donor HCT survival, and avoidance of nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in otherwise HLA-matched pairs is indicated. PMID:25161269

  11. Honokiol radiosensitizes colorectal cancer cells: enhanced activity in cells with mismatch repair defects

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiyun; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramalingam, Satish; Dhar, Animesh; Postier, Russell G.; Umar, Shahid; Zhang, Youcheng

    2011-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is required for correcting any mismatches that are created during replication and recombination, and a defective mismatch repair system contributes to DNA damage-induced growth arrest. The colorectal cancer cell line HCT116 is known to have a mutation in the hMLH1 mismatch repair gene resulting in microsatellite instability and defective mismatch repair. Honokiol is a biphenolic compound that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating various ailments including cancer. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that honokiol enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells with mismatch repair defect (HCT116) compared with those that are mismatch repair proficient (HCT116-CH3). We first determined that the combination of honokiol and γ-irradiation treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and colony formation in both cell lines. However, the effects were more pronounced in HCT116 cells. Similarly, the combination induced higher levels of apoptosis (caspase 3 activation, Bax to Bcl2 ratio) in the HCT116 cells compared with HCT116-CH3 cells. Cell cycle analyses revealed higher levels of dead cells in HCT116 cells. The combination treatment reduced expression of cyclin A1 and D1 and increased phosphorylated p53 in both cell lines, although there were significantly lower amounts of phosphorylated p53 in the HCT116-CH3 cells, suggesting that high levels of hMLH1 reduce radiosensitivity. These data demonstrate that honokiol is highly effective in radiosensitizing colorectal cancer cells, especially those with a mismatch repair defect. PMID:21836060

  12. Honokiol radiosensitizes colorectal cancer cells: enhanced activity in cells with mismatch repair defects.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyun; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Ramalingam, Satish; Dhar, Animesh; Postier, Russell G; Umar, Shahid; Zhang, Youcheng; Anant, Shrikant

    2011-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair is required for correcting any mismatches that are created during replication and recombination, and a defective mismatch repair system contributes to DNA damage-induced growth arrest. The colorectal cancer cell line HCT116 is known to have a mutation in the hMLH1 mismatch repair gene resulting in microsatellite instability and defective mismatch repair. Honokiol is a biphenolic compound that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating various ailments including cancer. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that honokiol enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells with mismatch repair defect (HCT116) compared with those that are mismatch repair proficient (HCT116-CH3). We first determined that the combination of honokiol and γ-irradiation treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and colony formation in both cell lines. However, the effects were more pronounced in HCT116 cells. Similarly, the combination induced higher levels of apoptosis (caspase 3 activation, Bax to Bcl2 ratio) in the HCT116 cells compared with HCT116-CH3 cells. Cell cycle analyses revealed higher levels of dead cells in HCT116 cells. The combination treatment reduced expression of cyclin A1 and D1 and increased phosphorylated p53 in both cell lines, although there were significantly lower amounts of phosphorylated p53 in the HCT116-CH3 cells, suggesting that high levels of hMLH1 reduce radiosensitivity. These data demonstrate that honokiol is highly effective in radiosensitizing colorectal cancer cells, especially those with a mismatch repair defect.

  13. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Borgogno, María V.; Monti, Mariela R.; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3′ end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5′ end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity. PMID:26709229

  14. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS.

    PubMed

    Monti, Maria Chiara; Cohen, Serge X; Fish, Alexander; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Barendregt, Arjan; Friedhoff, Peter; Perrakis, Anastassis; Heck, Albert J R; Sixma, Titia K; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2011-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires identification of the relevant MutS.mmDNA.nucleotide species. Here, we use native mass spectrometry to detect simultaneous DNA mismatch binding and asymmetric nucleotide binding to Escherichia coli MutS. To resolve the small differences between macromolecular species bound to different nucleotides, we developed a likelihood based algorithm capable to deconvolute the observed spectra into individual peaks. The obtained mass resolution resolves simultaneous binding of ADP and AMP.PNP to this ABC ATPase in the absence of DNA. Mismatched DNA regulates the asymmetry in the ATPase sites; we observe a stable DNA-bound state containing a single AMP.PNP cofactor. This is the first direct evidence for such a postulated mismatch repair intermediate, and showcases the potential of native MS analysis in detecting mechanistically relevant reaction intermediates.

  15. Game, set, match for factor VIII mismatch?

    PubMed

    Miller, Connie H

    2015-08-13

    In this issue of Blood, Gunasekera et al provide evidence that the high rate of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors seen in black hemophilia A (HA) patients is not due to a mismatch between the structure of treatment products and FVIII genotypes common in blacks.

  16. Aortic mismatch in heart transplantation: readaptation.

    PubMed

    Miralles, A

    1997-10-01

    Great vessel mismatch between donor and recipient is very usual in heart transplantation. Different procedures have been used to manage this situation. A tailoring aortoplasty is described, as a technical alternative, in cases of considerable size incongruence between donor and recipient aortic diameters.

  17. Mismatch repair during homologous and homeologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans.

  18. Mismatch Repair during Homologous and Homeologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans. PMID:25731766

  19. HLA Mismatching Strategies for Solid Organ Transplantation – A Balancing Act

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Andrea A.; Leffell, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    HLA matching provides numerous benefits in organ transplantation including better graft function, fewer rejection episodes, longer graft survival, and the possibility of reduced immunosuppression. Mismatches are attended by more frequent rejection episodes that require increased immunosuppression that, in turn, can increase the risk of infection and malignancy. HLA mismatches also incur the risk of sensitization, which can reduce the opportunity and increase waiting time for a subsequent transplant. However, other factors such as donor age, donor type, and immunosuppression protocol, can affect the benefit derived from matching. Furthermore, finding a well-matched donor may not be possible for all patients and usually prolongs waiting time. Strategies to optimize transplantation for patients without a well-matched donor should take into account the immunologic barrier represented by different mismatches: what are the least immunogenic mismatches considering the patient’s HLA phenotype; should repeated mismatches be avoided; is the patient sensitized to HLA and, if so, what are the strengths of the patient’s antibodies? This information can then be used to define the HLA type of an immunologically optimal donor and the probability of such a donor occurring. A probability that is considered to be too low may require expanding the donor population through paired donation or modifying what is acceptable, which may require employing treatment to overcome immunologic barriers such as increased immunosuppression or desensitization. Thus, transplantation must strike a balance between the risk associated with waiting for the optimal donor and the risk associated with a less than optimal donor. PMID:28003816

  20. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  1. Transfusion of ABO-mismatched platelets leads to early platelet refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Carr, R; Hutton, J L; Jenkins, J A; Lucas, G F; Amphlett, N W

    1990-07-01

    Forty-three consecutive patients previously unexposed to platelets and undergoing treatment for acute leukaemia or autografting for relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma were randomized to receive transfused platelets of either their own ABO group (OG) or of a major mismatched group (MMG). The 26 evaluable patients were equally distributed between the two study groups. Nine of 13 (69%) MMG patients became refractory with a median onset at transfusion 7 (15 d), compared with only one of 13 (8%) OG patients (P = 0.001). Refractoriness was associated with the formation of high titre isoagglutinins, anti-HLA and platelet specific antibodies. In one patient refractoriness appeared to be due to high titre isoagglutinins alone. Six other patients developed an increase in isoagglutinin titre sufficient to adversely affect platelet increments. Patients receiving ABO-mismatched platelets had a higher incidence of anti-HLA antibodies (5 v. 1) and platelet specific antibodies (4 v. 1). ABO-mismatched platelets transfused prior to the onset of refractoriness resulted in increments similar to those achieved by ABO-matched platelets. The study demonstrates that ABO-mismatched platelets are as effective as matched platelets in patients with low titre isoagglutinins requiring only few transfusions. However, the greater incidence of early refractoriness induced in MMG patients indicates that ABO-mismatched platelets should not be given to patients with marrow failure requiring long-term support.

  2. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  3. Positional and neighboring base pair effects on the thermodynamic stability of RNA single mismatches.

    PubMed

    Davis, Amber R; Znosko, Brent M

    2010-10-12

    Many naturally occurring RNA structures contain single mismatches, many of which occur near the ends of helices. However, previous thermodynamic studies have focused their efforts on thermodynamically characterizing centrally placed single mismatches. Additionally, algorithms currently used to predict secondary structure from sequence are based on two assumptions for predicting the stability of RNA duplexes containing this motif. It has been assumed that the thermodynamic contribution of small RNA motifs is independent of both its position in the duplex and the identity of the non-nearest neighbors. Thermodynamically characterizing single mismatches three nucleotides from both the 3' and 5' ends (i.e., off-center) of an RNA duplex and comparing these results to those of the same single mismatch-nearest neighbor combination centrally located have allowed for the investigation of these effects. The thermodynamic contributions of 13 single mismatch-nearest neighbor combinations are reported, but only nine combinations are studied at all three duplex positions and are used to determine trends and patterns. In general, the 5'- and 3'-shifted single mismatches are relatively similar, on average, and more favorable in free energy than centrally placed single mismatches. However, close examination and comparison shows there are several associated idiosyncrasies with these identified general trends. These peculiarities may be due, in part, to the identities of the single mismatch, the nearest neighbors, and the non-nearest neighbors, along with the effects of the single mismatch position in the duplex. The prediction algorithm recently proposed by Davis and Znosko [Davis, A. R., and Znosko, B. M. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 10178-10187] is used to predict the thermodynamic parameters of single mismatch contribution, and those values are compared to the measured values presented here. This comparison suggests the proposed model is a good approximation but could be improved by

  4. Topologically clustering: a method for discarding mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Dazhi; Gao, Chenqiang; Tian, Jinwen

    2007-11-01

    Wide baseline stereo correspondence has become a challenging and attractive problem in computer vision and its related applications. Getting high correct ratio initial matches is a very important step of general wide baseline stereo correspondence algorithm. Ferrari et al. suggested a voting scheme called topological filter in [3] to discard mismatches from initial matches, but they didn't give theoretical analysis of their method. Furthermore, the parameter of their scheme was uncertain. In this paper, we improved Ferraris' method based on our theoretical analysis, and presented a novel scheme called topologically clustering to discard mismatches. The proposed method has been tested using many famous wide baseline image pairs and the experimental results showed that the developed method can efficiently extract high correct ratio matches from low correct ratio initial matches for wide baseline image pairs.

  5. Acoustic evidence for phonologically mismatched speech errors.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Speech errors are generally said to accommodate to their new phonological context. This accommodation has been validated by several transcription studies. The transcription methodology is not the best choice for detecting errors at this level, however, as this type of error can be difficult to perceive. This paper presents an acoustic analysis of speech errors that uncovers non-accommodated or mismatch errors. A mismatch error is a sub-phonemic error that results in an incorrect surface phonology. This type of error could arise during the processing of phonological rules or they could be made at the motor level of implementation. The results of this work have important implications for both experimental and theoretical research. For experimentalists, it validates the tools used for error induction and the acoustic determination of errors free of the perceptual bias. For theorists, this methodology can be used to test the nature of the processes proposed in language production.

  6. The MRA-DWI Mismatch Identifies Patients With Stroke Who Are Likely to Benefit From Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; Thijs, Vincent N.; Bammer, Roland; Olivot, Jean-Marc; Marks, Michael P.; Wechsler, Lawrence R.; Kemp, Stephanie; Albers, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of this exploratory analysis was to evaluate if a combination of MR angiography (MRA) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) selection criteria can be used to identify patients with acute stroke who are likely to benefit from early reperfusion. Methods Data from DEFUSE, a study of 74 patients with stroke who received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in the 3- to 6-hour time window and underwent MRIs before and approximately 4 hours after treatment were analyzed. The MRA–DWI mismatch model was defined as (1) a DWI lesion volume less than 25 mL in patients with a proximal vessel occlusion; or (2) a DWI lesion volume less than 15 mL in patients with proximal vessel stenosis or an abnormal finding of a distal vessel. Favorable clinical response was defined as an improvement on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of at least 8 points between baseline and 30 days or a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≤1 at 30 days. Results Twenty-seven of 62 patients (44%) had an MRA-DWI mismatch. There was a differential response to early reperfusion based on MRA-DWI mismatch status. Reperfusion was associated with an increased rate of a favorable clinical response in patients with an MRA-DWI mismatch (OR, 12.5; 95% CI, 1.8 to 83.9) and a lower rate in patients without mismatch (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.0 to 0.8). Conclusions The MRA-DWI mismatch model appears to identify patients with stroke who are likely to benefit from reperfusion therapy administered in the 3- to 6-hour time window after symptom onset. The criteria established for the MRA-DWI mismatch model in this study require validation in an independent cohort. PMID:18635861

  7. Infrequent identity mismatches are frequently undetected

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately match faces to photographs bears critically on many domains, from controlling purchase of age-restricted goods to law enforcement and airport security. Despite its pervasiveness and importance, research has shown that face matching is surprisingly error prone. The majority of face-matching research is conducted under idealized conditions (e.g., using photographs of individuals taken on the same day) and with equal proportions of match and mismatch trials, a rate that is likely not observed in everyday face matching. In four experiments, we presented observers with photographs of faces taken an average of 1.5 years apart and tested whether face-matching performance is affected by the prevalence of identity mismatches, comparing conditions of low (10 %) and high (50 %) mismatch prevalence. Like the low-prevalence effect in visual search, we observed inflated miss rates under low-prevalence conditions. This effect persisted when participants were allowed to correct their initial responses (Experiment 2), when they had to verify every decision with a certainty judgment (Experiment 3) and when they were permitted “second looks” at face pairs (Experiment 4). These results suggest that, under realistic viewing conditions, the low-prevalence effect in face matching is a large, persistent source of errors. PMID:24500751

  8. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Erie, Dorothy A

    2015-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome.

  9. The seasonal cycle amplitude of total column CO2: Factors behind the model-observation mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sourish; Houweling, Sander; Peters, Wouter; Sweeney, Colm; Machida, Toshinobu; Maksyutov, Shamil; Patra, Prabir K.; Saito, Ryu; Chevallier, Frederic; Niwa, Yosuke; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Sawa, Yousuke

    2011-12-01

    CO2 surface fluxes that are statistically consistent with surface layer measurements of CO2, when propagated forward in time by atmospheric transport models, underestimate the seasonal cycle amplitude of total column CO2 in the northern temperate latitudes by 1-2 ppm. In this paper we verify the systematic nature of this underestimation at a number of Total Carbon Column Observation Network (TCCON) stations by comparing their measurements with a number of transport models. In particular, at Park Falls, Wisconsin (United States), we estimate this mismatch to be 1.4 ppm and try to attribute portions of this mismatch to different factors affecting the total column. We find that errors due to (1) the averaging kernel and prior profile used in forward models, (2) water vapor in the model atmosphere, (3) incorrect vertical transport by transport models in the free troposphere, (4) incorrect aging of air in transport models in the stratosphere, and (5) air mass dependence in TCCON data can explain up to 1 ppm of this mismatch. The remaining 0.4 ppm mismatch is at the edge of the ≤0.4 ppm accuracy requirement on satellite measurements to improve on our current estimate of surface fluxes. Uncertainties in the biosphere fluxes driving the transport models could explain a part of the remaining 0.4 ppm mismatch, implying that with corrections to the factors behind the accounted-for 1 ppm underestimation, present inverse modeling frameworks could effectively assimilate satellite CO2 measurements.

  10. Mismatched DNTP Incorporation By DNA Polymerase Beta Does Not Proceed Via Globally Different Conformational Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.-H.; Niebuhr, M.; Tung, C.-S.; Chan, H.-c.; Chou, C.-C.; Tsai, M.-D.

    2009-05-26

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  11. A non-canonical mismatch repair pathway in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-García, A.; Prieto, A. I.; Rodríguez-Beltrán, J.; Alonso, N.; Cantillon, D.; Costas, C.; Pérez-Lago, L.; Zegeye, E. D.; Herranz, M.; Plociński, P.; Tonjum, T.; García de Viedma, D.; Paget, M.; Waddell, S. J.; Rojas, A. M.; Doherty, A. J.; Blázquez, J.

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is a near ubiquitous pathway, essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Members of the MutS and MutL protein families perform key steps in mismatch correction. Despite the major importance of this repair pathway, MutS–MutL are absent in almost all Actinobacteria and many Archaea. However, these organisms exhibit rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations similar to MMR-bearing species, suggesting the existence of an alternative to the canonical MutS–MutL-based MMR. Here we report that Mycobacterium smegmatis NucS/EndoMS, a putative endonuclease with no structural homology to known MMR factors, is required for mutation avoidance and anti-recombination, hallmarks of the canonical MMR. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of naturally occurring polymorphic NucS in a M. smegmatis surrogate model, suggests the existence of M. tuberculosis mutator strains. The phylogenetic analysis of NucS indicates a complex evolutionary process leading to a disperse distribution pattern in prokaryotes. Together, these findings indicate that distinct pathways for MMR have evolved at least twice in nature. PMID:28128207

  12. A non-canonical mismatch repair pathway in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-García, A; Prieto, A I; Rodríguez-Beltrán, J; Alonso, N; Cantillon, D; Costas, C; Pérez-Lago, L; Zegeye, E D; Herranz, M; Plociński, P; Tonjum, T; García de Viedma, D; Paget, M; Waddell, S J; Rojas, A M; Doherty, A J; Blázquez, J

    2017-01-27

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is a near ubiquitous pathway, essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Members of the MutS and MutL protein families perform key steps in mismatch correction. Despite the major importance of this repair pathway, MutS-MutL are absent in almost all Actinobacteria and many Archaea. However, these organisms exhibit rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations similar to MMR-bearing species, suggesting the existence of an alternative to the canonical MutS-MutL-based MMR. Here we report that Mycobacterium smegmatis NucS/EndoMS, a putative endonuclease with no structural homology to known MMR factors, is required for mutation avoidance and anti-recombination, hallmarks of the canonical MMR. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of naturally occurring polymorphic NucS in a M. smegmatis surrogate model, suggests the existence of M. tuberculosis mutator strains. The phylogenetic analysis of NucS indicates a complex evolutionary process leading to a disperse distribution pattern in prokaryotes. Together, these findings indicate that distinct pathways for MMR have evolved at least twice in nature.

  13. Resolution of Mismatched Overlap Holliday Junction Intermediates by the Tyrosine Recombinase IntDOT.

    PubMed

    Ringwald, Kenneth; Yoneji, Sumiko; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2017-05-15

    CTnDOT is an integrated conjugative element found in Bacteroides species. CTnDOT contains and transfers antibiotic resistance genes. The element integrates into and excises from the host chromosome via a Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate as part of a site-specific recombination mechanism. The CTnDOT integrase, IntDOT, is a tyrosine recombinase with core-binding, catalytic, and amino-terminal (N) domains. Unlike well-studied tyrosine recombinases, such as lambda integrase (Int), IntDOT is able to resolve Holliday junctions containing heterology (mismatched bases) between the sites of strand exchange. All known natural isolates of CTnDOT contain mismatches in the overlap region between the sites of strand exchange. Previous work showed that IntDOT was unable to resolve synthetic Holliday junctions containing mismatched bases to products in the absence of the arm-type sites and a DNA-bending protein. We constructed synthetic HJs with the arm-type sites and tested them with the Bacteroides host factor (BHFa). We found that the addition of BHFa stimulated resolution of HJ intermediates with mismatched overlap regions to products. In addition, the L1 site is required for directionality of the reaction, particularly when the HJ contains mismatches. BHFa is required for product formation when the overlap region contains mismatches, and it stimulates resolution to products when the overlap region is identical. Without this DNA bending, the N domain of IntDOT is likely unable to bind the L1 arm-type site. These findings suggest that BHFa bends DNA into the necessary conformation for the higher-order complexes, including the L1 site, that are required for product formation.IMPORTANCE CTnDOT is a mobile element that carries antibiotic resistance genes and moves by site-selective recombination and subsequent conjugation. The recombination reaction is catalyzed by an integrase IntDOT that is a member of the tyrosine recombinase family. The reaction proceeds through ordered

  14. Job Supply and Demand for University Graduates in Spain: A (Relative) Mismatch Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parellada, Marti; Duch, Nestor; Alvarez, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of job supply by Spanish firms and the demand for work, and the mismatch that occurs between these two variables. Data are taken for the year 2006, with particular attention to jobs offered by firms that require people with university degrees or other higher education qualifications. Demand and supply are broken…

  15. Job Supply and Demand for University Graduates in Spain: A (Relative) Mismatch Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parellada, Marti; Duch, Nestor; Alvarez, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of job supply by Spanish firms and the demand for work, and the mismatch that occurs between these two variables. Data are taken for the year 2006, with particular attention to jobs offered by firms that require people with university degrees or other higher education qualifications. Demand and supply are broken…

  16. Production and characterization of the celery mismatch endonuclease CEL II using baculovirus/silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jaeman; Fukushima, Mai; Nagata, Yudai; Fujii, Mie; Xu, Jian; Nishi, Oumi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection by nucleases has become a more important tool in clinical and biological researches. There are several kinds of single-stranded nucleases for detecting mismatched DNAs. One of them, CEL II, was isolated from Apium graveolens and cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of mismatch. High-throughput mutation scanning requires large quantity of CEL II endonuclease. Here, we demonstrate high-level expression of CEL II using silkworm-baculovirus system. The recombinant CEL II secreted in silkworm hemolymph was glycosylated and susceptible to N-glycosidase F. Additionally, larger metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) were able to replace Mg(2+) and enhanced mismatch cleavage activity of CEL II. These results indicate that the silkworm-baculovirus platform is a good alternative system to obtain the functional CEL II.

  17. An IQ mismatch calibration and compensation technique for wideband wireless transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng; Liguo, Zhou; Heng, Yao; Fang, Yuan; Zhi, Fang; Yin, Shi

    2014-08-01

    An IQ mismatch calibration and compensation technique based on the digital baseband for wideband wireless communication transmitters is proposed. The digital baseband transmits the signal used for IQ mismatch calibration. The signal passes through the RF transmitter path, the calibration loop (which is composed of a square power detector and a band-pass filter in the RF transceiver) and the variable gain amplifier of the receiver. The digital baseband samples the signal for IQ mismatch estimation and compensates for it. Compared with the self-calibration technique in the RF chip, the proposed technique saves area and power consumption for the wireless local area network solution. This technique has been successfully used for the 802.11n system and satisfies the requirement of the standard by achieving over 50 dB image suppression.

  18. Mismatch binding, ADP-ATP exchange and intramolecular signaling during mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Manju M.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the DNA binding and ATPase activities of the mismatch repair (MMR) protein, MutS—our current understanding of how this protein uses ATP to fuel its actions on DNA and initiate repair via interactions with MutL, the next protein in the pathway. Structure-function and kinetic studies have yielded detailed views of the MutS mechanism of action in MMR. How MutS and MutL work together after mismatch recognition to enable strand-specific nicking, which leads to strand excision and synthesis, is less clear and remains an active area of investigation. PMID:26704427

  19. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  20. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; Emery, Keith A.; Williams, Rafell

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  1. Visual mismatch negativity: a predictive coding view

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Kremláček, Jan; Czigler, István

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies investigate the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) or use the vMMN as a tool to probe various aspects of human cognition. This paper reviews the theoretical underpinnings of vMMN in the light of methodological considerations and provides recommendations for measuring and interpreting the vMMN. The following key issues are discussed from the experimentalist's point of view in a predictive coding framework: (1) experimental protocols and procedures to control “refractoriness” effects; (2) methods to control attention; (3) vMMN and veridical perception. PMID:25278859

  2. Identification of a new motif required for the 3'-5' exonuclease activity of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment): the RRRY motif is necessary for the binding of single-stranded DNA substrate and the template strand of the mismatched duplex.

    PubMed

    Kukreti, Pinky; Singh, Kamalendra; Ketkar, Amit; Modak, Mukund J

    2008-06-27

    The Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I houses catalytic centers for both polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities that are separated by about 35 A. Upon the incorporation of a mismatched nucleotide, the primer terminus is transferred from the polymerase site to an exonuclease site designed for excision of the mismatched nucleotides. The structural comparison of the binary complexes of DNA polymerases in the polymerase and the exonuclease modes, together with a molecular modeling of the template strand overhang in Klenow fragment, indicated its binding in the region spanning residues 821-824. Since these residues are conserved in the "A" family DNA polymerases, we have designated this region as the RRRY motif. The alanine substitution of individual amino acid residues of this motif did not change the polymerase activity; however, the 3'-5' exonuclease activity was reduced 2-29-fold, depending upon the site of mutation. The R821A and R822A/Y824A mutant enzymes showed maximum cleavage defect with single-stranded DNA, mainly due to a large decrease in the ssDNA binding affinity of these enzymes. Mismatch removal by these enzymes was only moderately affected. However, data from the exonuclease-polymerase balance assays with mismatched template-primer suggest that the mutant enzymes are defective in switching mismatched primer from the polymerase to the exonuclease site. Thus, the RRRY motif provides a binding track for substrate ssDNA and for nonsubstrate single-stranded template overhang, in a polarity-dependent manner. This binding then facilitates cleavage of the substrate at the exonuclease site.

  3. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  4. Convergent Transmission of RNAi Guide-Target Mismatch Information across Argonaute Internal Allosteric Network

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.; Osman, Roman

    2012-01-01

    In RNA interference, a guide strand derived from a short dsRNA such as a microRNA (miRNA) is loaded into Argonaute, the central protein in the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) that silences messenger RNAs on a sequence-specific basis. The positions of any mismatched base pairs in an miRNA determine which Argonaute subtype is used. Subsequently, the Argonaute-guide complex binds and silences complementary target mRNAs; certain Argonautes cleave the target. Mismatches between guide strand and the target mRNA decrease cleavage efficiency. Thus, loading and silencing both require that signals about the presence of a mismatched base pair are communicated from the mismatch site to effector sites. These effector sites include the active site, to prevent target cleavage; the binding groove, to modify nucleic acid binding affinity; and surface allosteric sites, to control recruitment of additional proteins to form the RISC. To examine how such signals may be propagated, we analyzed the network of internal allosteric pathways in Argonaute exhibited through correlations of residue-residue interactions. The emerging network can be described as a set of pathways emanating from the core of the protein near the active site, distributed into the bulk of the protein, and converging upon a distributed cluster of surface residues. Nucleotides in the guide strand “seed region” have a stronger relationship with the protein than other nucleotides, concordant with their importance in sequence selectivity. Finally, any of several seed region guide-target mismatches cause certain Argonaute residues to have modified correlations with the rest of the protein. This arises from the aggregation of relatively small interaction correlation changes distributed across a large subset of residues. These residues are in effector sites: the active site, binding groove, and surface, implying that direct functional consequences of guide-target mismatches are mediated through the cumulative

  5. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph

    2017-08-11

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression due to degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of <12-13mm or a Torg-Pavlov Ratio of <0.80-0.82; however, these factors do not take into account the size of the spinal cord, which varies across patients independent of canal size. Recent large MRI studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). SCOR defined as ≥70% on mid-sagittal imaging, ≥80% on axial imaging appear to be effective methods of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but require further validation. Cord-Canal Size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI due to: (1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, (2) less CSF surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurological outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI, support that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. ABO blood group mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Sibel Akpınar; Özbek, Namık

    2016-02-01

    Apart from solid organ transplantations, use of ABO-blood group mismatched (ABO-mismatched) donors is acceptable in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. About 20-40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients will receive grafts from ABO-mismatched donors. ABO incompatible HSCT procedures are associated with immediate and late consequences, including but not restricted to acute or delayed hemolytic reactions, delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and graft-versus-host disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge about consequences of ABO-mismatched HSCT in terms of associated complications and will evaluate its impact on important outcome parameters of HSCT.

  7. HLA-DQ Mismatches and Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Jeremy R.; Coates, Patrick T.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Russ, Graeme R.; Watson, Narelle; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Wong, Germaine

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The current allocation algorithm for deceased donor kidney transplantation takes into consideration HLA mismatches at the ABDR loci but not HLA mismatches at other loci, including HLA-DQ. However, the independent effects of incompatibilities for the closely linked HLA-DQ antigens in the context of HLA-DR antigen matched and mismatched allografts are uncertain. We aimed to determine the effect of HLA-DQ mismatches on renal allograft outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, we examined the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and acute rejections in primary live and deceased donor kidney transplant recipients between 2004 and 2012 using adjusted Cox regression models. Results Of the 788 recipients followed for a median of 2.8 years (resulting in 2891 person-years), 321 (40.7%) and 467 (59.3%) received zero and one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, respectively. Compared with recipients who have received zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, those who have received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys experienced greater numbers of any rejection (50 of 321 versus 117 of 467; P<0.01), late rejections (occurring >6 months post-transplant; 8 of 321 versus 27 of 467; P=0.03), and antibody-mediated rejections (AMRs; 12 of 321 versus 38 of 467; P=0.01). Compared with recipients of zero HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, the adjusted hazard ratios for any and late rejections in recipients who had received one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys were 1.54 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08 to 2.19) and 2.85 (95% CI, 1.05 to 7.75), respectively. HLA-DR was an effect modifier between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR (P value for interaction =0.02), such that the association between HLA-DQ mismatches and AMR was statistically significant in those who have received one or two HLA-DR mismatched kidneys, with adjusted hazard ratio of 2.50 (95% CI, 1.05 to 5.94). Conclusions HLA

  8. Alignment to natural and imposed mismatches between the senses.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, K; Brenner, E; van Beers, R J; Schot, W D; Smeets, J B J

    2013-04-01

    Does the nervous system continuously realign the senses so that objects are seen and felt in the same place? Conflicting answers to this question have been given. Research imposing a sensory mismatch has provided evidence that the nervous system realigns the senses to reduce the mismatch. Other studies have shown that when subjects point with the unseen hand to visual targets, their end points show visual-proprioceptive biases that do not disappear after episodes of visual feedback. These biases are indicative of intersensory mismatches that the nervous system does not align for. Here, we directly compare how the nervous system deals with natural and imposed mismatches. Subjects moved a hand-held cube to virtual cubes appearing at pseudorandom locations in three-dimensional space. We alternated blocks in which subjects moved without visual feedback of the hand with feedback blocks in which we rendered a cube representing the hand-held cube. In feedback blocks, we rotated the visual feedback by 5° relative to the subject's head, creating an imposed mismatch between vision and proprioception on top of any natural mismatches. Realignment occurred quickly but was incomplete. We found more realignment to imposed mismatches than to natural mismatches. We propose that this difference is related to the way in which the visual information changed when subjects entered the experiment: the imposed mismatches were different from the mismatch in daily life, so alignment started from scratch, whereas the natural mismatches were not imposed by the experimenter, so subjects are likely to have entered the experiment partly aligned.

  9. Oxidative mutagenesis, mismatch repair, and aging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Amy M; Turker, Mitchell S

    2005-03-02

    A PubMed search for the term "oxidative stress" yields over 29,000 articles published on the subject over the past 10 years; more than 2000 of these articles also include the term "aging" in their title or abstract. Many theories of aging predict causal roles for oxidative stress in the myriad of pathological changes that occur as a function of age, including an increasing propensity to develop cancer. A possible link between aging and cancer is the induction and accumulation of somatic mutations caused by oxidative stress. This Review focuses on small mutational events that are induced by oxidative stress and the role of mismatch repair (MMR) in preventing their formation. It also discusses a possible inhibitory effect of oxidative stress on MMR. We speculate that a synergistic interaction between oxidative damage to DNA and reduced MMR levels will, in part, account for an accumulation of small mutational events, and hence cancer, with aging.

  10. Transplant size mismatch in restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Asvin M; Mulvihill, Michael S; Englum, Brian R; Speicher, Paul J; Gulack, Brian C; Osho, Asishana A; Yerokun, Babatunde A; Snyder, Laurie R; Davis, Duane; Hartwig, Matthew G

    2017-04-01

    To maximize the benefit of lung transplantation, the effect of size mismatch on survival in lung transplant recipients with restrictive lung disease (RLD) was examined. All single and bilateral RLD lung transplants from 1987 to 2011 in the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Database were identified. Donor predicted total lung capacity (pTLC):Recipient pTLC ratio (pTLCr) quantified mismatch. pTLCr was segregated into five strata. A Cox proportional hazards model evaluated the association of pTLCr with mortality hazard. To identify a critical pTLCr, a Cox model using a restricted cubic spline for pTLCr was used. A total of 6656 transplants for RLD were identified. Median pTLCr for single orthotopic lung transplant (SOLT) and bilateral orthotopic lung transplant (BOLT) was 1.0 (0.69-1.47) and 0.98 (0.66-1.45). Examination of pTLCr as a categorical variable revealed that undersizing (pTLCr <0.8) for SOLT and moderate oversizing (pTLCr = 1.1-1.2) for SOLT and BOLT had a harmful survival effect [for SOLT pTLC <0.8: HR 1.711 (95% CI 1.146-2.557), P = 0.01 and for BOLT pTLC 1.1-1.2: HR 1.717 (95% CI 1.112-2.651), P = 0.02]. Spline analysis revealed significant changes in SOLT mortality by variation of pTLCr between 0.8-0.9 and 1.1-1.2. RLD patients undergoing SOLT are susceptible to detriments of an undersized lung. RLD patients undergoing BOLT have higher risk of mortality when pTLCr falls between 1.1 and 1.2. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  11. Comparison of Arterial Spin Labeling and Bolus Perfusion-Weighted Imaging for Detecting Mismatch in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zaharchuk, Greg; El Mogy, Ibraheem S.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Albers, Gregory W.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) – diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch paradigm is widely used in stroke imaging studies. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an alternative perfusion method that does not require contrast. This study compares the agreement of ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch classification in stroke patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective study drawn from all 1.5T MRI studies performed in 2010 at a single institution. Inclusion criteria were: symptom onset<5 days, DWI lesion>10 ml, acquisition of both PWI and ASL. DWI and PWI-Tmax>6 sec lesion volumes were determined using automated software. Patients were classified into reperfused, matched, or mismatch groups. Two radiologists classified ASL-DWI qualitatively into the same categories, blinded to DWI-PWI. Agreement between both individual readers and methods was assessed. RESULTS 51 studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven cases were excluded (1 due to PWI susceptibility artifact, 2 due to motion, and 4 due to severe ASL borderzone sign), resulting in 44 studies for comparison. Inter-rater agreement for ASL–DWI mismatch status was high (κ =0.92, 95% CI 0.80–1.00). ASL-DWI and PWI-DWI mismatch categories agreed in 25/44 cases (57%). In the 16 of 19 discrepant cases (84%), ASL overestimated the PWI lesion size. In 34/44 cases (77%), they agreed regarding the presence of mismatch versus no mismatch. CONCLUSION Mismatch classification based on ASL and PWI agree frequently but not perfectly. ASL tends to overestimate the PWI-Tmax lesion volume. Improved ASL methodologies and/or higher field strength are necessary before ASL can be recommended for routine use in acute stroke. PMID:22539548

  12. Phenological mismatch and the effectiveness of assisted gene flow.

    PubMed

    Wadgymar, Susana M; Weis, Arthur E

    2017-06-01

    The persistence of narrowly adapted species under climate change will depend on their ability to migrate apace with their historical climatic envelope or to adapt in place to maintain fitness. This second path to persistence can only occur if there is sufficient genetic variance for response to new selection regimes. Inadequate levels of genetic variation can be remedied through assisted gene flow (AGF), that is the intentional introduction of individuals genetically adapted to localities with historic climates similar to the current or future climate experienced by the resident population. However, the timing of reproduction is frequently adapted to local conditions. Phenological mismatch between residents and migrants can reduce resident × migrant mating frequencies, slowing the introgression of migrant alleles into the resident genetic background and impeding evolutionary rescue efforts. Focusing on plants, we devised a method to estimate the frequency of resident × migrant matings based on flowering schedules and applied it in an experiment that mimicked the first generation of an AGF program with Chamaecrista fasciculata, a prairie annual, under current and expected future temperature regimes. Phenological mismatch reduced the potential for resident × migrant matings by 40-90%, regardless of thermal treatment. The most successful migrant sires were the most resident like in their flowering time, further biasing the genetic admixture between resident and migrant populations. Other loci contributing to local adaptation-heat-tolerance genes, for instance-may be in linkage disequilibrium with phenology when residents and migrants are combined into a single mating pool. Thus, introgression of potentially adaptive migrant alleles into the resident genetic background is slowed when selection acts against migrant phenology. Successful AGF programs may require sustained high immigration rates or preliminary breeding programs when phenologically matched migrant

  13. Mechanisms in E. coli and Human Mismatch Repair (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Modrich, Paul

    2016-07-18

    DNA molecules are not completely stable, they are subject to chemical or photochemical damage and errors that occur during DNA replication resulting in mismatched base pairs. Through mechanistic studies Paul Modrich showed how replication errors are corrected by strand-directed mismatch repair in Escherichia coli and human cells.

  14. Speaking Self-Assessment: Mismatches between Learners' and Teachers' Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaii, Esmat; Taghaddomi, Shahin; Pashmforoosh, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual (mis)matches between teachers and learners are said to affect learning success or failure. Self-assessment, as a formative assessment tool, may, inter alia, be considered a means to minimize such mismatches. Therefore, the present study investigated the extent to which learners' assessment of their own speaking performance, before and…

  15. Educational Mismatch of Graduates: A Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betti, Gianni; D'Agostino, Antonella; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to measure the educational mismatch, seen as a problem of overeducation, using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Educational mismatch can be difficult to measure because many factors can converge to its definition and the traditional unidimensional indicators presented in literature can offer a restricted view of…

  16. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5′-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  17. Speaking Self-Assessment: Mismatches between Learners' and Teachers' Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaii, Esmat; Taghaddomi, Shahin; Pashmforoosh, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual (mis)matches between teachers and learners are said to affect learning success or failure. Self-assessment, as a formative assessment tool, may, inter alia, be considered a means to minimize such mismatches. Therefore, the present study investigated the extent to which learners' assessment of their own speaking performance, before and…

  18. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  19. Educational Mismatch of Graduates: A Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betti, Gianni; D'Agostino, Antonella; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to measure the educational mismatch, seen as a problem of overeducation, using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Educational mismatch can be difficult to measure because many factors can converge to its definition and the traditional unidimensional indicators presented in literature can offer a restricted view of…

  20. Mismatch Repair Proteins Are Activators of Toxic Responses to Chromium-DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Mindy; Quievryn, George; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal that causes the formation of DNA phosphate-based adducts. Cr-DNA adducts are genotoxic in human cells, although they do not block replication in vitro. Here, we report that induction of cytotoxicity in Cr(VI)-treated human colon cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts requires the presence of all major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Cr-DNA adducts lost their ability to block replication of Cr-modified plasmids in human colon cells lacking MLH1 protein. The presence of functional mismatch repair caused induction of p53-independent apoptosis associated with activation of caspases 2 and 7. Processing of Cr-DNA damage by mismatch repair resulted in the extensive formation of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase, indicating generation of double-stranded breaks as secondary toxic lesions. Induction of γ-H2AX foci was observed at 6 to 12 h postexposure, which was followed by activation of apoptosis in the absence of significant G2 arrest. Our results demonstrate that mismatch repair system triggers toxic responses to Cr-DNA backbone modifications through stress mechanisms that are significantly different from those for other forms of DNA damage. Selection for Cr(VI) resistant, MMR-deficient cells may explain the very high frequency of lung cancers with microsatellite instability among chromate workers. PMID:15831465

  1. Novel Rx IQ mismatch compensation considering laser phase noise for CO-OFDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiurong; Ding, Zhaocai; Li, Kun; Wang, Xiao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel compensation scheme for receiver (Rx) in-phase/quadrature (IQ) mismatch is proposed in coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) system in the presence of laser phase noise. In this scheme, laser phase noise and channel distortion were combined as a new channel transfer factor, the IQ mismatch factor and initial channel transfer factor can be estimated independently based on the relationship of IQ mismatch factors. And the channel transfer factor can be updated on a symbol-by-symbol basis which retrieves an estimation of the phase noise value by extracting and averaging the phase drift of all OFDM sub-channels. Numerical results indicate that when the phase and amplitude mismatch are 10° and 2 dB respectively, a 1.6 dB optical signal-to noise ratio is improved at laser linewidth of 60 kHz. Furthermore, the complexity of the proposed method is analyzed in terms of the number of required complex multiplications per bit.

  2. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-01-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  3. PD-1 Blockade in Tumors with Mismatch-Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Le, D.T.; Uram, J.N.; Wang, H.; Bartlett, B.R.; Kemberling, H.; Eyring, A.D.; Skora, A.D.; Luber, B.S.; Azad, N.S.; Laheru, D.; Biedrzycki, B.; Donehower, R.C.; Zaheer, A.; Fisher, G.A.; Crocenzi, T.S.; Lee, J.J.; Duffy, S.M.; Goldberg, R.M.; de la Chapelle, A.; Koshiji, M.; Bhaijee, F.; Huebner, T.; Hruban, R.H.; Wood, L.D.; Cuka, N.; Pardoll, D.M.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K.W.; Zhou, S.; Cornish, T.C.; Taube, J.M.; Anders, R.A.; Eshleman, J.R.; Vogelstein, B.; Diaz, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations have the potential to encode “non-self” immunogenic antigens. We hypothesized that tumors with a large number of somatic mutations due to mismatch-repair defects may be susceptible to immune checkpoint blockade. METHODS We conducted a phase 2 study to evaluate the clinical activity of pembrolizumab, an anti–programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, in 41 patients with progressive metastatic carcinoma with or without mismatch-repair deficiency. Pembrolizumab was administered intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 14 days in patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers, patients with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers, and patients with mismatch repair–deficient cancers that were not colorectal. The coprimary end points were the immune-related objective response rate and the 20-week immune-related progression-free survival rate. RESULTS The immune-related objective response rate and immune-related progression-free survival rate were 40% (4 of 10 patients) and 78% (7 of 9 patients), respectively, for mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers and 0% (0 of 18 patients) and 11% (2 of 18 patients) for mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were not reached in the cohort with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer but were 2.2 and 5.0 months, respectively, in the cohort with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancer (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.10 [P<0.001], and hazard ratio for death, 0.22 [P = 0.05]). Patients with mismatch repair–deficient noncolorectal cancer had responses similar to those of patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer (immune-related objective response rate, 71% [5 of 7 patients]; immune-related progression-free survival rate, 67% [4 of 6 patients]). Whole-exome sequencing revealed a mean of 1782 somatic mutations per tumor in

  4. A periodic table of symmetric tandem mismatches in RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; McDowell, J A; Turner, D H

    1995-03-14

    The stabilities and structures of a series of RNA octamers containing symmetric tandem mismatches were studied by UV melting and imino proton NMR. The free energy increments for tandem mismatch formation are found to depend upon both mismatch sequence and adjacent base pairs. The observed sequence dependence of tandem mismatch stability is UGGU > GUUG > GAAG > or = AGGA > UUUU > CAAC > or = CUUC approximately UCCU approximately CCCC approximately ACCA approximately AAAA, and the closing base pair dependence is 5'G3'C > 5'C3'G > 5'U3'A approximately 5'A3'U. These results differ from expectations based on models used in RNA folding algorithms and from the sequence dependence observed for folding of RNA hairpins. Imino proton NMR results indicate the sequence dependence is partially due to hydrogen bonding within mismatches.

  5. Determinants of DNA mismatch recognition within the polymerase domain of the Klenow fragment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elizabeth H Z; Bailey, Michael F; van der Schans, Edwin J C; Joyce, Catherine M; Millar, David P

    2002-01-22

    The Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I catalyzes template-directed synthesis of DNA and uses a separate 3'-5' exonuclease activity to edit misincorporated bases. The polymerase and exonuclease activities are contained in separate structural domains. In this study, nine Klenow fragment derivatives containing mutations within the polymerase domain were examined for their interaction with model primer-template duplexes. The partitioning of the DNA primer terminus between the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease active sites of the mutant proteins was assessed by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, utilizing a dansyl fluorophore attached to the DNA. Mutation of N845 or R668 disrupted favorable interactions between the Klenow fragment and a duplex containing a matched terminal base pair but had little effect when the terminus was mismatched. Thus, N845 and R668 are required for recognition of correct terminal base pairs in the DNA substrate. Mutation of N675, R835, R836, or R841 resulted in tighter polymerase site binding of DNA, suggesting that the side chains of these residues induce strain in the DNA and/or protein backbone. A double mutant (N675A/R841A) showed an even greater polymerase site partitioning than was displayed by either single mutation, indicating that such strain is additive. In both groups of mutant proteins, the ability to discriminate between duplexes containing matched or mismatched base pairs was impaired. In contrast, mutation of K758 or Q849 had no effect on partitioning relative to wild type, regardless of DNA mismatch character. These results demonstrate that DNA mismatch recognition is dependent on specific amino acid residues within the polymerase domain and is not governed solely by thermodynamic differences between correct and mismatched base pairs. Moreover, this study suggests a mechanism whereby the Klenow fragment is able to recognize polymerase errors following a misincorporation event, leading to their eventual

  6. Does ergonomic mismatch at school impact pain in school children?

    PubMed

    Brewer, J M; Davis, K G; Dunning, K K; Succop, P A

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in school-aged children is highly prevalent. While there are many potential factors relating to this discomfort, one unexplored factor is the ergonomic mismatch. The objective of this study was to determine whether the degree of mismatch between the body dimensions and the classroom furniture was associated with body discomfort. One hundred and thirty-nine children in a Midwestern U.S. school district participated in the study where demographic information, anthropometric measurements, self-reported regional body discomfort, and furniture measurements were collected. The results indicate an extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch. Contrary to what was hypothesized, the ergonomic mismatch was not associated with body discomfort. The lack of association may have been a result of the extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch as well as potential adaptations by the students. Although almost every student was found to not fit their desk and chairs, ergonomic mismatch had limited impact on the body discomfort. It appears that other factors such as backpack weight and time carrying may contribute more to the discomfort of students. However, caution is stress with regard to dismissing ergonomic mismatch factor as a potential risk factor since the extremely high prevalence may have washed out any effect.

  7. Mismatch negativity in socially withdrawn children.

    PubMed

    Bar-Haim, Yair; Marshall, Peter J; Fox, Nathan A; Schorr, Efrat A; Gordon-Salant, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    Individual differences in auditory processing have been associated with social withdrawal, introversion, and other forms of dysfunction in social engagement. The goal of this study was to investigate the characteristics of an electrophysiologic response that is seen to index early cortical auditory processing (mismatch negativity, MMN) among socially withdrawn and more sociable control children. Auditory event-related potentials to standard and deviant tone stimuli were computed for 23 socially withdrawn children and 22 control subjects. We calculated MMN difference waveforms for frontal, central, and parietal electrode sites. Socially withdrawn children had smaller MMN amplitude and longer MMN latencies compared with more sociable control children. The findings point to the involvement of individual differences in early cortical auditory processing in childhood social withdrawal. Reduced MMN amplitude and delayed latency may index a component of social withdrawal seen in socially withdrawn children and in depressed and schizophrenic patients. The existence of a secondary MMN generator in the frontal cortex may provide a link between the hypothesized frontal lobe involvement in childhood social withdrawal, schizophrenia, and depression and the MMN reductions seen in these conditions.

  8. The effects of phenological mismatches on demography

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Høye, Toke Thomas; Inouye, David W.; Post, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is altering the phenology of species across the world, but what are the consequences of these phenological changes for the demography and population dynamics of species? Time-sensitive relationships, such as migration, breeding and predation, may be disrupted or altered, which may in turn alter the rates of reproduction and survival, leading some populations to decline and others to increase in abundance. However, finding evidence for disrupted relationships, or lack thereof, and their demographic effects, is difficult because the necessary detailed observational data are rare. Moreover, we do not know how sensitive species will generally be to phenological mismatches when they occur. Existing long-term studies provide preliminary data for analysing the phenology and demography of species in several locations. In many instances, though, observational protocols may need to be optimized to characterize timing-based multi-trophic interactions. As a basis for future research, we outline some of the key questions and approaches to improving our understanding of the relationships among phenology, demography and climate in a multi-trophic context. There are many challenges associated with this line of research, not the least of which is the need for detailed, long-term data on many organisms in a single system. However, we identify key questions that can be addressed with data that already exist and propose approaches that could guide future research. PMID:20819811

  9. Determination of sensor oversize for stereo-pair mismatch compensation and image stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Prajit

    2013-03-01

    Stereoscopic cameras consist of two camera modules that in theory are mounted parallel to each other at a fixed distance along a single plane. Practical tolerances in the manufacturing and assembly process can, however, cause mismatches in the relative orientation of the modules. One solution to this problem is to design sensors that image a larger field-of-view than is necessary to meet system specifications. This requires the computation of the sensor oversize needed to compensate for the various types of mismatch. This work presents a mathematical framework to determine these oversize values for mismatch along each of the six degrees of freedom. One module is considered as the reference and the extreme rays of the field-of-view of the second sensor are traced in order to derive equations for the required horizontal and vertical oversize. As a further application, by modeling user hand-shake as the displacement of the sensor from its intended position, these deterministic equations could be used to estimate the sensor oversize required to stabilize images that are captured using cell phones.

  10. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) < or = 0.85 cm2/m2 because of performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) with annular enlargement and only 2 (3.8%) out of 53 patients receiving CEP valves developed PPM. Consequently, the prevalence of PPM was 1.1% in this series. The prevalence of PPM was low in patients over 65 years old with a relatively small body size who received bioprosthetic valves. A pericardial bioprosthesis was considered to be an appropriate valve in older population with regard to avoiding PPM. In patients under 65 years old with a small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  11. Mismatch repair genes in renal cortical neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Baiyee, Daniel; Banner, Barbara

    2006-02-01

    Mutation of human mutL homolog 1 (MLH-1) and human mutS homolog 2 (MSH-2) has been linked with the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome and other carcinomas. Mutations of these genes in renal cell carcinomas were recently described. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of MLH-1 and MSH-2 in renal cortical neoplasms of various histological types by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-eight (n = 38) resected renal tumors were obtained from the surgical pathology files of the UMass Memorial Healthcare, including clear cell carcinomas (CLEARs, n = 20), papillary carcinomas (PAPs, n = 8), chromophobe carcinomas (CHRs, n = 4), and oncocytomas (ONCs, n = 6). Positive immunostaining for MLH-1 and MSH-2 was graded by the number of positive tumor cell nuclei, as follows: 0, negative; 1, up to one third of positive nuclei; 2, one to two thirds positive; and 3, greater than two thirds positive. Loss of MLH-1 or MSH-2 was defined as a tumor with grade 0 or 1, compared with the normal tubules. Normal tubules and intercalated ducts contained cells positive for MLH-1 and MSH-2 in all cases. For both antibodies, positive staining in tumors ranged from grade 1 to 3 in the CLEAR and PAP but was only grade 2 to 3 in the CHR and ONC. Loss of MLH-1 and/or MSH-2 occurred in malignant tumors but not in ONC. Loss of MLH-1 was present in 8 (40%) of 20 CLEARs and 4 (50%) of 8 PAPs, compared with loss of MSH-2 in 4 (20%) of 20 CLEARs and 1 (25%) of 4 CHRs. Our results suggest that loss of mismatch repair genes is involved in the malignant transformation in some renal carcinomas, particularly those derived from the proximal tubules.

  12. Identifying Mismatches in Alignments of Large Anatomical Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songmao; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to propose a model of matching errors for identifying mismatches in alignments of large anatomical ontologies. Methods: Three approaches to identifying mismatches are utilized: 1) lexical, based on the presence of modifiers in the names of the concepts aligned; 2) structural, identifying conflicting relations resulting from the alignment; and 3) semantic, based on disjoint top-level categories across ontologies. Results: 83% of the potential mismatches identified by the HMatch system are identified by at least one of the approaches. Conclusions: Although not a substitute for a careful validation of the matches, these approaches significantly reduce the need for manual validation by effectively characterizing most mismatches. PMID:18693957

  13. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  14. [Moving sound source discrimination in humans (mismatch negativity and psychophysics)].

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, Iu A; Shestopalova, L B

    2010-01-01

    Ability to discriminate the moving sound sources with different dynamic properties was studied in humans. The auditory motion was simulated by introducing variable interaural time differences into the deviant stimuli. The electrophysiological experiment explored mismatch negativity elicited by the abrupt sound shift taken as deviant against gradual sound motion taken as standard. The psychoacoustic procedure revealed that these stimuli were not differentiated behaviorally. Nevertheless, the significant mismatch negativities were obtained. It was also established that the mismatch negativity was not influenced by the direction of sound motion. The results obtained are discussed from the point of view of actual theories of moving sound localization. The findings are in line with the hypothesis that mismatch negativity should not be considered as a direct index of behavioral discrimination accuracy.

  15. Communication in the Home and Classroom: Match or Mismatch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iglesias, Aquiles

    1985-01-01

    The article examines variations in communication of cultural-linguistic minority children at home and in school and describes a communicative match/mismatch model. Implications of educational policy and program development are noted. (CL)

  16. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  17. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction based on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongzhou; Li, Guoqiang; Yang, Ruofu; Yang, Chunping; Ao, Mingwu

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  18. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction base on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongzhou, Dong; Guoqiang, Li; Ruofu, Yang; Chunping, Yang; Mingwu, Ao

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  19. User image mismatch in anaesthesia alarms: a cognitive systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Raymer, Karen E; Bergström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, principles of Cognitive Systems Engineering are used to better understand the human-machine interaction manifesting in the use of anaesthesia alarms. The hypothesis is that the design of the machine incorporates built-in assumptions of the user that are discrepant with the anaesthesiologist's self-assessment, creating 'user image mismatch'. Mismatch was interpreted by focusing on the 'user image' as described from the perspectives of both machine and user. The machine-embedded image was interpreted through document analysis. The user-described image was interpreted through user (anaesthesiologist) interviews. Finally, an analysis was conducted in which the machine-embedded and user-described images were contrasted to identify user image mismatch. It is concluded that analysing user image mismatch expands the focus of attention towards macro-elements in the interaction between man and machine. User image mismatch is interpreted to arise from complexity of algorithm design and incongruity between alarm design and tenets of anaesthesia practice. Cognitive system engineering principles are applied to enhance the understanding of the interaction between anaesthesiologist and alarm. The 'user image' is interpreted and contrasted from the perspectives of machine as well as the user. Apparent machine-user mismatch is explored pertaining to specific design features.

  20. The Effect of Basepair Mismatch on DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, D W Bo; Kim, Harold D

    2016-04-12

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single basepair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage time approach to quantitatively explain the salient features of the observed relationship. We also introduce the concept of splitting probabilities to justify that the concurrent model can be simplified into a three-step sequential model in the presence of an invader mismatch. We expect our model to become a powerful tool to design DNA-based reaction schemes with broad functionality.

  1. Deficient mismatch repair: Read all about it (Review)

    PubMed Central

    RICHMAN, SUSAN

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, result in a phenotype called microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in up to 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers. Approximately one quarter of colon cancers with deficient MMR (dMMR) develop as a result of an inherited predisposition syndrome, Lynch syndrome (formerly known as HNPCC). It is essential to identify patients who potentially have Lynch syndrome, as not only they, but also family members, may require screening and monitoring. Diagnostic criteria have been developed, based primarily on Western populations, and several methodologies are available to identify dMMR tumours, including immunohistochemistry and microsatellite testing. These criteria have provided evidence supporting the introduction of reflex testing. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that tests have a limited sensitivity and specificity and may yet be superseded by next generation sequencing. In this review, the limitations of diagnostic criteria are discussed, and current and emerging screening technologies explained. There is now useful evidence supporting the prognostic and predictive value of dMMR status in colorectal tumours, but much less is known about their value in extracolonic tumours, that may also feature in Lynch syndrome. This review assesses current literature relating to dMMR in endometrial, ovarian, gastric and melanoma cancers, which it would seem, may benefit from large-scale clinical trials in order to further close the gap in knowledge between colorectal and extracolonic tumours. PMID:26315971

  2. Who Is Ahead in the Labor Queue? Institutions' and Employers' Perspective on Overeducation, Undereducation, and Horizontal Mismatches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Stasio, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Using vignettes, this study compares employers' assessments of matched and mismatched job applicants in England and the Netherlands. It contributes to the overeducation literature in several ways. First, matching is measured from the perspective of employers, who are better informed about job requirements than employees. Second, overeducated…

  3. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  4. Mismatch repair balances leading and lagging strand DNA replication fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Scott A; Williams, Jessica S; Pursell, Zachary F; Abdulovic-Cui, Amy A; Clark, Alan B; Nick McElhinny, Stephanie A; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    The two DNA strands of the nuclear genome are replicated asymmetrically using three DNA polymerases, α, δ, and ε. Current evidence suggests that DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) is the primary leading strand replicase, whereas Pols α and δ primarily perform lagging strand replication. The fact that these polymerases differ in fidelity and error specificity is interesting in light of the fact that the stability of the nuclear genome depends in part on the ability of mismatch repair (MMR) to correct different mismatches generated in different contexts during replication. Here we provide the first comparison, to our knowledge, of the efficiency of MMR of leading and lagging strand replication errors. We first use the strand-biased ribonucleotide incorporation propensity of a Pol ε mutator variant to confirm that Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then use polymerase-specific error signatures to show that MMR efficiency in vivo strongly depends on the polymerase, the mismatch composition, and the location of the mismatch. An extreme case of variation by location is a T-T mismatch that is refractory to MMR. This mismatch is flanked by an AT-rich triplet repeat sequence that, when interrupted, restores MMR to > 95% efficiency. Thus this natural DNA sequence suppresses MMR, placing a nearby base pair at high risk of mutation due to leading strand replication infidelity. We find that, overall, MMR most efficiently corrects the most potentially deleterious errors (indels) and then the most common substitution mismatches. In combination with earlier studies, the results suggest that significant differences exist in the generation and repair of Pol α, δ, and ε replication errors, but in a generally complementary manner that results in high-fidelity replication of both DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  5. Structure of the EndoMS-DNA Complex as Mismatch Restriction Endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Setsu; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Kouki; Kouyama, Ken-Ichi; Mayanagi, Kouta; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Archaeal NucS nuclease was thought to degrade the single-stranded region of branched DNA, which contains flapped and splayed DNA. However, recent findings indicated that EndoMS, the orthologous enzyme of NucS, specifically cleaves double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing mismatched bases. In this study, we determined the structure of the EndoMS-DNA complex. The complex structure of the EndoMS dimer with dsDNA unexpectedly revealed that the mismatched bases were flipped out into binding sites, and the overall architecture most resembled that of restriction enzymes. The structure of the apo form was similar to the reported structure of Pyrococcus abyssi NucS, indicating that movement of the C-terminal domain from the resting state was required for activity. In addition, a model of the EndoMS-PCNA-DNA complex was preliminarily verified with electron microscopy. The structures strongly support the idea that EndoMS acts in a mismatch repair pathway.

  6. Mismatch novelty exploration training enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity: a tool for cognitive stimulation?

    PubMed

    Aidil-Carvalho, M F; Carmo, A J S; Ribeiro, J A; Cunha-Reis, D

    2017-09-08

    Memory formation relies on experience-dependent changes in synaptic strength such as long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic activity, that in turn depend on previous learning experiences through metaplasticity. Novelty detection is a particularly important cognitive stimulus in this respect, and mismatch novelty has been associated with the activation of the hippocampal CA1 area in human studies. A single exposure a new location of known objects in a familiar environment, a behavioural mismatch novelty paradigm, is known to favour the expression of LTD in hippocampal CA3 to CA1 synaptic transmission in vivo, through short-term metaplasticity. Aiming to shape hippocampal responsiveness to synaptic plasticity phenomena we developed a training program based on exploration of a known environment containing familiar objects everyday presented in a new location. Repeated exposure to this new location of objects for two weeks caused a mild long-lasting decrease in synaptic efficacy. Furthermore, it enhanced both LTP evoked by theta-burst stimulation and depotentiation evoked by low-frequency stimulation of CA3 to CA1 hippocampal synaptic transmission in juvenile rats. This suggests that training programs using these behavioural tasks involving mismatch novelty can be used to reshape brain circuits and promote cognitive recovery in pathologies where LTP/LTD imbalance occurs, such as epilepsy, aging or Dowńs syndrome, an approach that requires further investigation at the behavioural level. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Bubbles and mismatches in DNA melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan

    We obtained the first experimental measurements of the length of the denaturation bubble appearing in the DNA melting transition. This is achieved by working with short oligomers which can form only one bubble per molecule. We used sequences clamped at the ends with GC pairs (strong binding) and possessing AT rich (weaker binding) middle regions in order to have the bubble open in the middle, and sequences with GC pairs at one end and AT pairs at the other end in order to form the bubble at the end. Use a quenching technique to trap the bubble states, we could measure the length of the bubble and the relative weights of the bubble states as a function of temperature. We found that the average bubble size <ℓ> grows for increasing temperature, but reaches a plateau at a length of order B (the length of the AT region). After the plateau, the average bubble length jumps to 1. This jump of the order parameter is a signature of a discontinuous transition, one where the bubble size remains finite up to critical temperature of strand separation. When B increases, the extension of the plateau shrinks. This suggests a continuous transition for a homogenous sequence (e.g. all AT base pairs) in the thermodynamic limit. The presence of the bubble states decreases as B is reduced. By plotting the average statistical weight of the bubble states vs. B, we obtained the first direct measurement of the nucleation size of the bubble. For a bubble flanked by double-stranded regions, the nucleation size is ˜ 3 bases. For bubbles opening at the ends of the molecule there is no nucleation threshold. The measured statistical weights of the bubble states agree with the predictions of the widely used thermodynamic models in the case of unzipping from the ends; however, internal bubble states are not completely described by the model. For the first time we show experimentally that a single mismatch transforms a transition with many intermediates into a nearly two-state transition for

  8. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dinglin; Chen, Danfeng; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  9. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  10. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-30

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  11. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  12. Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses

    SciTech Connect

    Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S.; de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-07-15

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

  13. High fitness costs of climate change-induced camouflage mismatch.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L Scott; Nowak, J Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has created myriad stressors that threaten to cause local extinctions if wild populations fail to adapt to novel conditions. We studied individual and population-level fitness costs of a climate change-induced stressor: camouflage mismatch in seasonally colour molting species confronting decreasing snow cover duration. Based on field measurements of radiocollared snowshoe hares, we found strong selection on coat colour molt phenology, such that animals mismatched with the colour of their background experienced weekly survival decreases up to 7%. In the absence of adaptive response, we show that these mortality costs would result in strong population-level declines by the end of the century. However, natural selection acting on wide individual variation in molt phenology might enable evolutionary adaptation to camouflage mismatch. We conclude that evolutionary rescue will be critical for hares and other colour molting species to keep up with climate change. © 2016 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair-Induced Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Marinus, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli dam mutants are sensitized to the cytotoxic action of base analogs, cisplatin and N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), while their mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient derivatives are tolerant to these agents. We showed previously, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, that MMR-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs) are produced by cisplatin in dam recB (Ts) cells at the non-permissive temperature. We demonstrate here that the majority of these DSBs require DNA replication for their formation, consistent with a model in which replication forks collapse at nicks or gaps formed during MMR. DSBs were also detected in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG in a dose- and MMR-dependent manner. In contrast to cisplatin, the formation of these DSBs was not affected by DNA replication and it is proposed that two separate mechanisms result in DSB formation. Replication-independent DSBs arise from overlapping base excision and MMR repair tracts on complementary strands and constitute the majority of detectable DSBs in dam recB(Ts) ada ogt cells exposed to MNNG. Replication-dependent DSBs result from replication fork collapse at O6-meG base pairs undergoing MMR futile cycling and are more likely to contribute to cytotoxicity. This model is consistent with the observation that fast-growing dam recB (Ts) ada ogt cells, which have more chromosome replication origins, are more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of MNNG than the same cells growing slowly. PMID:17827074

  16. Thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Miller, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) for advanced gas turbine blades have been under intensive development during the last several years. This investigation is intended to achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria TBCs, involving a nickle-chromium-aluminum bond coat. The near term objectives are to study the stress states in a relatively simple model TBC subjected to steady state thermal loading. The resulting thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation have been primary targets for the study. The finite element approach and the effects of thermal mismatch and oxidation are described. A proposed mechanism for oxidation induced coating failure is also presented.

  17. Teaching Counselling in Universities: Match or Mismatch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Mary; Woolfe, Ray

    1997-01-01

    Raises questions about the match between the culture of counseling and the culture of universities, with a particular emphasis on traditional university styles of pedagogy and the learning requirements of trainee counselors. Drawing on Kolb's model of experiential learning, examines issues relating to teaching methods and assessment procedures.…

  18. Approaches for Language Identification in Mismatched Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-08

    Hereafter, we will refer to the UBM/T-matrix training and WC/TMs training stages as the front- end and back - end , respectively, as indicated in...the back - end with the specified group of training data and leaves the front- end untouched (CTS-trained). This method is particularly attractive...because the back - end can generally be trained relatively quickly, but requires labeled data. 2) Front-to- Back : this approach only retrains the front

  19. Roles for mismatch repair family proteins in promoting meiotic crossing over

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Carol M.; Alani, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) family complexes Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 act with Exo1 and Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 in a meiotic double strand break repair pathway that results in the asymmetric cleavage of double Holliday junctions (dHJ) to form crossovers. This review discusses how meiotic roles for Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 do not fit paradigms established for post-replicative MMR. We also outline models used to explain how these factors promote the formation of meiotic crossovers required for the accurate segregation of chromosome homologs during the Meiosis I division. PMID:26686657

  20. DNA Mismatch Repair Status Predicts Need for Future Colorectal Surgery for Metachronous Neoplasms in Young Individuals Undergoing Colorectal Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Melyssa; Holter, Spring; Semotiuk, Kara; Winter, Laura; Pollett, Aaron; Gallinger, Steven; Cohen, Zane; Gryfe, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of colorectal cancer in young patients involves both management of the incident cancer and consideration of the possibility of Lynch syndrome and the development of metachronous colorectal cancers. This study aims to assess the prognostic role of DNA mismatch repair deficiency and extended colorectal resection for metachronous colorectal neoplasia risk in young patients with colorectal cancer. This is a retrospective review of 285 patients identified in our GI cancer registry with colorectal cancer diagnosed at 35 years or younger in the absence of polyposis. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we assessed the prognostic role of mismatch repair deficiency and standard clinicopathologic characteristics, including the extent of resection, on the rate of developing metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in biospecimens from 44% of patients and was significantly associated with an increased risk for metachronous colorectal neoplasia requiring resection (10-year cumulative risk, 13.5% ± 4.2%) compared with 56% of patients with mismatch repair-intact colorectal cancer (10-year cumulative risk, 5.8% ± 3.3%; p = 0.011). In multivariate analysis, mismatch repair deficiency was associated with a HR of 3.65 (95% CI, 1.44-9.21; p = 0.006) for metachronous colorectal neoplasia, whereas extended resection with ileorectal or ileosigmoid anastomosis significantly decreased the risk of metachronous colorectal neoplasia (HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.05-0.90; p = 0.036). This study had a retrospective design, and, therefore, recommendations for colorectal cancer surgery and screening were not fully standardized. Quality of life after colorectal cancer surgery was not assessed. Young patients with colorectal cancer with molecular hallmarks of Lynch syndrome were at significantly higher risk for the development of subsequent colorectal neoplasia. This risk was significantly reduced in those who underwent extended

  1. Discriminating DNA mismatches by electrochemical and gravimetric techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazouz, Zouhour; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Ommezine, Asma; Rebhi, Lamia; Yaakoubi, Nourdin; Kalfat, Rafik; Othmane, Ali

    2013-10-15

    A silicon nitride functionalized electrode and a 104 MHz lithium tantalate (LiTaO₃) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor have been used to investigate target-probe recognition processes. Electrochemical and gravimetric measurements have been considered to monitor hybridization of single base mismatch (SBM) in synthetic oligonucleotides and single-nucleotide polymorphisms ApoE in real clinical genotypes. Obvious discrimination of SBM in nucleotides has been shown by both gravimetric and electrochemical techniques, without labeling nor amplification. Investigations on mismatches nature and position have also been considered. For guanine-adenine (GA), guanine-thymine (GT) and guanine-guanine (GG) mismatches, the sensors responses present a dependence upon positions. Considering the capacitance variations and hybridization rates, results showed that gravimetric transduction is more sensitive than electrochemical one. Moreover, the highest value of GT hybridization rate (in the middle position) was found in accordance with the nearest-neighbor model, where the considered configuration appears as the most thermodynamically stable. For the real samples, where the electrochemical transduction, by combining capacitance and flat-band potential measurements, were found more sensitive, the results show that the realized sensor permits an unambiguous discrimination of recognition between fully complementary, non-complementary and single base mismatched targets, and even between the combination of differently matched strands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Skills Mismatch among University Graduates in the Nigeria Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitan, Oluyomi S.; Adedeji, S. O.

    2012-01-01

    University graduates in Nigeria have been reported to be poorly prepared for work in recent years. This has implications on the relevance of university education, the employability and productivity of university graduates. One of the reasons suggested for this condition by previous studies was skill mismatch--a situation where there is a disparity…

  3. Computing highly specific and mismatch tolerant oligomers efficiently.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Morishita, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes of a variety of species and the growing databases containing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and complementary DNAs (cDNAs) facilitate the design of highly specific oligomers for use as genomic markers, PCR primers, or DNA oligo microarrays. The first step in evaluating the specificity of short oligomers of about twenty units in length is to determine the frequencies at which the oligomers occur. However, for oligomers longer than about fifty units this is not efficient, as they usually have a frequency of only 1. A more suitable procedure is to consider the mismatch tolerance of an oligomer, that is, the minimum number of mismatches that allows a given oligomer to match a sub-sequence other than the target sequence anywhere in the genome or the EST database. However, calculating the exact value of mismatch tolerance is computationally costly and impractical. Therefore, we studied the problem of checking whether an oligomer meets the constraint that its mismatch tolerance is no less than a given threshold. Here, we present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm solution that utilizes suffix and height arrays. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this algorithm by efficiently computing a dense list of oligo-markers applicable to the human genome. Experimental results show that the algorithm runs faster than well-known Abrahamson's algorithm by orders of magnitude and is able to enumerate 63% to approximately 79% of qualified oligomers.

  4. Mismatch Negativity in Children with Autism and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Michelle A.; Gomes, Hilary; Gravel, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism are often characterized as having abnormalities in auditory processing. This study examined automatic and active processing of simple auditory stimuli in children using a component of event related potentials, the mismatch negativity (MMN). Amplitude of MMN in children with autism was significantly smaller than in children…

  5. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT. PMID:27022317

  6. Educational Mismatch and Spatial Flexibility in Italian Local Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, Giuseppe; Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent literature, this paper highlights the relevance of spatial mobility as an explanatory factor of the individual risk of job-education mismatch. To investigate this causal link, we use individual information about daily home-to-work commuting time and choices to relocate in a different local area to get a job. Our model takes…

  7. A mishmash of methods for mitigating the model mismatch mess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, Andrew D.; Pevný, Tomáš

    2014-02-01

    The model mismatch problem occurs in steganalysis when a binary classifier is trained on objects from one cover source and tested on another: an example of domain adaptation. It is highly realistic because a steganalyst would rarely have access to much or any training data from their opponent, and its consequences can be devastating to classifier accuracy. This paper presents an in-depth study of one particular instance of model mismatch, in a set of images from Flickr using one fixed steganography and steganalysis method, attempting to separate different effects of mismatch in feature space and find methods of mitigation where possible. We also propose new benchmarks for accuracy, which are more appropriate than mean error rates when there are multiple actors and multiple images, and consider the case of 3-valued detectors which also output `don't know'. This pilot study demonstrates that some simple feature-centering and ensemble methods can reduce the mismatch penalty considerably, but not completely remove it.

  8. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  9. Job Sprawl, Spatial Mismatch, and Black Employment Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between job sprawl and the spatial mismatch between blacks and jobs. Using data from a variety of sources, including the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census and U.S. Department of Commerce's ZIP Code Business Patterns, I control extensively for metropolitan area characteristics and other factors. In addition, I use…

  10. Closed-form mismatched filter synthesis for complementary range response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The combined response of a pair of complementary waveforms has zero range sidelobes and could significantly improve synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image quality by reducing multiplicative noise. However, complementary waveforms may not be practical for SAR imaging for reasons such as Doppler tolerance and unimodular waveform constraints. By using mismatched filters to achieve either a complementary or near-complementary response, two or more practical waveforms could be employed and SAR image quality improved. A closed-form approach was developed that calculates mismatched filters so that the coherent sum of the range responses from each waveform and its corresponding mismatched filter is complementary. A second approach reduced sidelobes while retaining a frequency response close to the waveforms' frequency responses. Images processed using X-band radar data collected under the Air Force Gotcha program exhibited improvements in image quality over those processed using matched filters. The closed-form approach is presented for both complementary and reduced-sidelobe mismatched filters and image quality is quantified. The approach developed in this work offers improved image quality, is suitable for near real-time operation, and is independent of the waveforms.

  11. Minority Students and Research Universities: How to Overcome the "Mismatch"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A controversial theory much in the news lately claims that affirmative action is often unfair to the very students it is intended to help. Called the "mismatch" theory, it suggests that underrepresented minority students are more likely to leave science, math, and engineering when, because of affirmative action, they attend colleges for which they…

  12. Phase mismatched optical parametric generation in semiconductor magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Swati; Ghosh, S.; Jain, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Optical parametric generation involves the interaction of pump, signal, and idler waves satisfying law of conservation of energy. Phase mismatch parameter plays important role for the spatial distribution of the field along the medium. In this paper instead of exactly matching wave vector, a small mismatch is admitted with a degree of phase velocity mismatch between these waves. Hence the medium must possess certain finite coherence length. This wave mixing process is well explained by coupled mode theory and one dimensional hydrodynamic model. Based on this scheme, expressions for threshold pump field and transmitted intensity have been derived. It is observed that the threshold pump intensity and transmitted intensity can be manipulated by varying doping concentration and magnetic field under phase mismatched condition. A compound semiconductor crystal of n-InSb is assumed to be shined at 77 K by a 10.6μm CO2 laser with photon energy well below band gap energy of the crystal, so that only free charge carrier influence the optical properties of the medium for the I.R. parametric generation in a semiconductor plasma medium. Favorable parameters were explored to incite the said process keeping in mind the cost effectiveness and conversion efficiency of the process.

  13. Educational Mismatch and Spatial Flexibility in Italian Local Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, Giuseppe; Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent literature, this paper highlights the relevance of spatial mobility as an explanatory factor of the individual risk of job-education mismatch. To investigate this causal link, we use individual information about daily home-to-work commuting time and choices to relocate in a different local area to get a job. Our model takes…

  14. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  15. Current mismatch violation in concentrator multijunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvarts, Maxim Z.; Filimonov, Evgeniy D.; Kozhukhovskaia, Svetlana A.; Mintairov, Mikhail A.; Timoshina, Nailya Kh.; Andreev, Viacheslav M.

    2017-09-01

    The work presents an experimental techniques aimed at investigating the subcells photocurrent nonlinear behavior in MJ SC with irradiance increase and the revealing of a possible shift in the current matching between the subcells of the MJ SC at sunlight concentration ratio rise and determining the causes of possible current mismatch.

  16. Coded aperture design in mismatched compressive spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Laura; Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-11-20

    Compressive spectral imaging (CSI) senses a scene by using two-dimensional coded projections such that the number of measurements is far less than that used in spectral scanning-type instruments. An architecture that efficiently implements CSI is the coded aperture snapshot spectral imager (CASSI). A physical limitation of the CASSI is the system resolution, which is determined by the lowest resolution element used in the detector and the coded aperture. Although the final resolution of the system is usually given by the detector, in the CASSI, for instance, the use of a low resolution coded aperture implemented using a digital micromirror device (DMD), which induces the grouping of pixels in superpixels in the detector, is decisive to the final resolution. The mismatch occurs by the differences in the pitch size of the DMD mirrors and focal plane array (FPA) pixels. A traditional solution to this mismatch consists of grouping several pixels in square features, which subutilizes the DMD and the detector resolution and, therefore, reduces the spatial and spectral resolution of the reconstructed spectral images. This paper presents a model for CASSI which admits the mismatch and permits exploiting the maximum resolution of the coding element and the FPA sensor. A super-resolution algorithm and a synthetic coded aperture are developed in order to solve the mismatch. The mathematical models are verified using a real implementation of CASSI. The results of the experiments show a significant gain in spatial and spectral imaging quality over the traditional grouping pixel technique.

  17. Job Sprawl, Spatial Mismatch, and Black Employment Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between job sprawl and the spatial mismatch between blacks and jobs. Using data from a variety of sources, including the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census and U.S. Department of Commerce's ZIP Code Business Patterns, I control extensively for metropolitan area characteristics and other factors. In addition, I use…

  18. DNA mismatch repair: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Peggy

    2012-09-14

    In this issue, Peña-Diaz et al. (2012) describe a pathway for somatic mutation in nonlymphoid cells termed noncanonical DNA mismatch repair, whereby the error-prone translesion polymerase Pol-η substitutes for high-fidelity replicative polymerases to resynthesize excised regions opposite DNA damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Minority Students and Research Universities: How to Overcome the "Mismatch"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A controversial theory much in the news lately claims that affirmative action is often unfair to the very students it is intended to help. Called the "mismatch" theory, it suggests that underrepresented minority students are more likely to leave science, math, and engineering when, because of affirmative action, they attend colleges for which they…

  20. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  1. Unnatural substrates reveal the importance of 8-oxoguanine for in vivo mismatch repair by MutY

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Alison L.; O’Shea, Valerie L.; Kim, Taewoo; Kool, Eric T.; David, Sheila S.

    2009-01-01

    Escherchia coli MutY plays an important role in preventing mutations associated with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (OG) in DNA by excising adenines from OG:A mismatches as the first step of base excision repair. To determine the importance of specific steps in the base pair recognition and base removal process of MutY, we have evaluated the effects of modifications of the OG:A substrate on the kinetics of base removal, mismatch affinity and repair to G:C in an Escherchia coli-based assay. Surprisingly, adenine modification was tolerated in the cellular assay, while modification of OG results in minimal cellular repair. High affinity for the mismatch and efficient base removal require the presence of OG. Taken together, these results suggest that the presence of OG is a critical feature for MutY to locate OG:A mismatches and select the appropriate adenines for excision to initiate repair in vivo prior to replication. PMID:18026095

  2. Alleles of the yeast Pms1 mismatch-repair gene that differentially affect recombination- and replication-related processes.

    PubMed Central

    Welz-Voegele, Caroline; Stone, Jana E; Tran, Phuoc T; Kearney, Hutton M; Liskay, R Michael; Petes, Thomas D; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Mismatch-repair (MMR) systems promote eukaryotic genome stability by removing errors introduced during DNA replication and by inhibiting recombination between nonidentical sequences (spellchecker and antirecombination activities, respectively). Following a common mismatch-recognition step effected by MutS-homologous Msh proteins, homologs of the bacterial MutL ATPase (predominantly the Mlh1p-Pms1p heterodimer in yeast) couple mismatch recognition to the appropriate downstream processing steps. To examine whether the processing steps in the spellchecker and antirecombination pathways might differ, we mutagenized the yeast PMS1 gene and screened for mitotic separation-of-function alleles. Two alleles affecting only the antirecombination function of Pms1p were identified, one of which changed an amino acid within the highly conserved ATPase domain. To more specifically address the role of ATP binding/hydrolysis in MMR-related processes, we examined mutations known to compromise the ATPase activity of Pms1p or Mlh1p with respect to the mitotic spellchecker and antirecombination activities and with respect to the repair of mismatches present in meiotic recombination intermediates. The results of these analyses confirm a differential requirement for the Pms1p ATPase activity in replication vs. recombination processes, while demonstrating that the Mlh1p ATPase activity is important for all examined MMR-related functions. PMID:12454061

  3. US protected lands mismatch biodiversity priorities.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Clinton N; Van Houtan, Kyle S; Pimm, Stuart L; Sexton, Joseph O

    2015-04-21

    Because habitat loss is the main cause of extinction, where and how much society chooses to protect is vital for saving species. The United States is well positioned economically and politically to pursue habitat conservation should it be a societal goal. We assessed the US protected area portfolio with respect to biodiversity in the country. New synthesis maps for terrestrial vertebrates, freshwater fish, and trees permit comparison with protected areas to identify priorities for future conservation investment. Although the total area protected is substantial, its geographic configuration is nearly the opposite of patterns of endemism within the country. Most protected lands are in the West, whereas the vulnerable species are largely in the Southeast. Private land protections are significant, but they are not concentrated where the priorities are. To adequately protect the nation's unique biodiversity, we recommend specific areas deserving additional protection, some of them including public lands, but many others requiring private investment.

  4. US protected lands mismatch biodiversity priorities

    PubMed Central

    Pimm, Stuart L.; Sexton, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    Because habitat loss is the main cause of extinction, where and how much society chooses to protect is vital for saving species. The United States is well positioned economically and politically to pursue habitat conservation should it be a societal goal. We assessed the US protected area portfolio with respect to biodiversity in the country. New synthesis maps for terrestrial vertebrates, freshwater fish, and trees permit comparison with protected areas to identify priorities for future conservation investment. Although the total area protected is substantial, its geographic configuration is nearly the opposite of patterns of endemism within the country. Most protected lands are in the West, whereas the vulnerable species are largely in the Southeast. Private land protections are significant, but they are not concentrated where the priorities are. To adequately protect the nation’s unique biodiversity, we recommend specific areas deserving additional protection, some of them including public lands, but many others requiring private investment. PMID:25847995

  5. Meniscus regeneration by syngeneic, minor mismatched, and major mismatched transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Makiko; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Ozeki, Nobutake; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2014-07-01

    We compared the effect of syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for meniscus regeneration in a rat model. Synovium was harvested from the knee joints of three strains of rats. The anterior half of the medial meniscus in both knees of F344 rats was removed and 5 million synovial MSCs derived from F344 (syngeneic transplantation), Lewis (minor mismatched transplantation), and ACI (major mismatched transplantation) were injected into the knee of the F344 rats. At 4 weeks, the area of the regenerated meniscus in the F344 group was significantly larger than that in the ACI group. Histological score was significantly better in the F344 and Lewis groups than in the ACI group at 8 weeks. DiI labeled cells could be observed in the knee joint in the F344 group, but were hardly detected in the ACI group at 1 week. The number of macrophages and CD8 T cells at synovium around the meniscus defect was significantly lower in the F344 group than in the ACI group at 1 week. Syngeneic and minor mismatched transplantation of synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration better than major mismatched transplantation in a rat meniscectmized model.

  6. Human mismatch repair system balances mutation rates between strands by removing more mismatches from the lagging strand.

    PubMed

    Andrianova, Maria A; Bazykin, Georgii A; Nikolaev, Sergey I; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B

    2017-08-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the main systems maintaining fidelity of replication. Differences in correction of errors produced during replication of the leading and the lagging DNA strands were reported in yeast and in human cancers, but the causes of these differences remain unclear. Here, we analyze data on human cancers with somatic mutations in two of the major DNA polymerases, delta and epsilon, that replicate the genome. We show that these cancers demonstrate a substantial asymmetry of the mutations between the leading and the lagging strands. The direction of this asymmetry is the opposite between cancers with mutated polymerases delta and epsilon, consistent with the role of these polymerases in replication of the lagging and the leading strands in human cells, respectively. Moreover, the direction of strand asymmetry observed in cancers with mutated polymerase delta is similar to that observed in MMR-deficient cancers. Together, these data indicate that polymerase delta (possibly together with polymerase alpha) contributes more mismatches during replication than its leading-strand counterpart, polymerase epsilon; that most of these mismatches are repaired by the MMR system; and that MMR repairs about three times more mismatches produced in cells during lagging strand replication compared with the leading strand. © 2017 Andrianova et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of the specific binding between Ag+ ions and C:C mismatched base pairs in duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2011-02-01

    Metal-mediated base pairs formed by the interaction between metal ions and artificial bases in oligonucleotides have been developed for potential applications in nanotechnology. We recently found that a natural C:C mismatched base pair bound to an Ag(+) ion to generate a novel metal-mediated base pair in duplex DNA. Preparation of the novel C-Ag-C base pair involving natural bases is more convenient than that of metal-mediated base pairs involving artificial bases because time-consuming base synthesis is not required. Here, we examined the thermodynamic properties of the binding between the Ag(+) ion and each of single and double C:C mismatched base pair in duplex DNA by isothermal titration calorimetry. The Ag(+) ion specifically bound to the C:C mismatched base pair at a 1:1 molar ratio with 10(6) M(-1) binding constant, which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion-DNA interactions. The specific binding between the Ag(+) ion and the single C:C mismatched base pair was mainly driven by the positive dehydration entropy change and the negative binding enthalpy change. In the interaction between the Ag(+) ion and each of the consecutive and interrupted double C:C mismatched base pairs, stoichiometric binding at a 1:1 molar ratio was achieved in each step of the first and second Ag(+) binding. The binding affinity for the second Ag(+) binding was similar to that for the first Ag(+) binding. Stoichiometric binding without interference and negative cooperativity may be favorable for aligning multiple Ag(+) ions in duplex DNA for applications of the metal-mediated base pairs in nanotechnology.

  8. Foot-to-shoe mismatch and rates of referral in Special Olympics athletes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David W; Cooper, Kimbal; O'Connor, Rachel; Watanabe, Liane

    2012-01-01

    Improperly fitted shoes are frequently seen in athletes participating in Special Olympics competitions. This foot-to-shoe mismatch may result in deformities as well as discomfort and reduced performance or injuries in competitions. A primary purpose for providing medical screenings is to identify conditions unknown and to promptly refer to an appropriate provider for evaluation and care. This study attempts to determine the prevalence of improperly fitted shoes and the rate of referral for Special Olympics athletes screened at Fit Feet venues. To evaluate the foot-to-shoe mismatch and rate of referral, 4,094 Fit Feet screenings of Special Olympics athletes participating in US competitions in 2005 to 2009 were analyzed. The participants were 58.5% male and 41.5% female, with a median age of 25.6 years. A power analysis and the χ(2) test were used. The athletes voluntarily underwent a foot screening that followed the standardized Special Olympics Fit Feet protocol. The Brannock Device for measuring feet was used to assess proper fit. A proper fit was found in 58.56% of the athletes, with 28.60% wearing shoes too big and 12.84% wearing shoes too small. Unrelated to shoe fit, 20% of the athletes required referrals for professional follow-up based on abnormal clinical findings. There is a significant (41.44%) mismatch of foot to shoe in Special Olympics athletes. The most common mismatch is a shoe too big, with a much smaller number of athletes having shoes too small. Awareness of this foot-to-shoe incompatibility may be useful for the development of shoes better designed for athletes with a foot structure not consistent with conventional shoes. Because 20% of the athletes required a referral for professional follow-up, Fit Feet examinations are important for identifying athletes with conditions that can be more readily evaluated and treated, thus improving the athletes' comfort and performance. Beyond knowing the rate of referral, future studies can determine the

  9. Mismatch Responses to Lexical Tone, Initial Consonant, and Vowel in Mandarin-Speaking Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chia-Ying; Yen, Huei-ling; Yeh, Pei-wen; Lin, Wan-Hsuan; Cheng, Ying-Ying; Tzeng, Yu-Lin; Wu, Hsin-Chi

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates how age, phonological saliency, and deviance size affect the presence of mismatch negativity (MMN) and positive mismatch response (P-MMR). This work measured the auditory mismatch responses to Mandarin lexical tones, initial consonants, and vowels in 4- to 6-year-old preschoolers using the multiple-deviant oddball…

  10. Mismatch repair genes identified using genetic screens in Blm-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ge; Wang, Wei; Bradley, Allan

    2004-06-24

    Phenotype-driven recessive genetic screens in diploid organisms require a strategy to render the mutation homozygous. Although homozygous mutant mice can be generated by breeding, a reliable method to make homozygous mutations in cultured cells has not been available, limiting recessive screens in culture. Cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells provide access to all of the genes required to elaborate the fundamental components and physiological systems of a mammalian cell. Here we have exploited the high rate of mitotic recombination in Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm)-deficient ES cells to generate a genome-wide library of homozygous mutant cells from heterozygous mutations induced with a revertible gene trap retrovirus. We have screened this library for cells with defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), a system that detects and repairs base-base mismatches. We demonstrate the recovery of cells with homozygous mutations in known and novel MMR genes. We identified Dnmt1(ref. 5) as a novel MMR gene and confirmed that Dnmt1-deficient ES cells exhibit micro-satellite instability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the role of Dnmt1 in cancer. The combination of insertional mutagenesis in Blm-deficient ES cells establishes a new approach for phenotype-based recessive genetic screens in ES cells.

  11. Elementary sensory deficits in schizophrenia indexed by impaired visual mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Kinga; Stefanics, Gábor; Marosi, Csilla; Csukly, Gábor

    2015-08-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an automatic brain response to unexpected events. It represents a prediction error (PE) response, reflecting the difference between the sensory input and predictions. While deficits in auditory MMN are well known in schizophrenia, only few studies investigated impairments in predictive visual processing in schizophrenia. These studies used complex stimuli such as motion direction and emotional facial expressions. Here we studied whether automatic predictive processing of elementary features such as orientation is also impaired in schizophrenia. Altogether 28 patients with schizophrenia and 27 healthy controls matched in age, gender, and education participated in the study. EEG was recorded using 128 channels in the two experimental blocks. Using an oddball paradigm, horizontal stripes of Gabor patches were presented as frequent standards and vertical stripes as rare deviants in one block. Stimulus probabilities were swapped in the other block. Mismatch responses were obtained by subtracting responses to standard from those to deviant stimuli. We found significant mismatch responses in healthy controls but not in patients in the prefrontal and occipital-parietal regions in the 90-200ms interval. Furthermore patients showed significantly decreased deviant minus standard difference waveforms relative to controls in the same regions with moderate to large effect sizes. Our findings demonstrate that predictive processing of unattended low-level visual features such as orientation is impaired in schizophrenia. Our results complement reports of sensory deficits found in tasks requiring attentive processing and suggest that deficits are present in automatic visual sensory processes putatively mediated by glutamatergic functioning. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Colorectal cancer intrinsic subtypes predict chemotherapy benefit, deficient mismatch repair and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Roepman, Paul; Schlicker, Andreas; Tabernero, Josep; Majewski, Ian; Tian, Sun; Moreno, Victor; Snel, Mireille H; Chresta, Christine M; Rosenberg, Robert; Nitsche, Ulrich; Macarulla, Teresa; Capella, Gabriel; Salazar, Ramon; Orphanides, George; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bernards, Rene; Simon, Iris M

    2014-01-01

    In most colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, outcome cannot be predicted because tumors with similar clinicopathological features can have differences in disease progression and treatment response. Therefore, a better understanding of the CRC biology is required to identify those patients who will benefit from chemotherapy and to find a more tailored therapy plan for other patients. Based on unsupervised classification of whole genome data from 188 stages I–IV CRC patients, a molecular classification was developed that consist of at least three major intrinsic subtypes (A-, B- and C-type). The subtypes were validated in 543 stages II and III patients and were associated with prognosis and benefit from chemotherapy. The heterogeneity of the intrinsic subtypes is largely based on three biological hallmarks of the tumor: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, deficiency in mismatch repair genes that result in high mutation frequency associated with microsatellite instability and cellular proliferation. A-type tumors, observed in 22% of the patients, have the best prognosis, have frequent BRAF mutations and a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. C-type patients (16%) have the worst outcome, a mesenchymal gene expression phenotype and show no benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Both A-type and B-type tumors have a more proliferative and epithelial phenotype and B-types benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. B-type tumors (62%) show a low overall mutation frequency consistent with the absence of DNA mismatch repair deficiency. Classification based on molecular subtypes made it possible to expand and improve CRC classification beyond standard molecular and immunohistochemical assessment and might help in the future to guide treatment in CRC patients. PMID:23852808

  13. New insights into the mechanism of DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Gloria X.; Schmidt, Tobias T.; Kolodner, Richard D.; Hombauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The genome of all organisms is constantly being challenged by endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage. Errors like base:base mismatches or small insertions and deletions, primarily introduced by DNA polymerases during DNA replication are repaired by an evolutionary conserved DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. The MMR system, together with the DNA replication machinery, promote repair by an excision and resynthesis mechanism during or after DNA replication, increasing replication fidelity by upto-three orders of magnitude. Consequently, inactivation of MMR genes results in elevated mutation rates that can lead to increased cancer susceptibility in humans. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of MMR with a focus on the different MMR protein complexes, their function and structure. We also discuss how recent findings have provided new insights in the spatio-temporal regulation and mechanism of MMR. PMID:25862369

  14. Mismatch repair system proteins in oral benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Silva, Gleyson Kleber do; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2017-04-01

    Different environmental agents may cause DNA mutations by disrupting its double-strand structure; however, even normal DNA polymerase function may synthesize mismatch nucleotide bases, occasionally demonstrating failure in its proofreading activity. To overcome this issue, mismatch repair (MMR) system, a group of proteins specialized in finding mispairing bases and small loops of insertion or deletion, works to avoid the occurrence of mutations that could ultimately lead to innumerous human diseases. In the last decades, the role of MMR proteins in oral carcinogenesis and in the development of other oral cavity neoplasms has grown, but their importance in the pathogenesis and their prognostic potential for patients affected by oral malignancies, especially oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), remain unclear. Therefore, in this manuscript we aimed to review and critically discuss the currently available data on MMR proteins expression in oral potentially malignant lesions, in OSCC, and in other oral neoplasms to better understand their relevance in these lesions.

  15. Effect of resonant-frequency mismatch on attractors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Lai, Choy Heng

    2006-06-01

    Resonant perturbations are effective for harnessing nonlinear oscillators for various applications such as controlling chaos and inducing chaos. Of physical interest is the effect of small frequency mismatch on the attractors of the underlying dynamical systems. By utilizing a prototype of nonlinear oscillators, the periodically forced Duffing oscillator and its variant, we find a phenomenon: resonant-frequency mismatch can result in attractors that are nonchaotic but are apparently strange in the sense that they possess a negative Lyapunov exponent but its information dimension measured using finite numerics assumes a fractional value. We call such attractors pseudo-strange. The transition to pesudo-strange attractors as a system parameter changes can be understood analytically by regarding the system as nonstationary and using the Melnikov function. Our results imply that pseudo-strange attractors are common in nonstationary dynamical systems.

  16. Influence of Hydrophobic Mismatching on Membrane Protein Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The observation of membrane domains in vivo and in vitro has triggered a renewed interest in the size-dependent diffusion of membrane inclusions (e.g., clusters of transmembrane proteins and lipid rafts). Here, we have used coarse-grained membrane simulations to quantify the influence of a hydrophobic mismatch between the inclusion's transmembrane portion and the surrounding lipid bilayer on the diffusive mobility of the inclusion. Our data indicate only slight changes in the mobility (<30%) when altering the hydrophobic mismatch, and the scaling of the diffusion coefficient D is most consistent with previous hydrodynamic predictions, i.e., with the Saffman-Delbruck relation and the edgewise motion of a thin disk in the limit of small and large radii, respectively. PMID:18502792

  17. Influence of hydrophobic mismatching on membrane protein diffusion.

    PubMed

    Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2008-08-01

    The observation of membrane domains in vivo and in vitro has triggered a renewed interest in the size-dependent diffusion of membrane inclusions (e.g., clusters of transmembrane proteins and lipid rafts). Here, we have used coarse-grained membrane simulations to quantify the influence of a hydrophobic mismatch between the inclusion's transmembrane portion and the surrounding lipid bilayer on the diffusive mobility of the inclusion. Our data indicate only slight changes in the mobility (<30%) when altering the hydrophobic mismatch, and the scaling of the diffusion coefficient D is most consistent with previous hydrodynamic predictions, i.e., with the Saffman-Delbruck relation and the edgewise motion of a thin disk in the limit of small and large radii, respectively.

  18. Does b1000-b0 Mismatch Challenge Diffusion-Weighted Imaging-Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Mismatch in Stroke?

    PubMed

    Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Berner, Lise-Prune; Haesebaert, Julie; Chabrol, Aurélie; Cho, Tae-Hee; Derex, Laurent; Hermier, Marc; Louis-Tisserand, Guy; Chamard, Leila; Klaerke Mikkelsen, Irene; Ribe, Lars; Østergaard, Leif; Hjort, Niels; Pedraza, Salvador; Thomalla, Götz; Baron, Jean-Claude; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Berthèzene, Yves

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to explore whether the mismatch in lesion visibility between b1000 and b0 images is an alternative to mismatch between diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging as a surrogate marker of stroke age. We analyzed patients from the European multicenter I-KNOW database. Independent readers assessed the visibility of ischemic lesions of the anterior circulation on b0 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging images. The signal-intensity ratio for b0 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging images was also measured from the segmented stroke lesion volume on b1000 images. This study included 112 patients (68 men; mean age, 67.4 years) with stroke onset within (n=85) or longer than (n=27) 4.5 hours. b1000-b0 mismatch identified patients within 4.5 hours of stroke onset with moderate sensitivity (72.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63.5-82.4) and specificity (70.4%; 95% CI, 53.2-87.6), high positive predictive value (88.6%; 95% CI, 81.1-96.0), and low negative predictive value (45.2%; 95% CI, 30.2-60.3). Global comparison of b1000-b0 mismatch with diffusion-weighted imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging mismatch (considered the imaging gold standard) indicated high sensitivity (85.9%; 95% CI, 78.2-93.6), specificity (91.2%; 95% CI, 76.3-98.1), and positive predictive value (96.7%; 95% CI, 88.0-99.1) and moderate negative predictive value (73.8%; 95% CI, 60.5-87.1) of this new approach. b0 signal-intensity ratio (r=0.251; 95% CI, 0.069-0.417; P=0.008) was significantly although weakly correlated with delay between stroke onset and magnetic resonance imaging. b1000-b0 mismatch may identify patients with ischemic stroke of the within 4.5 hours of onset with high positive predictive value, perhaps constituting an alternative imaging tissue clock. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Effect of Fuel System Impedance Mismatch on Combustion Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Robey, E.H.

    2008-01-01

    Combustion dynamics are a challenging problem in the design and operation of premixed gas turbine combustors. In premixed combustors, pressure oscillations created by the flame dynamic response can lead to damage. These dynamics are typically controlled by designing the combustor to achieve a stable operation for planned conditions, but dynamics may still occur with minor changes in ambient operating conditions or fuel composition. In these situations, pilot flames or adjustment to fuel flow splits can be used to stabilize the combustor, but often with a compromise in emission performance. As an alternative to purely passive design changes, prior studies have demonstrated that adjustment to the fuel system impedance can be used to stabilize combustion. Prior studies have considered just the response of an individual fuel injector and combustor. However, in practical combustion systems, multiple fuel injectors are used. In this situation, individual injector impedance can be modified to produce a different dynamic response from individual flames. The resulting impedance mismatch prevents all injectors from strongly coupling to the same acoustic mode. In principle, this mismatch should reduce the amplitude of dynamics and may expand the operating margin for stable combustion conditions. In this paper, a 30 kW laboratory combustor with two premixed fuel injectors is used to study the effect of impedance mismatch on combustion stability. The two fuel injectors are equipped with variable geometry resonators that allow a survey of dynamic stability while changing the impedance of the individual fuel systems. Results demonstrate that a wide variation in dynamic response can be achieved by combining different impedance fuel injectors. A base line 7% rms pressure oscillation was reduced to less than 3% by mismatching the fuel impedance.

  20. Phenotypic Mismatches Reveal Escape from Arms-Race Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-01-01

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were “ahead” of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race. PMID:18336073

  1. Quantifying the Displacement of Mismatches in Multiple Sequence Alignment Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Bawono, Punto; van der Velde, Arjan; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) methods are typically benchmarked on sets of reference alignments. The quality of the alignment can then be represented by the sum-of-pairs (SP) or column (CS) scores, which measure the agreement between a reference and corresponding query alignment. Both the SP and CS scores treat mismatches between a query and reference alignment as equally bad, and do not take the separation into account between two amino acids in the query alignment, that should have been matched according to the reference alignment. This is significant since the magnitude of alignment shifts is often of relevance in biological analyses, including homology modeling and MSA refinement/manual alignment editing. In this study we develop a new alignment benchmark scoring scheme, SPdist, that takes the degree of discordance of mismatches into account by measuring the sequence distance between mismatched residue pairs in the query alignment. Using this new score along with the standard SP score, we investigate the discriminatory behavior of the new score by assessing how well six different MSA methods perform with respect to BAliBASE reference alignments. The SP score and the SPdist score yield very similar outcomes when the reference and query alignments are close. However, for more divergent reference alignments the SPdist score is able to distinguish between methods that keep alignments approximately close to the reference and those exhibiting larger shifts. We observed that by using SPdist together with SP scoring we were able to better delineate the alignment quality difference between alternative MSA methods. With a case study we exemplify why it is important, from a biological perspective, to consider the separation of mismatches. The SPdist scoring scheme has been implemented in the VerAlign web server (http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/veralignwww/). The code for calculating SPdist score is also available upon request. PMID:25993129

  2. Quantifying the displacement of mismatches in multiple sequence alignment benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Bawono, Punto; van der Velde, Arjan; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) methods are typically benchmarked on sets of reference alignments. The quality of the alignment can then be represented by the sum-of-pairs (SP) or column (CS) scores, which measure the agreement between a reference and corresponding query alignment. Both the SP and CS scores treat mismatches between a query and reference alignment as equally bad, and do not take the separation into account between two amino acids in the query alignment, that should have been matched according to the reference alignment. This is significant since the magnitude of alignment shifts is often of relevance in biological analyses, including homology modeling and MSA refinement/manual alignment editing. In this study we develop a new alignment benchmark scoring scheme, SPdist, that takes the degree of discordance of mismatches into account by measuring the sequence distance between mismatched residue pairs in the query alignment. Using this new score along with the standard SP score, we investigate the discriminatory behavior of the new score by assessing how well six different MSA methods perform with respect to BAliBASE reference alignments. The SP score and the SPdist score yield very similar outcomes when the reference and query alignments are close. However, for more divergent reference alignments the SPdist score is able to distinguish between methods that keep alignments approximately close to the reference and those exhibiting larger shifts. We observed that by using SPdist together with SP scoring we were able to better delineate the alignment quality difference between alternative MSA methods. With a case study we exemplify why it is important, from a biological perspective, to consider the separation of mismatches. The SPdist scoring scheme has been implemented in the VerAlign web server (http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/veralignwww/). The code for calculating SPdist score is also available upon request.

  3. Mismatch between classroom furniture and anthropometric measures in Chilean schools.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Viviani, C A

    2010-07-01

    Children spend about five hours per day sitting down while doing their school work. Considering this as well as the potential inadequate use of school furniture, it is likely that some anatomical-functional changes and problems in the learning process may occur. The aim of this study was to compare furniture sizes within three different schools with the anthropometric characteristics of Chilean students in the Valparaíso region, in order to evaluate the potential mismatch between them. The sample consisted of 195 volunteer students (94 male, 101 female) of the 8th grade, ranging from 12.5 to 14.5 years of age from 3 different schools. Regarding the methodology, 6 anthropometric measures (Stature, Popliteal height, Buttock-popliteal length, Elbow height while sitting, Hip width, Thigh thickness and Subscapular height) were gathered, as well as 8 dimensions from the school furniture. For the evaluation of classroom furniture a match criterion equation was defined. After considering the existing classroom furniture dimensions in each match criterion equation, the anthropometric characteristics of the considered population were compared in order to determine the mismatch between them. Results indicated that seat height, which should be considered as the starting point for the design of classroom furniture, was appropriate for students' popliteal height in only 14% of the 2 out of the 3 schools, and 28% in the third. Seat to desk height was too high and mismatched 99% of the students in one school and 100% in the others. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that the classroom's furniture was inadequate in almost all the analyzed cases and subjects. It is possible that the high mismatch percentage found between furniture and students' anthropometry can be associated to the fact that the acquisition and selection of the furniture was made without any ergonomic concern or criteria.

  4. The developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kathryn L; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Regions of the human brain develop at different rates across the first two decades of life, with some maturing before others. It has been hypothesized that a mismatch in the timing of maturation between subcortical regions (involved in affect and reward processing) and prefrontal regions (involved in cognitive control) underlies the increase in risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors observed during adolescence. Most support for this 'dual systems' hypothesis relies on cross-sectional data, and it is not known whether this pattern is present at an individual level. The current study utilizes longitudinal structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to describe the developmental trajectories of regions associated with risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors, namely, the amygdala, nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Structural trajectories of gray matter volumes were analyzed using FreeSurfer in 33 participants aged 7-30 years, each of whom had at least three high-quality MRI scans spanning three developmental periods: late childhood, adolescence and early adulthood (total 152 scans). The majority of individuals in our sample showed relatively earlier maturation in the amygdala and/or NAcc compared to the PFC, providing evidence for a mismatch in the timing of structural maturation between these structures. We then related individual developmental trajectories to retrospectively assessed self-reported risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence in a subsample of 24 participants. Analysis of this smaller sample failed to find a relationship between the presence of a mismatch in brain maturation and risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence. Taken together, it appears that the developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation is present in neurotypically developing individuals. This pattern of development did not directly relate to self-reported behaviors at an individual level in our sample

  5. Role of mismatch repair in the Escherichia coli UVM response.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H S; Palejwala, V A; Rahman, M S; Dunman, P M; Wang, G; Humayun, M Z

    1996-12-01

    Mutagenesis at 3,N4-ethenocytosine (epsilonC), a nonpairing mutagenic lesion, is significantly enhanced in Escherichia coli cells pretreated with UV, alkylating agents, or H2O2. This effect, termed UVM (for UV modulation of mutagenesis), is distinct from known DNA damage-inducible responses, such as the SOS response, the adaptive response to alkylating agents, or the oxyR-mediated response to oxidative agents. Here, we have addressed the hypothesis that UVM results from transient depletion of a mismatch repair activity that normally acts to reduce mutagenesis. To test whether the loss of mismatch repair activities results in the predicted constitutive UVM phenotype, E. coli cells defective for methyl-directed mismatch repair, for very-short-patch repair, or for the N-glycosylase activities MutY and MutM were treated with the UVM-inducing agent 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, with subsequent transfection of M13 viral single-stranded DNA bearing a site-specific epsilonC lesion. Survival of the M13 DNA was measured as transfection efficiency, and mutation fixation at the lesion was characterized by multiplex sequencing technology. The results showed normal UVM induction patterns in all the repair-defective strains tested. In addition, normal UVM induction was observed in cells overexpressing MutH, MutL, or MutS. All strains displayed UVM reactivation, the term used to describe the increased survival of epsilonC-containing DNA in UVM-induced cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the UVM response is independent of known mismatch repair systems in E. coli and may thus represent a previously unrecognized misrepair or misreplication pathway.

  6. Memory-based mismatch response to frequency changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Astikainen, Piia; Stefanics, Gabor; Nokia, Miriam; Lipponen, Arto; Cong, Fengyu; Penttonen, Markku; Ruusuvirta, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Any occasional changes in the acoustic environment are of potential importance for survival. In humans, the preattentive detection of such changes generates the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of event-related brain potentials. MMN is elicited to rare changes ('deviants') in a series of otherwise regularly repeating stimuli ('standards'). Deviant stimuli are detected on the basis of a neural comparison process between the input from the current stimulus and the sensory memory trace of the standard stimuli. It is, however, unclear to what extent animals show a similar comparison process in response to auditory changes. To resolve this issue, epidural potentials were recorded above the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, tone frequency was used to differentiate deviants interspersed randomly among a standard tone. Mismatch responses were observed at 60-100 ms after stimulus onset for frequency increases of 5% and 12.5% but not for similarly descending deviants. The response diminished when the silent inter-stimulus interval was increased from 375 ms to 600 ms for +5% deviants and from 600 ms to 1000 ms for +12.5% deviants. In comparison to the oddball condition the response also diminished in a control condition in which no repetitive standards were presented (equiprobable condition). These findings suggest that the rat mismatch response is similar to the human MMN and indicate that anesthetized rats provide a valuable model for studies of central auditory processing.

  7. Investigating Interaural Frequency-Place Mismatches via Bimodal Vowel Integration

    PubMed Central

    Santurette, Sébastien; Chalupper, Josef; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    For patients having residual hearing in one ear and a cochlear implant (CI) in the opposite ear, interaural place-pitch mismatches might be partly responsible for the large variability in individual benefit. Behavioral pitch-matching between the two ears has been suggested as a way to individualize the fitting of the frequency-to-electrode map but is rather tedious and unreliable. Here, an alternative method using two-formant vowels was developed and tested. The interaural spectral shift was inferred by comparing vowel spaces, measured by presenting the first formant (F1) to the nonimplanted ear and the second (F2) on either side. The method was first evaluated with eight normal-hearing listeners and vocoder simulations, before being tested with 11 CI users. Average vowel distributions across subjects showed a similar pattern when presenting F2 on either side, suggesting acclimatization to the frequency map. However, individual vowel spaces with F2 presented to the implant did not allow a reliable estimation of the interaural mismatch. These results suggest that interaural frequency-place mismatches can be derived from such vowel spaces. However, the method remains limited by difficulties in bimodal fusion of the two formants. PMID:25421087

  8. Current status of the Scandiatransplant acceptable mismatch program.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, I D; Pedersen, F; Grunnet, N

    2013-04-01

    This article describes the Scandiatransplant Acceptable Mismatch Program (STAMP), which was set into action in 2009. The aim of STAMP is to define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) toward which the potential kidney recipient has not developed antibodies, as "acceptable mismatches" in the Scandiatransplant database. In many cases this may improve the probability for a highly immunized recipient to receive a suitable kidney graft from a deceased donor. Using data extracted from the Scandiatransplant database on the outcomes of the program after the first 3 years, 31/115 recipients included in the program have undergone transplantation. From 2008 to 2011 the mean waiting time for highly immunized patients has decreased from 42 to 37 months. Continuous evaluation and follow-up of the program is essential to improve the procedures and outcomes. Calculation of transplantability based on a given set of acceptable mismatches was added to the program in 2011, based on the historical deceased donor pool providing the possibility of a specific patient to receive a kidney through STAMP. It is still a challenge for the tissue typing laboratories to determine which detected HLA antibodies are clinical relevant. We concluded that STAMP has had the intended effects, however adjustments and improvements is an ongoing process. As an improvment of the program HLA-C was added to the STAMP search algorithm in September 2012.

  9. JPEG quantization table mismatched steganalysis via robust discriminative feature transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Likai; Kong, Xiangwei; Li, Ming; Guo, Yanqing

    2015-03-01

    The cover source mismatch is a common problem in steganalysis, which may result in the degradation of detection accuracy. In this paper, we present a novel method to mitigate the problem of JPEG quantization table mismatch, named as Robust Discriminative Feature Transformation (RDFT). RDFT transforms original features to new feature representations based on a non-linear transformation matrix. It can improve the statistical consistency of the training samples and testing samples and learn new matched feature representations from original features by minimizing feature distribution difference while preserving the classification ability of training data. The comparison to prior arts reveals that the detection accuracy of the proposed RDFT algorithm can significantly outperform traditional steganalyzers under mismatched conditions and it is close to that of matched scenario. RDFT has several appealing advantages: 1) it can improve the statistical consistency of the training and testing data; 2) it can reduce the distribution difference between the training features and testing features; 3) it can preserve the classification ability of the training data; 4) it is robust to parameters and can achieve a good performance under a wide range of parameter values.

  10. Investigating interaural frequency-place mismatches via bimodal vowel integration.

    PubMed

    Guérit, François; Santurette, Sébastien; Chalupper, Josef; Dau, Torsten

    2014-11-23

    For patients having residual hearing in one ear and a cochlear implant (CI) in the opposite ear, interaural place-pitch mismatches might be partly responsible for the large variability in individual benefit. Behavioral pitch-matching between the two ears has been suggested as a way to individualize the fitting of the frequency-to-electrode map but is rather tedious and unreliable. Here, an alternative method using two-formant vowels was developed and tested. The interaural spectral shift was inferred by comparing vowel spaces, measured by presenting the first formant (F1) to the nonimplanted ear and the second (F2) on either side. The method was first evaluated with eight normal-hearing listeners and vocoder simulations, before being tested with 11 CI users. Average vowel distributions across subjects showed a similar pattern when presenting F2 on either side, suggesting acclimatization to the frequency map. However, individual vowel spaces with F2 presented to the implant did not allow a reliable estimation of the interaural mismatch. These results suggest that interaural frequency-place mismatches can be derived from such vowel spaces. However, the method remains limited by difficulties in bimodal fusion of the two formants. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Semiblind Hyperspectral Unmixing in the Presence of Spectral Library Mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Ma, Wing-Kin; Bioucas-Dias, Jose M.; Chan, Tsung-Han

    2016-09-01

    The dictionary-aided sparse regression (SR) approach has recently emerged as a promising alternative to hyperspectral unmixing (HU) in remote sensing. By using an available spectral library as a dictionary, the SR approach identifies the underlying materials in a given hyperspectral image by selecting a small subset of spectral samples in the dictionary to represent the whole image. A drawback with the current SR developments is that an actual spectral signature in the scene is often assumed to have zero mismatch with its corresponding dictionary sample, and such an assumption is considered too ideal in practice. In this paper, we tackle the spectral signature mismatch problem by proposing a dictionary-adjusted nonconvex sparsity-encouraging regression (DANSER) framework. The main idea is to incorporate dictionary correcting variables in an SR formulation. A simple and low per-iteration complexity algorithm is tailor-designed for practical realization of DANSER. Using the same dictionary correcting idea, we also propose a robust subspace solution for dictionary pruning. Extensive simulations and real-data experiments show that the proposed method is effective in mitigating the undesirable spectral signature mismatch effects.

  12. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells.

    PubMed

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J; Te Riele, Hein P J

    2016-04-12

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype.

  13. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells

    PubMed Central

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W.; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K.; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J.; te Riele, Hein P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype. PMID:26951689

  14. On compensation of mismatched recording conditions in the Bayesian approach for forensic automatic speaker recognition.

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Alexander, A; Drygajlo, A

    2004-12-02

    This paper deals with a procedure to compensate for mismatched recording conditions in forensic speaker recognition, using a statistical score normalization. Bayesian interpretation of the evidence in forensic automatic speaker recognition depends on three sets of recordings in order to perform forensic casework: reference (R) and control (C) recordings of the suspect, and a potential population database (P), as well as a questioned recording (QR) . The requirement of similar recording conditions between suspect control database (C) and the questioned recording (QR) is often not satisfied in real forensic cases. The aim of this paper is to investigate a procedure of normalization of scores, which is based on an adaptation of the Test-normalization (T-norm) [2] technique used in the speaker verification domain, to compensate for the mismatch. Polyphone IPSC-02 database and ASPIC (an automatic speaker recognition system developed by EPFL and IPS-UNIL in Lausanne, Switzerland) were used in order to test the normalization procedure. Experimental results for three different recording condition scenarios are presented using Tippett plots and the effect of the compensation on the evaluation of the strength of the evidence is discussed.

  15. Shape forming by thermal expansion mismatch and shape memory locking in polymer/elastomer laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Ding, Zhen; Wang, T. J.; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2017-10-01

    This paper studies a novel method to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) structure from 2D thermo-responsive shape memory polymer (SMP)/elastomer bilayer laminate. In this method, the shape change is actuated by the thermal mismatch strain between the SMP and the elastomer layers upon heating. However, the glass transition behavior of the SMP locks the material into a new 3D shape that is stable even upon cooling. Therefore, the second shape becomes a new permanent shape of the laminate. A theoretical model that accounts for the temperature-dependent thermomechanical behavior of the SMP material and thermal mismatch strain between the two layers is developed to better understand the underlying physics. Model predictions and experiments show good agreement and indicate that the theoretical model can well predict the bending behavior of the bilayer laminate. The model is then used in the optimal design of geometrical configuration and material selection. The latter also illustrates the requirement of thermomechanical behaviors of the SMP to lock the shape. Based on the fundamental understandings, several self-folding structures are demonstrated by the bilayer laminate design.

  16. Production of extrachromosomal microDNAs is linked to mismatch repair pathways and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Laura W.; Kumar, Pankaj; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D.; Pommier, Yves; Takeda, Shunichi; Dutta, Anindya

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY MicroDNAs are <400-base extrachromosomal circles found in mammalian cells. Tens of thousands of microDNAs have been found in all tissue types, including sperm. MicroDNAs arise preferentially from areas with high gene density, GC content, and exon density, from promoters with activating chromatin modifications and in sperm from the 5'-UTR of full-length LINE-1 elements, but are depleted from lamin-associated heterochromatin. Analysis of microDNAs from a set of human cancer cell lines revealed lineage-specific patterns of microDNA origins. A survey of microDNAs from chicken cells defective in various DNA repair proteins reveal that homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining repair pathways are not required for microDNA production. Deletion of the MSH3 DNA mismatch repair protein results in a significant decrease in microDNA abundance, specifically from non-CpG genomic regions. Thus, microDNAs arise as part of normal cellular physiology; either from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or from replication slippage followed by mismatch repair. PMID:26051933

  17. Mismatch drift failure of long channel n-MOSFETs caused by substrate hot-electron effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wei; Hannaman, David

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, we report the case of burn-in failure due to mismatch of two structurally paired long channel N-MOSFETs (W/L equals 15 micrometers /10 micrometers ). The mismatch was attributed to substrate hot-electron induced positive threshold voltage shift under certain stress conditions. The rate of threshold voltage shift was found to be sensitive to device geometry, bias condition and stress temperature. In contrast to the channel hot electron effect, long channel devices showed large shift and the short channel device (L equals 0.8 micrometers ) was found to be stable under the same stress conditions. In addition to gate and drain bias, a positive source voltage is required to cause the shift. A large shift was observed when gate, drain and source were all biased positively. The shift was also found to increase with the stress temperature. From the MEDICI simulations, it is revealed that the rate of shift is correlated to the vertical electrical filed int eh channel deletion region with a large shift for a high vertical electrical filed. The enhanced degradation at elevated temperature suggests that the thermally generated electrons in the substrate is the source of hot electrons.

  18. Production of Extrachromosomal MicroDNAs Is Linked to Mismatch Repair Pathways and Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Laura W; Kumar, Pankaj; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D; Pommier, Yves; Takeda, Shunichi; Dutta, Anindya

    2015-06-23

    MicroDNAs are <400-base extrachromosomal circles found in mammalian cells. Tens of thousands of microDNAs have been found in all tissue types, including sperm. MicroDNAs arise preferentially from areas with high gene density, GC content, and exon density from promoters with activating chromatin modifications and in sperm from the 5'-UTR of full-length LINE-1 elements, but are depleted from lamin-associated heterochromatin. Analysis of microDNAs from a set of human cancer cell lines revealed lineage-specific patterns of microDNA origins. A survey of microDNAs from chicken cells defective in various DNA repair proteins reveals that homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining repair pathways are not required for microDNA production. Deletion of the MSH3 DNA mismatch repair protein results in a significant decrease in microDNA abundance, specifically from non-CpG genomic regions. Thus, microDNAs arise as part of normal cellular physiology—either from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or from replication slippage followed by mismatch repair.

  19. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  20. Visual-Functional Mismatch Between Coronary Angiography, Fractional Flow Reserve, and Quantitative Coronary Angiography.

    PubMed

    Safi, Morteza; Eslami, Vahid; Namazi, Mohammad Hasan; Vakili, Hossain; Saadat, Habib; Alipourparsa, Saeid; Adibi, Ali; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical and functional mismatches are not uncommon in the assessment of coronary lesions. The aim of this study was to identify clinical and lesion-specific factors affecting angiographic, anatomical, and functional mismatch in intermediate coronary lesions. In patients who underwent coronary angiography for clinical reasons, fractional flow reserve (FFR), and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) analyses for intermediate stenotic lesions were performed simultaneously. Mismatches between the measured values were analyzed. A total of 95 intermediate lesions were assessed simultaneously by visual angiography, FFR, and QCA. The visual-FFR mismatch was found in 40% of the lesions while reverse visual-FFR mismatch was determined in nearly 14% of the lesions. Mismatch and reverse mismatch between FFR and QCA parameters were observed in 10 and 23% of the lesions. FFR value was significant in 32% of the lesions while visually significant stenosis was shown in 61% of the lesions. Among the visual-FFR reverse mismatch group, the prevalence of culprit lesions within the left anterior descending (LAD) was significantly higher than other vessels (p value < 0.02). There were high frequencies of angiographic, QCA, and functional mismatches in analyses of intermediate coronary lesions. LAD lesions showed the highest mismatch. Angiographic or QCA estimation of lesion severity has consistently resulted in inappropriate stenting of functionally nonsignificant lesions or undertreatment of significant lesions based on FFR.

  1. Emotion-related visual mismatch responses in schizophrenia: impairments and correlations with emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Csukly, Gábor; Stefanics, Gábor; Komlósi, Sarolta; Czigler, István; Czobor, Pál

    2013-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential (ERP) measure of preattentional sensory processing. While deficits in the auditory MMN are robust electrophysiological findings in schizophrenia, little is known about visual mismatch response and its association with social cognitive functions such as emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Our aim was to study the potential deficit in the visual mismatch response to unexpected facial emotions in schizophrenia and its association with emotion recognition impairments, and to localize the sources of the mismatch signals. The sample comprised 24 patients with schizophrenia and 24 healthy control subjects. Controls were matched individually to patients by gender, age, and education. ERPs were recorded using a high-density 128-channel BioSemi amplifier. Mismatch responses to happy and fearful faces were determined in 2 time windows over six regions of interest (ROIs). Emotion recognition performance and its association with the mismatch response were also investigated. Mismatch signals to both emotional conditions were significantly attenuated in patients compared to controls in central and temporal ROIs. Controls recognized emotions significantly better than patients. The association between overall emotion recognition performance and mismatch response to the happy condition was significant in the 250-360 ms time window in the central ROI. The estimated sources of the mismatch responses for both emotional conditions were localized in frontal regions, where patients showed significantly lower activity. Impaired generation of mismatch signals indicate insufficient automatic processing of emotions in patients with schizophrenia, which correlates strongly with decreased emotion recognition.

  2. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P.; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F.; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S.; O’Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient’s only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients’ and donors’ HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  3. DNA Bending Propensity in the Presence of Base Mismatches: Implications for DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Monika; Predeus, Alexander V.; Mukherjee, Shayantani; Feig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    DNA bending is believed to facilitate the initial recognition of the mismatched base for repair. The repair efficiencies are dependent on both the mismatch type and neighboring nucleotide sequence. We have studied bending of several DNA duplexes containing canonical matches: A:T, G:C, various mismatches: A:A, A:C, G:A, G:G, G:T, C:C, C:T, T:T, and a bis-abasic site: X:X. Free energy profiles were generated for DNA bending using umbrella sampling. The highest energetic cost associated with DNA bending is observed for canonical matches while bending free energies are lower in the presence of mismatches, with the lowest value for the abasic site. In all of the sequences, DNA duplexes bend towards the major groove with widening of the minor groove. For homoduplexes, DNA bending is observed to occur via smooth deformations, whereas for heteroduplexes, kinks are observed at the mismatch site during strong bending. In general, pyrimidine:pyrimidine mismatches are the most destabilizing, while purine:purine mismatches lead to intermediate destabilization and purine:pyrimidine mismatches are the least destabilizing. The ease of bending is partially correlated with the binding affinity of MutS to the mismatch pairs and subsequent repair efficiencies, indicating that intrinsic DNA bending propensities are a key factor of mismatch recognition. PMID:23621762

  4. Climate change can cause spatial mismatch of trophically interacting species.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Oliver; Settele, Josef; Kudrna, Otakar; Klotz, Stefan; Kühn, Ingolf

    2008-12-01

    Climate change is one of the most influential drivers of biodiversity. Species-specific differences in the reaction to climate change can become particularly important when interacting species are considered. Current studies have evidenced temporal mismatching of interacting species at single points in space, and recently two investigations showed that species interactions are relevant for their future ranges. However, so far we are not aware that the ranges of interacting species may become substantially spatially mismatched. We developed separate ecological-niche models for a monophagous butterfly (Boloria titania) and its larval host plant (Polygonum bistorta) based on monthly interpolated climate data, land-cover classes, and soil data at a 10'-grid resolution. We show that all of three chosen global-change scenarios, which cover a broad range of potential developments in demography, socio-economics, and technology during the 21st century from moderate to intermediate to maximum change, will result in a pronounced spatial mismatch between future niche spaces of these species. The butterfly may expand considerably its future range (by 124-258%) if the host plant has unlimited dispersal, but it could lose 52-75% of its current range if the host plant is not able to fill its projected ecological niche space, and 79-88% if the butterfly also is assumed to be highly dispersal limited. These findings strongly suggest that climate change has the potential to disrupt trophic interactions because co-occurring species do not necessarily react in a similar manner to global change, having important consequences at ecological and evolutionary time scales.

  5. Emotional Intelligence and Mismatching Expressive and Verbal Messages: A Contribution to Detection of Deception

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Jerzy; Stolarski, Maciej; Matthews, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI). However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test) that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception. PMID:24658500

  6. Emotional intelligence and mismatching expressive and verbal messages: a contribution to detection of deception.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Jerzy; Stolarski, Maciej; Matthews, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI). However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test) that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception.

  7. Absolute gain measurement by the image method under mismatched condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Baddour, Maurice F.

    1987-01-01

    Purcell's image method for measuring the absolute gain of an antenna is particularly attractive for small test antennas. The method is simple to use and utilizes only one antenna with a reflecting plane to provide an image for the receiving antenna. However, the method provides accurate results only if the antenna is matched to its waveguide. In this paper, a waveguide junction analysis is developed to determine the gain of an antenna under mismatched condition. Absolute gain measurements for two standard gain horn antennas have been carried out. Experimental results agree closely with published data.

  8. Copper(II)-Controlled Molecular Glue for Mismatched DNA.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Naoko; Guillot, Régis; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Granzhan, Anton

    2017-04-04

    Isothermal hybridization of two DNA strands bearing three thymine-thymine (T:T) mismatches can be brought about in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of a bis-naphthalene macrocycle, 2,7-BisNP-NH. This process can be reverted by addition of a Cu(II) salt due to formation of a dinuclear metal complex which does not bind to DNA. Subsequent sequestration of Cu(II) releases the macrocycle and restores the hybridization state of DNA strands, thus allowing implementation of a fast fluorescent two-state DNA switch. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Gene-environment mismatch in decompression sickness and air embolism.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Joe; Brainard, Andrew H

    2010-08-01

    Decompression sickness causes injury and death in SCUBA divers when air bubbles obstruct the flow of blood. Platelets aggregate in response to gas and promote inflammation. Inflammation in decompression sickness may have its origin in the innate immune system's response to pathogens. Bubbles are often found in tissues during gas-forming infections and in infection-prone states. In these diseases, intravascular gas offers a signal of infection to immune cells. Platelet activation by gas may often accompany a beneficial immune response to pathogens. Pathologic bubble-platelet interaction in decompression illness may be an example of gene-environment mismatch. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Shells on lattice-mismatched colloidal spheres, cubes, and peanuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoro, Melinda; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Cavities form spontaneously due to geometrical frustration when crystalline shells is gradually grown on non-linear surfaces. This we conclude experimentally from growing lattice mismatched shells on colloidal spheres, cubes, and peanuts, all of them providing different local curvature. According to the core shape, the underlying interfacial curvature promotes different cavity formation which we can follow over time. The resulting spatio-temporal heterogeneity adds up to a propagation of an increasingly strong mechanical stress at the core-shell interface, inducing core-shells transformation to yolk-shells.

  11. Model mismatch analysis and compensation for modal phase measuring deflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Gao, Bo; ...

    2017-01-11

    The correspondence residuals due to the discrepancy between the reality and the shape model in use are analyzed for the modal phase measuring deflectometry. Slope residuals are calculated from these discrepancies between the modal estimation and practical acquisition. Since the shape mismatch mainly occurs locally, zonal integration methods which are good at dealing with local variations are used to reconstruct the height residual for compensation. Finally, results of both simulation and experiment indicate the proposed height compensation method is effective, which can be used as a post-complement for the modal phase measuring deflectometry.

  12. Optimal control design that accounts for model mismatch errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.J.; Hull, D.G.

    1995-02-01

    A new technique is presented in this paper that reduces the complexity of state differential equations while accounting for modeling assumptions. The mismatch controls are defined as the differences between the model equations and the true state equations. The performance index of the optimal control problem is formulated with a set of tuning parameters that are user-selected to tune the control solution in order to achieve the best results. Computer simulations demonstrate that the tuned control law outperforms the untuned controller and produces results that are comparable to a numerically-determined, piecewise-linear optimal controller.

  13. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  14. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of nonlinear mismatched uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoya, Divyesh; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design of multiple-surface sliding mode control for a class of nonlinear uncertain systems with mismatched uncertainties and disturbances. In the method of multiple-surface sliding mode control, it is required to compensate for the derivatives of the virtual inputs which gives rise to the so-called problem of 'explosion of terms'. In this paper a disturbance observer based multiple-surface sliding mode control is proposed to estimate the uncertainties as well as the derivative of the virtual inputs to overcome this problem. The practical stability of the overall system is proved. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is illustrated via simulation of a benchmark problem and comparison with other control strategies. The proposed scheme is validated by implementing it on a serial flexible joint manipulator in the laboratory.

  15. Unattentive speech processing is influenced by orthographic knowledge: evidence from mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Morais, José; Colin, Cécile; Kolinsky, Régine

    2014-10-01

    How far can acquired knowledge such as orthographic knowledge affect pre-existing abilities such as speech perception? This controversial issue was addressed by investigating the automaticity of the influence of orthographic knowledge on speech processing. Many studies demonstrated this influence in active, lexico-semantic speech processing tasks. However, it has never been observed when speech is unattended. Here, the Mismatch Negativity (MMN), an automatic index of experience-dependent auditory traces, was recorded in an unattended oddball paradigm manipulating the orthographic congruency between frequent and deviant spoken riming words. Both orthographically congruent and incongruent deviant words elicited a typical MMN over the fronto-central regions, with a stronger response in the incongruent condition. The finding showed that the orthographic dimension of spoken words influences a physiological marker of speech processing although participants were required not to attend to the auditory input. This provides evidence for an impact of acquiring a written code on speech processing.

  16. Strain analysis by mismatch moire method and grid method using Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Seguchi, Y.; Higashi, T.

    1990-01-01

    We have formerly presented a new method of the moire analysis of strain using the Fourier transform. It uses the phase information of the moire fringe brightness. By shifting the Fourier spectrum of the image of deformed grating lines, we obtain the “complex moire pattern”. Strain distribution is given as the derivatives of the phases of the complex moire fringes. The analysis is completely automated by digital image processing. All of the laborious and subjective procedures required in the conventional analysis such as fringe sign determination, fringe ordering and fringe interpolation are thus eliminated, and objective, fast and accurate analysis can be made. In this paper, we develop the method to a mismatch method and a grid method. We show some applications for analyzing strain distribution by using this method.

  17. Predictable patterns of trait mismatches between interacting plants and insects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few predictions about the directionality or extent of morphological trait (mis)matches between interacting organisms. We review and analyse studies on morphological trait complementarity (e.g. floral tube length versus insect mouthpart length) at the population and species level. Results Plants have consistently more exaggerated morphological traits than insects at high trait magnitudes and in some cases less exaggerated traits than insects at smaller trait magnitudes. This result held at the population level, as well as for phylogenetically adjusted analyses at the species-level and for both pollination and host-parasite interactions, perhaps suggesting a general pattern. Across communities, the degree of trait mismatch between one specialist plant and its more generalized pollinator was related to the level of pollinator specialization at each site; the observed pattern supports the "life-dinner principle" of selection acting more strongly on species with more at stake in the interaction. Similarly, plant mating system also affected the degree of trait correspondence because selfing reduces the reliance on pollinators and is analogous to pollination generalization. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that there are predictable "winners" and "losers" of evolutionary arms races and the results of this study highlight the fact that breeding system and the degree of specialization can influence the outcome. PMID:20604973

  18. Toward a phenological mismatch in estuarine pelagic food web?

    PubMed

    Chevillot, Xavier; Drouineau, Hilaire; Lambert, Patrick; Carassou, Laure; Sautour, Benoit; Lobry, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Alterations of species phenology in response to climate change are now unquestionable. Until now, most studies have reported precocious occurrence of life cycle events as a major phenological response. Desynchronizations of biotic interactions, in particular predator-prey relationships, are however assumed to strongly impact ecosystems' functioning, as formalized by the Match-Mismatch Hypothesis (MMH). Temporal synchronicity between juvenile fish and zooplankton in estuaries is therefore of essential interest since estuaries are major nursery grounds for many commercial fish species. The Gironde estuary (SW France) has suffered significant alterations over the last three decades, including two Abrupt Ecosystem Shifts (AES), and three contrasted intershift periods. The main objective of this study was to depict modifications in fish and zooplankton phenology among inter-shift periods and discuss the potential effects of the resulting mismatches at a community scale. A flexible Bayesian method was used to estimate and compare yearly patterns of species abundance in the estuary among the three pre-defined periods. Results highlighted (1) an earlier peak of zooplankton production and entrance of fish species in the estuary and (2) a decrease in residence time of both groups in the estuary. Such species-specific phenological changes led to changes in temporal overlap between juvenile fish and their zooplanktonic prey. This situation questions the efficiency and potentially the viability of nursery function of the Gironde estuary, with potential implications for coastal marine fisheries of the Bay of Biscay.

  19. Predicting χ for polymers with stiffness mismatch from simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuch, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlin; Gomez, Enrique; Milner, Scott

    The Flory-Huggins χ parameter describes the excess free energy of mixing and governs phase behavior for polymer blends and block copolymers. For chemically distinct polymers, the value of χ is dominated by the mismatch in cohesive energy densities of the monomers. For blends of chemically similar polymers, the entropic portion of χ, arising from non-ideal local packing, becomes more significant. Using polymer field theory, Fredrickson, Liu, and Bates predict that a difference in backbone stiffness can result in a positive χ for chains consisting of chemically identical monomers. To quantitatively investigate this phenomenon, we perform molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for bead-spring chains which differ only in stiffness. From the simulations, we apply a novel thermodynamic integration to extract χ as low as 10-3 per monomer for blends with mild stiffness mismatch. By introducing a standardized effective monomer, we map real polymers to our bead-spring chains and show that the predicted entropic portion of χ are consistent with experimental data.

  20. Mismatch Repair Proficiency and In Vitro Response to 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.; CHAUHAN, DHARAM P.; FINK, DANIEL; NEBEL, SIBYLLE; BRESALIER, ROBERT S.; HOWELL, STEPHEN B.; BOLAND, C. RICHARD

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes certain DNA adducts caused by alkylation damage in addition to its role in recognizing and directing repair of interstrand nucleotide mismatches and slippage mistakes at microsatellite sequences. Because defects in the MMR system can confer tolerance to acquired DNA damage and, by inference, the toxic effects of certain chemotherapeutic agents, we investigated the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on colon cancer cell lines. Methods We determined growth selection by cell enrichment assay and cloning efficiency after treatment with 5 μmol/L 5-FU, assayed nucleic 3H–5-FU incorporation, and analyzed the cell cycle by flow cytometry. Results 5-FU treatment provided a growth advantage for MMR-deficient cell lines, indicating a relative degree of tolerance to 5-FU by the MMR-deficient cell lines. Enhanced survival was statistically significant after 5 days of growth, and a 28-fold reduction in survival was noted in the MMR-proficient cells by clonagenic assays after 10 days of growth. Differences in nucleotide uptake of 5-FU did not account for the observed growth differences, and specific cell cycle checkpoint arrest was not detected. Conclusions Intact DNA MMR seems to recognize 5-FU incorporated into DNA but may do so in a different manner than other types of alkylation damage. Defective DNA MMR might be one mechanism for tumor resistance to 5-FU. PMID:10381918

  1. Evidence against the mismatched interlanguage speech intelligibility benefit hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Stibbard, Richard M; Lee, Jeong-In

    2006-07-01

    In a follow-up study to that of Bent and Bradlow (2003), carrier sentences containing familiar keywords were read aloud by five talkers (Korean high proficiency; Korean low proficiency; Saudi Arabian high proficiency; Saudi Arabian low proficiency; native English). The intelligibility of these keywords to 50 listeners in four first language groups (Korean, n = 10; Saudi Arabian, n = 10; native English, n = 10; other mixed first languages, n = 20) was measured in a word recognition test. In each case, the non-native listeners found the non-native low-proficiency talkers who did not share the same first language as the listeners the least intelligible, at statistically significant levels, while not finding the low-proficiency talker who shared their own first language similarly unintelligible. These findings indicate a mismatched interlanguage speech intelligibility detriment for low-proficiency non-native speakers and a potential intelligibility problem between mismatched first language low-proficiency speakers unfamiliar with each others' accents in English. There was no strong evidence to support either an intelligibility benefit for the high-proficiency non-native talkers to the listeners from a different first language background or to indicate that the native talkers were more intelligible than the high-proficiency non-native talkers to any of the listeners.

  2. Symptom-Hemodynamic Mismatch and Heart Failure Event Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher S.; Hiatt, Shirin O.; Denfeld, Quin E.; Mudd, James O.; Chien, Christopher; Gelow, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a heterogeneous condition of both symptoms and hemodynamics. Objective The goal of this study was to identify distinct profiles among integrated data on physical and psychological symptoms and hemodynamics, and quantify differences in 180-day event-risk among observed profiles. Methods A secondary analysis of data collected during two prospective cohort studies by a single group of investigators was performed. Latent class mixture modeling was used to identify distinct symptom-hemodynamic profiles. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to quantify difference in event-risk (HF emergency visit, hospitalization or death) among profiles. Results The mean age (n=291) was 57±13 years, 38% were female, and 61% had class III/IV HF. Three distinct symptom-hemodynamic profiles were identified. 17.9% of patients had concordant symptoms and hemodynamics (i.e. moderate physical and psychological symptoms matched the comparatively hemodynamic profile), 17.9% had severe symptoms and average hemodynamics, and 64.2% had poor hemodynamics and mild symptoms. Compared to those in the concordant profile, both profiles of symptom-hemodynamic mismatch were associated with a markedly increased event-risk (severe symptoms hazards ratio = 3.38, p=0.033; poor hemodynamics hazards ratio = 3.48, p=0.016). Conclusions A minority of adults with HF have concordant symptoms and hemodynamics. Either profile of symptom-hemodynamic mismatch in HF is associated with a greater risk of healthcare utilization for HF or death. PMID:24988323

  3. Toward a phenological mismatch in estuarine pelagic food web?

    PubMed Central

    Chevillot, Xavier; Drouineau, Hilaire; Lambert, Patrick; Carassou, Laure; Sautour, Benoit; Lobry, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Alterations of species phenology in response to climate change are now unquestionable. Until now, most studies have reported precocious occurrence of life cycle events as a major phenological response. Desynchronizations of biotic interactions, in particular predator-prey relationships, are however assumed to strongly impact ecosystems’ functioning, as formalized by the Match-Mismatch Hypothesis (MMH). Temporal synchronicity between juvenile fish and zooplankton in estuaries is therefore of essential interest since estuaries are major nursery grounds for many commercial fish species. The Gironde estuary (SW France) has suffered significant alterations over the last three decades, including two Abrupt Ecosystem Shifts (AES), and three contrasted intershift periods. The main objective of this study was to depict modifications in fish and zooplankton phenology among inter-shift periods and discuss the potential effects of the resulting mismatches at a community scale. A flexible Bayesian method was used to estimate and compare yearly patterns of species abundance in the estuary among the three pre-defined periods. Results highlighted (1) an earlier peak of zooplankton production and entrance of fish species in the estuary and (2) a decrease in residence time of both groups in the estuary. Such species-specific phenological changes led to changes in temporal overlap between juvenile fish and their zooplanktonic prey. This situation questions the efficiency and potentially the viability of nursery function of the Gironde estuary, with potential implications for coastal marine fisheries of the Bay of Biscay. PMID:28355281

  4. Case Report: Prothesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Garcia-Morell, Juan; Rodriguez-Monserrate, Carla P; Valentin-Nieves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Valve replacement is the standard surgical treatment of diseased valves that cannot be repaired. The main goal of replacement is to exchange the diseased valve with one that has the engineering and hemodynamics as close as possible to the disease free native valve. However due to mechanical and fluid dynamic constraints all prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are smaller than normal and thus are inherently stenotic. This represents a challenge when it comes time to replace a valve. The correct valve with the correct and matching profile has to be selected before the procedure to avoid possible complications. It is well recognized that patients are also prone to patient-prosthesis mismatch at long term which could have consequences in the clinical outcomes (1). The evaluation of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has not been sufficiently emphasized in common practice. Failure to recognize this fact may lead to significant hemodynamic impairment and worsening of the clinical status over the time. Making efforts to identifying patients at risk may decrease the prevalence of PPM, the economic impact to our health system, the morbidity and mortality involved in these cases as well as creates efforts to standardized pre-operative protocols to minimized risk of PPM. We present a case of a 78 years old male patient who underwent aortic valve replacement due severe aortic stenosis, afterwards his clinical course got complicated with several admissions for shortness of breath and decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF).

  5. Hydrophobic mismatch in gramicidin A prime /lecithin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watnick, P.I.; Chan, S.I. ); Dea, P. )

    1990-07-03

    Gramicidin A{prime} (GA{prime}) has been added to three lipid systems of varying hydrophobic thickness: dimyristoyllecithin (DML), dipalmitoyllecithin (DPL), and distearoyllecithin (DSL). The similarity in length between the hydrophobic portion of GA{prime} and the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid bilayers has been studied by using {sup 31}P and {sup 2}H NMR. Hydrophobic mismatch has been found to be most severe in the DML bilayer system and minimal in the case of DSL. In addition, the effects of hydrophobic mismatch on the cooperative properties of the bilayer have been obtained from {sup 2}H NMR relaxation measurements. The results indicate that incorporation of the peptide into the bilayer disrupts the cooperative director fluctuations characteristic of pure multilamellar lipid dispersions. Finally, the GA{prime}/lecithin ratio at which the well-known transformation from bilayer to reverse hexagonal (H{sub II}) phase occurs is shown to depend on the acyl chain length of the phospholipid. A rationale is proposed for this chain length dependence.

  6. Mismatch repair status may predict response to adjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Riazy, Maziar; Kalloger, Steve E; Sheffield, Brandon S; Peixoto, Renata D; Li-Chang, Hector H; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-10-01

    Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been associated with inferior response to 5-FU in colorectal cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is similarly treated with pyrimidine analogs, yet the predictive value of mismatch repair status for response to these agents has not been examined in this malignancy. A tissue microarray with associated clinical outcome, comprising 254 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was stained for four mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Mismatch repair deficiency and proficiency was determined by the absence or presence of uniform nuclear staining in tumor cells, respectively. Cases identified as mismatch repair deficient on the tissue microarray were confirmed by immunohistochemistry on whole slide sections. Of the 265 cases, 78 (29%) received adjuvant treatment with a pyrimidine analog and 41 (15%) showed a mismatch repair-deficient immunoprofile. Multivariable disease-specific survival in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy, regional lymph-node status, gender, and the presence of tumor budding were significant independent prognostic variables (P≤0.04); however, none of the eight clinico-pathologic covariates examined in the mismatch repair-deficient cohort were of independent prognostic significance. Univariable assessment of disease-specific survival revealed an almost identical survival profile for both treated and untreated patients with a mismatch repair-deficient profile, while treatment in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort conferred a greater than 10-month median disease-specific survival advantage over their untreated counterparts (P=0.0018). In this cohort, adjuvant chemotherapy with a pyrimidine analog conferred no survival advantage to mismatch repair-deficient pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. Mismatch repair immunoprofiling is a feasible predictive marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, and further prospective

  7. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging mismatch criteria to select patients for endovascular stroke therapy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nishant K; Albers, Gregory W; Christensen, Søren; Marks, Michael; Hamilton, Scott; Straka, Matus; Liggins, John T P; Kemp, Stephanie; Mlynash, Michael; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G

    2014-05-01

    The Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution 2 (DEFUSE 2) study has shown that clinical response to endovascular reperfusion differs between patients with and without perfusion-diffusion (perfusion-weighted imaging-diffusion-weighted imaging, PWI-DWI) mismatch: patients with mismatch have a favorable clinical response to reperfusion, whereas patients without mismatch do not. This study examined whether alternative mismatch criteria can also differentiate patients according to their response to reperfusion. Patients from the DEFUSE 2 study were categorized according to vessel occlusion on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and DWI lesion volume criteria (MRA-DWI mismatch) and symptom severity and DWI criteria (clinical-DWI mismatch). Favorable clinical response was defined as an improvement of ≥8 points on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) by day 30 or an NIHSS score of ≤1 at day 30. We assessed, for each set of criteria, whether the association between reperfusion and favorable clinical response differed according to mismatch status. A differential response to reperfusion was observed between patients with and without MRA-DWI mismatch defined as an internal carotid artery or M1 occlusion and a DWI lesion<50 mL. Reperfusion was associated with good functional outcome in patients who met these MRA-DWI mismatch criteria (odds ratio [OR], 8.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-31.3), whereas no association was observed in patients who did not meet these criteria (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.08-3.1; P for difference between the odds, 0.01). No differential response to reperfusion was observed with other variations of the MRA-DWI or clinical-DWI mismatch criteria. The MRA-DWI mismatch is a promising alternative to DEFUSE 2's PWI-DWI mismatch for patient selection in endovascular stroke trials.

  8. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of epitaxial growth on a (111) layer with mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.; Ghazali, A.; Lévy, J.-C. S.

    1997-04-01

    A high-temperature deposition of adatoms on a substrate with or without lattice mismatch from -10% to +10%, followed by slow cooling to a given temperature, is simulated by means of a Monte Carlo algorithm with Lennard-Jones interatomic pair potentials. Stranski-Krastanov growth is always observed with a lateral island size controlled by the lattice mismatch, while the deposition mode acts strongly on the island slope. Complete healing of the island structure never occurs before the tenth layer. The interlayer distance undergoes oscillations as a function of the layer number. This is observed for a ±10% mismatch as well as for a -5% mismatch.

  10. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  11. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  12. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  13. Identification of a permissible HLA mismatch in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Wang, Tao; Lee, Stephanie J.; Haagenson, Michael; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee-Ann; Gajewski, James; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Marino, Susana; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Schultz, Kirk; Turner, E. Victoria; Waller, Edmund K.; Woolfrey, Ann; Umejiego, John; Spellman, Stephen R.; Setterholm, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    In subjects mismatched in the HLA alleles C*03:03/C*03:04 no allogeneic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are detected in vitro. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with unrelated donors (UDs) showed no association between the HLA-C allele mismatches (CAMMs) and adverse outcomes; antigen mismatches at this and mismatches other HLA loci are deleterious. The absence of effect of the CAMM may have resulted from the predominance of the mismatch C*03:03/C*03:04. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving UD HSCT matched in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA alleles were examined. Transplants mismatched in HLA-C antigens or mismatched in HLA-A, -B, or -DRB1 presented significant differences (P < .0001) in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37, 1.30), disease-free survival (HR = 1.33, 1.27), treatment-related mortality (HR = 1.54, 1.54), and grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (HR = 1.49, 1.77) compared with the 8/8 group; transplants mismatched in other CAMMs had similar outcomes with HR ranging from 1.34 to 172 for these endpoints. The C*03:03/C*03:04 mismatched and the 8/8 matched groups had identical outcomes (HR ranging from 0.96-1.05). The previous finding that CAMMs do not associate with adverse outcomes is explained by the predominance (69%) of the mismatch C*03:03/03:04 in this group that is better tolerated than other HLA mismatches. PMID:24408320

  14. Indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Crochemore, Maxime; Langiu, Alessio; Rahman, M. Sohel

    2014-01-01

    Mapping reads against a genome sequence is an interesting and useful problem in computational molecular biology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we focus on the problem of indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch. We first focus on a simpler problem where the length of the pattern is given beforehand during the data structure construction. This version of the problem is interesting in its own right in the context of the next generation sequencing. In the sequel, we show how to solve the more general problem. In both cases, our algorithm can construct an efficient data structure in time and space and can answer subsequent queries in time. Here, n is the length of the sequence, m is the length of the read, 0<ε<1 and is the optimal output size. PMID:24751874

  15. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty complicated by mismatched implant components

    PubMed Central

    Calistri, Alessandro; Campbell, Patricia; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Smet, Koen Aimè

    2017-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has gained popularity as a feasible treatment option for young and active patients with hip osteoarthritis and high functional expectations. This procedure should only be performed by surgeons who have trained specifically in this technique. Preoperative planning is essential for hip resurfacing in order to execute a successful operation and preview any technical problems. The authors present a case of a man who underwent a resurfacing arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the left hip that was complicated by mismatched implant components that were revised three days afterwards for severe pain and leg length discrepancy. Such mistakes, although rare, can be prevented by educating operating room staff in the size and colour code tables provided by the companies on their prostheses or implant boxes. PMID:28361022

  16. Phoneme discrimination and mismatch negativity in English and Japanese speakers

    PubMed Central

    Bomba, Marie D.; Choly, David; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Neural templates for phonemes in one’s native language are formed early in life; these can be modified but are difficult to form de novo. These can be examined with mismatch negativity. Three phonemic contrasts were presented to adult native English compared to Japanese speakers who acquired English later: vowels native to both languages (/i//iy/); consonant-vowel contrasts (/da//wa/) phonemic in both languages; and consonant-vowel contrasts phonemic in English but not in Japanese (/ra//la/). For vowels, no MMN differences were found. For /da//wa/, MMN amplitude was significantly reduced in Japanese speakers. For /ra//la/, only 50% of the Japanese group showed an identifiable MMN. This suggests that phonemic templates are formed early in life and non-native consonant contrasts are difficult to learn later. PMID:21610545

  17. The mismatch negativity: A review of underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Marta I.; Kilner, James M.; Stephan, Klaas E.; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is a brain response to violations of a rule, established by a sequence of sensory stimuli (typically in the auditory domain) [Näätänen R. Attention and brain function. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum; 1992]. The MMN reflects the brain’s ability to perform automatic comparisons between consecutive stimuli and provides an electrophysiological index of sensory learning and perceptual accuracy. Although the MMN has been studied extensively, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the MMN are not well understood. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the generation of the MMN; amongst these accounts, the “adaptation hypothesis” and the “model adjustment hypothesis” have received the most attention. This paper presents a review of studies that focus on neuronal mechanisms underlying the MMN generation, discusses the two major explanatory hypotheses, and proposes predictive coding as a general framework that attempts to unify both. PMID:19181570

  18. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-01

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  19. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-03

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  20. Is it time to move mismatch negativity into the clinic?

    PubMed

    Schall, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in the 1970s, the mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential has improved our understanding of pre-attentive detection of rule violations, which is a fundamental cognitive process considered by some a form of "primitive intelligence". The body of research to date ranges from animal studies (i.e. when investigating the neural mechanisms and pharmacological properties of MMN generation) to researching the psychophysiological nature of human consciousness. MMN therefore offers the possibility to detect abnormal functioning in the neural system involved in MMN generation, such as it occurs in some neurodevelopmental disorders or patients in vegetative state. While the clinical research data holds considerable promise for translation into clinical practice, standardization and normative data of an optimized (i.e. disorder-specific) MMN recording algorithm is needed in order for MMN to become a valuable clinical investigation tool.

  1. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty complicated by mismatched implant components.

    PubMed

    Calistri, Alessandro; Campbell, Patricia; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Smet, Koen Aimè

    2017-03-18

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has gained popularity as a feasible treatment option for young and active patients with hip osteoarthritis and high functional expectations. This procedure should only be performed by surgeons who have trained specifically in this technique. Preoperative planning is essential for hip resurfacing in order to execute a successful operation and preview any technical problems. The authors present a case of a man who underwent a resurfacing arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the left hip that was complicated by mismatched implant components that were revised three days afterwards for severe pain and leg length discrepancy. Such mistakes, although rare, can be prevented by educating operating room staff in the size and colour code tables provided by the companies on their prostheses or implant boxes.

  2. Three perspectives on the mismatch between measures of material poverty.

    PubMed

    Hick, Rod

    2015-03-01

    The two most prominent measures of material poverty within contemporary European poverty analysis are low income and material deprivation. However, it is by now well-known that these measures identify substantially different people as being poor. In this research note, I seek to demonstrate that there are at least three ways to understand the mismatch between low income and material deprivation, relating to three different forms of identification: identifying poor households, identifying groups at risk of poverty and identifying trends in material poverty over time. Drawing on data from the British Household Panel Survey, I show that while low income and material deprivation identify very different households as being poor, and display distinct trends over time, in many cases they identify the same groups at being at risk of material poverty. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  3. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  4. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  5. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  6. Visual mismatch response evoked by a perceptually indistinguishable oddball.

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takayoshi; Aoyama, Atsushi; Amano, Kaoru; Takeda, Tsunehiro

    2011-08-03

    Mismatch field (MMF) is an early magnetoencephalographic response evoked by deviant stimuli within a sequence of standard stimuli. Although auditory MMF is reported to be an automatic response, the automaticity of visual MMF has not been clearly demonstrated, partly because of the difficulty in designing an ignore condition. Our modified oddball paradigm had a masking stimulus inserted between briefly presented standard and deviant stimuli (vertical gratings with different spatial frequencies). Perceptual discrimination between masked standard and deviant stimuli was difficult, but the early magnetoencephalographic response for the deviant was significantly larger than that for the standard, when the former had a higher spatial frequency than the latter. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that visual MMF is evoked automatically.

  7. Performance of mismatched Viterbi receiver on satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Omura, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a satellite communication system using a Viterbi receiver. Here we have a bandlimited nonlinear channel where both uplink and downlink are taken into account as well as the effect of Intersymbol Interference, phase and time synchronization errors. In order that ISI can be combatted effectively, we use a Viterbi demodulator which is designed for the satellite channel when there is no uplink noise. The Viterbi demodulator for the channels with large memory is too complex to be implemented. To reduce the complexity, a Viterbi demodulator with memory shorter than the true channel memory is used. The objective of this paper is to analyze the performance degradation of this 'Mismatched Viterbi Receiver' due to the uplink noise and memory truncation, and to understand how the time and phase synchronization errors influence the performance.

  8. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H; Hsieh, Peggy

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Thermal Protection Supplement for Reducing Interface Thermal Mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A thermal protection system that reduces a mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients CTE between a first material layer (CTE1) and a second material layer (CTE2) at a first layer-second layer interface. A portion of aluminum borosilicate (abs) or another suitable additive (add), whose CTE value, CTE(add), satisfies (CTE(add)-CTE1)(CTE(add)-CTE2)<0, is distributed with variable additive density,.rho.(z;add), in the first material layer and/or in the second material layer, with.rho.(z;add) near the materials interface being relatively high (alternatively, relatively low) and.rho.(z;add) in a region spaced apart from the interface being relatively low (alternatively, relatively high).

  10. Radiation of cylindrical duct acoustic modes with flow mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savkar, S. D.; Edelfelt, I. H.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations for the radiation of spinning acoustic modes, with or without a centerbody, and with or without flow temperature and velocity discontinuity, are presented. Solutions to the appropriate convected wave equations devised around Fourier transforms and Wiener-Hopf technique are presented. The decomposition of the asymmetric kernel, resulting from a flow and temperature mismatch, is carried out in part exactly and partially using the so-called Carrier-Koiter approximation procedure. The resulting solutions offer a good approximation to the radiation of both symmetric and asymmetric modes through a flow discontinuity represented as a plug flow jet issuing from a cylindrical duct. Besides the Koiter approximation, the major limitation on the calculation program is the difficulty of calculating the high order Bessel functions with sufficient accuracy.

  11. Cluster formation of transmembrane proteins due to hydrophobic mismatching.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2008-09-19

    Membranes are the defining envelopes of living cells. At this boundary a multitude of transmembrane proteins mediate signal and mass transfer between cells and their environment. Clustering of these proteins is a frequent and often vital phenomenon that relies at least in part on membrane-mediated interactions. Indeed, the mismatch between proteins' hydrophobic transmembrane domains and the surrounding lipid bilayer has been predicted to facilitate clustering, yet unequivocal quantitative data in support of these predictions have been lacking. Here, we have used coarse-grained membrane simulations to thoroughly address the clustering of transmembrane proteins in detail. Our results emphasize the universal nature of membrane-mediated attraction which relaxes the need for a plethora of fine-tuned interactions between membrane proteins.

  12. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  13. Role of frequency mismatch in neuronal communication through coherence.

    PubMed

    Sancristóbal, Belén; Vicente, Raul; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    Neuronal gamma oscillations have been described in local field potentials of different brain regions of multiple species. Gamma oscillations are thought to reflect rhythmic synaptic activity organized by inhibitory interneurons. While several aspects of gamma rhythmogenesis are relatively well understood, we have much less solid evidence about how gamma oscillations contribute to information processing in neuronal circuits. One popular hypothesis states that a flexible routing of information between distant populations occurs via the control of the phase or coherence between their respective oscillations. Here, we investigate how a mismatch between the frequencies of gamma oscillations from two populations affects their interaction. In particular, we explore a biophysical model of the reciprocal interaction between two cortical areas displaying gamma oscillations at different frequencies, and quantify their phase coherence and communication efficiency. We observed that a moderate excitatory coupling between the two areas leads to a decrease in their frequency detuning, up to ∼6 Hz, with no frequency locking arising between the gamma peaks. Importantly, for similar gamma peak frequencies a zero phase difference emerges for both LFP and MUA despite small axonal delays. For increasing frequency detunings we found a significant decrease in the phase coherence (at non-zero phase lag) between the MUAs but not the LFPs of the two areas. Such difference between LFPs and MUAs behavior is due to the misalignment between the arrival of afferent synaptic currents and the local excitability windows. To test the efficiency of communication we evaluated the success of transferring rate-modulations between the two areas. Our results indicate that once two populations lock their peak frequencies, an optimal phase relation for communication appears. However, the sensitivity of locking to frequency mismatch suggests that only a precise and active control of gamma frequency could

  14. Understanding the Mismatch Between Coaches' and Players' Perceptions of Exertion.

    PubMed

    Brink, Michel S; Kersten, Anna W; Frencken, Wouter G P

    2017-04-01

    A mismatch between the training exertion intended by a coach and the exertion perceived by players is well established in sports. However, it is unknown whether coaches can accurately observe exertion of individual players during training. Furthermore, the discrepancy in coaches' and players' perceptions has not been explained. To determine the relation between intended and observed training exertion by the coach and perceived training exertion by the players and establish whether on-field training characteristics, intermittent endurance capacity, and maturity status explain the mismatch. During 2 mesocycles of 4 wk (in November and March), rating of intended exertion (RIE), rating of observed exertion (ROE), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored in 31 elite young soccer players. External and internal training loads were objectively quantified with accelerometers (PlayerLoad) and heart-rate monitors (TRIMPmod). Results of an interval shuttle-run test (ISRT) and age at peak height velocity (APHV) were determined for all players. RIE, ROE, and RPE were monitored in 977 training sessions. The correlations between RIE and RPE (r = .58; P < .01) and between ROE and RPE (r = .64; P < .01) were moderate. The mean difference between RIE and RPE was -0.31 ± 1.99 and between ROE and RPE was -0.37 ± 1.87. Multilevel analyses showed that PlayerLoad and ISRT predicted RIE and ROE. Coaches base their intended and observed exertion on what they expect players will do and what they actually did on the field. When doing this, they consider the intermittent endurance capacity of individual players.

  15. Significance of clinical-diffusion mismatch in hyperacute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ichiro; Takeda, Hidetaka; Furuya, Daisuke; Hattori, Kimihiko; Dembo, Tomohisa; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Kato, Yuji; Fukuoka, Takuya; Maruyama, Hajime; Tanahashi, Norio

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, patient selection for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) therapy based on clinical-diffusion mismatch (CDM) has been closely examined. We investigated the relationship between prognosis and CDM in patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction within 3 hours of onset and compared CDM with diffusion-perfusion mismatch (DPM). Of 122 patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction who visited the hospital within 3 hours of onset between April 2007 and November 2008, 85 patients with cerebral infarction in the anterior circulation who underwent head magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)/magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) (51 men and 34 women; average age, 74 ± 10 years) were enrolled. Seventeen of these patients underwent CT perfusion imaging. CDM-positive cases were those with a National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score ≥ 8 and a DWI-Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (DWI-ASPECTS) ≥ 8; CDM-negative cases were those with an NIHSS score ≥ 8 and an ASPECTS-DWI < 8. The other patients were classified as belonging to the NIHSS score < 8 group. Of the 32 CDM-positive cases, 10 received t-PA infusion. These patients had markedly higher modified Rankin Scale scores 90 days after onset compared with the 22 patients who did not receive t-PA infusion. The 8 CDM-positive cases included 4 DPM-positive cases and 4 DPM-negative cases, and a discrepancy was confirmed between CDM and DPM. In all DPM-positive cases, MRA confirmed lesions in major intracranial arteries. CDM may enable more accurate prediction of outcomes in patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction. In addition, the combination of CDM findings and MRA findings (stenosis or occlusion in major intracranial arteries) may be an alternative to DPM for determining the indications for IV t-PA therapy in patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction. Copyright © 2011 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of mismatch repair and RAD1 genes on interchromosomal crossover recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Ainsley; Fabbri, Rebecca M; Reeves, Jason W; Crouse, Gray F

    2006-06-01

    We have previously shown that recombination between 400-bp substrates containing only 4-bp differences, when present in an inverted repeat orientation, is suppressed by >20-fold in wild-type strains of S. cerevisiae. Among the genes involved in this suppression were three genes involved in mismatch repair--MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6--and one in nucleotide excision repair, RAD1. We now report the involvement of these genes in interchromosomal recombination occurring via crossovers using these same short substrates. In these experiments, recombination was stimulated by a double-strand break generated by the HO endonuclease and can occur between completely identical (homologous) substrates or between nonidentical (homeologous) substrates. In addition, a unique feature of this system is that recombining DNA strands can be given a choice of either type of substrate. We find that interchromosomal crossover recombination with these short substrates is severely inhibited in the absence of MSH2, MSH3, or RAD1 and is relatively insensitive to the presence of mismatches. We propose that crossover recombination with these short substrates requires the products of MSH2, MSH3, and RAD1 and that these proteins have functions in recombination in addition to the removal of terminal nonhomology. We further propose that the observed insensitivity to homeology is a result of the difference in recombinational mechanism and/or the timing of the observed recombination events. These results are in contrast with those obtained using longer substrates and may be particularly relevant to recombination events between the abundant short repeated sequences that characterize the genomes of higher eukaryotes.

  17. DNA conformations in mismatch repair probed in solution by X-ray scattering from gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hura, Greg L; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Claridge, Shelley A; Mendillo, Marc L; Smith, Jessica M; Williams, Gareth J; Mastroianni, Alexander J; Alivisatos, A Paul; Putnam, Christopher D; Kolodner, Richard D; Tainer, John A

    2013-10-22

    DNA metabolism and processing frequently require transient or metastable DNA conformations that are biologically important but challenging to characterize. We use gold nanocrystal labels combined with small angle X-ray scattering to develop, test, and apply a method to follow DNA conformations acting in the Escherichia coli mismatch repair (MMR) system in solution. We developed a neutral PEG linker that allowed gold-labeled DNAs to be flash-cooled and stored without degradation in sample quality. The 1,000-fold increased gold nanocrystal scattering vs. DNA enabled investigations at much lower concentrations than otherwise possible to avoid concentration-dependent tetramerization of the MMR initiation enzyme MutS. We analyzed the correlation scattering functions for the nanocrystals to provide higher resolution interparticle distributions not convoluted by the intraparticle distribution. We determined that mispair-containing DNAs were bent more by MutS than complementary sequence DNA (csDNA), did not promote tetramer formation, and allowed MutS conversion to a sliding clamp conformation that eliminated the DNA bends. Addition of second protein responder MutL did not stabilize the MutS-bent forms of DNA. Thus, DNA distortion is only involved at the earliest mispair recognition steps of MMR: MutL does not trap bent DNA conformations, suggesting migrating MutL or MutS/MutL complexes as a conserved feature of MMR. The results promote a mechanism of mismatch DNA bending followed by straightening in initial MutS and MutL responses in MMR. We demonstrate that small angle X-ray scattering with gold labels is an enabling method to examine protein-induced DNA distortions key to the DNA repair, replication, transcription, and packaging.

  18. DNA conformations in mismatch repair probed in solution by X-ray scattering from gold nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Hura, Greg L.; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Claridge, Shelley A.; Mendillo, Marc L.; Smith, Jessica M.; Williams, Gareth J.; Mastroianni, Alexander J.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.; Tainer, John A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA metabolism and processing frequently require transient or metastable DNA conformations that are biologically important but challenging to characterize. We use gold nanocrystal labels combined with small angle X-ray scattering to develop, test, and apply a method to follow DNA conformations acting in the Escherichia coli mismatch repair (MMR) system in solution. We developed a neutral PEG linker that allowed gold-labeled DNAs to be flash-cooled and stored without degradation in sample quality. The 1,000-fold increased gold nanocrystal scattering vs. DNA enabled investigations at much lower concentrations than otherwise possible to avoid concentration-dependent tetramerization of the MMR initiation enzyme MutS. We analyzed the correlation scattering functions for the nanocrystals to provide higher resolution interparticle distributions not convoluted by the intraparticle distribution. We determined that mispair-containing DNAs were bent more by MutS than complementary sequence DNA (csDNA), did not promote tetramer formation, and allowed MutS conversion to a sliding clamp conformation that eliminated the DNA bends. Addition of second protein responder MutL did not stabilize the MutS-bent forms of DNA. Thus, DNA distortion is only involved at the earliest mispair recognition steps of MMR: MutL does not trap bent DNA conformations, suggesting migrating MutL or MutS/MutL complexes as a conserved feature of MMR. The results promote a mechanism of mismatch DNA bending followed by straightening in initial MutS and MutL responses in MMR. We demonstrate that small angle X-ray scattering with gold labels is an enabling method to examine protein-induced DNA distortions key to the DNA repair, replication, transcription, and packaging. PMID:24101514

  19. Human MutL-complexes monitor homologous recombination independently of mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Siehler, Simone Yasmin; Schrauder, Michael; Gerischer, Ulrike; Cantor, Sharon; Marra, Giancarlo; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2009-02-01

    The role of mismatch repair proteins has been well studied in the context of DNA repair following DNA polymerase errors. Particularly in yeast, MSH2 and MSH6 have also been implicated in the regulation of genetic recombination, whereas MutL homologs appeared to be less important. So far, little is known about the role of the human MutL homolog hMLH1 in recombination, but recently described molecular interactions suggest an involvement. To identify activities of hMLH1 in this process, we applied an EGFP-based assay for the analysis of different mechanisms of DNA repair, initiated by a targeted double-stranded DNA break. We analysed 12 human cellular systems, differing in the hMLH1 and concomitantly in the hPMS1 and hPMS2 status via inducible protein expression, genetic reconstitution, or RNA interference. We demonstrate that hMLH1 and its complex partners hPMS1 and hPMS2 downregulate conservative homologous recombination (HR), particularly when involving DNA sequences with only short stretches of uninterrupted homology. Unexpectedly, hMSH2 is dispensable for this effect. Moreover, the damage-signaling kinase ATM and its substrates BLM and BACH1 are not strictly required, but the combined effect of ATM/ATR-signaling components may mediate the anti-recombinogenic effect. Our data indicate a protective role of hMutL-complexes in a process which may lead to detrimental genome rearrangements, in a manner which does not depend on mismatch repair.

  20. Effective site-energy model: A thermodynamic approach applied to size-mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, F.; Creuze, J.; Legrand, B.

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel energetic model that takes into account atomistic relaxations to describe the thermodynamic properties of AcB1 -c binary alloys. It requires the calculation of the energies on each site of a random solid solution after relaxation as a function of both the local composition and the nominal concentration. These site energies are obtained by molecular static simulations using N -body interatomic potentials derived from the second-moment approximation (SMA) of the tight-binding scheme. This new model allows us to determine the effective pair interactions (EPIs) that drive the short-range order (SRO) and to analyze the relative role of the EPIs' contribution to the mixing enthalpy, with respect to the contribution due to the lattice mismatch between the constituents. We apply this formalism to Au-Ni and Ag-Cu alloys, both of them tending to phase separate in the bulk and exhibiting a large size mismatch. Rigid-lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations lead to phase diagrams that are in good agreement with both those obtained by off-lattice SMA-MC simulations and the experimental ones. While the phase diagrams of Au-Ni and Ag-Cu alloys are very similar, we show that phase separation is mainly driven by the elastic contribution for Au-Ni and by the EPIs' contribution for Ag-Cu. Furthermore, for Au-Ni, the analysis of the SRO shows an inversion between the tendency to order and the tendency to phase separate as a function of the concentration.

  1. Novel DNA mismatch-repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Mason, Penelope A; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2009-06-04

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch-binding and recognition steps.

  2. A mismatch characterization and simulation environment for weak-to-strong inversion CMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde-Ramirez, J.; Vicente-Sanchez, G.; Serrano-Gotarredona, T.; Linares-Barranco, B.

    2005-06-01

    Mismatch analysis and simulation is crucial for modern analog design with submicron technologies, where transistors tend to be biased in weak and moderate inversion regions because of the down shrinking of power supply voltage. For optimum analog design where speed, power consumption, area, noise, and accuracy need to be carefully traded off, it is crucial to have available a precise estimation of transistor mismatch in order to avoid overdesign and consequently sacrify unnecessarily speed, power consumption, and area. In this paper we will provide experimental mismatch measurements of different 0.35um CMOS technologies. Each technology has been characterized for a large number of transistor sizes (25-30), by sweeping different width and length values. A large number of transistor curves are measured ranging over different possible biasing conditions. A recent mismatch model will be used to fit the data, and extract electrical parameters. Some of those parameters will be used to adjust the measured mismatch. As a result, a set of standard deviations and correlation coefficients result for the statistical characterization of the mismatch responsible parameters. The resulting electrical parameters, and statistical mismatch parameters are then used in the Spectre simulator of Cadence design environment, to implement the mismatch models using the AHDL behavioral level Spectre description language. The paper shows good agreement between measured data, predicted data, and simulated data.

  3. Fast Kids, Slow Kids, Lazy Kids: Framing the Mismatch Problem in Mathematics Teachers' Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Ilana Seidel

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the social nature of teachers' conceptions by showing how teachers frame the "mismatch" of students' perceived abilities and the intended school curriculum through conversational category systems. This study compares the conversations of 2 groups of high school mathematics teachers addressing the Mismatch Problem…

  4. Effect of Field-Independence Match or Mismatch on a Communication Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Bernard M.; Davis, J. Kent

    1982-01-01

    The effect of field independence-dependence match or mismatch within the context of a communication task was examined. Results showed field-independent matched dyads performed better than field-dependent matched dyads, with the mismatched conditions' performance falling between the matched ones. (Author/GK)

  5. Are Educational Mismatches Responsible for the "Inequality Increasing Effect" of Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budria, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks whether educational mismatches can account for the positive association between education and wage inequality found in the data. We use two different data sources, the European Community Household Panel and the Portuguese Labour Force Survey, and consider several types of mismatch, including overqualification, underqualification…

  6. Luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ Bound to RNA Mismatches

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Anna J.; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence of rac-[Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ (bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine) was explored in the presence of RNA oligonucleotides containing a single RNA mismatch (CA and GG) in order to develop a probe for RNA mismatches. While there is minimal luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ in the presence of matched RNA due to weak binding, the luminescence is significantly enhanced in the presence of a single CA mismatch. The luminescence differential between CA mismatched and matched RNA is substantially higher compared to the DNA analogue, and therefore, [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ appears to be also a sensitive light switch probe for a CA mismatch in duplex RNA. Although the luminescence intensity is lower in the presence of RNA than DNA, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor ruthenium complex and FRET acceptor SYTO 61 is successfully exploited to amplify the luminescence in the presence of the mismatch. Luminescence and quenching studies with sodium iodide suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ binds to these mismatches via metalloinsertion from the minor groove. This work provides further evidence that metalloinsertion is a general binding mode of octahedral metal complexes to thermodynamically destabilized mismatches not only in DNA, but also in RNA. PMID:23968195

  7. Ceppellini Lecture 2012: collateral damage from HLA mismatching in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Opelz, G; Döhler, B

    2013-10-01

    Inclusion of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching in donor kidney allocation schemes has been based solely on its association with graft survival. Other long-term effects associated with HLA incompatibility are largely unexplored. Data from deceased donor kidney transplants reported to the Collaborative Transplant Study have been analyzed to assess the relation between HLA mismatching and clinical events to 3 years post-transplant, and an overview of these analyses is presented. A significant correlation was observed between the number of mismatches and the need for anti-rejection therapy during the first year post-transplant, which was maintained for HLA-DR and HLA-A + B mismatching separately and at years 2 and 3 post-transplant. The number of HLA-DR mismatches and the number of HLA-A + B mismatches as well as rejection treatment showed significant associations with the dose of maintenance steroids. The cumulative incidences of death with a functioning graft from infection or cardiovascular causes, but not from cancer, were also significantly associated with HLA mismatching. The number of HLA-DR mismatches showed a significant association with the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and hip fractures. These findings show that the adverse consequences of HLA mismatching on kidney transplants extend beyond an effect on graft survival, and include an increased risk of death with a functioning graft, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and hip fracture. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. On the Mismatch between Multicultural Education and Its Subjects in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizrachi, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    This article draws attention to the growing evidence of a mismatch between sociological categorization and actors' worlds of meaning as expressed in the classroom. The mismatch is especially blatant in cases where students from disadvantaged groups are introduced to what educators and theorists presume to be the liberating discourse of…

  9. The Impact of Major-Job Mismatch on College Graduates' Early Career Earnings: Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the mismatch between a college major and job on college graduates' early career earnings using a sample from China. On average, a major-job mismatched college graduate is found to suffer from an income loss that is much lower than the penalty documented in previous studies. The income losses are also found to be…

  10. Luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ bound to RNA mismatches.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Anna J; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2013-09-03

    The luminescence of rac-[Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was explored in the presence of RNA oligonucleotides containing a single RNA mismatch (CA and GG) in order to develop a probe for RNA mismatches. While there is minimal luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) in the presence of matched RNA due to weak binding, the luminescence is significantly enhanced in the presence of a single CA mismatch. The luminescence differential between CA mismatched and matched RNA is substantially higher compared to the DNA analogue, and therefore, [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) appears to be also a sensitive light switch probe for a CA mismatch in duplex RNA. Although the luminescence intensity is lower in the presence of RNA than DNA, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor ruthenium complex and FRET acceptor SYTO 61 is successfully exploited to amplify the luminescence in the presence of the mismatch. Luminescence and quenching studies with sodium iodide suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) binds to these mismatches via metalloinsertion from the minor groove. This work provides further evidence that metalloinsertion is a general binding mode of octahedral metal complexes to thermodynamically destabilized mismatches not only in DNA but also in RNA.

  11. On the Mismatch between Multicultural Education and Its Subjects in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizrachi, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    This article draws attention to the growing evidence of a mismatch between sociological categorization and actors' worlds of meaning as expressed in the classroom. The mismatch is especially blatant in cases where students from disadvantaged groups are introduced to what educators and theorists presume to be the liberating discourse of…

  12. A Modified Protocol with Improved Detection Rate for Mis-Matched Donor HLA from Low Quantities of DNA in Urine Samples from Kidney Graft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Janette; Choi, Leo C W; Ho, Jenny C Y; Chan, Gavin S W; Mok, Maggie M Y; Lam, Man-Fei; Chak, Wai-Leung; Cheuk, Au; Chau, Ka-Foon; Tong, Matthew; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Chan, Tak-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Urine from kidney transplant recipient has proven to be a viable source for donor DNA. However, an optimized protocol would be required to determine mis-matched donor HLA specificities in view of the scarcity of DNA obtained in some cases. In this study, fresh early morning urine specimens were obtained from 155 kidney transplant recipients with known donor HLA phenotype. DNA was extracted and typing of HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci by polymerase chain reaction-specific sequence primers was performed using tailor-made condition according to the concentration of extracted DNA. HLA typing of DNA extracted from urine revealed both recipient and donor HLA phenotypes, allowing the deduction of the unknown donor HLA and hence the degree of HLA mis-match. By adopting the modified procedures, mis-matched donor HLA phenotypes were successfully deduced in all of 35 tested urine samples at DNA quantities spanning the range of 620-24,000 ng. This urine-based method offers a promising and reliable non-invasive means for the identification of mis-matched donor HLA antigens in kidney transplant recipients with unknown donor HLA phenotype or otherwise inadequate donor information.

  13. A Modified Protocol with Improved Detection Rate for Mis-Matched Donor HLA from Low Quantities of DNA in Urine Samples from Kidney Graft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Janette; Choi, Leo C. W.; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Chan, Gavin S. W.; Mok, Maggie M. Y.; Lam, Man-Fei; Chak, Wai-Leung; Cheuk, Au; Chau, Ka-Foon; Tong, Matthew; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Chan, Tak-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Background Urine from kidney transplant recipient has proven to be a viable source for donor DNA. However, an optimized protocol would be required to determine mis-matched donor HLA specificities in view of the scarcity of DNA obtained in some cases. Methods In this study, fresh early morning urine specimens were obtained from 155 kidney transplant recipients with known donor HLA phenotype. DNA was extracted and typing of HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci by polymerase chain reaction-specific sequence primers was performed using tailor-made condition according to the concentration of extracted DNA. Results HLA typing of DNA extracted from urine revealed both recipient and donor HLA phenotypes, allowing the deduction of the unknown donor HLA and hence the degree of HLA mis-match. By adopting the modified procedures, mis-matched donor HLA phenotypes were successfully deduced in all of 35 tested urine samples at DNA quantities spanning the range of 620–24,000 ng. Conclusions This urine-based method offers a promising and reliable non-invasive means for the identification of mis-matched donor HLA antigens in kidney transplant recipients with unknown donor HLA phenotype or otherwise inadequate donor information. PMID:27861530

  14. The Shape Interaction Matrix-Based Affine Invariant Mismatch Removal for Partial-Duplicate Image Search.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Lin, Zhouchen; Zha, Hongbin

    2017-02-01

    Mismatch removal is a key step in many computer vision problems. In this paper, we handle the mismatch removal problem by adopting shape interaction matrix (SIM). Given the homogeneous coordinates of the two corresponding point sets, we first compute the SIMs of the two point sets. Then, we detect the mismatches by picking out the most different entries between the two SIMs. Even under strong affine transformations, outliers, noises, and burstiness, our method can still work well. Actually, this paper is the first non-iterative mismatch removal method that achieves affine invariance. Extensive results on synthetic 2D points matching data sets and real image matching data sets verify the effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness of our method in removing mismatches. Moreover, when applied to partial-duplicate image search, our method reaches higher retrieval precisions with shorter time cost compared with the state-of-the-art geometric verification methods.

  15. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  16. Emotion-Related Visual Mismatch Responses in Schizophrenia: Impairments and Correlations with Emotion Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Csukly, Gábor; Stefanics, Gábor; Komlósi, Sarolta; Czigler, István; Czobor, Pál

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential (ERP) measure of preattentional sensory processing. While deficits in the auditory MMN are robust electrophysiological findings in schizophrenia, little is known about visual mismatch response and its association with social cognitive functions such as emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Our aim was to study the potential deficit in the visual mismatch response to unexpected facial emotions in schizophrenia and its association with emotion recognition impairments, and to localize the sources of the mismatch signals. Experimental Design The sample comprised 24 patients with schizophrenia and 24 healthy control subjects. Controls were matched individually to patients by gender, age, and education. ERPs were recorded using a high-density 128-channel BioSemi amplifier. Mismatch responses to happy and fearful faces were determined in 2 time windows over six regions of interest (ROIs). Emotion recognition performance and its association with the mismatch response were also investigated. Principal Observations Mismatch signals to both emotional conditions were significantly attenuated in patients compared to controls in central and temporal ROIs. Controls recognized emotions significantly better than patients. The association between overall emotion recognition performance and mismatch response to the happy condition was significant in the 250–360 ms time window in the central ROI. The estimated sources of the mismatch responses for both emotional conditions were localized in frontal regions, where patients showed significantly lower activity. Conclusions Impaired generation of mismatch signals indicate insufficient automatic processing of emotions in patients with schizophrenia, which correlates strongly with decreased emotion recognition. PMID:24116046

  17. Single-molecule views of MutS on mismatched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Bong; Cho, Won-Ki; Park, Jonghyun; Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Fishel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Base-pair mismatches that occur during DNA replication or recombination can reduce genetic stability or conversely increase genetic diversity. The genetics and biophysical mechanism of mismatch repair (MMR) has been extensively studied since its discovery nearly 50 years ago. MMR is a strand-specific excision-resynthesis reaction that is initiated by MutS homolog (MSH) binding to the mismatched nucleotides. The MSH mismatch-binding signal is then transmitted to the immediate downstream MutL homolog (MLH/PMS) MMR components and ultimately to a distant strand scission site where excision begins. The mechanism of signal transmission has been controversial for decades. We have utilized single molecule Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET), Fluorescence Tracking (smFT) and Polarization Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (smP-TIRF) to examine the interactions and dynamic behaviors of single Thermus aquaticus MutS (TaqMutS) particles on mismatched DNA. We determined that Taq-MutS forms an incipient clamp to search for a mismatch in ∼1 s intervals by 1-dimensional (1D) thermal fluctuation-driven rotational diffusion while in continuous contact with the helical duplex DNA. When MutS encounters a mismatch it lingers for ∼3 s to exchange bound ADP for ATP (ADP → ATP exchange). ATP binding by TaqMutS induces an extremely stable clamp conformation (∼10 min) that slides off the mismatch and moves along the adjacent duplex DNA driven simply by 1D thermal diffusion. The ATP-bound sliding clamps rotate freely while in discontinuous contact with the DNA. The visualization of a train of MSH proteins suggests that dissociation of ATP-bound sliding clamps from the mismatch permits multiple mismatch-dependent loading events. These direct observations have provided critical clues into understanding the molecular mechanism of MSH proteins during MMR. PMID:24629484

  18. Employability of German Geography Graduates: The Mismatch between Knowledge Acquired and Competences Required

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennemann, Stefan; Liefner, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    The employability of university graduates is a concern in higher education as labour markets change more and more rapidly. This is of particular relevance for multi-faceted subjects such as geography. Studies on employability have to consider to what degree a university education helps graduates start a career. The results of a survey of 257…

  19. Employability of German Geography Graduates: The Mismatch between Knowledge Acquired and Competences Required

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennemann, Stefan; Liefner, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    The employability of university graduates is a concern in higher education as labour markets change more and more rapidly. This is of particular relevance for multi-faceted subjects such as geography. Studies on employability have to consider to what degree a university education helps graduates start a career. The results of a survey of 257…

  20. Marrow Ablative and Immunosuppressive Effects of I-131-anti-CD45 Antibody in Congenic and H2-Mismatched Murine Transplant Models

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D. C.; Martin, P J.; Nourigat, C.; Appelbaum, F. R.; Fisher, Darrell R. ); Bernstein, I. D.

    1998-12-01

    Targeted hematopoietic irradiation delivered by I-131-anti-CD45 antibody has been combined with conventional marrow transplant preparative regimens in an effort to decrease relapse. Before increasing the proportion of therapy delivered by radiolabeled antibody, the myeloablative and immunosuppressive effects of such low dose rate irradiation must be quantitated. We have examined the ability of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody to facilitate engraftment in Ly5-congenic and H2-mismatched murine marrow transplant models. Recipient B6-Ly5-a mice were treated with 30F11 antibody labeled with 0.1 to 1.5 mCi I-131 and/or total body irradiation (TBI), followed by T-cell-depleted marrow from Ly5-b-congenic (C57BL/6) or H2-mismatched (BALB/c) donors. Engraftment was achieved readily in the Ly5-congenic setting, with greater than 80% donor granulocytes and T cells after 0.5 mCi I-131 (estimated 17 Gy to marrow) or 8 Gy TBI. A higher TBI dose (14 Gy) was required to achieve engraftment of H2-mismatched mar row, and engraftment occurred in only 3 of 11 mice receiving 1.5 mCi I-131 delivered by anti-CD45 antibody. Engraftment of H2-mismatched marrow was achieved in 22 of 23 animals receiving 0.75 mCi I-131 delivered by anti-CD45 antibody combined with 8 Gy TBI. Thus, targeted radiation delivered via I-131-anti-CD45 antibody can enable engraftment of congenic marrow and can partially replace TBI when transplanting T-cell-depleted H2-mismatched marrow.

  1. Negative effects of a disulfide bond mismatch in anti-rabies G protein single-chain antibody variable fragment FV57.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ye; Gu, Tiejun; Zhang, Xizhen; Jiang, Chunlai; Yuan, Ruosen; Li, Zhuang; Wang, Dandan; Chen, Xiaoxu; Wu, Chunlai; Chen, Yan; Wu, Yongge; Kong, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Rabies virus (RV) causes a fatal infectious disease requiring efficient post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which includes a rabies vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). The single-chain antibody variable fragment (scFv), a small engineered antibody fragment derived from an antibody variable heavy chain and light chain, has the potential to replace the current application of RIG. In previous studies, we constructed and evaluated an anti-rabies virus G protein scFv (FV57) based on the monoclonal antibody CR57. Of the five cysteines in FV57, four are linked in intra-chain disulfide bonds (Cys-VH28/Cys-VH98 and Cys-VL16/Cys-VL84), and one is free (Cys-VL85). However, the thiol in Cys-VL85 neighboring Cys-VL84 in the CDR3 of the light chain is likely to mismatch with the thiol in Cys-VL16 during the renaturing process. In order to study effects of the mismatched disulfide bond, Cys-VL85 and Cys-VL84 of FV57 were mutated to serine to construct mutants FV57(VL85S) and FV57(VL84S). Furthermore, the disulfide bonds in the light chain of FV57, FV57(VL85S) and FV57(VL84S) were deleted by mutating Cys-VL16 to serine. All mutants were prepared and evaluated along with the original FV57. The results indicated that the mismatched disulfide bond of FV57 linking the light chain FR1 and CDR3 would confer deleterious negative effects on its activity against RV, likely due to spatial hindrance in the light chain CDR3. Moreover, avoidance of the disulfide bond mismatch provided an additional 30% protective efficacy against RV infection in the mouse RV challenge model. Thus, modifications of FV57 to eliminate the disulfide bond mismatch may provide a candidate therapeutic agent for effective PEP against rabies.

  2. Repair of Single- and Multiple-Substitution Mismatches during Recombination in Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gasc, A. M.; Sicard, A. M.; Claverys, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use as genetic markers, during transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae, of 19 sequences differing from wild type, located throughout the amiA locus, enabled us to examine the fate of 24 single- and 11 multiple-mismatches during recombination. Tentative mismatch ranking as a function of decreasing repair efficiency by the Hex mismatch repair system is G/T = A/C = G/G (maximum repair: 90-95%) > C/T (mostly 75 to 90% repair) > A/A (from 50 to 90% repair) > T/T (50-65% repair) > A/G (from 0 to 20% repair) > C/C. No indication of correction of the latter has been obtained. Over the limited number of samples examined, we observed no influence of the base composition of the surrounding sequence on correction efficiency for both transition mismatches and for G/G and C/C. Variations in the surrounding sequence affect repair of A/G and C/T, and, even more strongly, of A/A and T/T. No simple correlation to the G:C content of the surrounding sequence is apparent from our results, in contrast to the conclusion drawn for the Mut mismatch repair system of Escherichia coli. Examination of the fate of multiple mismatches suggests that C/C may sometimes impede recognition of otherwise corrected mismatches. PMID:2645195

  3. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex drives hippocampal theta oscillations induced by mismatch computations.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Marta I; Barnes, Gareth R; Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-10-15

    Detecting environmental change is fundamental for adaptive behavior in an uncertain world. Previous work indicates the hippocampus supports the generation of novelty signals via implementation of a match-mismatch detector that signals when an incoming sensory input violates expectations based on past experience. While existing work has emphasized the particular contribution of the hippocampus, here we ask which other brain structures also contribute to match-mismatch detection. Furthermore, we leverage the fine-grained temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate whether mismatch computations are spectrally confined to the theta range, based on the prominence of this range of oscillations in models of hippocampal function. By recording MEG activity while human subjects perform a task that incorporates conditions of match-mismatch novelty we show that mismatch signals are confined to the theta band and are expressed in both the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Effective connectivity analyses (dynamic causal modeling) show that the hippocampus and vmPFC work as a functional circuit during mismatch detection. Surprisingly, our results suggest that the vmPFC drives the hippocampus during the generation and processing of mismatch signals. Our findings provide new evidence that the hippocampal-vmPFC circuit is engaged during novelty processing, which has implications for emerging theories regarding the role of vmPFC in memory.

  4. Social, Spatial, and Skill Mismatch among Immigrants and Native-Born Workers in Los Angeles. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Manuel, Jr.; Marcelli, Enrico A.

    Racially different economic outcomes stem from multiple causes, including various "mismatches" between minority employees and available jobs. A skill mismatch occurs when individuals' education and job skills do not qualify them for existing jobs. A spatial mismatch means that people live far from the work for which they qualify. A…

  5. Meniscus replacement: Influence of geometrical mismatches on chondroprotective capabilities.

    PubMed

    Párraga Quiroga, J M; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2015-06-01

    The chondroprotective success of meniscal transplantation is variable. Poorly controlled factors such as a geometrical mismatch of the implant may be partly responsible. Clinical data, animal studies and cadaver experiments suggest that smaller transplants perform better than oversized, but clear evidence is lacking. The hypothesis of this study is that smaller menisci outperform larger ones because they distribute stresses more effectively at those particular locations that receive the highest loads. Consequently, collagen in the adjacent cartilage is protected from damage due to overstraining. Experimentally it is not possible to measure load distribution and collagen strain inside articular cartilage (AC). Therefore, a numerical model was used to determine the mechanical conditions throughout the depth of the AC. Meniscus implants with different sizes and mechanical properties were evaluated. These were compared with healthy and with meniscectomized joints. To account for the time-dependent behavior 600s of loading was simulated; results were visualized after 1s and 600s. Simulations showed that AC's strains strongly depended on implant size and loading duration. They depended less on the stiffness of the implant material. With an oversized implant, collagen strains were particularly large in the femoral AC initially and further increased upon sustained loading. The severest compressive strains occurred after sustained loading in the meniscectomized joint. Strains with an undersized meniscus were comparable to a perfectly sized implant. In conclusion, these results support the hypothesis that an undersized implant may outperform an oversized one because it distributes stresses better in the most intensely loaded joint area.

  6. Mismatch negativity of higher amplitude for melodic ascendance than descendance.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvirta, Timo T; Astikainen, Piia

    2012-03-07

    The auditory system prefers, presumably because of evolutionary adaptation, melodically upward over downward steps in sound frequency. The mismatch negativity (MMN) of event-related potentials (ERPs) to auditory oddball stimuli, an index of preattentive auditory change detection, is also augmented for the upward relative to the downward steps. We aimed to test whether this melodic MMN asymmetry shows specificity to the oddball stimuli. Auditory ERPs were recorded in adult humans during a visual task. In an oddball condition, a repeated 400 Hz tone was occasionally (P=0.01) replaced either by a 380 Hz or by a 420 Hz tone. In a same-rate condition, the tones of the three frequencies occurred at equal probabilities (P=0.33). In the oddball condition, frontally augmented ERPs of negative polarity (MMN) were found to be of higher amplitude for the 420 Hz tone than for the 380 Hz tone. In the same-rate condition, ERPs did not distinguish between the tones. The findings associate the melodic MMN asymmetry with the neural detection of oddball tones in particular.

  7. Modelling Trial-by-Trial Changes in the Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Lieder, Falk; Daunizeau, Jean; Garrido, Marta I.; Friston, Karl J.; Stephan, Klaas E.

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is a differential brain response to violations of learned regularities. It has been used to demonstrate that the brain learns the statistical structure of its environment and predicts future sensory inputs. However, the algorithmic nature of these computations and the underlying neurobiological implementation remain controversial. This article introduces a mathematical framework with which competing ideas about the computational quantities indexed by MMN responses can be formalized and tested against single-trial EEG data. This framework was applied to five major theories of the MMN, comparing their ability to explain trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude. Three of these theories (predictive coding, model adjustment, and novelty detection) were formalized by linking the MMN to different manifestations of the same computational mechanism: approximate Bayesian inference according to the free-energy principle. We thereby propose a unifying view on three distinct theories of the MMN. The relative plausibility of each theory was assessed against empirical single-trial MMN amplitudes acquired from eight healthy volunteers in a roving oddball experiment. Models based on the free-energy principle provided more plausible explanations of trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude than models representing the two more traditional theories (change detection and adaptation). Our results suggest that the MMN reflects approximate Bayesian learning of sensory regularities, and that the MMN-generating process adjusts a probabilistic model of the environment according to prediction errors. PMID:23436989

  8. The mismatch between laboratory boiling heat transfer data and industrialrequirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beduz, C.; Scurlock, R. G.

    There is a large mis-match between published boiling heat transferdata and the operation of industrial cryogenic plant. Published data are generally obtained on small laboratory test-rigs at uniform heat flux with vertical channel heights of the order of 50mm. Operation of industrial plant demands a constant wall temperature and vertical channel heights of up to 2000mm (2m). Using a 2.7m long cryostat with forced circulation of liquid nitrogen to promote an isothermal bath temperature, results show that boiling heat transfer at constant wall temperature Tw (as in a reboiler-condenser) is strongly affected by local sub-cooling of the liquid. Indeed, no boiling takes place until Tw exceeds the local boiling temperature determined by the pressure head of the liquid. For high thermodynamic efficiency, boiling heat transfer with smalltemperature difference T w-T 0 (where T 0 is the surface saturation temperature) there is a depth of liquid below which there is no boiling.

  9. Systematic misestimation in a vernier task arising from contrast mismatch.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Lee, Barry B; Baraas, Rigmor C

    2008-01-01

    Luminance signals mediated by the magnocellular (MC) pathway play an important role in vernier tasks. MC ganglion cells show a phase advance in their responses to sinusoidal stimuli with increasing contrast due to contrast gain control mechanisms. If the phase information in MC ganglion cell responses were utilized by central mechanisms in vernier tasks, one might expect systematic errors caused by the phase advance. This systematic error may contribute to the contrast paradox phenomenon, where vernier performance deteriorates, rather than improves, when only one of the target pair increases in contrast. Vernier psychometric functions for a pair of gratings of mismatched contrast were measured to seek such misestimation. In associated electrophysiological experiments, MC and parvocellular (PC) ganglion cells' responses to similar stimuli were measured to provide a physiological reference. The psychophysical experiments show that a high-contrast grating is perceived as phase advanced in the drift direction compared to a low-contrast grating, especially at a high drift rate (8 Hz). The size of the phase advance was comparable to that seen in MC cells under similar stimulus conditions. These results are consistent with the MC pathway supporting vernier performance with achromatic gratings. The shifts in vernier psychometric functions were negligible for pairs of chromatic gratings under the conditions tested here, consistent with the lack of phase advance both in responses of PC ganglion cells and in frequency-doubled chromatic responses of MC ganglion cells.

  10. The visual mismatch negativity elicited with visual speech stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Files, Benjamin T.; Auer, Edward T.; Bernstein, Lynne E.

    2013-01-01

    The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN), deriving from the brain's response to stimulus deviance, is thought to be generated by the cortex that represents the stimulus. The vMMN response to visual speech stimuli was used in a study of the lateralization of visual speech processing. Previous research suggested that the right posterior temporal cortex has specialization for processing simple non-speech face gestures, and the left posterior temporal cortex has specialization for processing visual speech gestures. Here, visual speech consonant-vowel (CV) stimuli with controlled perceptual dissimilarities were presented in an electroencephalography (EEG) vMMN paradigm. The vMMNs were obtained using the comparison of event-related potentials (ERPs) for separate CVs in their roles as deviant vs. their roles as standard. Four separate vMMN contrasts were tested, two with the perceptually far deviants (i.e., “zha” or “fa”) and two with the near deviants (i.e., “zha” or “ta”). Only far deviants evoked the vMMN response over the left posterior temporal cortex. All four deviants evoked vMMNs over the right posterior temporal cortex. The results are interpreted as evidence that the left posterior temporal cortex represents speech contrasts that are perceived as different consonants, and the right posterior temporal cortex represents face gestures that may not be perceived as different CVs. PMID:23882205

  11. Rubberband Effect in Temporal Control of Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a difference event-related potential (ERP) wave reflecting the brain’s automatic reaction to deviant sensory stimuli, and it has been proven to be a useful tool in research on cognitive functions or clinical disorders. In most MMN studies, amplitude, peak latency, or the integral of the responses, in rare cases also the slopes of the responses, have been employed as parameters of the ERP responses for quantitative analyses. However, little is known about correlations between these parameters. To better understand the relations between different ERP parameters, we extracted and correlated several different parameters characterizing the MMN waves. We found an unexpected correlation which gives new insight into the temporal control of MMN: response amplitudes are positively correlated with downside slopes, whereas barely correlated with upside slopes. This result suggests an efficient feedback mechanism for the MMN to return to the baseline within a predefined time window, contradicting an exponential decay function as one might expect. As a metaphor we suggest a rubberband effect for the MMN responses, i.e., the larger the distance of the response from neural equilibrium, the stronger the return force to equilibrium. PMID:27642285

  12. Modeling Ketamine Effects on Synaptic Plasticity During the Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, André; Diaconescu, Andreea O.; Kometer, Michael; Friston, Karl J.; Stephan, Klaas E.; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based investigation of mechanisms underlying the reduction of mismatch negativity (MMN) amplitudes under the NMDA-receptor antagonist ketamine. We applied dynamic causal modeling and Bayesian model selection to data from a recent ketamine study of the roving MMN paradigm, using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Our modeling was guided by a predictive coding framework that unifies contemporary “adaptation” and “model adjustment” MMN theories. Comparing a series of dynamic causal models that allowed for different expressions of neuronal adaptation and synaptic plasticity, we obtained 3 major results: 1) We replicated previous results that both adaptation and short-term plasticity are necessary to explain MMN generation per se; 2) we found significant ketamine effects on synaptic plasticity, but not adaptation, and a selective ketamine effect on the forward connection from left primary auditory cortex to superior temporal gyrus; 3) this model-based estimate of ketamine effects on synaptic plasticity correlated significantly with ratings of ketamine-induced impairments in cognition and control. Our modeling approach thus suggests a concrete mechanism for ketamine effects on MMN that correlates with drug-induced psychopathology. More generally, this demonstrates the potential of modeling for inferring on synaptic physiology, and its pharmacological modulation, from electroencephalography data. PMID:22875863

  13. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses.

    PubMed

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-02-15

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy-projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of contralateral white noise masking on the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Salo, S K; Lang, A H; Salmivalli, A J

    1995-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditive event-related potential (ERP) component, evoked by deviant stimuli in a homogeneous stream of standard stimuli was studied in a unilateral stimulation and contralateral white noise masking condition. Eleven subjects (Ss) with normal hearing (aged 20-35 years) were examined using sine tone stimuli (70 dB HL, interstimulus interval 300 ms, duration 40 ms with 5 ms rise and fall times). Three blocks of standard (std)/deviant (dev) series of stimuli were used: std 500/dev 600 Hz, std 2000/dev 1900 Hz, and std 2000/dev 1600 Hz. The first block was repeated for another group of 11 Ss with normal hearing (aged 17-27 years). The MMN was analysed from the difference curves recorded at Fz, Cz and Pz. The stimuli were delivered unilaterally, either with or without 50 dB effective masking level white noise to the contralateral ear. The MMN amplitude attenuated significantly when contralateral masking was used. In addition, there was interaction between noise masking and the stimulated ear. The MMN latencies were not affected by white noise masking.

  15. Electrical current through DNA containing mismatched base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edirisinghe, Neranjan; Apalkov, Vadym; Berashevich, Julia; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-06-01

    Mismatched base pairs, such as different conformations of the G·A mispair, cause only minor structural changes in the host DNA molecule, thereby making mispair recognition an arduous task. Electron transport in DNA that depends strongly on the hopping transfer integrals between the nearest base pairs, which in turn are affected by the presence of a mispair, might be an attractive approach in this regard. We report here on our investigations, via the I-V characteristics, of the effect of a mispair on the electrical properties of homogeneous and generic DNA molecules. The I-V characteristics of DNA were studied numerically within the double-stranded tight-binding model. The parameters of the tight-binding model, such as the transfer integrals and on-site energies, are determined from first-principles calculations. The changes in electrical current through the DNA chain due to the presence of a mispair depend on the conformation of the G·A mispair and are appreciable for DNA consisting of up to 90 base pairs. For homogeneous DNA sequences the current through DNA is suppressed and the strongest suppression is realized for the G(anti)·A(syn) conformation of the G·A mispair. For inhomogeneous (generic) DNA molecules, the mispair result can be either a suppression or an enhancement of the current, depending on the type of mispairs and actual DNA sequence.

  16. Maternal effect for DNA mismatch repair in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Gurtu, Vanessa E; Verma, Shelly; Grossmann, Allie H; Liskay, R Michael; Skarnes, William C; Baker, Sean M

    2002-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (DMR) functions to maintain genome stability. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells deficient in DMR show a microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype characterized by repeat length alterations at microsatellite sequences. Mice deficient in Pms2, a mammalian homolog of bacterial mutL, develop cancer and display MSI in all tissues examined, including the male germ line where a frequency of approximately 10% was observed. To determine the consequences of maternal DMR deficiency on genetic stability, we analyzed F(1) progeny from Pms2(-/-) female mice mated with wild-type males. Our analysis indicates that MSI in the female germ line was approximately 9%. MSI was also observed in paternal alleles, a surprising result since the alleles were obtained from wild-type males and the embryos were therefore DMR proficient. We propose that mosaicism for paternal alleles is a maternal effect that results from Pms2 deficiency during the early cleavage divisions. The absence of DMR in one-cell embryos leads to the formation of unrepaired replication errors in early cell divisions of the zygote. The occurrence of postzygotic mutation in the early mouse embryo suggests that Pms2 deficiency is a maternal effect, one of a limited number identified in the mouse and the first to involve a DNA repair gene. PMID:11805062

  17. DNA hybridization to mismatched templates: A chip study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naef, Felix; Lim, Daniel A.; Patil, Nila; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2002-04-01

    High-density oligonucleotide arrays are among the most rapidly expanding technologies in biology today. In the GeneChip system, the reconstruction of the sample mRNA concentrations depends upon the differential signal generated by hybridizing the RNA to two nearly identical templates: a perfect match probe (PM) containing the exact biological sequence; and a single mismatch (MM) differing from the PM by a single base substitution. It has been observed that a large fraction of MMs repeatably bind targets better than the PMs, against the obvious expectation of sequence specificity. We examine this problem via statistical analysis of a large set of microarray experiments. We classify the probes according to their signal to noise (S/N) ratio, defined as the eccentricity of a (PM,MM) pair's ``trajectory'' across many experiments. Of those probes having large S/N (>3) only a fraction behave consistently with the commonly assumed hybridization model. Our results imply that the physics of DNA hybridization in microarrays is more complex than expected, and suggest estimators for the target RNA concentration.

  18. Modeling cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. M.; Speck, J. S.; Romanov, A. E.; Bobeth, M.; Pompe, W.

    2002-02-01

    We propose and investigate a model for the development of cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers. The model incorporates two important elements: (i) strain relaxation due to dislocation glide in the layer (film) interior that is also associated with misfit dislocation formation at the film/substrate interface and (ii) lateral surface transport that eliminates surface steps that originated from dislocation glide. A combination of dislocation-assisted strain relaxation and surface step flow leads to the appearance of surface height undulations during layer growth. A Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to model dislocation nucleation events in the course of strain relaxation. The simulation was used to model the influence of dislocations on film surface height profiles. The surface height displacement was calculated from the analytic elasticity solutions for edge dislocations near a free surface. The results of the modeling predict that the average amplitude of the surface undulations and their apparent wavelength both increase with increasing film relaxation and film thickness. The developed cross-hatch pattern is characterized by an atomically smooth but mesoscopically (lateral dimensions ˜0.1-10 μm) rough surface morphology. The conclusions of the model are in agreement with atomic force microscopy observations of cross-hatch surface relief in In0.25Ga0.75As/GaAs samples grown well beyond the critical thickness for misfit dislocation formation.

  19. The mismatch negativity in evaluating central auditory dysfunction in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Kujala, T; Näätänen, R

    2001-08-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN), a brain response elicited by a discriminable change in any repetitive aspect of auditory stimulation even in the absence of attention, has been widely used in both basic and clinical research during recent years. The fact that the MMN reflects the accuracy of auditory discrimination and that it can be obtained even from unattentive subjects makes it an especially attractive tool for studying various central auditory-system dysfunctions both in adults and children. In this review, we will discuss the applicability of the MMN to studies in dyslexia, which is currently thought, in the majority of the cases, to primarily result either from a dysfunction of the phonological system or a more general auditory deficit. Recent evidence indicates that the MMN enables one to determine which aspects of auditory information are deficiently processed in dyslexia. The MMN might also be helpful in the early definition of the dyslexia type, which would make it possible to start correctly-targeted training programmes before any major learning delays occur. Furthermore, the MMN holds promise of showing plastic changes in the brain of dyslexic individuals underlying the alleviation or remediation of dyslexia in the course of a successful training programme.

  20. Modelling trial-by-trial changes in the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Falk; Daunizeau, Jean; Garrido, Marta I; Friston, Karl J; Stephan, Klaas E

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is a differential brain response to violations of learned regularities. It has been used to demonstrate that the brain learns the statistical structure of its environment and predicts future sensory inputs. However, the algorithmic nature of these computations and the underlying neurobiological implementation remain controversial. This article introduces a mathematical framework with which competing ideas about the computational quantities indexed by MMN responses can be formalized and tested against single-trial EEG data. This framework was applied to five major theories of the MMN, comparing their ability to explain trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude. Three of these theories (predictive coding, model adjustment, and novelty detection) were formalized by linking the MMN to different manifestations of the same computational mechanism: approximate Bayesian inference according to the free-energy principle. We thereby propose a unifying view on three distinct theories of the MMN. The relative plausibility of each theory was assessed against empirical single-trial MMN amplitudes acquired from eight healthy volunteers in a roving oddball experiment. Models based on the free-energy principle provided more plausible explanations of trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude than models representing the two more traditional theories (change detection and adaptation). Our results suggest that the MMN reflects approximate Bayesian learning of sensory regularities, and that the MMN-generating process adjusts a probabilistic model of the environment according to prediction errors.

  1. Mammalian mismatches in nucleotide metabolism: implications for xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Khalpey, Zain; Yuen, Ada H Y; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; McGregor, Christopher G A; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Yacoub, Magdi H; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2007-10-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) limits the clinical application of animal organs for xenotransplantation. Mammalian disparities in nucleotide metabolism may contribute significantly to the microvascular component in AHR; these, however remain ill-defined. We evaluated the extent of species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism. HPLC analysis was performed on venous blood samples (nucleotide metabolites) and heart biopsies (purine enzymes) from wild type mice, rats, pigs, baboons, and human donors.Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E5'N) activities were 4-fold lower in pigs and baboon hearts compared to human and mice hearts while rat activity was highest. Similar differences between pigs and humans were also observed with kidneys and endothelial cells. More than 10-fold differences were observed with other purine enzymes. AMP deaminase (AMPD) activity was exceptionally high in mice but very low in pig and baboon hearts. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was highest in baboons. Adenosine kinase (AK) activity was more consistent across different species. Pig blood had the highest levels of hypoxanthine, inosine and adenine. Human blood uric acid concentration was almost 100 times higher than in other species studied. We conclude that species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism may affect compatibility of pig organs within a human metabolic environment. Furthermore, nucleotide metabolic mismatches may affect clinical relevance of animal organ transplant models. Supplementation of deficient precursors or application of inhibitors of nucleotide metabolism (e.g., allopurinol) or transgenic upregulation of E5'N may overcome some of these differences.

  2. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J.; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J.; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy—projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. PMID:26584870

  3. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:26708047

  4. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies.

  5. Development of a simple and highly sensitive mutation screening system by enzyme mismatch cleavage with optimized conditions for standard laboratories.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takanori; Niida, Yo

    2008-04-01

    Efficient screening of unknown DNA variations is one of the substantive matters of molecular biology even today. Historically, SSCP and heteroduplex analysis (HA) are the most commonly used methods for detecting DNA variations everywhere in the world because of their simplicity. However, the sensitivity of these methods is not satisfactory for screening purpose. Recently, several new PCR-based mutation screening methods have been developed, but most of them require special instruments and adjustment of conditions for each DNA sequence to attain the maximum sensitivity, eventually becoming as inconvenient as old methods. Enzyme mismatch cleavage (EMC) is potentially an ideal screening method. With high-performance nucleases and once experimental conditions are optimized, it requires only conventional staff and conditions remain the same for each PCR product. In this study we tested four commercially available endonucleases for EMC and optimized the electrophoresis and developing conditions. We prepared 25 known DNA variations consisting of 18 single base substitutions (8 transitions and 10 transversions, including all possible sets of mismatches) and 7 small deletions or insertions. The combination of CEL nuclease, 12% PAGE and rapid silver staining can detect all types of mutations and achieved 100% sensitivity.

  6. Economic thermoregulatory response explains mismatch between thermal physiology and behaviour in newts.

    PubMed

    Gvoždík, Lumír; Kristín, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Temperature is an important factor determining distribution and abundance of organisms. Predicting the impact of warming climate on ectotherm populations requires information about species' thermal requirements, i.e. their so-called 'thermal niche'. The characterization of thermal niche remains a complicated task. We compared the applicability of two indirect approaches, based on reaction norm (aerobic scope curve) and optimality (preferred body temperature) concepts, for indirect estimation of thermal niche while using newts, Ichthyosaura alpestris, as a study system. If the two approaches are linked, then digesting newts should keep their body temperatures close to values maximizing aerobic scope for digestion. After feeding, newts maintained their body temperatures within a narrower range than did hungry individuals. The range of preferred body temperatures was well below the temperature maximizing aerobic scope for digestion. Optimal temperatures for factorial aerobic scope fell within the preferred body temperature range of digesting individuals. We conclude that digesting newts prefer body temperatures that are optimal for the maximum aerobic performance but relative to the maintenance costs. What might be termed the 'economic' thermoregulatory response explains the mismatch between thermal physiology and behaviour in this system.

  7. Autofrettage to Counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Mismatch in Cryogenic Pressurized Pipes with Metallic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Ed; Barbero, Ever; Tygielski, Phlip; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Composite feedlines with metal liners have the potential to reduce weight/cost while providing the same level of permeation resistance and material compatibility of all-metal feedlines carrying cryogenic propellants in spacecraft. The major technical challenges are the large difference in Coefficient of Thermal Expansion between the liner and the composite, and the manufacturing method required to make a very thin liner with the required strength and dimensional tolerance. This study investigates the use of autofrettage (compressive preload) to counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion when pre-pressurization procedures cannot be used to solve this problem. Promising materials (aluminum 2219, Inconel 718, nickel, nickel alloy) and manufacturing techniques (chemical milling, electroplating) are evaluated to determine the best liner candidates. Robust, autofrettaged feedlines with a low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion liner (Inconel 718 or nickel alloy) are shown to successfully counteract mismatch at LOX temperature. A new concept, autofrettage by temperature, is introduced for high Coefficient of Thermal Expansion materials (aluminum and pure nickel) where pressure cannot be used to add compressive preload.

  8. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  9. Re-Examining Risk of Repeated HLA Mismatch in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rose, Caren; Hariharan, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Kidney retransplantation is a risk factor for decreased allograft survival. Repeated mismatched HLA antigens between first and second transplant may be a stimulus for immune memory responses and increased risk of alloimmune damage to the second allograft. Historical data identified a role of repeated HLA mismatches in allograft loss. However, evolution of HLA testing methods and a modern transplant era necessitate re-examination of this role to more accurately risk-stratify recipients. We conducted a contemporary registry analysis of data from 13,789 patients who received a second kidney transplant from 1995 to 2011, of which 3868 had one or more repeated mismatches. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling revealed no effect of repeated mismatches on all–cause or death–censored graft loss. Analysis of predefined subgroups, however, showed that any class 2 repeated mismatch increased the hazard of death–censored graft loss, particularly in patients with detectable panel–reactive antibody before second transplant (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.02 to 1.29). Furthermore, in those who had nephrectomy of the first allograft, class 2 repeated mismatches specifically associated with all–cause (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.58) and death–censored graft loss (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.78). These updated data redefine the effect of repeated mismatches in retransplantation and challenge the paradigm that repeated mismatches in isolation confer increased immunologic risk. We also defined clear recipient categories for which repeated mismatches may be of greater concern in a contemporary cohort. Additional studies are needed to determine appropriate interventions for these recipients. PMID:26888475

  10. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junqiao

    2002-01-01

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs1-xNx and GaP1-xNx with x ~< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also

  11. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(sub x)Te(sub 1-x) and ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, y between 0 and 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the

  12. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(sub x)Te(sub 1-x) and ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, y between 0 and 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the

  13. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A.; Su, Ching-Hua; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(x)V(1-x), alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(x),V(1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(x)Te(l-x) and ZnSe(Y)Te(1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, 0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the interaction between

  14. Mismatch negativity to pitch pattern deviants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Sarah M; Matteis, Mario De; Coffman, Brian A; Murphy, Timothy K; Butera, Christiana D; Ward, Kayla L; Leiter-McBeth, Justin R; Salisbury, Dean F

    2017-09-01

    Simple mismatch negativity (MMN) to infrequent pitch deviants is impaired in individuals with long-term schizophrenia (Sz). The complex MMN elicited by pattern deviance often manifes is cut from here]->ts later after deviant onset than simple MMN and can ascertain deficits in abstracting relationships between stimuli. Sz exhibit reduced complex MMN, but so far this has only been measured when deviance detection relies on a grouping rule. We measured MMN to deviants in pitch-based rules to see whether MMN is also abnormal in Sz under these conditions. Three experiments were conducted. Twenty-seven Sz and 28 healthy matched controls (HC) participated in Experiments 1 and 2, and 24 Sz and 26 HC participated in Experiment 3. Experiment 1 was a standard pitch MMN task, and Sz showed the expected MMN reduction (~ 115 ms) in the simple pitch deviant compared to HC. Experiment 2 comprised standard groups of six tones that ascended in pitch, and deviant groups where the last tone descended in pitch. Complex MMN was late (~ 510 ms) and significantly blunted in Sz. Experiment 3 comprised standard groups of 12 tones (six tones ascending in pitch followed by six tones descending in pitch, like a scale), and deviant groups containing two repetitions of six ascending tones (the scale restarted midstream). Complex MMN was also late (~ 460 ms) and significantly blunted in Sz. These results identify a late pitch pattern deviance-related MMN that is deficient in schizophrenia. This suggests specific deficits in later more complex deviance detection in schizophrenia for abstract patterns. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  16. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer.

    PubMed

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-02-01

    The DNA repair pathway mismatch repair (MMR) is responsible for the recognition and correction of DNA biosynthetic errors caused by inaccurate nucleotide incorporation during replication. Faulty MMR leads to failure to address the mispairs or insertion deletion loops (IDLs) left behind by the replicative polymerases and results in increased mutation load at the genome. The realization that defective MMR leads to a hypermutation phenotype and increased risk of tumorigenesis highlights the relevance of this pathway for human disease. The association of MMR defects with increased risk of cancer development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome (LS) partly to include the associated risk of developing extra-colonic cancers. In addition, a number of non-hereditary, mostly epigenetic, alterations of MMR genes have been described in sporadic tumors. Besides conferring a strong cancer predisposition, genetic or epigenetic inactivation of MMR genes also renders cells resistant to some chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, diagnosis of MMR deficiency has important implications for the management of the patients, the surveillance of their relatives in the case of LS and for the choice of treatment. Some of the alterations found in MMR genes have already been well defined and their pathogenicity assessed. Despite this substantial wealth of knowledge, the effects of a large number of alterations remain uncharacterized (variants of uncertain significance, VUSs). The advent of personalized genomics is likely to increase the list of VUSs found in MMR genes and anticipates the need of diagnostic tools for rapid assessment of their pathogenicity. This review describes current tools and future strategies for addressing the relevance

  17. Effect of Aripiprazole on Mismatch Negativity (MMN) in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenhe; Zhu, Hongmei; Chen, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits are considered core symptoms of the schizophrenia. Cognitive function has been found to be a better predictor of functional outcome than symptom levels. Changed mismatch negativity (MMN) reflects abnormalities of early auditory processing in schizophrenia. Up to now, no studies for the effects of aripiprazole on MMN in schizophrenia have been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Subjects included 26 patients with schizophrenia, and 26 controls. Psychopathology was rated in patients with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at baseline, after 4- and 8-week treatments with aripiprazole. Auditory stimuli for ERP consisted of 100 millisecond/1000 Hz standards, intermixed with 100 millisecond/1500 Hz frequency deviants and 250 millisecond/1000 Hz duration deviants. EEG was recorded at Fz. BESA 5.1.8 was used to perform data analysis. MMN waveforms were obtained by subtracting waveforms elicited by standards from waveforms elicited by frequency- or duration-deviant stimuli. Aripiprazole decreased all PANSS. Patients showed smaller mean amplitudes of frequency and duration MMN at baseline than did controls. A repeated measure ANOVA with sessions (i.e., baseline, 4- and 8-week treatments) and MMN type (frequency vs. duration) as within-subject factors revealed no significant MMN type or MMN type × session main effect for MMN amplitudes. Session main effect was significant. LSD tests demonstrated significant differences between MMN amplitudes at 8 weeks and those at both baseline and 4 weeks. There was significant negative correlation between changes in amplitudes of frequency and duration MMN and changes in PANSS total scores at baseline and follow-up periods. Conclusions Aripiprazole improved the amplitudes of MMN. MMN offers objective evidence that treatment with the aripiprazole may ameliorate preattentive deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:23308105

  18. Auditory Evoked Potential Mismatch Negativity in Normal-Hearing Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schwade, Laura Flach; Didoné, Dayane Domeneghini; Sleifer, Pricila

    2017-01-01

    Introduction  Mismatch Negativity (MMN) corresponds to a response of the central auditory nervous system. Objective  The objective of this study is to analyze MMN latencies and amplitudes in normal-hearing adults and compare the results between ears, gender and hand dominance. Methods  This is a cross-sectional study. Forty subjects participated, 20 women and 20 men, aged 18 to 29 years and having normal auditory thresholds. A frequency of 1000Hz (standard stimuli) and 2000Hz (deviant stimuli) was used to evoked the MMN. Results  Mean latencies in the right ear were 169.4ms and 175.3ms in the left ear, with mean amplitudes of 4.6µV in the right ear and 4.2µV in the left ear. There was no statistically significant difference between ears. The comparison of latencies between genders showed a statistically significant difference for the right ear, being higher in the men than in women. There was no significant statistical difference between ears for both right-handed and left-handed group. However, the results indicated that the latency of the right ear was significantly higher for the left handers than the right handers. We also found a significant result for the latency of the left ear, which was higher for the right handers. Conclusion  It was possible to obtain references of values for the MMN. There are no differences in the MMN latencies and amplitudes between the ears. Regarding gender, the male group presented higher latencies in relation to the female group in the right ear. Some results indicate that there is a significant statistical difference of the MMN between right- and left-handed individuals. PMID:28680490

  19. MUTYH and the mismatch repair system: partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Niessen, Renée C; Sijmons, Rolf H; Ou, J; Olthof, Sandra G M; Osinga, Jan; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Weiss, Marjan M; Tops, Carli M J; Hes, Frederik J; de Bock, Geertruida H; Buys, Charles H C M; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2006-03-01

    Biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH-a gene encoding a base excision repair protein-are associated with an increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer. Whether monoallelic MUTYH mutations also increase cancer risk is not yet clear, although there is some evidence suggesting a slight increase of risk. As the MUTYH protein interacts with the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we hypothesised that the combination of a monoallelic MUTYH mutation with an MMR gene mutation increases cancer risk. We therefore investigated the prevalence of monoallelic MUTYH mutations in carriers of a germline MMR mutation: 40 carriers of a truncating mutation (group I) and 36 of a missense mutation (group II). These patients had been diagnosed with either colorectal or endometrial cancer. We compared their MUTYH mutation frequencies with those observed in a group of 134 Dutch colorectal and endometrial cancer patients without an MMR gene mutation (0.7%) and those reported for Caucasian controls (1.5%). In group I one monoallelic MUTYH mutation was found (2.5%). In group II five monoallelic germline MUTYH mutations were found (14%), four of them in MSH6 missense mutation carriers (20%). Of all patients with an MMR gene mutation, only those with a missense mutation showed a significantly higher frequency of (monoallelic) MUTYH mutations than the Dutch cancer patients without MMR gene mutations (P = 0.002) and the published controls (P = 0.001). These results warrant further study to test the hypothesis of mutations in MMR genes (in particular MSH6) and MUTYH acting together to increase cancer risk.

  20. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch during lung aeration at birth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; te Pas, Arjan B; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Wheeler, Kevin I; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sonobe, Takashi; Hooper, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    At birth, the transition to newborn life is triggered by lung aeration, which stimulates a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). Current theories predict that the increase in PBF is spatially related to ventilated lung regions as they aerate after birth. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography we investigated the spatial relationships between lung aeration and the increase in PBF after birth. Six near-term (30-day gestation) rabbits were delivered by caesarean section, intubated and an intravenous catheter inserted, before they were positioned for X-ray imaging. During imaging, iodine was injected before ventilation onset, after ventilation of the right lung only, and after ventilation of both lungs. Unilateral ventilation increased iodine levels entering both left and right pulmonary arteries (PAs) and significantly increased heart rate, iodine ejection per beat, diameters of both left and right PAs, and number of visible vessels in both lungs. Within the 6th intercostal space, the mean gray level (relative measure of iodine level) increased from 68.3 ± 11.6 and 70.3 ± 7.5%·s to 136.3 ± 22.6 and 136.3 ± 23.7%·s in the left and right PAs, respectively. No differences were observed between vessels in the left and right lungs, despite the left lung not initially being ventilated. The increase in PBF at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration allowing a large ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or pulmonary shunting, to occur in the partially aerated lung at birth.

  1. Mismatched racial identities, colourism, and health in Toronto and Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Gerry

    2011-10-01

    Using original telephone survey data collected from adult residents of Toronto (n = 685) and Vancouver (n = 814) in 2009, I investigate associations between mental and physical health and variously conceived racial identities. An 'expressed racial identity' is a self-identification with a racial grouping that a person will readily express to others when asked to fit into official racial classifications presented by Census forms, survey researchers, insurance forms, and the like. Distinguishing between Asian, Black, South Asian, and White expressed racial identities, I find that survey respondents expressing Black identity are the most likely to report high blood pressure or hypertension, a risk that is slightly attenuated by socioeconomic status, and that respondents expressing Asian identity are the most likely to report poorer self-rated mental health and self-rated overall health, risks that are not explained by socioeconomic status. I also find that darker-skinned Black respondents are more likely than lighter-skinned Black respondents to report poor health outcomes, indicating that colourism, processes of discrimination which privilege lighter-skinned people of colour over their darker-skinned counterparts, exists and has implications for well-being in Canada as it does in the United States. Finally, 'reflected racial identity' refers to the racial identity that a person believes that others tend to perceive him or her to be. I find that expressed and reflected racial identities differ from one another for large proportions of self-expressed Black and South Asian respondents and relatively few self-expressed White and Asian respondents. I also find that mismatched racial identities correspond with relatively high risks of various poor health outcomes, especially for respondents who consider themselves White but believe that others tend to think they are something else. I conclude by presenting a framework for conceptualizing multifaceted suites of racial

  2. DNA mismatch repair and its many roles in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dekang; Keijzers, Guido; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-07-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an important DNA repair pathway that plays critical roles in DNA replication fidelity, mutation avoidance and genome stability, all of which contribute significantly to the viability of cells and organisms. MMR is widely-used as a diagnostic biomarker for human cancers in the clinic, and as a biomarker of cancer susceptibility in animal model systems. Prokaryotic MMR is well-characterized at the molecular and mechanistic level; however, MMR is considerably more complex in eukaryotic cells than in prokaryotic cells, and in recent years, it has become evident that MMR plays novel roles in eukaryotic cells, several of which are not yet well-defined or understood. Many MMR-deficient human cancer cells lack mutations in known human MMR genes, which strongly suggests that essential eukaryotic MMR components/cofactors remain unidentified and uncharacterized. Furthermore, the mechanism by which the eukaryotic MMR machinery discriminates between the parental (template) and the daughter (nascent) DNA strand is incompletely understood and how cells choose between the EXO1-dependent and the EXO1-independent subpathways of MMR is not known. This review summarizes recent literature on eukaryotic MMR, with emphasis on the diverse cellular roles of eukaryotic MMR proteins, the mechanism of strand discrimination and cross-talk/interactions between and co-regulation of MMR and other DNA repair pathways in eukaryotic cells. The main conclusion of the review is that MMR proteins contribute to genome stability through their ability to recognize and promote an appropriate cellular response to aberrant DNA structures, especially when they arise during DNA replication. Although the molecular mechanism of MMR in the eukaryotic cell is still not completely understood, increased used of single-molecule analyses in the future may yield new insight into these unsolved questions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient-prosthesis mismatch in patients with aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Misawa, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Konishi, Hiroaki; Miyata, Hiroaki; Motomura, Noboru; Takamoto, Shin-ichi

    2013-05-01

    Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) may affect clinical outcomes in patients with aortic valve replacement (AVR). We retrospectively examined the PPM in patients with isolated AVR in the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD). We examined all patients with isolated AVR between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. The JACVSD data collection form has a total of 255 variables. We defined PPM as an effective orifice area index of ≤ 0.85 m(2)/cm(2). PPM was observed in 306 of 3,609 cases analyzed, PPM rate was 8.5 %. Body surface area was larger and body mass index was higher in the PPM group than the non-PPM group (P < 0.001). Patients with PPM were older (P = 0.001) and had a higher prevalence of diabetes (P = 0.004), dyslipidemia (P < 0.001), hypertension (P < 0.001), cerebrovascular disease (P = 0.031), old myocardial infarction (P = 0.006), previous percutaneous coronary artery intervention (P = 0.001), coronary artery disease (P = 0.018), and aortic valve stenosis (P < 0.001). Perioperative blood transfusion (P < 0.001) and dialysis (P = 0.005) were more frequent in the PPM group. Postoperative ventilation (P = 0.004) and intensive care unit stay (P = 0.004) were significantly longer in the PPM group. Age, aortic valve stenosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension, old myocardial infarction, previous percutaneous coronary artery intervention, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, and high body mass index were the risk factors for PPM. PPM was not an independent risk factor for short-term mortality.

  4. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Petruzielo, Robin S; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kucerka, Norbert; Feigenson, Gerald; Katsaras, John

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  5. Discrimination of auditory motion patterns: the mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Shestopalova, L B; Petropavlovskaia, E A; Vaitulevich, S Ph; Vasilenko, Yu A; Nikitin, N I; Altman, J A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to test whether mismatch negativity (MMN) response can be elicited by changes in auditory motion dynamics. The discrimination of auditory motion patterns was investigated using psychophysical and electrophysiological methods in the same group of subjects. Auditory event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded for stationary midline noises and moving noises shifting to the left/right from the head midline. Two patterns of auditory motion were used with gradual (Motion) and stepwise (Step) movements which started and ended at the same loci. Auditory motion was produced by linear and abrupt changes of interaural time differences (ITD) in binaurally presented stimuli. In Experiment 1, ERPs were recorded for stationary midline standards and for Motion and Step deviants. It was found that Step deviants result in larger MMN amplitudes than Motion deviants with the same distance travelled, which implies that information contained in the stimulus midportion could be involved in the processing of the auditory motion. The threshold ITD values for the detection of Step and Motion stimuli displacement obtained during psychoacoustic tests were greater than the minimal ITD changes which elicited significant MMN. Experiment 2 demonstrated that Step deviants elicited significant MMNs in the context of Motion standards, although these stimuli could not be discriminated behaviourally. MMNs elicited by Step deviants in different acoustic contexts are discussed from the viewpoint of different brain processes underlying the discrimination of the abrupt ITD change. These results suggest that the early cortical mechanism of auditory motion processing reflected by MMN could not be considered as a spatial discriminator of the onset/offset stimulus positions, that is, a simple onset-offset detector. Combining psychoacoustic data with MMN results we may conclude that motion discrimination in auditory system might be better at the preattentive level. Copyright

  6. Interictal lack of habituation of mismatch negativity in migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Losito, L; Difruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Puca, F M

    2004-08-01

    The aim was to study mismatch negativity features and habituation during the interictal phase of migraine. In migraine patients, a strong negative correlation has been found between the initial amplitude of long latency auditory-evoked potentials and their amplitude increase during subsequent averaging. We studied 12 outpatients with a diagnosis of migraine without aura recorded in a headache-free interval and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers not suffering from any recurrent headache. The experiment consisted of two sequential blocks of 2000 stimulations, during which 1800 (90%) recordings for standard tones and 200 (10%) for target tones were selected for averaging. The latency of the N1 component was significantly increased in migraine patients in respect of controls in both the first and second repetitions; the MMN latency was increased in the second repetition. In the control group the MMN amplitude decreased on average by 3.2 +/- 1.4 microV in the second trial, whereas in migraine patients it showed a slight increase of 0.21 +/- 0.11 microV in the second repetition. The MMN latency relieved in the second trial was significantly correlated with the duration of illness in the migraine patients (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.69; P < 0.05). The increases in N1 latency and MMN latency and amplitude, the latter correlated with duration of illness, seemed to be due to a reduced anticipatory effect of stimulus repetition in migraine patients. This suggests that such hypo-activity of automatic cortical processes, subtending the discrimination of acoustic stimuli, may be a basic abnormality in migraine, developing in the course of the disease.

  7. Chronic effects of cannabis use on the auditory mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Lisa-Marie; Broyd, Samantha J; Croft, Rodney; Todd, Juanita; Michie, Patricia T; Johnstone, Stuart; Murray, Robin; Solowij, Nadia

    2014-03-15

    Cannabis use is associated with the development of psychotic symptoms and increased risk for schizophrenia. The mismatch negativity (MMN) is a brain event-related potential marker of change detection thought to index glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated neurotransmission, which is known to be deficient in schizophrenia. This study examined auditory MMN in otherwise healthy chronic cannabis users compared with nonuser control subjects. Forty-two chronic cannabis users and 44 nonuser healthy control subjects completed a multi-feature MMN paradigm, which included duration, frequency, and intensity deviants (deviants 6%; standards 82%). The MMN was compared between users and control subjects as well as between long- and short-term users and age- and gender-matched control subjects. Associations between MMN, cannabis use measures, and symptoms were examined. The MMN amplitude was significantly reduced to frequency but not duration or intensity deviants in overall cannabis users relative to control subjects. Frequency MMN was similarly attenuated in short- and long-term users relative to control subjects. Long-term users also exhibited reduced duration MMN relative to control subjects and short-term users and this was correlated with increased duration of exposure to cannabis and increased psychotic-like experiences during intoxication. In short-term users, a younger age of onset of regular cannabis use and greater frequency of use were associated with greater psychotic-like experiences and symptomatic distress. These results suggest impaired sensory memory that might reflect N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor dysfunction in chronic cannabis users. The pattern of MMN alterations in cannabis users differed from that typically observed in patients with schizophrenia, indicating overlapping but distinct underlying pathology. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neural mechanisms of mismatch negativity dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Sehatpour, P; Hoptman, M J; Lakatos, P; Dias, E C; Kantrowitz, J T; Martinez, A M; Javitt, D C

    2017-02-07

    Schizophrenia is associated with cognitive deficits that reflect impaired cortical information processing. Mismatch negativity (MMN) indexes pre-attentive information processing dysfunction at the level of primary auditory cortex. This study investigates mechanisms underlying MMN impairments in schizophrenia using event-related potential, event-related spectral decomposition (ERSP) and resting state functional connectivity (rsfcMRI) approaches. For this study, MMN data to frequency, intensity and duration-deviants were analyzed from 69 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls. rsfcMRI was obtained from a subsample of 38 patients and 23 controls. As expected, schizophrenia patients showed highly significant, large effect size (P=0.0004, d=1.0) deficits in MMN generation across deviant types. In ERSP analyses, responses to deviants occurred primarily the theta (4-7 Hz) frequency range consistent with distributed corticocortical processing, whereas responses to standards occurred primarily in alpha (8-12 Hz) range consistent with known frequencies of thalamocortical activation. Independent deficits in schizophrenia were observed in both the theta response to deviants (P=0.021) and the alpha-response to standards (P=0.003). At the single-trial level, differential patterns of response were observed for frequency vs duration/intensity deviants, along with At the network level, MMN deficits engaged canonical somatomotor, ventral attention and default networks, with a differential pattern of engagement across deviant types (P<0.0001). Findings indicate that deficits in thalamocortical, as well as corticocortical, connectivity contribute to auditory dysfunction in schizophrenia. In addition, differences in ERSP and rsfcMRI profiles across deviant types suggest potential differential engagement of underlying generator mechanisms.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.3.

  9. Optical CT imaging of solid radiochromic dosimeters in mismatched refractive index solutions using a scanning laser and large area detector.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-08-01

    either a uniform dose or a 2-level "step-dose" pattern. With 6% refractive index mismatching, a circular field of view of 85% of the diameter of a cylindrical sample can be reconstructed accurately. Reconstructed images of the test solution phantom were uniform (within 3%) inside this radius. However, the dose responses of the PRESAGE® samples were not spatially uniform, with variations of at least 5% in sensitivity. The variation appears as a "cupping" artifact with less sensitivity in the middle than at the periphery of the PRESAGE® cylinder. Polarization effects were also detected for these samples. The fiducial-based ray path measurement scheme, coupled with an iterative reconstruction algorithm, enabled optical CT scanning of PRESAGE® dosimeters immersed in mismatched refractive index solutions. However, improvements to PRESAGE® dose response uniformity are required.

  10. A spectral method for halo particle definition in intense mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-15

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mismatched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  11. Effects of electrode array length on frequency-place mismatch and speech perception with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Venail, Frederic; Mathiolon, Caroline; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Piron, Jean Pierre; Sicard, Marielle; Villemus, Françoise; Vessigaud, Marie Aude; Sterkers-Artieres, Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Uziel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-place mismatch often occurs after cochlear implantation, yet its effect on speech perception outcome remains unclear. In this article, we propose a method, based on cochlea imaging, to determine the cochlear place-frequency map. We evaluated the effect of frequency-place mismatch on speech perception outcome in subjects implanted with 3 different lengths of electrode arrays. A deeper insertion was responsible for a larger frequency-place mismatch and a decreased and delayed speech perception improvement by comparison with a shallower insertion, for which a similar but slighter effect was noticed. Our results support the notion that selecting an electrode array length adapted to each individual's cochlear anatomy may reduce frequency-place mismatch and thus improve speech perception outcome.

  12. Human errors are symptoms of a mismatch between pilots, machines and the operating environment.

    PubMed

    Sarter, N B

    1996-10-01

    The author suggests that errors should be the starting point for analysis of aviation mishaps. The analysis should focus on human, automation, and environment interaction and determine any mismatch among these factors.

  13. New Spectral Method for Halo Particle Definition in Intense Mis-matched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-27

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mis-matched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  14. Simulated growth of layers on a substrate with mismatch: structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.; Ghazali, A.; Lévy, J. C. S.

    1996-12-01

    High temperature deposition of metallic materials on a (111) face of a fcc substrate, followed by a slow cooling down to a given temperature, is simulated by means of a Monte-Carlo algorithm with Lennard-Jones interatomic pair potentials. Adsorption and growth modes on the surface are studied in order to determine whether the growth is three- or two-dimensional, according to relevant parameters such as lattice mismatch and relative atomic binding energy. For a ± 10% mismatch it is found that the Stranski-Krastanov process starts early and is later healed by the appearance of bridges between islands, after a deposition of about ten monolayers. The interlayer distance undergoes oscillations as a function of the layer number. This is observed for a ± 10% mismatch as well as for a 5% mismatch.

  15. Velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters via sampled position data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Huang, Chunli; Lü, Jinhu; Li, Xiong; Chen, Shihua

    2016-02-01

    Power systems are special multi-agent systems with nonlinear coupling function and symmetric structures. This paper extends these systems to a class of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters, linear coupling function, and asymmetric structures and investigates their velocity synchronization via sampled position data. The dynamics of the agents is adopted as that of generators with mismatched parameters, while the system structures are supposed to be complex. Two distributed linear consensus protocols are designed, respectively, for multi-agent systems without or with communication delay. Necessary and sufficient conditions based on the sampling period, the mismatched parameters, the delay, and the nonzero eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix are established. It is shown that velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters can be achieved if the sampled period is chosen appropriately. Simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  16. A Direct Adaptive Control Approach in the Presence of Model Mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Tao, Gang; Khong, Thuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of direct model reference adaptive control when the plant-model matching conditions are violated due to abnormal changes in the plant or incorrect knowledge of the plant's mathematical structure. The approach consists of direct adaptation of state feedback gains for state tracking, and simultaneous estimation of the plant-model mismatch. Because of the mismatch, the plant can no longer track the state of the original reference model, but may be able to track a new reference model that still provides satisfactory performance. The reference model is updated if the estimated plant-model mismatch exceeds a bound that is determined via robust stability and/or performance criteria. The resulting controller is a hybrid direct-indirect adaptive controller that offers asymptotic state tracking in the presence of plant-model mismatch as well as parameter deviations.

  17. Patient - implant dimension mismatch in total knee arthroplasty: Is it worth worrying? An Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thilak, Jai; George, Melvin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: The correct sizing of the components in both anteroposterior and mediolateral (ML) dimensions is crucial for the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The size of the implants selected is based on the intraoperative measurements. The currently used TKA implants available to us are based on morphometric measurements obtained from a Western/Caucasian population. Hence, the risk of component ML mismatch is more common in Asian sub-population, as they are of a smaller built and stature. This study aims to look into the following aspects agnitude of the ML mismatch between the femoral component and the patient's anatomical dimension, evaluation of gender variations in distal femur dimensions, and gender-wise and implant-wise correlation of ML mismatch. Materials and Methods: Intraoperatively, the distal femoral dimensions were measured using sterile calipers after removing the osteophytes and compared with the ML dimension of the implant used. ML mismatch length thus obtained is correlated with the various parameters. Results: Males showed larger distal femoral dimensions when compared to females. Males had larger ML mismatch. None of the implants used perfectly matched the patient's anatomical dimensions. Patients with larger mismatch had lower scorings at 2 years postoperative followup. Conclusion: Implant manufacturers need to design more options of femoral implants for a better fit in our subset of patients. The exact magnitude of mismatch which can cause functional implications need to be made out. The mismatch being one of the important factors for the success of the surgery, we should focus more on this aspect. PMID:27746494

  18. The incidence and etiology of the ventilation/perfusion reverse mismatch defect

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P.; Lavender, J.P. )

    1989-08-01

    Kr-81m ventilation and Tc-99m perfusion images of 392 patients were examined retrospectively for the incidence and etiology of the reverse mismatch defect, which is characterized by a region of lung where the perfusion defect exceeds the ventilation defect. Forty-six patients (11.7%) showed such defects. The most frequent causes were pneumonia (15%), atelactasis (15%), pleural effusions (15%), chronic obstructive airway disease (24%), and bronchial obstruction (31%). The significance of the reverse mismatch defect is discussed.

  19. Stability and Mismatch Discrimination of Locked Nucleic Acid–DNA Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Locked nucleic acids (LNA; symbols of bases, +A, +C, +G, and +T) are introduced into chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to increase duplex stability and specificity. To understand these effects, we have determined thermodynamic parameters of consecutive LNA nucleotides. We present guidelines for the design of LNA oligonucleotides and introduce free online software that predicts the stability of any LNA duplex oligomer. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the single strand–duplex transition is characterized by a favorable enthalpic change and by an unfavorable loss of entropy. A single LNA modification confines the local conformation of nucleotides, causing a smaller, less unfavorable entropic loss when the single strand is restricted to the rigid duplex structure. Additional LNAs adjacent to the initial modification appear to enhance stacking and H-bonding interactions because they increase the enthalpic contributions to duplex stabilization. New nearest-neighbor parameters correctly forecast the positive and negative effects of LNAs on mismatch discrimination. Specificity is enhanced in a majority of sequences and is dependent on mismatch type and adjacent base pairs; the largest discriminatory boost occurs for the central +C·C mismatch within the +T+C+C sequence and the +A·G mismatch within the +T+A+G sequence. LNAs do not affect specificity in some sequences and even impair it for many +G·T and +C·A mismatches. The level of mismatch discrimination decreases the most for the central +G·T mismatch within the +G+G+C sequence and the +C·A mismatch within the +G+C+G sequence. We hypothesize that these discrimination changes are not unique features of LNAs but originate from the shift of the duplex conformation from B-form to A-form. PMID:21928795

  20. Force free wafer bonding of lattice mismatched materials: Fabrication of extremely low dark current photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzone, Christopher James Richard

    This dissertation describes the development of a new method for joining two materials of different lattice dimensions in a way which leads to the formation of a defect-free interface. This technique is unique in that one member of the bond pair is made compliant by removal of the film's substrate, and a permanent bond is then formed without the application of external pressure. This eliminates the strain of lattice and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the two surfaces. The surface conditions required to achieve a strong bond and the optimization of epitaxially grown compound semiconductor surfaces during metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are compound semiconductor surfaces during metalorganic chemical vapor deposition are explored. The detection and removal of surface contaminants which prevent direct wafer bonding are investigated. Techniques for formation of van der Waals bonds between the two dissimilar surfaces are described, and the van der Waals bond formed negates the need for constraining and compressing the bond pair at high temperature. The thermal and lattice mismatch stress is therefore reduced, as is the interfacial energy which would force the nucleation of threading dislocations. Direct analysis of the bonded material by transmission electron microscopy and double crystal x-ray diffraction shows the superior nature of the interface produced as compared to previous techniques of wafer bonding. Novel photodetector devices were fabricated from the bonded material. Avalanche operation of these devices under 1.3 micron illumination resulted in gain (G) equal to 100, with a measured dark current (Idm) of 3 nano-amperes. This record low dark current further characterizes the interface as free of excitonic traps. This work makes a fundamental contribution to material science by making possible the monolithic integration of materials without necessary conscription to a single lattice parameter, thereby unlocking an infinite range of

  1. Pure Red Cell Aplasia in Major ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is Associated with Severe Pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Aung, Fleur M; Lichtiger, Benjamin; Rondon, Gabriela; Yin, C Cameron; Alousi, Amin; Ahmed, Sairah; Andersson, Borje S; Bashir, Qaiser; Ciurea, Stefan O; Hosing, Chitra; Jones, Roy; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; Nieto, Yago; Oran, Betul; Parmar, Simrit; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Shah, Nina; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Popat, Uday

    2016-05-01

    In major ABO-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) persistence of antidonor isohemagglutinins leads to pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). To investigate severe pancytopenia noted in a previous study of PRCA, we analyzed all major ABO-mismatched HSCT between January 2003 and December 2012. Of 83 PRCA patients, 13 (16%) had severe pancytopenia. Severe pancytopenia was defined as an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) < 1.5 K/μL or requiring granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, platelets < 50 K/μL or transfusion dependent, and PRCA with RBC transfusion dependence at post-transplant day 90. In 6 patients (46%) severe pancytopenia resolved after PRCA resolution. Two patients (15%) received a second transplant because of persistent pancytopenia/secondary graft failure, 1 (8%) died from secondary graft failure despite a stem cell boost, 1 (8%) did not recover his platelet counts despite RBC/ANC recovery, and 3 patients (23%) died from disease relapse. We found that severe pancytopenia is frequently associated with PRCA in 16% of major ABO-incompatible HSCT with a higher incidence in males and pancytopenia resolved with resolution of PRCA in 46% of patients.

  2. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  3. Comparison of T7E1 and surveyor mismatch cleavage assays to detect mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-07

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

  4. Comparison of T7E1 and Surveyor Mismatch Cleavage Assays to Detect Mutations Triggered by Engineered Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases. PMID:25566793

  5. Profiling single-guide RNA specificity reveals a mismatch sensitive core sequence

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ting; Hou, Yingzi; Zhang, Pingjing; Zhang, Zhenxi; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Letian; Niu, Leilei; Yang, Yi; Liang, Da; Yi, Fan; Peng, Wei; Feng, Wenjian; Yang, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Zhang, Li-He; Du, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Targeting specificity is an essential issue in the development of CRISPR-Cas technology. Using a luciferase activation assay, off-target cleavage activity of sgRNA was systematically investigated on single nucleotide-mismatched targets. In addition to confirming that PAM-proximal mismatches are less tolerated than PAM-distal mismatches, our study further identified a “core” sequence that is highly sensitive to target-mismatch. This sequence is of 4-nucleotide long, located at +4 to +7 position upstream of PAM, and positioned in a steric restriction region when assembled into Cas9 endonuclease. Our study also found that, single or multiple target mismatches at this region abolished off-target cleavage mediated by active sgRNAs, thus proposing a principle for gene-specific sgRNA design. Characterization of a mismatch sensitive “core” sequence not only enhances our understanding of how this elegant system functions, but also facilitates our efforts to improve targeting specificity of a sgRNA. PMID:28098181

  6. Detecting mismatches of bird migration stopover and tree phenology in response to changing climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellermann, Jherime L.; Van Riper, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Migratory birds exploit seasonal variation in resources across latitudes, timing migration to coincide with the phenology of food at stopover sites. Differential responses to climate in phenology across trophic levels can result in phenological mismatch; however, detecting mismatch is sensitive to methodology. We examined patterns of migrant abundance and tree flowering, phenological mismatch, and the influence of climate during spring migration from 2009 to 2011 across five habitat types of the Madrean Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona, USA. We used two metrics to assess phenological mismatch: synchrony and overlap. We also examined whether phenological overlap declined with increasing difference in mean event date of phenophases. Migrant abundance and tree flowering generally increased with minimum spring temperature but depended on annual climate by habitat interactions. Migrant abundance was lowest and flowering was highest under cold, snowy conditions in high elevation montane conifer habitat while bird abundance was greatest and flowering was lowest in low elevation riparian habitat under the driest conditions. Phenological synchrony and overlap were unique and complementary metrics and should both be used when assessing mismatch. Overlap declined due to asynchronous phenologies but also due to reduced migrant abundance or flowering when synchrony was actually maintained. Overlap declined with increasing difference in event date and this trend was strongest in riparian areas. Montane habitat specialists may be at greatest risk of mismatch while riparian habitat could provide refugia during dry years for phenotypically plastic species. Interannual climate patterns that we observed match climate change projections for the arid southwest, altering stopover habitat condition.

  7. The P2L method of mismatch detection for push broom high-resolution satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yi; Zhang, Yongjun

    2017-08-01

    RANSAC-based mismatch detection methods are widely used in the geometric registration of images. Despite their prevalence, setting the detection thresholds for different situations continues to be difficult without an appropriate geometric model. In high-resolution satellite images, simple image-space transformations are commonly influenced by the terrain or elevation errors. This paper introduces a new method, called the P2L method, which uses the distance between the transformed right image point and the segment of the corresponding epipolar line to distinguish the correct matches and mismatches. The affine model of the P2L method is solved to transform the right image points towards the segment of the epipolar line. The images for demonstration were acquired by GeoEye-1, Ikonos-2, and Ziyuan-3; and each type of image pairs had different intersection angles to explore the influence of the elevation error. The correct matches were manually collected and the mismatches were simulated. The experiments in this paper, which used only correct matches, demonstrated that this method was very robust with one specific threshold (five pixels) and was suitable for all the image pairs. The experiments using simulated mismatches and real matching points demonstrated that this method was able to distinguish most of the mismatches; and even for the image pair that had a 54-degree intersection angle, the ratio of mismatches was reduced from 81% to 11%.

  8. Mismatch repair regulates homologous recombination, but has little influence on antigenic variation, in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joanna S; McCulloch, Richard

    2003-11-14

    Antigenic variation is critical in the life of the African trypanosome, as it allows the parasite to survive in the face of host immunity and enhance its transmission to other hosts. Much of trypanosome antigenic variation uses homologous recombination of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG)-encoding genes into specialized transcription sites, but little is known about the processes that regulate it. Here we describe the effects on VSG switching when two central mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1, are mutated. We show that disruption of the parasite mismatch repair system causes an increased frequency of homologous recombination, both between perfectly matched DNA molecules and between DNA molecules with divergent sequences. Mismatch repair therefore provides an important regulatory role in homologous recombination in this ancient eukaryote. Despite this, the mismatch repair system has no detectable role in regulating antigenic variation, meaning that VSG switching is either immune to mismatch selection or that mismatch repair acts in a subtle manner, undetectable by current assays.

  9. Detecting mismatches of bird migration stopover and tree phenology in response to changing climate.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Jherime L; van Riper, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Migratory birds exploit seasonal variation in resources across latitudes, timing migration to coincide with the phenology of food at stopover sites. Differential responses to climate in phenology across trophic levels can result in phenological mismatch; however, detecting mismatch is sensitive to methodology. We examined patterns of migrant abundance and tree flowering, phenological mismatch, and the influence of climate during spring migration from 2009 to 2011 across five habitat types of the Madrean Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona, USA. We used two metrics to assess phenological mismatch: synchrony and overlap. We also examined whether phenological overlap declined with increasing difference in mean event date of phenophases. Migrant abundance and tree flowering generally increased with minimum spring temperature but depended on annual climate by habitat interactions. Migrant abundance was lowest and flowering was highest under cold, snowy conditions in high elevation montane conifer habitat while bird abundance was greatest and flowering was lowest in low elevation riparian habitat under the driest conditions. Phenological synchrony and overlap were unique and complementary metrics and should both be used when assessing mismatch. Overlap declined due to asynchronous phenologies but also due to reduced migrant abundance or flowering when synchrony was actually maintained. Overlap declined with increasing difference in event date and this trend was strongest in riparian areas. Montane habitat specialists may be at greatest risk of mismatch while riparian habitat could provide refugia during dry years for phenotypically plastic species. Interannual climate patterns that we observed match climate change projections for the arid southwest, altering stopover habitat condition.

  10. The dual nature of mismatch repair as antimutator and mutator: for better or for worse

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Sara Thornby; Sakellariou, Despoina; Pena-Diaz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    DNA is constantly under attack by a number of both exogenous and endogenous agents that challenge its integrity. Among the mechanisms that have evolved to counteract this deleterious action, mismatch repair (MMR) has specialized in removing DNA biosynthetic errors that occur when replicating the genome. Malfunction or inactivation of this system results in an increase in spontaneous mutability and a strong predisposition to tumor development. Besides this key corrective role, MMR proteins are involved in other pathways of DNA metabolism such as mitotic and meiotic recombination and processing of oxidative damage. Surprisingly, MMR is also required for certain mutagenic processes. The mutagenic MMR has beneficial consequences contributing to the generation of a vast repertoire of antibodies through class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation processes. However, this non-canonical mutagenic MMR also has detrimental effects; it promotes repeat expansions associated with neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases and may contribute to cancer/disease-related aberrant mutations and translocations. The reaction responsible for replication error correction has been the most thoroughly studied and it is the subject to numerous reviews. This review describes briefly the biochemistry of MMR and focuses primarily on the non-canonical MMR activities described in mammals as well as emerging research implicating interplay of MMR and chromatin. PMID:25191341

  11. A Mismatch-Based Model for Memory Reconsolidation and Extinction in Attractor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Olavo B.

    2011-01-01

    The processes of memory reconsolidation and extinction have received increasing attention in recent experimental research, as their potential clinical applications begin to be uncovered. A number of studies suggest that amnestic drugs injected after reexposure to a learning context can disrupt either of the two processes, depending on the behavioral protocol employed. Hypothesizing that reconsolidation represents updating of a memory trace in the hippocampus, while extinction represents formation of a new trace, we have built a neural network model in which either simple retrieval, reconsolidation or extinction of a stored attractor can occur upon contextual reexposure, depending on the similarity between the representations of the original learning and reexposure sessions. This is achieved by assuming that independent mechanisms mediate Hebbian-like synaptic strengthening and mismatch-driven labilization of synaptic changes, with protein synthesis inhibition preferentially affecting the former. Our framework provides a unified mechanistic explanation for experimental data showing (a) the effect of reexposure duration on the occurrence of reconsolidation or extinction and (b) the requirement of memory updating during reexposure to drive reconsolidation. PMID:21826231

  12. A Modular Multilevel Converter with Power Mismatch Control for Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Duman, Turgay; Marti, Shilpa; Moonem, M. A.; ...

    2017-05-17

    A modular multilevel power converter configuration for grid connected photovoltaic (PV) systems is proposed. The converter configuration replaces the conventional bulky line frequency transformer with several high frequency transformers, potentially reducing the balance of systems cost of PV systems. The front-end converter for each port is a neutral-point diode clamped (NPC) multi-level dc-dc dual-active bridge (ML-DAB) which allows maximum power point tracking (MPPT). The integrated high frequency transformer provides the galvanic isolation between the PV and grid side and also steps up the low dc voltage from PV source. Following the ML-DAB stage, in each port, is a NPC inverter.more » N number of NPC inverters’ outputs are cascaded to attain the per-phase line-to-neutral voltage to connect directly to the distribution grid (i.e., 13.8 kV). The cascaded NPC (CNPC) inverters have the inherent advantage of using lower rated devices, smaller filters and low total harmonic distortion required for PV grid interconnection. The proposed converter system is modular, scalable, and serviceable with zero downtime with lower foot print and lower overall cost. A novel voltage balance control at each module based on power mismatch among N-ports, have been presented and verified in simulation. Analysis and simulation results are presented for the N-port converter. The converter performance has also been verified on a hardware prototype.« less

  13. Lattice-mismatched phosphide-based LEDs for color mixing white light applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberi, Kirstin

    2011-03-01

    The most promising means of achieving high efficiency white light emitting diodes (LEDs) with high color rendering indices (CRI) is to combine individual red (615 nm), yellow (573 nm), green (535 nm) and blue (459 nm) solid-state LEDs in a four color RYGB architecture. Due to their high bandgaps and the availability of bulk substrates, phosphide-based alloys are currently leading candidates for achieving the longer wavelengths, of which AlGaInP lattice-matched to GaAs has been extensively explored. In a departure from this approach, we investigate phosphide alloys at compositions that are lattice-mismatched with respect to GaAs for color mixing white light applications. Lifting the lattice-matching requirement extends the options for active and cladding layer design and optimization, thereby providing additional avenues for reducing carrier loss pathways and improving device efficiency. This talk covers our work on issues central to the success of this technology: metamorphic growth of high quality epilayers, the competing trade-off between operating wavelength and intervalley carrier transfer loss, and the availability of optimal cladding layers for high power operation. Support from the DOE EERE-SSL and BES-DMS programs and the ~LDRD program at NREL is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Light up and see: enhancement of the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Derek J; Scott, Terri Lynne; Shah, Dhrasti K; Prise, Stephanie; Thompson, Mackenzie; Knott, Verner J

    2010-02-08

    Both smoking and nicotine can facilitate cognitive efficiency in humans, however the exact mechanism underlying this improvement in cognitive performance is unclear. Nicotine-related improvements in visual task performance may stem from facilitation of the identification and encoding of rare deviant stimuli at early sensory levels. Visual processes at these early levels are thought to be indexed by the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN), an event-related potential (ERP) measure of pre-conscious deviant detection. In order to contribute to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying nicotinic modulated cognition, the current study investigated the acute effects of nicotine on vMMN in a non-smoking sample. Twenty-seven volunteers (7 males, 20 females) were treated with nicotine gum (6 mg) in a double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled repeated measures design. ERPs (vMMN; visual N100 and P200) and motor indices of performance were extracted from an intermodal task, requiring participants to attend selectively to auditory targets presented within concurrent, non-overlapping oddball sequences of visual standard and deviant stimuli. Behavioural performance was unaffected by nicotine, however nicotine was found to enhance vMMN and P200 amplitude. The findings are discussed in relation to attentional and neurobiological theories of nicotine dependence and of cognition in general. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of auditory and visual training on the mismatch negativity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kärgel, Christian; Sartory, Gudrun; Kariofillis, Daniela; Wiltfang, Jens; Müller, Bernhard W

    2016-04-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is an electrophysiological index of early auditory attention and has repeatedly been suggested to be associated with cognitive functioning. Despite the frequently reported finding of reduced MMN amplitude in schizophrenia, up to now, studies assessing the impact of perceptual discrimination training aiming to improve MMN measures in schizophrenia patients are scarce. In the present study, the effect of auditory training (AUD, n=14) on the MMN was compared to that of visual-spatial training (VIS, n=14) and a treatment-as-usual (TAU, n=14) condition in schizophrenia patients. Training consisted of ten 50-min sessions over two weeks. Assessments took place before and after training and at a two-month follow-up. They comprised clinical measures and MMN recordings to frequency and duration deviant stimuli. There was a significant main effect for type of stimulus deviance with a more negative MMN to frequency than duration deviants. In contrast to our hypotheses, we did not find training specific effects on MMN amplitude or latency. The visual, as well as the auditory training program failed to result in treatment related MMN changes in schizophrenia patients when compared to treatment-as-usual as a control condition. In contrast to reports in healthy subjects, the induction of training related MMN changes in schizophrenia patients may constitute a specific challenge and require more extensive training protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The match-mismatch model of emotion processing styles and emotion regulation strategies in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Geenen, Rinie; van Ooijen-van der Linden, Linda; Lumley, Mark A; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; van Middendorp, Henriët

    2012-01-01

    Individuals differ in their style of processing emotions (e.g., experiencing affects intensely or being alexithymic) and their strategy of regulating emotions (e.g., expressing or reappraising). A match-mismatch model of emotion processing styles and emotion regulation strategies is proposed and tested. This model specifies that for people high on affect intensity, emotion expression is more adaptive than reappraisal, whereas for alexithymic people, reappraisal is more adaptive than expression. The present study tested this model in 403 women with fibromyalgia (mean age 46.5±12.3 years). In a cross-sectional design, we assessed affect intensity (Berkeley Expressivity Questionnaire), alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20), cognitive reappraisal (Emotion Regulation Questionnaire), and emotion expression (Emotional Approach Coping Scales), as well as the impact of fibromyalgia (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire). Multiple regression analyses with interaction terms indicated that among people high on affect intensity, emotion expression - but not cognitive reappraisal - was associated with less fibromyalgia impact. No support was found for the hypothesis that among alexithymic people, cognitive reappraisal would be more adaptive than emotion expression. Findings suggest that for women with fibromyalgia who experience their emotions intensely, an emotional disclosure or expression intervention may be beneficial. This hypothesis requires verification in experimental studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Brain activity from stimuli that are not perceived: Visual mismatch negativity during binocular rivalry suppression.

    PubMed

    Jack, Bradley N; Widmann, Andreas; O'Shea, Robert P; Schröger, Erich; Roeber, Urte

    2017-02-20

    Predictive coding explains visual perception as the result of an interaction between bottom-up sensory input and top-down generative models at each level of the visual hierarchy. Evidence for this comes from the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN): a more negative ERP for rare, unpredictable visual stimuli-deviants, than for frequent, predictable visual stimuli-standards. Here, we show that the vMMN does not require conscious experience. We measured the vMMN from monocular luminance-decrement deviants that were either perceived or not during binocular rivalry dominance or suppression, respectively. We found that both sorts of deviants elicited the vMMN at about 250 ms after stimulus onset, with perceived deviants eliciting a bigger vMMN than not-perceived deviants. These results show that vMMN occurs in the absence of consciousness, and that consciousness enhances the processing underlying vMMN. We conclude that generative models of visual perception are tested, even when sensory input for those models is not perceived.

  18. Immunoscore in mismatch repair-proficient and -deficient colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Wirta, Erkki-Ville; Seppälä, Toni; Friman, Marjukka; Väyrynen, Juha; Ahtiainen, Maarit; Kautiainen, Hannu; Kuopio, Teijo; Kellokumpu, Ilmo; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Böhm, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate immune response and its prognostic significance in colon carcinomas using the previously described Immunoscore (IS). A population-based series of 779 colorectal cancers, operated on between 2000 and 2010, were classified according to tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) status, mismatch repair (MMR), and BRAF mutation status. Rectal cancer cases (n = 203) were excluded as a high proportion of these patients received preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Tissue microarray (TMA) samples collected from the tumour centre and invasive front were immunostained for CD3 and CD8. Lymphocytes were then digitally calculated to categorize IS from grade 0 to 4. Samples adequate for IS were available from 510 tumours. IS was significantly associated with AJCC/UICC stage, T stage, lymph node and distant metastases, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, MMR status, and BRAF mutation status. For IS0, IS1, IS2, IS3 and IS4, respectively, the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 59, 68, 78, 83 and 94% (p < 0.001); 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were 47, 55, 75, 80, and 89% (p < 0.001); and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 40, 44, 66, 61, and 76% (p < 0.001). IS was also prognostic for DFS, DSS, and OS within subsets of microsatellite-stable (MSS) and microsatellite-instable (MSI) disease. Multivariable analysis showed that IS, AJCC/UICC stage, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node ratio in AJCC/UICC stage III disease were independent prognostic factors for DFS, DSS, and OS. Age was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and OS. Gender and BRAF mutation were independent prognostic factors for OS. In conclusion, IS differentiated patients with poor versus improved prognosis in MSS and MSI disease and across AJCC/UICC stages. IS, AJCC/UICC stage, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node ratio in AJCC/UICC stage III disease were independent prognostic factors for DFS, DSS, and OS.

  19. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD).

    PubMed

    Ramchander, N C; Ryan, N A J; Crosbie, E J; Evans, D G

    2017-04-05

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of the founder PMS2 mutation - NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11 and its associated cancers in this family. The proband is 30 years old and is alive today. She is of Pakistani ethnic origin and a product of consanguinity. She initially presented aged 24 with painless bleeding per-rectum from colorectal polyps and was referred to clinical genetics. Clinical examination revealed two café-au-lait lesions, lichen planus, and a dermoid cyst. Her sister had been diagnosed in childhood with an aggressive brain tumour followed by colorectal cancer. During follow up, the proband developed 37 colorectal adenomatous polyps, synchronous ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinomas, and ultimately a metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma. DNA sequencing of peripheral lymphocytes revealed a bi-allelic inheritance of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11. Ovarian tumour tissue demonstrated low microsatellite instability. To date, she has had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a total gastrectomy. Aspirin and oestrogen-only hormone replacement therapy provide some chemoprophylaxis and manage postmenopausal symptoms, respectively. An 18-monthly colonoscopy surveillance programme has led to the excision of three high-grade dysplastic colorectal tubular adenomatous polyps. The proband's family pedigree displays multiple relatives with cancers including a likely case of 'true' Turcot syndrome. Constitutional mismatch repair

  20. Mismatch repair proteins collaborate with methyltransferases in the repair of O6-methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Rye, Peter T.; Delaney, James C.; Netirojjanakul, Chawita; Sun, Dana X.; Liu, Jenny Z.; Essigmann, John M.

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair is essential for combatting the adverse effects of damage to the genome. One example of base damage is O6-methylguanine (O6mG), which stably pairs with thymine during replication and thereby creates a promutagenic O6mG:T mismatch. This mismatch has also been linked with cellular toxicity. Therefore, in the absence of repair, O6mG:T mismatches can lead to cell death or result in G:C→A:T transition mutations upon the next round of replication. Cysteine thiolate residues on the Ada and Ogt methyltransferase (MTase) proteins directly reverse the O6mG base damage to yield guanine. When a cytosine is opposite the lesion, MTase repair restores a normal G:C pairing. However, if replication past the lesion has produced an O6mG:T mismatch, MTase conversion to a G:T mispair must still undergo correction to avoid mutation. Two mismatch repair pathways in E. coli that convert G:T mispairs to native G:C pairings are methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) and very short patch repair (VSPR). This work examined the possible roles that proteins in these pathways play in coordination with the canonical MTase repair of O6mG:T mismatches. The possibility of this repair network was analyzed by probing the efficiency of MTase repair of a single O6mG residue in cells deficient in individual mismatch repair proteins (Dam, MutH, MutS, MutL, or Vsr). We found that MTase repair in cells deficient in Dam or MutH showed wild-type levels of MTase repair. In contrast, cells lacking any of the VSPR proteins MutS, MutL, or Vsr showed a decrease in repair of O6mG by the Ada and Ogt MTases. Evidence is presented that the VSPR pathway positively influences MTase repair of O6mG:T mismatches, and assists the efficiency of restoring these mismatches to native G:C base pairs. PMID:17951114

  1. Advancing the match-mismatch framework for large herbivores in the Arctic: Evaluating the evidence for a trophic mismatch in caribou.

    PubMed

    Gustine, David; Barboza, Perry; Adams, Layne; Griffith, Brad; Cameron, Raymond; Whitten, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Climate-induced shifts in plant phenology may adversely affect animals that cannot or do not shift the timing of their reproductive cycle. The realized effect of potential trophic "mismatches" between a consumer and its food varies with the degree to which species rely on dietary income and stored capital. Large Arctic herbivores rely heavily on maternal capital to reproduce and give birth near the onset of the growing season but are they vulnerable to trophic mismatch? We evaluated the long-term changes in the temperatures and characteristics of the growing seasons (1970-2013), and compared growing conditions and dynamics of forage quality for caribou at peak parturition, peak lactation, and peak forage biomass, and plant senescence between two distinct time periods over 36 years (1977 and 2011-13). Despite advanced thaw dates (7-12 days earlier), increased growing season lengths (15-21 days longer), and consistent parturition dates, we found no decline in forage quality and therefore no evidence within this dataset for a trophic mismatch at peak parturition or peak lactation from 1977 to 2011-13. In Arctic ungulates that use stored capital for reproduction, reproductive demands are largely met by body stores deposited in the previous summer and autumn, which reduces potential adverse effects of any mismatch between food availability and timing of parturition. Climate-induced effects on forages growing in the summer and autumn ranges, however, do correspond with the demands of female caribou and their offspring to gain mass for the next reproductive cycle and winter. Therefore, we suggest the window of time to examine the match-mismatch framework in Arctic ungulates is not at parturition but in late summer-autumn, where the multiplier effects of small changes in forage quality are amplified by forage abundance, peak forage intake, and resultant mass gains in mother-offspring pairs.

  2. The Eukaryotic Mismatch Recognition Complexes Track with the Replisome during DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Joanna E.; Gammie, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    During replication, mismatch repair proteins recognize and repair mispaired bases that escape the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase. In this work, we tested the model that the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex tracks with the advancing replisome. Using yeast, we examined the dynamics during replication of the leading strand polymerase Polε using Pol2 and the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex using Msh2, the invariant protein involved in mismatch recognition. Specifically, we synchronized cells and processed samples using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with custom DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip). The Polε signal was not detectable in G1, but was observed at active origins and replicating DNA throughout S-phase. The Polε signal provided the resolution to track origin firing timing and efficiencies as well as replisome progression rates. By detecting Polε and Msh2 dynamics within the same strain, we established that the mismatch recognition complex binds origins and spreads to adjacent regions with the replisome. In mismatch repair defective PCNA mutants, we observed that Msh2 binds to regions of replicating DNA, but the distribution and dynamics are altered, suggesting that PCNA is not the sole determinant for the mismatch recognition complex association with replicating regions, but may influence the dynamics of movement. Using biochemical and genomic methods, we provide evidence that both MutS complexes are in the vicinity of the replisome to efficiently repair the entire spectrum of mutations during replication. Our data supports the model that the proximity of MutSα/β to the replisome for the efficient repair of the newly synthesized strand before chromatin reassembles. PMID:26684201

  3. Impact of Slow Blood Filling via Collaterals on Infarct Growth: Comparison of Mismatch and Collateral Status

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jeong Pyo; Lee, Mi Ji; Kim, Suk Jae; Chung, Jong-Won; Cha, Jihoon; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bang, Oh Young

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Perfusion-diffusion mismatch has been evaluated to determine whether the presence of a target mismatch helps to identify patients who respond favorably to recanalization therapies. We compared the impact on infarct growth of collateral status and the presence of a penumbra, using magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) techniques. Methods Consecutive patients who were candidates for recanalization therapy and underwent serial diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MRP were enrolled. A collateral flow map derived from MRP source data was generated by automatic post-processing. The impact of a target mismatch (Tmax>6 s/apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) volume≥1.8, ADC volume<70 mL; and Tmax>10 s for ADC volume<100 mL) on infarct growth was compared with MR-based collateral grading on day 7 DWI, using multivariate linear regression analysis. Results Among 73 patients, 55 (75%) showed a target mismatch, whereas collaterals were poor in 14 (19.2%), intermediate in 36 (49.3%), and good in 23 (31.5%) patients. After adjusting for initial severity of stroke, early recanalization (P<0.001) and the MR-based collateral grading (P=0.001), but not the presence of a target mismatch, were independently associated with infarct growth. Even in patients with a target mismatch and successful recanalization, the degree of infarct growth depended on the collateral status. Perfusion status at later Tmax time points (beyond the arterial phase) was more closely correlated with collateral status. Conclusions Patients with good collaterals show a favorable outcome in terms of infarct growth, regardless of the presence of a target mismatch pattern. The presence of slow blood filling predicts collateral status and infarct growth. PMID:28030891

  4. Formation of the BiAg2 surface alloy on lattice-mismatched interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Fattah, Z. M.; Lutz, P.; Piquero-Zulaica, I.; Lobo-Checa, J.; Schiller, F.; Bentmann, H.; Ortega, J. E.; Reinert, F.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the growth of a monolayer-thick BiAg2 surface alloy on thin Ag films grown on Pt(111) and Cu(111). Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) we show that the surface structure of the 1/3 ML Bi/x -ML Ag/Pt(111) system (x ≥2 ) is strongly affected by the annealing temperature required to form the alloy. As judged from the characteristic (√{3 }×√{3 } )R 30∘ LEED pattern, the BiAg2 alloy is partially formed at room temperature. A gentle, gradual increase in the annealing temperatures successively results in the formation of a pure BiAg2 phase, a combination of that phase with a (2 ×2 ) superstructure, and finally the pure (2 ×2 ) phase, which persists at higher annealing temperatures. These results complement recent work reporting the (2 ×2 ) as a predominant phase, and attributing the absence of BiAg2 alloy to the strained Ag/Pt interface. Likewise, we show that the growth of the BiAg2 alloy on similarly lattice-mismatched 1 and 2 ML Ag-Cu(111) interfaces also requires a low annealing temperature, whilst higher temperatures result in BiAg2 clustering and the formation of a BiCu2 alloy. The demonstration that the BiAg2 alloy can be formed on thin Ag films on different substrates presenting a strained interface has the prospect of serving as bases for technologically relevant systems, such as Rashba alloys interfaced with magnetic and semiconductor substrates.

  5. An Optimized Pentaplex PCR for Detecting DNA Mismatch Repair-Deficient Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hamelin, Richard; Boland, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Microsatellite instability (MSI) is used to screen colorectal cancers (CRC) for Lynch Syndrome, and to predict outcome and response to treatment. The current technique for measuring MSI requires DNA from normal and neoplastic tissues, and fails to identify tumors with specific DNA mismatch repair (MMR) defects. We tested a panel of five quasi-monomorphic mononucleotide repeat markers amplified in a single multiplex PCR reaction (pentaplex PCR) to detect MSI. Experimental Design We investigated a cohort of 213 CRC patients, comprised of 114 MMR-deficient and 99 MMR-proficient tumors. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis evaluated the expression of MLH1, MSH2, PMS2 and MSH6. MSI status was defined by differences in the quasi-monomorphic variation range (QMVR) from a pool of normal DNA samples, and measuring differences in allele lengths in tumor DNA. Results Amplification of 426 normal alleles allowed optimization of the QMVR at each marker, and eliminated the requirement for matched reference DNA to define MSI in each sample. Using ≥2/5 unstable markers as the criteria for MSI resulted in a sensitivity of 95.6% (95% CI = 90.1–98.1%) and a positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI = 96.6%–100%). Detection of MSH6-deficiency was limited using all techniques. Data analysis with a three-marker panel (BAT26, NR21 and NR27) was comparable in sensitivity (97.4%) and positive predictive value (96.5%) to the five marker panel. Both approaches were superior to the standard approach to measuring MSI. Conclusions An optimized pentaplex (or triplex) PCR offers a facile, robust, very inexpensive, highly sensitive, and specific assay for the identification of MSI in CRC. PMID:20195377

  6. Overeducation and Educational-Occupational Mismatch: A Distinguishing Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sharon; Rosenbloom, Tova

    2016-01-01

    This article accounts for a renovation by enriching the existent literature regarding two major nowadays phenomena and their labor implications, which might require a rethinking regarding new career-development approaches: the overeducation phenomenon (academic graduates whose educational level exceeds the educational level required in their jobs)…

  7. Overeducation and Educational-Occupational Mismatch: A Distinguishing Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sharon; Rosenbloom, Tova

    2016-01-01

    This article accounts for a renovation by enriching the existent literature regarding two major nowadays phenomena and their labor implications, which might require a rethinking regarding new career-development approaches: the overeducation phenomenon (academic graduates whose educational level exceeds the educational level required in their jobs)…

  8. Fibroblast growth factor-1 stimulation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells increases G/T mismatch-binding protein expression.

    PubMed

    Donohue, P J; Feng, S L; Alberts, G F; Guo, Y; Peifley, K A; Hsu, D K; Winkles, J A

    1996-10-01

    Polypeptide growth factors promote cell-cycle progression in part by the transcriptional activation of a diverse group of specific genes. We have used an mRNA differential-display approach to identify several fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 (acidic FGF)-inducible genes in NIH 3T3 cells. Here we report that one of these genes, called FGF-regulated (FR)-3, is predicted to encode G/T mismatch-binding protein (GTBP), a component of the mammalian DNA mismatch correction system. The murine GTBP gene is transiently expressed after FGF-1 or calf serum treatment, with maximal mRNA levels detected at 12 and 18 h post-stimulation. FGF-1-stimulated NIH 3T3 cells also express an increased amount of GTBP as determined by immunoblot analysis. These results indicate that elevated levels of GTBP may be required during the DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle for efficient G/T mismatch recognition and repair.

  9. Technical communication: inhaled anesthetic agent-vaporizer mismatch: management in settings with limited resources: don't try this at home.

    PubMed

    Adler, Adam C; Connelly, Neil Roy; Ankam, Abistanand; Raghunathan, Karthik

    2013-06-01

    Agent-specific vaporizers minimize opportunities for error and evidence our specialty's commitment to patient safety as a general principle. End-tidal anesthetic gas concentration monitoring is a useful adjunct whenever inhaled anesthetics are used in operating rooms. Due to their expense and required maintenance, end-tidal anesthetic gas monitors are not commonly used in developing nations. Unfortunately, in resource-constrained environments, situations may arise in which inhaled anesthetic agent-vaporizer mismatch may be necessary in the absence of end-tidal anesthetic gas monitoring. Rather than merely censure such practice as a threat to safety, we believe that certain anesthetic agent-vaporizer mismatch situations can be safely managed providing patients with predictable inspired anesthetic gas concentrations while minimizing errors. We present an approach based on mathematical models and tested in an artificial lung model. Mismatching of inhaled agent and vaporizer is a dangerous practice and should not be performed unless it is absolutely necessary. Such situations may arise in remote locations where neither end-tidal anesthetic gas monitoring nor vaporizer-specific agent is available. We hope our article provides guidance in such situations.

  10. Fibroblast growth factor-1 stimulation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells increases G/T mismatch-binding protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, P J; Feng, S L; Alberts, G F; Guo, Y; Peifley, K A; Hsu, D K; Winkles, J A

    1996-01-01

    Polypeptide growth factors promote cell-cycle progression in part by the transcriptional activation of a diverse group of specific genes. We have used an mRNA differential-display approach to identify several fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 (acidic FGF)-inducible genes in NIH 3T3 cells. Here we report that one of these genes, called FGF-regulated (FR)-3, is predicted to encode G/T mismatch-binding protein (GTBP), a component of the mammalian DNA mismatch correction system. The murine GTBP gene is transiently expressed after FGF-1 or calf serum treatment, with maximal mRNA levels detected at 12 and 18 h post-stimulation. FGF-1-stimulated NIH 3T3 cells also express an increased amount of GTBP as determined by immunoblot analysis. These results indicate that elevated levels of GTBP may be required during the DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle for efficient G/T mismatch recognition and repair. PMID:8870641

  11. The Histone Mark H3K36me3 Regulates Human DNA Mismatch Repair through its Interaction with MutSα

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Mao, Guogen; Tong, Dan; Huang, Jian; Gu, Liya; Yang, Wei; Li, Guo-Min

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA mismatch repair (MMR) ensures replication fidelity by correcting mismatches generated during DNA replication. Although human MMR has been reconstituted in vitro, how MMR occurs in vivo is unknown. Here, we show that an epigenetic histone mark, H3K36me3, is required in vivo to recruit the mismatch recognition protein hMutSα (hMSH2-hMSH6) onto chromatin through direct interactions with the hMSH6 PWWP domain. The abundance of H3K36me3 in G1 and early S phases ensures that hMutSα is enriched on chromatin before mispairs are introduced during DNA replication. Cells lacking the H3K36 tri-methyltransferase SETD2 display microsatellite instability (MSI) and an elevated spontaneous mutation frequency, characteristic of MMR-deficient cells. This work reveals that a histone mark regulates MMR in human cells and explains the long-standing puzzle of MSI-positive cancer cells that lack detectable mutations in known MMR genes. PMID:23622243

  12. MRD detection of leukemia relapse using HLA typing by FACS in combination with FISH after mismatched allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Eri; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Tsuma, Yusuke; Kawashima-Goto, Sachiko; Tamura, Shinichi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Hosoi, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Loss of mismatched HLA is a cause of relapse following HLA-mismatched allo-SCT. We directly detected the loss of mismatched HLA alleles in relapsed leukemic cells at a MRD level using HLA typing by multicolor FACS (HLA-Flow) in combination with FISH in the BM of two patients with MLL-AF9-positive AML, at 6 and 10 months after mismatched allo-SCT. HLA-Flow with FISH analysis detected relapsed leukemic cells not expressing a mismatched HLA allele and harboring the MLL rearrangement. Simultaneously, real-time quantitative RT-PCR detected a low copy number of MLL-AF9 transcripts, consistent with MRD detection. HLA-Flow with FISH is a powerful method for detecting molecular relapse after mismatched allo-SCT and provides important information on the HLA expression status of the relapsed leukemic cells to help determine the next intervention.

  13. Significance of single ventilation/perfusion mismatches in krypton-81m/technetium-99m lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Palestro, C.J.; Markowitz, D.; Alderson, P.O.

    1986-03-01

    The significance of a single area of ventilation/perfusion (V/P) mismatch in lung scans performed on patients suspected of pulmonary embolism (PE) was evaluated. Ten of 20 patients with this scan finding were found to have PE. An intermediate probability of PE was found with segmental (71%) or subsegmental (45%) single V/P mismatches. Seven of 16 patients with a single V/P mismatch and without a matching radiographic opacity had PE. Three of the four patients who had a V/P mismatch and a matching radiographic opacity were found to have PE. Multiview ventilation imaging with 81mKr was found to have advantages for the evaluation of single V/P mismatches. Based on the data available at this time, a single V/P mismatch suggests an intermediate probability of PE.

  14. Feature versus gestalt representation of stimuli in the mismatch negativity system of 7- to 9-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Molholm, Sophie; Gomes, Hilary; Lobosco, Jacqueline; Deacon, Diana; Ritter, Walter

    2004-05-01

    We examined preattentive auditory change detection in 7- to 9-year-old children. The question of interest was whether the preattentive comparison of stimuli indexed by the scalp-recorded mismatch negativity (MMN) was performed on representations of individual stimulus features or on gestalt representations of their combined attributes. The design of the study, based on a work by D. Deacon, J. Nousak, M. Pilotti, W. Ritter, and C. Yang (Psychophysiology, 1998), was such that both feature and gestalt representations could have been available to the comparator mechanism generating the MMN. The data indicated that for the majority of the children-those that exhibited an inverse relationship between the amplitude of the MMN and the probability of the deviant-the MMN was based on feature-specific information. This study also provides a method to obtain MMNs to deviants in three different features in the time usually required to obtain an MMN to a single acoustic feature.

  15. Is ABO mismatch another risk factor for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric thalassemic patients?

    PubMed

    Atay, Didem; Erbey, Fatih; Akcay, Arzu; Ozturk, Gulyuz

    2015-09-01

    The ABO incompatibility between donor and recipient is not considered a barrier to successful allogeneic HSCT. Nevertheless, conflicting data still exist about the influence of ABO incompatibility on transplant outcome in pediatric patients with thalassemia. Fifty-one children with beta-thalassemia major who underwent allogeneic HSCT were enrolled this study. Twenty-three of them (45%) received an ABO-incompatible transplant [minor ABO mismatch: six (26%), major ABO mismatch: fourteen (61%), and bidirectional mismatch: three (13%)]. In this study, ABO incompatibility did not significantly impair GVHD, VOD, neutrophil and platelet engraftment, TRM, OS and TFS. Particularly in major and bidirectional ABO-mismatched patients, a delayed erythroid recovery was recorded as compared to the group receiving an ABO-compatible graft (median time, 31 and 38 days vs. 19.5 days; p: 0.02 and p: 0.03). Median time to red cell transfusion independence was significantly longer in major ABO-incompatible patients (median time, 87 days vs. 32 days; p: 0.001). Therefore, whenever feasible, major ABO-mismatched donors should be avoided in HSCT recipients, to prevent delayed erythroid recovery with prolonged RBC transfusion needs and impaired quality of life.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and outcome risk in unrelated mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an exploration study.

    PubMed

    Harkensee, Christian; Oka, Akira; Onizuka, Makoto; Middleton, Peter G; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Kashiwase, Koichi; Yabe, Toshio; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gennery, Andrew R; Ando, Kiyoshi; Morishima, Yasuo

    2012-06-28

    Genetic risk factors contribute to adverse outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Mismatching of the HLA complex most strongly determines outcomes, whereas non-HLA genetic polymorphisms are also having an impact. Although the majority of HSCTs are mismatched, only few studies have investigated the effects of non-HLA polymorphisms in the unrelated HSCT and HLA-mismatched setting. To understand these effects, we genotyped 41 previously studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2 independent, large cohorts of HSCT donor-recipient pairs (n = 460 and 462 pairs) from a homogeneous genetic background. The study population was chosen to pragmatically represent a large clinically homogeneous group (acute leukemia), allowing all degrees of HLA matching. The TNF-1031 donor-recipient genotype mismatch association with acute GVHD grade 4 was the only consistent association identified. Analysis of a subgroup of higher HLA matching showed consistent associations of the recipient IL2-330 GT genotype with risk of chronic GVHD, and the donor CTLA4-CT60 GG genotype with protection from acute GVHD. These associations are strong candidates for prediction of risk in a clinical setting. This study shows that non-HLA gene polymorphisms are of relevance for predicting HSCT outcome, even for HLA mismatched transplants.

  17. Prophylactic red blood cell exchange for ABO-mismatched hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Cunard, Robyn; Marquez, Isagani I; Ball, Edward D; Nelson, Connie L; Corringham, Sue; Clopton, Paul; Sanchez, Amber P; Lane, Thomas; Ward, David M

    2014-07-01

    To enhance donor availability, almost half of hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants (HPCTs) cross ABO blood type boundaries. ABO-incompatible HPCTs are well tolerated; however, there is an increased risk of delayed hemolysis in patients with minor and bidirectional ABO mismatches. Delayed hemolysis generally occurs 1 to 2 weeks after HPCT and is related to production of alloantibodies directed against recipient ABO red blood cell (RBC) antigens by passenger donor lymphocytes. One previous study has suggested that prophylactic RBC exchange in patients with minor and bidirectional ABO-mismatched HPCT reduces the risks of severe immune hemolysis, but this recommendation is controversial. Herein we describe our experience using prophylactic RBC exchange in patients with minor and bidirectional ABO-mismatched HPCTs who were deemed to be at high risk for immune hemolysis. We compare the group of patients that received prophylactic RBC exchange with a historical cohort of ABO-mismatched patients who underwent HPCT without prophylactic RBC exchange. Our study suggests that prophylactic RBC exchange in minor and bidirectional ABO-mismatched HPCT does not reduce severe immune hemolysis, nor does it improve 1-year survival, the number of RBC units transfused after transplant, or length of hospitalization after HPCT. This study failed to identify a clear role for selected prophylactic RBC exchange in patients who were deemed at risk for severe post-HPCT immune hemolysis. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. A P300 brain-computer interface based on a modification of the mismatch negativity paradigm.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Sellers, Eric W; Zhou, Sijie; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    The P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) is an extension of the oddball paradigm, and can facilitate communication for people with severe neuromuscular disorders. It has been shown that, in addition to the P300, other event-related potential (ERP) components have been shown to contribute to successful operation of the P300 BCI. Incorporating these components into the classification algorithm can improve the classification accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR). In this paper, a single character presentation paradigm was compared to a presentation paradigm that is based on the visual mismatch negativity. The mismatch negativity paradigm showed significantly higher classification accuracy and ITRs than a single character presentation paradigm. In addition, the mismatch paradigm elicited larger N200 and N400 components than the single character paradigm. The components elicited by the presentation method were consistent with what would be expected from a mismatch paradigm and a typical P300 was also observed. The results show that increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the amplitude of ERP components can significantly improve BCI speed and accuracy. The mismatch presentation paradigm may be considered a viable option to the traditional P300 BCI paradigm.

  19. Assessing mismatches between ecosystem structure and function in Jiaozhou Bay by coordination degree algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huiwang; Chen, Zhenhua; Yao, Xiaohong; Sun, Peng

    2017-04-01

    A healthy ecosystem depends on the coordination of ecosystem structure and function. The coordination among ecosystem components, however, is seldom taken into account in current ecosystem health assessments (EHA). Neglect of such coordination may lead to large degrees of uncertainty in EHA and fail to support ecosystem management. We propose an approach to quantify the level of dynamic mismatching between ecosystem structure and function and the impact on ecosystem health by incorporating the ecosystem coordination index into EHA. The coordination degree is calculated using variation coefficient of six proxies for ecosystem structure and functions. The ecosystem at Jiaozhou Bay, as a microcosm of China's coast, has been documented to fluctuate from healthy to unhealthy status over the past three decades. The results indicate that there is a 3%-17% lower health level than that calculated by common methods used in the literature, indicating that the health of Jiaozhou Bay has become worse than expected. Habitat change contributes 20%-52% to ecosystem mismatches and is the most uncoordinated factor. Mismatch-related declines account for approximately one-fourth of the total ecological declines. Restoration scenarios that aim to resolve ecosystem mismatches could increase efficiency by about 50% compared to restoration scenarios that do not consider mismatches. This study investigates ecological declines in a coastal bay due to 30 years of rapid economic development. In doing so, this study provides novel insights and enhances our understanding of the reasons for failure in ecological restoration.

  20. Controlling Kondo Scattering at the Conducting Oxide Interfaces via Lattice Mismatch and Growth Oxygen Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kun; Zheng, Shengwei; Huang, Zhen; Li, Changjian; Zhou, Wenxiong; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando, Ariando; Ariando Team

    The interface magnetism, such as Kondo effect and ferromagnetism at the conducting interfaces between nonmagnetic oxides, has attracted great attention in recent years. In this report, we show that the interfacial Kondo scattering is enhanced by large lattice mismatch and high growth oxygen pressure. For the (001) LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface with 3.0% lattice mismatch, the sheet resistance upturn appears around 40 K when the growth oxygen pressure PO 2 is beyond 1 mTorr. By contrast, for the (001) (La0.3Sr0.7) (Al0.65Ta0.35) O3/SrTiO3 interface with 1.0% lattice mismatch, no resistance upturn is observed until PO 2 is increased to 100 mTorr. Moreover, the magnetoresistance data confirm the resistance upturn is caused by Kondo scattering. We propose that the interface disorders, which can be induced by a large lattice mismatch and high PO 2, are important for forming localized Ti3+ ions. These Ti3+ ions can be spin-polarized and scatter electrons that are confined near the interface by high PO 2. This explains why the stronger magnetic interaction is observed at the SrTiO3-based interfaces with the higher PO 2 and larger lattice mismatch, paving the way for manipulating the interface magnetism at the functional oxide interface.

  1. Saturation of DNA mismatch repair and error catastrophe by a base analogue in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Kazuo; Loakes, David; Schaaper, Roel M

    2002-01-01

    Deoxyribosyl-dihydropyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (dP) is a potent mutagenic deoxycytidine-derived base analogue capable of pairing with both A and G, thereby causing G. C --> A. T and A. T --> G. C transition mutations. We have found that the Escherichia coli DNA mismatch-repair system can protect cells against this mutagenic action. At a low dose, dP is much more mutagenic in mismatch-repair-defective mutH, mutL, and mutS strains than in a wild-type strain. At higher doses, the difference between the wild-type and the mutator strains becomes small, indicative of saturation of mismatch repair. Introduction of a plasmid containing the E. coli mutL(+) gene significantly reduces dP-induced mutagenesis. Together, the results indicate that the mismatch-repair system can remove dP-induced replication errors, but that its capacity to remove dP-containing mismatches can readily be saturated. When cells are cultured at high dP concentration, mutant frequencies reach exceptionally high levels and viable cell counts are reduced. The observations are consistent with a hypothesis in which dP-induced cell killing and growth impairment result from excess mutations (error catastrophe), as previously observed spontaneously in proofreading-deficient mutD (dnaQ) strains. PMID:12196386

  2. Role of energy-level mismatches in a multi-pathway complex of photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, James; Ryu, Junghee; Lee, Changhyoup; Yoo, Seokwon; Jeong, Hyunseok; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2011-10-01

    Considering a multi-pathway structure in a light-harvesting complex of photosynthesis, we investigated the role of energy-level mismatches between antenna molecules in transferring the absorbed energy to a reaction center (RC). We found a condition in which the antenna molecules faithfully play their roles: when their effective absorption ratios are larger than those of the receiver molecule directly coupled to the RC. In the absence of energy-level mismatches and dephasing noise, there arises quantum destructive interference between multiple paths that restricts the energy transfer. On the other hand, the destructive interference diminishes as asymmetrically biasing the energy-level mismatches and/or introducing quantum noise of dephasing for the antenna molecules, so that the transfer efficiency is greatly enhanced to nearly unity. Remarkably, the near-unity efficiency can be achieved at a wide range of asymmetric energy-level mismatches. Temporal characteristics are also optimized at the energy-level mismatches where the transfer efficiency is nearly unity. We discuss these effects, in particular, for the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex.

  3. MSH-MLH complexes formed at a DNA mismatch are disrupted by the PCNA sliding clamp.

    PubMed

    Bowers, J; Tran, P T; Joshi, A; Liskay, R M; Alani, E

    2001-03-09

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mismatch repair (MMR) is initiated by the binding of heterodimeric MutS homolog (MSH) complexes to mismatches that include single nucleotide and loop insertion/deletion mispairs. In in vitro experiments, the mismatch binding specificity of the MSH2-MSH6 heterodimer is eliminated if ATP is present. However, addition of the MutL homolog complex MLH1-PMS1 to binding reactions containing MSH2-MSH6, ATP, and mismatched substrate results in the formation of a stable ternary complex. The stability of this complex suggests that it represents an intermediate in MMR that is subsequently acted upon by other MMR factors. In support of this idea, we found that the replication processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which plays a critical role in MMR at step(s) prior to DNA resynthesis, disrupted preformed ternary complexes. These observations, in conjunction with experiments performed with streptavidin end-blocked mismatch substrates, suggested that PCNA interacts with an MSH-MLH complex formed on DNA mispairs.

  4. Real-time Diffusion-Perfusion Mismatch Analysis in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Matus; Albers, Gregory W.; Bammer, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-perfusion mismatch can be used to identify acute stroke patients that could benefit from reperfusion therapies. Early assessment of the mismatch facilitates necessary diagnosis and treatment decisions in acute stroke. We developed the RApid processing of PerfusIon and Diffusion (RAPID) for unsupervised, fully automated processing of perfusion and diffusion data for the purpose of expedited routine clinical assessment. The RAPID system computes quantitative perfusion maps (CBV, CBF, MTT, and Tmax) using deconvolution of tissue and arterial signals. DWI/PWI mismatch is automatically determined using infarct core segmentation of ADC maps and perfusion deficits segmented from Tmax maps. The performance of the RAPID was evaluated on 63 acute stroke cases, in which diffusion and perfusion lesion volumes were outlined by both a human reader and the RAPID system. The correlation of outlined lesion volumes obtained from both methods was r2 = 0.99 for DWI and r2 = 0.96 for PWI. For mismatch identification, RAPID showed 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity. The mismatch information is made available on the hospital's PACS within 5-7 minutes. Results indicate that the automated system is sufficiently accurate and fast enough to be used for routine care as well as in clinical trials. PMID:21031505

  5. Mismatch negativity in children with specific language impairment and auditory processing disorder.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Muniz, Caroline Nunes; Befi-Lopes, Débora Maria; Schochat, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity, an electrophysiological measure, evaluates the brain's capacity to discriminate sounds, regardless of attentional and behavioral capacity. Thus, this auditory event-related potential is promising in the study of the neurophysiological basis underlying auditory processing. To investigate complex acoustic signals (speech) encoded in the auditory nervous system of children with specific language impairment and compare with children with auditory processing disorders and typical development through the mismatch negativity paradigm. It was a prospective study. 75 children (6-12 years) participated in this study: 25 children with specific language impairment, 25 with auditory processing disorders, and 25 with typical development. Mismatch negativity was obtained by subtracting from the waves obtained by the stimuli /ga/ (frequent) and /da/ (rare). Measures of mismatch negativity latency and two amplitude measures were analyzed. It was possible to verify an absence of mismatch negativity in 16% children with specific language impairment and 24% children with auditory processing disorders. In the comparative analysis, auditory processing disorders and specific language impairment showed higher latency values and lower amplitude values compared to typical development. These data demonstrate changes in the automatic discrimination of crucial acoustic components of speech sounds in children with specific language impairment and auditory processing disorders. It could indicate problems in physiological processes responsible for ensuring the discrimination of acoustic contrasts in pre-attentional and pre-conscious levels, contributing to poor perception. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. On pattern matching with k mismatches and few don't cares.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Marius; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2017-02-01

    We consider the problem of pattern matching with k mismatches, where there can be don't care or wild card characters in the pattern. Specifically, given a pattern P of length m and a text T of length n, we want to find all occurrences of P in T that have no more than k mismatches. The pattern can have don't care characters, which match any character. Without don't cares, the best known algorithm for pattern matching with k mismatches has a runtime of [Formula: see text]. With don't cares in the pattern, the best deterministic algorithm has a runtime of O(nk polylog m). Therefore, there is an important gap between the versions with and without don't cares. In this paper we give an algorithm whose runtime increases with the number of don't cares. We define an island to be a maximal length substring of P that does not contain don't cares. Let q be the number of islands in P. We present an algorithm that runs in [Formula: see text] time. If the number of islands q is O(k) this runtime becomes [Formula: see text], which essentially matches the best known runtime for pattern matching with k mismatches without don't cares. If the number of islands q is O(k(2)), this algorithm is asymptotically faster than the previous best algorithm for pattern matching with k mismatches with don't cares in the pattern.

  7. The phenology mismatch hypothesis: are declines of migrant birds linked to uneven global climate change?

    PubMed

    Jones, Tim; Cresswell, Will

    2010-01-01

    1. Migrant bird populations are declining and have been linked to anthropogenic climate change. The phenology mismatch hypothesis predicts that migrant birds, which experience a greater rate of warming in their breeding grounds compared to their wintering grounds, are more likely to be in decline, because their migration will occur later and they may then miss the early stages of the breeding season. Population trends will also be negatively correlated with distance, because the chances of phenology mismatch increase with number of staging sites. 2. Population trends from the Palaearctic (1990-2000) and Nearctic (1980-2006) were collated for 193 spatially separate migrant bird populations, along with temperature trends for the wintering and breeding areas. An index of phenology mismatch was calculated as the difference between wintering and breeding temperature trends. 3. In the Nearctic, phenology mismatch was correlated with population declines as predicted, but in the Palaearctic, distance was more important. This suggests that differential global climate change may be responsible for contributing to some migrant species' declines, but its effects may be more important in the Nearctic. 4. Differences in geography and so average migration distance, migrant species composition and history of anthropogenic change in the two areas may account for the differences in the strength of the importance of phenology mismatch on migrant declines in the Nearctic and Palaearctic.

  8. Temperature dependence of gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature X-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch of three different nickel-base superalloys at temperatures between 18 and 1000 C. The measurements were performed on oriented single-crystal disks which had been aged to produce a semicoherent gamma-gamma prime structure. The thermal expansion of the lattice parameters of the gamma and gamma-prime phases was described by a second-order polynomial expression. The expansion of the gamma-prime phase was consistently smaller than that of the gamma phase, which caused the lattice mismatch to become more negative at higher temperatures. It was also shown that high values of lattice mismatch resulted in increased rates of directional gamma-prime coarsening during elevated temperature creep exposure.

  9. Daytime Locations in Spatial Mismatch: Job Accessibility and Employment at Reentry From Prison.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Naomi F; Lens, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    Individuals recently released from prison confront many barriers to employment. One potential obstacle is spatial mismatch-the concentration of low-skilled, nonwhite job-seekers within central cities and the prevalence of relevant job opportunities in outlying areas. Prior research has found mixed results about the importance of residential place for reentry outcomes. In this article, we propose that residential location matters for finding work, but this largely static measure does not capture the range of geographic contexts that individuals inhabit throughout the day. We combine novel, real-time GPS information on daytime locations and self-reported employment collected from smartphones with sophisticated measures of job accessibility to test the relative importance of spatial mismatch based on residence and daytime locations. Our findings suggest that the ability of low-skilled, poor, and urban individuals to compensate for their residential deficits by traveling to job-rich areas is an overlooked and salient consideration in spatial mismatch perspectives.

  10. Significance of angular mismatch between vertebral endplate and prosthetic endplate in lumbar total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong Suh; Chung, Sung Soo; Oh, Sung Kyun; You, Je Wook

    2011-05-01

    A retrospective study. To determine whether angular mismatch between the vertebral endplate and prosthetic endplate during lumbar total disc replacement (L-TDR) affects the radiological and clinical outcomes. A prosthesis anchored to the vertebral body by using a large central keel carries an inherent risk of angular mismatch between the vertebral endplate and prosthetic endplate at a segment with a greater degree of lordosis, such as L5-S1. Theoretically, this angular mismatch can cause several problems, such as segmental hyperlordosis, anterior positioning of the upper prosthesis, posterior prosthetic edge subsidence, decreased range of motion (ROM), and a poor clinical outcome. This study evaluated 64 prosthetic levels of 56 patients who were implanted with L-TDR between June 2002 and February 2006. There were 38 and 26 prosthetic levels at the L4-5 and L5-S1, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 25.6 (12 to 49) months. The angle of mismatch between the lower endplate of the upper vertebral body and the upper prosthetic plate, segmental flexion/extension ROM, segmental lordosis angle at extension, distance from the posterior wall of the vertebral body to the posterior prosthetic edge were measured by obtaining radiographs. Clinically, the Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index were also evaluated. The angular mismatches between the upper vertebra and prosthesis at L4-5 and L5-S1 were 1.6 degree and 5.6 degree, respectively (P <0.001), at the final follow-up; these angles were not significantly different from those measured on radiographs obtained postoperatively (2.3 degree and 4.9 degree in L4-5 and L5-S1, respectively, P=0.324 in L4-5 and P=0.620 in L5-S1). The mean segmental ROM of the operated levels was 10.6 degree (4 to 22) and 6.1 degree (2 to 13) in the L4-5 and L5-S1, respectively (P <0.001). The mean segmental ROM, mean segmental lordosis angle, and mean distance from the posterior margin of the vertebral body to the posterior edge

  11. Poorly repaired mismatches in heteroduplex DNA are hyper-recombinagenic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Manivasakam, P.; Hastings, P.J.; Rosenberg, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    In yeast meiotic recombination, alleles used as genetic markers fall into two classes as regards their fate when incorporated into heteroduplex DNA. Normal alleles are those that form heteroduplexes that are nearly always recognized and corrected by the mismatch repair system operating in meiosis. High PMS (postmeiotic segregation) alleles form heteroduplexes that are inefficiently mismatch repaired. We propose that this hyperrecombination is caused by the high PMS allele blocking a mismatch repair tract initiated from the normal allele, thus preventing corepair of the two alleles, which would prevent formation of recombinants. The results of three point crosses involving two PMS alleles and a normal allele suggest that high PMS alleles placed between two alleles that are normally corepaired block that corepair. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. The role of the bacterial mismatch repair system in SOS-induced mutagenesis: a theoretical background.

    PubMed

    Belov, Oleg V; Chuluunbaatar, Ochbadrakh; Kapralov, Mikhail I; Sweilam, Nasser H

    2013-09-07

    A theoretical study is performed of the possible role of the methyl-directed mismatch repair system in the ultraviolet-induced mutagenesis of Escherichia coli bacterial cells. For this purpose, mathematical models of the SOS network, translesion synthesis and mismatch repair are developed. Within the proposed models, the key pathways of these repair systems were simulated on the basis of modern experimental data related to their mechanisms. Our model approach shows a possible mechanistic explanation of the hypothesis that the bacterial mismatch repair system is responsible for attenuation of mutation frequency during ultraviolet-induced SOS response via removal of the nucleotides misincorporated by DNA polymerase V (the UmuD'2C complex). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reducing thermal mismatch stress in anodically bonded silicon-glass wafers: theoretical estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Leonid S.; Ryabov, Vladimir T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical study and estimations of thermal mismatch stress reduction in anodically bonded silicon-glass stacks by justifiable selection of bonding temperature and glass thickness. This can be done only after prior thorough study of temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the glass and silicon to be used. We show by analyzing such a dependence of several glass brands that the usual idea of decreasing the bonding process temperature as a solution to the thermal mismatch stress problem can be a failure. Interchanging glass brands during device design is shown to produce very contrasting changes in residual stresses. These results are in good agreement with finite-element modeling. This paper reports there is proportion between glass and silicon wafer thicknesses minimizing thermal mismatch stress at unbonded side of the silicon independently of the bonding or working temperatures chosen.

  14. Mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Previous work indicated that extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells could be explained by the single-strand annealing (SSA) model. This model predicts that extrachromosomal recombination leads to nonconservative crossover products and that heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) is formed by annealing of complementary single strands. Mismatched bases in hDNA may subsequently be repaired to wild-type or mutant sequences, or they may remain unrepaired and segregate following DNA replication. We describe a system to examine the formation and mismatch repair of hDNA in recombination intermediates. Our results are consistent with extrachromosomal recombination occurring via SSA and producing crossover recombinant products. As predicted by the SSA model, hDNA was present in double-strand break-induced recombination intermediates. By placing either silent or frameshift mutations in the predicted hDNA region, we have shown that mismatches are efficiently repaired prior to DNA replication. Images PMID:8264607

  15. Analysis of spatially mismatched imagery for synthetic aperture radar ATR classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, Chad T.; Halversen, Shawn D.; Montagnino, Lee J.; Hebert, Christina L.; Young, Matthew T.; Cassabaum, Mary L.; Ku, Neilson

    2008-04-01

    Template-based classification algorithms used with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) automatic target recognition (ATR) degrade in performance when used with spatially mismatched imagery. The degradation, caused by a spatial mismatch between the template and image, is analyzed to show acceptable tolerances for SAR systems. The mismatch between the image and template is achieved by resampling the test imagery to different pixel spacings. A consistent SAR dataset is used to examine pixel spacings between 0.1069 and 0.2539 meters with a nominal spacing of 0.2021 meters. Performance degradation is observed as the pixel spacing is adjusted, Small amounts of variation in the pixel spacing cause little change in performance and allow design engineers to set reliable tolerances. Alternatively, the results show that using templates and images collected from slightly different sensor platforms is a very real possibility with the ability to predict the classification performance.

  16. Cognitive mismatches in the cockpit: will they ever be a thing of the past?

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gordon; Besnard, Denis; Riley, Dominic

    2007-07-01

    Changes in aviation over the last 30 years have dramatically affected the way that flight crews fly aircraft. The implementation and evolution of the glass cockpit, however, has happened in an almost ad hoc fashion, meaning that it does not always properly support the flight crew in carrying out their tasks. In such situations, the crew's mental model of what is happening does not always match the real state of affairs. In other words, there is a cognitive mismatch. An initial taxonomy of cognitive mismatches is defined, and the problem illustrated using an example from an aviation accident. Consideration is then given to how cognitive mismatches can be managed. A call is made for the development of an integrated cockpit architecture that takes better account of human capabilities and allows for new developments to be added to the cockpit in a more seamless manner.

  17. Brain potentials to sexually suggestive whistles show meaning modulates the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Frangos, Jason; Ritter, Walter; Friedman, David

    2005-08-22

    Electroencephalographic data suggest that spoken words produce an enhanced output of the brain's automatic deviance detection system, as reflected by the mismatch negativity. Using meaningful and nonmeaningful whistles, we sought to distinguish the effect of semantic content on the brain's deviance detection system from language-specific stimulus features. In the meaningful condition, study participants heard a human 'wolf whistle', which is commonly interpreted as an unsolicited expression of sexual attention. In the nonmeaningful condition participants heard an acoustically identical, but digitally rearranged, version of the wolf whistle. The mismatch negativity amplitude was significantly larger when the infrequent stimulus was meaningful than when it was meaningless. These data suggest that enhanced mismatch negativity magnitude was due to the semantic valence of the eliciting deviant.

  18. Energetic and fitness costs of mismatching resource supply and demand in seasonally breeding birds.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D W; Blondel, J; Perret, P; Lambrechts, M M; Speakman, J R

    2001-03-30

    By advancing spring leaf flush and ensuing food availability, climatic warming results in a mismatch between the timing of peak food supply and nestling demand, shifting the optimal time for reproduction in birds. Two populations of blue tits (Parus caeruleus) that breed at different dates in similar, but spatially distinct, habitat types in Corsica and southern France provide a unique opportunity to quantify the energetic and fitness consequences when breeding is mismatched with local productivity. As food supply and demand become progressively mismatched, the increased cost of rearing young pushes the metabolic effort of adults beyond their apparent sustainable limit, drastically reducing the persistence of adults in the breeding population. We provide evidence that the economics of parental foraging and limits to sustainable metabolic effort are key selective forces underlying synchronized seasonal breeding and long-term shifts in breeding date in response to climatic change.

  19. Manufacturer-provided effective orifice area index charts and the prevention of prosthesis-patient mismatch.

    PubMed

    House, Chad M; Nelson, William B; Kroshus, Timothy J; Dahiya, Ranjan; Pibarot, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) occurs when an implanted prosthesis is too small relative to the patient's body surface area (BSA). However, mismatch can often be prevented by indexing the expected effective orifice area (EOA) of a prosthesis to the patient's BSA and then selecting the largest implantable prosthesis to avoid mismatch. Previously, prosthesis manufacturers have attempted to simplify this process by providing charts that include the expected EOA for their prosthesis, already indexed into an array of BSA values. One caveat with these charts is that the expected EOA data must truly be reliable, or the charts will misguide the implanting surgeon. Manufacturer-provided charts could be improved by standardizing the EOA data, with one potential source being the hemodynamic data submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration. This review discusses PPM, manufacturer-provided EOA charts, and the regulation of EOA data.

  20. Receiver IQ mismatch estimation in PDM CO-OFDM system using training symbol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dandan; Ma, Xiurong; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Haoyuan

    2017-07-01

    Receiver in-phase/quadrature (IQ) mismatch is hard to mitigate at the receiver via using conventional method in polarization division multiplexed (PDM) coherent optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) system. In this paper, a novel training symbol structure is proposed to estimate IQ mismatch and channel distortion. Combined this structure with Gram Schmidt orthogonalization procedure (GSOP) algorithm, we can get lower bit error rate (BER). Meanwhile, based on this structure one estimation method is deduced in frequency domain which can achieve the estimation of IQ mismatch and channel distortion independently and improve the system performance obviously. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed two methods have better performance than compared method at 100 Gb/s after 480 km fiber transmission. Besides, the calculation complexity is also analyzed.

  1. Advancing the match-mismatch framework for large herbivores in the Arctic: Evaluating the evidence for a trophic mismatch in caribou

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Perry; Adams, Layne; Griffith, Brad; Whitten, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Climate-induced shifts in plant phenology may adversely affect animals that cannot or do not shift the timing of their reproductive cycle. The realized effect of potential trophic “mismatches” between a consumer and its food varies with the degree to which species rely on dietary income and stored capital. Large Arctic herbivores rely heavily on maternal capital to reproduce and give birth near the onset of the growing season but are they vulnerable to trophic mismatch? We evaluated the long-term changes in the temperatures and characteristics of the growing seasons (1970–2013), and compared growing conditions and dynamics of forage quality for caribou at peak parturition, peak lactation, and peak forage biomass, and plant senescence between two distinct time periods over 36 years (1977 and 2011–13). Despite advanced thaw dates (7−12 days earlier), increased growing season lengths (15−21 days longer), and consistent parturition dates, we found no decline in forage quality and therefore no evidence within this dataset for a trophic mismatch at peak parturition or peak lactation from 1977 to 2011–13. In Arctic ungulates that use stored capital for reproduction, reproductive demands are largely met by body stores deposited in the previous summer and autumn, which reduces potential adverse effects of any mismatch between food availability and timing of parturition. Climate-induced effects on forages growing in the summer and autumn ranges, however, do correspond with the demands of female caribou and their offspring to gain mass for the next reproductive cycle and winter. Therefore, we suggest the window of time to examine the match-mismatch framework in Arctic ungulates is not at parturition but in late summer-autumn, where the multiplier effects of small changes in forage quality are amplified by forage abundance, peak forage intake, and resultant mass gains in mother-offspring pairs. PMID:28231256

  2. Advancing the match-mismatch framework for large herbivores in the Arctic: Evaluating the evidence for a trophic mismatch in caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustine, David D.; Barboza, Perry; Adams, Layne G.; Griffith, Brad; Cameron, Raymond; Whitten, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    Climate-induced shifts in plant phenology may adversely affect animals that cannot or do not shift the timing of their reproductive cycle. The realized effect of potential trophic “mismatches” between a consumer and its food varies with the degree to which species rely on dietary income and stored capital. Large Arctic herbivores rely heavily on maternal capital to reproduce and give birth near the onset of the growing season but are they vulnerable to trophic mismatch? We evaluated the long-term changes in the temperatures and characteristics of the growing seasons (1970–2013), and compared growing conditions and dynamics of forage quality for caribou at peak parturition, peak lactation, and peak forage biomass, and plant senescence between two distinct time periods over 36 years (1977 and 2011–13). Despite advanced thaw dates (7−12 days earlier), increased growing season lengths (15−21 days longer), and consistent parturition dates, we found no decline in forage quality and therefore no evidence within this dataset for a trophic mismatch at peak parturition or peak lactation from 1977 to 2011–13. In Arctic ungulates that use stored capital for reproduction, reproductive demands are largely met by body stores deposited in the previous summer and autumn, which reduces potential adverse effects of any mismatch between food availability and timing of parturition. Climate-induced effects on forages growing in the summer and autumn ranges, however, do correspond with the demands of female caribou and their offspring to gain mass for the next reproductive cycle and winter. Therefore, we suggest the window of time to examine the match-mismatch framework in Arctic ungulates is not at parturition but in late summer-autumn, where the multiplier effects of small changes in forage quality are amplified by forage abundance, peak forage intake, and resultant mass gains in mother-offspring pairs.

  3. Educational mismatch and health status among foreign-born workers in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dunlavy, A C; Garcy, A M; Rostila, M

    2016-04-01

    Foreign-born workers have been shown to experience poorer working conditions than native-born workers. Yet relationships between health and educational mismatch have been largely overlooked among foreign-born workers. This study uses objective and self-reported measures of educational mismatch to compare the prevalence of educational mismatch among native (n = 2359) and foreign-born (n = 1789) workers in Sweden and to examine associations between educational mismatch and poor self-rated health. Findings from weighted multivariate logistic regression which controlled for social position and individual-level demographic characteristics suggested that over-educated foreign-born workers had greater odds ratios for poor-self rated health compared to native-born matched workers. This association was particularly evident among men (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.04-4.39) and women (OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.12-4.03) from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand. Associations between under-education and poor-self rated health were also found among women from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.27-3.18). These findings suggest that educational mismatch may be an important work-related social determinant of health among foreign-born workers. Future studies are needed to examine the effects of long-term versus short-term states of educational mismatch on health and to study relationships over time.

  4. Influence of electrode mismatch on Cole parameter estimation from total right side electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Rubén; Bogónez-Franco, Paco; Nescolarde, Lexa; Seoane, Fernando

    2012-09-01

    Applications based on measurements of Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) spectroscopy analysis, like assessment of body composition, have proliferated in the past years. Currently Body Composition Assessment (BCA) based in Bioimpedance Spectroscopy (BIS) analysis relays on an accurate estimation of the Cole parameters R(0) and R(∞). A recent study by Bogonez-Franco et al. has proposed electrode mismatch as source of remarkable artefacts in BIS measurements. Using Total Right Side BIS measurements from the aforementioned study, this work has focused on the influence of electrode mismatch on the estimation of R(0) and R(∞) using the Non-Linear Least Square curve fitting technique on the modulus of the impedance. The results show that electrode mismatch on the voltage sensing electrodes produces an overestimation of the impedance spectrum leading to a wrong estimation of the parameters R(0) and R(∞), and consequently obtaining values around 4% larger that the values obtained from BIS without electrode mismatch. The specific key factors behind electrode mismatch or its influence on the analysis of single and spectroscopy measurements have not been investigated yet, no compensation or correction technique is available to overcome the deviation produced on the EBI measurement. Since textile-enabled EBI applications using dry textrodes, i.e. textile electrodes with dry skin-electrode interfaces and potentially large values of electrode polarization impedance are more prone to produce electrode mismatch, the lack of a correction or compensation technique might hinder the proliferation of textile-enabled EBI applications for personalized healthcare monitoring. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of angular mismatch between vertebral endplate and vertebral body replacement endplate on implant subsidence.

    PubMed

    Mohammad-Shahi, Mohammad H; Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Giannitsios, Demetrios; Ouellet, Jean; Jarzem, Peter F

    2013-07-01

    Comparative biomechanical study. To determine whether an angular mismatch between the vertebral body replacement (VBR) endplate and the simulated foam vertebral endplate leads to accelerated subsidence in a cyclic compression model of the VBR-vertebra interface. One of the main complications of the VBR surgery is postoperative subsidence and collapse of the VBR implant into the adjacent vertebral bodies. Although numerous factors affecting intervertebral cage subsidence have been cited, few studies have proposed factors responsible for VBR cage subsidence. Hardwood blocks at 0-30-degree angles and polyurethane foam blocs have been used as base for this experimental setting. One end of the Synex (Synthes) expandable cage was attached to a material testing machine. The endplate of the implant was placed at a similar spot on the block in such a manner that there was an exact match between the Synex endplate and the foam block at 0 degrees, subsequent angled blocks would tilt the foam endplates by the 10-, 20-, and 30-degree increments as needed. Cyclic axial loads were applied in 9 load-unload cycles. Five samples were tested at each mismatch angle (0, 10, 20, and 30 degrees), for a total of 20 trials. Implant subsidence significantly increased for each 10-degree increase in mismatch angle. This effect, however, did not follow a uniform trend at all angles. The curve appeared exponential at 0 degree of angular mismatch, became linear at 10-20 degrees of mismatch, and then demonstrated some ability to resist load at 30 degrees, leading to a plateau at the higher loads. Increasing mismatch angles are an important factor in leading to increased cage subsidence into polyurethane blocks. Consequently, the incidence of subsidence in the clinical setting could be reduced by paying careful attention to ensuring that both the prosthetic and bony endplates are well apposed at the end of surgery.

  6. Revisiting Hydrophobic Mismatch with Free Energy Simulation Studies of Transmembrane Helix Tilt and Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehoon; Im, Wonpil

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Protein-lipid interaction and bilayer regulation of membrane protein functions are largely controlled by the hydrophobic match between the transmembrane (TM) domain of membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer. To systematically characterize responses of a TM helix and lipid adaptations to a hydrophobic mismatch, we have performed a total of 5.8-μs umbrella sampling simulations and calculated the potentials of mean force (PMFs) as a function of TM helix tilt angle under various mismatch conditions. Single-pass TM peptides called WALPn (n = 16, 19, 23, and 27) were used in two lipid bilayers with different hydrophobic thicknesses to consider hydrophobic mismatch caused by either the TM length or the bilayer thickness. In addition, different flanking residues, such as alanine, lysine, and arginine, instead of tryptophan in WALP23 were used to examine their influence. The PMFs, their decomposition, and trajectory analysis demonstrate that 1), tilting of a single-pass TM helix is the major response to a hydrophobic mismatch; 2), TM helix tilting up to ∼10° is inherent due to the intrinsic entropic contribution arising from helix precession around the membrane normal even under a negative mismatch; 3), the favorable helix-lipid interaction provides additional driving forces for TM helix tilting under a positive mismatch; 4), the minimum-PMF tilt angle is generally located where there is the hydrophobic match and little lipid perturbation; 5), TM helix rotation is dependent on the specific helix-lipid interaction; and 6), anchoring residues at the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface can be an important determinant of TM helix orientation. PMID:20655845

  7. Trophic mismatch and its effects on the growth of young in an Arctic herbivore.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Madeleine; Gauthier, Gilles; Lévesque, Esther

    2015-12-01

    In highly seasonal environments, timing of breeding of organisms is typically set to coincide with the period of highest resource availability. However, breeding phenology may not change at a rate sufficient to keep up with rapid changes in the environment in the wake of climate change. The lack of synchrony between the phenology of consumers and that of their resources can lead to a phenomenon called trophic mismatch, which may have important consequences on the reproductive success of herbivores. We analyzed long-term data (1991-2010) on climate, plant phenology and the reproduction of a long-distance Arctic migrant, the greater snow goose (Chen caerulescens atlantica), in order to examine the effects of mismatched reproduction on the growth of young. We found that geese are only partially able to adjust their breeding phenology to compensate for annual changes in the timing of high-quality food plants, leading to mismatches of up to 20 days between the two. The peak of nitrogen concentration in plants, an index of their nutritive quality for goslings, occurred earlier in warm springs with an early snow melt. Likewise, mismatch between hatch dates of young and date of peak nitrogen was more important in years with early snow melt. Gosling body mass and structural size at fledging was reduced when trophic mismatch was high, particularly when the difference between date of peak nitrogen concentration and hatching was >9 days. Our results support the hypothesis that trophic mismatch can negatively affect the fitness of Arctic herbivores and that this is likely to be exacerbated by rising global temperatures.

  8. Biotic interactions and macroevolution: extensions and mismatches across scales and levels.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, David

    2008-04-01

    Clade dynamics in the fossil record broadly fit expectations from the operation of competition, predation, and mutualism, but data from both modern and ancient systems suggest mismatches across scales and levels. Indirect effects, as when antagonistic or mutualistic interactions restrict geographic range and thereby elevate extinction risk, are probably widespread and may flow in both directions, as when species- or organismic-level factors increase extinction risk or speciation probabilities. Apparent contradictions across scales and levels have been neglected, including (1) the individualistic geographic shifts of species on centennial and millennial timescales versus evidence for fine-tuned coevolutionary relationships; (2) the extensive and dynamic networks of interactions faced by most species versus the evolution of costly enemy-specific defenses and finely attuned mutualisms; and (3) the macroevolutionary lags often seen between the origin and the diversification of a clade or an evolutionary novelty versus the rapid microevolution of advantageous phenotypes and the invasibility of most communities. Resolution of these and other cross-level tensions presumably hinges on how organismic interactions impinge on genetic population structures, geographic ranges, and the persistence of incipient species, but generalizations are not yet possible. Paleontological and neontological data are both incomplete and so the most powerful response to these problems will require novel integrative approaches. Promising research areas include more realistic approaches to modeling and empirical analysis of large-scale diversity dynamics of ostensibly competing clades; spatial and phylogenetic dissections of clades involved in escalatory dynamics (where prey respond evolutionarily to a broad and shifting array of enemies); analyses of the short- versus long-term consequences of mutualistic symbioses; and fuller use of abundant natural experiments on the evolutionary impacts of

  9. Face configuration affects speech perception: Evidence from a McGurk mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Eskelund, Kasper; MacDonald, Ewen N; Andersen, Tobias S

    2015-01-01

    We perceive identity, expression and speech from faces. While perception of identity and expression depends crucially on the configuration of facial features it is less clear whether this holds for visual speech perception. Facial configuration is poorly perceived for upside-down faces as demonstrated by the Thatcher illusion in which the orientation of the eyes and mouth with respect to the face is inverted (Thatcherization). This gives the face a grotesque appearance but this is only seen when the face is upright. Thatcherization can likewise disrupt visual speech perception but only when the face is upright indicating that facial configuration can be important for visual speech perception. This effect can propagate to auditory speech perception through audiovisual integration so that Thatcherization disrupts the McGurk illusion in which visual speech perception alters perception of an incongruent acoustic phoneme. This is known as the McThatcher effect. Here we show that the McThatcher effect is reflected in the McGurk mismatch negativity (MMN). The MMN is an event-related potential elicited by a change in auditory perception. The McGurk-MMN can be elicited by a change in auditory perception due to the McGurk illusion without any change in the acoustic stimulus. We found that Thatcherization disrupted a strong McGurk illusion and a correspondingly strong McGurk-MMN only for upright faces. This confirms that facial configuration can be important for audiovisual speech perception. For inverted faces we found a weaker McGurk illusion but, surprisingly, no MMN. We also found no correlation between the strength of the McGurk illusion and the amplitude of the McGurk-MMN. We suggest that this may be due to a threshold effect so that a strong McGurk illusion is required to elicit the McGurk-MMN. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual mismatch negativity to masked stimuli presented at very brief presentation rates.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Maria; Liasis, Alki; Gardner, Mark; Towell, Tony

    2017-02-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) has been characterised as a 'pre-attentive' component of an event-related potential (ERP) that is related to discrimination and error prediction processes. The aim of the current experiment was to establish whether visual MMN could be recorded to briefly presented, backward and forward masked visual stimuli, given both below and above levels of subjective experience. Evidence of visual MMN elicitation in the absence of the ability to consciously report stimuli would provide strong evidence for the automaticity of the visual MMN mechanism. Using an oddball paradigm, two stimuli that differed in orientation from each other, a + and an ×, were presented on a computer screen. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from nine participants (six females), mean age 21.4 years. Results showed that for stimuli that were effectively masked at 7 ms presentation, there was little variation in the ERPs evoked to standard and deviant stimuli or in the subtraction waveform employed to delineate the visual MMN. At 14 ms stimulus presentation, when participants were able to report stimulus presence, an enhanced negativity at around 175 and 305 ms was observed to the deviant and was evident in the subtraction waveform. However, some of the difference observed in the ERPs can be attributed to stimulus characteristics, as the use of a 'lonely' deviant protocol revealed attenuated visual MMN components at 14 ms stimulus presentation. Overall, results suggest that some degree of conscious attention is required before visual MMN components emerge, suggesting visual MMN is not an entirely pre-attentive process.

  11. Perfusion-diffusion mismatch: does it identify who will benefit from reperfusion therapy?

    PubMed

    Powers, William J

    2012-06-01

    A method to determine which patients would benefit from reperfusion therapies after 4.5 h would greatly add to our ability to reduce the disability caused by stroke. The goal of magnetic resonance perfusion-diffusion imaging in hyperacute ischemic stroke is to identify regions of the brain that will die if untreated and will live and regain function if quickly reperfused. The clinical value of perfusion-diffusion imaging in hyperacute ischemic stroke can be proven only by demonstrating empirically in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that there is an improvement in patient outcome that depends on the use of the neuroimaging modality to guide therapy. To date, there have been only a few RCTs that have evaluated whether perfusion-diffusion imaging can identify a subgroup of patients with ischemic stroke more than 4.5 h from onset in whom the overall benefit from reperfusion therapy outweighs the risk. None have met the rigorous design requirements of the three-group study necessary to adequately test this hypothesis, and none have even met their own criteria for demonstrating a clinical benefit. While studies are not sufficient to conclusively disprove the hypothesis there are no RCT data to support it, and thus, the clinical value of MRI perfusion-diffusion imaging in this setting remains unproven. It is worthy of further investigation in rigorously designed RCTs. However, the risks of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage with reperfusion therapies in acute ischemic stroke are proven. Unless RCT data are forthcoming to demonstrate that MRI perfusion-diffusion mismatch improves clinical outcome, it should not be used to guide delayed reperfusion therapy.

  12. A mismatch between population health literacy and the complexity of health information: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Gillian; Protheroe, Joanne; Winkley, John; Richardson, Marty; Seed, Paul T; Rudd, Rima

    2015-06-01

    Low health literacy is associated with poorer health and higher mortality. Complex health materials are a barrier to health. To assess the literacy and numeracy skills required to understand and use commonly used English health information materials, and to describe population skills in relation to these. An English observational study comparing health materials with national working-age population skills. Health materials were sampled using a health literacy framework. Competency thresholds to understand and use the materials were identified. The proportion of the population above and below these thresholds, and the sociodemographic variables associated with a greater risk of being below the thresholds, were described. Sixty-four health materials were sampled. Two competency thresholds were identified: text (literacy) only, and text + numeracy; 2515/5795 participants (43%) were below the text-only threshold, while 2905/4767 (61%) were below the text + numeracy threshold. Univariable analyses of social determinants of health showed that those groups more at risk of socioeconomic deprivation had higher odds of being below the health literacy competency threshold than those at lower risk of deprivation. Multivariable analysis resulted in some variables becoming non-significant or reduced in effect. Levels of low health literacy mirror those found in other industrialised countries, with a mismatch between the complexity of health materials and the skills of the English adult working-age population. Those most in need of health information have the least access to it. Efficacious strategies are building population skills, improving health professionals' communication, and improving written health information. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  13. A rescaling method for correcting log-layer mismatch in detached eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning

    2013-06-01

    In order to correct the unphysical log-layer mismatch commonly encountered in detached eddy simulation (DES) of flows with attached boundary layers, a function ℓM,ML, which has a multi-layer structure with scaling laws in each layer and a plateau related to the Kármán constant, is defined. The height of this plateau is found to be crucial for obtaining the correct log-layer. A target scaling function is designed which equals ℓM,ML in the near-wall region, but with the height of plateau determined analytically from the classical log-law. This scaling function is used as a target function according to which the resolved turbulent fluctuations are renormalized, in order to recover the height of plateau prescribed by the log-law. The renormalization procedure guarantees the height of ℓM,ML required by log-law, resulting in correct log layer slope. The method is also shown to maintain similar turbulent properties in the large eddy simulation (LES) region of DES method. Hence it predicts the turbulent intensity correctly. The results demonstrate the relationship between constant ℓM,ML and log-law profile of mean velocity, and relate the Kármán constant to turbulent fluctuations, implying a complete description of turbulent structural ensemble dynamics. The proposed method can be extended to more general flows with log layers since it uses only the log-law with Kármán constant as the input, while the intercept of log layer depends on the solution of Spalart-Allmaras (SA) model in the near-wall field, where Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions are accurate.

  14. Crosstalk between mismatch repair and base excision repair in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Valeria; Leuzzi, Giuseppe; Basile, Giorgia; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Fortini, Paola; Franchitto, Annapaola; Viti, Valentina; Brown, Ashley R; Parlanti, Eleonora; Pascucci, Barbara; Palli, Domenico; Giuliani, Alessandro; Palombo, Fabio; Sobol, Robert W; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-06-20

    DNA repair gene expression in a set of gastric cancers suggested an inverse association between the expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and that of the base excision repair (BER) gene DNA polymerase β (Polβ). To gain insight into possible crosstalk of these two repair pathways in cancer, we analysed human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells over-expressing Polβ or Polβ active site mutants, alone or in combination with MLH1 silencing. Next, we investigated the cellular response to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the purine analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG), agents that induce lesions that are substrates for BER and/or MMR. AGS cells over-expressing Polβ were resistant to 6-TG to a similar extent as when MLH1 was inactivated while inhibition of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was required to detect resistance to MMS. Upon either treatment, the association with MLH1 down-regulation further amplified the resistant phenotype. Moreover, AGS cells mutated in Polβ were hypersensitive to both 6-TG and MMS killing and their sensitivity was partially rescued by MLH1 silencing. We provide evidence that the critical lethal lesions in this new pathway are double strand breaks that are exacerbated when Polβ is defective and relieved when MLH1 is silenced. In conclusion, we provide evidence of crosstalk between MLH1 and Polβ that modulates the response to alkylation damage. These studies suggest that the Polβ/MLH1 status should be taken into consideration when designing chemotherapeutic approaches for gastric cancer.

  15. Object-related regularities are processed automatically: evidence from the visual mismatch negativity

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dagmar; Widmann, Andreas; Schröger, Erich

    2013-01-01

    One of the most challenging tasks of our visual systems is to structure and integrate the enormous amount of incoming information into distinct coherent objects. It is an ongoing debate whether or not the formation of visual objects requires attention. Implicit behavioral measures suggest that object formation can occur for task-irrelevant and unattended visual stimuli. The present study investigated pre-attentive visual object formation by combining implicit behavioral measures and an electrophysiological indicator of pre-attentive visual irregularity detection, the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) of the event-related potential. Our displays consisted of two symmetrically arranged, task-irrelevant ellipses, the objects. In addition, there were two discs of either high or low luminance presented on the objects, which served as targets. Participants had to indicate whether the targets were of the same or different luminance. In separate conditions, the targets either usually were enclosed in the same object or in two different objects (standards). Occasionally, the regular target-to-object assignment was changed (deviants). That is, standards and deviants were exclusively defined on the basis of the task-irrelevant target-to-object assignment but not on the basis of some feature regularity. Although participants did not notice the regularity nor the occurrence of the deviation in the sequences, task-irrelevant deviations resulted in increased reaction times. Moreover, compared with physically identical standard displays deviating target-to-object assignments elicited a negative potential in the 246–280 ms time window over posterio-temporal electrode positions which was identified as vMMN. With variable resolution electromagnetic tomography (VARETA) object-related vMMN was localized to the inferior temporal gyrus. Our results support the notion that the visual system automatically structures even task-irrelevant aspects of the incoming information into objects

  16. Solution of transport equations in layered media with refractive index mismatch using the PN-method.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Kevin G; Jacques, Steven L

    2009-10-01

    The PN-method is a spectral discretization technique used to obtain numerical solutions to the radiative transport equation. To the best of our knowledge, the PN-method has yet to be generalized to the case of refractive index mismatch in layered slabs used to numerically simulate skin. Our main contribution is the application of a collocation method that takes into account refractive index mismatch at layer interfaces. The stability, convergence, and accuracy of the method are established. Example calculations demonstrating the flexibility of the method are performed.

  17. The effect of a visual/motion display mismatch in a single axis compensatory tracking task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirachi, D. K.; Shirley, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment was performed to determine the effect of a performance mismatch between the visual and motion display systems on a real time piloted aircraft simulation. Pilots performed a compensatory roll tracking task with dynamics typical of medium jet transports. Between 0 and 10 rad/sec, visual and motion system responses were equivalent to either unity or a first order lag at 4.8 rad/sec. Pilot describing functions and error scores were calculated. Results show that the mismatch between visual and motion display systems has no significant effect. It is the absence of high frequency visual and/or motion cues which significantly affects pilot performance.

  18. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-10-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication.

  19. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S N

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green's function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  20. Binaural benefit for speech recognition with spectral mismatch across ears in simulated electric hearing.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yang-soo; Liu, Aiguo; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2011-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of binaural spectral mismatch on binaural benefits in the context of bilateral cochlear implants using acoustic simulations. Binaural spectral mismatch was systematically manipulated by simulating changes in the relative insertion depths across ears. Sentence recognition, presented unilaterally and bilaterally, were measured in normal-hearing listeners in quiet and noise at +5 dB signal-to-noise ratio. Significant binaural benefits were observed when the interaural difference in insertion depth was 1 mm or less. This result suggests a dependence of the binaural benefit on redundant speech information, rather than on similarity in performance across ears.

  1. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green’s function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  2. The effects of binaural spectral resolution mismatch on Mandarin speech perception in simulated electric hearing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Wong, Lena L N; Tahmina, Qudsia; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi

    2012-08-01

    This study assessed the effects of binaural spectral resolution mismatch on the intelligibility of Mandarin speech in noise using bilateral cochlear implant simulations. Noise-vocoded Mandarin speech, corrupted by speech-shaped noise at 0 and 5 dB signal-to-noise ratios, were presented unilaterally or bilaterally to normal-hearing listeners with mismatched spectral resolution between ears. Significant binaural benefits for Mandarin speech recognition were observed only with matched spectral resolution between ears. In addition, the performance of tone identification was more robust to noise than that of sentence recognition, suggesting factors other than tone identification might account more for the degraded sentence recognition in noise.

  3. Test report for twinax cable (Rockwell type MB0150-051). [effects of mismatched termination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    A controlled impedance twisted pair shielded cable was tested to determine the frequency response and effects of mismatched termination. It was found that a long length of this cable, about 100 feet, exhibited a frequency sensitive attenuation roll-off greater than 1.5 db down at 5 MHz. It was also determined that improper termination resulted in losses of 1/2 to 1 db within the frequency range of 200 KHz to greater than 1-1/2 MHz. The test results indicate a possible problem where mismatched connectors are used in video signal cables.

  4. Tuning thermal mismatch between turbine rotor parts with a thermal medium

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2001-01-01

    In a turbine rotor, an aft shaft wheel and the final-stage wheel of the rotor are coupled together, including by a rabbeted joint. During shutdown and startup of the turbine, a thermal mismatch between the aft shaft wheel and final-stage wheel is avoided by respectively heating and cooling the aft shaft wheel to maintain the thermal mismatch within acceptable limits, thereby avoiding opening of the rabbeted joint and the potential for unbalancing the rotor and rotor vibration. The thermal medium may be supplied by piping in the aft bearing cavity into the cavity between the forward closure plate and the aft shaft wheel.

  5. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A rare cause of scintigraphic ventilation-perfusion mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Pochis, W.T.; Krasnow, A.Z.; Collier, B.D.; Mewissen, M.W.; Almagro, U.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T. )

    1990-05-01

    A case of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with multiple areas of mismatch on ventilation-perfusion lung imaging in the absence of pulmonary embolism is presented. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is one of the few nonembolic diseases producing a pulmonary ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In this condition, chest radiographs may not detect the full extent of disease, and xenon-133 ventilation imaging may be relatively insensitive to morbid changes in small airways. Thus, when examining patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, one should be aware that abnormal perfusion imaging patterns without matching ventilation abnormalities are not always due to embolism. In this setting, contrast pulmonary angiography is often needed for accurate differential diagnosis.

  6. In-flight simulation with pilot-center of gravity offset and velocity mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Similarity transformations which preserve modal characteristics and pilot's acceleration cues in in-flight simulation are presented. The model transformation for lateral acceleration matching is developed. A velocity-mismatch example, based on a VRA simulation of the Space Shuttle, illustrates that acceleration matching is achieved at the expense of mismatching in cues which are secondary to the simulated piloting task, while primarily cues are preserved. The approach is applicable for both implicit and explicit model-following, and it can easily be extended to the longitudinal case.

  7. Epitaxial growth of largely mismatched crystals on H-terminated Si(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Hidehito

    2010-12-01

    A strontium or strontium oxide epitaxial layer was grown using a monoatomic buffer layer of hydrogen on silicon, in spite of a huge lattice mismatch. The onset of the initial growth stage of strontium crystals occur with only one atomic layer deposition. To investigate the growth mechanism in the highly mismatched system, combination analysis using neutron reflection, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectra, and stress measurements is employed. The interface structure has opened up a new way to fabricate novel heterostructures, consisting of various kinds of one-, two- or three-dimensional materials for future silicon-based technology.

  8. Complete achromatic optical switching between two waveguides with a sign flip of the phase mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Rangelov, Andon A.; Kyoseva, Elica

    2014-11-01

    We present a two-waveguide coupler which realizes complete achromatic all-optical switching. The coupling of the waveguides has a hyperbolic-secant shape, while the phase mismatch has a sign flip at the maximum of the coupling. We derive an analytic solution for the electric field propagation using coupled-mode theory and show that the light switching is robust against small to moderate variations in the coupling strength and phase mismatch. Thus, we realize an achromatic light switching between the two waveguides. We further consider the extended case of three coupled waveguides in an array and pay special attention to the case of equal bidirectional achromatic light beam splitting.

  9. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-01-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication. PMID:27698379

  10. Hippocampal Mismatch Signals Are Modulated by the Strength of Neural Predictions and Their Similarity to Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Long, Nicole M; Lee, Hongmi; Kuhl, Brice A

    2016-12-14

    The hippocampus is thought to compare predicted events with current perceptual input, generating a mismatch signal when predictions are violated. However, most prior studies have only inferred when predictions occur without measuring them directly. Moreover, an important but unresolved question is whether hippocampal mismatch signals are modulated by the degree to which predictions differ from outcomes. Here, we conducted a human fMRI study in which subjects repeatedly studied various word-picture pairs, learning to predict particular pictures (outcomes) from the words (cues). After initial learning, a subset of cues was paired with a novel, unexpected outcome, whereas other cues continued to predict the same outcome. Critically, when outcomes changed, the new outcome was either "near" to the predicted outcome (same visual category as the predicted picture) or "far" from the predicted outcome (different visual category). Using multivoxel pattern analysis, we indexed cue-evoked reactivation (prediction) within neocortical areas and related these trial-by-trial measures of prediction strength to univariate hippocampal responses to the outcomes. We found that prediction strength positively modulated hippocampal responses to unexpected outcomes, particularly when unexpected outcomes were close, but not identical, to the prediction. Hippocampal responses to unexpected outcomes were also associated with a tradeoff in performance during a subsequent memory test: relatively faster retrieval of new (updated) associations, but relatively slower retrieval of the original (older) associations. Together, these results indicate that hippocampal mismatch signals reflect a comparison between active predictions and current outcomes and that these signals are most robust when predictions are similar, but not identical, to outcomes. Although the hippocampus is widely thought to signal "mismatches" between memory-based predictions and outcomes, previous research has not linked

  11. The Mismatch between Children's Health Needs and School Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knauer, Heather; Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who require various levels of care each school day. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of public schools in supporting CSHCN through in-depth key informant interviews. For this qualitative study, the authors interviewed 17 key informants to identify key…

  12. The Mismatch between Children's Health Needs and School Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knauer, Heather; Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who require various levels of care each school day. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of public schools in supporting CSHCN through in-depth key informant interviews. For this qualitative study, the authors interviewed 17 key informants to identify key…

  13. Matched and Mismatched Metabolic Fuels in Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Gerriets, Valerie A.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological function requires metabolic support to suit the needs of lymphocytes at a variety of distinct differentiation and activation states. It is now evident that the signaling pathways that drive lymphocyte survival and activity can directly control cellular metabolism. This linkage provides a mechanism by which activation and specific signaling pathways provide a supply of appropriate and required nutrients to support cell functions in a pro-active supply rather than consumption-based metabolic model. In this way, the metabolism and fuel choices of lymphocytes are guided to specifically match the anticipated needs. If the fuel choice or metabolic pathways of lymphocytes are dysregulated, however, metabolic checkpoints can become activated to disrupt immunological function. These changes are now shown in several immunological diseases and may open new opportunities to selectively enhance or suppress specific immune functions through targeting of glucose, lipid, or amino acid metabolism. PMID:23290889

  14. Dimer of 2,7-diamino-1,8-naphthyridine for the detection of mismatches formed by pyrimidine nucleotide bases.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Akio; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2008-12-15

    Discrimination of base mismatches from normal Watson-Crick base pairs in duplex DNA constitutes a key approach to the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We have developed a sensor for a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay system to detect G-G, A-A, and C-C mismatch duplexes by employing a surface upon which mismatch-binding ligands (MBLs) are immobilized. We synthesized a new MBL consisting of 2,7-diamino-1,8-naphthyridine (damND) and immobilized it onto a CM5 sensor chip to carry out the SPR assay of DNA duplexes containing a single-base mismatch. The SPR sensor with damND revealed strong responses to all C-C mismatches, and sequence-dependent C-T and T-T mismatches. Compared to ND- and naphthyridine-azaquinolone hybrid (NA)-immobilized sensor surfaces, with affinity to mismatches composed of purine nucleotide bases, the damND-immobilized surface was useful for the detection of the mismatches composed of pyrimidine nucleotide bases.

  15. Deciphering the mismatch recognition cycle in MutS and MSH2-MSH6 using normal-mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shayantani; Law, Sean M; Feig, Michael

    2009-03-04

    Postreplication DNA mismatch repair is essential for maintaining the integrity of genomic information in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The first step in mismatch repair is the recognition of base-base mismatches and insertions/deletions by bacterial MutS or eukaryotic MSH2-MSH6. Crystal structures of both proteins bound to mismatch DNA reveal a similar molecular architecture but provide limited insight into the detailed molecular mechanism of long-range allostery involved in mismatch recognition and repair initiation. This study describes normal-mode calculations of MutS and MSH2-MSH6 with and without DNA. The results reveal similar protein flexibilities and suggest common dynamic and functional characteristics. A strongly correlated motion is present between the lever domain and ATPase domains, which suggests a pathway for long-range allostery from the N-terminal DNA binding domain to the C-terminal ATPase domains, as indicated by experimental studies. A detailed analysis of individual low-frequency modes of both MutS and MSH2-MSH6 shows changes in the DNA-binding domains coupled to the ATPase sites, which are interpreted in the context of experimental data to arrive at a complete molecular-level mismatch recognition cycle. Distinct conformational states are proposed for DNA scanning, mismatch recognition, repair initiation, and sliding along DNA after mismatch recognition. Hypotheses based on the results presented here form the basis for further experimental and computational studies.

  16. DnaN clamp zones provide a platform for spatiotemporal coupling of mismatch detection to DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Justin S; Sharma, Anushi; Hingorani, Manju M; Simmons, Lyle A

    2013-02-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) increases the fidelity of DNA replication by identifying and correcting replication errors. Processivity clamps are vital components of DNA replication and MMR, yet the mechanism and extent to which they participate in MMR remains unclear. We investigated the role of the Bacillus subtilis processivity clamp DnaN, and found that it serves as a platform for mismatch detection and coupling of repair to DNA replication. By visualizing functional MutS fluorescent fusions in vivo, we find that MutS forms foci independent of mismatch detection at sites of replication (i.e. the replisome). These MutS foci are directed to the replisome by DnaN clamp zones that aid mismatch detection by targeting the search to nascent DNA. Following mismatch detection, MutS disengages from the replisome, facilitating repair. We tested the functional importance of DnaN-mediated mismatch detection for MMR, and found that it accounts for 90% of repair. This high dependence on DnaN can be bypassed by increasing MutS concentration within the cell, indicating a secondary mode of detection in vivo whereby MutS directly finds mismatches without associating with the replisome. Overall, our results provide new insight into the mechanism by which DnaN couples mismatch recognition to DNA replication in living cells. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. The Impact of Educational Mismatch on Firm Productivity: Evidence from Linked Panel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampelmann, Stephan; Rycx, Francois

    2012-01-01

    We provide first evidence regarding the direct impact of educational mismatch on firm productivity. To do so, we rely on representative linked employer-employee panel data for Belgium covering the period 1999-2006. Controlling for simultaneity issues, time-invariant unobserved workplace characteristics, cohort effects and dynamics in the…

  18. STEM in the Ohio Labor Market: A Mismatch or a Missed Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Stacia Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the supply of educated workers and the talent demands of employers is complex. Declining educational attainment levels in the US have been identified as a possible cause for the reported mismatch between the availability of talent that businesses want to hire and the talent available in the labor market, especially in the…

  19. A simple ABO genotyping by PCR using sequence-specific primers with mismatched nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Taki, Takashi; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    In forensics, the specific ABO blood group is often determined by analyzing the ABO gene. Among various methods used, PCR employing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) is simpler than other methods for ABO typing. When performing the PCR-SSP, the pseudo-positive signals often lead to errors in ABO typing. We introduced mismatched nucleotides at the second and the third positions from the 3'-end of the primers for the PCR-SSP method and examined whether reliable typing could be achieved by suppressing pseudo-positive signals. Genomic DNA was extracted from nail clippings of 27 volunteers, and the ABO gene was examined with PCR-SSP employing primers with and without mismatched nucleotides. The ABO blood group of the nail clippings was also analyzed serologically, and these results were compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP. When mismatched primers were employed for amplification, the results of the ABO typing matched with those obtained by the serological method. When primers without mismatched nucleotides were used for PCR-SSP, pseudo-positive signals were observed. Thus our method may be used for achieving more reliable ABO typing.

  20. Regional Differences in the Listener's Phonemic Inventory Affect Semantic Processing: A Mismatch Negativity (MMN) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunelliere, Angele; Dufour, Sophie; Nguyen, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Using the mismatch negativity (MMN) response, we examined how Standard French and Southern French speakers access the meaning of words ending in /e/ or /[epsilon]/ vowels which are contrastive in Standard French but not in Southern French. In Standard French speakers, there was a significant difference in the amplitude of the brain response after…

  1. Optimizing the Face Paradigm of BCI System by Modified Mismatch Negative Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sijie; Jin, Jing; Daly, Ian; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have focused on improving the performance of event-related potential (ERP) based brain computer interfaces (BCIs). The use of a face pattern has been shown to obtain high classification accuracies and information transfer rates (ITRs) by evoking discriminative ERPs (N200 and N400) in addition to P300 potentials. Recently, it has been proved that the performance of traditional P300-based BCIs could be improved through a modification of the mismatch pattern. In this paper, a mismatch inverted face pattern (MIF-pattern) was presented to improve the performance of the inverted face pattern (IF-pattern), one of the state of the art patterns used in visual-based BCI systems. Ten subjects attended in this experiment. The result showed that the mismatch inverted face pattern could evoke significantly larger vertex positive potentials (p < 0.05) and N400s (p < 0.05) compared to the inverted face pattern. The classification accuracy (mean accuracy is 99.58%) and ITRs (mean bit rate is 27.88 bit/min) of the mismatch inverted face pattern was significantly higher than that of the inverted face pattern (p < 0.05). PMID:27774046

  2. Educational Mismatches and Earnings: Extensions of Occupational Mobility Theory and Evidence of Human Capital Depreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubb, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Using a human capital theory framework, this study examines the impact of educational mismatches on earnings and occupational mobility. Occupational mobility theory suggests that overeducated workers observe greater upward occupational mobility and undereducated workers observe lower upward occupational mobility. By extension, this leads to…

  3. Graduates in Economics and Educational Mismatch: The Case Study of the University of Naples "Parthenope"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintano, Claudio; Castellano, Rosalia; D'Agostino, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    The quality of jobs of economics graduates was studied in terms of educational mismatch. The returns of over-education on earnings and on the job-search were also investigated. The discussion regards the second wave of a longitudinal survey of a random sample of economics graduates from the University of Naples "Parthenope", a major…

  4. Affirmative Action in Higher Education in India: Targeting, Catch Up, and Mismatch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisancho, Veronica; Krishna, Kala

    2016-01-01

    Using detailed data on the 2008 graduating class from an elite engineering institution in India, we evaluate the impact of affirmative action policies in higher education focusing on three issues: targeting, catch up, and mismatch. We find that admission preferences effectively target minority students who are poorer than average displaced…

  5. Cultural Mismatch and the Education of Aboriginal Youths: The Interplay of Cultural Identities and Teacher Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryberg, Stephanie A.; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; D'Arrisso, Alexandra; Flores, Heidi; Ponizovskiy, Vladimir; Ranney, John D.; Mandour, Tarek; Tootoosis, Curtis; Robinson, Sandy; Russo, Natalie; Burack, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    In response to the enduring "deficit" approach to the educational attainment of Aboriginal students in North America, we hypothesized that academic underperformance is related to a cultural mismatch between Aboriginal students' cultural background, which emphasizes connectedness and interdependence, and the mainstream White model of…

  6. 76 FR 33780 - Assessments for Mismatched Payments or Inadequate Payment Information for Geothermal, Solid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ...Regulations for geothermal, solid minerals, and Indian oil and gas leases authorize the Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) to assess payors for failure to submit payments of the same amount as the royalty or bill document, or to provide adequate information. The amount assessed for each mismatched or inadequately identified payment will be $214.00, effective on the date stated below.

  7. Labour Market Mismatch among UK Graduates: An Analysis Using REFLEX Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Seamus; Sloane, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    There is much disagreement in the literature over the extent to which graduates are mismatched in the labour market and the reasons for this. In this paper we utilise the Flexible Professional in the Knowledge Society (REFLEX) data set to cast light on these issues, based on data for UK graduates. We find substantial pay penalties for…

  8. Competition Effects in Phonological Priming: The Role of Mismatch Position between Primes and Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Sophie; Peereman, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    In three experiments, we examined lexical competition effects using the phonological priming paradigm in a shadowing task. Experiments 1A and 1B showed that an inhibitory priming effect occurred when the primes mismatched the targets on the last phoneme (/bagar/-/bagaj/). In contrast, a facilitatory priming effect was observed when the primes…

  9. Regional Differences in the Listener's Phonemic Inventory Affect Semantic Processing: A Mismatch Negativity (MMN) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunelliere, Angele; Dufour, Sophie; Nguyen, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Using the mismatch negativity (MMN) response, we examined how Standard French and Southern French speakers access the meaning of words ending in /e/ or /[epsilon]/ vowels which are contrastive in Standard French but not in Southern French. In Standard French speakers, there was a significant difference in the amplitude of the brain response after…

  10. A rare case mimicking positron emission tomography/computed tomography mismatch: Hepatic subcapsular hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Inanir, Sabahat; Oksuzoglu, Kevser; Aras, Mustafa; Tuney, Davut

    2015-01-01

    Subcapsular collections of bile, air or blood in the liver have been described following transhepatic procedures due to the leakage of bile and blood from the percutaneous puncture at the surface of the liver. Herein we presented the subcapsular collection led to a mismatch between functional and anatomical boundaries of the liver. PMID:26430331

  11. A rare case mimicking positron emission tomography/computed tomography mismatch: Hepatic subcapsular hematoma.

    PubMed

    Inanir, Sabahat; Oksuzoglu, Kevser; Aras, Mustafa; Tuney, Davut

    2015-01-01

    Subcapsular collections of bile, air or blood in the liver have been described following transhepatic procedures due to the leakage of bile and blood from the percutaneous puncture at the surface of the liver. Herein we presented the subcapsular collection led to a mismatch between functional and anatomical boundaries of the liver.

  12. Mismatch Negativity Elicited by Tones and Speech Sounds: Changed Topographical Distribution in Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Frank; Reinvang, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study used the event-related brain potential mismatch negativity (MMN) to investigate preconscious discrimination of harmonically rich tones (differing in duration) and consonant-vowel syllables (differing in the initial consonant) in aphasia. Eighteen Norwegian aphasic patients, examined on average 3 months after brain injury, were compared…

  13. Mental Ability and Mismatch Negativity: Pre-Attentive Discrimination of Abstract Feature Conjunctions in Auditory Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlihan, Michael; Stelmack, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The relation between mental ability and the ability to detect violations of an abstract, third-order conjunction rule was examined using event-related potential measures, specifically mismatch negativity (MMN). The primary objective was to determine whether the extraction of invariant relations based on abstract conjunctions between two…

  14. Nuclease stability of boron-modified nucleic acids: application to label-free mismatch detection.

    PubMed

    Reverte, Maëva; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Smietana, Michael

    2015-11-21

    5'-End boronic acid-modified oligonucleotides were evaluated against various nucleases at single and double stranded levels. The results show that these modifications induce a high resistance to degradation by calf-spleen and snake venom phosphodiesterases. More importantly, this eventually led to the development of a new label-free enzyme-assisted fluorescence-based method for single mismatch detection.

  15. Sector-Based Analysis of the Education-Occupation Mismatch in the Turkish Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercan, Murat Anil; Karakas, Mesut; Citci, Sadettin Haluk; Babacan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of sectorial undereducation and overeducation problems in the Turkish labor market. In order to cope with this issue, the 2009 Household Labor Force Survey (TurkStat), which covers 145,934 individuals within 27 sectors, was utilized. An objective measure of education-occupation mismatch based…

  16. A quantitative model of bacterial mismatch repair as applied to studying induced mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, O. V.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Kapralov, M. I.; Sweilam, N. H.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of the DNA mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli bacterial cells. The key pathways of this repair mechanism were simulated on the basis of modern experimental data. We have modelled in detail five main pathways of DNA misincorporation removal with different DNA exonucleases. Here we demonstrate an application of the model to problems of radiation-induced mutagenesis.

  17. Matching/Mismatching Revisited: An Empirical Study of Learning and Teaching Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nigel; Chen, Sherry Y.

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of a study of postgraduate students who were asked to create Web pages using HTML in order to explore the relationship between matching and mismatching instructional presentation style (breadth-first and depth-first) with students' cognitive style (field dependence-independence) in a computer-based learning environment. Findings…

  18. High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, GaInP solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wanlass, Mark W; Carapella, Jeffrey J; Steiner, Myles A

    2016-11-01

    High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, photovoltaic cells (10), both transparent and non-transparent to sub-bandgap light, are provided as devices for use alone or in combination with other cells in split spectrum apparatus or other applications.

  19. High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, GaInP solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2014-07-08

    High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, photovoltaic cells (10), both transparent and non-transparent to sub-bandgap light, are provided as devices for use alone or in combination with other cells in split spectrum apparatus or other applications.

  20. Geographic Skills Mismatch, Job Search, and Race. Discussion Paper No. 1288-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines whether a geographic skills mismatch exists between the location of less-educated minorities, in particular African Americans, and high-skill job concentrations, and if so, whether it contributes to the relatively poor employment outcomes of this group. It explores these questions by examining data on the recent geographic…

  1. Strain compensation in a semiconducting device structure using an intentionally mismatched uniform buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, John E.

    2016-12-01

    The extent of strain relaxation in semiconducting device heterostructures has important implications in the design of high electron mobility transistors, light-emitting diodes, and laser diodes, in which the residual strain affects the device characteristics. In this work, we develop the theoretical framework for understanding strain compensation in a semiconductor device layer using a uniform buffer layer which can be intentionally mismatched to the material above. Specifically, we determined the critical condition for complete strain compensation in the device layer by intentionally introducing a compositional mismatch at the device-buffer interface. We present minimum energy calculations and show that for a given device layer with fixed mismatch and layer thickness, the buffer layer may be designed with the appropriate combination of thickness and mismatch such that the device layer will have zero residual strain in equilibrium. Such a structure can be referred to as a completely strain-compensated design. In the more general case, there may be partial strain compensation, and we give a simple physics-based Gaussian-type function describing the residual strain in the device layer. We have applied this general framework to In x Ga1-x As/GaAs (001) heterostructures for the purpose of illustration, but the work is applicable to any diamond or zinc blende (001) heteroepitaxial material system.

  2. Can Mismatch Negativity Be Linked to Synaptic Processes? A Glutamatergic Approach to Deviance Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelnikov, Kuzma

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to provide a theoretical framework to elucidate the neurophysiological underpinnings of deviance detection as reflected by mismatch negativity. A six-step model of the information processing necessary for deviance detection is proposed. In this model, predictive coding of learned regularities is realized by means of long-term…

  3. Evaluating the Competency Mismatch between Master of Engineering Graduates and Industry Needs in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Lijun; Zhang, Shulin; Gu, Jibao

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the mismatch between the educational attainment of a graduate with a Master of Engineering (MEng) degree and the industry needs in China. A competency list for MEng graduates from the perspective of industry needs was constructed. And a survey was conducted among MEng graduate students, alumni, and employers to assess the…

  4. Evaluating the Competency Mismatch between Master of Engineering Graduates and Industry Needs in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Lijun; Zhang, Shulin; Gu, Jibao

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the mismatch between the educational attainment of a graduate with a Master of Engineering (MEng) degree and the industry needs in China. A competency list for MEng graduates from the perspective of industry needs was constructed. And a survey was conducted among MEng graduate students, alumni, and employers to assess the…

  5. Influence of RF channels mismatch and mutual coupling phenomenon on performance of a multistatic passive radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossa, Robert; Górski, Maksymilian

    2010-09-01

    In the paper we analyze the influence of RF channels mismatch and mutual coupling effect on the performance of the multistatic passive radar with Uniform Circular Array (UCA) configuration. The problem was tested intensively in numerous different scenarios with a reference virtual multistatic passive radar. Finally, exemplary results of the computer software simulations are provided and discussed.

  6. Graduates in Economics and Educational Mismatch: The Case Study of the University of Naples "Parthenope"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintano, Claudio; Castellano, Rosalia; D'Agostino, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    The quality of jobs of economics graduates was studied in terms of educational mismatch. The returns of over-education on earnings and on the job-search were also investigated. The discussion regards the second wave of a longitudinal survey of a random sample of economics graduates from the University of Naples "Parthenope", a major…

  7. STEM in the Ohio Labor Market: A Mismatch or a Missed Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Stacia Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the supply of educated workers and the talent demands of employers is complex. Declining educational attainment levels in the US have been identified as a possible cause for the reported mismatch between the availability of talent that businesses want to hire and the talent available in the labor market, especially in the…

  8. Cultural Mismatch in Honduran Garifuna Communities: The Role of Culture, Race, and Language in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleyn, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    The Garifuna are an Indigenous, Afro-Latino group in Honduras whose distinct cultural, ethnic, and linguistic background has been unacknowledged and frequently misunderstood on a societal level and, consequently, in the schools that serve them. This study argues for the utility of a cultural mismatch approach, one applied primarily to U.S.…

  9. Labour Market Mismatch among UK Graduates: An Analysis Using REFLEX Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Seamus; Sloane, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    There is much disagreement in the literature over the extent to which graduates are mismatched in the labour market and the reasons for this. In this paper we utilise the Flexible Professional in the Knowledge Society (REFLEX) data set to cast light on these issues, based on data for UK graduates. We find substantial pay penalties for…

  10. Educational Mismatches and Earnings: Extensions of Occupational Mobility Theory and Evidence of Human Capital Depreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubb, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Using a human capital theory framework, this study examines the impact of educational mismatches on earnings and occupational mobility. Occupational mobility theory suggests that overeducated workers observe greater upward occupational mobility and undereducated workers observe lower upward occupational mobility. By extension, this leads to…

  11. Examining the Mismatch between Pupil and Teacher Knowledge in Acid-Base Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    2003-01-01

    Reports a mismatch between teacher and pupil knowledge of acid-base chemistry as a result of controversial episodes from three science lessons. Suggests that the teacher's knowledge is guided by textbook information while the pupil's knowledge is based on direct experimental experience. Proposes that classroom activities should support the…

  12. The effect of matching and mismatching cognitive style and science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conwell, Catherine R.; Helgeson, Stanley L.; Wachowiak, Dale G.

    This study examined the effect of matching learners' cognitive styles with science learning activities on science knowledge and attitudes. Fifty-six elementary education majors who were identified as Sensing Feeling types on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator participated in this study. The Sensing Feeling type is predominant among elementary school educators. The subjects participated in either nine science activities matched to the learning preferences of Sensing Feelers or nine science activities mismatched to their learning preferences. These mismatched activities were geared toward the learning preferences of Intuitive Thinkers, the dominant type among scientists. Results revealed no significant differences between matched and mismatched groups in knowledge of the material presented or overall attitude toward science and toward science teaching. Comparisons made subsequent to the hypothesized analyses did suggest that cognitive style may affect reactions to certain specific learning activities. The immediate reactions of forty non-Sensing Feeling types who also experienced the treatments were compared to those of the 56 Sensing Feeling subjects. Certain activities which were rated by judges prior to the onset of treatment as being particularly well-matched to the Sensing Feeling style did receive significantly more favorable ratings by the Sensing Feeling subjects than by other types. Conversely, the Sensing Feelers gave significantly lower ratings than other types to certain activities which, according to independent judges, were strongly mismatched to the Sensing Feeling style.

  13. The Extent of Skills Mismatch among Childhood Education Graduates of Princess Alia University College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashash, Hyam M.

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the extent of skill mismatch between the skills the childhood education graduates at Al-Balqa Applied University--Princess Alia University College acquired during their studies and those demanded in the labor market. The descriptive survey design was adopted and the purposive sampling technique was employed to…

  14. Can Mismatch Negativity Be Linked to Synaptic Processes? A Glutamatergic Approach to Deviance Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelnikov, Kuzma

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to provide a theoretical framework to elucidate the neurophysiological underpinnings of deviance detection as reflected by mismatch negativity. A six-step model of the information processing necessary for deviance detection is proposed. In this model, predictive coding of learned regularities is realized by means of long-term…

  15. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-03-03

    The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important.

  16. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important. PMID:26317639

  17. Penalized or Protected? Gender and the Consequences of Nonstandard and Mismatched Employment Histories

    PubMed Central

    Pedulla, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of workers are employed in positions that deviate from the full-time, standard employment relationship or work in jobs that are mismatched with their skills, education, or experience. Yet, little is known about how employers evaluate workers who have experienced these employment arrangements, limiting our knowledge about how part-time work, temporary agency employment, and skills underutilization affect workers’ labor market opportunities. Drawing on original field and survey experiment data, I examine three questions: (1) What are the consequences of having a nonstandard or mismatched employment history for workers’ labor market opportunities? (2) Are the effects of nonstandard or mismatched employment histories different for men and women? and (3) What are the mechanisms linking nonstandard or mismatched employment histories to labor market outcomes? The field experiment shows that skills underutilization is as scarring for workers as a year of unemployment, but that there are limited penalties for workers with histories of temporary agency employment. Additionally, although men are penalized for part-time employment histories, women face no penalty for part-time work. The survey experiment reveals that employers’ perceptions of workers’ competence and commitment mediate these effects. These findings shed light on the consequences of changing employment relations for the distribution of labor market opportunities in the “new economy.” PMID:27182069

  18. Capital and income breeding traits differentiate trophic match–mismatch dynamics in large herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Kerby, Jeffrey; Post, Eric

    2013-01-01

    For some species, climate change has altered environmental conditions away from those in which life-history strategies evolved. In such cases, if adaptation does not keep pace with these changes, existing life-history strategies may become maladaptive and lead to population declines. We use life-history theory, with a specific emphasis on breeding strategies, in the context of the trophic match–mismatch framework to form generalizable hypotheses about population-level consumer responses to climate-driven perturbations in resource availability. We first characterize the income and breeding traits of sympatric caribou and muskoxen populations in western Greenland, and then test trait-based hypotheses about the expected reproductive performance of each population during a period of high resource variability at that site. The immediate reproductive performance of income breeding caribou decreased with trophic mismatch. In contrast, capital breeding muskoxen were relatively unaffected by current breeding season resource variability, but their reproductive performance was sensitive to resource conditions from previous years. These responses matched our expectations about how capital and income breeding strategies should influence population susceptibility to phenological mismatch. We argue for a taxon-independent assessment of trophic mismatch vulnerability based on a life-history strategy perspective in the context of prevailing environmental conditions. PMID:23836789

  19. Whose Reality? Mismatch of Perceptions of ESL Pupils and Teachers in Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collet, R. J.

    The role of the specialist in English as a Second Language (ESL) in sensitizing colleagues, administrators and politicians to the mismatch of perceptions in the classroom and in helping establish and consolidate links with the minority communities is discussed. Seven factors said to contribute to the underachievement of children of Caribbean…

  20. Competition Effects in Phonological Priming: The Role of Mismatch Position between Primes and Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Sophie; Peereman, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    In three experiments, we examined lexical competition effects using the phonological priming paradigm in a shadowing task. Experiments 1A and 1B showed that an inhibitory priming effect occurred when the primes mismatched the targets on the last phoneme (/bagar/-/bagaj/). In contrast, a facilitatory priming effect was observed when the primes…