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Sample records for mph1 requires mismatch

  1. Differential regulation of the anti-crossover and replication fork regression activities of Mph1 by Mte1

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Papusha, Alma; Choi, Koyi; Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Kumar, Sandeep; Niu, Hengyao; Kaur, Hardeep; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Donnianni, Roberto A.; Lu, Lucy; Lichten, Michael; Zhao, Xiaolan; Ira, Grzegorz; Sung, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We identified Mte1 (Mph1-associated telomere maintenance protein 1) as a multifunctional regulator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1, a member of the FANCM family of DNA motor proteins important for DNA replication fork repair and crossover suppression during homologous recombination. We show that Mte1 interacts with Mph1 and DNA species that resemble a DNA replication fork and the D loop formed during recombination. Biochemically, Mte1 stimulates Mph1-mediated DNA replication fork regression and branch migration in a model substrate. Consistent with this activity, genetic analysis reveals that Mte1 functions with Mph1 and the associated MHF complex in replication fork repair. Surprisingly, Mte1 antagonizes the D-loop-dissociative activity of Mph1–MHF and exerts a procrossover role in mitotic recombination. We further show that the influence of Mte1 on Mph1 activities requires its binding to Mph1 and DNA. Thus, Mte1 differentially regulates Mph1 activities to achieve distinct outcomes in recombination and replication fork repair. PMID:26966246

  2. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales. PMID:26649399

  3. Mte1 interacts with Mph1 and promotes crossover recombination and telomere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Sonia; Altmannova, Veronika; Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Henriksen, Peter; Gallina, Irene; Yang, Xuejiao; Choudhary, Chunaram; Luke, Brian; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-01-01

    Mph1 is a member of the conserved FANCM family of DNA motor proteins that play key roles in genome maintenance processes underlying Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome in humans. Here, we identify Mte1 as a novel interactor of the Mph1 helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vitro, Mte1 (Mph1-associated telomere maintenance protein 1) binds directly to DNA with a preference for branched molecules such as D loops and fork structures. In addition, Mte1 stimulates the helicase and fork regression activities of Mph1 while inhibiting the ability of Mph1 to dissociate recombination intermediates. Deletion of MTE1 reduces crossover recombination and suppresses the sensitivity of mph1Δ mutant cells to replication stress. Mph1 and Mte1 interdependently colocalize at DNA damage-induced foci and dysfunctional telomeres, and MTE1 deletion results in elongated telomeres. Taken together, our data indicate that Mte1 plays a role in regulation of crossover recombination, response to replication stress, and telomere maintenance. PMID:26966248

  4. Binding of the Fkh1 Forkhead Associated Domain to a Phosphopeptide within the Mph1 DNA Helicase Regulates Mating-Type Switching in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhangli; Cherney, Rachel; Choi, Koyi; Denu, John; Zhao, Xiaolan; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fkh1 protein has roles in cell-cycle regulated transcription as well as a transcription-independent role in recombination donor preference during mating-type switching. The conserved FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by juxtaposing two distant regions on chromosome III to promote their recombination. A model posits that this Fkh1-mediated long-range chromosomal juxtaposition requires an interaction between the FHA domain and a partner protein(s), but to date no relevant partner has been described. In this study, we used structural modeling, 2-hybrid assays, and mutational analyses to show that the predicted phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain of Fkh1 interacted with multiple partner proteins. The Fkh1 FHA domain was important for its role in cell-cycle regulation, but no single interaction partner could account for this role. In contrast, Fkh1’s interaction with the Mph1 DNA repair helicase regulated donor preference during mating-type switching. Using 2-hybrid assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and fluorescence anisotropy, we mapped a discrete peptide within the regulatory Mph1 C-terminus required for this interaction and identified two threonines that were particularly important. In vitro binding experiments indicated that at least one of these threonines had to be phosphorylated for efficient Fkh1 binding. Substitution of these two threonines with alanines (mph1-2TA) specifically abolished the Fkh1-Mph1 interaction in vivo and altered donor preference during mating-type switching to the same degree as mph1Δ. Notably, the mph1-2TA allele maintained other functions of Mph1 in genome stability. Deletion of a second Fkh1-interacting protein encoded by YMR144W also resulted in a change in Fkh1-FHA-dependent donor preference. We have named this gene FDO1 for Forkhead one interacting protein involved in donor preference. We conclude that a phosphothreonine-mediated protein-protein interface between Fkh1-FHA and Mph1 contributes

  5. Centromere-tethered Mps1 pombe homolog (Mph1) kinase is a sufficient marker for recruitment of the spindle checkpoint protein Bub1, but not Mad1.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yu; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint delays the onset of anaphase until all of the chromosomes properly achieve bipolar attachment to the spindle. It has been shown that unattached kinetochores are the site that emits a signal for activation of the checkpoint. Although the components of the checkpoint such as Bub1, Mad1 and Mad2 selectively accumulate at unattached kinetochores, the answer to how they recognize unattached kinetochores has remained elusive. Mps1 pombe homolog (Mph1) kinase has been shown to function upstream of most of the components of the checkpoint and thus it is thought to recognize unattached kinetochores by itself and recruit other components. In this study we have expressed a fusion protein of Mph1 and Ndc80 (a kinetochore protein of the outer plate) and shown that the fusion protein arrests cell cycle progression in a spindle-checkpoint\\x{2013}dependent manner in fission yeast. When expression of Mad2 is turned off, the cells grow normally with Mph1 constitutively localized at centromeres/kinetochores. Under this condition, Bub1 can be found with Mph1 throughout the cell cycle, indicating that localization of Mph1 at centromeres/kinetochores is sufficient to recruit Bub1. In contrast, Mad1 is found to transiently localize at kinetochores, which are presumably unattached to the spindle, but soon it dissociates from kinetochores. We propose that Mph1 is a sufficient marker for recruitment of Bub1. Mad1, in contrast, requires an additional condition/component for stable association with kinetochores. PMID:22184248

  6. Mph1 and Mus81-Mms4 prevent aberrant processing of mitotic recombination intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Mazón, Gerard; Symington, Lorraine S

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Homology-dependent repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) from non-sister templates has the potential to generate loss of heterozygosity or deleterious genome rearrangements. Here we show the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1 helicase prevents crossovers between ectopic sequences by removing substrates for Mus81-Mms4 or Rad1-Rad10 cleavage. A role for Yen1 is only apparent in the absence of Mus81. Cells lacking Mph1 and the three nucleases are highly defective in the repair of a single DSB, suggesting the recombination intermediates that accumulate cannot be processed by the Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 complex (STR). Consistent with this hypothesis, ectopic joint molecules accumulate transiently in the mph1Δ mutant and persistently when Mus81 is eliminated. Furthermore, the ectopic JMs formed in the absence of Mus81 are connected by a single HJ explaining why STR is unable to process them. We suggest that Mph1 and Mus81-Mms4 recognize a common early strand exchange intermediate and direct repair to non-crossover or crossover outcomes, respectively. PMID:24119400

  7. MPH1 is a thylakoid membrane protein involved in protecting photosystem II from photodamage in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Last, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is highly susceptible to photoinhibition caused by environmental stimuli such as high light; therefore plants have evolved multifaceted mechanisms to efficiently protect PSII from photodamage. We previously published data suggesting that Maintenance of PSII under High light 1 (MPH1, encoded by AT5G07020), a PSII-associated proline-rich protein found in land plants, participates in the maintenance of normal PSII activity under photoinhibitory stress. Here we provide additional evidence for the role of MPH1 in protecting PSII against photooxidative damage. Two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking a functional MPH1 gene suffer from severe photoinhibition relative to the wild-type plants under high irradiance light. The mph1 mutants exhibit significantly decreased PSII quantum yield and electron transport rate after exposure to photoinhibitory light. The mutants also display drastically elevated photodamage to PSII reaction center proteins after high-light treatment. These data add further evidence that MPH1 is involved in PSII photoprotection in Arabidopsis. MPH1 homologs are found across phylogenetically diverse land plants but are not detected in algae or prokaryotes. Taken together, these results suggest that MPH1 protein began to play a role in protecting PSII against excess light following the transition from aquatic to terrestrial conditions. PMID:26337456

  8. Mismatch repair proficiency is not required for radioenhancement by gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Chris van . E-mail: c.vanbree@amc.uva.nl; Rodermond, Hans M.; Vos, Judith de; Haveman, Jaap; Franken, Nicolaas

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Mismatch repair (MMR) proficiency has been reported to either increase or decrease radioenhancement by 24-h incubations with gemcitabine. This study aimed to establish the importance of MMR for radioenhancement by gemcitabine after short-exposure, high-dose treatment and long-exposure, low-dose treatment. Methods and Materials: Survival of MMR-deficient HCT116 and MMR-proficient HCT116 + 3 cells was analyzed by clonogenic assays. Mild, equitoxic gemcitabine treatments (4 h, 0.1 {mu}M vs. 24 h, 6 nM) were combined with {gamma}-irradiation to determine the radioenhancement with or without recovery. Gemcitabine metabolism and cell-cycle effects were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis and bivariate flow cytometry. Results: Radioenhancement after 4 h of 0.1 {mu}M of gemcitabine was similar in both cell lines, but the radioenhancement after 24 h of 6 nM of gemcitabine was reduced in MMR-proficient cells. No significant differences between both cell lines were observed in the gemcitabine metabolism or cell-cycle effects after these treatments. Gemcitabine radioenhancement after recovery was also lower in MMR-proficient cells than in MMR-deficient cells. Conclusion: Mismatch repair proficiency decreases radioenhancement by long incubations of gemcitabine but does not affect radioenhancement by short exposures to a clinically relevant gemcitabine dose. Our data suggest that MMR contributes to the recovery from gemcitabine treatment.

  9. Wastewater treatment models in teaching and training: the mismatch between education and requirements for jobs.

    PubMed

    Hug, Thomas; Benedetti, Lorenzo; Hall, Eric R; Johnson, Bruce R; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Nopens, Ingmar; Rieger, Leiv; Shaw, Andrew; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    As mathematical modeling of wastewater treatment plants has become more common in research and consultancy, a mismatch between education and requirements for model-related jobs has developed. There seems to be a shortage of skilled people, both in terms of quantity and in quality. In order to address this problem, this paper provides a framework to outline different types of model-related jobs, assess the required skills for these jobs and characterize different types of education that modelers obtain "in school" as well as "on the job". It is important to consider that education of modelers does not mainly happen in university courses and that the variety of model related jobs goes far beyond use for process design by consulting companies. To resolve the mismatch, the current connection between requirements for different jobs and the various types of education has to be assessed for different geographical regions and professional environments. This allows the evaluation and improvement of important educational paths, considering quality assurance and future developments. Moreover, conclusions from a workshop involving practitioners and academics from North America and Europe are presented. The participants stressed the importance of non-technical skills and recommended strengthening the role of realistic modeling experience in university training. However, this paper suggests that all providers of modeling education and support, not only universities, but also software suppliers, professional associations and companies performing modeling tasks are called to assess and strengthen their role in training and support of professional modelers.

  10. Mps1Mph1 Kinase Phosphorylates Mad3 to Inhibit Cdc20Slp1-APC/C and Maintain Spindle Checkpoint Arrests

    PubMed Central

    Syred, Heather M.; van der Sar, Sjaak; Patel, Hitesh; Moresco, James J.; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Rappsilber, Juri; Hardwick, Kevin G.

    2016-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a mitotic surveillance system which ensures equal segregation of sister chromatids. It delays anaphase onset by inhibiting the action of the E3 ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). Mad3/BubR1 is a key component of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) which binds and inhibits the APC/C early in mitosis. Mps1Mph1 kinase is critical for checkpoint signalling and MCC-APC/C inhibition, yet few substrates have been identified. Here we identify Mad3 as a substrate of fission yeast Mps1Mph1 kinase. We map and mutate phosphorylation sites in Mad3, producing mutants that are targeted to kinetochores and assembled into MCC, yet display reduced APC/C binding and are unable to maintain checkpoint arrests. We show biochemically that Mad3 phospho-mimics are potent APC/C inhibitors in vitro, demonstrating that Mad3p modification can directly influence Cdc20Slp1-APC/C activity. This genetic dissection of APC/C inhibition demonstrates that Mps1Mph1 kinase-dependent modifications of Mad3 and Mad2 act in a concerted manner to maintain spindle checkpoint arrests. PMID:26882497

  11. SPATIAL MISMATCH OR RACIAL MISMATCH?*

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstein, Judith K.; Neumark, David; McInerney, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    We contrast the spatial mismatch hypothesis with what we term the racial mismatch hypothesis – that the problem is not a lack of jobs, per se, where blacks live, but a lack of jobs where blacks live into which blacks are hired. We first report new evidence on the spatial mismatch hypothesis, using data from Census Long-Form respondents. We construct direct measures of the presence of jobs in detailed geographic areas, and find that these job density measures are related to employment of black male residents in ways that would be predicted by the spatial mismatch hypothesis – in particular that spatial mismatch is primarily an issue for low-skilled black male workers. We then look at mismatch along not only spatial lines but racial lines as well, by estimating the effects of job density measures that are disaggregated by race. We find that it is primarily black job density that influences black male employment, whereas white job density has little if any influence on their employment. The evidence implies that space alone plays a relatively minor role in low black male employment rates. PMID:19727422

  12. On Business-Driven IT Security Management and Mismatches between Security Requirements in Firms, Industry Standards and Research Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirth, Christian

    Industry managers have long recognized the vital importance of information security for their businesses, but at the same time they perceived security as a technology-driven rather then a business-driven field. Today, this notion is changing and security management is shifting from technology- to business-oriented approaches. Whereas there is evidence of this shift in the literature, this paper argues that security standards and academic work have not yet taken it fully into account. We examine whether this disconnect has lead to a misalignment of IT security requirements in businesses versus industry standards and academic research. We conducted 13 interviews with practitioners from 9 different firms to investigate this question. The results present evidence for a significant gap between security requirements in industry standards and actually reported security vulnerabilities. We further find mismatches between the prioritization of security factors in businesses, standards and real-world threats. We conclude that security in companies serves the business need of protecting information availability to keep the business running at all times.

  13. Mismatch Repair in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe Requires the Mutl Homologous Gene Pms1: Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schar, P.; Baur, M.; Schneider, C.; Kohli, J.

    1997-01-01

    Homologues of the bacterial mutS and mutL genes involved in DNA mismatch repair have been found in organisms from bacteria to humans. Here, we describe the structure and function of a newly identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene that encodes a predicted amino acid sequence of 794 residues with a high degree of homology to MutL related proteins. On the basis of its closer relationship to the eukaryotic ``PMS'' genes than to the ``MLH'' genes, we have designated the S. pombe homologue pms1. Disruption of the pms1 gene causes a significant increase of spontaneous mutagenesis as documented by reversion rate measurements. Tetrad analyses of crosses homozygous for the pms1 mutation reveal a reduction of spore viability from >92% to 80% associated with a low proportion (~50%) of meioses producing four viable spores and a significant, allele-dependent increase of the level of post-meiotic segregation of genetic marker allele pairs. The mutant phenotypes are consistent with a general function of pms1 in correction of mismatched base pairs arising as a consequence of DNA polymerase errors during DNA synthesis, or of hybrid DNA formation between homologous but not perfectly complementary DNA strands during meiotic recombination. PMID:9258673

  14. Size mismatch in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Kyota; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Size mismatch is an unique and inevitable but critical issue in live donor liver transplantation. Unmatched metabolic demand of recipient as well as physiologic mismatch aggravates the damage to liver graft, inevitably leading to graft failure on recipient. Also, an excessive resection of liver graft for better recipient outcome in live donor liver transplant may jeopardize the healthy donor well-being and even put donor life in danger. There is a fine balance between resected graft volume required to meet the recipient's metabolic demand and residual graft volume required for donor safety. The obvious clinical necessity of finding that balance has prompted a clinical need and promoted the improvement of knowledge and development of management strategies for size-mismatched transplants. The development of the size-matching methodology has significantly improved graft outcome and recipient survival in live donor liver transplants. On the other hand, the effect of size mismatch in cadaveric transplants has never been observed as being so pronounced. The importance of matching of the donor recipient size has been unrecognized in cadaveric liver transplant. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current most updated knowledge on the subject, particularly addressing the definition and complications of size-mismatched cadaveric liver transplant, as well as management strategies. PMID:27474079

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  16. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  17. Detecting scale violations in absence of mismatch requires music-syntactic analysis: a further look at the early right anterior negativity (ERAN).

    PubMed

    Kalda, Tiina; Minati, Ludovico

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether infrequent scale violations in a sequence of in-key notes are detected when the deviants are matched for frequency of occurrence and preceding intervals with the control notes. We further investigated whether the detectability of scale violations is modulated by the presence of melodic context and by the level of musical training. Event related potentials were recorded from 14 musicians and 13 non-musicians. In non-musicians, the out-of-key notes elicited an early right anterior negativity (ERAN), which appeared prominently over right frontal sites only when presented within structured sequences; no effects were found when the out-of-key notes were presented within scrambled sequences. In musicians, the out-of-key notes elicited a similar bilateral ERAN in structured and scrambled sequences. Our findings suggest that scale information is processed at the level of music-syntactic analysis, and that the detection of deviants does not require activation of auditory sensory memory by mismatch effects. Scales are perceived as a broader context, not just as online interval relations. Additional melodic context information appears necessary to support the representation of scale deviants in non-musicians, but not in musically-trained individuals, likely as a consequence of stronger pre-existing representations. PMID:22080232

  18. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  19. A Jobs Mismatch. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marina, Brenda L. H.

    2011-01-01

    In the article "A Jobs Mismatch", Jaschik has compiled the findings of a new report that was released by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The Georgetown University report claims that there is a severe shortage of college graduates in America, and that this shortage has the United States on a "collision course with…

  20. Mismatch repair-dependent G2 checkpoint induced by low doses of SN1 type methylating agents requires the ATR kinase.

    PubMed

    Stojic, Lovorka; Mojas, Nina; Cejka, Petr; Di Pietro, Massimiliano; Ferrari, Stefano; Marra, Giancarlo; Jiricny, Josef

    2004-06-01

    S(N)1-type alkylating agents represent an important class of chemotherapeutics, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity are unknown. Thus, although these substances modify predominantly purine nitrogen atoms, their toxicity appears to result from the processing of O(6)-methylguanine ((6Me)G)-containing mispairs by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, because cells with defective MMR are highly resistant to killing by these agents. In an attempt to understand the role of the MMR system in the molecular transactions underlying the toxicity of alkylating agents, we studied the response of human MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells to low concentrations of the prototypic methylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We now show that MNNG treatment induced a cell cycle arrest that was absolutely dependent on functional MMR. Unusually, the cells arrested only in the second G(2) phase after treatment. Downstream targets of both ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) kinases were modified, but only the ablation of ATR, or the inhibition of CHK1, attenuated the arrest. The checkpoint activation was accompanied by the formation of nuclear foci containing the signaling and repair proteins ATR, the S(*)/T(*)Q substrate, gamma-H2AX, and replication protein A (RPA). The persistence of these foci implied that they may represent sites of irreparable damage. PMID:15175264

  1. Formal Education, Mismatch and Wages after Transition: Assessing the Impact of Unobserved Heterogeneity Using Matching Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamo, Ana; Messina, Julian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the incidence and consequences of the mismatch between formal education and the educational requirements of jobs in Estonia during the years 1997-2003. We find large wage penalties associated with the phenomenon of educational mismatch. Moreover, the incidence and wage penalty of mismatches increase with age. This suggests that…

  2. Generation of DNA nanocircles containing mismatched bases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu; Jung, Caroline; Marx, Andreas D; Winkler, Ines; Wyman, Claire; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Friedhoff, Peter; Cristovao, Michele

    2011-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes and repairs errors that escaped the proofreading function of DNA polymerases. To study molecular details of the MMR mechanism, in vitro biochemical assays require specific DNA substrates carrying mismatches and strand discrimination signals. Current approaches used to generate MMR substrates are time-consuming and/or not very flexible with respect to sequence context. Here we report an approach to generate small circular DNA containing a mismatch (nanocircles). Our method is based on the nicking of PCR products resulting in single-stranded 3' overhangs, which form DNA circles after annealing and ligation. Depending on the DNA template, one can generate mismatched circles containing a single hemimethylated GATC site (for use with the bacterial system) and/or nicking sites to generate DNA circles nicked in the top or bottom strand (for assays with the bacterial or eukaryotic MMR system). The size of the circles varied (323 to 1100 bp), their sequence was determined by the template DNA, and purification of the circles was achieved by ExoI/ExoIII digestion and/or gel extraction. The quality of the nanocircles was assessed by scanning-force microscopy and their suitability for in vitro repair initiation was examined using recombinant Escherichia coli MMR proteins.

  3. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  4. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  5. Educational Mismatch and Self-Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Roche, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on educational mismatch concentrates on estimating its labor market consequences but with a focus on wage and salary workers. This paper examines the far less studied influence of mismatch on the self-employed. Using a sample of workers in science and engineering fields, results show larger earnings penalties for mismatch among…

  6. Mismatch Invisible Underemployment and Male Competency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gloria J.

    Mismatch invisible underemployment is defined as a condition in which a person with a given level of education receives less than he/she should in terms of income and prestige. To examine the relationship between mismatch invisible underemployment and male competency and to determine the degree to which mismatch invisible underemployment affects a…

  7. Structural Properties of Mismatched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    The problem of understanding the local structure of disordered alloys has been around for a long time. In this thesis, I look more specifically at the effect of size-mismatch disorder in binary alloys under many forms: metallic and semiconductor alloys, bulk and surfaces, two and three dimensional systems. I have studied the limitations of a central-force model (CFM) and an embedded-atom potential (EAM) in describing the local structure of binary metallic alloys composed of Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, or Pt. Although an analytical model developed using the CFM explains qualitatively well the experimental and numerical results, in many cases, it is important to add electronic density effects through a more sophisticated potential like EAM in order to agree quantitatively with experiment. I have also looked at amorphous and crystalline silicon-germanium alloys. It turns out that the effect of size-mismatch is the same on a crystalline and an amorphous lattice. In the latter case, it can be seen as a perturbation of the much larger disorder due to the amorphisation process. However, the analytical predictions differ, for both the crystalline and amorphous alloys, from the experimental results. If one is to believe the data, there is only one possible explanation for this inconsistency: large amounts of hydrogen are present in the samples used for the measurements. Since the data analysis of EXAFS results is not always straightforward, I have proposed some experiments that could shed light on this problem. One of these experiments would be to look at the (111) surface of a Si-Ge alloy with a scanning tunneling microscope. I also present in this thesis the theoretical predictions for the height distribution at the surface as well as some more general structural information about the relaxation in the network as one goes away from the surface. Finally, I have studied the effect of size -mismatch in a purely two dimensional lattice, looking for mismatch-driven phase transitions

  8. Mismatch-mediated error prone repair at the immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Chahwan, Richard; Edelmann, Winfried; Scharff, Matthew D; Roa, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    The generation of effective antibodies depends upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of antibody genes by activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and the subsequent recruitment of error prone base excision and mismatch repair. While AID initiates and is required for SHM, more than half of the base changes that accumulate in V regions are not due to the direct deamination of dC to dU by AID, but rather arise through the recruitment of the mismatch repair complex (MMR) to the U:G mismatch created by AID and the subsequent perversion of mismatch repair from a high fidelity process to one that is very error prone. In addition, the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) is essential during CSR, and the resolution of AID-generated mismatches by MMR to promote such DSBs is critical for the efficiency of the process. While a great deal has been learned about how AID and MMR cause hypermutations and DSBs, it is still unclear how the error prone aspect of these processes is largely restricted to antibody genes. The use of knockout models and mice expressing mismatch repair proteins with separation-of-function point mutations have been decisive in gaining a better understanding of the roles of each of the major MMR proteins and providing further insight into how mutation and repair are coordinated. Here, we review the cascade of MMR factors and repair signals that are diverted from their canonical error free role and hijacked by B cells to promote genetic diversification of the Ig locus. This error prone process involves AID as the inducer of enzymatically-mediated DNA mismatches, and a plethora of downstream MMR factors acting as sensors, adaptors and effectors of a complex and tightly regulated process from much of which is not yet well understood.

  9. The structural impact of DNA mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D.; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  10. The structural impact of DNA mismatches.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-04-30

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  11. Educational Mismatch between Graduates' Possessed Skills and Market Demands in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzair-ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Noreen, Zahida

    2013-01-01

    Educational mismatch in skills that graduates possess and market requires creates barriers for organizations as well as for job seekers. The study was conducted to find out the educational mismatch between graduates possessed skills and market demands. Convenient sampling was carried out and data were collected from 200 graduates of economics…

  12. Imagery mismatch negativity in musicians.

    PubMed

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated musical imagery in musicians and nonmusicians by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). We used a new paradigm in which subjects had to continue familiar melodies in their mind and then judged if a further presented tone was a correct continuation of the melody. Incorrect tones elicited an imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN) in musicians but not in nonmusicians. This finding suggests that the MMN component can be based on an imagined instead of a sensory memory trace and that imagery of music is modulated by musical expertise. PMID:19673775

  13. Elastic mismatch enhances cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Yony; Palmieri, Benoit; Grant, Martin

    In recent years, the study of physics phenomena in cancer has drawn considerable attention. In cancer metastasis, a soft cancer cell leaves the tumor, and must pass through the endothelium before reaching the bloodstream. Using a phase-field model we have shown that the elasticity mismatch between cells alone is sufficient to enhance the motility of thesofter cancer cell by means of bursty migration, in agreement with experiment. We will present further characterization of these behaviour, as well as new possible applications for this model.

  14. Dynamic mismatch between bonded dissimilar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chou H.

    1993-06-01

    In the bonding of dissimilar materials, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) relates to only the static or thermal equilibrium case, and does not represent most actual conditions (i.e., the service and processing temperatures are usually changing rather than fixed). This article outlines an approach that computes the effective, or dynamic, CTE mismatch. This dynamic mismatch varies with the bonded material shapes and sizes, surface characteristics, and heating or cooling conditions and times and may be several times greater than the corresponding static CTE mismatch. Unrelieved, the computed transient or dynamic thermal-strain mismatch may exceed the yield point of the metal, while the transient or dynamic mismatch stress often exceeds the flexural or compressive strength of the ceramic. Understanding transient mismatch phenomena has led to new, unmatched metal-ceramic joints that withstand repeated, rapid thermal shocks and subsequent severe mechanical shocks. The final forced fractures occur outside the bonded regions, indicating defect-free joints.

  15. Dynamic mismatch between bonded dissimilar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chou H.

    1993-06-01

    In the bonding of dissimilar materials, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) relates to only the static or thermal equilibrium case, and does not represent most actual conditions (i.e., the service and processing temperatures are usually changing rather than fixed). This article outlines an approach that computes the effective, or dynamic, CTE mismatch. This dynamic mismatch varies with the bonded material shapes and sizes, surface characteristics, and heating or cooling conditions and times and may be several times greater than the corresponding static CTE mismatch. Unrelieved, the computed transient or dynamic thermal-strain mismatch may exceed the yield point of the metal, while the transient or dynamic mismatch stress often exceeds the flexural or compressive strength of the ceramic. Understanding transient mismatch phenomena has led to new, unmatched metal-ceramic joints that withstand repeated, rapid thermal shocks and subsequent severe mechanical shocks. The final forced fractures occur outside the bonded regions, indicating defect free joints.

  16. Mismatch Negativity: Translating the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Juanita; Harms, Lauren; Schall, Ulrich; Michie, Patricia T.

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential has become a valuable tool in cognitive neuroscience. Its reduced size in persons with schizophrenia is of unknown origin but theories proposed include links to problems in experience-dependent plasticity reliant on N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors. In this review we address the utility of this tool in revealing the nature and time course of problems in perceptual inference in this illness together with its potential for use in translational research testing animal models of schizophrenia-related phenotypes. Specifically, we review the reasons for interest in MMN in schizophrenia, issues pertaining to the measurement of MMN, its use as a vulnerability index for the development of schizophrenia, the pharmacological sensitivity of MMN and the progress in developing animal models of MMN. Within this process we highlight the challenges posed by knowledge gaps pertaining to the tool and the pharmacology of the underlying system. PMID:24391602

  17. Calculation of wind speeds required to damage or destroy buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Henry

    Determination of wind speeds required to damage or destroy a building is important not only for the improvement of building design and construction but also for the estimation of wind speeds in tornadoes and other damaging storms. For instance, since 1973 the U.S. National Weather Service has been using the well-known Fujita scale (F scale) to estimate the maximum wind speeds of tornadoes [Fujita, 1981]. The F scale classifies tornadoes into 13 numbers, F-0 through F-12. The wind speed (maximum gust speed) associated with each F number is given in Table 1. Note that F-6 through F-12 are for wind speeds between 319 mi/hr (mph) and the sonic velocity (approximately 760 mph; 1 mph = 1.6 km/kr). However, since no tornadoes have been classified to exceed F-5, the F-6 through F-12 categories have no practical meaning [Fujita, 1981].

  18. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  19. Metamer mismatching in practice versus theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiandou; Funt, Brian; Mirzaei, Hamidreza

    2016-03-01

    Metamer mismatching (the phenomenon that two objects matching in color under one illuminant may not match under a different illuminant) potentially has important consequences for color perception. Logvinenko et al. [PLoS ONE10, e0135029 (2015)] show that in theory the extent of metamer mismatching can be very significant. This paper examines metamer mismatching in practice by computing the volumes of the empirical metamer mismatch bodies and comparing them to the volumes of the theoretical mismatch bodies. A set of more than 25 million unique reflectance spectra is assembled using datasets from several sources. For a given color signal (e.g., CIE XYZ) recorded under a given first illuminant, its empirical metamer mismatch body for a change to a second illuminant is computed as follows: the reflectances having the same color signal when lit by the first illuminant (i.e., reflect metameric light) are computationally relit by the second illuminant, and the convex hull of the resulting color signals then defines the empirical metamer mismatch body. The volume of these bodies is shown to vary systematically with Munsell value and chroma. The empirical mismatch bodies are compared to the theoretical mismatch bodies computed using the algorithm of Logvinenko et al. [IEEE Trans. Image Process.23, 34 (2014)]. There are three key findings: (1) the empirical bodies are found to be substantially smaller than the theoretical ones; (2) the sizes of both the empirical and theoretical bodies show a systematic variation with Munsell value and chroma; and (3) applied to the problem of color-signal prediction, the centroid of the empirical metamer mismatch body is shown to be a better predictor of what a given color signal might become under a specified illuminant than state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26974929

  20. Hydrolytic function of Exo1 in mammalian mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hongbing; Baitinger, Celia; Soderblom, Erik J.; Burdett, Vickers; Modrich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have previously implicated exonuclease 1 (Exo1) in yeast and mammalian mismatch repair, with results suggesting that function of the protein in the reaction depends on both its hydrolytic activity and its ability to interact with other components of the repair system. However, recent analysis of an Exo1-E109K knockin mouse has concluded that Exo1 function in mammalian mismatch repair is restricted to a structural role, a conclusion based on a prior report that N-terminal His-tagged Exo1-E109K is hydrolytically defective. Because Glu-109 is distant from the nuclease hydrolytic center, we have compared the activity of untagged full-length Exo1-E109K with that of wild type Exo1 and the hydrolytically defective active site mutant Exo1-D173A. We show that the activity of Exo1-E109K is comparable to that of wild type enzyme in a conventional exonuclease assay and that in contrast to a D173A active site mutant, Exo1-E109K is fully functional in mismatch-provoked excision and repair. We conclude that the catalytic function of Exo1 is required for its participation in mismatch repair. We also consider the other phenotypes of the Exo1-E109K mouse in the context of Exo1 hydrolytic function. PMID:24829455

  1. Modeling of channel mismatch in time-interleaved SAR ADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengquan, Li; Liang, Zhang; Zhangming, Zhu; Yintang, Yang

    2015-09-01

    In a time-interleaved analog-to-digital converter (TI ADC), several individual ADCs operate in parallel to achieve a higher sampling rate. Low power consumption as well as good linearity can be obtained by applying successive approximation register (SAR) converters as sub-channel ADCs. In spite of the advantages, this structure suffers from three mismatches, which are offset mismatch, gain mismatch, and time skew. This paper focuses on a TI SAR ADC with a number of channels. The mismatch effects in the frequency domain are analyzed and the derived close form formulas are verified based on Matlab. In addition, we clarify that the standard deviation of DNL and INL of an M-channel TI ADC is reduced by a factor of \\sqrt M compared to a single channel ADC. The formulas can be used to derive the corresponding requirements when designing a TI ADC. Our analysis process is able to inform the study of calibration algorithms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234002, 61322405, 61306044, 61376033) and the National High-Tech Program of China (No. 2013AA014103).

  2. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, María V; Monti, Mariela R; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2016-03-01

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3' end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5' end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity.

  3. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  4. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    PubMed Central

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour. PMID:24619446

  5. Interplay between mismatch repair and chromatin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schöpf, Barbara; Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Kadyrov, Farid A.; Almouzni, Genevieve; Jiricny, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Single strand nicks and gaps in DNA have been reported to increase the efficiency of nucleosome loading mediated by chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1). However, on mismatch-containing substrates, these strand discontinuities are utilized by the mismatch repair (MMR) system as loading sites for exonuclease 1, at which degradation of the error-containing strand commences. Because packaging of DNA into chromatin might inhibit MMR, we were interested to learn whether chromatin assembly is differentially regulated on heteroduplex and homoduplex substrates. We now show that the presence of a mismatch in a nicked plasmid substrate delays nucleosome loading in human cell extracts. Our data also suggest that, once the mismatch is removed, repair of the single-stranded gap is accompanied by efficient nucleosome loading. We postulated that the balance between MMR and chromatin assembly might be governed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor of replicative DNA polymerases, which is loaded at DNA termini and which interacts with the MSH6 subunit of the mismatch recognition factor MutSα, as well as with CAF-1. We now show that this regulation might be more complex; MutSα and CAF-1 interact not only with PCNA, but also with each other. In vivo this interaction increases during S-phase and may be controlled by the phosphorylation status of the p150 subunit of CAF-1. PMID:22232658

  6. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-31

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n{sub 0}, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  7. Towards automatic identification of mismatched image pairs through loop constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elibol, Armagan; Kim, Jinwhan; Gracias, Nuno; Garcia, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Obtaining image sequences has become easier and easier thanks to the rapid progress on optical sensors and robotic platforms. Processing of image sequences (e.g., mapping, 3D reconstruction, Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM)) usually requires 2D image registration. Recently, image registration is accomplished by detecting salient points in two images and nextmatching their descriptors. To eliminate outliers and to compute a planar transformation (homography) between the coordinate frames of images, robust methods (such as Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) and Least Median of Squares (LMedS)) are employed. However, image registration pipeline can sometimes provide sufficient number of inliers within the error bounds even when images do not overlap. Such mismatches occur especially when the scene has repetitive texture and shows structural similarity. In this study, we present a method to identify the mismatches using closed-loop (cycle) constraints. The method exploits the fact that images forming a cycle should have identity mapping when all the homographies between images in the cycle multiplied. Cycles appear when the camera revisits an area that was imaged before, which is a common practice especially for mapping purposes. Our proposal extracts several cycles to obtain error statistics for each matched image pair. Then, it searches for image pairs that have extreme error histogram comparing to the other pairs. We present experimental results with artificially added mismatched image pairs on real underwater image sequences.

  8. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  9. Flux-mediated diffuse mismatch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, G. C.; Tay, B. K.; Teo, E. H. T.

    2010-09-01

    The diffuse mismatch model (DMM) is modified to account for the effect of thermal flux on phonon transmission at interfaces. This new model, the flux-mediated diffuse mismatch model (FMDMM) takes a slightly different approach in its formulation, and does not employ the principle of detailed balance. Two competing processes—an increase in the flux coefficient, and a decrease in the rest of the transmission term, may result in either a rise or fall in thermal boundary resistance when thermal flux is increased. This might partially explain the large disparities between experimental, theoretical, and simulated results of thermal boundary resistance.

  10. Microsecond dynamics of mismatch repair proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsbury, Freddie; Thompson, William

    We will present the results of long-time simulations (250ns-1microsecond) of the mismatch repair protein complexes Mutsalpha bound to various substrates, both normal and damaged. We do so to demonstrate the importance of long-range fluctuations and generalized allostery in such systems and how long-scale GPU-enabled simulations can enabled such analysis.

  11. Educational Mismatch and the Careers of Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Heywood, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research confirms that many employees work in jobs not well matched to their skills and education, resulting in lower pay and job satisfaction. While this literature typically uses cross-sectional data, we examine the evolution of mismatch and its consequences over a career, by using a panel data set of scientists in the USA. The results…

  12. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases mortality after myeloablative unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stephanie J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Hai-Lin; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Dehn, Jason; Fernandez Viña, Marcelo; Gratwohl, Alois; Gupta, Vikas; Hanna, Rabi; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kassim, Adetola A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Mueller, Carlheinz; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Prasad, Vinod; Robinson, James; Saber, Wael; Schultz, Kirk R.; Shaw, Bronwen; Storek, Jan; Wood, William A.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We examined current outcomes of unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to determine the clinical implications of donor-recipient HLA matching. Adult and pediatric patients who had first undergone myeloablative-unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome between 1999 and 2011 were included. All had high-resolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Of the total (n = 8003), cases were 8/8 (n = 5449), 7/8 (n = 2071), or 6/8 (n = 483) matched. HLA mismatch (6-7/8) conferred significantly increased risk for grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft vs host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall mortality compared with HLA-matched cases (8/8). Type (allele/antigen) and locus (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) of mismatch were not associated with overall mortality. Among 8/8 matched cases, HLA-DPB1 and -DQB1 mismatch resulted in increased acute GVHD, and HLA-DPB1 mismatch had decreased relapse. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 allele mismatch was associated with higher TRM compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch or HLA-DPB1 match and increased overall mortality compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch in 8/8 (and 10/10) matched cases. Full matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 is required for optimal unrelated donor HCT survival, and avoidance of nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in otherwise HLA-matched pairs is indicated. PMID:25161269

  13. Neurophysiological correlates of mismatch in lexical access

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Claudia K

    2005-01-01

    Background In the present study neurophysiological correlates related to mismatching information in lexical access were investigated with a fragment priming paradigm. Event-related brain potentials were recorded for written words following spoken word onsets that either matched (e.g., kan – Kante [Engl. edge]), partially mismatched (e.g., kan – Konto [Engl. account]), or were unrelated (e.g., kan – Zunge [Engl. tongue]). Previous psycholinguistic research postulated the activation of multiple words in the listeners' mental lexicon which compete for recognition. Accordingly, matching words were assumed to be strongly activated competitors, which inhibit less strongly activated partially mismatching words. Results ERPs for matching and unrelated control words differed between 300 and 400 ms. Difference waves (unrelated control words – matching words) replicate a left-hemispheric P350 effect in this time window. Although smaller than for matching words, a P350 effect and behavioural facilitation was also found for partially mismatching words. Minimum norm solutions point to a left hemispheric centro-temporal source of the P350 effect in both conditions. The P350 is interpreted as a neurophysiological index for the activation of matching words in the listeners' mental lexicon. In contrast to the P350 and the behavioural responses, a brain potential ranging between 350 and 500 ms (N400) was found to be equally reduced for matching and partially mismatching words as compared to unrelated control words. This latter effect might be related to strategic mechanisms in the priming situation. Conclusion A left-hemispheric neuronal network engaged in lexical access appears to be gradually activated by matching and partially mismatching words. Results suggest that neural processing of matching words does not inhibit processing of partially mismatching words during early stages of lexical identification. Furthermore, the present results indicate that neurophysiological

  14. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  15. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  16. Acoustic evidence for phonologically mismatched speech errors.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Speech errors are generally said to accommodate to their new phonological context. This accommodation has been validated by several transcription studies. The transcription methodology is not the best choice for detecting errors at this level, however, as this type of error can be difficult to perceive. This paper presents an acoustic analysis of speech errors that uncovers non-accommodated or mismatch errors. A mismatch error is a sub-phonemic error that results in an incorrect surface phonology. This type of error could arise during the processing of phonological rules or they could be made at the motor level of implementation. The results of this work have important implications for both experimental and theoretical research. For experimentalists, it validates the tools used for error induction and the acoustic determination of errors free of the perceptual bias. For theorists, this methodology can be used to test the nature of the processes proposed in language production.

  17. Space Charge Waves in Mismatched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y; Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2009-04-17

    Mismatch oscillations resulting from the propagation of space charge waves in intense beams may lead to halo generation, beam loss, and modification of longitudinal beam properties. These oscillations have amplitudes and frequencies different from that of the main beam and are particularly important in machines such as the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), in which the beam dynamics scales to parameters associated with heavy ion fusion drivers. To study these effects, we use the particle in cell code LSP [1] to simulate space charge wave dynamics in an intense electron beam propagating in a smooth focusing channel with 2-D cylindrical symmetry. We examine the evolution of linear and nonlinear density perturbations for both matched and mismatched beams. Comparisons between LSP simulations and numerical models are presented.

  18. Infrequent identity mismatches are frequently undetected

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately match faces to photographs bears critically on many domains, from controlling purchase of age-restricted goods to law enforcement and airport security. Despite its pervasiveness and importance, research has shown that face matching is surprisingly error prone. The majority of face-matching research is conducted under idealized conditions (e.g., using photographs of individuals taken on the same day) and with equal proportions of match and mismatch trials, a rate that is likely not observed in everyday face matching. In four experiments, we presented observers with photographs of faces taken an average of 1.5 years apart and tested whether face-matching performance is affected by the prevalence of identity mismatches, comparing conditions of low (10 %) and high (50 %) mismatch prevalence. Like the low-prevalence effect in visual search, we observed inflated miss rates under low-prevalence conditions. This effect persisted when participants were allowed to correct their initial responses (Experiment 2), when they had to verify every decision with a certainty judgment (Experiment 3) and when they were permitted “second looks” at face pairs (Experiment 4). These results suggest that, under realistic viewing conditions, the low-prevalence effect in face matching is a large, persistent source of errors. PMID:24500751

  19. Mismatched DNTP Incorporation By DNA Polymerase Beta Does Not Proceed Via Globally Different Conformational Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.-H.; Niebuhr, M.; Tung, C.-S.; Chan, H.-c.; Chou, C.-C.; Tsai, M.-D.

    2009-05-26

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  20. HLA-DR and -DQ eplet mismatches and transplant glomerulopathy: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sapir-Pichhadze, R; Tinckam, K; Quach, K; Logan, A G; Laupacis, A; John, R; Beyene, J; Kim, S J

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a nested case-control study from a cohort of adult kidney transplant recipients to assess the risk of transplant glomerulopathy (TG) as a function of donor and recipient HLA-DR and -DQ incompatibility at the eplet level. Cases (n = 52) were defined as patients diagnosed with transplant glomerulopathy based on biopsies showing glomerular basement membrane duplication without immune complex deposition. Controls (n = 104) with a similar follow-up from transplantation were randomly selected from the remaining cohort. HLAMatchmaker was used to ascertain the number of DRB1/3/4/5, DQA1 and DQB1 related eplet mismatches (eplet load). Multivariable conditional logistic regression models demonstrated an increase in the odds of TG (odds ratios [OR] of 2.84 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 7.84] and 4.62 [95% CI: 1.51, 14.14]) in the presence of 27-43 and >43 HLA-DR + DQ related eplet mismatches versus <27 eplet mismatches, respectively. When the eplet load was modeled as a continuous variable, the OR for TG was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.50) for every 10 additional HLA-DR + DQ eplet mismatches. Our study suggests that minimization of HLA-DR + DQ eplet mismatches may decrease the incidence of transplant glomerulopathy diagnosed by indication biopsies. The role of eplet immunogenicity/antigenicity as determinants of allograft outcomes requires further study. PMID:25521856

  1. Production and characterization of the celery mismatch endonuclease CEL II using baculovirus/silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jaeman; Fukushima, Mai; Nagata, Yudai; Fujii, Mie; Xu, Jian; Nishi, Oumi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection by nucleases has become a more important tool in clinical and biological researches. There are several kinds of single-stranded nucleases for detecting mismatched DNAs. One of them, CEL II, was isolated from Apium graveolens and cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of mismatch. High-throughput mutation scanning requires large quantity of CEL II endonuclease. Here, we demonstrate high-level expression of CEL II using silkworm-baculovirus system. The recombinant CEL II secreted in silkworm hemolymph was glycosylated and susceptible to N-glycosidase F. Additionally, larger metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) were able to replace Mg(2+) and enhanced mismatch cleavage activity of CEL II. These results indicate that the silkworm-baculovirus platform is a good alternative system to obtain the functional CEL II.

  2. Job Supply and Demand for University Graduates in Spain: A (Relative) Mismatch Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parellada, Marti; Duch, Nestor; Alvarez, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of job supply by Spanish firms and the demand for work, and the mismatch that occurs between these two variables. Data are taken for the year 2006, with particular attention to jobs offered by firms that require people with university degrees or other higher education qualifications. Demand and supply are broken…

  3. Visual mismatch negativity: a predictive coding view

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Kremláček, Jan; Czigler, István

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies investigate the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) or use the vMMN as a tool to probe various aspects of human cognition. This paper reviews the theoretical underpinnings of vMMN in the light of methodological considerations and provides recommendations for measuring and interpreting the vMMN. The following key issues are discussed from the experimentalist's point of view in a predictive coding framework: (1) experimental protocols and procedures to control “refractoriness” effects; (2) methods to control attention; (3) vMMN and veridical perception. PMID:25278859

  4. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; Emery, Keith A.; Williams, Rafell

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  5. Kinetics of largely lattice-mismatch epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong |

    1997-12-31

    The kinetics of island nucleation, growth, and dislocation formation in largely lattice-mismatch heteroepitaxy are analyzed theoretically. It is shown that 2D platelets tend to transform to 3D islands as they exceed a certain critical size. During island growth, the increase of the strain concentration at the island edge makes it increasingly difficult for adatoms to reach the island, which leads to the formation of homogeneously sized islands. The high strain concentration at the island edge is eventually relieved by growing-in dislocations.

  6. HIP-assisted CTE mismatch tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zick, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    A novel tooling technique is described which allows diffusion bonding of components with excellent dimensional control. The technique makes use of the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the tooling and the bonded components. Unlike traditional CTE mismatch tooling, the new technique allows low tensile strength, low cost materials such as graphite or ceramics to be used as the major tooling structure. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is employed to clamp together the tooling through a surrounding metallic capsule. An example will be presented of how the technique was used to bond numerous patterned stainless steel plates into a block containing intricate interconnected passages.

  7. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  8. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  9. Interactions of Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes with DNA mismatches and abasic sites.

    PubMed

    Nandhini, T; Anju, K R; Manikandamathavan, V M; Vaidyanathan, V G; Nair, B U

    2015-05-21

    Polypyridyl based ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(bpy)2(furphen)](PF6)2 (1) and [Ru(bpy)2(imiphen)](PF6)2 (2) {furphen: 2-(furan-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline and imiphen: 2-(1H-imidazol-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} were synthesized and characterized by ESI-MS, NMR, UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The interaction of Ru(II) complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) as well as oligonucleotides containing mismatches and abasic sites was studied along with unmodified control DNA. Based on absorption titration studies, binding constants (Kb) for the interaction of complexes 1 and 2 with DNA were found to be 6.7 ± 0.2 × 10(3) and 4.9 ± 0.2 × 10(4) M(-1), respectively. Hydrodynamic studies revealed weak interactions between the two complexes and CT-DNA. Luminescence studies revealed that both the complexes exhibit a five-fold increase in emission upon addition of CT-DNA. The integrated emission intensity of complexes 1 and 2 with CC mismatch oligonucleotides was 1.5 and 1.2 fold higher than that of control GC match oligonucleotides, respectively. Both the complexes did not show any specificity towards abasic or other mismatch sites except for CC mismatch. The results from this study provide an insight into the requirements of ligand shape in recognising DNA mutations such as mismatch and selectivity between DNA mismatches. PMID:25893583

  10. Band anticrossing in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.

    2002-07-26

    The basic theoretical aspects of the band anticrossing effects in highly electronegativity-mismatched semiconductor alloys are reviewed. The many-impurity Anderson model treated in the coherent potential approximation is applied to the semiconductor alloys, in which metallic anion atoms are partially substituted by atoms of a highly electronegative element. Analytical solutions for the Green's function describe dispersion relations and state broadening effects for the restructured conduction band. The solutions are identical to those obtained from the physically intuitive and widely used two-level band anticrossing model. It is shown that the model explains key experimental observations including the unusual composition and pressure dependence of the interband optical transitions and the large enhancement of the electron effective mass.

  11. A neurocomputational model of the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Falk; Stephan, Klaas E; Daunizeau, Jean; Garrido, Marta I; Friston, Karl J

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event related potential evoked by violations of regularity. Here, we present a model of the underlying neuronal dynamics based upon the idea that auditory cortex continuously updates a generative model to predict its sensory inputs. The MMN is then modelled as the superposition of the electric fields evoked by neuronal activity reporting prediction errors. The process by which auditory cortex generates predictions and resolves prediction errors was simulated using generalised (Bayesian) filtering--a biologically plausible scheme for probabilistic inference on the hidden states of hierarchical dynamical models. The resulting scheme generates realistic MMN waveforms, explains the qualitative effects of deviant probability and magnitude on the MMN - in terms of latency and amplitude--and makes quantitative predictions about the interactions between deviant probability and magnitude. This work advances a formal understanding of the MMN and--more generally--illustrates the potential for developing computationally informed dynamic causal models of empirical electromagnetic responses. PMID:24244118

  12. Mismatch Oscillations in High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.A.

    2005-05-03

    When planning the design of high-current FODO transport for accelerators, it is useful to have simple, accurate tools for calculating quantities such as the phase advances {sigma}{sub 0} and !given the lattice and beam parameters. Along with the KV beam model, the smooth approximation is often used. It is simple but not very accurate in many cases. Although Struckmeier and Reiser [1] showed that the stable oscillation frequencies of mismatched beams could be obtained accurately, they actually used a hybrid approach where {sigma}{sub 0} and {sigma} were already known precisely. When starting instead with basic quantities such as quadrupole dimensions, field strength, beam line charge density and emittance, the smooth approximation gives substantial errors. Here we derive a simple modification of the smooth approximation formula that improves the accuracy of the predicted frequencies by a factor of five at {sigma}{sub 0} = 83{sup o}.

  13. A multivariate CAR model for mismatched lattices.

    PubMed

    Porter, Aaron T; Oleson, Jacob J

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a multivariate Gaussian conditional autoregressive model for use on mismatched lattices. Most current multivariate CAR models are designed for each multivariate outcome to utilize the same lattice structure. In many applications, a change of basis will allow different lattices to be utilized, but this is not always the case, because a change of basis is not always desirable or even possible. Our multivariate CAR model allows each outcome to have a different neighborhood structure which can utilize different lattices for each structure. The model is applied in two real data analysis. The first is a Bayesian learning example in mapping the 2006 Iowa Mumps epidemic, which demonstrates the importance of utilizing multiple channels of infection flow in mapping infectious diseases. The second is a multivariate analysis of poverty levels and educational attainment in the American Community Survey. PMID:25457598

  14. Vehicle mismatch: injury patterns and severity.

    PubMed

    Acierno, S; Kaufman, R; Rivara, F P; Grossman, D C; Mock, C

    2004-09-01

    Light truck vehicles (LTV) are becoming more popular on US highways. This creates greater opportunity for collisions with passenger vehicles (PV). The mismatch in weight, stiffness, and height between LTV and PV has been surmised to result in increased fatalities among PV occupants when their vehicles collide with LTV. We reviewed cases of vehicle mismatch collisions in the Seattle Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) database to establish patterns and source of injury. Of the first 200 Seattle CIREN cases reviewed, 32 collisions with 41 occupant cases were found to involve LTV versus PV. The cases were reviewed by type of collision and vehicle of injured occupant: side impact of PV with LTV, front impact of PV with LTV, and front impact of LTV with PV. For each type of crash, injury patterns and mechanisms were identified. For side impact to PV, head and upper thorax injuries were frequently encountered due to LTV bumper frame contact above the PV side door reinforcement. For frontal impact to PV, severe multiple extremity fractures along with some head and chest injuries were caused by intrusion of the instrument panel and steering column due to bumper frame override of the LTV. Underriding of the PV when colliding with the LTV resulted in severe lower extremity fractures of the LTV occupant due to intrusion of the toe pan into the vehicle compartment of the LTV. The injuries and the sources identified in this case series support the need for re-designing both LTV and PV to improve vehicle compatibility. Revising Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 214 to reinforce the entire door, consider adding side airbags, and re-engineering LTV bumpers and/or frame heights and PV front ends are possible ways to reduce these injuries and deaths by making the vehicles more compatible. PMID:15203353

  15. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-04-20

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5'-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  16. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  17. Educational Mismatch of Graduates: A Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betti, Gianni; D'Agostino, Antonella; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to measure the educational mismatch, seen as a problem of overeducation, using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Educational mismatch can be difficult to measure because many factors can converge to its definition and the traditional unidimensional indicators presented in literature can offer a restricted view of…

  18. Mechanisms in E. coli and Human Mismatch Repair (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Modrich, Paul

    2016-07-18

    DNA molecules are not completely stable, they are subject to chemical or photochemical damage and errors that occur during DNA replication resulting in mismatched base pairs. Through mechanistic studies Paul Modrich showed how replication errors are corrected by strand-directed mismatch repair in Escherichia coli and human cells.

  19. A periodic table of symmetric tandem mismatches in RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; McDowell, J A; Turner, D H

    1995-03-14

    The stabilities and structures of a series of RNA octamers containing symmetric tandem mismatches were studied by UV melting and imino proton NMR. The free energy increments for tandem mismatch formation are found to depend upon both mismatch sequence and adjacent base pairs. The observed sequence dependence of tandem mismatch stability is UGGU > GUUG > GAAG > or = AGGA > UUUU > CAAC > or = CUUC approximately UCCU approximately CCCC approximately ACCA approximately AAAA, and the closing base pair dependence is 5'G3'C > 5'C3'G > 5'U3'A approximately 5'A3'U. These results differ from expectations based on models used in RNA folding algorithms and from the sequence dependence observed for folding of RNA hairpins. Imino proton NMR results indicate the sequence dependence is partially due to hydrogen bonding within mismatches.

  20. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-11-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  1. Automated Adaptor Generation for Behavioral Mismatching Services Based on Pushdown Model Checking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Aoki, Toshiaki; Katayama, Takuya

    In this paper, we introduce an approach of service adaptation for behavior mismatching services using pushdown model checking. This approach uses pushdown systems as model of adaptors so that capturing non-regular behavior in service interactions is possible. Also, the use of pushdown model checking integrates adaptation and verification. This guarantees that an adaptor generated by our approach not only solves behavior mismatches but also satisfies usual verification properties if specified. Unlike conventional approaches, we do not count on specifications of adaptor contracts but take only information from behavior interfaces of services and perform fully automated adaptor generation. Three requirements relating to behavior mismatches, unbounded messages, and branchings are retrieved from behavior interfaces and used to build LTL properties for pushdown model checking. Properties for unbounded messages, i.e., messages sent and received arbitrary multiple times, are especially addressed since it characterizes non-regular behavior in service composition. This paper also shows some experimental results from a prototype tool and provides directions for building BPEL adaptors from behavior interface of generated adaptor. The results show that our approach does solve behavior mismatches and successfully capture non-regular behavior in service composition under the scale of real service applications.

  2. The contrasting structures of mismatched DNA sequences containing looped-out bases (bulges) and multiple mismatches (bubbles).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, A; Lilley, D M

    1989-09-12

    We have studied the structure and reactivities of two kinds of mismatched DNA sequences--unopposed bases, or bulges, and multiple mismatched pairs of bases. These were generated in a constant sequence environment, in relatively long DNA fragments, using a technique based on heteroduplex formation between sequences cloned into single-stranded M13 phage. The mismatched sequences were studied from two points of view, viz 1. The mobility of the fragments on gel electrophoresis in polyacrylamide was studied in order to examine possible bending of the DNA due to the presence of the mismatch defect. Such bending would constitute a global effect on the conformation of the molecule. 2. Sequences in and around the mismatches were studied using enzyme and chemical probes of DNA structure. This would reveal more local structural effects of the mismatched sequences. We observed that the structures of the bulges and the multiple mismatches appear to be fundamentally different. The bulged sequences exhibited a large gel retardation, consistent with a significant bending of the DNA at the bulge, and whose magnitude depends on the number of mismatched bases. The larger bulges were sensitive to cleavage by single-strand specific nucleases, and modified by diethyl pyrocarbonate (adenines) or osmium tetroxide (thymines) in a non-uniform way, suggesting that the bulges have a precise structure that leads to exposure of some, but not all, of the bases. In contrast the multiple mismatches ('bubbles') cause very much less bending of the DNA fragment in which they occur, and uniform patterns of chemical reactivity along the length of the mismatched sequences, suggesting a less well defined, and possibly flexible, structure. The precise structure of the bulges suggests that such features may be especially significant for recognition by proteins.

  3. Mammalian cells defective in DNA mismatch correction

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, P.; Aquilina, G.; Hess, P.

    1994-12-31

    Mammalian cells counteract the cytotoxicity of methylating agents, including some used in antitumor chemotherapy, by removing the methylated base, O{sup 6}-methylguanine (O{sup 6}-meG) from their DNA. This removal is normally effected by a specific DNA repair enzyme (O{sup 6}-meG-DNA methyltransferase) that is expressed constitutively. In addition, an alternative type of resistance to methylating agents can be acquired after exposure of cells to the drug. This acquired resistance is highly specific for O{sup 6}-meG and is unusual in that alkylation of DNA is normal and there is no increase in the rate of repair of O{sup 6}-meG or any other damaged base. Instead, the cell is able to tolerate the presence of the usually cytotoxic O{sup 6}-meG and to replicate its DNA normally. The ambiguity of base pairing by O{sup 6}-meG and the observation that tolerant cells are also cross-resistant to the structurally similar 6-thioguanine in DNA has led to the suggestion that the cytotoxicity of O{sup 6}-meG (and 6-thioguanine) arises from ineffective attempts at DNA mismatch correction. This model postulates that tolerance arises as a consequence of loss of this important pathway.

  4. Determination of sensor oversize for stereo-pair mismatch compensation and image stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Prajit

    2013-03-01

    Stereoscopic cameras consist of two camera modules that in theory are mounted parallel to each other at a fixed distance along a single plane. Practical tolerances in the manufacturing and assembly process can, however, cause mismatches in the relative orientation of the modules. One solution to this problem is to design sensors that image a larger field-of-view than is necessary to meet system specifications. This requires the computation of the sensor oversize needed to compensate for the various types of mismatch. This work presents a mathematical framework to determine these oversize values for mismatch along each of the six degrees of freedom. One module is considered as the reference and the extreme rays of the field-of-view of the second sensor are traced in order to derive equations for the required horizontal and vertical oversize. As a further application, by modeling user hand-shake as the displacement of the sensor from its intended position, these deterministic equations could be used to estimate the sensor oversize required to stabilize images that are captured using cell phones.

  5. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction base on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongzhou, Dong; Guoqiang, Li; Ruofu, Yang; Chunping, Yang; Mingwu, Ao

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  6. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  7. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  8. Polarizing keys prevent mismatch of connector plugs and receptacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiapuzio, A.

    1966-01-01

    Keying prevents mismatching of plugs and receptacles in connector patching of instrumentation involving several thousand leads. Each receptacle and plug contains three polarizing keys that must mate in a complementary mode before the connector pins and sockets will engage.

  9. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction based on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongzhou; Li, Guoqiang; Yang, Ruofu; Yang, Chunping; Ao, Mingwu

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  10. Deficient mismatch repair: Read all about it (Review).

    PubMed

    Richman, Susan

    2015-10-01

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, result in a phenotype called microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in up to 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers. Approximately one quarter of colon cancers with deficient MMR (dMMR) develop as a result of an inherited predisposition syndrome, Lynch syndrome (formerly known as HNPCC). It is essential to identify patients who potentially have Lynch syndrome, as not only they, but also family members, may require screening and monitoring. Diagnostic criteria have been developed, based primarily on Western populations, and several methodologies are available to identify dMMR tumours, including immunohistochemistry and microsatellite testing. These criteria have provided evidence supporting the introduction of reflex testing. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that tests have a limited sensitivity and specificity and may yet be superseded by next generation sequencing. In this review, the limitations of diagnostic criteria are discussed, and current and emerging screening technologies explained. There is now useful evidence supporting the prognostic and predictive value of dMMR status in colorectal tumours, but much less is known about their value in extracolonic tumours, that may also feature in Lynch syndrome. This review assesses current literature relating to dMMR in endometrial, ovarian, gastric and melanoma cancers, which it would seem, may benefit from large-scale clinical trials in order to further close the gap in knowledge between colorectal and extracolonic tumours. PMID:26315971

  11. Deficient mismatch repair: Read all about it (Review)

    PubMed Central

    RICHMAN, SUSAN

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, result in a phenotype called microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in up to 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers. Approximately one quarter of colon cancers with deficient MMR (dMMR) develop as a result of an inherited predisposition syndrome, Lynch syndrome (formerly known as HNPCC). It is essential to identify patients who potentially have Lynch syndrome, as not only they, but also family members, may require screening and monitoring. Diagnostic criteria have been developed, based primarily on Western populations, and several methodologies are available to identify dMMR tumours, including immunohistochemistry and microsatellite testing. These criteria have provided evidence supporting the introduction of reflex testing. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that tests have a limited sensitivity and specificity and may yet be superseded by next generation sequencing. In this review, the limitations of diagnostic criteria are discussed, and current and emerging screening technologies explained. There is now useful evidence supporting the prognostic and predictive value of dMMR status in colorectal tumours, but much less is known about their value in extracolonic tumours, that may also feature in Lynch syndrome. This review assesses current literature relating to dMMR in endometrial, ovarian, gastric and melanoma cancers, which it would seem, may benefit from large-scale clinical trials in order to further close the gap in knowledge between colorectal and extracolonic tumours. PMID:26315971

  12. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  13. Single base mismatch detection by microsecond voltage pulses.

    PubMed

    Fixe, F; Chu, V; Prazeres, D M F; Conde, J P

    2005-12-15

    A single square voltage pulse applied to metal electrodes underneath a silicon dioxide film upon which DNA probes are immobilized allows the discrimination of DNA targets with a single base mismatch during hybridization. Pulse duration, magnitude and slew rate of the voltage pulse are all key factors controlling the rates of electric field assisted hybridization. Although pulses with 1 V, lasting less than 1 ms and with a rise/fall times of 4.5 ns led to maximum hybridization of fully complementary strands, lack of stringency did not allow the discrimination of single base mismatches. However, by choosing pulse conditions that are slightly off the optimum, the selectivity for discriminating single base mismatches could be improved up to a factor approximately 5 when the mismatch was in the middle of the strand and up to approximately 1.5 when the mismatch was on the 5'-end and. These results demonstrate that hybridization with the appropriate electric field pulse provides a new, site-specific, approach to the discrimination of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sub-millisecond time scale, for addressable DNA microarrays. PMID:16257657

  14. Controllable Mismatched Ligation for Bioluminescence Screening of Known and Unknown Mutations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinfeng; Huang, Si-qiang; Ma, Fei; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2016-02-16

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are closely related to human diseases and individual drug responses, and the accurate detection of SNPs is crucial to both clinical diagnosis and development of personalized medicine. Among various SNPs detection methods, ligase detection reaction (LDR) has shown great potential due to its low detection limit and excellent specificity. However, frequent involvement of expensive labels increases the experimental cost and compromises the assay efficiency, and the requirement of careful predesigned probes limits it to only known SNPs assays. In this research, we develop a controllable mismatched ligation for bioluminescence screening of both known and unknown mutations. Especially, the ligation specificity of E. coli ligase is tunable under different experimental conditions. The mismatches locating on the 3'-side of the nick cannot be ligated efficiently by E. coli ligase, whereas all mismatches locating on the 5'-side of the nick can be ligated efficiently by E. coli ligase. We design a 3'-discriminating probe (3'-probe) for the discrimination of known mutation and introduce a T7 Endo I for the detection of unknown mutation. With the integration of bioluminescence monitoring of ligation byproduct adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), both known and unknown SNPs can be easily detected without the involvement of any expensive labels and labor-intensive separation. This method is simple, homogeneous, label-free, and cost-effective and may provide a valuable complement to current sequencing technologies for disease diagnostics, personalized medicine, and biomedical research. PMID:26754165

  15. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  16. High fitness costs of climate change-induced camouflage mismatch.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L Scott; Nowak, J Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has created myriad stressors that threaten to cause local extinctions if wild populations fail to adapt to novel conditions. We studied individual and population-level fitness costs of a climate change-induced stressor: camouflage mismatch in seasonally colour molting species confronting decreasing snow cover duration. Based on field measurements of radiocollared snowshoe hares, we found strong selection on coat colour molt phenology, such that animals mismatched with the colour of their background experienced weekly survival decreases up to 7%. In the absence of adaptive response, we show that these mortality costs would result in strong population-level declines by the end of the century. However, natural selection acting on wide individual variation in molt phenology might enable evolutionary adaptation to camouflage mismatch. We conclude that evolutionary rescue will be critical for hares and other colour molting species to keep up with climate change.

  17. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  18. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  19. Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses

    SciTech Connect

    Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S.; de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-07-15

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

  20. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  1. Neighboring extremal optimal control design including model mismatch errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.J.; Hull, D.G.

    1994-11-01

    The mismatch control technique that is used to simplify model equations of motion in order to determine analytic optimal control laws is extended using neighboring extremal theory. The first variation optimal control equations are linearized about the extremal path to account for perturbations in the initial state and the final constraint manifold. A numerical example demonstrates that the tuning procedure inherent in the mismatch control method increases the performance of the controls to the level of a numerically-determined piecewise-linear controller.

  2. Distinct structural alterations in PCNA block DNA mismatch repair†

    PubMed Central

    Dieckman, Lynne M.; Boehm, Elizabeth M.; Hingorani, Manju M.; Washington, M. Todd

    2013-01-01

    During DNA replication, mismatches and small loops in the DNA resulting from insertions or deletions are repaired by the mismatch repair (MMR) machinery. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in both mismatch-recognition and resynthesis stages of MMR. Previously, two mutant forms of PCNA were identified that cause defects in MMR with little, if any, other defects. The C22Y mutant PCNA protein completely blocks MutSα-dependent MMR, and the C81R mutant PCNA protein partially blocks both MutSα-dependent and MutSβ-dependent MMR. In order to understand the structural and mechanistic basis by which these two amino acid substitutions in PCNA proteins block MMR, we solved the X-ray crystal structures of both mutant proteins and carried out further biochemical studies. We found that these amino acid substitutions lead to subtle, distinct structural changes in PCNA. The C22Y substitution alters the positions of the α-helices lining the central hole of the PCNA ring, whereas the C81R substitution creates a distortion in an extended loop near the PCNA subunit interface. We conclude that the structural integrity of the α-helices lining the central hole and this loop are both necessary to form productive complexes with MutS α and mismatch-containing DNA. PMID:23869605

  3. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  4. Minority Students and Research Universities: How to Overcome the "Mismatch"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A controversial theory much in the news lately claims that affirmative action is often unfair to the very students it is intended to help. Called the "mismatch" theory, it suggests that underrepresented minority students are more likely to leave science, math, and engineering when, because of affirmative action, they attend colleges for which they…

  5. Job Sprawl, Spatial Mismatch, and Black Employment Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between job sprawl and the spatial mismatch between blacks and jobs. Using data from a variety of sources, including the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census and U.S. Department of Commerce's ZIP Code Business Patterns, I control extensively for metropolitan area characteristics and other factors. In addition, I use…

  6. Skills Mismatch among University Graduates in the Nigeria Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitan, Oluyomi S.; Adedeji, S. O.

    2012-01-01

    University graduates in Nigeria have been reported to be poorly prepared for work in recent years. This has implications on the relevance of university education, the employability and productivity of university graduates. One of the reasons suggested for this condition by previous studies was skill mismatch--a situation where there is a disparity…

  7. Discriminating DNA mismatches by electrochemical and gravimetric techniques.

    PubMed

    Mazouz, Zouhour; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Ommezine, Asma; Rebhi, Lamia; Yaakoubi, Nourdin; Kalfat, Rafik; Othmane, Ali

    2013-10-15

    A silicon nitride functionalized electrode and a 104 MHz lithium tantalate (LiTaO₃) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor have been used to investigate target-probe recognition processes. Electrochemical and gravimetric measurements have been considered to monitor hybridization of single base mismatch (SBM) in synthetic oligonucleotides and single-nucleotide polymorphisms ApoE in real clinical genotypes. Obvious discrimination of SBM in nucleotides has been shown by both gravimetric and electrochemical techniques, without labeling nor amplification. Investigations on mismatches nature and position have also been considered. For guanine-adenine (GA), guanine-thymine (GT) and guanine-guanine (GG) mismatches, the sensors responses present a dependence upon positions. Considering the capacitance variations and hybridization rates, results showed that gravimetric transduction is more sensitive than electrochemical one. Moreover, the highest value of GT hybridization rate (in the middle position) was found in accordance with the nearest-neighbor model, where the considered configuration appears as the most thermodynamically stable. For the real samples, where the electrochemical transduction, by combining capacitance and flat-band potential measurements, were found more sensitive, the results show that the realized sensor permits an unambiguous discrimination of recognition between fully complementary, non-complementary and single base mismatched targets, and even between the combination of differently matched strands.

  8. Educational Mismatch and Spatial Flexibility in Italian Local Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, Giuseppe; Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent literature, this paper highlights the relevance of spatial mobility as an explanatory factor of the individual risk of job-education mismatch. To investigate this causal link, we use individual information about daily home-to-work commuting time and choices to relocate in a different local area to get a job. Our model takes…

  9. Absolute gain measurement of microstrip antennas under mismatched conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Baddour, M. F.

    1988-01-01

    The gain of a single microstrip patch and a two-layer parasitic array is measured using the image method under mismatched conditions. This method produces accurate results, even in the case of low-gain microstrip antennas. The advantages of this method over the gain comparison technique are discussed.

  10. DNA mismatch repair: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Peggy

    2012-09-14

    In this issue, Peña-Diaz et al. (2012) describe a pathway for somatic mutation in nonlymphoid cells termed noncanonical DNA mismatch repair, whereby the error-prone translesion polymerase Pol-η substitutes for high-fidelity replicative polymerases to resynthesize excised regions opposite DNA damage. PMID:22980456

  11. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors. PMID:25711864

  12. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  13. Roles for mismatch repair family proteins in promoting meiotic crossing over.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Carol M; Alani, Eric

    2016-02-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) family complexes Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 act with Exo1 and Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 in a meiotic double strand break repair pathway that results in the asymmetric cleavage of double Holliday junctions (dHJ) to form crossovers. This review discusses how meiotic roles for Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 do not fit paradigms established for post-replicative MMR. We also outline models used to explain how these factors promote the formation of meiotic crossovers required for the accurate segregation of chromosome homologs during the Meiosis I division.

  14. US protected lands mismatch biodiversity priorities

    PubMed Central

    Pimm, Stuart L.; Sexton, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    Because habitat loss is the main cause of extinction, where and how much society chooses to protect is vital for saving species. The United States is well positioned economically and politically to pursue habitat conservation should it be a societal goal. We assessed the US protected area portfolio with respect to biodiversity in the country. New synthesis maps for terrestrial vertebrates, freshwater fish, and trees permit comparison with protected areas to identify priorities for future conservation investment. Although the total area protected is substantial, its geographic configuration is nearly the opposite of patterns of endemism within the country. Most protected lands are in the West, whereas the vulnerable species are largely in the Southeast. Private land protections are significant, but they are not concentrated where the priorities are. To adequately protect the nation’s unique biodiversity, we recommend specific areas deserving additional protection, some of them including public lands, but many others requiring private investment. PMID:25847995

  15. US protected lands mismatch biodiversity priorities.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Clinton N; Van Houtan, Kyle S; Pimm, Stuart L; Sexton, Joseph O

    2015-04-21

    Because habitat loss is the main cause of extinction, where and how much society chooses to protect is vital for saving species. The United States is well positioned economically and politically to pursue habitat conservation should it be a societal goal. We assessed the US protected area portfolio with respect to biodiversity in the country. New synthesis maps for terrestrial vertebrates, freshwater fish, and trees permit comparison with protected areas to identify priorities for future conservation investment. Although the total area protected is substantial, its geographic configuration is nearly the opposite of patterns of endemism within the country. Most protected lands are in the West, whereas the vulnerable species are largely in the Southeast. Private land protections are significant, but they are not concentrated where the priorities are. To adequately protect the nation's unique biodiversity, we recommend specific areas deserving additional protection, some of them including public lands, but many others requiring private investment.

  16. A Computational Model for Biomechanical Effects of Arterial Compliance Mismatch.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Hua, Lu; Gao, Li-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Compliance mismatch is a negative factor and it needs to be considered in arterial bypass grafting. Objective. A computational model was employed to investigate the effects of arterial compliance mismatch on blood flow, wall stress, and deformation. Methods. The unsteady blood flow was assumed to be laminar, Newtonian, viscous, and incompressible. The vessel wall was assumed to be linear elastic, isotropic, and incompressible. The fluid-wall interaction scheme was constructed using the finite element method. Results. The results show that there are identical wall shear stress waveforms, wall stress, and strain waveforms at different locations. The comparison of the results demonstrates that wall shear stresses and wall strains are higher while wall stresses are lower at the more compliant section. The differences promote the probability of intimal thickening at some locations. Conclusions. The model is effective and gives satisfactory results. It could be extended to all kinds of arteries with complicated geometrical and material factors. PMID:27019580

  17. Enhanced densification of metal powders by transformation-mismatch plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Schuh, C.; Noel, P.; Dunand, D.C.

    2000-05-11

    The densification of titanium powders is investigated in uniaxial die pressing experiments carried out isothermally at 980 C (in the {beta}-field of titanium) and during thermal cycling between 860 and 980 C (about the {alpha}/{beta} phase transformation of titanium). Thermal cycling is found to enhance densification kinetics through the emergence of transformation-mismatch plasticity (the mechanism responsible for transformation superplasticity) as a densification mechanism. The isothermal hot-pressing data compare favorably with existing models of powder densification, and these models are successfully adapted to the case of transformation-mismatch plasticity during thermal cycling. Similar conclusions are reached for the densification of titanium powders containing 1, 5, or 10 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} particles. However, the addition of ZrO{sub 2} hinders densification by dissolving in the titanium matrix during the hot-pressing procedure.

  18. Phenotypic Mismatches Reveal Escape from Arms-Race Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-01-01

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were “ahead” of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race. PMID:18336073

  19. Phenotypic mismatches reveal escape from arms-race coevolution.

    PubMed

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-03-11

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were "ahead" of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race.

  20. Effect of ABO blood group mismatching on corneal epithelial cells: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, J.; Dua, H.; Powell-Richards, A.; Jones, D; Harris, I.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To determine, in vitro, the effects of blood group ABO mismatching on corneal epithelial cells.
METHODS—Corneal epithelial cell cultures were established from 32 human cadaver donor eyes. Epithelial cells (100 µl of 4 × 102 cells per µl) were incubated for 4 hours with antibodies against blood group antigens A, B, and AB, with and without complement. Cell lysis was assayed by a chemiluminescent assay using Cytolite reagent. Live cells, remaining after incubation, were counted in a scintillation counter. The blood group of the donors was determined retrospectively, in a blinded manner.
RESULTS—Retrospective tracing of donor blood groups was possible for 20 donors. In all cases the blood group corresponded with that suggested by the cell lysis assay. Significant cell lysis was observed when known A group cells were incubated with anti-A and anti-AB antibody, B group cells were incubated with anti-B and AB antibody, and AB group cells were incubated with anti-AB antibody. Lysis occurred only in the presence of complement. No lysis of O group cells was observed with any of the antibodies. In all cases, lysis was observed only with neat (serum) antibody concentrations.
CONCLUSIONS—Blood group ABO mismatching results in significant lysis of corneal epithelial cells. The antibody concentration required for lysis equals that found in serum. Such levels of antibody are unlikely to be achieved in tears and/or aqueous. This may offer an explanation for the conflicting reports of the studies on the effect of blood group matching on corneal grafts. The variability in the outcome may reflect the levels of antibodies gaining access to the corneal cells and not the mismatching alone.

 PMID:11520765

  1. Semiblind Hyperspectral Unmixing in the Presence of Spectral Library Mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Ma, Wing-Kin; Bioucas-Dias, Jose M.; Chan, Tsung-Han

    2016-09-01

    The dictionary-aided sparse regression (SR) approach has recently emerged as a promising alternative to hyperspectral unmixing (HU) in remote sensing. By using an available spectral library as a dictionary, the SR approach identifies the underlying materials in a given hyperspectral image by selecting a small subset of spectral samples in the dictionary to represent the whole image. A drawback with the current SR developments is that an actual spectral signature in the scene is often assumed to have zero mismatch with its corresponding dictionary sample, and such an assumption is considered too ideal in practice. In this paper, we tackle the spectral signature mismatch problem by proposing a dictionary-adjusted nonconvex sparsity-encouraging regression (DANSER) framework. The main idea is to incorporate dictionary correcting variables in an SR formulation. A simple and low per-iteration complexity algorithm is tailor-designed for practical realization of DANSER. Using the same dictionary correcting idea, we also propose a robust subspace solution for dictionary pruning. Extensive simulations and real-data experiments show that the proposed method is effective in mitigating the undesirable spectral signature mismatch effects.

  2. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  3. Current status of the Scandiatransplant acceptable mismatch program.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, I D; Pedersen, F; Grunnet, N

    2013-04-01

    This article describes the Scandiatransplant Acceptable Mismatch Program (STAMP), which was set into action in 2009. The aim of STAMP is to define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) toward which the potential kidney recipient has not developed antibodies, as "acceptable mismatches" in the Scandiatransplant database. In many cases this may improve the probability for a highly immunized recipient to receive a suitable kidney graft from a deceased donor. Using data extracted from the Scandiatransplant database on the outcomes of the program after the first 3 years, 31/115 recipients included in the program have undergone transplantation. From 2008 to 2011 the mean waiting time for highly immunized patients has decreased from 42 to 37 months. Continuous evaluation and follow-up of the program is essential to improve the procedures and outcomes. Calculation of transplantability based on a given set of acceptable mismatches was added to the program in 2011, based on the historical deceased donor pool providing the possibility of a specific patient to receive a kidney through STAMP. It is still a challenge for the tissue typing laboratories to determine which detected HLA antibodies are clinical relevant. We concluded that STAMP has had the intended effects, however adjustments and improvements is an ongoing process. As an improvment of the program HLA-C was added to the STAMP search algorithm in September 2012.

  4. Insertion and Deletion Mismatches Distant from the Target Position Improve Gene Correction with a Tailed Duplex.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Natsuki; Ikeda, Akihiro; Yukawa, Seiya; Morita, Yukiko; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-01

    A 5'-tailed duplex (TD) DNA corrects a base-substitution mutation. In this study, the effects of insertion and deletion (indel) mismatches distant from the target position on the gene correction were examined. Three target plasmid DNAs with and without indel mismatches ∼330 bases distant from the correction target position were prepared, and introduced into HeLa cells together with the TD. The indel mismatches improved the gene correction efficiency and specificity without sequence conversions at the indel mismatch site. These results suggested that the gene correction efficiency and specificity are increased when an appropriate second mismatch is introduced into the TD fragment. PMID:27253876

  5. On compensation of mismatched recording conditions in the Bayesian approach for forensic automatic speaker recognition.

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Alexander, A; Drygajlo, A

    2004-12-01

    This paper deals with a procedure to compensate for mismatched recording conditions in forensic speaker recognition, using a statistical score normalization. Bayesian interpretation of the evidence in forensic automatic speaker recognition depends on three sets of recordings in order to perform forensic casework: reference (R) and control (C) recordings of the suspect, and a potential population database (P), as well as a questioned recording (QR) . The requirement of similar recording conditions between suspect control database (C) and the questioned recording (QR) is often not satisfied in real forensic cases. The aim of this paper is to investigate a procedure of normalization of scores, which is based on an adaptation of the Test-normalization (T-norm) [2] technique used in the speaker verification domain, to compensate for the mismatch. Polyphone IPSC-02 database and ASPIC (an automatic speaker recognition system developed by EPFL and IPS-UNIL in Lausanne, Switzerland) were used in order to test the normalization procedure. Experimental results for three different recording condition scenarios are presented using Tippett plots and the effect of the compensation on the evaluation of the strength of the evidence is discussed.

  6. Distinct patterns of Cas9 mismatch tolerance in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Becky X.H.; St. Onge, Robert P.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Smith, Justin D.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9, a CRISPR-associated RNA-guided nuclease, has been rapidly adopted as a tool for biochemical and genetic manipulation of DNA. Although complexes between Cas9 and guide RNAs (gRNAs) offer remarkable specificity and versatility for genome manipulation, mis-targeted events occur. To extend the understanding of gRNA::target homology requirements, we compared mutational tolerance for a set of Cas9::gRNA complexes in vitro and in vivo (in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). A variety of gRNAs were tested with variant libraries based on four different targets (with varying GC content and sequence features). In each case, we challenged a mixture of matched and mismatched targets, evaluating cleavage activity on a wide variety of potential target sequences in parallel through high-throughput sequencing of the products retained after cleavage. These experiments evidenced notable and consistent differences between in vitro and S. cerevisiae (in vivo) Cas9 cleavage specificity profiles including (i) a greater tolerance for mismatches in vitro and (ii) a greater specificity increase in vivo with truncation of the gRNA homology regions. PMID:27198218

  7. A multitask sliding mode control for mismatched uncertain large-scale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yao-Wen; Van Huynh, Van

    2015-09-01

    A new sliding mode control (SMC) approach, output variables only, single phase only and chattering phenomenon free, is presented for a class of mismatched uncertain large-scale systems. For a new multitask SMC, it is not required that the system states are available. Moreover, the sliding function in this study just depends on output variables. Using an exponential type sliding surface, the system states are always in the sliding mode at the beginning time t = 0. Using a newly appropriate linear matrix inequality stability conditions by the Lyapunov method are derived such that each subsystem in the new sliding mode is completely invariant to matched uncertainties. As a result, robustness of the mismatched uncertain large-scale systems can be assured throughout an entire response of the system starting from the initial time t = 0. In every subsystem, a scheme of decentralised control using only output states is proposed. In addition, a continuous controller is finally designed for chattering removal. Finally, a numerical example is used to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method.

  8. LNA modification of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides allows subtle gene modification in mismatch-repair-proficient cells

    PubMed Central

    van Ravesteyn, Thomas W.; Dekker, Marleen; Fish, Alexander; Sixma, Titia K.; Wolters, Astrid; Dekker, Rob J.; te Riele, Hein P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to generate subtle genetic modifications in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells without the requirement for prior generation of DNA double-stranded breaks. However, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) suppresses the efficiency of gene modification by >100-fold. Here we present a commercially available ssODN design that evades MMR and enables subtle gene modification in MMR-proficient cells. The presence of locked nucleic acids (LNAs) in the ssODNs at mismatching bases, or also at directly adjacent bases, allowed 1-, 2-, or 3-bp substitutions in MMR-proficient mouse embryonic stem cells as effectively as in MMR-deficient cells. Additionally, in MMR-proficient Escherichia coli, LNA modification of the ssODNs enabled effective single-base-pair substitution. In vitro, LNA modification of mismatches precluded binding of purified E. coli MMR protein MutS. These findings make ssODN-directed gene modification particularly well suited for applications that require the evaluation of a large number of sequence variants with an easy selectable phenotype. PMID:26951689

  9. Skill (Mis-)Matches and Over-Education of Younger Workers. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Chris; Sinning, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Younger workers, particularly those entering the workforce at ages 25-34 years, are more educated than ever before. The potential for these workers to be over-educated in their jobs might therefore be high. But does it follow that they are mismatched to the skill requirements of their jobs? This study examines the link between over-education and…

  10. Climate change can cause spatial mismatch of trophically interacting species.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Oliver; Settele, Josef; Kudrna, Otakar; Klotz, Stefan; Kühn, Ingolf

    2008-12-01

    Climate change is one of the most influential drivers of biodiversity. Species-specific differences in the reaction to climate change can become particularly important when interacting species are considered. Current studies have evidenced temporal mismatching of interacting species at single points in space, and recently two investigations showed that species interactions are relevant for their future ranges. However, so far we are not aware that the ranges of interacting species may become substantially spatially mismatched. We developed separate ecological-niche models for a monophagous butterfly (Boloria titania) and its larval host plant (Polygonum bistorta) based on monthly interpolated climate data, land-cover classes, and soil data at a 10'-grid resolution. We show that all of three chosen global-change scenarios, which cover a broad range of potential developments in demography, socio-economics, and technology during the 21st century from moderate to intermediate to maximum change, will result in a pronounced spatial mismatch between future niche spaces of these species. The butterfly may expand considerably its future range (by 124-258%) if the host plant has unlimited dispersal, but it could lose 52-75% of its current range if the host plant is not able to fill its projected ecological niche space, and 79-88% if the butterfly also is assumed to be highly dispersal limited. These findings strongly suggest that climate change has the potential to disrupt trophic interactions because co-occurring species do not necessarily react in a similar manner to global change, having important consequences at ecological and evolutionary time scales.

  11. Evolutionary mismatch, neural reward circuits, and pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Marcello

    2003-04-01

    Evolutionary mismatch theory has been applied to disorders of self-regulation such as maladaptive eating patterns and drug abuse. Modern gambling represents a refinement of the elements of risk and chance, which draw upon the faculties of judgment and novelty-seeking. A set of neuroanatomical structures, including prefrontal-subcortical systems and associated limbic structures, have been implicated in the processing of reward and punishment, including gambling-related situations. Neurobiological systems guiding choice and behavior have evolved to maximize chances for survival under hunter-gatherer conditions, and modern gambling represents an abrupt departure from these circumstances, sometimes resulting in pathological gambling.

  12. Gene-environment mismatch in decompression sickness and air embolism.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Joe; Brainard, Andrew H

    2010-08-01

    Decompression sickness causes injury and death in SCUBA divers when air bubbles obstruct the flow of blood. Platelets aggregate in response to gas and promote inflammation. Inflammation in decompression sickness may have its origin in the innate immune system's response to pathogens. Bubbles are often found in tissues during gas-forming infections and in infection-prone states. In these diseases, intravascular gas offers a signal of infection to immune cells. Platelet activation by gas may often accompany a beneficial immune response to pathogens. Pathologic bubble-platelet interaction in decompression illness may be an example of gene-environment mismatch.

  13. Optimal control design that accounts for model mismatch errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.J.; Hull, D.G.

    1995-02-01

    A new technique is presented in this paper that reduces the complexity of state differential equations while accounting for modeling assumptions. The mismatch controls are defined as the differences between the model equations and the true state equations. The performance index of the optimal control problem is formulated with a set of tuning parameters that are user-selected to tune the control solution in order to achieve the best results. Computer simulations demonstrate that the tuned control law outperforms the untuned controller and produces results that are comparable to a numerically-determined, piecewise-linear optimal controller.

  14. Single-mismatch detection using gold-quenched fluorescent oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dubertret, B; Calame, M; Libchaber, A J

    2001-04-01

    Here we describe a hybrid material composed of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecule, a 1.4 nm diameter gold nanoparticle, and a fluorophore that is highly quenched by the nanoparticle through a distance-dependent process. The fluorescence of this hybrid molecule increases by a factor of as much as several thousand as it binds to a complementary ssDNA. We show that this composite molecule is a different type of molecular beacon with a sensitivity enhanced up to 100-fold. In competitive hybridization assays, the ability to detect single mismatch is eightfold greater with this probe than with other molecular beacons.

  15. HLA-C expression levels define permissible mismatches in hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Malkki, Mari; Bacigalupo, Andrea P.; Cesbron, Anne; Du Toit, Ernette; Ehninger, Gerhard; Egeland, Torstein; Fischer, Gottfried F.; Gervais, Thibaut; Haagenson, Michael D.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hsu, Katharine; Jindra, Pavel; Madrigal, Alejandro; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Ringdén, Olle; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Velardi, Andrea; Witt, Campbell S.; O’Huigin, Colm; Apps, Richard; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) limits the use of HLA-C-mismatched unrelated donors in transplantation. Clinicians lack criteria for donor selection when HLA-C-mismatched donors are a patient’s only option for cure. We examined the role for HLA-C expression levels to identify permissible HLA-C mismatches. The median fluorescence intensity, a proxy of HLA-C expression, was assigned to each HLA-C allotype in 1975 patients and their HLA-C-mismatched unrelated transplant donors. The association of outcome with the level of expression of patients’ and donors’ HLA-C allotypes was evaluated in multivariable models. Increasing expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype was associated with increased risks of grades III to IV acute GVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and mortality. Increasing expression level among HLA-C mismatches with residue 116 or residue 77/80 mismatching was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality. The immunogenicity of HLA-C mismatches in unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by the expression level of the patient’s mismatched HLA-C allotype. HLA-C expression levels provide new information on mismatches that should be avoided and extend understanding of HLA-C-mediated immune responses in human disease. PMID:25323824

  16. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  17. DNA bending propensity in the presence of base mismatches: implications for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Predeus, Alexander V; Mukherjee, Shayantani; Feig, Michael

    2013-05-23

    DNA bending is believed to facilitate the initial recognition of the mismatched base for repair. The repair efficiencies are dependent on both the mismatch type and neighboring nucleotide sequence. We have studied bending of several DNA duplexes containing canonical matches: A:T and G:C; various mismatches: A:A, A:C, G:A, G:G, G:T, C:C, C:T, and T:T; and a bis-abasic site: X:X. Free-energy profiles were generated for DNA bending using umbrella sampling. The highest energetic cost associated with DNA bending is observed for canonical matches while bending free energies are lower in the presence of mismatches, with the lowest value for the abasic site. In all of the sequences, DNA duplexes bend toward the major groove with widening of the minor groove. For homoduplexes, DNA bending is observed to occur via smooth deformations, whereas for heteroduplexes, kinks are observed at the mismatch site during strong bending. In general, pyrimidine:pyrimidine mismatches are the most destabilizing, while purine:purine mismatches lead to intermediate destabilization, and purine:pyrimidine mismatches are the least destabilizing. The ease of bending is partially correlated with the binding affinity of MutS to the mismatch pairs and subsequent repair efficiencies, indicating that intrinsic DNA bending propensities are a key factor of mismatch recognition.

  18. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-Ping; Tao, Lu-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  19. Emotional Intelligence and Mismatching Expressive and Verbal Messages: A Contribution to Detection of Deception

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Jerzy; Stolarski, Maciej; Matthews, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI). However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test) that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception. PMID:24658500

  20. Effects of detector efficiency mismatch on security of quantum cryptosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vadim; Anisimov, Andrey; Skaar, Johannes

    2006-08-15

    We suggest a type of attack on quantum cryptosystems that exploits variations in detector efficiency as a function of a control parameter accessible to an eavesdropper. With gated single-photon detectors, this control parameter can be the timing of the incoming pulse. When the eavesdropper sends short pulses using the appropriate timing so that the two gated detectors in Bob's setup have different efficiencies, the security of quantum key distribution can be compromised. Specifically, we show for the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) protocol that if the efficiency mismatch between 0 and 1 detectors for some value of the control parameter gets large enough (roughly 15:1 or larger), Eve can construct a successful faked-states attack causing a quantum bit error rate lower than 11%. We also derive a general security bound as a function of the detector sensitivity mismatch for the BB84 protocol. Experimental data for two different detectors are presented, and protection measures against this attack are discussed.

  1. Sorin Solo stentless valve: extended adaptability for sinotubular junction mismatch.

    PubMed

    Weltert, Luca; De Paulis, Ruggero; Maselli, Daniele; Scaffa, Raffaele

    2008-08-01

    Stentless valve continence is affected by the implantation technique, annular symmetry and dilatation of the sinotubular junction. We tested in vitro how the Sorin Solo stentless pericardial valve adapts to a slightly dilated sinotubular junction. Stentless Sorin Solo aortic valves (25 mm) were sutured into a 32-mm Valsalva graft suspending the commissures into the expandable region of the graft. The neo-aortic root was pressurized and sinotubular junction size progressively decreased by wrapping the neocommissural ridge with Dacron rings. Direct endoscopic view and ultrasound imaging were used to observe geometry and morphology of leaflets, regurgitation, height and level of leaflets coaptation. Fresh porcine valves of the same annular size were used as controls. Solo valves had mild regurgitation at baseline, became continent at 32 mm sinotubular junction size and remained continent at any size of reduction, with optimal coaptation height and level. Porcine valves had severe regurgitation at baseline, became continent at 30 mm and showed mild insufficiency and reduction of the coaptation level at a sinotubular junction of 28 mm. The Solo valve prevents residual valve regurgitation for a wider range of sinotubular junction mismatch when compared with natural porcine valves. This extended tolerance to sinotubular junction mismatch suggests a safe use of stentless valves even in suboptimal geometry roots.

  2. Visualization of mismatch repair complexes using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tobias T; Hombauer, Hans

    2016-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a surveillance mechanism present in most living organisms, which repairs errors introduced by DNA polymerases. Importantly, loss of MMR function due to inactivating mutations and/or epigenetic silencing results in the accumulation of mutations and as consequence increased cancer susceptibility, as observed in Lynch syndrome patients. During the past decades important progress has been made in the MMR field resulting in the identification and characterization of essential MMR components, culminating in the in vitro reconstitution of 5' and 3' nick-directed MMR. However, several mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction remain not fully understood, therefore alternative approaches and further investigations are needed. Recently, the use of imaging techniques and, more specifically, visualization of MMR components in living cells, has broadened our mechanistic understanding of the repair reaction providing more detailed information about the spatio-temporal organization of MMR in vivo. In this review we would like to comment on mechanistic aspects of the MMR reaction in light of these and other recent findings. Moreover, we will discuss the current limitations and provide future perspectives regarding imaging of mismatch repair components in diverse organisms. PMID:26725956

  3. The grain size of auditory mismatch response in speech perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Kuhl, Patricia; Imada, Toshiaki; Imada, Toshiaki; Kotani, Makoto

    2005-09-01

    This phonetic study examined neural encoding of within-and cross- category information as a function of language experience. Behavioral and magnetoencephalography (MEG) measures for synthetic /ba-wa/ and /ra-la/ stimuli were obtained from ten American and ten Japanese subjects. The MEG experiments employed the oddball paradigm in two conditions. One condition used single exemplars to represent the phonetic categories, and the other introduced within-category variations for both the standard and deviant stimuli. Behavioral results showed three major findings: (a) a robust phonetic boundary effect was observed only in the native listeners; (b) all listeners were able to detect within-category differences on an acoustic basis; and (c) both within- and cross- category discriminations were strongly influenced by language experience. Consistent with behavioral findings, American listeners had larger mismatch field (MMF) responses for /ra-la/ in both conditions but not for /ba-wa/ in either. Moreover, American listeners showed a significant MMF reduction in encoding within-category variations for /ba-wa/ but not for /ra-la/, and Japanese listeners had MMF reductions for both. These results strongly suggest that the grain size of auditory mismatch response is determined not only by experience-dependent phonetic knowledge, but also by the specific characteristics of speech stimuli. [Work supported by NIH.

  4. Predictable patterns of trait mismatches between interacting plants and insects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few predictions about the directionality or extent of morphological trait (mis)matches between interacting organisms. We review and analyse studies on morphological trait complementarity (e.g. floral tube length versus insect mouthpart length) at the population and species level. Results Plants have consistently more exaggerated morphological traits than insects at high trait magnitudes and in some cases less exaggerated traits than insects at smaller trait magnitudes. This result held at the population level, as well as for phylogenetically adjusted analyses at the species-level and for both pollination and host-parasite interactions, perhaps suggesting a general pattern. Across communities, the degree of trait mismatch between one specialist plant and its more generalized pollinator was related to the level of pollinator specialization at each site; the observed pattern supports the "life-dinner principle" of selection acting more strongly on species with more at stake in the interaction. Similarly, plant mating system also affected the degree of trait correspondence because selfing reduces the reliance on pollinators and is analogous to pollination generalization. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that there are predictable "winners" and "losers" of evolutionary arms races and the results of this study highlight the fact that breeding system and the degree of specialization can influence the outcome. PMID:20604973

  5. Hydrophobic mismatch in gramicidin A prime /lecithin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watnick, P.I.; Chan, S.I. ); Dea, P. )

    1990-07-03

    Gramicidin A{prime} (GA{prime}) has been added to three lipid systems of varying hydrophobic thickness: dimyristoyllecithin (DML), dipalmitoyllecithin (DPL), and distearoyllecithin (DSL). The similarity in length between the hydrophobic portion of GA{prime} and the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid bilayers has been studied by using {sup 31}P and {sup 2}H NMR. Hydrophobic mismatch has been found to be most severe in the DML bilayer system and minimal in the case of DSL. In addition, the effects of hydrophobic mismatch on the cooperative properties of the bilayer have been obtained from {sup 2}H NMR relaxation measurements. The results indicate that incorporation of the peptide into the bilayer disrupts the cooperative director fluctuations characteristic of pure multilamellar lipid dispersions. Finally, the GA{prime}/lecithin ratio at which the well-known transformation from bilayer to reverse hexagonal (H{sub II}) phase occurs is shown to depend on the acyl chain length of the phospholipid. A rationale is proposed for this chain length dependence.

  6. Systematic analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 mismatch tolerance reveals low levels of off-target activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Emily M; Haupt, Amanda; Schiel, John A; Chou, Eldon; Machado, Hidevaldo B; Strezoska, Žaklina; Lenger, Steve; McClelland, Shawn; Birmingham, Amanda; Vermeulen, Annaleen; Smith, Anja van Brabant

    2015-10-10

    The discovery that the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) acquired immune system can be utilized to create double-strand breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotic genomes has resulted in the ability to create genomic changes more easily than with other genome engineering techniques. While there is significant potential for the CRISPR-Cas9 system to advance basic and applied research, several unknowns remain, including the specificity of the RNA-directed DNA cleavage by the small targeting RNA, the CRISPR RNA (crRNA). Here we describe a novel synthetic RNA approach that allows for high-throughput gene editing experiments. This was used with a functional assay for protein disruption to perform high-throughput analysis of crRNA activity and specificity. We performed a comprehensive test of target cleavage using crRNAs that contain one and two nucleotide mismatches to the DNA target in the 20mer targeting region of the crRNA, allowing for the evaluation of hundreds of potential mismatched target sites without the requirement for the off-target sequences and their adjacent PAMs to be present in the genome. Our results demonstrate that while many crRNAs are functional, less than 5% of crRNAs with two mismatches to their target are effective in gene editing; this suggests an overall high level of functionality but low level of off-targeting.

  7. Mitotic crossovers between diverged sequences are regulated by mismatch repair proteins in Saccaromyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, A; Adjiri, A; New, L; Crouse, G F; Jinks Robertson, S

    1996-01-01

    Mismatch repair systems correct replication- and recombination-associated mispaired bases and influence the stability of simple repeats. These systems thus serve multiple roles in maintaining genetic stability in eukaryotes, and human mismatch repair defects have been associated with hereditary predisposition to cancer. In prokaryotes, mismatch repair systems also have been shown to limit recombination between diverged (homologous) sequences. We have developed a unique intron-based assay system to examine the effects of yeast mismatch repair genes (PMS1, MSH2, and MSH3) on crossovers between homologous sequences. We find that the apparent antirecombination effects of mismatch repair proteins in mitosis are related to the degree of substrate divergence. Defects in mismatch repair can elevate homologous recombination between 91% homologous substrates as much as 100-fold while having only modest effects on recombination between 77% homologous substrates. These observations have implications for genome stability and general mechanisms of recombination in eukaryotes. PMID:8622653

  8. Enlargement of mitral valve ring in a young woman with severe prosthesis-patient mismatch.

    PubMed

    Attisani, Matteo; Pellegrini, Augusto; Sorrentino, Paolo; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical prosthesis is the first choice for valve replacement at the mitral position in children. Replacement of the original prosthesis because of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is almost inevitable when prostheses are implanted in small children. The impact of PPM on long-term mortality becomes significant when the effective orifice area (EOA) is severely reduced. In these cases prosthesis replacement can be technically difficult, and it often requires extended enlargement of the mitral valve annulus ring. We report a case of a woman who underwent a mitral valve replacement with a 19-mm St. Jude mechanical prosthetic valve at the age of 3 years. At the age of 33 years, the patient underwent a successful minimally invasive mitral annulus ring enlargement and implantation of a 23-mm St. Jude mechanical prosthetic valve via a right minithoracotomy. PMID:24808442

  9. Lattice-mismatch-induced twinning for seeded growth of anisotropic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenni; Chen, Zhengzheng; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Haijun; Jin, Mingshang; Wu, Chao; Yang, Deren; Yin, Yadong

    2015-03-24

    Synthesis of anisotropic nanostructures from materials with isotropic crystal structures often requires the use of seeds containing twin planes to break the crystalline symmetry and promote the preferential anisotropic growth. Controlling twinning in seeds is therefore critically important for high-yield synthesis of many anisotropic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a unique strategy to induce twinning in metal nanostructures for anisotropic growth by taking advantage of the large lattice mismatch between two metals. By using Au-Cu as an example, we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that deposition of Cu to the surface of single-crystalline Au seeds can build up strain energy, which effectively induces the formation of twin planes. Subsequent seeded growth allows the production of Cu nanorods with high shape anisotropy that is unachievable without the use of Au seeds. This work provides an effective strategy for the preparation of anisotropic metal nanostructures. PMID:25744113

  10. Kinetics and binding of the thymine-DNA mismatch glycosylase, Mig-Mth, with mismatch-containing DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Begley, Thomas J; Haas, Brian J; Morales, Juan C; Kool, Eric T; Cunningham, Richard P

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the removal of thymine residues from T-G mismatches in DNA by the thymine-DNA mismatch glycosylase from Methanobacterium thermoautrophicum (Mig-Mth), within the context of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, to investigate why this glycosylase has such low activity in vitro. Using single-turnover kinetics and steady-state kinetics, we calculated the catalytic and product dissociation rate constants for Mig-Mth, and determined that Mig-Mth is inhibited by product apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) provide evidence that the specificity of product binding is dependent upon the base opposite the AP site. The binding of Mig-Mth to DNA containing the non-cleavable substrate analogue difluorotoluene (F) was also analyzed to determine the effect of the opposite base on Mig-Mth binding specificity for substrate-like duplex DNA. The results of these experiments support the idea that opposite strand interactions play roles in determining substrate specificity. Endonuclease IV, which cleaves AP sites in the next step of the BER pathway, was used to analyze the effect of product removal on the overall rate of thymine hydrolysis by Mig-Mth. Our results support the hypothesis that endonuclease IV increases the apparent activity of Mig-Mth significantly under steady-state conditions by preventing reassociation of enzyme to product. PMID:12509271

  11. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  12. Unconscious learning of auditory discrimination using mismatch negativity (MMN) neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Naruse, Yasushi; Ando, Hideyuki; Maeda, Taro

    2014-10-24

    Neurofeedback is a strong direct training method for brain function, wherein brain activity patterns are measured and displayed as feedback, and trainees try to stabilize the feedback signal onto certain desirable states to regulate their own mental states. Here, we introduce a novel neurofeedback method, using the mismatch negativity (MMN) responses elicited by similar sounds that cannot be consciously discriminated. Through neurofeedback training, without participants' attention to the auditory stimuli or awareness of what was to be learned, we found that the participants could unconsciously achieve a significant improvement in the auditory discrimination of the applied stimuli. Our method has great potential to provide effortless auditory perceptual training. Based on this method, participants do not need to make an effort to discriminate auditory stimuli, and can choose tasks of interest without boredom due to training. In particular, it could be used to train people to recognize speech sounds that do not exist in their native language and thereby facilitate foreign language learning.

  13. Is it time to move mismatch negativity into the clinic?

    PubMed

    Schall, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in the 1970s, the mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential has improved our understanding of pre-attentive detection of rule violations, which is a fundamental cognitive process considered by some a form of "primitive intelligence". The body of research to date ranges from animal studies (i.e. when investigating the neural mechanisms and pharmacological properties of MMN generation) to researching the psychophysiological nature of human consciousness. MMN therefore offers the possibility to detect abnormal functioning in the neural system involved in MMN generation, such as it occurs in some neurodevelopmental disorders or patients in vegetative state. While the clinical research data holds considerable promise for translation into clinical practice, standardization and normative data of an optimized (i.e. disorder-specific) MMN recording algorithm is needed in order for MMN to become a valuable clinical investigation tool.

  14. DNA mismatch repair gene mutations in human cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Peltomäki, P

    1997-01-01

    A new pathogenetic mechanism leading to cancer has been delineated in the past 3 years when human homologues of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have been identified and shown to be involved in various types of cancer. Germline mutations of MMR genes cause susceptibility to a hereditary form of colon cancer, hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), which represents one of the most common syndromes associated with cancer predisposition in man. Tumors from HNPCC patients are hypermutable and show length variation at short tandem repeat sequences, a phenomenon referred to as microsatellite instability or replication errors. A similar abnormality is found in a proportion of sporadic tumors of the colorectum as well as a variety of other organs; acquired mutations in MMR genes or other endogenous or exogenous causes may underlie these cases. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the functions of normal and mutated MMR genes elucidates mechanisms of cancer development and provides tools for diagnostic applications. PMID:9255561

  15. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  16. Deterministic coherence resonance in coupled chaotic oscillators with frequency mismatch.

    PubMed

    Pisarchik, A N; Jaimes-Reátegui, R

    2015-11-01

    A small mismatch between natural frequencies of unidirectionally coupled chaotic oscillators can induce coherence resonance in the slave oscillator for a certain coupling strength. This surprising phenomenon resembles "stabilization of chaos by chaos," i.e., the chaotic driving applied to the chaotic system makes its dynamics more regular when the natural frequency of the slave oscillator is a little different than the natural frequency of the master oscillator. The coherence is characterized with the dominant component in the power spectrum of the slave oscillator, normalized standard deviations of both the peak amplitude and the interpeak interval, and Lyapunov exponents. The enhanced coherence is associated with increasing negative both the third and the fourth Lyapunov exponents, while the first and second exponents are always positive and zero, respectively.

  17. Concentrative meditation enhances preattentive processing: a mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Narayanan; Baijal, Shruti

    2007-10-29

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigm that is an indicator of preattentive processing was used to study the effects of concentrative meditation. Sudarshan Kriya Yoga meditation is a yogic exercise practiced in an ordered sequence beginning with breathing exercises, and ending with concentrative (Sahaj Samadhi) meditation. Auditory MMN waveforms were recorded at the beginning and after each of these practices for meditators, and equivalently after relaxation sessions for the nonmeditators. Overall meditators were found to have larger MMN amplitudes than nonmeditators. The meditators also exhibited significantly increased MMN amplitudes immediately after meditation suggesting transient state changes owing to meditation. The results indicate that concentrative meditation practice enhances preattentive perceptual processes, enabling better change detection in auditory sensory memory.

  18. DNA mismatch repair: molecular mechanisms and biological function.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Mark J; Hsieh, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) guards the integrity of the genome in virtually all cells. It contributes about 1000-fold to the overall fidelity of replication and targets mispaired bases that arise through replication errors, during homologous recombination, and as a result of DNA damage. Cells deficient in MMR have a mutator phenotype in which the rate of spontaneous mutation is greatly elevated, and they frequently exhibit microsatellite instability at mono- and dinucleotide repeats. The importance of MMR in mutation avoidance is highlighted by the finding that defects in MMR predispose individuals to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. In addition to its role in postreplication repair, the MMR machinery serves to police homologous recombination events and acts as a barrier to genetic exchange between species. PMID:14527292

  19. Three perspectives on the mismatch between measures of material poverty.

    PubMed

    Hick, Rod

    2015-03-01

    The two most prominent measures of material poverty within contemporary European poverty analysis are low income and material deprivation. However, it is by now well-known that these measures identify substantially different people as being poor. In this research note, I seek to demonstrate that there are at least three ways to understand the mismatch between low income and material deprivation, relating to three different forms of identification: identifying poor households, identifying groups at risk of poverty and identifying trends in material poverty over time. Drawing on data from the British Household Panel Survey, I show that while low income and material deprivation identify very different households as being poor, and display distinct trends over time, in many cases they identify the same groups at being at risk of material poverty.

  20. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  1. Visual Mismatch Negativity Reveals Automatic Detection of Sequential Regularity Violation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Kimura, Motohiro; Czigler, István

    2011-01-01

    Sequential regularities are abstract rules based on repeating sequences of environmental events, which are useful to make predictions about future events. Here, we tested whether the visual system is capable to detect sequential regularity in unattended stimulus sequences. The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) component of the event-related potentials is sensitive to the violation of complex regularities (e.g., object-related characteristics, temporal patterns). We used the vMMN component as an index of violation of conditional (if, then) regularities. In the first experiment, to investigate emergence of vMMN and other change-related activity to the violation of conditional rules, red and green disk patterns were delivered in pairs. The majority of pairs comprised of disk patterns with identical colors, whereas in deviant pairs the colors were different. The probabilities of the two colors were equal. The second member of the deviant pairs elicited a vMMN with longer latency and more extended spatial distribution to deviants with lower probability (10 vs. 30%). In the second (control) experiment the emergence of vMMN to violation of a simple, feature-related rule was studied using oddball sequences of stimulus pairs where deviant colors were presented with 20% probabilities. Deviant colored patterns elicited a vMMN, and this component was larger for the second member of the pair, i.e., after a shorter inter-stimulus interval. This result corresponds to the SOA/(v)MMN relationship, expected on the basis of a memory-mismatch process. Our results show that the system underlying vMMN is sensitive to abstract, conditional rules. Representation of such rules implicates expectation of a subsequent event, therefore vMMN can be considered as a correlate of violated predictions about the characteristics of environmental events. PMID:21629766

  2. Nucleotide metabolic mismatches in mammalian hearts: implications for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, MH; Smolenski, RT

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human donor organ shortages have led surgeons and scientists to explore the use of animals as alternative organ sources. Acute thrombovascular rejection (AVR) is the main hurdle in xenotransplantation. Disparities in nucleotide metabolism in the vessels of different species may contribute significantly to the microvascular component of AVR. Methods We evaluated the extent of nucleotide metabolism mismatch in selected organs and endothelial cells of different mammals with particular focus on the changes in activity of ecto-5’-nucleotidase (E5’N) elicited by exposure of porcine hearts or endothelial cells to human blood (ex vivo) or human plasma (in vitro). Results E5’N activity in the rat heart was significantly higher than in other species. We noted a significant difference (p<0.001) in E5’N activity between human and pig endothelial cell lines. Initial pig aortic endothelial E5’N activity decreased in vitro after a three-hour exposure to human and porcine plasma while remaining constant in controls. Ex vivo perfusion with fresh human blood for four hours resulted in a significant decrease of E5’N activity in both wild type and transgenic pig hearts overexpressing human decay accelerating factor (p<0.001). Conclusions This study provides evidence that mismatches in basal mammalian metabolic pathways and humoral immunity interact in a xenogeneic environment. Understanding the role of nucleotide metabolism and signalling in xenotransplantation may identify new targets for genetic modifications and may lead to the development of new therapies extending graft survival. PMID:23317713

  3. Identification of a permissible HLA mismatch in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Wang, Tao; Lee, Stephanie J.; Haagenson, Michael; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee-Ann; Gajewski, James; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Marino, Susana; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Schultz, Kirk; Turner, E. Victoria; Waller, Edmund K.; Woolfrey, Ann; Umejiego, John; Spellman, Stephen R.; Setterholm, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    In subjects mismatched in the HLA alleles C*03:03/C*03:04 no allogeneic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are detected in vitro. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with unrelated donors (UDs) showed no association between the HLA-C allele mismatches (CAMMs) and adverse outcomes; antigen mismatches at this and mismatches other HLA loci are deleterious. The absence of effect of the CAMM may have resulted from the predominance of the mismatch C*03:03/C*03:04. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving UD HSCT matched in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA alleles were examined. Transplants mismatched in HLA-C antigens or mismatched in HLA-A, -B, or -DRB1 presented significant differences (P < .0001) in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37, 1.30), disease-free survival (HR = 1.33, 1.27), treatment-related mortality (HR = 1.54, 1.54), and grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (HR = 1.49, 1.77) compared with the 8/8 group; transplants mismatched in other CAMMs had similar outcomes with HR ranging from 1.34 to 172 for these endpoints. The C*03:03/C*03:04 mismatched and the 8/8 matched groups had identical outcomes (HR ranging from 0.96-1.05). The previous finding that CAMMs do not associate with adverse outcomes is explained by the predominance (69%) of the mismatch C*03:03/03:04 in this group that is better tolerated than other HLA mismatches. PMID:24408320

  4. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  5. The role of co-inhibitory signals in spontaneous tolerance of weakly mismatched transplants.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Murphy, Kenneth M; Yagita, Hideo; Boon, Louis; Anderson, Colin C

    2011-08-01

    The immune system of female H-2(b) (C57BL/6) mice is a strong responder against the male minor-H antigen. However rejection or acceptance of such weakly mismatched grafts depends on the type of tissue transplanted. The mechanism responsible for such spontaneous graft acceptance, and its relationship to the natural mechanisms of tolerance of self antigens is unknown. Co-inhibitory molecules negatively regulate immune responses, and are important for self tolerance. We examined whether co-inhibitory molecules play a critical role in "spontaneous" allograft tolerance. Naïve or donor sensitized diabetic female C57BL/6 (B6) wild type (WT), PD-1(-/-), and BTLA(-/-) mice were transplanted with freshly isolated syngeneic male islet grafts. The role of co-inhibitors during priming of anti-donor responses and graft challenge was also assessed using monoclonal antibodies targeting co-inhibitory receptors. Among the co-inhibitor (CTLA-4, PD-1) specific antibodies tested, only anti-PD-1 showed some potential to prevent spontaneous acceptance of male islet grafts. All BTLA(-/-) and almost all PD-1(-/-) recipients maintained the ability to spontaneously accept male islet grafts. While spontaneous graft acceptance in naïve recipients was only weakly PD-1 dependent, tolerance induced by the accepted islets was found to be highly PD-1 dependent. Furthermore, spontaneous graft acceptance in pre-sensitized recipients showed an absolute requirement for recipient PD-1 but not BTLA. Thus, the PD-1 pathway, involved in self tolerance, plays a critical role in spontaneous tolerance induced by weakly mismatched grafts in naïve recipients and spontaneous graft acceptance in pre-sensitized recipients.

  6. An alkylation-tolerant, mutator human cell line is deficient in strand-specific mismatch repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kat, A.; Thilly, W.G. ); Fang, W.H.; Longley, M.J.; Li, G.M.; Modrich, P. )

    1993-07-15

    The human lymphoblastoid MT1 B-cell line was previously isolated as one of a series of mutant cells able to survive the cytotoxic effects of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). MT1 cells nevertheless remain sensitive to mutagenesis by MNNG and display a mutator phenotype. These phenotypes have been attributed to a single genetic alteration postulated to confer a defect in strand-specific mismatch repair, a proposal that attributes the cytotoxic effect of DNA alkylation in wild-type cells to futile attempts to correct mispairs that arise during replication of alkylated template strands. Our results support this view. MNNG-induced mutations in the HPRT gene of MT1 cells are almost exclusively GC [yields] AT transitions, while spontaneous mutations observed in this mutator cell line are single-nucleotide insertions, transversions, and AT [yields] GC transitions. In vitro assay has demonstrated that the MT1 line is in fact deficient in strand-specific correction of all eight base-base mispairs. This defect, which is manifest at or prior to the excision stage of the reaction, is due to simple deficiency of a required activity because MT1 nuclear extracts can be complemented by a partially purified HeLa fraction to restore in vitro repair. These findings substantiate the idea that strand-specific mismatch repair contributes to alkylation-induced cytotoxicity and imply that this process serves as a barrier to spontaneous transition, transversion, and insertion/deletion mutations in mammalian cells. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Detection of base pair mismatches in duplex DNA and RNA oligonucleotides using electrospray mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffey, Richard H.; Greig, Michael J.

    1997-05-01

    The identify and location of base pair mismatches in non- covalent DNA:RNA duplexes are established using MS and MS-MS on a quadruple ion trap with electrospray ionization (ESI). MS-MS experiments on a 14mer duplex (D) with a single C:A base pair mismatch using lower activation energy results in selective cleavage of the mismatched A nucleobase, even in the presence of the wild-type duplex. The location of the mismatch base pair can be discerned via presence of the wild-type duplex. The location of the mismatch base pair can be discerned via selection of the (D-5H)5- ion and fragmentation of the backbone at that location in a n additional MS-MS experiment. Selective fragmentation is observed for C in a C-C mismatched base pair, which is very difficult to detect using chemical cleavage or E. coli mismatch binding protein. In an RNA:DNA duplex with a single base pair mismatch, the DNA base is removed without fragmentation of the RNA strand, greatly simplifying the interpretation of the resulting MS spectrum. A method is presented for detecting two DNA strands, for example a point mutation which generates an oncogenic phenotype, and the wild-type message. The results suggest that ESI-MS-MS may provide a rapid and selective method to identify and locate genetic mutations without the need for chemical degradation or protein binding followed by gel electrophoresis.

  8. Novel DNA mismatch repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Mason, Penelope A.; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch binding and recognition steps. PMID:19272840

  9. Fast Kids, Slow Kids, Lazy Kids: Framing the Mismatch Problem in Mathematics Teachers' Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Ilana Seidel

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the social nature of teachers' conceptions by showing how teachers frame the "mismatch" of students' perceived abilities and the intended school curriculum through conversational category systems. This study compares the conversations of 2 groups of high school mathematics teachers addressing the Mismatch Problem when…

  10. Electrochemical Investigation of Interaction between a Bifunctional Probe and GG Mismatch Duplex.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Peng, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-01-01

    A bifunctional probe (FecNC), containing a recognition part and an electrochemical active center, was applied to electrochemical detection of GG mismatch duplexes. The preparation of gold electrodes modified by mismatch and complementatry duplexes was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and optimized for better detection in terms of self-assembly time, hybridization time, and incubation time. The interaction between FecNC and DNA duplexes modified on the surface of a gold electrode was explored by square wave voltammetry (SWV) and EIS. The results showed that the DNA duplexes with GG mismatch on the surface of a gold electrode was easily detected by the largest electrochemical signal of the bifunctional probe because of its selective binding to GG mismatches. The bifunctional probe could offer a simple, effective electrochemical detection of GG mismatches, and theoretical bases for development of electrochemical biosensors. Further, the method would be favorable for diagnosis of genetic diseases. PMID:26165289

  11. Electrochemical Investigation of Interaction between a Bifunctional Probe and GG Mismatch Duplex.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Peng, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-01-01

    A bifunctional probe (FecNC), containing a recognition part and an electrochemical active center, was applied to electrochemical detection of GG mismatch duplexes. The preparation of gold electrodes modified by mismatch and complementatry duplexes was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and optimized for better detection in terms of self-assembly time, hybridization time, and incubation time. The interaction between FecNC and DNA duplexes modified on the surface of a gold electrode was explored by square wave voltammetry (SWV) and EIS. The results showed that the DNA duplexes with GG mismatch on the surface of a gold electrode was easily detected by the largest electrochemical signal of the bifunctional probe because of its selective binding to GG mismatches. The bifunctional probe could offer a simple, effective electrochemical detection of GG mismatches, and theoretical bases for development of electrochemical biosensors. Further, the method would be favorable for diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  12. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  13. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses.

    PubMed

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-02-15

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy-projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. PMID:26584870

  14. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses.

    PubMed

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-02-15

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy-projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace.

  15. Rubberband Effect in Temporal Control of Mismatch Negativity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingyan; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a difference event-related potential (ERP) wave reflecting the brain's automatic reaction to deviant sensory stimuli, and it has been proven to be a useful tool in research on cognitive functions or clinical disorders. In most MMN studies, amplitude, peak latency, or the integral of the responses, in rare cases also the slopes of the responses, have been employed as parameters of the ERP responses for quantitative analyses. However, little is known about correlations between these parameters. To better understand the relations between different ERP parameters, we extracted and correlated several different parameters characterizing the MMN waves. We found an unexpected correlation which gives new insight into the temporal control of MMN: response amplitudes are positively correlated with downside slopes, whereas barely correlated with upside slopes. This result suggests an efficient feedback mechanism for the MMN to return to the baseline within a predefined time window, contradicting an exponential decay function as one might expect. As a metaphor we suggest a rubberband effect for the MMN responses, i.e., the larger the distance of the response from neural equilibrium, the stronger the return force to equilibrium. PMID:27642285

  16. A frontal attention mechanism in the visual mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Hedge, Craig; Stothart, George; Todd Jones, Jenna; Rojas Frías, Priscila; Magee, Kristopher Lundy; Brooks, Jonathan C W

    2015-10-15

    Automatic detection of environmental change is a core component of attention. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an electrophysiological marker of this mechanism, has been studied prominently in the auditory domain, with cortical generators identified in temporal and frontal regions. Here, we combined electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether the underlying frontal regions associated with auditory change detection also play a role in visual change detection. Twenty healthy young adults completed a visual MMN task in separate EEG and fMRI sessions. Region of interest analyses were conducted on left and right middle frontal (MFG) and inferior frontal (IFG) gyri, i.e., the frontal areas identified as potential auditory MMN generators. A significant increase in activation was observed in the left IFG and MFG in response to blocks containing deviant stimuli. These findings suggest that a frontal mechanism is involved in the detection of change in the visual MMN. Our results support the notion that frontal mechanisms underlie attention switching, as measured via MMN, across multiple modalities. PMID:26183650

  17. Rubberband Effect in Temporal Control of Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a difference event-related potential (ERP) wave reflecting the brain’s automatic reaction to deviant sensory stimuli, and it has been proven to be a useful tool in research on cognitive functions or clinical disorders. In most MMN studies, amplitude, peak latency, or the integral of the responses, in rare cases also the slopes of the responses, have been employed as parameters of the ERP responses for quantitative analyses. However, little is known about correlations between these parameters. To better understand the relations between different ERP parameters, we extracted and correlated several different parameters characterizing the MMN waves. We found an unexpected correlation which gives new insight into the temporal control of MMN: response amplitudes are positively correlated with downside slopes, whereas barely correlated with upside slopes. This result suggests an efficient feedback mechanism for the MMN to return to the baseline within a predefined time window, contradicting an exponential decay function as one might expect. As a metaphor we suggest a rubberband effect for the MMN responses, i.e., the larger the distance of the response from neural equilibrium, the stronger the return force to equilibrium.

  18. A frontal attention mechanism in the visual mismatch negativity

    PubMed Central

    Hedge, Craig; Stothart, George; Todd Jones, Jenna; Rojas Frías, Priscila; Magee, Kristopher Lundy; Brooks, Jonathan C.W.

    2015-01-01

    Automatic detection of environmental change is a core component of attention. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an electrophysiological marker of this mechanism, has been studied prominently in the auditory domain, with cortical generators identified in temporal and frontal regions. Here, we combined electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether the underlying frontal regions associated with auditory change detection also play a role in visual change detection. Twenty healthy young adults completed a visual MMN task in separate EEG and fMRI sessions. Region of interest analyses were conducted on left and right middle frontal (MFG) and inferior frontal (IFG) gyri, i.e., the frontal areas identified as potential auditory MMN generators. A significant increase in activation was observed in the left IFG and MFG in response to blocks containing deviant stimuli. These findings suggest that a frontal mechanism is involved in the detection of change in the visual MMN. Our results support the notion that frontal mechanisms underlie attention switching, as measured via MMN, across multiple modalities. PMID:26183650

  19. Rubberband Effect in Temporal Control of Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a difference event-related potential (ERP) wave reflecting the brain’s automatic reaction to deviant sensory stimuli, and it has been proven to be a useful tool in research on cognitive functions or clinical disorders. In most MMN studies, amplitude, peak latency, or the integral of the responses, in rare cases also the slopes of the responses, have been employed as parameters of the ERP responses for quantitative analyses. However, little is known about correlations between these parameters. To better understand the relations between different ERP parameters, we extracted and correlated several different parameters characterizing the MMN waves. We found an unexpected correlation which gives new insight into the temporal control of MMN: response amplitudes are positively correlated with downside slopes, whereas barely correlated with upside slopes. This result suggests an efficient feedback mechanism for the MMN to return to the baseline within a predefined time window, contradicting an exponential decay function as one might expect. As a metaphor we suggest a rubberband effect for the MMN responses, i.e., the larger the distance of the response from neural equilibrium, the stronger the return force to equilibrium. PMID:27642285

  20. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J.; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J.; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy—projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. PMID:26584870

  1. Employability of German Geography Graduates: The Mismatch between Knowledge Acquired and Competences Required

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennemann, Stefan; Liefner, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    The employability of university graduates is a concern in higher education as labour markets change more and more rapidly. This is of particular relevance for multi-faceted subjects such as geography. Studies on employability have to consider to what degree a university education helps graduates start a career. The results of a survey of 257…

  2. When some is not every: dissociating scalar implicature generation and mismatch.

    PubMed

    Shetreet, Einat; Chierchia, Gennaro; Gaab, Nadine

    2014-04-01

    Making inferences beyond the literal meaning of sentences occurs with certain scalar expressions via scalar implicatures. For example, adults usually interpret some as some but not all. On the basis of behavioral research, it has been suggested that processing implicatures is cognitively costly. However, many studies have used cases where sentences with some did not match the context in which they were presented. Our study aimed to examine whether the processing cost is linked to implicature generation, to the mismatch between the implicature and the context, or to both processes. To do so, we explored the neural patterns of implicature generation and implicature mismatch using fMRI. Thirteen participants performed a sentence-picture matching task (where pictures determined the context) with mismatched implicatures, successful implicatures or no implicature conditions. Several brain regions were identified when comparing cases of implicature mismatch and cases without implicatures. One of these regions, left-IFG, was jointly activated for mismatched and successful implicatures, as observed in a conjunction analysis. By contrast, left-MFG and medial-frontal-gyrus, were identified when comparing cases of implicature mismatch with cases of successful implicatures. Thus, the left IFG can be interpreted as being linked to implicature generation, whereas the other two areas seem to participate in the processing of the mismatch between the implicature and its context. Our results indicate that scalar implicatures induce processing cost in different ways. This should be considered in future research.

  3. Social, Spatial, and Skill Mismatch among Immigrants and Native-Born Workers in Los Angeles. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Manuel, Jr.; Marcelli, Enrico A.

    Racially different economic outcomes stem from multiple causes, including various "mismatches" between minority employees and available jobs. A skill mismatch occurs when individuals' education and job skills do not qualify them for existing jobs. A spatial mismatch means that people live far from the work for which they qualify. A social mismatch…

  4. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  5. Immunohistochemistry for hMLH1 and hMSH2: a practical test for DNA mismatch repair-deficient tumors.

    PubMed

    Marcus, V A; Madlensky, L; Gryfe, R; Kim, H; So, K; Millar, A; Temple, L K; Hsieh, E; Hiruki, T; Narod, S; Bapat, B V; Gallinger, S; Redston, M

    1999-10-01

    Inactivation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair genes, most commonly human mutL homologue 1 (hMLH1) or human mutS homologue 2 (hMSH2), is a recently described alternate pathway in cancer development and progression. The resulting genetic instability is characterized by widespread somatic mutations in tumor DNA, and is termed high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Although described in a variety of tumors, mismatch repair deficiency has been studied predominantly in colorectal carcinoma. Most MSI-H colorectal carcinomas are sporadic, but some occur in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), and are associated with germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. Until now, the identification of MSI-H cancers has required molecular testing. To evaluate the role of immunohistochemistry as a new screening tool for mismatch repair-deficient neoplasms, the authors studied the expression of hMLH1 and hMSH2, using commercially available monoclonal antibodies, in 72 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors that had been tested previously for microsatellite instability. They compared immunohistochemical patterns of 38 MSI-H neoplasms, including 16 cases from HNPCC patients with known germline mutations in hMLH1 or hMSH2, with 34 neoplasms that did not show microsatellite instability. Thirty-seven of 38 MSI-H neoplasms were predicted to have a mismatch repair gene defect, as demonstrated by the absence of hMLH1 and/or hMSH2 expression. This included correspondence with all 16 cases with germline mutations. All 34 microsatellite-stable cancers had intact staining with both antibodies. These findings clearly demonstrate that immunohistochemistry can discriminate accurately between MSI-H and microsatellite-stable tumors, providing a practical new technique with important clinical and research applications. PMID:10524526

  6. Autofrettage to Counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Mismatch in Cryogenic Pressurized Pipes with Metallic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Ed; Barbero, Ever; Tygielski, Phlip; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Composite feedlines with metal liners have the potential to reduce weight/cost while providing the same level of permeation resistance and material compatibility of all-metal feedlines carrying cryogenic propellants in spacecraft. The major technical challenges are the large difference in Coefficient of Thermal Expansion between the liner and the composite, and the manufacturing method required to make a very thin liner with the required strength and dimensional tolerance. This study investigates the use of autofrettage (compressive preload) to counteract Coefficient of Thermal Expansion when pre-pressurization procedures cannot be used to solve this problem. Promising materials (aluminum 2219, Inconel 718, nickel, nickel alloy) and manufacturing techniques (chemical milling, electroplating) are evaluated to determine the best liner candidates. Robust, autofrettaged feedlines with a low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion liner (Inconel 718 or nickel alloy) are shown to successfully counteract mismatch at LOX temperature. A new concept, autofrettage by temperature, is introduced for high Coefficient of Thermal Expansion materials (aluminum and pure nickel) where pressure cannot be used to add compressive preload.

  7. Capacitor mismatch caused by oxide thickness variations in submicron I. C. processes

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Zimmerman

    1999-05-04

    Chip design in submicron processes will present new challenges and problems which were not present in designs with larger dimension processes. One effect in the newer processes is the field oxide thickness variation due to interconnect density variations. This effect becomes much more extreme for the smaller dimension processes. Large density discontinuities can cause lower yield and will also result in capacitor value mismatch over substantial distances from the edges of a large array when using poly/metal capacitors. If good matching in this type of large area capacitor array is required, the only way to achieve this is to guarantee nearly constant metal/ poly density for at least 1500 microns (this distance will likely depend on the process) around the edges of the array. If the array boundary is close to the chip edge, then dummy capacitors should be placed up to the chip edge, and another layout with similar density must be placed as close as possible to the relevant edges of the chip in the reticle. When using a standard MOSIS reticle size, this may entail placing dummy chip layouts around the chips of interest in order to guarantee that identical density exists for the required distance outside of any chip�s borders.

  8. [Correlation between Sensory Gating P50, Mismatch Negativity, and Reaction Time].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, A A; Dmitrieva, E S; Stankevich, L N

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about the correlation pre-attentive processes, such as P50 sensory gating (SG P50) and mismatch negativity (MMN) with each other and with sensorimotor reaction time (RT). SG P50 data were obtained in the standard paired-click paradigm, MMN was measured in the passive odd-ball paradigm sensorimotor reaction time was studied in an active odd-ball paradigm. Was obtained positive correlation sensory gating P50 with amplitude mismatch negativity, amplitude mismatch negativity with sensorimotor reaction time, sensory gating P50 with sensorimotor reaction time.

  9. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junqiao

    2002-09-09

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x} and GaP{sub 1-x}N{sub x} with x {approx}< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also occurs between

  10. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(sub x)Te(sub 1-x) and ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, y between 0 and 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the

  11. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A.; Su, Ching-Hua; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(x)V(1-x), alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(x),V(1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(x)Te(l-x) and ZnSe(Y)Te(1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, 0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the interaction between

  12. Comparative reactivity of mismatched and unpaired bases in relation to their type and surroundings. Chemical cleavage of DNA mismatches in mutation detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Yakubovskaya, Marianna G; Belyakova, Anna A; Gasanova, Viktoria K; Belitsky, Gennady A; Dolinnaya, Nina G

    2010-07-01

    Systematic study of chemical reactivity of non-Watson-Crick base pairs depending on their type and microenvironment was performed on a model system that represents two sets of synthetic DNA duplexes with all types of mismatched and unmatched bases flanked by T.A or G.C pairs. Using comparative cleavage pattern analysis, we identified the main and additional target bases and performed quantitative study of the time course and efficacy of DNA modification caused by potassium permanganate or hydroxylamine. Potassium permanganate in combination with tetraethylammonium chloride was shown to induce DNA cleavage at all mismatched or bulged T residues, as well as at thymines of neighboring canonical pairs. Other mispaired (bulged) bases and thymine residues located on the second position from the mismatch site were not the targets for KMnO(4) attack. In contrast, hydroxylamine cleaved only heteroduplexes containing mismatched or unmatched C residues, and did not modify adjacent cytosines. However when G.C pairs flank bulged C residue, neighboring cytosines are also attacked by hydroxylamine due to defect migration. Chemical reactivity of target bases was shown to correlate strongly with the local disturbance of DNA double helix at mismatch or bulge site. With our model system, we were able to prove the absence of false-negative and false-positive results. Portion of heteroduplex reliably revealed in a mixture with corresponding homoduplex consists of 5% for bulge bases and "open" non-canonical pairs, and 10% for wobble base pairs giving minimal violations in DNA structure. This study provides a complete understanding of the principles of mutation detection methodology based on chemical cleavage of mismatches and clarifies the advantages and limitations of this approach in various biological and conformational studies of DNA.

  13. Processing of unattended facial emotions: a visual mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Stefanics, Gábor; Csukly, Gábor; Komlósi, Sarolta; Czobor, Pál; Czigler, István

    2012-02-01

    Facial emotions express our internal states and are fundamental in social interactions. Here we explore whether the repetition of unattended facial emotions builds up a predictive representation of frequently encountered emotions in the visual system. Participants (n=24) were presented peripherally with facial stimuli expressing emotions while they performed a visual detection task presented in the center of the visual field. Facial stimuli consisted of four faces of different identity, but expressed the same emotion (happy or fearful). Facial stimuli were presented in blocks of oddball sequence (standard emotion: p=0.9, deviant emotion: p=0.1). Event-related potentials (ERPs) to the same emotions were compared when the emotions were deviant and standard, respectively. We found visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) responses to unattended deviant emotions in the 170-360 ms post-stimulus range over bilateral occipito-temporal sites. Our results demonstrate that information about the emotional content of unattended faces presented at the periphery of the visual field is rapidly processed and stored in a predictive memory representation by the visual system. We also found evidence that differential processing of deviant fearful faces starts already at 70-120 ms after stimulus onset. This finding shows a 'negativity bias' under unattended conditions. Differential processing of fearful deviants were more pronounced in the right hemisphere in the 195-275 ms and 360-390 ms intervals, whereas processing of happy deviants evoked larger differential response in the left hemisphere in the 360-390 ms range, indicating differential hemispheric specialization for automatic processing of positive and negative affect. PMID:22037000

  14. Mismatch Negativity Latency and Cognitive Function in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kärgel, Christian; Sartory, Gudrun; Kariofillis, Daniela; Wiltfang, Jens; Müller, Bernhard W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Mismatch Negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential (ERP) sensitive to early auditory deviance detection and has been shown to be reduced in schizophrenia patients. Moreover, MMN amplitude reduction to duration deviant tones was found to be related to functional outcomes particularly, to neuropsychological (working memory and verbal domains) and psychosocial measures. While MMN amplitude is thought to be correlated with deficits of early sensory processing, the functional significance of MMN latency remains unclear so far. The present study focused on the investigation of MMN in relation to neuropsychological function in schizophrenia. Method Forty schizophrenia patients and 16 healthy controls underwent a passive oddball paradigm (2400 binaural tones; 88% standards [1 kHz, 80 db, 80 ms], 11% frequency deviants [1.2 kHz], 11% duration deviants [40 ms]) and a neuropsychological test-battery. Patients were assessed with regard to clinical symptoms. Results Compared to healthy controls schizophrenia patients showed diminished MMN amplitude and shorter MMN latency to both deviants as well as an impaired neuropsychological test performance. Severity of positive symptoms was related to decreased MMN amplitude to duration deviants. Furthermore, enhanced verbal memory performance was associated with prolonged MMN latency to frequency deviants in patients. Conclusion The present study corroborates previous results of a diminished MMN amplitude and its association with positive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Both, the findings of a shorter latency to duration and frequency deviants and the relationship of the latter with verbal memory in patients, emphasize the relevance of the temporal aspect of early auditory discrimination processing in schizophrenia. PMID:24740391

  15. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  16. Interictal lack of habituation of mismatch negativity in migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Losito, L; Difruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Puca, F M

    2004-08-01

    The aim was to study mismatch negativity features and habituation during the interictal phase of migraine. In migraine patients, a strong negative correlation has been found between the initial amplitude of long latency auditory-evoked potentials and their amplitude increase during subsequent averaging. We studied 12 outpatients with a diagnosis of migraine without aura recorded in a headache-free interval and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers not suffering from any recurrent headache. The experiment consisted of two sequential blocks of 2000 stimulations, during which 1800 (90%) recordings for standard tones and 200 (10%) for target tones were selected for averaging. The latency of the N1 component was significantly increased in migraine patients in respect of controls in both the first and second repetitions; the MMN latency was increased in the second repetition. In the control group the MMN amplitude decreased on average by 3.2 +/- 1.4 microV in the second trial, whereas in migraine patients it showed a slight increase of 0.21 +/- 0.11 microV in the second repetition. The MMN latency relieved in the second trial was significantly correlated with the duration of illness in the migraine patients (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.69; P < 0.05). The increases in N1 latency and MMN latency and amplitude, the latter correlated with duration of illness, seemed to be due to a reduced anticipatory effect of stimulus repetition in migraine patients. This suggests that such hypo-activity of automatic cortical processes, subtending the discrimination of acoustic stimuli, may be a basic abnormality in migraine, developing in the course of the disease. PMID:15265055

  17. Interictal lack of habituation of mismatch negativity in migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Losito, L; Difruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Puca, F M

    2004-08-01

    The aim was to study mismatch negativity features and habituation during the interictal phase of migraine. In migraine patients, a strong negative correlation has been found between the initial amplitude of long latency auditory-evoked potentials and their amplitude increase during subsequent averaging. We studied 12 outpatients with a diagnosis of migraine without aura recorded in a headache-free interval and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers not suffering from any recurrent headache. The experiment consisted of two sequential blocks of 2000 stimulations, during which 1800 (90%) recordings for standard tones and 200 (10%) for target tones were selected for averaging. The latency of the N1 component was significantly increased in migraine patients in respect of controls in both the first and second repetitions; the MMN latency was increased in the second repetition. In the control group the MMN amplitude decreased on average by 3.2 +/- 1.4 microV in the second trial, whereas in migraine patients it showed a slight increase of 0.21 +/- 0.11 microV in the second repetition. The MMN latency relieved in the second trial was significantly correlated with the duration of illness in the migraine patients (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.69; P < 0.05). The increases in N1 latency and MMN latency and amplitude, the latter correlated with duration of illness, seemed to be due to a reduced anticipatory effect of stimulus repetition in migraine patients. This suggests that such hypo-activity of automatic cortical processes, subtending the discrimination of acoustic stimuli, may be a basic abnormality in migraine, developing in the course of the disease.

  18. Enhancement of thermal stability in microwave applicators by mismatching and detuning

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.M.

    1996-07-01

    Many microwave applicator systems experiencing thermal runaway can be stabilized by mismatching and/or detuning the system. The stability of the systems is discussed qualitatively and a conservative guide for adjusting microwave applicators for enhanced stability is described.

  19. A Direct Adaptive Control Approach in the Presence of Model Mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Tao, Gang; Khong, Thuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of direct model reference adaptive control when the plant-model matching conditions are violated due to abnormal changes in the plant or incorrect knowledge of the plant's mathematical structure. The approach consists of direct adaptation of state feedback gains for state tracking, and simultaneous estimation of the plant-model mismatch. Because of the mismatch, the plant can no longer track the state of the original reference model, but may be able to track a new reference model that still provides satisfactory performance. The reference model is updated if the estimated plant-model mismatch exceeds a bound that is determined via robust stability and/or performance criteria. The resulting controller is a hybrid direct-indirect adaptive controller that offers asymptotic state tracking in the presence of plant-model mismatch as well as parameter deviations.

  20. Effect of Lattice Mismatch on HgCdTe LPE Film Surface Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quanzhi; Wei, Yanfeng; Zhang, Juan; Sun, Ruiyun

    2016-09-01

    A new type of crystal defect, which we call a rough structure, is reported in this work. The rough structure appears in large lattice mismatch regions whereas a normal surface appears in the regions where there is a small lattice mismatch on the same substrate. Experiments proved that under normal liquid-phase epitaxy growth conditions, the appearance of a rough structure is related to the lattice mismatch between the substrate and the film. Statistical data indicated that for Hg1- x Cd x Te films with different Cd compositions x, a rough structure appeared on the film surface when the lattice mismatch was outside the range of 0.02-0.11%. The rough structure may result from the misfit dislocations resulting from strain relaxation. When there was a small surface crystal orientation deviation from (111), dense growth ripples appeared instead of the rough structure. A super-flat surface sometimes appeared inside the rough structure regions.

  1. A spectral method for halo particle definition in intense mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-15

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mismatched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  2. Infection risk decreases with increasing mismatch in host and pathogen environmental tolerances.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, A Justin; Whitfield, Steven M; Eskew, Evan A; Thompson, Michelle E; Rose, Jonathan P; Caraballo, Benjamin L; Kerby, Jacob L; Donnelly, Maureen A; Todd, Brian D

    2016-09-01

    The fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has caused the greatest known wildlife pandemic, infecting over 500 amphibian species. It remains unclear why some host species decline from disease-related mortality whereas others persist. We introduce a conceptual model that predicts that infection risk in ectotherms will decrease as the difference between host and pathogen environmental tolerances (i.e. tolerance mismatch) increases. We test this prediction using both local-scale data from Costa Rica and global analyses of over 11 000 Bd infection assays. We find that infection prevalence decreases with increasing thermal tolerance mismatch and with increasing host tolerance of habitat modification. The relationship between environmental tolerance mismatches and Bd infection prevalence is generalisable across multiple amphibian families and spatial scales, and the magnitude of the tolerance mismatch effect depends on environmental context. These findings may help explain patterns of amphibian declines driven by a global wildlife pandemic. PMID:27339786

  3. New Spectral Method for Halo Particle Definition in Intense Mis-matched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-27

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mis-matched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  4. Channel mismatch estimation in time-interleaved ADCs based on input dependent estimating model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sujuan; Wang, Junshan; Qi, Peipei; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-04-01

    Time-interleaved Analog-to-Digital Converter (TIADC) is an efficient way to achieve higher sampling rates for medium-to-high resolution applications. However, the performance of a TIADC suffers from mismatch errors among the sub-channels. This paper presents a method to estimate the channel mismatch errors using the sub-channels' output data. The proposed method introduces an input dependent estimating model (IDEM) based on an equivalent transfer function including the mismatch errors to calculate the standard deviation of the mismatch errors. The spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) is then evaluated by applying multi-tone sinusoids signal to input. The simulated results show that the method in this work can get about 45dB SFDR enhancement.

  5. Mismatch detection in DNA monolayers by atomic force microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosetti, Elena; Scoles, Giacinto; Casalis, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: DNA hybridization is at the basis of most current technologies for genotyping and sequencing, due to the unique properties of DNA base-pairing that guarantee a high grade of selectivity. Nonetheless the presence of single base mismatches or not perfectly matched sequences can affect the response of the devices and the major challenge is, nowadays, to distinguish a mismatch of a single base and, at the same time, unequivocally differentiate devices read-out of fully and partially matching sequences. Results: We present here two platforms based on different sensing strategies, to detect mismatched and/or perfectly matched complementary DNA strands hybridization into ssDNA oligonucleotide monolayers. The first platform exploits atomic force microscopy-based nanolithography to create ssDNA nano-arrays on gold surfaces. AFM topography measurements then monitor the variation of height of the nanostructures upon biorecognition and then follow annealing at different temperatures. This strategy allowed us to clearly detect the presence of mismatches. The second strategy exploits the change in capacitance at the interface between an ssDNA-functionalized gold electrode and the solution due to the hybridization process in a miniaturized electrochemical cell. Through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements on extended ssDNA self-assembled monolayers we followed in real-time the variation of capacitance, being able to distinguish, through the difference in hybridization kinetics, not only the presence of single, double or triple mismatches in the complementary sequence, but also the position of the mismatched base pair with respect to the electrode surface. Conclusion: We demonstrate here two platforms based on different sensing strategies as sensitive and selective tools to discriminate mismatches. Our assays are ready for parallelization and can be used in the detection and quantification of single nucleotide mismatches in microRNAs or in

  6. Single-molecule motions and interactions in live cells reveal target search dynamics in mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Gao, Burke; Simmons, Lyle A.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2015-01-01

    MutS is responsible for initiating the correction of DNA replication errors. To understand how MutS searches for and identifies rare base-pair mismatches, we characterized the dynamic movement of MutS and the replisome in real time using superresolution microscopy and single-molecule tracking in living cells. We report that MutS dynamics are heterogeneous in cells, with one MutS population exploring the nucleoid rapidly, while another MutS population moves to and transiently dwells at the replisome region, even in the absence of appreciable mismatch formation. Analysis of MutS motion shows that the speed of MutS is correlated with its separation distance from the replisome and that MutS motion slows when it enters the replisome region. We also show that mismatch detection increases MutS speed, supporting the model for MutS sliding clamp formation after mismatch recognition. Using variants of MutS and the replication processivity clamp to impair mismatch repair, we find that MutS dynamically moves to and from the replisome before mismatch binding to scan for errors. Furthermore, a block to DNA synthesis shows that MutS is only capable of binding mismatches near the replisome. It is well-established that MutS engages in an ATPase cycle, which is necessary for signaling downstream events. We show that a variant of MutS with a nucleotide binding defect is no longer capable of dynamic movement to and from the replisome, showing that proper nucleotide binding is critical for MutS to localize to the replisome in vivo. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the trafficking and movement of MutS in live cells as it searches for mismatches. PMID:26575623

  7. Patient - implant dimension mismatch in total knee arthroplasty: Is it worth worrying? An Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thilak, Jai; George, Melvin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: The correct sizing of the components in both anteroposterior and mediolateral (ML) dimensions is crucial for the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The size of the implants selected is based on the intraoperative measurements. The currently used TKA implants available to us are based on morphometric measurements obtained from a Western/Caucasian population. Hence, the risk of component ML mismatch is more common in Asian sub-population, as they are of a smaller built and stature. This study aims to look into the following aspects agnitude of the ML mismatch between the femoral component and the patient's anatomical dimension, evaluation of gender variations in distal femur dimensions, and gender-wise and implant-wise correlation of ML mismatch. Materials and Methods: Intraoperatively, the distal femoral dimensions were measured using sterile calipers after removing the osteophytes and compared with the ML dimension of the implant used. ML mismatch length thus obtained is correlated with the various parameters. Results: Males showed larger distal femoral dimensions when compared to females. Males had larger ML mismatch. None of the implants used perfectly matched the patient's anatomical dimensions. Patients with larger mismatch had lower scorings at 2 years postoperative followup. Conclusion: Implant manufacturers need to design more options of femoral implants for a better fit in our subset of patients. The exact magnitude of mismatch which can cause functional implications need to be made out. The mismatch being one of the important factors for the success of the surgery, we should focus more on this aspect. PMID:27746494

  8. Detecting mismatches of bird migration stopover and tree phenology in response to changing climate.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Jherime L; van Riper, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Migratory birds exploit seasonal variation in resources across latitudes, timing migration to coincide with the phenology of food at stopover sites. Differential responses to climate in phenology across trophic levels can result in phenological mismatch; however, detecting mismatch is sensitive to methodology. We examined patterns of migrant abundance and tree flowering, phenological mismatch, and the influence of climate during spring migration from 2009 to 2011 across five habitat types of the Madrean Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona, USA. We used two metrics to assess phenological mismatch: synchrony and overlap. We also examined whether phenological overlap declined with increasing difference in mean event date of phenophases. Migrant abundance and tree flowering generally increased with minimum spring temperature but depended on annual climate by habitat interactions. Migrant abundance was lowest and flowering was highest under cold, snowy conditions in high elevation montane conifer habitat while bird abundance was greatest and flowering was lowest in low elevation riparian habitat under the driest conditions. Phenological synchrony and overlap were unique and complementary metrics and should both be used when assessing mismatch. Overlap declined due to asynchronous phenologies but also due to reduced migrant abundance or flowering when synchrony was actually maintained. Overlap declined with increasing difference in event date and this trend was strongest in riparian areas. Montane habitat specialists may be at greatest risk of mismatch while riparian habitat could provide refugia during dry years for phenotypically plastic species. Interannual climate patterns that we observed match climate change projections for the arid southwest, altering stopover habitat condition.

  9. Phenological mismatch and ontogenetic diet shifts interactively affect offspring condition in a passerine.

    PubMed

    Samplonius, Jelmer M; Kappers, Elena F; Brands, Stef; Both, Christiaan

    2016-09-01

    Climate change may cause phenological asynchrony between trophic levels, which can lead to mismatched reproduction in animals. Although indirect effects of mismatch on fitness are well described, direct effects on parental prey choice are not. Moreover, direct effects of prey variation on offspring condition throughout their early development are understudied. Here, we used camera trap data collected over 2 years to study the effects of trophic mismatch and nestling age on prey choice in pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Furthermore, we studied the effect of mismatch and variation in nestling diet on offspring condition. Both experimentally induced and natural mismatches with the caterpillar peak negatively affected absolute and relative numbers of caterpillars and offspring condition (mass, tarsus and wing length) and positively affected absolute and relative numbers of flying insects in the nestling diet. Feeding more flying insects was negatively correlated with nestling day 12 mass. Both descriptive and experimental data showed preferential feeding of spiders when nestlings were <7 days old. Receiving more spiders during this phase was positively correlated with tarsus growth. These results highlight the need for a more inclusive framework to study phenological mismatch in nature. The general focus on only one prey type, the rarity of studies that measure environmental abundance of prey, and the lack of timing experiments in dietary studies currently hamper understanding of the actual trophic interactions that affect fitness under climate change. PMID:27263989

  10. Detecting mismatches of bird migration stopover and tree phenology in response to changing climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellermann, Jherime L.; Van Riper, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Migratory birds exploit seasonal variation in resources across latitudes, timing migration to coincide with the phenology of food at stopover sites. Differential responses to climate in phenology across trophic levels can result in phenological mismatch; however, detecting mismatch is sensitive to methodology. We examined patterns of migrant abundance and tree flowering, phenological mismatch, and the influence of climate during spring migration from 2009 to 2011 across five habitat types of the Madrean Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona, USA. We used two metrics to assess phenological mismatch: synchrony and overlap. We also examined whether phenological overlap declined with increasing difference in mean event date of phenophases. Migrant abundance and tree flowering generally increased with minimum spring temperature but depended on annual climate by habitat interactions. Migrant abundance was lowest and flowering was highest under cold, snowy conditions in high elevation montane conifer habitat while bird abundance was greatest and flowering was lowest in low elevation riparian habitat under the driest conditions. Phenological synchrony and overlap were unique and complementary metrics and should both be used when assessing mismatch. Overlap declined due to asynchronous phenologies but also due to reduced migrant abundance or flowering when synchrony was actually maintained. Overlap declined with increasing difference in event date and this trend was strongest in riparian areas. Montane habitat specialists may be at greatest risk of mismatch while riparian habitat could provide refugia during dry years for phenotypically plastic species. Interannual climate patterns that we observed match climate change projections for the arid southwest, altering stopover habitat condition.

  11. Differential immunogenicity of HLA mismatches: HLA-A2 versus HLA-A28.

    PubMed

    Dankers, Marlies K A; Roelen, Dave L; Van Der Meer-Prins, Ellen M W; De Lange, Peter; Korfage, Nelleke; Smits, Jacqueline M A; Persijn, Guido G; Welsh, Ken I; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Claas, Frans H J

    2003-02-15

    The immunogenicity of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 versus HLA-A28 was analyzed by antibody production, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) induction, and graft survival. We observed that an HLA-A2 mismatched child in HLA-A28 women leads to HLA-A2 specific antibodies in 32% of the women (n=31), whereas in the case of an HLA-A28 child and HLA-A2 women (n=30), no HLA-A28 specific antibodies were found ( P<0.002). Also, the CTL precursor frequencies were significantly lower against HLA-A28 compared with CTLp frequencies against HLA-A2 ( P=0.012). Finally, the kidney graft survival was slightly better in HLA-A2 positive recipients transplanted with HLA-A28 mismatches. We can conclude that single HLA-A28 mismatches are less immunogenic in HLA-A2 individuals compared with single HLA-A2 mismatches in HLA-A28 individuals, which is probably because the mismatched epitopes on the HLA-A2 molecule are unique epitopes, whereas the mismatched epitopes on HLA-A28 are shared by other HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. PMID:12589169

  12. Screening for mutations by enzyme mismatch cleavage with T4 endonuclease VII.

    PubMed Central

    Youil, R; Kemper, B W; Cotton, R G

    1995-01-01

    Each of four possible sets of mismatches (G.A/C.T, C.C/G.G, A.A/T.T, and C.A/G.T) containing the 8 possible single-base-pair mismatches derived from isolated mutations were examined to test the ability of T4 endonuclease VII to consistently detect mismatches in heteroduplexes. At least two examples of each set of mismatches were studied for cleavage in the complementary pairs of heteroduplexes formed between normal and mutant DNA. Four deletion mutations were also included in this study. The various PCR-derived products used in the formation of heteroduplexes ranged from 133 to 1502 bp. At least one example of each set showed cleavage of at least one strand containing a mismatch. Cleavage of at least one strand of the pairs of heteroduplexes occurred in 17 of the 18 known single-base-pair mutations tested, with an A.A/T.T set not being cleaved in any mismatched strand. We propose that this method may be effective in detecting and positioning almost all mutational changes when DNA is screened for mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7816853

  13. Ion channel stability of Gramicidin A in lipid bilayers: effect of hydrophobic mismatch.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ipsita; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic mismatch which is defined as the difference between the lipid hydrophobic thickness and the peptide hydrophobic length is known to be responsible in altering the lipid/protein dynamics. Gramicidin A (gA), a 15 residue β helical peptide which is well recognized to form ion conducting channels in lipid bilayer, may change its structure and function in a hydrophobic mismatched condition. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of gA dimer in phospholipid bilayers to investigate whether or not the conversion from channel to non-channel form of gA dimer would occur under extreme negative hydrophobic mismatch. By varying the length of lipid bilayers from DLPC (1, 2-Dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) to DAPC (1, 2-Diarachidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), a broad range of mismatch was considered from nearly matching to extremely negative. Our simulations revealed that though the ion-channel conformation is retained by gA under a lesser mismatched situation, in extremely negative mismatched situation, in addition to bilayer thinning, the conformation of gA is changed and converted to a non-channel one. Our results demonstrate that although the channel conformation of Gramicidin A is the most stable structure, it is possible for gA to change its conformation from channel to non-channel depending upon the local environment of host bilayers.

  14. Complex relationship between mismatch repair proteins and MBD4 during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Grigera, Fernando; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Kenter, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) safeguards against genomic instability and is required for efficient Ig class switch recombination (CSR). Methyl CpG binding domain protein 4 (MBD4) binds to MutL homologue 1 (MLH1) and controls the post-transcriptional level of several MMR proteins, including MutS homologue 2 (MSH2). We show that in WT B cells activated for CSR, MBD4 is induced and interacts with MMR proteins, thereby implying a role for MBD4 in CSR. However, CSR is in the normal range in Mbd4 deficient mice deleted for exons 2-5 despite concomitant reduction of MSH2. We show by comparison in Msh2(+/-) B cells that a two-fold reduction of MSH2 and MBD4 proteins is correlated with impaired CSR. It is therefore surprising that CSR occurs at normal frequencies in the Mbd4 deficient B cells where MSH2 is reduced. We find that a variant Mbd4 transcript spanning exons 1,6-8 is expressed in Mbd4 deficient B cells. This transcript can be ectopically expressed and produces a truncated MBD4 peptide. Thus, the 3' end of the Mbd4 locus is not silent in Mbd4 deficient B cells and may contribute to CSR. Our findings highlight a complex relationship between MBD4 and MMR proteins in B cells and a potential reconsideration of their role in CSR.

  15. FANCJ localization by mismatch repair is vital to maintain genomic integrity after UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Guillemette, Shawna; Branagan, Amy; Peng, Min; Dhruva, Aashana; Schärer, Orlando D; Cantor, Sharon B

    2014-02-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is critical for the repair of DNA lesions induced by UV radiation, but its contribution in replicating cells is less clear. Here, we show that dual incision by NER endonucleases, including XPF and XPG, promotes the S-phase accumulation of the BRCA1 and Fanconi anemia-associated DNA helicase FANCJ to sites of UV-induced damage. FANCJ promotes replication protein A phosphorylation and the arrest of DNA synthesis following UV irradiation. Interaction defective mutants of FANCJ reveal that BRCA1 binding is not required for FANCJ localization, whereas interaction with the mismatch repair (MMR) protein MLH1 is essential. Correspondingly, we find that FANCJ, its direct interaction with MLH1, and the MMR protein MSH2 function in a common pathway in response to UV irradiation. FANCJ-deficient cells are not sensitive to killing by UV irradiation, yet we find that DNA mutations are significantly enhanced. Thus, we considered that FANCJ deficiency could be associated with skin cancer. Along these lines, in melanoma we found several somatic mutations in FANCJ, some of which were previously identified in hereditary breast cancer and Fanconi anemia. Given that, mutations in XPF can also lead to Fanconi anemia, we propose collaborations between Fanconi anemia, NER, and MMR are necessary to initiate checkpoint activation in replicating human cells to limit genomic instability.

  16. The dual nature of mismatch repair as antimutator and mutator: for better or for worse.

    PubMed

    Bak, Sara Thornby; Sakellariou, Despoina; Pena-Diaz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    DNA is constantly under attack by a number of both exogenous and endogenous agents that challenge its integrity. Among the mechanisms that have evolved to counteract this deleterious action, mismatch repair (MMR) has specialized in removing DNA biosynthetic errors that occur when replicating the genome. Malfunction or inactivation of this system results in an increase in spontaneous mutability and a strong predisposition to tumor development. Besides this key corrective role, MMR proteins are involved in other pathways of DNA metabolism such as mitotic and meiotic recombination and processing of oxidative damage. Surprisingly, MMR is also required for certain mutagenic processes. The mutagenic MMR has beneficial consequences contributing to the generation of a vast repertoire of antibodies through class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation processes. However, this non-canonical mutagenic MMR also has detrimental effects; it promotes repeat expansions associated with neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases and may contribute to cancer/disease-related aberrant mutations and translocations. The reaction responsible for replication error correction has been the most thoroughly studied and it is the subject to numerous reviews. This review describes briefly the biochemistry of MMR and focuses primarily on the non-canonical MMR activities described in mammals as well as emerging research implicating interplay of MMR and chromatin.

  17. Nuclear localization of human DNA mismatch repair protein exonuclease 1 (hEXO1)

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Vinther, Lena; Bertelsen, Ronni; Holten-Andersen, Steen; Liberti, Sascha Emilie; Hofstra, Robert; Kooi, Krista; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2007-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is implicated in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and mutations in hEXO1 may be associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Since the subcellular localization of MMR proteins is essential for proper MMR function, we characterized possible nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in hEXO1. Using fluorescent fusion proteins, we show that the sequence 418KRPR421, which exhibit strong homology to other monopartite NLS sequences, is responsible for correct nuclear localization of hEXO1. This NLS sequence is located in a region that is also required for hEXO1 interaction with hMLH1 and we show that defective nuclear localization of hEXO1 mutant proteins could be rescued by hMLH1 or hMSH2. Both hEXO1 and hMLH1 form complexes with the nuclear import factors importin β/α1,3,7 whereas hMSH2 specifically recognizes importin β/α3. Taken together, we infer that hEXO1, hMLH1 and hMSH2 form complexes and are imported to the nucleus together, and that redundant NLS import signals in the proteins may safeguard nuclear import and thereby MMR activity. PMID:17426132

  18. Mismatch between what is expected and what actually occurs triggers memory reconsolidation or extinction.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, María Eugenia; Pérez-Cuesta, Luis María; Maldonado, Héctor

    2004-01-01

    In previous experiments on contextual memory, we proposed that the unreinforced re-exposure to the learning context (conditioned stimulus, CS) acts as a switch guiding the memory course toward reconsolidation or extinction, depending on reminder duration. This proposal implies that the system computes the total exposure time to the context, from CS onset to CS offset, and therefore, that the reminder presentation must be terminated for the switching mechanism to become operative. Here we investigated to what extent this requirement is necessary, and we explored the relation between diverse phases in the reconsolidation and extinction processes. We used the contextual memory model of the crab Chasmagnathus which involves an association between the learning context (CS) and a visual danger stimulus (unconditioned stimulus, US). Administration of cycloheximide was used to test the lability state of memory at different time points. The results show that two factors, no-reinforcement during the reminder (i.e., CS re-exposure) and CS offset are the necessary conditions for both processes to occur. Regardless of the reminder duration, memory retrieved by unreinforced CS re-exposure emerges intact and consolidated when tested before CS offset, suggesting that neither reconsolidation nor extinction is concomitant with CS re-exposure. Either process could only be triggered once the definitive mismatch between CS and US is confirmed by CS termination without the expected reinforcement.

  19. Nonlinear phase mismatch and optimal input combination in atomic four-wave mixing in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qiguang; Seo, J.T.; Creekmore, Santiel; Temple, Doyle A.; Ye Peixian; Bonner, Carl; Namkung, M.; Jung, S.S.; Kim, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    This work treats four-wave mixing (4WM) in Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC), focusing on the nonlinear phase mismatch, maximum output, and optimal input combination. We show that the nonlinear phase mismatch decreases the 4WM efficiency. It was found that the 4WM efficiency depends on both the coupling coefficient (i.e., the product of the total number of atoms, the scattering length, and the overlap integral) and the ratios among the three initial input beams. The 4WM efficiency increases with the increase of the coupling coefficient when it is small, then saturates, and finally decreases at high coupling coefficient due to both pump depletion and phase-modulation effects. A maximum output efficiency of about 50% in our case is predicted. In order to get the maximum output, the two pump beams should have equal amplitude and the probe beam should be as small as possible. In addition, a large coupling coefficient (>{pi}/2), which is determined by the ratio of the probe beam to the total input, is required. On the other hand, when the coupling coefficient is fixed, a maximum output for this case can be obtained by optimizing the input ratios among the three input beams. Other ratio combinations will decrease the 4WM efficiency.

  20. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  1. Fade statistics of a ground-to-satellite optical link in the presence of lead-ahead and aperture mismatch.

    PubMed

    Basu, Santasri; Voelz, David; Borah, Deva K

    2009-03-01

    In a recent publication [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A25, 1594-1608 (2008).JOAOD60740-323210.1364/JOSAA.25.001594] we developed expressions for the tilt errors that arise from the effects of lead-ahead and aperture mismatch when transmitting a laser beam from the ground to a satellite. We extend these results to examine the fade statistics of the irradiance at the satellite due to these tilt errors and turbulence induced scintillation. The system concept is that the light from a beacon on the satellite is received by the ground station and a derived signal is used to drive a tracking/pointing system for the uplink beam. However, the beam must be pointed ahead along the satellite track to intercept the satellite (lead-ahead), and physical constraints may require that the beam transmit aperture is different in size or location than the aperture receiving the beacon signal (aperture mismatch). These two issues cause the light entering the receiving aperture (tracker) and the beam exiting the transmit aperture (pointer) to traverse somewhat different turbulence volumes, which limits the ability of the tracking/pointing system to place the maximum flux on the satellite.

  2. Rapid induction of chromatin-associated DNA mismatch repair proteins after MNNG treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schroering, Allen G.; Williams, Kandace J.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with low concentrations of monofunctional alkylating agents induces a G2 arrest only after the second round of DNA synthesis in mammalian cells and requires a proficient mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Here we have investigated rapid alkylation-induced recruitment of DNA repair proteins to chromosomal DNA within synchronized populations of MMR proficient cells (HeLa MR) after MNNG treatment. Within the first hour, the concentrations of MutSα and PCNA increase well beyond their constitutive chromosomally bound levels and MutLα is newly recruited to the chromatin-bound MutSα. Remarkably, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate rapid association of these proteins on the alkylation-damaged chromatin, even when DNA replication is completely blocked. The extent of association of PCNA and MMR proteins on the chromatin is dependent upon the concentration of MNNG and on the specific type of replication block. A subpopulation of the MutSα-associated PCNA also becomes monoubiquitinated, a known requirement for PCNA to interact with translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases. In addition, chromatin-bound SMC1 and NBS1 proteins, associated with DNA double-strand-breaks (DSBs), become phosphorylated within one to two hours of exposure to MNNG. However, these activated proteins are not colocalized on the chromatin with MutSα in response to MNNG exposure. PCNA, MutSα/MutLα and activated SMC1/NBS1 remain chromatin-bound for at least 6–8 hours after alkylation damage. Thus, cells that are exposed to low levels of alkylation treatment undergo rapid recruitment to and/or activation of key proteins already on the chromatin without the requirement for DNA replication, apparently via different DNA-damage signaling pathways. PMID:18468964

  3. Reliability of a Noninvasive Measure of V./Q. Mismatch for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bamat, Nicolas; Ghavam, Sarvin; Liu, Yumei; DeMauro, Sara B.; Jensen, Erik A.; Roberts, Robin; Yoder, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Currently used definitions of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) lack a continuous measure of disease severity. Objectives: To determine if an indirect measure of V./Q. mismatch is reliable when simplified to facilitate more widespread use for grading disease severity in BPD at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. Methods: We used prospectively collected data from 32 preterm infants undergoing an oxygen reduction test at 36 weeks postmenstrual age to perform a simplified indirect assessment of V./Q. mismatch for each infant. Independent raters applied the model, and interrater reliability for a quantitative measure of mismatch was measured by intraclass correlation coefficient. A receiver operating characteristic curve evaluated the impact of increasing degrees of V./Q. mismatch on diagnosing BPD as defined by oxygen reduction test failure. Measurements and Main Results: Concordance for the quantitative measure of V./Q. mismatch between independent raters improved from 0.72 (confidence interval [CI], 0.48–0.86) to 0.93 (CI, 0.87–0.96) after refinement of instructions for applying the simplified model. Higher degrees of mismatch were increasingly predictive of oxygen reduction test failure, with a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis area under the curve of 0.83 (CI, 0.68–0.99; P = 0.03). Conclusions: A simplified indirect measure of V./Q. mismatch for diagnosing and grading disease severity in BPD has high reliability and can be performed with data obtained during a standard oxygen reduction test. This should facilitate more widespread investigation of this model as a technique for characterizing BPD severity. PMID:25714998

  4. Phenological mismatch strongly affects individual fitness but not population demography in a woodland passerine.

    PubMed

    Reed, Thomas E; Jenouvrier, Stephanie; Visser, Marcel E

    2013-01-01

    Populations are shifting their phenology in response to climate change, but these shifts are often asynchronous among interacting species. Resulting phenological mismatches can drive simultaneous changes in natural selection and population demography, but the links between these interacting processes are poorly understood. Here we analyse 37 years of data from an individual-based study of great tits (Parus major) in the Netherlands and use mixed-effects models to separate the within- and across-year effects of phenological mismatch between great tits and caterpillars (a key food source for developing nestlings) on components of fitness at the individual and population levels. Several components of individual fitness were affected by individual mismatch (i.e. late breeding relative to the caterpillar food peak date), including the probability of double-brooding, fledgling success, offspring recruitment probability and the number of recruits. Together these effects contributed to an overall negative relationship between relative fitness and laying dates, that is, selection for earlier laying on average. Directional selection for earlier laying was stronger in years where birds bred on average later than the food peak, but was weak or absent in years where the phenology of birds and caterpillars matched (i.e. no population mismatch). The mean number of fledglings per female was lower in years when population mismatch was high, in part because fewer second broods were produced. Population mismatch had a weak effect on the mean number of recruits per female, and no effect on mean adult survival, after controlling for the effects of breeding density and the quality of the autumnal beech (Fagus sylvatica) crop. These findings illustrate how climate change-induced mismatch can have strong effects on the relative fitness of phenotypes within years, but weak effects on mean demographic rates across years. We discuss various general mechanisms that influence the extent of

  5. Escherichia Coli Mutator Mutd5 Is Defective in the Muthls Pathway of DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Schaaper, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    We have previously reported that the Escherichia coli mutator strain mutD5 was defective in the correction of bacteriophage M13mp2 heteroduplex DNA containing a T·G mismatch. Here, this defect was further investigated with regard to its interaction with the mutHLS pathway of mismatch repair. A set of 15 different M13mp2 heteroduplexes was used to measure the mismatch-repair capability of wild-type, mutL and mutD5 cells. Throughout the series, the mutD5 strain proved as deficient in mismatch repair as the mutL strain, indicating that the repair defect is similar in the two strains in both extent and specificity. [One exception was noted in the case of a T·G mispair that was subject to VSP (Very Short Patch) repair. VSP repair was abolished by mutL but not by mutD.] Variation in the dam-methylation state of the heteroduplex molecules clearly affected repair in the wild-type strain but had no effect on either the mutD or mutL strain. Finally, mutDmutL or mutDmutS double-mutator strains were no more deficient in mismatch repair as were the single mutator strains. The combined results strongly argue that the mismatch-repair deficiency of mutD5 cells resides in the mutH,L,S-dependent pathway of mismatch repair and that the high mutation rate of mutD strains derives in part from this defect. PMID:2659431

  6. Afterload mismatch after MitraClip insertion for functional mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Melisurgo, Giulio; Ajello, Silvia; Pappalardo, Federico; Guidotti, Andrea; Agricola, Eustachio; Kawaguchi, Masanori; Latib, Azeem; Covello, Remo Daniel; Denti, Paolo; Zangrillo, Alberto; Alfieri, Ottavio; Maisano, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Afterload mismatch, defined as acute impairment of left ventricular function after mitral surgery, is a major issue in patients with low ejection fraction and functional mitral regurgitation (FMR). Safety and efficacy of MitraClip therapy have been assessed in randomized trials, but limited data on its acute hemodynamic effects are available. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and prognostic role of afterload mismatch in patients affected by FMR treated with MitraClip therapy. We retrospectively analyzed patients affected by FMR and submitted to MitraClip therapy from October 2008 to December 2012. Patients were assigned to 2 groups according to the occurrence of the afterload mismatch: patients with afterload mismatch (AM+) and without afterload mismatch (AM-). Of 73 patients, 19 (26%) experienced afterload mismatch in the early postoperative period. Among preoperative variables, end-diastolic diameter (71 ± 8 vs 67 ± 7 mm, p = 0.02) and end-systolic diameter (57 ± 9 vs 53 ± 7 mm, p = 0.04) were both significantly larger in AM+ group. An increased incidence of right ventricular dysfunction (68% vs 31%, p = 0.049) and pulmonary hypertension (49 ± 10 vs 40 ± 10 mm Hg, p = 0.0009) was found in AM+ group. Before hospital discharge, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) became similar in both groups (31 ± 9% vs 33 ± 11%, p = 0.65). Long-term survival was comparable between the 2 groups (p = 0.44). A low LVEF in the early postoperative period (LVEF <17%) was significantly associated with higher mortality rate in long-term follow-up (p = 0.048). In conclusion, reduction of mitral regurgitation with MitraClip can cause afterload mismatch; however, this phenomenon is transient, without long-term prognostic implications.

  7. Mutation rates, spectra, and genome-wide distribution of spontaneous mutations in mismatch repair deficient yeast.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gregory I; Parsons, Lance; Gammie, Alison E

    2013-09-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a highly conserved DNA repair pathway. In humans, germline mutations in hMSH2 or hMLH1, key components of mismatch repair, have been associated with Lynch syndrome, a leading cause of inherited cancer mortality. Current estimates of the mutation rate and the mutational spectra in mismatch repair defective cells are primarily limited to a small number of individual reporter loci. Here we use the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a genome-wide view of the rates, spectra, and distribution of mutation in the absence of mismatch repair. We performed mutation accumulation assays and next generation sequencing on 19 strains, including 16 msh2 missense variants implicated in Lynch cancer syndrome. The mutation rate for DNA mismatch repair null strains was approximately 1 mutation per genome per generation, 225-fold greater than the wild-type rate. The mutations were distributed randomly throughout the genome, independent of replication timing. The mutation spectra included insertions/deletions at homopolymeric runs (87.7%) and at larger microsatellites (5.9%), as well as transitions (4.5%) and transversions (1.9%). Additionally, repeat regions with proximal repeats are more likely to be mutated. A bias toward deletions at homopolymers and insertions at (AT)n microsatellites suggests a different mechanism for mismatch generation at these sites. Interestingly, 5% of the single base pair substitutions might represent double-slippage events that occurred at the junction of immediately adjacent repeats, resulting in a shift in the repeat boundary. These data suggest a closer scrutiny of tumor suppressors with homopolymeric runs with proximal repeats as the potential drivers of oncogenesis in mismatch repair defective cells. PMID:23821616

  8. The Eukaryotic Mismatch Recognition Complexes Track with the Replisome during DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Joanna E.; Gammie, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    During replication, mismatch repair proteins recognize and repair mispaired bases that escape the proofreading activity of DNA polymerase. In this work, we tested the model that the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex tracks with the advancing replisome. Using yeast, we examined the dynamics during replication of the leading strand polymerase Polε using Pol2 and the eukaryotic mismatch recognition complex using Msh2, the invariant protein involved in mismatch recognition. Specifically, we synchronized cells and processed samples using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with custom DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-chip). The Polε signal was not detectable in G1, but was observed at active origins and replicating DNA throughout S-phase. The Polε signal provided the resolution to track origin firing timing and efficiencies as well as replisome progression rates. By detecting Polε and Msh2 dynamics within the same strain, we established that the mismatch recognition complex binds origins and spreads to adjacent regions with the replisome. In mismatch repair defective PCNA mutants, we observed that Msh2 binds to regions of replicating DNA, but the distribution and dynamics are altered, suggesting that PCNA is not the sole determinant for the mismatch recognition complex association with replicating regions, but may influence the dynamics of movement. Using biochemical and genomic methods, we provide evidence that both MutS complexes are in the vicinity of the replisome to efficiently repair the entire spectrum of mutations during replication. Our data supports the model that the proximity of MutSα/β to the replisome for the efficient repair of the newly synthesized strand before chromatin reassembles. PMID:26684201

  9. Indirectly Recognized HLA-C Mismatches and Their Potential Role in Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Thus, Kirsten A.; Te Boome, Liane; Kuball, Jürgen; Spierings, Eric

    2014-01-01

    HLA-C mismatches are clearly associated to alloreactivity after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation; in a number of large cohorts, HLA-C mismatches are correlated to an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or even impaired survival. While for HLA-A and -B, both antigenic as well as allelic mismatches are associated with an increased risk of acute GVHD, such an increased risk is only observed for antigenic HLA-C mismatches and not for allelic mismatches. These observations raise the question what sets HLA-C apart from HLA-A and -B. The difference may well be related to the reduced levels of cell-surface expression of HLA-C as compared to HLA-A and -B, possibly due to, among other factors, a limited peptide-binding capacity. This limited peptide-binding capacity may retain HLA-C in the ER and enhance degradation of the HLA-C protein. Once degraded, HLA-C-derived peptides can be presented to the immune system via other HLA alleles and are thus available for indirect recognition. Indeed, such HLA-C-derived peptides have previously been eluted from other HLA alleles. We have recently developed an approach to predict indirect recognition of HLA molecules, by establishing the numbers of predicted indirectly recognizable HLA epitopes (PIRCHES). The number of PIRCHES presented on HLA class I and II (PIRCHE-I and -II, respectively), are highly correlated to clinical measures of alloreactivity, such as acute GVHD. In the present “Hypothesis & Theory,” we reviewed the current knowledge on HLA-C mismatches and alloreactivity. Moreover, we speculate about the role of direct and indirect recognition of HLA-C and the consequences for donor selection in HLA-C mismatched stem-cell transplantation. PMID:24860572

  10. Model Mismatch Paradigm for Probe based Nanoscale Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pranav

    Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) are widely used for investigation of material properties and manipulation of matter at the nanoscale. These instruments are considered critical enablers of nanotechnology by providing the only technique for direct observation of dynamics at the nanoscale and affecting it with sub Angstrom resolution. Current SPMs are limited by low throughput and lack of quantitative measurements of material properties. Various applications like the high density data storage, sub-20 nm lithography, fault detection and functional probing of semiconductor circuits, direct observation of dynamical processes involved in biological samples viz. motor proteins and transport phenomena in various materials demand high throughput operation. Researchers involved in material characterization at nanoscale are interested in getting quantitative measurements of stiffness and dissipative properties of various materials in a least invasive manner. In this thesis, system theoretic concepts are used to address these limitations. The central tenet of the thesis is to model, the known information about the system and then focus on perturbations of these known dynamics or model, to sense the effects due to changes in the environment such as changes in material properties or surface topography. Thus a model mismatch paradigm for probe based nanoscale imaging is developed. The topic is developed by presenting physics based modeling of a particular mode of operation of SPMs called the dynamic mode operation. This mode is modeled as a forced Lure system where a linear time invariant system is in feedback with an unknown static memoryless nonlinearity. Tools from averaging theory are used to tame this complex nonlinear system by approximating it as a linear system with time varying parameters. Material properties are thus transformed from being parameters of unknown nonlinear functions to being unknown coefficients of a linear plant. The first contribution of this thesis

  11. Dual daughter strand incision is processive and increases the efficiency of DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Nicolaas; Laffeber, Charlie; Cristovão, Michele; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Mardenborough, Yannicka; Ikpa, Pauline; Jaddoe, Aruna; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Wyman, Claire; Jiricny, Josef; Kanaar, Roland; Friedhoff, Peter; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2016-08-19

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an evolutionarily-conserved process responsible for the repair of replication errors. In Escherichia coli, MMR is initiated by MutS and MutL, which activate MutH to incise transiently-hemimethylated GATC sites. MMR efficiency depends on the distribution of these GATC sites. To understand which molecular events determine repair efficiency, we quantitatively studied the effect of strand incision on unwinding and excision activity. The distance between mismatch and GATC site did not influence the strand incision rate, and an increase in the number of sites enhanced incision only to a minor extent. Two GATC sites were incised by the same activated MMR complex in a processive manner, with MutS, the closed form of MutL and MutH displaying different roles. Unwinding and strand excision were more efficient on a substrate with two nicks flanking the mismatch, as compared to substrates containing a single nick or two nicks on the same side of the mismatch. Introduction of multiple nicks by the human MutLα endonuclease also contributed to increased repair efficiency. Our data support a general model of prokaryotic and eukaryotic MMR in which, despite mechanistic differences, mismatch-activated complexes facilitate efficient repair by creating multiple daughter strand nicks.

  12. The γ/γ ' mismatch in Ni based superalloys: In situ measurements during a creep test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diologent, F.; Caron, P.; d'Almeida, T.; Jacques, A.; Bastie, P.

    2003-01-01

    The lattice mismatch between the fcc γ matrix and the ordered γ ' cuboı̈dal precipitates in superalloys induces large internal stresses within the material. These stresses have a major effect on its mechanical behaviour and on the anisotropic evolution of the microstructure (rafting…) during its lifetime. The evolution of the effective lattice mismatch of the AM1 and MCNG superalloys was measured continuously during high temperature creep tests (1100 °C, 150 MPa) at the ID 15 (high energy) beamline of the ESRF. The bulk profiles of the 200 reflection (parallel to the tensile axis) were recorded using the triple crystal diffractometer. Both materials have a negative mismatch, and exhibit a transition between the initial wide γ ' peak to a two peaks profile during stage I of the creep curve, as rafting takes place. During stage II, the 200 mismatch decreases in magnitude. During stage III, as a microstructural transition (coalescence) occurs and the strain rate increases, the mismatch changes in the same direction, but at a faster rate, while the thickness of both peaks increases. Evolution of the MCNG specimen was the same as AM1 ones, but rafting and transition to stage II take place at a different rate.

  13. Saturation of DNA mismatch repair and error catastrophe by a base analogue in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Kazuo; Loakes, David; Schaaper, Roel M

    2002-01-01

    Deoxyribosyl-dihydropyrimido[4,5-c][1,2]oxazin-7-one (dP) is a potent mutagenic deoxycytidine-derived base analogue capable of pairing with both A and G, thereby causing G. C --> A. T and A. T --> G. C transition mutations. We have found that the Escherichia coli DNA mismatch-repair system can protect cells against this mutagenic action. At a low dose, dP is much more mutagenic in mismatch-repair-defective mutH, mutL, and mutS strains than in a wild-type strain. At higher doses, the difference between the wild-type and the mutator strains becomes small, indicative of saturation of mismatch repair. Introduction of a plasmid containing the E. coli mutL(+) gene significantly reduces dP-induced mutagenesis. Together, the results indicate that the mismatch-repair system can remove dP-induced replication errors, but that its capacity to remove dP-containing mismatches can readily be saturated. When cells are cultured at high dP concentration, mutant frequencies reach exceptionally high levels and viable cell counts are reduced. The observations are consistent with a hypothesis in which dP-induced cell killing and growth impairment result from excess mutations (error catastrophe), as previously observed spontaneously in proofreading-deficient mutD (dnaQ) strains. PMID:12196386

  14. Phonological mismatch and explicit cognitive processing in a sample of 102 hearing-aid users.

    PubMed

    Rudner, Mary; Foo, Catharina; Sundewall-Thorén, Elisabet; Lunner, Thomas; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2008-11-01

    Rudner et al (2008) showed that when compression release settings are manipulated in the hearing instruments of Swedish habitual users, the resulting mismatch between the phonological form of the input speech signal and representations stored in long-term memory leads to greater engagement of explicit cognitive processing under taxing listening conditions. The mismatch effect is manifest in significant correlations between performance on cognitive tests and aided-speech-recognition performance in modulated noise and/or with fast compression release settings. This effect is predicted by the ELU model (Rönnberg et al, 2008). In order to test whether the mismatch effect can be generalized across languages, we examined two sets of aided speech recognition data collected from a Danish population where two cognitive tests, reading span and letter monitoring, had been administered. A reanalysis of all three datasets, including 102 participants, demonstrated the mismatch effect. These findings suggest that the effect of phonological mismatch, as predicted by the ELU model (Rönnberg et al, this issue) and tapped by the reading span test, is a stable phenomenon across these two Scandinavian languages.

  15. Lattice Mismatch Dominant Yet Mechanically Tunable Thermal Conductivity in Bilayer Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Qingchang; Xu, Baoxing

    2016-05-24

    Heterostructures that are assembled by interfacing two-dimensional (2D) materials offer a unique platform for the emerging devices with unprecedented functions. The attractive functions in heterostructures that are usually absent and beyond the single layer 2D materials are largely affected by the inherent lattice mismatch between layers. Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the phonon thermal transport in the graphene-MoS2 bilayer heterostructure is reduced by the lattice mismatch, and the reduction can be mitigated well by an external tension, weakening the effect of inherent mismatch-induced strain on thermal conductivity. Mechanical analysis in each layered component indicates that the external tension will alleviate the lattice mismatch-induced deformation. The phonon spectra are also softened by the applied tension with a significant shift of frequency from high to low modes. A universal theory is proposed to quantitatively predict the role of the lattice mismatch in thermal conductivity of various bilayer heterostructures and shows good agreement with simulations.

  16. Lattice Mismatch Dominant Yet Mechanically Tunable Thermal Conductivity in Bilayer Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Qingchang; Xu, Baoxing

    2016-05-24

    Heterostructures that are assembled by interfacing two-dimensional (2D) materials offer a unique platform for the emerging devices with unprecedented functions. The attractive functions in heterostructures that are usually absent and beyond the single layer 2D materials are largely affected by the inherent lattice mismatch between layers. Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the phonon thermal transport in the graphene-MoS2 bilayer heterostructure is reduced by the lattice mismatch, and the reduction can be mitigated well by an external tension, weakening the effect of inherent mismatch-induced strain on thermal conductivity. Mechanical analysis in each layered component indicates that the external tension will alleviate the lattice mismatch-induced deformation. The phonon spectra are also softened by the applied tension with a significant shift of frequency from high to low modes. A universal theory is proposed to quantitatively predict the role of the lattice mismatch in thermal conductivity of various bilayer heterostructures and shows good agreement with simulations. PMID:27093571

  17. Feature versus gestalt representation of stimuli in the mismatch negativity system of 7- to 9-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Molholm, Sophie; Gomes, Hilary; Lobosco, Jacqueline; Deacon, Diana; Ritter, Walter

    2004-05-01

    We examined preattentive auditory change detection in 7- to 9-year-old children. The question of interest was whether the preattentive comparison of stimuli indexed by the scalp-recorded mismatch negativity (MMN) was performed on representations of individual stimulus features or on gestalt representations of their combined attributes. The design of the study, based on a work by D. Deacon, J. Nousak, M. Pilotti, W. Ritter, and C. Yang (Psychophysiology, 1998), was such that both feature and gestalt representations could have been available to the comparator mechanism generating the MMN. The data indicated that for the majority of the children-those that exhibited an inverse relationship between the amplitude of the MMN and the probability of the deviant-the MMN was based on feature-specific information. This study also provides a method to obtain MMNs to deviants in three different features in the time usually required to obtain an MMN to a single acoustic feature. PMID:15102123

  18. Resolution of Specific Nucleotide Mismatches by Wild-Type and AZT-Resistant Reverse Transcriptases during HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; King, Steven R; Ndongmo, Clement B; Stilger, Krista L; An, Wenfeng; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2016-06-01

    A key contributor to HIV-1 genetic variation is reverse transcriptase errors. Some mutations result because reverse transcriptase (RT) lacks 3' to 5' proofreading exonuclease and can extend mismatches. However, RT also excises terminal nucleotides to a limited extent, and this activity contributes to AZT resistance. Because HIV-1 mismatch resolution has been studied in vitro but only indirectly during replication, we developed a novel system to study mismatched base pair resolution during HIV-1 replication in cultured cells using vectors that force template switching at defined locations. These vectors generated mismatched reverse transcription intermediates, with proviral products diagnostic of mismatch resolution mechanisms. Outcomes for wild-type (WT) RT and an AZT-resistant (AZT(R)) RT containing a thymidine analog mutation set-D67N, K70R, D215F, and K219Q-were compared. AZT(R) RT did not excise terminal nucleotides more frequently than WT, and for the majority of tested mismatches, both WT and AZT(R) RTs extended mismatches in more than 90% of proviruses. However, striking enzyme-specific differences were observed for one mispair, with WT RT preferentially resolving dC-rC pairs either by excising the mismatched base or switching templates prematurely, while AZT(R) RT primarily misaligned the primer strand, causing deletions via dislocation mutagenesis. Overall, the results confirmed HIV-1 RT's high capacity for mismatch extension during virus replication and revealed dramatic differences in aberrant intermediate resolution repertoires between WT and AZT(R) RTs on one mismatched replication intermediate. Correlating mismatch extension frequencies observed here with reported viral mutation rates suggests a complex interplay of nucleotide discrimination and mismatch extension drives HIV-1 mutagenesis. PMID:27075671

  19. Polymerase Interactions with Wobble Mismatches in Synthetic Genetic Systems and Their Evolutionary Implications.

    PubMed

    Winiger, Christian B; Kim, Myong-Jung; Hoshika, Shuichi; Shaw, Ryan W; Moses, Jennifer D; Matsuura, Mariko F; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Benner, Steven A

    2016-07-19

    In addition to completing the Watson-Crick nucleobase matching "concept" (big pairs with small, hydrogen bond donors pair with hydrogen bond acceptors), artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS) also challenge DNA polymerases with a complete set of mismatches, including wobble mismatches. Here, we explore wobble mismatches with AEGIS with DNA polymerase 1 from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we find that the polymerase tolerates an AEGIS:standard wobble that has the same geometry as the G:T wobble that polymerases have evolved to exclude but excludes a wobble geometry that polymerases have never encountered in natural history. These results suggest certain limits to "structural analogy" and "evolutionary guidance" as tools to help synthetic biologists expand DNA alphabets. PMID:27347689

  20. Cognitive mismatches in the cockpit: will they ever be a thing of the past?

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gordon; Besnard, Denis; Riley, Dominic

    2007-07-01

    Changes in aviation over the last 30 years have dramatically affected the way that flight crews fly aircraft. The implementation and evolution of the glass cockpit, however, has happened in an almost ad hoc fashion, meaning that it does not always properly support the flight crew in carrying out their tasks. In such situations, the crew's mental model of what is happening does not always match the real state of affairs. In other words, there is a cognitive mismatch. An initial taxonomy of cognitive mismatches is defined, and the problem illustrated using an example from an aviation accident. Consideration is then given to how cognitive mismatches can be managed. A call is made for the development of an integrated cockpit architecture that takes better account of human capabilities and allows for new developments to be added to the cockpit in a more seamless manner.

  1. Temperature dependence of gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch in nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Garlick, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    High temperature X-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the gamma-gamma prime lattice mismatch of three different nickel-base superalloys at temperatures between 18 and 1000 C. The measurements were performed on oriented single-crystal disks which had been aged to produce a semicoherent gamma-gamma prime structure. The thermal expansion of the lattice parameters of the gamma and gamma-prime phases was described by a second-order polynomial expression. The expansion of the gamma-prime phase was consistently smaller than that of the gamma phase, which caused the lattice mismatch to become more negative at higher temperatures. It was also shown that high values of lattice mismatch resulted in increased rates of directional gamma-prime coarsening during elevated temperature creep exposure.

  2. Mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Previous work indicated that extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells could be explained by the single-strand annealing (SSA) model. This model predicts that extrachromosomal recombination leads to nonconservative crossover products and that heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) is formed by annealing of complementary single strands. Mismatched bases in hDNA may subsequently be repaired to wild-type or mutant sequences, or they may remain unrepaired and segregate following DNA replication. We describe a system to examine the formation and mismatch repair of hDNA in recombination intermediates. Our results are consistent with extrachromosomal recombination occurring via SSA and producing crossover recombinant products. As predicted by the SSA model, hDNA was present in double-strand break-induced recombination intermediates. By placing either silent or frameshift mutations in the predicted hDNA region, we have shown that mismatches are efficiently repaired prior to DNA replication. Images PMID:8264607

  3. Group velocity and pulse lengthening of mismatched laser pulses in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Tilborg, J. van; Leemans, W. P.

    2011-08-15

    Analytic solutions are presented to the non-paraxial wave equation describing an ultra-short, low-power, laser pulse propagating in a plasma channel. Expressions for the laser pulse centroid motion and laser group velocity are derived, valid for matched and mismatched propagation in a parabolic plasma channel, as well as in vacuum, for an arbitrary Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. The group velocity of a mismatched laser pulse, for which the laser spot size is strongly oscillating, is found to be independent of propagation distance and significantly less than that of a matched pulse. Laser pulse lengthening of a mismatched pulse owing to laser mode slippage is examined and found to dominate over that due to dispersive pulse spreading for sufficiently long pulses. Analytic results are shown to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions of the full Maxwell equations coupled to the plasma response. Implications for plasma channel diagnostics are discussed.

  4. Spectral-mismatch-induced resolution limit of interferometric fiber Fabry-Perot sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Siliang; Ma, Lina; Xiong, Shuidong; Hu, Yongming

    2011-12-01

    The mismatch of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in spectral profiles can lead to a severe degraded resolution of the constructed fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) sensor system through its effect on the fringe visibility. The variation of visibility induced by spectral mismatch and the corresponding phase resolution limit are analyzed theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical analyses are based on the approximation of Gaussian profiles to the reflection spectra of weak FBGs, especially with consideration of side lobes. The investigation provides an insight into the evolution of the fringe visibility caused by spectral mismatch, and shows good agreement with experimental results. An optimum phase resolution of about 55 μrad/Hz 1/2 above 100 Hz is achieved for a nearly 4 m-long FFP sensor by matching spectral profiles of the gratings and balancing path length differences of the tandem interferometers.

  5. Poorly repaired mismatches in heteroduplex DNA are hyper-recombinagenic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Manivasakam, P.; Hastings, P.J.; Rosenberg, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    In yeast meiotic recombination, alleles used as genetic markers fall into two classes as regards their fate when incorporated into heteroduplex DNA. Normal alleles are those that form heteroduplexes that are nearly always recognized and corrected by the mismatch repair system operating in meiosis. High PMS (postmeiotic segregation) alleles form heteroduplexes that are inefficiently mismatch repaired. We propose that this hyperrecombination is caused by the high PMS allele blocking a mismatch repair tract initiated from the normal allele, thus preventing corepair of the two alleles, which would prevent formation of recombinants. The results of three point crosses involving two PMS alleles and a normal allele suggest that high PMS alleles placed between two alleles that are normally corepaired block that corepair. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Trophic mismatch and its effects on the growth of young in an Arctic herbivore.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Madeleine; Gauthier, Gilles; Lévesque, Esther

    2015-12-01

    In highly seasonal environments, timing of breeding of organisms is typically set to coincide with the period of highest resource availability. However, breeding phenology may not change at a rate sufficient to keep up with rapid changes in the environment in the wake of climate change. The lack of synchrony between the phenology of consumers and that of their resources can lead to a phenomenon called trophic mismatch, which may have important consequences on the reproductive success of herbivores. We analyzed long-term data (1991-2010) on climate, plant phenology and the reproduction of a long-distance Arctic migrant, the greater snow goose (Chen caerulescens atlantica), in order to examine the effects of mismatched reproduction on the growth of young. We found that geese are only partially able to adjust their breeding phenology to compensate for annual changes in the timing of high-quality food plants, leading to mismatches of up to 20 days between the two. The peak of nitrogen concentration in plants, an index of their nutritive quality for goslings, occurred earlier in warm springs with an early snow melt. Likewise, mismatch between hatch dates of young and date of peak nitrogen was more important in years with early snow melt. Gosling body mass and structural size at fledging was reduced when trophic mismatch was high, particularly when the difference between date of peak nitrogen concentration and hatching was >9 days. Our results support the hypothesis that trophic mismatch can negatively affect the fitness of Arctic herbivores and that this is likely to be exacerbated by rising global temperatures. PMID:26235037

  7. Educational mismatch and health status among foreign-born workers in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dunlavy, A C; Garcy, A M; Rostila, M

    2016-04-01

    Foreign-born workers have been shown to experience poorer working conditions than native-born workers. Yet relationships between health and educational mismatch have been largely overlooked among foreign-born workers. This study uses objective and self-reported measures of educational mismatch to compare the prevalence of educational mismatch among native (n = 2359) and foreign-born (n = 1789) workers in Sweden and to examine associations between educational mismatch and poor self-rated health. Findings from weighted multivariate logistic regression which controlled for social position and individual-level demographic characteristics suggested that over-educated foreign-born workers had greater odds ratios for poor-self rated health compared to native-born matched workers. This association was particularly evident among men (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.04-4.39) and women (OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.12-4.03) from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand. Associations between under-education and poor-self rated health were also found among women from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.27-3.18). These findings suggest that educational mismatch may be an important work-related social determinant of health among foreign-born workers. Future studies are needed to examine the effects of long-term versus short-term states of educational mismatch on health and to study relationships over time.

  8. Educational mismatch and health status among foreign-born workers in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dunlavy, A C; Garcy, A M; Rostila, M

    2016-04-01

    Foreign-born workers have been shown to experience poorer working conditions than native-born workers. Yet relationships between health and educational mismatch have been largely overlooked among foreign-born workers. This study uses objective and self-reported measures of educational mismatch to compare the prevalence of educational mismatch among native (n = 2359) and foreign-born (n = 1789) workers in Sweden and to examine associations between educational mismatch and poor self-rated health. Findings from weighted multivariate logistic regression which controlled for social position and individual-level demographic characteristics suggested that over-educated foreign-born workers had greater odds ratios for poor-self rated health compared to native-born matched workers. This association was particularly evident among men (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.04-4.39) and women (OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.12-4.03) from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand. Associations between under-education and poor-self rated health were also found among women from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.27-3.18). These findings suggest that educational mismatch may be an important work-related social determinant of health among foreign-born workers. Future studies are needed to examine the effects of long-term versus short-term states of educational mismatch on health and to study relationships over time. PMID:26943012

  9. Voluntary action modulates the brain response to rule-violating events indexed by visual mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Motohiro; Takeda, Yuji

    2014-12-01

    An event-related brain potential (ERP) component called visual mismatch negativity (MMN) is automatically elicited when sequential rules inherent in a visual stimulus sequence are violated. To elucidate whether the visual MMN-generating processes are strictly determined in a bottom-up (i.e., stimulus-driven) manner, or can be modulated by top-down control, we investigated whether or not visual MMN is affected by prior information about the occurrence of rule violation derived from the participant׳s voluntary action. The participants were required to produce a visual stimulus sequence by pressing one button frequently (about 90%) and another button infrequently (10%) in random order; an oddball sequence consisting of repetition-rule-conforming and -violating stimuli in Experiment 1 and a more complex sequence consisting of change-rule-conforming and -violating stimuli in Experiment 2. Frequently-performed button presses triggered rule-conforming stimuli (81%), but occasionally rule-violating stimuli (9%). In contrast, infrequently-performed button presses triggered rule-violating stimuli (9%), but occasionally rule-conforming stimuli (1%). The results showed that visual MMN was elicited by rule-violating stimuli triggered by frequently-performed button presses, while it was not elicited by physically the same rule-violating stimuli triggered by infrequently-performed button presses. That is, visual MMN was strongly affected by action-based prior information about the occurrence of rule violation. This result suggests that the visual MMN-generating processes can be flexibly controlled in a top-down manner, so that rule violation that can carry significant information is selectively detected.

  10. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A rare cause of scintigraphic ventilation-perfusion mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Pochis, W.T.; Krasnow, A.Z.; Collier, B.D.; Mewissen, M.W.; Almagro, U.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T. )

    1990-05-01

    A case of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with multiple areas of mismatch on ventilation-perfusion lung imaging in the absence of pulmonary embolism is presented. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is one of the few nonembolic diseases producing a pulmonary ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In this condition, chest radiographs may not detect the full extent of disease, and xenon-133 ventilation imaging may be relatively insensitive to morbid changes in small airways. Thus, when examining patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, one should be aware that abnormal perfusion imaging patterns without matching ventilation abnormalities are not always due to embolism. In this setting, contrast pulmonary angiography is often needed for accurate differential diagnosis.

  11. Spin splitting of electron states in lattice-mismatched (110)-oriented quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestoklon, M. O.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Benchamekh, R.; Voisin, P.

    2016-09-01

    We show that for lattice-mismatched zinc-blende-type (110)-grown quantum wells a significant contribution to the zero-magnetic-field spin splitting of electron subbands comes from strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. Combining the envelope function theory and atomistic tight-binding approach, we calculate spin-orbit splitting constants for realistic quantum wells. It is found that the strain due to lattice mismatch in conventional GaAs/AlGaAs structures may noticeably modify the spin splitting while in InGaAs/GaAs structures it plays a major role and may even change the sign of the spin splitting constant.

  12. H2 control of linear uncertain systems considering input quantization with encoder/decoder mismatch.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo-Chao; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an H2 control design for linear uncertain systems with input quantization in the presence of more general encoder/decoder mismatch is investigated. The construction of the control law includes two parts: linear part and nonlinear part. The gain of the linear part is derived from linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and the linear part of the control law is designed for achieving the H2 performance against system characteristic matrix uncertainty and encoder/decoder mismatch. The nonlinear part is designed to eliminate the influence of external disturbance and quantization error. Finally, examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Tuning thermal mismatch between turbine rotor parts with a thermal medium

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2001-01-01

    In a turbine rotor, an aft shaft wheel and the final-stage wheel of the rotor are coupled together, including by a rabbeted joint. During shutdown and startup of the turbine, a thermal mismatch between the aft shaft wheel and final-stage wheel is avoided by respectively heating and cooling the aft shaft wheel to maintain the thermal mismatch within acceptable limits, thereby avoiding opening of the rabbeted joint and the potential for unbalancing the rotor and rotor vibration. The thermal medium may be supplied by piping in the aft bearing cavity into the cavity between the forward closure plate and the aft shaft wheel.

  14. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-01-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication. PMID:27698379

  15. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-10-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication.

  16. Space-charge driven emittance growth in a 3D mismatched anisotropic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Hofmann, I.

    2002-12-03

    In this paper we present a 3D simulation study of the emittance growth in a mismatched anisotropic beam. The equipartitioning driven by a 4th order space-charge resonance can be significantly modified by the presence of mismatch oscillation and halo formation. This causes emittance growth in both the longitudinal and transverse directions which could drive the beam even further away from equipartition. The averaged emittance growth per degree freedom follows the upper bound of the 2D free energy limit plus the contributions from equipartitioning.

  17. Detection of base-pair mismatches in DNA using graphene-based nanopore device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We present a unique way to detect base-pair mismatches in DNA, leading to a different epigenetic disorder by the method of nanopore sequencing. Based on a tight-binding formulation of a graphene-based nanopore device, using the Green’s function approach we study the changes in the electronic transport properties of the device as we translocate a double-stranded DNA through the nanopore embedded in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In the present work we are not only successful in detecting the usual AT and GC pairs but also a set of possible mismatches in the complementary base pairing.

  18. Advances in Mismatch Identification and Power Loss Evaluation of Concentrating Photovoltaic Multijunction Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minuto, A.; Timò, G.; Groppelli, P.

    2011-12-01

    The outdoor I-V curve of a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) Multi-junction (MJ) module is affected by temperature, series resistance, electro-optical mismatches among receivers mainly due to soiling effects, tracker misalignment and a particular spectral solar content. Starting from the previous works [1] and [2] and considering CPV MJ modules of only-one string with series-connected receivers, an original algorithm is developed to identify the photovoltaic current and the operating junction temperature of each receiver. Power losses due to the temperature, the series resistance and the electro-optical mismatches can be separately identified as well.

  19. The Mismatch between Children's Health Needs and School Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knauer, Heather; Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who require various levels of care each school day. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of public schools in supporting CSHCN through in-depth key informant interviews. For this qualitative study, the authors interviewed 17 key informants to identify key…

  20. 12 CFR 3.161 - Qualification requirements for incorporation of operational risk mitigants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Measurement Approaches Risk-Weighted Assets for Operational Risk § 3.161 Qualification requirements for... payment; (iv) The uncertainty of payment by the provider of the policy; and (v) Mismatches in...

  1. Structural Features and Functional Dependency on β-Clamp Define Distinct Subfamilies of Bacterial Mismatch Repair Endonuclease MutL.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kenji; Baba, Seiki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Yano, Takato

    2016-08-12

    In early reactions of DNA mismatch repair, MutS recognizes mismatched bases and activates MutL endonuclease to incise the error-containing strand of the duplex. DNA sliding clamp is responsible for directing the MutL-dependent nicking to the newly synthesized/error-containing strand. In Bacillus subtilis MutL, the β-clamp-interacting motif (β motif) of the C-terminal domain (CTD) is essential for both in vitro direct interaction with β-clamp and in vivo repair activity. A large cluster of negatively charged residues on the B. subtilis MutL CTD prevents nonspecific DNA binding until β clamp interaction neutralizes the negative charge. We found that there are some bacterial phyla whose MutL endonucleases lack the β motif. For example, the region corresponding to the β motif is completely missing in Aquifex aeolicus MutL, and critical amino acid residues in the β motif are not conserved in Thermus thermophilus MutL. We then revealed the 1.35 Å-resolution crystal structure of A. aeolicus MutL CTD, which lacks the β motif but retains the metal-binding site for the endonuclease activity. Importantly, there was no negatively charged cluster on its surface. It was confirmed that CTDs of β motif-lacking MutLs, A. aeolicus MutL and T. thermophilus MutL, efficiently incise DNA even in the absence of β-clamp and that β-clamp shows no detectable enhancing effect on their activity. In contrast, CTD of Streptococcus mutans, a β motif-containing MutL, required β-clamp for the digestion of DNA. We propose that MutL endonucleases are divided into three subfamilies on the basis of their structural features and dependence on β-clamp. PMID:27369079

  2. Capital and income breeding traits differentiate trophic match–mismatch dynamics in large herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Kerby, Jeffrey; Post, Eric

    2013-01-01

    For some species, climate change has altered environmental conditions away from those in which life-history strategies evolved. In such cases, if adaptation does not keep pace with these changes, existing life-history strategies may become maladaptive and lead to population declines. We use life-history theory, with a specific emphasis on breeding strategies, in the context of the trophic match–mismatch framework to form generalizable hypotheses about population-level consumer responses to climate-driven perturbations in resource availability. We first characterize the income and breeding traits of sympatric caribou and muskoxen populations in western Greenland, and then test trait-based hypotheses about the expected reproductive performance of each population during a period of high resource variability at that site. The immediate reproductive performance of income breeding caribou decreased with trophic mismatch. In contrast, capital breeding muskoxen were relatively unaffected by current breeding season resource variability, but their reproductive performance was sensitive to resource conditions from previous years. These responses matched our expectations about how capital and income breeding strategies should influence population susceptibility to phenological mismatch. We argue for a taxon-independent assessment of trophic mismatch vulnerability based on a life-history strategy perspective in the context of prevailing environmental conditions. PMID:23836789

  3. A review of climate-driven mismatches between interdependent phenophases in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Alison; Caffarra, Amelia; O'Neill, Bridget F

    2011-11-01

    Mismatches in phenology between mutually dependent species, resulting from climate change, can have far-reaching consequences throughout an ecosystem at both higher and lower trophic levels. Rising temperatures, due to climate warming, have resulted in advances in development and changes in behaviour of many organisms around the world. However, not all species or phenophases are responding to this increase in temperature at the same rate, thus creating a disruption to previously synchronised interdependent key life-cycle stages. Mismatches have been reported between plants and pollinators, predators and prey, and pests and hosts. Here, we review mismatches between interdependent phenophases at different trophic levels resulting from climate change. We categorized the studies into (1) terrestrial (natural and agricultural) ecosystems, and (2) aquatic (freshwater and marine) ecosystems. As expected, we found reports of 'winners' and 'losers' in each system, such as earlier emergence of prey enabling partial avoidance of predators, potential reductions in crop yield if herbivore pests emerge before their predators and possible declines in marine biodiversity due to disruption in plankton-fish phenologies. Furthermore, in the marine environment rising temperatures have resulted in synchrony in a previously mismatched prey and predator system, resulting in an abrupt population decline in the prey species. The examples reviewed suggest that more research into the complex interactions between species in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is necessary to make conclusive predictions of how climate warming may impact the fragile balances within ecosystems in future.

  4. Graduates in Economics and Educational Mismatch: The Case Study of the University of Naples "Parthenope"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintano, Claudio; Castellano, Rosalia; D'Agostino, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    The quality of jobs of economics graduates was studied in terms of educational mismatch. The returns of over-education on earnings and on the job-search were also investigated. The discussion regards the second wave of a longitudinal survey of a random sample of economics graduates from the University of Naples "Parthenope", a major school of…

  5. Repair of naturally occurring mismatches can induce mutations in flanking DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Miller, Brendan F; Furano, Anthony V

    2014-01-01

    ‘Normal’ genomic DNA contains hundreds of mismatches that are generated daily by the spontaneous deamination of C (U/G) and methyl-C (T/G). Thus, a mutagenic effect of their repair could constitute a serious genetic burden. We show here that while mismatches introduced into human cells on an SV40-based episome were invariably repaired, this process induced mutations in flanking DNA at a significantly higher rate than no mismatch controls. Most mutations involved the C of TpC, the substrate of some single strand-specific APOBEC cytidine deaminases, similar to the mutations that can typify the ‘mutator phenotype’ of numerous tumors. siRNA knockdowns and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that TpC preferring APOBECs mediate the mutagenesis, and siRNA knockdowns showed that both the base excision and mismatch repair pathways are involved. That naturally occurring mispairs can be converted to mutators, represents an heretofore unsuspected source of genetic changes that could underlie disease, aging, and evolutionary change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02001.001 PMID:24843013

  6. Repair of naturally occurring mismatches can induce mutations in flanking DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Miller, Brendan F; Furano, Anthony V

    2014-01-01

    'Normal' genomic DNA contains hundreds of mismatches that are generated daily by the spontaneous deamination of C (U/G) and methyl-C (T/G). Thus, a mutagenic effect of their repair could constitute a serious genetic burden. We show here that while mismatches introduced into human cells on an SV40-based episome were invariably repaired, this process induced mutations in flanking DNA at a significantly higher rate than no mismatch controls. Most mutations involved the C of TpC, the substrate of some single strand-specific APOBEC cytidine deaminases, similar to the mutations that can typify the 'mutator phenotype' of numerous tumors. siRNA knockdowns and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that TpC preferring APOBECs mediate the mutagenesis, and siRNA knockdowns showed that both the base excision and mismatch repair pathways are involved. That naturally occurring mispairs can be converted to mutators, represents an heretofore unsuspected source of genetic changes that could underlie disease, aging, and evolutionary change.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02001.001. PMID:24843013

  7. Cultural Mismatch in Honduran Garifuna Communities: The Role of Culture, Race, and Language in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleyn, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    The Garifuna are an Indigenous, Afro-Latino group in Honduras whose distinct cultural, ethnic, and linguistic background has been unacknowledged and frequently misunderstood on a societal level and, consequently, in the schools that serve them. This study argues for the utility of a cultural mismatch approach, one applied primarily to U.S.…

  8. SOS mutator effect in E. coli mutants deficient in mismatch correction.

    PubMed Central

    Caillet-Fauquet, P; Maenhaut-Michel, G; Radman, M

    1984-01-01

    We have used bacteriophage lambda to characterize the mutator effect of the SOS response induced by u.v. irradiation of Escherichia coli. Mutagenesis of unirradiated phages grown in irradiated or unirradiated bacteria was detected by measuring forward mutagenesis in the immunity genes or reversion mutagenesis of an amber codon in the R gene. Relative to the wild-type, the SOS mutator effect was higher in E. coli mismatch correction-deficient mutants (mutH, mutL and mutS) and lower in an adenine methylation-deficient mutant ( dam3 ). We conclude that a large proportion of SOS-induced 'untargeted' mutations are removed by the methyl-directed mismatch correction system, which acts on newly synthesized DNA strands. The lower SOS mutator effect observed in E. coli dam mutants may be due to a selective killing of mismatch-bearing chromosomes resulting from undirected mismatch repair. The SOS mutator effect on undamaged lambda DNA, induced by u.v. irradiation of the host, appears to result from decreased fidelity of DNA synthesis. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6233141

  9. High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, GaInP solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2014-07-08

    High performance, high bandgap, lattice-mismatched, photovoltaic cells (10), both transparent and non-transparent to sub-bandgap light, are provided as devices for use alone or in combination with other cells in split spectrum apparatus or other applications.

  10. STEM in the Ohio Labor Market: A Mismatch or a Missed Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Stacia Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the supply of educated workers and the talent demands of employers is complex. Declining educational attainment levels in the US have been identified as a possible cause for the reported mismatch between the availability of talent that businesses want to hire and the talent available in the labor market, especially in the…

  11. Sector-Based Analysis of the Education-Occupation Mismatch in the Turkish Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercan, Murat Anil; Karakas, Mesut; Citci, Sadettin Haluk; Babacan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of sectorial undereducation and overeducation problems in the Turkish labor market. In order to cope with this issue, the 2009 Household Labor Force Survey (TurkStat), which covers 145,934 individuals within 27 sectors, was utilized. An objective measure of education-occupation mismatch based…

  12. Nuclease stability of boron-modified nucleic acids: application to label-free mismatch detection.

    PubMed

    Reverte, Maëva; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Smietana, Michael

    2015-11-21

    5'-End boronic acid-modified oligonucleotides were evaluated against various nucleases at single and double stranded levels. The results show that these modifications induce a high resistance to degradation by calf-spleen and snake venom phosphodiesterases. More importantly, this eventually led to the development of a new label-free enzyme-assisted fluorescence-based method for single mismatch detection.

  13. A review of climate-driven mismatches between interdependent phenophases in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Alison; Caffarra, Amelia; O'Neill, Bridget F

    2011-11-01

    Mismatches in phenology between mutually dependent species, resulting from climate change, can have far-reaching consequences throughout an ecosystem at both higher and lower trophic levels. Rising temperatures, due to climate warming, have resulted in advances in development and changes in behaviour of many organisms around the world. However, not all species or phenophases are responding to this increase in temperature at the same rate, thus creating a disruption to previously synchronised interdependent key life-cycle stages. Mismatches have been reported between plants and pollinators, predators and prey, and pests and hosts. Here, we review mismatches between interdependent phenophases at different trophic levels resulting from climate change. We categorized the studies into (1) terrestrial (natural and agricultural) ecosystems, and (2) aquatic (freshwater and marine) ecosystems. As expected, we found reports of 'winners' and 'losers' in each system, such as earlier emergence of prey enabling partial avoidance of predators, potential reductions in crop yield if herbivore pests emerge before their predators and possible declines in marine biodiversity due to disruption in plankton-fish phenologies. Furthermore, in the marine environment rising temperatures have resulted in synchrony in a previously mismatched prey and predator system, resulting in an abrupt population decline in the prey species. The examples reviewed suggest that more research into the complex interactions between species in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is necessary to make conclusive predictions of how climate warming may impact the fragile balances within ecosystems in future. PMID:21509461

  14. Can Mismatch Negativity Be Linked to Synaptic Processes? A Glutamatergic Approach to Deviance Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelnikov, Kuzma

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to provide a theoretical framework to elucidate the neurophysiological underpinnings of deviance detection as reflected by mismatch negativity. A six-step model of the information processing necessary for deviance detection is proposed. In this model, predictive coding of learned regularities is realized by means of long-term…

  15. Practical attacks on decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems with detector efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Yangyang; Gao, Ming; Wang, Weilong; Li, Chaobo; Ma, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    To the active-basis-choice decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems with detector efficiency mismatch, we present a modified attack strategy, which is based on the faked states attack, with quantum nondemolition measurement ability to restress the threat of detector efficiency mismatch. Considering that perfect quantum nondemolition measurement ability doesn't exist in real life, we also propose a practical attack strategy using photon number resolving detectors. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation results show that, without changing the channel, our attack strategies are serious threats to decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems. The eavesdropper may get some information about the secret key without causing any alarms. Besides, the lower bound of detector efficiency mismatch to run our modified faked states attack successfully with perfect quantum nondemolition measurement ability is also given out, which provides the producers of quantum-key-distribution systems with a reference and can be treated as the approximate secure bound of detector efficiency mismatch in decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems.

  16. Affirmative Action in Higher Education in India: Targeting, Catch Up, and Mismatch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisancho, Veronica; Krishna, Kala

    2016-01-01

    Using detailed data on the 2008 graduating class from an elite engineering institution in India, we evaluate the impact of affirmative action policies in higher education focusing on three issues: targeting, catch up, and mismatch. We find that admission preferences effectively target minority students who are poorer than average displaced…

  17. The Extent of Skills Mismatch among Childhood Education Graduates of Princess Alia University College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashash, Hyam M.

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the extent of skill mismatch between the skills the childhood education graduates at Al-Balqa Applied University--Princess Alia University College acquired during their studies and those demanded in the labor market. The descriptive survey design was adopted and the purposive sampling technique was employed to…

  18. Cultural Mismatch and the Education of Aboriginal Youths: The Interplay of Cultural Identities and Teacher Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryberg, Stephanie A.; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; D'Arrisso, Alexandra; Flores, Heidi; Ponizovskiy, Vladimir; Ranney, John D.; Mandour, Tarek; Tootoosis, Curtis; Robinson, Sandy; Russo, Natalie; Burack, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    In response to the enduring "deficit" approach to the educational attainment of Aboriginal students in North America, we hypothesized that academic underperformance is related to a cultural mismatch between Aboriginal students' cultural background, which emphasizes connectedness and interdependence, and the mainstream White model of education,…

  19. Labour Market Mismatch among UK Graduates: An Analysis Using REFLEX Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Seamus; Sloane, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    There is much disagreement in the literature over the extent to which graduates are mismatched in the labour market and the reasons for this. In this paper we utilise the Flexible Professional in the Knowledge Society (REFLEX) data set to cast light on these issues, based on data for UK graduates. We find substantial pay penalties for…

  20. Optimizing the Face Paradigm of BCI System by Modified Mismatch Negative Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sijie; Jin, Jing; Daly, Ian; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have focused on improving the performance of event-related potential (ERP) based brain computer interfaces (BCIs). The use of a face pattern has been shown to obtain high classification accuracies and information transfer rates (ITRs) by evoking discriminative ERPs (N200 and N400) in addition to P300 potentials. Recently, it has been proved that the performance of traditional P300-based BCIs could be improved through a modification of the mismatch pattern. In this paper, a mismatch inverted face pattern (MIF-pattern) was presented to improve the performance of the inverted face pattern (IF-pattern), one of the state of the art patterns used in visual-based BCI systems. Ten subjects attended in this experiment. The result showed that the mismatch inverted face pattern could evoke significantly larger vertex positive potentials (p < 0.05) and N400s (p < 0.05) compared to the inverted face pattern. The classification accuracy (mean accuracy is 99.58%) and ITRs (mean bit rate is 27.88 bit/min) of the mismatch inverted face pattern was significantly higher than that of the inverted face pattern (p < 0.05). PMID:27774046

  1. Mental Ability and the Effect of Pattern Violation Discrimination on P300 and Mismatch Negativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sculthorpe, Lauren D.; Stelmack, Robert M.; Campbell, Kenneth B.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between mental ability and the ability to detect auditory pattern violations was examined using event-related potential measures, specifically P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN). Thirty female volunteers were presented with a two tone alternating pattern containing infrequent repetition violations in passive (ignore) then active…

  2. Examining the Mismatch between Pupil and Teacher Knowledge in Acid-Base Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    2003-01-01

    Reports a mismatch between teacher and pupil knowledge of acid-base chemistry as a result of controversial episodes from three science lessons. Suggests that the teacher's knowledge is guided by textbook information while the pupil's knowledge is based on direct experimental experience. Proposes that classroom activities should support the…

  3. The effect of matching and mismatching cognitive style and science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conwell, Catherine R.; Helgeson, Stanley L.; Wachowiak, Dale G.

    This study examined the effect of matching learners' cognitive styles with science learning activities on science knowledge and attitudes. Fifty-six elementary education majors who were identified as Sensing Feeling types on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator participated in this study. The Sensing Feeling type is predominant among elementary school educators. The subjects participated in either nine science activities matched to the learning preferences of Sensing Feelers or nine science activities mismatched to their learning preferences. These mismatched activities were geared toward the learning preferences of Intuitive Thinkers, the dominant type among scientists. Results revealed no significant differences between matched and mismatched groups in knowledge of the material presented or overall attitude toward science and toward science teaching. Comparisons made subsequent to the hypothesized analyses did suggest that cognitive style may affect reactions to certain specific learning activities. The immediate reactions of forty non-Sensing Feeling types who also experienced the treatments were compared to those of the 56 Sensing Feeling subjects. Certain activities which were rated by judges prior to the onset of treatment as being particularly well-matched to the Sensing Feeling style did receive significantly more favorable ratings by the Sensing Feeling subjects than by other types. Conversely, the Sensing Feelers gave significantly lower ratings than other types to certain activities which, according to independent judges, were strongly mismatched to the Sensing Feeling style.

  4. Mismatch Negativity Elicited by Tones and Speech Sounds: Changed Topographical Distribution in Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Frank; Reinvang, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study used the event-related brain potential mismatch negativity (MMN) to investigate preconscious discrimination of harmonically rich tones (differing in duration) and consonant-vowel syllables (differing in the initial consonant) in aphasia. Eighteen Norwegian aphasic patients, examined on average 3 months after brain injury, were compared…

  5. Mental Ability and Mismatch Negativity: Pre-Attentive Discrimination of Abstract Feature Conjunctions in Auditory Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlihan, Michael; Stelmack, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The relation between mental ability and the ability to detect violations of an abstract, third-order conjunction rule was examined using event-related potential measures, specifically mismatch negativity (MMN). The primary objective was to determine whether the extraction of invariant relations based on abstract conjunctions between two…

  6. Educational Mismatches and Earnings: Extensions of Occupational Mobility Theory and Evidence of Human Capital Depreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubb, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Using a human capital theory framework, this study examines the impact of educational mismatches on earnings and occupational mobility. Occupational mobility theory suggests that overeducated workers observe greater upward occupational mobility and undereducated workers observe lower upward occupational mobility. By extension, this leads to…

  7. The Impact of Educational Mismatch on Firm Productivity: Evidence from Linked Panel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampelmann, Stephan; Rycx, Francois

    2012-01-01

    We provide first evidence regarding the direct impact of educational mismatch on firm productivity. To do so, we rely on representative linked employer-employee panel data for Belgium covering the period 1999-2006. Controlling for simultaneity issues, time-invariant unobserved workplace characteristics, cohort effects and dynamics in the…

  8. Mismatching between circulating strains and vaccine strains of influenza: Effect on Hajj pilgrims from both hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine is expected to provide optimum protection if the vaccine strains match the circulating strains. The effect of worldwide mismatch between the vaccine strains and extant strains on travelers attending Hajj pilgrimage is not known. Annually 2-3 million Muslims coming from north and south hemispheres congregate at Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, where intense congestion amplifies the risk of respiratory infection up to eight fold. In order to estimate, to what extent mismatching increases the risk of vaccine failure in Hajj pilgrims, we have examined the global data on influenza epidemiology since 2003, in light of the available data from Hajj. These data demonstrate that globally mismatching between circulating and vaccine strains has occurred frequently over the last 12 years, and the mismatch seems to have affected the Hajj pilgrims, however, influenza virus characteristics were studied only in a limited number of Hajj seasons. When the vaccines are different, dual vaccination of travelers by vaccines for southern and northern hemispheres should be considered for Hajj pilgrims whenever logistically feasible. Consideration should also be given to the use of vaccines with broader coverage, i.e., quadrivalent, or higher immunogenicity. Continuous surveillance of influenza at Hajj is important. PMID:26317639

  9. Regional Differences in the Listener's Phonemic Inventory Affect Semantic Processing: A Mismatch Negativity (MMN) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunelliere, Angele; Dufour, Sophie; Nguyen, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Using the mismatch negativity (MMN) response, we examined how Standard French and Southern French speakers access the meaning of words ending in /e/ or /[epsilon]/ vowels which are contrastive in Standard French but not in Southern French. In Standard French speakers, there was a significant difference in the amplitude of the brain response after…

  10. A mismatch in the human realism of face and voice produces an uncanny valley.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Wade J; Szerszen, Kevin A; Lu, Amy Shirong; Schermerhorn, Paul W; Scheutz, Matthias; Macdorman, Karl F

    2011-01-01

    The uncanny valley has become synonymous with the uneasy feeling of viewing an animated character or robot that looks imperfectly human. Although previous uncanny valley experiments have focused on relations among a character's visual elements, the current experiment examines whether a mismatch in the human realism of a character's face and voice causes it to be evaluated as eerie. The results support this hypothesis.

  11. Evaluating the Competency Mismatch between Master of Engineering Graduates and Industry Needs in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Lijun; Zhang, Shulin; Gu, Jibao

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the mismatch between the educational attainment of a graduate with a Master of Engineering (MEng) degree and the industry needs in China. A competency list for MEng graduates from the perspective of industry needs was constructed. And a survey was conducted among MEng graduate students, alumni, and employers to assess the…

  12. Use of mismatched grating pairs in chirped-pulse amplification systems.

    PubMed

    Squier, J; Barty, C P; Salin, F O; Le Blanc, C; Kane, S

    1998-03-20

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge the use of mismatched grating pairs between the stretching and compression systems in a chirped-pulse amplification laser. Pulses as short as 57 fs are generated with 2000-lines/mm gratings in the compressor and 1200-lines/mm gratings in the stretcher.

  13. The Impact of Major-Job Mismatch on College Graduates' Early Career Earnings: Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the mismatch between a college major and job on college graduates' early career earnings using a sample from China. On average, a major-job mismatched college graduate is found to suffer from an income loss that is much lower than the penalty documented in previous studies. The income losses are also found to…

  14. The Role of Education Pathways in the Relationship between Job Mismatch, Wages and Job Satisfaction: A Panel Estimation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavromaras, Kostas; Sloane, Peter; Wei, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the outcome of over-skilling and over-education on wages and job satisfaction of full-time employees in Australia between 2001 and 2008. We employ a random effects probit model with Mundlak corrections. We find differences by type of mismatch, education pathway, and gender. We categorise reported mismatches as genuine…

  15. Marker Effects of G to C Transversions on Intragenic Recombination and Mismatch Repair in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Schar, P.; Kohli, J.

    1993-01-01

    G to C transversion mutations show very strong allele-specific marker effects on the frequency of wild-type recombinants in intragenic two-factor crosses. Here we present a detailed study of the marker effect of one representative, the ade6-M387 mutation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Crosses of M387 with other mutations at varying distance reveal highly increased prototroph frequencies in comparison with the C to T transition mutation ade6-51 (control without any known marker effect) located four nucleotides from M387. The marker effect of M387 is strongest (>40-fold) for crosses with mutations less than 15 nucleotides from M387. It decreases to an intermediate level (5-10-fold) in crosses with mutations located 25-150 base pairs from M387/51 and is very low in crosses with mutations beyond 200 base pairs. On the basis of these results and the quantitation of the low efficiency of C/C mismatch repair presented in the accompanying publication we propose the existence of at least two different types of mechanisms for base mismatch repair in fission yeast. The major system is suggested to recognize all base mismatches except C/C with high efficiency and to generate long excision tracts (approximately 100 nucleotides unidirectionally). The minor system is proposed to recognize all base mismatches including C/C with low and variable efficiency and to have short excision tracts (approximately 10 nucleotides unidirectionally). We estimate from the M387 marker effect that the minor system accounts for approximately 1-8% repair of non-C/C mismatches (depending on the nature of the mutation) in fission yeast meiosis. PMID:8462844

  16. Influence of donor–recipient sex mismatch on long-term survival of pancreatic grafts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Mei, Shengmin; Xiang, Jie; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Qijun; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Hu, Zhenhua; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of sex mismatch on graft survival after pancreas transplantation. We evaluated 24,195 pancreas-transplant recipients reported in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients over a 25-year period. Pancreatic graft survival (PGS) was analyzed according to donor–recipient sex pairing using Kaplan–Meier estimations. Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. A total of 14,187 male and 10,008 female recipients were included in final analyses. Mean follow-up was 8.3 ± 5.7 years. In multivariate analyses, neither recipient sex nor donor sex was associated with pancreatic graft failure (PGF), but donor–recipient sex mismatch (regardless of recipient sex) was an independent predictor of PGS (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04–1.14; p < 0.001). Compared with M → M sex-matched recipients in univariate analyses, M → F and F → M sex mismatches were associated with an increased risk of PGF. Adjustment for significant recipient and donor factors eliminated the association between F → M sex mismatch and PGF (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.93–1.10; p = 0.752), but not M → F (1.09; 1.02–1.17; 0.020). Stratified analyses suggested that the negative effect of donor–recipient sex mismatch could be neutralized in older patients. These findings suggest that donor–recipient sex pairing should be taken into consideration in organ-allocation strategies. PMID:27403718

  17. Functional distance between recipient and donor HLA-DPB1 determines nonpermissive mismatches in unrelated HCT.

    PubMed

    Crivello, Pietro; Heinold, Andreas; Rebmann, Vera; Ottinger, Hellmut D; Horn, Peter A; Beelen, Dietrich W; Fleischhauer, Katharina

    2016-07-01

    The role of HLA amino acid (AA) polymorphism for the outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is controversial, in particular for HLA class II. Here, we investigated this question in nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 T-cell epitope (TCE) mismatches reflected by numerical functional distance (FD) scores, assignable to all HLA-DPB1 alleles based on the combined impact of 12 polymorphic AAs. We calculated the difference in FD scores (ΔFD) of mismatched HLA-DPB1 alleles in patients and their 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated donors of 379 HCTs performed at our center for acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Receiver-operator curve-based stratification into 2 ΔFD subgroups showed a significantly higher percentage of nonpermissive TCE mismatches for ΔFD >2.665, compared with ΔFD ≤2.665 (88% vs 25%, P < .0001). In multivariate analysis, ΔFD >2.665 was significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.87; P < .021) and event-free survival (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.82; P < .021), compared with ΔFD ≤2.665. These associations were stronger than those observed for TCE mismatches. There was a marked but not statistically significant increase in the hazards of relapse and nonrelapse mortality in the high ΔFD subgroup, whereas no differences were observed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. Seven nonconservative AA substitutions in peptide-binding positions had a significantly stronger impact on ΔFD compared with 5 others (P = .0025), demonstrating qualitative differences in the relative impact of AA polymorphism in HLA-DPB1. The novel concept of ΔFD sheds new light onto nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in unrelated HCT. PMID:27162243

  18. Camouflage mismatch in seasonal coat color due to decreased snow duration.

    PubMed

    Mills, L Scott; Zimova, Marketa; Oyler, Jared; Running, Steven; Abatzoglou, John T; Lukacs, Paul M

    2013-04-30

    Most examples of seasonal mismatches in phenology span multiple trophic levels, with timing of animal reproduction, hibernation, or migration becoming detached from peak food supply. The consequences of such mismatches are difficult to link to specific future climate change scenarios because the responses across trophic levels have complex underlying climate drivers often confounded by other stressors. In contrast, seasonal coat color polyphenism creating camouflage against snow is a direct and potentially severe type of seasonal mismatch if crypsis becomes compromised by the animal being white when snow is absent. It is unknown whether plasticity in the initiation or rate of coat color change will be able to reduce mismatch between the seasonal coat color and an increasingly snow-free background. We find that natural populations of snowshoe hares exposed to 3 y of widely varying snowpack have plasticity in the rate of the spring white-to-brown molt, but not in either the initiation dates of color change or the rate of the fall brown-to-white molt. Using an ensemble of locally downscaled climate projections, we also show that annual average duration of snowpack is forecast to decrease by 29-35 d by midcentury and 40-69 d by the end of the century. Without evolution in coat color phenology, the reduced snow duration will increase the number of days that white hares will be mismatched on a snowless background by four- to eightfold by the end of the century. This novel and visually compelling climate change-induced stressor likely applies to >9 widely distributed mammals with seasonal coat color. PMID:23589881

  19. Facilitating mismatch discrimination by surface-affixed PNA probes via ionic regulation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabani; Mishra, Sourav; Banerjee, Trambaki; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2013-03-12

    There has been a search for alternative nucleic acids that can be more effectively used in nucleic acid detection technologies compared to the DNA probes. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which contains a non-ionic peptidic backbone, offers such possibilities since it is nuclease-resistant, it binds to DNA with high affinity, and it can be readily self-assembled onto solid substrates, e.g., gold(111), with a molecular backbone orientation away from the substrate. Although application of PNA as a sensor probe has been exemplified, so far there is little or no account of the ionic modulation of single base mismatch discrimination capacity of surface-tethered PNA probes. Herein, we report "on-surface" melting temperatures of PNA-DNA duplexes formed on gold(111) surface, as obtained from fluorescence measurements. We show that surface-tethered PNA forms a stabler duplex than DNA, and is more effective in single base mismatch discrimination than DNA. Importantly, although PNA backbone is non-ionic, variation in the ionic components in hybridization buffer, i.e., varying concentration of monovalent sodium ion, and the nature of anion and the cation, exhibits clear effects on the mismatch discrimination capacity of PNA probes. In general, with decreasing cation concentration, PNA-DNA duplexes are stabilized and mismatch discrimination capacity of the PNA probes is enhanced. The stabilizing/destabilizing effects of anions are found to follow the Hofmeister series, emphasizing the importance of hydrophobic interaction between nucleobases for stability of the PNA-DNA duplexes. Interestingly, the nature of ionic dependence of "on-surface" mismatch detection ability of PNA probes differs significantly from the "solution" behavior of these probes.

  20. Significance of magnetic resonance angiography-diffusion weighted imaging mismatch in hyperacute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ichiro; Takeda, Hidetaka; Furuya, Daisuke; Dembo, Tomohisa; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Kato, Yuji; Ito, Yasuo; Fukuoka, Takuya; Maruyama, Hajime; Tanahashi, Norio

    2012-02-01

    Therapeutic results with respect to lesion size were analyzed and compared in patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction with and without major artery lesions on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and in those who did and did not receive intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Of the patients with cerebral infarction who visited the hospital within 3 hours of onset between April 2007 and September 2009, 127 patients with cerebral infarction in the anterior circulation region in whom head magnetic resonance imaging (diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) or MRA was performed (81 men and 46 women; mean age, 71 ± 11 years) were enrolled. Major artery lesions (+) were defined as internal carotid artery occlusion and middle cerebral artery (M1/M2 segment) occlusion and ≥50% stenosis. Based on the presence or absence of major artery lesions and the size of DWI lesions, the subjects were divided into 3 groups: MRA-DWI mismatch (+) group [major artery lesion (+) and DWI-ASPECTS ≥6], MRA-DWI mismatch (-) group [major artery lesion (+) and DWI-ASPECTS <6], and major artery lesion (-) group. IV t-PA was given to 21 of the 64 patients in the MRA-DWI mismatch (+) group, to 1 of the 24 patients in the MRA-DWI mismatch (-) group, and to 9 of the 39 patients in the major artery lesion (-) group. In the MRA-DWI mismatch (+) group (n = 64), the median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission was higher in t-PA-treated patients than in t-PA-untreated patients (15 vs 11). The modified Rankin scale (mRS) score at day 90 after onset was more favorable in t-PA-treated patients (0-2 in 10 patients [48%] and 3-6 in 11 patients [52%]) than in t-PA-untreated patients (0-2 in 12 patients [28%] and 3-6 in 31 patients [72%]). After adjusting for admission NIHSS score, there was a significant difference in outcome (mRS score) between t-PA-treated patients (0-2 in 10 patients [48%] and 3-6 in 11 patients [52%]) and t-PA-untreated patients (0-2 in 3

  1. Underivatized oxysterols and nanoLC-ESI-MS: A mismatch.

    PubMed

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Vesterdal, Caroline; Wilson, Steven Ray; Lundanes, Elsa

    2015-07-01

    Due to their non-charged character, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) measurements of oxysterols are often performed after derivatization with e.g. charged Girard reagents. However, derivatization reactions are time-consuming and may require numerous steps to remove excess reagent. In addition, extensive sample handling can be associated with cholesterol autoxidation, resulting in analyte artifacts and hence false positives. Nano scale liquid chromatography in combination with electrospray-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-MS) is a powerful tool for analyzing limited samples, due to substantially increased sensitivity compared to conventional LC-ESI-MS. The signal enhancement may compensate for the poor ionization of the oxysterols; hence we have explored the possibility to quantify oxysterols without derivatization using nanoLC-ESI-MS. Non-derivatized oxysterols and nanoLC were however not compatible, due to persistent and large carry-over. This was attributed to the extended contribution of surface to volume ratio in such miniaturized systems and interactions with the materials of the nanoLC instrumentation (e.g. adsorption to the fused silica tubing). Two contemporary MS instruments (Q-Exactive™ hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap and TSQ Quantiva™ triple quadrupole) were used. However, both the MS and MS/MS spectra of non-derivatized oxysterols were ambiguous and/or unrepeatable for both of the instruments employed. Derivatizing oxysterols is more cumbersome, but provides more selective and reliable results, and Girard derivatization+nanoLC-ESI-MS continues to be our recommended choice for measuring oxysterols in very limited samples. These investigations also indicate that extra care should be taken to remove lipids prior to nanoLC of other analytes, as adsorbed oxysterols, etc. can compromise analysis.

  2. Auditory mismatch impairments are characterized by core neural dysfunctions in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gaebler, Arnim Johannes; Mathiak, Klaus; Koten, Jan Willem; König, Andrea Anna; Koush, Yury; Weyer, David; Depner, Conny; Matentzoglu, Simeon; Edgar, James Christopher; Willmes, Klaus; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail

    2015-05-01

    Major theories on the neural basis of schizophrenic core symptoms highlight aberrant salience network activity (insula and anterior cingulate cortex), prefrontal hypoactivation, sensory processing deficits as well as an impaired connectivity between temporal and prefrontal cortices. The mismatch negativity is a potential biomarker of schizophrenia and its reduction might be a consequence of each of these mechanisms. In contrast to the previous electroencephalographic studies, functional magnetic resonance imaging may disentangle the involved brain networks at high spatial resolution and determine contributions from localized brain responses and functional connectivity to the schizophrenic impairments. Twenty-four patients and 24 matched control subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during an optimized auditory mismatch task. Haemodynamic responses and functional connectivity were compared between groups. These data sets further entered a diagnostic classification analysis to assess impairments on the individual patient level. In the control group, mismatch responses were detected in the auditory cortex, prefrontal cortex and the salience network (insula and anterior cingulate cortex). Furthermore, mismatch processing was associated with a deactivation of the visual system and the dorsal attention network indicating a shift of resources from the visual to the auditory domain. The patients exhibited reduced activation in all of the respective systems (right auditory cortex, prefrontal cortex, and the salience network) as well as reduced deactivation of the visual system and the dorsal attention network. Group differences were most prominent in the anterior cingulate cortex and adjacent prefrontal areas. The latter regions also exhibited a reduced functional connectivity with the auditory cortex in the patients. In the classification analysis, haemodynamic responses yielded a maximal accuracy of 83% based on four features; functional connectivity

  3. Electrical impedance tomography for assessing ventilation/perfusion mismatch for pulmonary embolism detection without interruptions in respiration.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Doan Trang; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Bhaskaran, Abhishek; Barry, Michael A; Pouliopoulos, Jim; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair L

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown high correlation between pulmonary perfusion mapping with impedance contrast enhanced Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) and standard perfusion imaging methods such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT). EIT has many advantages over standard imaging methods as it is highly portable and non-invasive. Contrast enhanced EIT uses hypertonic saline bolus instead of nephrotoxic contrast medium that are utilized by CT and nuclear Ventilation/Perfusion (V/Q) scans. However, current implementation of contrast enhanced EIT requires induction of an apnea period for perfusion measurement, rendering it disadvantageous compared with current gold standard imaging modalities. In the present paper, we propose the use of a wavelet denoising algorithm to separate perfusion signal from ventilation signal such that no interruption in patient's ventilation would be required. Furthermore, right lung to left lung perfusion ratio and ventilation ratio are proposed to assess the mismatch between ventilation and perfusion for detection of Pulmonary Embolism (PE). The proposed methodology was validated on an ovine model (n=3, 83.7±7.7 kg) with artificially induced PE in the right lung. The results showed a difference in right lung to left lung perfusion ratio between baseline and diseased states in all cases with all paired t-tests between baseline and PE yielding p <; 0.01, while the right lung to left lung ventilation ratio remained unchanged in two out of three experiments. Statistics were pooled from multiple repetitions of measurements per experiment.

  4. Perturbation theory for the refractive index mismatch between the inclusion and the surrounding tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Chenggang; Liu, Quan

    2016-08-01

    Tissue refractive index is one optical contrast mechanism with diagnostic potential, it is very important to investigate the effect of the refractive index mismatch on light propagation through diffusive regions. Here, we present a new analytical solution of perturbation theory for the refractive index mismatch between the small spherical inclusion and the surrounding tissues. The solution has been used to implement fitting procedures in order to obtain the optical properties of a heterogeneous sphere in semi-infinite medium from measurements of diffuse reflectance. Finally, perturbation theory has been validated by comparisons with the results of Monte Carlo simulation. The new perturbation theory would provide a basis for allowing early disease diagnosis and automatic screening.

  5. A review and summary of cell and module mismatch losses from theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambarski, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Studies on power loss due to photovoltaic (PV) cell and module parameter mismatch were reviewed. The losses result from the current voltage (I-V) characteristics of cells which vary over a manufactured lot. The peak power and the peak power I-V point vary from cell to cell. The largest parameter variation occurs in the cell photocurrent generation and the most significant loss occurs in series connections since all cells are essentially limited by the lowest photocurrent. Most theoretical studies address only photocurrent variation effects, which consider shunt and series resistance, ideality factor and saturation current to be comparatively insignificant. One study is identified which specifically configured the study of mismatch loss effects. Experimental results consist of estimates based on limited data not taken from specially configured tests.

  6. Maladaptation and phenotypic mismatch in hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon Salmo salar released in the wild.

    PubMed

    Stringwell, R; Lock, A; Stutchbury, C J; Baggett, E; Taylor, J; Gough, P J; Garcia de Leaniz, C

    2014-12-01

    Changes in body shape, fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and crypsis were compared among Atlantic salmon Salmo salar fry kept as controls in captivity and those released and subsequently recaptured in the wild according to a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design. Hatchery fish that survived in the wild became more cryptic and displayed a much lower incidence of fin erosion and of asymmetric individuals than control fish kept in captivity. Significant differences in body shape were also apparent, and survivors had longer heads, thicker caudal peduncles and a more streamlined body shape than hatchery controls as early as 20 days following stocking, most likely as a result of phenotypic plasticity and non-random, selective mortality of maladapted phenotypes. Hatchery-reared fish typically perform poorly in the wild and the results of this study indicate that this may be due to phenotypic mismatch, i.e. because hatcheries generate fish that are phenotypically mismatched to the natural environment.

  7. Surface reconstruction: An effective method for the growth of mismatched materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Zheng, Beining; Wu, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Long; Wu, Jie; Guo, Hongping; Huang, Keke; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-01-01

    The crystalline quality of epitaxial films depends on the degree of lattice match between substrates and films. Here, we report a growth strategy for large mismatched epi-films to grow GaSb films on Si(1 1 1) substrates. The epitaxial strategy can be influenced by controlling the surface reconstructions of Sb-treated Si(1 1 1). The film with the best quality was grown on Si(1 1 1)-(5√3 × 5√3)-Sb surface due to the stress release and the formation of a self-assembled 2D fishbone structure. Controlled surface engineering provides an effective pathway towards the growth of the large mismatched materials.

  8. Atomic and electronic structures of lattice mismatched Cu2O/TiO2 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuzhi; Kavaipatti, Balasubramaniam; Kim, Sung-Joo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Ager, Joel W.; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2014-05-01

    Heterojunction interfaces between metal oxides are often highly lattice mismatched. The atomic and electronic structures of such interfaces, however, are not well understood. We have synthesized Cu2O/TiO2 heterojunction thin films with 13% lattice mismatch and studied the interface via experimental methods and large-scale density function theory calculations of supercells containing ˜1300 atoms. We find that an interface of epitaxial quality is formed via a coincidence site lattice of 8 Cu2O unit cells matching 9 TiO2 unit cells. Calculations reveal the existence of a dislocation core of the O sublattices at the interface and a random arrangement of one layer of interfacial Cu atoms. The interfacial electronic structure is found to be mostly determined by the interfacial Cu distribution, rather than by the O dislocation core. The conduction band minimum and valence band maximum states are spatially separated, and there is no strongly localized state near the core.

  9. Phosphorylation of PCNA by EGFR inhibits mismatch repair and promotes misincorporation during DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Janice; Li, Jessie Y; Lee, Sanghee; Tong, Dan; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2015-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays essential roles in eukaryotic cells during DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair (MMR), and other events at the replication fork. Earlier studies show that PCNA is regulated by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation of tyrosine 211 (Y211) by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the functional significance of Y211-phosphorylated PCNA remains unknown. Here, we show that PCNA phosphorylation by EGFR alters its interaction with mismatch-recognition proteins MutSα and MutSβ and interferes with PCNA-dependent activation of MutLα endonuclease, thereby inhibiting MMR at the initiation step. Evidence is also provided that Y211-phosphorylated PCNA induces nucleotide misincorporation during DNA synthesis. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which Y211-phosphorylated PCNA promotes cancer development and progression via facilitating error-prone DNA replication and suppressing the MMR function.

  10. Iterative Robust Capon Beamforming with Adaptively Updated Array Steering Vector Mismatch Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liguo

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the conventional adaptive beamformer is sensitive to the array steering vector (ASV) mismatch. And the output signal-to interference and noise ratio (SINR) suffers deterioration, especially in the presence of large direction of arrival (DOA) error. To improve the robustness of traditional approach, we propose a new approach to iteratively search the ASV of the desired signal based on the robust capon beamformer (RCB) with adaptively updated uncertainty levels, which are derived in the form of quadratically constrained quadratic programming (QCQP) problem based on the subspace projection theory. The estimated levels in this iterative beamformer present the trend of decreasing. Additionally, other array imperfections also degrade the performance of beamformer in practice. To cover several kinds of mismatches together, the adaptive flat ellipsoid models are introduced in our method as tight as possible. In the simulations, our beamformer is compared with other methods and its excellent performance is demonstrated via the numerical examples. PMID:27355008

  11. Design and synthesis of hairpin probe for specific mis-match discrimination.

    PubMed

    Misra, Arvind; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, K C

    2007-01-01

    A single stranded hairpin probe labeled with fluorescein at its 5'-end and terminates with deoxyguanosine nucleotide at 3'- end, as quencher, has been designed and synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The system has been used as an alternative to molecular beacon. The deoxyguanosine residues have been kept at the 3'-end of the complementary arm strand to quench the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore, making the hairpin probe behave like a conventional molecular beacon. The proposed probe has been used to find a correlation between fluorescence and thermal behaviour on hybridizing it with several mismatched target oligonucleotides. The designed probe has shown greater degree of specificity with perfectly matched target oligonucleotide, while it shows a variable degree of destabilization with mismatched (A/C) target complementary oligonucleotides.

  12. Influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli GlpG rhomboid protease.

    PubMed

    Foo, Alexander C Y; Harvey, Brandon G R; Metz, Jeff J; Goto, Natalie K

    2015-04-01

    Rhomboids comprise a broad family of intramembrane serine proteases that are found in a wide range of organisms and participate in a diverse array of biological processes. High-resolution structures of the catalytic transmembrane domain of the Escherichia coli GlpG rhomboid have provided numerous insights that help explain how hydrolytic cleavage can be achieved below the membrane surface. Key to this are observations that GlpG hydrophobic domain dimensions may not be sufficient to completely span the native lipid bilayer. This formed the basis for a model where hydrophobic mismatch Induces thinning of the local membrane environment to promote access to transmembrane substrates. However, hydrophobic mismatch also has the potential to alter the functional properties of the rhomboid, a possibility we explore in the current work. For this purpose, we purified the catalytic transmembrane domain of GlpG into phosphocholine or maltoside detergent micelles of varying alkyl chain lengths, and assessed proteolytic function with a model water-soluble substrate. Catalytic turnover numbers were found to depend on detergent alkyl chain length, with saturated chains containing 10-12 carbon atoms supporting maximal activity. Similar results were obtained in phospholipid bicelles, with no proteolytic activity being detected in longer-chain lipids. Although differences in thermal stability and GlpG oligomerization could not explain these activity differences, circular dichroism spectra suggest that mismatch gives rise to a small change in structure. Overall, these results demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch can exert an inhibitory effect on rhomboid activity, with the potential for changes in local membrane environment to regulate activity in vivo.

  13. Questioning the role of phenology shifts and trophic mismatching in a planktonic food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Angus; Harmer, Rachel A.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; McEvoy, Andrea J.; Smyth, Tim J.; Cummings, Denise G.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Maud, Jacqueline L.; McConville, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    In a warming climate, differential shifts in the seasonal timing of predators and prey have been suggested to lead to trophic "mismatches" that decouple primary, secondary and tertiary production. We tested this hypothesis using a 25-year time-series of weekly sampling at the Plymouth L4 site, comparing 57 plankton taxa spanning 4 trophic levels. During warm years, there was a weak tendency for earlier timings of spring taxa and later timings of autumn taxa. While this is in line with many previous findings, numerous exceptions existed and only a few taxa (e.g. Gyrodinium spp., Pseudocalanus elongatus, and Acartia clausi) showed consistent, strong evidence for temperature-related timing shifts, revealed by all 4 of the timing indices that we used. Also, the calculated offsets in timing (i.e. "mismatches") between predator and prey were no greater in extreme warm or cold years than during more average years. Further, the magnitude of these offsets had no effect on the "success" of the predator, in terms of their annual mean abundance or egg production rates. Instead numerous other factors override, including: inter-annual variability in food quantity, high food baseline levels, turnover rates and prolonged seasonal availability, allowing extended periods of production. Furthermore many taxa, notably meroplankton, increased well before the spring bloom. While theoretically a chronic mismatch, this likely reflects trade-offs for example in predation avoidance. Various gelatinous taxa (Phaeocystis, Noctiluca, ctenophores, appendicularians, medusae) may have reduced these predation constraints, with variable, explosive population outbursts likely responding to improved conditions. The match-mismatch hypothesis may apply for highly seasonal, pulsed systems or specialist feeders, but we suggest that the concept is being over-extended to other marine systems where multiple factors compensate.

  14. Robust Sierpiński triangle fractals on symmetry-mismatched Ag(100).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Na; Liu, Liwei; Gu, Gaochen; Li, Chao; Tang, Hao; Peng, Lianmao; Hou, Shimin; Wang, Yongfeng

    2016-08-18

    Sierpiński triangle fractals were constructed on both Ag(111) and symmetry-mismatched fourfold Ag(100) surfaces through chemical reaction between H3PH molecules and Fe atoms under vacuum. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the fractals were stabilized by the strong coordination interaction between Fe and O atoms. In comparison, pure H3PH molecules formed fractals via moderately strong hydrogen bonds only on Ag(111), not on Ag(100).

  15. Regulation of mismatch repair by histone code and posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Ortega, Janice; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2016-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protects genome integrity by correcting DNA replication-associated mispairs, modulating DNA damage-induced cell cycle checkpoints and regulating homeologous recombination. Loss of MMR function leads to cancer development. This review describes progress in understanding how MMR is carried out in the context of chromatin and how chromatin organization/compaction, epigenetic mechanisms and posttranslational modifications of MMR proteins influence and regulate MMR in eukaryotic cells.

  16. Effect of group velocity mismatch on acousto-optic interaction of ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yushkov, K B; Molchanov, V Ya

    2011-12-31

    Equations describing acousto-optic diffraction of ultrashort laser pulses in an anisotropic medium are derived, taking into account the group velocity mismatch of optical eigenmodes. It is shown that the solution of the modified coupled-mode equations taking into account the group delay is characterised by an increase in the pulse duration, a decrease in diffraction efficiency, a change in the shape of the wave packet envelope, as well as by an increase in the width of the transmission function.

  17. Robust Sierpiński triangle fractals on symmetry-mismatched Ag(100).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Li, Na; Liu, Liwei; Gu, Gaochen; Li, Chao; Tang, Hao; Peng, Lianmao; Hou, Shimin; Wang, Yongfeng

    2016-08-18

    Sierpiński triangle fractals were constructed on both Ag(111) and symmetry-mismatched fourfold Ag(100) surfaces through chemical reaction between H3PH molecules and Fe atoms under vacuum. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the fractals were stabilized by the strong coordination interaction between Fe and O atoms. In comparison, pure H3PH molecules formed fractals via moderately strong hydrogen bonds only on Ag(111), not on Ag(100). PMID:27498982

  18. Scalable solution-phase epitaxial growth of symmetry-mismatched heterostructures on two-dimensional crystal soft template

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhaoyang; Yin, Anxiang; Mao, Jun; Xia, Yi; Kempf, Nicholas; He, Qiyuan; Wang, Yiliu; Chen, Chih-Yen; Zhang, Yanliang; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Ren, Zhifeng; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial heterostructures with precisely controlled composition and electronic modulation are of central importance for electronics, optoelectronics, thermoelectrics, and catalysis. In general, epitaxial material growth requires identical or nearly identical crystal structures with small misfit in lattice symmetry and parameters and is typically achieved by vapor-phase depositions in vacuum. We report a scalable solution-phase growth of symmetry-mismatched PbSe/Bi2Se3 epitaxial heterostructures by using two-dimensional (2D) Bi2Se3 nanoplates as soft templates. The dangling bond–free surface of 2D Bi2Se3 nanoplates guides the growth of PbSe crystal without requiring a one-to-one match in the atomic structure, which exerts minimal restriction on the epitaxial layer. With a layered structure and weak van der Waals interlayer interaction, the interface layer in the 2D Bi2Se3 nanoplates can deform to accommodate incoming layer, thus functioning as a soft template for symmetry-mismatched epitaxial growth of cubic PbSe crystal on rhombohedral Bi2Se3 nanoplates. We show that a solution chemistry approach can be readily used for the synthesis of gram-scale PbSe/Bi2Se3 epitaxial heterostructures, in which the square PbSe (001) layer forms on the trigonal/hexagonal (0001) plane of Bi2Se3 nanoplates. We further show that the resulted PbSe/Bi2Se3 heterostructures can be readily processed into bulk pellet with considerably suppressed thermal conductivity (0.30 W/m·K at room temperature) while retaining respectable electrical conductivity, together delivering a thermoelectric figure of merit ZT three times higher than that of the pristine Bi2Se3 nanoplates at 575 K. Our study demonstrates a unique epitaxy mode enabled by the 2D nanocrystal soft template via an affordable and scalable solution chemistry approach. It opens up new opportunities for the creation of diverse epitaxial heterostructures with highly disparate structures and functions. PMID:27730211

  19. A graphene solution to conductivity mismatch: spin injection from ferromagnetic metal/graphene tunnel contacts into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van't Erve, Olaf

    2014-03-01

    New paradigms for spin-based devices, such as spin-FETs and reconfigurable logic, have been proposed and modeled. These devices rely on electron spin being injected, transported, manipulated and detected in a semiconductor channel. This work is the first demonstration on how a single layer of graphene can be used as a low resistance tunnel barrier solution for electrical spin injection into Silicon at room temperature. We will show that a FM metal / monolayer graphene contact serves as a spin-polarized tunnel barrier which successfully circumvents the classic metal / semiconductor conductivity mismatch issue for electrical spin injection. We demonstrate electrical injection and detection of spin accumulation in Si above room temperature, and show that the corresponding spin lifetimes correlate with the Si carrier concentration, confirming that the spin accumulation measured occurs in the Si and not in interface trap states. An ideal tunnel barrier should exhibit several key material characteristics: a uniform and planar habit with well-controlled thickness, minimal defect / trapped charge density, a low resistance-area product for minimal power consumption, and compatibility with both the FM metal and semiconductor, insuring minimal diffusion to/from the surrounding materials at temperatures required for device processing. Graphene, offers all of the above, while preserving spin injection properties, making it a compelling solution to the conductivity mismatch for spin injection into Si. Although Graphene is very conductive in plane, it exhibits poor conductivity perpendicular to the plane. Its sp2 bonding results in a highly uniform, defect free layer, which is chemically inert, thermally robust, and essentially impervious to diffusion. The use of a single monolayer of graphene at the Si interface provides a much lower RA product than any film of an oxide thick enough to prevent pinholes (1 nm). Our results identify a new route to low resistance-area product spin

  20. DNA Mismatch Repair Interacts with CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent Histone (H3-H4)2 Tetramer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodriges Blanko, Elena; Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y; Kadyrov, Farid A

    2016-04-22

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is required for the maintenance of genome stability and protection of humans from several types of cancer. Human MMR occurs in the chromatin environment, but little is known about the interactions between MMR and the chromatin environment. Previous research has suggested that MMR coincides with replication-coupled assembly of the newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes. The first step in replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is CAF-1-dependent histone (H3-H4)2 tetramer deposition, a process that involves ASF1A-H3-H4 complex. In this work we used reconstituted human systems to investigate interactions between MMR and CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent histone (H3-H4)2 tetramer deposition. We have found that MutSα inhibits CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent packaging of a DNA mismatch into a tetrasome. This finding supports the idea that MMR occurs before the DNA mismatch is packaged into the tetrasome. Our experiments have also revealed that CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent deposition of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramers does not interfere with MMR reactions. In addition, we have established that unnecessary degradation of the discontinuous strand that takes place in both DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ)- and DNA polymerase ϵ (Pol ϵ)-dependent MMR reactions is suppressed by CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent deposition of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramers. These data suggest that CAF-1- and ASF1A-H3-H4-dependent deposition of the histone (H3-H4)2 tetramers is compatible with MMR and protects the discontinuous daughter strand from unnecessary degradation by MMR machinery.

  1. A Bortezomib-Based Regimen Offers Promising Survival and Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in Myeloablative HLA-Mismatched and Unrelated Donor Transplantation: A Phase II Trial.

    PubMed

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T; Lange, Paulina B; Bindra, Bhavjot; Reynolds, Carol G; Chammas, Marie J; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey S; Ho, Vincent T; Glotzbecker, Brett; Nikiforow, Sarah; Ritz, Jerome; Blazar, Bruce R; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Alyea, Edwin P

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients lacking HLA-matched related donors have increased graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Bortezomib added to reduced-intensity conditioning can offer benefit in T cell-replete HLA-mismatched HSCT and may also benefit myeloablative conditioning (MAC) transplants. We conducted a phase II trial of short-course bortezomib plus standard tacrolimus/methotrexate after busulfan/fludarabine MAC in 34 patients with predominantly myeloid malignancies. Fourteen (41%) received 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) and 20 (59%) received 7/8 HLA-mismatched related/unrelated donor peripheral blood stem cell grafts. Median age was 49 years (range, 21 to 60), and median follow-up was 25 months (range, 11 to 36). The regimen was well tolerated. No dose modifications were required. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred at a median of 14 (range, 10 to 33) and 17 (range, 10 to 54) days, respectively. Median 30-day donor chimerism was 99% (range, 90 to 100), and 100-day grades II to IV and III to IV acute GVHD incidence was 32% and 12% respectively. One-year chronic GVHD incidence was 50%. Two-year cumulative incidence of both NRM and relapse was 16%. Two-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 70% and 71%, respectively. Outcomes were comparable to an 8/8 MUD MAC cohort (n = 45). Immune reconstitution was robust. Bortezomib-based MAC HSCT is well tolerated, with HLA-mismatched outcomes comparable with 8/8 MUD MAC HSCT, and is suitable for randomized evaluation. (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01323920.).

  2. Decoding of single-trial auditory mismatch responses for online perceptual monitoring and neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Brandmeyer, Alex; Sadakata, Makiko; Spyrou, Loukianos; McQueen, James M.; Desain, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate pattern classification methods are increasingly applied to neuroimaging data in the context of both fundamental research and in brain-computer interfacing approaches. Such methods provide a framework for interpreting measurements made at the single-trial level with respect to a set of two or more distinct mental states. Here, we define an approach in which the output of a binary classifier trained on data from an auditory mismatch paradigm can be used for online tracking of perception and as a neurofeedback signal. The auditory mismatch paradigm is known to induce distinct perceptual states related to the presentation of high- and low-probability stimuli, which are reflected in event-related potential (ERP) components such as the mismatch negativity (MMN). The first part of this paper illustrates how pattern classification methods can be applied to data collected in an MMN paradigm, including discussion of the optimization of preprocessing steps, the interpretation of features and how the performance of these methods generalizes across individual participants and measurement sessions. We then go on to show that the output of these decoding methods can be used in online settings as a continuous index of single-trial brain activation underlying perceptual discrimination. We conclude by discussing several potential domains of application, including neurofeedback, cognitive monitoring and passive brain-computer interfaces. PMID:24415996

  3. Functional interactions and signaling properties of mammalian DNA mismatch repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellacosa, A

    2001-11-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system promotes genomic fidelity by repairing base-base mismatches, insertion-deletion loops and heterologies generated during DNA replication and recombination. This function is critically dependent on the assembling of multimeric complexes involved in mismatch recognition and signal transduction to downstream repair events. In addition, MMR proteins coordinate a complex network of physical and functional interactions that mediate other DNA transactions, such as transcription-coupled repair, base excision repair and recombination. MMR proteins are also involved in activation of cell cycle checkpoint and induction of apoptosis when DNA damage overwhelms a critical threshold. For this reason, they play a role in cell death by alkylating agents and other chemotherapeutic drugs, including cisplatin. Inactivation of MMR genes in hereditary and sporadic cancer is associated with a mutator phenotype and inhibition of apoptosis. In the future, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and functional interactions of MMR proteins will lead to the development of more effective cancer prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:11687886

  4. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A; Münsterkötter, Anna L; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences.

  5. Microsatellite instability in yeast: dependence on repeat unit size and DNA mismatch repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sia, E A; Kokoska, R J; Dominska, M; Greenwell, P; Petes, T D

    1997-01-01

    We examined the stability of microsatellites of different repeat unit lengths in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in DNA mismatch repair. The msh2 and msh3 mutations destabilized microsatellites with repeat units of 1, 2, 4, 5, and 8 bp; a poly(G) tract of 18 bp was destabilized several thousand-fold by the msh2 mutation and about 100-fold by msh3. The msh6 mutations destabilized microsatellites with repeat units of 1 and 2 bp but had no effect on microsatellites with larger repeats. These results argue that coding sequences containing repetitive DNA tracts will be preferred target sites for mutations in human tumors with mismatch repair defects. We find that the DNA mismatch repair genes destabilize microsatellites with repeat units from 1 to 13 bp but have no effect on the stability of minisatellites with repeat units of 16 or 20 bp. Our data also suggest that displaced loops on the nascent strand, resulting from DNA polymerase slippage, are repaired differently than loops on the template strand. PMID:9111357

  6. Modified bases enable high-efficiency oligonucleotide-mediated allelic replacement via mismatch repair evasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Harris H; Xu, George; Vonner, Ashley J; Church, George

    2011-09-01

    Genome engineering using single-stranded oligonucleotides is an efficient method for generating small chromosomal and episomal modifications in a variety of host organisms. The efficiency of this allelic replacement strategy is highly dependent on avoidance of the endogenous mismatch repair (MMR) machinery. However, global MMR inactivation generally results in significant accumulation of undesired background mutations. Here, we present a novel strategy using oligos containing chemically modified bases (2'-Fluoro-Uridine, 5-Methyl-deoxyCytidine, 2,6-Diaminopurine or Iso-deoxyGuanosine) in place of the standard T, C, A or G to avoid mismatch detection and repair, which we tested in Escherichia coli. This strategy increases transient allelic-replacement efficiencies by up to 20-fold, while maintaining a 100-fold lower background mutation level. We further show that the mismatched bases between the full length oligo and the chromosome are often not incorporated at the target site, probably due to nuclease activity at the 5' and 3' termini of the oligo. These results further elucidate the mechanism of oligo-mediated allelic replacement (OMAR) and enable improved methodologies for efficient, large-scale engineering of genomes.

  7. Vibrational mismatch of metal leads controls thermal conductance of self-assembled monolayer junctions.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shubhaditya; Sierra-Suarez, Jonatan A; Schiffres, Scott N; Ong, Wee-Liat; Higgs, C Fred; McGaughey, Alan J H; Malen, Jonathan A

    2015-05-13

    We present measurements of the thermal conductance of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) junctions formed between metal leads (Au, Ag, Pt, and Pd) with mismatched phonon spectra. The thermal conductance obtained from frequency domain thermoreflectance experiments is 65 ± 7 MW/m(2) K for matched Au-alkanedithiol-Au junctions, while the mismatched Au-alkanedithiol-Pd junctions yield a thermal conductance of 36 ± 3 MW/m(2) K. The experimental observation that junction thermal conductance (per molecule) decreases as the mismatch between the lead vibrational spectra increases, paired with results from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, suggest that phonons scatter elastically at the metal-SAM interfaces. Furthermore, we resolve a known discrepancy between measurements and MD predictions of SAM thermal conductance by using a contact mechanics model to predict 54 ± 15% areal contact in the Au-alkanedithiol-Au experimental junction. This incomplete contact obscures the actual junction thermal conductance of 115 ± 22 MW/m(2) K, which is comparable to that of metal-dielectric interfaces.

  8. Optimization of single-base-pair mismatch discrimination in oligonucleotide microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; El Fantroussi, Said; Smidt, Hauke; Smoot, James C.; Tribou, Erik H.; Kelly, John J.; Noble, Peter A.; Stahl, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The discrimination between perfect-match and single-base-pair-mismatched nucleic acid duplexes was investigated by using oligonucleotide DNA microarrays and nonequilibrium dissociation rates (melting profiles). DNA and RNA versions of two synthetic targets corresponding to the 16S rRNA sequences of Staphylococcus epidermidis (38 nucleotides) and Nitrosomonas eutropha (39 nucleotides) were hybridized to perfect-match probes (18-mer and 19-mer) and to a set of probes having all possible single-base-pair mismatches. The melting profiles of all probe-target duplexes were determined in parallel by using an imposed temperature step gradient. We derived an optimum wash temperature for each probe and target by using a simple formula to calculate a discrimination index for each temperature of the step gradient. This optimum corresponded to the output of an independent analysis using a customized neural network program. These results together provide an experimental and analytical framework for optimizing mismatch discrimination among all probes on a DNA microarray.

  9. A Provably Efficient Algorithm for the k-Mismatch Average Common Substring Problem.

    PubMed

    Thankachan, Sharma V; Apostolico, Alberto; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-06-01

    Alignment-free sequence comparison methods are attracting persistent interest, driven by data-intensive applications in genome-wide molecular taxonomy and phylogenetic reconstruction. Among all the methods based on substring composition, the average common substring (ACS) measure admits a straightforward linear time sequence comparison algorithm, while yielding impressive results in multiple applications. An important direction of this research is to extend the approach to permit a bounded edit/hamming distance between substrings, so as to reflect more accurately the evolutionary process. To date, however, algorithms designed to incorporate k ≥ 1 mismatches have O(n(2)) worst-case time complexity, where n is the total length of the input sequences. On the other hand, accounting for mismatches has shown to lead to much improved classification, while heuristics can improve practical performance. In this article, we close the gap by presenting the first provably efficient algorithm for the k-mismatch average common string (ACSk) problem that takes O(n) space and O(n log(k) n) time in the worst case for any constant k. Our method extends the generalized suffix tree model to incorporate a carefully selected bounded set of perturbed suffixes, and can be applied to other complex approximate sequence matching problems. PMID:27058840

  10. Segmental mismatch in crustacean appendages: the naupliar antennal exopod of Artemia (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Anostraca).

    PubMed

    Maruzzo, Diego; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2009-03-01

    Based on traditional techniques and confocal laser scanning microscopy for external morphology, and immunohistochemistry for the muscular system, we describe here the segmental features of the antennal exopod of Artemia nauplii. Two kinds of serial elements are present, i.e. setae (with cuticular folds at their base) and ringlets (serially arranged sclerites separated by joint-like cuticular folds not extending to form complete rings around the appendage). The two series are usually not in register. The cuticular folds of the setae and of the ringlets are also sites of intermediate insertions of the three exopod muscles: as the two tegumentary structures are discordant in periodicity, this is also mirrored in the pattern of muscle insertions on the two sides of the appendage. Similar cases of segmental mismatch are known for the trunk of several arthropods, but segmental mismatch along the appendages has received very little attention. The occurrence of segmental mismatch in the naupliar appendages of both extant and fossil crustaceans is reviewed and it is suggested here to be a primitive feature of the exopods of both second antennae and mandibles. Problems in the interpretation of morphological evidence are discussed, also in relation to development and evolution of segmentation of naupliar appendages.

  11. Mechanism of mismatch recognition revealed by human MutS[beta] bound to unpaired DNA loops

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shikha; Gellert, Martin; Yang, Wei

    2012-04-17

    DNA mismatch repair corrects replication errors, thus reducing mutation rates and microsatellite instability. Genetic defects in this pathway cause Lynch syndrome and various cancers in humans. Binding of a mispaired or unpaired base by bacterial MutS and eukaryotic MutS{alpha} is well characterized. We report here crystal structures of human MutS{beta} in complex with DNA containing insertion-deletion loops (IDL) of two, three, four or six unpaired nucleotides. In contrast to eukaryotic MutS{alpha} and bacterial MutS, which bind the base of a mismatched nucleotide, MutS{beta} binds three phosphates in an IDL. DNA is severely bent at the IDL; unpaired bases are flipped out into the major groove and partially exposed to solvent. A normal downstream base pair can become unpaired; a single unpaired base can thereby be converted to an IDL of two nucleotides and recognized by MutS{beta}. The C-terminal dimerization domains form an integral part of the MutS structure and coordinate asymmetrical ATP hydrolysis by Msh2 and Msh3 with mismatch binding to signal for repair.

  12. Effects of an artery/vascular graft compliance mismatch on protein transport: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sandy F C; Lyman, Donald J

    2004-07-01

    Small-diameter vascular graft failure by intimal hyperplasia and thrombosis may result from flow disturbances and disruption of chemical transport in the fluid at the distal anastomosis, because of compliance mismatch between the graft and host artery. In previous studies. lower-than-normal wall shear stress (WSS), particle trapping, and high particle residence times were observed at the distal anastomosis due to a pulsatile tubular expansion effect caused by nonuniform radial deformations. This study was undertaken to examine effects of compliance and radius mismatch on the distribution of a model protein released at the graft-fluid interface. Finite element simulations of end-to-end vascular grafting were performed under pulsatile flow, using fluid-structure coupling to give physiologic wall displacements. Results showed that protein is convected smoothly downstream in a uniform compliant tube. A compliance mismatch disturbed the transport, causing positive and negative gradients in the concentration profile at the distal anastomosis. This was seen when the graft and artery radii were matched at zero pressure and at mean arterial pressure; low WSSs were only observed in the former case. Thus the distal intimal hypertrophy seen in noncompliant grafts may be caused partly by decreased WSS, and partly by concentration gradients of dissolved chemicals affecting chemotaxis of cells. PMID:15298437

  13. DNA mismatch repair pathway defects in the pathogenesis and evolution of myeloma.

    PubMed

    Velangi, Mark R; Matheson, Elizabeth C; Morgan, Gareth J; Jackson, Graham H; Taylor, Penelope R; Hall, Andrew G; Irving, Julie A E

    2004-10-01

    Genetic instability is a prominent feature in multiple myeloma and progression of this disease from monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) and smouldering myeloma (SMM) is associated with increasing molecular and chromosomal abnormalities. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway is a post-replicational DNA repair system that maintains genetic stability by repairing mismatched bases and insertion/deletion loops mistakenly incorporated during DNA replication. Deficiencies in proteins pivotal to this pathway result in a higher mutation rate, particularly at regions of microsatellite DNA. We have investigated the proficiency of the MMR pathway in clinical samples and myeloma cell lines. Microsatellite analysis showed instability at one or more of nine loci examined in 15 from 92 patients: 7.7% of MGUS/SMM, 20.7% of MM/plasma cell leukaemia (PCL) and 12.5% of relapsed MM/PCL. An in vitro heteroduplex G/T repair assay found reduced repair in two cell lines, JIM1 and JIM3, and in two of four PCL cases and was associated with aberrant expression of at least one mismatch repair protein. Thus we show that MMR defects are found in plasma cell dyscrasias and the increased frequency during more active stages of the disease suggests a contributory role in disease progression. PMID:15142887

  14. Fabrication and characterization of multiband solar cells based on highly mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, N.; Braña, A. F.; García Núñez, C.; Hernández, M. J.; Cervera, M.; Martínez, M.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; García, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    Multiband solar cells are one type of third generation photovoltaic devices in which an increase of the power conversion efficiency is achieved through the absorption of low energy photons while preserving a large band gap that determines the open circuit voltage. The ability to absorb photons from different parts of the solar spectrum originates from the presence of an intermediate energy band located within the band gap of the material. This intermediate band, acting as a stepping stone allows the absorption of low energy photons to transfer electrons from the valence band to the conduction band by a sequential two photons absorption process. It has been demonstrated that highly mismatched alloys offer a potential to be used as a model material system for practical realization of multiband solar cells. Dilute nitride GaAs1-xNx highly mismatched alloy with low mole fraction of N is a prototypical multiband semiconductor with a well-defined intermediate band. Currently, we are using chemical beam epitaxy to synthesize dilute nitride highly mismatched alloys. The materials are characterized by a variety of structural and optical methods to optimize their properties for multiband photovoltaic devices.

  15. An interplay of the base excision repair and mismatch repair pathways in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation (ADDM) in mammals occurs via hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) by TET and/or deamination by AID/APOBEC family enzymes. The resulting 5mC derivatives are removed through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. At present, it is unclear how the cell manages to eliminate closely spaced 5mC residues whilst avoiding generation of toxic BER intermediates and whether alternative DNA repair pathways participate in ADDM. It has been shown that non-canonical DNA mismatch repair (ncMMR) can remove both alkylated and oxidized nucleotides from DNA. Here, a phagemid DNA containing oxidative base lesions and methylated sites are used to examine the involvement of various DNA repair pathways in ADDM in murine and human cell-free extracts. We demonstrate that, in addition to short-patch BER, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and uracil mispaired with guanine can be processed by ncMMR and long-patch BER with concomitant removal of distant 5mC residues. Furthermore, the presence of multiple mispairs in the same MMR nick/mismatch recognition region together with BER-mediated nick formation promotes proficient ncMMR resulting in the reactivation of an epigenetically silenced reporter gene in murine cells. These findings suggest cooperation between BER and ncMMR in the removal of multiple mismatches that might occur in mammalian cells during ADDM. PMID:26843430

  16. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A; Münsterkötter, Anna L; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences. PMID:26568620

  17. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A.; Münsterkötter, Anna L.; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences. PMID:26568620

  18. Mismatched partners that achieve postpairing behavioral similarity improve their reproductive success

    PubMed Central

    Laubu, Chloé; Dechaume-Moncharmont, François-Xavier; Motreuil, Sébastien; Schweitzer, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral similarity between partners is likely to promote within-pair compatibility and to result in better reproductive success. Therefore, individuals are expected to choose a partner that is alike in behavioral type. However, mate searching is very costly and does not guarantee finding a matching partner. If mismatched individuals pair, they may benefit from increasing their similarity after pairing. We show in a monogamous fish species—the convict cichlid—that the behavioral similarity between mismatched partners can increase after pairing. This increase resulted from asymmetrical adjustment because only the reactive individual became more alike its proactive partner, whereas the latter did not change its behavior. The mismatched pairs that increased their similarity not only improved their reproductive success but also raised it up to the level of matched pairs. While most studies assume that assortative mating results from mate choice, our study suggests that postpairing adjustment could be an alternative explanation for the high behavioral similarity between partners observed in the field. It also explains why interindividual behavioral differences can be maintained within a given population. PMID:26973869

  19. Roles of Interleaflet Coupling and Hydrophobic Mismatch in Lipid Membrane Phase-Separation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Williamson, John J; Sansom, Mark S P; Olmsted, Peter D

    2016-09-14

    Characterizing the nanoscale dynamic organization within lipid bilayer membranes is central to our understanding of cell membranes at a molecular level. We investigate phase separation and communication across leaflets in ternary lipid bilayers, including saturated lipids with between 12 and 20 carbons per tail. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations reveal a novel two-step kinetics due to hydrophobic mismatch, in which the initial response of the apposed leaflets upon quenching is to increase local asymmetry (antiregistration), followed by dominance of symmetry (registration) as the bilayer equilibrates. Antiregistration can become thermodynamically preferred if domain size is restricted below ∼20 nm, with implications for the symmetry of rafts and nanoclusters in cell membranes, which have similar reported sizes. We relate our findings to theory derived from a semimicroscopic model in which the leaflets experience a "direct" area-dependent coupling, and an "indirect" coupling that arises from hydrophobic mismatch and is most important at domain boundaries. Registered phases differ in composition from antiregistered phases, consistent with a direct coupling between the leaflets. Increased hydrophobic mismatch purifies the phases, suggesting that it contributes to the molecule-level lipid immiscibility. Our results demonstrate an interplay of competing interleaflet couplings that affect phase compositions and kinetics, and lead to a length scale that can influence lateral and transverse bilayer organization within cells. PMID:27574865

  20. Roles of Interleaflet Coupling and Hydrophobic Mismatch in Lipid Membrane Phase-Separation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the nanoscale dynamic organization within lipid bilayer membranes is central to our understanding of cell membranes at a molecular level. We investigate phase separation and communication across leaflets in ternary lipid bilayers, including saturated lipids with between 12 and 20 carbons per tail. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations reveal a novel two-step kinetics due to hydrophobic mismatch, in which the initial response of the apposed leaflets upon quenching is to increase local asymmetry (antiregistration), followed by dominance of symmetry (registration) as the bilayer equilibrates. Antiregistration can become thermodynamically preferred if domain size is restricted below ∼20 nm, with implications for the symmetry of rafts and nanoclusters in cell membranes, which have similar reported sizes. We relate our findings to theory derived from a semimicroscopic model in which the leaflets experience a “direct” area-dependent coupling, and an “indirect” coupling that arises from hydrophobic mismatch and is most important at domain boundaries. Registered phases differ in composition from antiregistered phases, consistent with a direct coupling between the leaflets. Increased hydrophobic mismatch purifies the phases, suggesting that it contributes to the molecule-level lipid immiscibility. Our results demonstrate an interplay of competing interleaflet couplings that affect phase compositions and kinetics, and lead to a length scale that can influence lateral and transverse bilayer organization within cells. PMID:27574865

  1. Mismatched partners that achieve postpairing behavioral similarity improve their reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Laubu, Chloé; Dechaume-Moncharmont, François-Xavier; Motreuil, Sébastien; Schweitzer, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral similarity between partners is likely to promote within-pair compatibility and to result in better reproductive success. Therefore, individuals are expected to choose a partner that is alike in behavioral type. However, mate searching is very costly and does not guarantee finding a matching partner. If mismatched individuals pair, they may benefit from increasing their similarity after pairing. We show in a monogamous fish species-the convict cichlid-that the behavioral similarity between mismatched partners can increase after pairing. This increase resulted from asymmetrical adjustment because only the reactive individual became more alike its proactive partner, whereas the latter did not change its behavior. The mismatched pairs that increased their similarity not only improved their reproductive success but also raised it up to the level of matched pairs. While most studies assume that assortative mating results from mate choice, our study suggests that postpairing adjustment could be an alternative explanation for the high behavioral similarity between partners observed in the field. It also explains why interindividual behavioral differences can be maintained within a given population. PMID:26973869

  2. The stress-coping (mis)match hypothesis for nature × nurture interactions.

    PubMed

    Homberg, Judith R

    2012-01-13

    There is high consensus that stress-related disorders like depression are shaped by nature×nurture interactions. However, the complexity appears larger than envisaged and nature×nurture research is progressing too slowly. An important reason is that mainstream research is focussing on the idea that a combination of genotypic stress-sensitivity and stress exposure inevitably leads to maladaptive stress-coping responses, and thereby stress-related disorders. However, stress-coping responses can also be adaptive and adhere to the expected norm. Here I elaborate the 'environment' mismatch hypothesis proposed by Mathias Schmidt (Psychoneuroendocrinology, 36, 330-338, 2011) to the stress-coping (mis)match (SCM) hypothesis postulating that stress-coping responses-as programmed by nature×age-dependent nurture interactions-are adaptive when they match current stress conditions, but maladaptive when they mismatch current stress conditions. For instance, acquisition of an active stress-coping response during nurture may lead to the programmed release of active coping responses in current life. This is adaptive when current stress is escapable, but maladaptive when current stress is inescapable, leading to agitation. A model par example for nature×nurture interactions is the serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism, which will be discussed in the framework of the SCM hypothesis. The potential role of the prefrontal-amygdala circuit and the therapeutic implications of the SCM hypothesis will also be discussed.

  3. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  4. Analysis of mismatch and shading effects in a photovoltaic array using different technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, J.; Muñoz, Y.; Ibáñez, F.; Ospino, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of a photovoltaic array implemented in the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia which consists of modules of different technologies and power, connected in series, in order to quantify the energy losses due to mismatch and the effect of the shadows. To do this, the performance of the modules was measured in operation under ambient conditions with field measurement equipment (AMPROBE Solar Analyzer, Solar - 4000), which allows the extrapolation of measures to standard conditions STC. For the data validation, measures under controlled conditions were taken to some modules in the flash test laboratory of the Institute of Energy Technology ITE of Valencia in Spain. Subsequently the array curves measured were validated with a photovoltaic array model developed in MATLAB-Simulink for the same conditions and technologies. The results of this particular array are lost up to 20% of the energy supplied due to the modules mismatch. The study shows the curves and the energy loss due to shadows modules. This result opens scenarios for conceivable modifications to the PV field configurations today, chosen during the design stage and unchangeable during the operating stage; and gives greater importance to the energy loss by mismatch in the PV array.

  5. Stability evaluation of the PUMA-560 robot arm under model mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Thomas; Perev, K.; Valavanis, Kimon P.; Gardner, S.

    1991-02-01

    This paper summarizes the stability of the PUMA - 560 robot manipulator under dynamic model mismatch resulting from incomplete knowledge of the link masses centers of mass and radii of gyration. PD and PID controllers are used. PAPER SUMMARY Model based control of robotic manipulators eliminates the nonlinearities in the manipulator equations under perfect knowledge of dynamic model parameters. When this is the case the manipulator model matches completely the real robot arm. However robot manipulators are in general extremely complicated to even approximately model. Moreover to keep the system model within practical and acceptable limits one has to accept (and control) unmodeled dynamics. Model mismatch may also result from incomplete knowledge of manipulator hardware parameters. This paper summarizes the stability of the PUMA - 560 manipulator under model mismatch using PD and PID controllers. Craig''s method [3] is directly applied when a PD controller is used. However it is also extended and modified to incorporate PID controllers [12]. The PUMA-560 robot arm has been selected because of our knowledge related to its real-time behavior [6 7 10 11]. All desired trajectories are achievable in real-time do not violate arm speed acceleration structural and hardware limits and have been repeatedly tested and used for real-time control of the PUMA robot arm. A software package (robot simulation package) has been built on top of the original software given to us by Dr.

  6. A Monofunctional Platinum Complex Coordinated to a Rhodium Metalloinsertor Selectively Binds Mismatched DNA in the Minor Groove

    PubMed Central

    Weidmann, Alyson G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh—O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA non-classically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors. PMID:26397309

  7. Evidence for the role of German final devoicing in pre-attentive speech processing: a mismatch negativity study

    PubMed Central

    Truckenbrodt, Hubert; Steinberg, Johanna; Jacobsen, Thomas K.; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Results of a mismatch negativity experiment are reported in which the pre-attentive relevance of the German phonological alternation of final devoicing (FD) is shown in two ways. The experiment employs pseudowords. (1) A deviant [vus] paired with standard /vuzə/ did not show a mismatch effect for the voicing change in /z/ versus [s] because the two can be related by FD. When standard and deviant were reversed, the two could not be related by FD and a mismatch effect for the voicing difference occurred. (2) An ill-formed deviant that violates FD, *[vuz], triggered mismatch effects that were plausibly attributed to its ill-formedness. The results show that a syllable-related process like FD is already taken into account by the processing system in early pre-attentive processing. PMID:25505433

  8. Evidence for the role of German final devoicing in pre-attentive speech processing: a mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Truckenbrodt, Hubert; Steinberg, Johanna; Jacobsen, Thomas K; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Results of a mismatch negativity experiment are reported in which the pre-attentive relevance of the German phonological alternation of final devoicing (FD) is shown in two ways. The experiment employs pseudowords. (1) A deviant [vus] paired with standard /vuzə/ did not show a mismatch effect for the voicing change in /z/ versus [s] because the two can be related by FD. When standard and deviant were reversed, the two could not be related by FD and a mismatch effect for the voicing difference occurred. (2) An ill-formed deviant that violates FD, *[vuz], triggered mismatch effects that were plausibly attributed to its ill-formedness. The results show that a syllable-related process like FD is already taken into account by the processing system in early pre-attentive processing. PMID:25505433

  9. HLA mismatches and hematopoietic cell transplantation: structural simulations assess the impact of changes in peptide binding specificity on transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yanover, Chen; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Malkki, Mari; Gooley, Ted; Spellman, Stephen; Velardi, Andrea; Bardy, Peter; Madrigal, Alejandro; Bignon, Jean-Denis; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic cell transplantation from an unrelated donor depends in part on the degree of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching between donor and patient. We present a structure-based analysis of HLA mismatching, focusing on individual amino acid mismatches and their effect on peptide binding specificity. Using molecular modeling simulations of HLA-peptide interactions, we find evidence that amino acid mismatches predicted to perturb peptide binding specificity are associated with higher risk of mortality in a large and diverse dataset of patient-donor pairs assembled by the International Histocompatibility Working Group in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation consortium. This analysis may represent a first step toward sequence-based prediction of relative risk for HLA allele mismatches. PMID:24482668

  10. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  11. Role of Cell Cycle Regulation and MLH1, A Key DNA Mismatch Repair Protein, In Adaptive Survival Responses. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Boothman

    1999-08-11

    Due to several interesting findings on both adaptive survival responses (ASRs) and DNA mismatch repair (MMR), this grant was separated into two discrete Specific Aim sets (each with their own discrete hypotheses). The described experiments were simultaneously performed.

  12. Radio metric errors due to mismatch and offset between a DSN antenna beam and the beam of a troposphere calibration instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linfield, R. P.; Wilcox, J. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Two components of the error of a troposphere calibration measurement were quantified by theoretical calculations. The first component is a beam mismatch error, which occurs when the calibration instrument senses a conical volume different from the cylindrical volume sampled by a Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna. The second component is a beam offset error, which occurs if the calibration instrument is not mounted on the axis of the DSN antenna. These two error sources were calculated for both delay (e.g., VLBI) and delay rate (e.g., Doppler) measurements. The beam mismatch error for both delay and delay rate drops rapidly as the beamwidth of the troposphere calibration instrument (e.g., a water vapor radiometer or an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer) is reduced. At a 10-deg elevation angle, the instantaneous beam mismatch error is 1.0 mm for a 6-deg beamwidth and 0.09 mm for a 0.5-deg beam (these are the full angular widths of a circular beam with uniform gain out to a sharp cutoff). Time averaging for 60-100 sec will reduce these errors by factors of 1.2-2.2. At a 20-deg elevation angle, the lower limit for current Doppler observations, the beam-mismatch delay rate error is an Allan standard deviation over 100 sec of 1.1 x 10(exp -14) with a 4-deg beam and 1.3 x 10(exp -l5) for a 0.5-deg beam. A 50-m beam offset would result in a fairly modest (compared to other expected error sources) delay error (less than or equal to 0.3 mm for 60-sec integrations at any elevation angle is greater than or equal to 6 deg). However, the same offset would cause a large error in delay rate measurements (e.g., an Allan standard deviation of 1.2 x 10(exp -14) over 100 sec at a 20-deg elevation angle), which would dominate over other known error sources if the beamwidth is 2 deg or smaller. An on-axis location is essential for accurate troposphere calibration of delay rate measurements. A half-power beamwidth (for a beam with a tapered gain profile) of 1.2 deg or smaller is

  13. Investigation on the influence of BBO thermal-induced phase mismatching in 266nm UV laser conversion efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Jin, Guangyong; Yu, Miao; Huang, Zhulong; Zhai, Ruizhi; Wang, Lei

    2014-12-01

    266nm UV laser has a wide range of applications in many fields, such as laser medical treatment, laser processing, precision measure and other applications for the reason of its advantages in wavelength, small diffraction effects, high single-photon energy, and high resolution and so on. BBO crystals absorb parts of the fundamental laser energy and second harmonic laser energy are unavoidable, and thus the temperature raise, so that the existing crystal phase matching conditions change, resulting in phase mismatching in the high-power frequency doubling, greatly influence the 266nm UV laser conversion efficiency. To further study the effect of phase mismatching to conversion efficiency, and improve the conversion efficiency, output power and other output characteristics of 266nm laser, the article mainly describe from the following three aspects. Firstly, took the use of three-dimensional nonlinear crystal temperature distribution which is obtained, the process of BBO crystal thermal-induced phase mismatching is analyzed. Secondly, based on frequency doubling theory, the effects of the thermal-induced phase mismatching affected of conversion in crystals are analyzed. Combining with the phase mismatching of the three-dimensional distributions, the fourth harmonic conversion efficiency with thermal phase mismatching changes of BBO 266nm UV laser are simulated for the first time. Thirdly, by using MATLAB software, the effects of phase mismatching to conversion efficiency in crystal for different waist radius, 532nm laser power and the fundamental beam quality are simulated. The results indicate a good physical interpretation of reasons of high power laser frequency doubling system. It shows that the model established explains the reason of the reduction of conversion efficiency, output power and the beam quality excellently. All results make a leading sense to the research on the compensating of the phase mismatching and on the improvement of conversion efficiency.

  14. The Combined Effect of Hydrophobic Mismatch and Bilayer Local Bending on the Regulation of Mechanosensitive Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Bavi, Omid; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Naghdabadi, Reza; Jamali, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic mismatch between the lipid bilayer and integral membrane proteins has well-defined effect on mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Also, membrane local bending is suggested to modulate MS channel activity. Although a number of studies have already shown the significance of each individual factor, the combined effect of these physical factors on MS channel activity have not been investigated. Here using finite element simulation, we study the combined effect of hydrophobic mismatch and local bending on the archetypal mechanosensitive channel MscL. First we show how the local curvature direction impacts on MS channel modulation. In the case of MscL, we show inward (cytoplasmic) bending can more effectively gate the channel compared to outward bending. Then we indicate that in response to a specific local curvature, MscL inserted in a bilayer with the same hydrophobic length is more expanded in the constriction pore region compared to when there is a protein-lipid hydrophobic mismatch. Interestingly in the presence of a negative mismatch (thicker lipids), MscL constriction pore is more expanded than in the presence of positive mismatch (thinner lipids) in response to an identical membrane curvature. These results were confirmed by a parametric energetic calculation provided for MscL gating. These findings have several biophysical consequences for understanding the function of MS channels in response to two major physical stimuli in mechanobiology, namely hydrophobic mismatch and local membrane curvature. PMID:26958847

  15. Differential mismatch recognition specificities of eukaryotic MutS homologs, MutSα and MutSβ.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Predeus, Alexander V; Kovacs, Nicholas; Feig, Michael

    2014-06-01

    In eukaryotes, the recognition of the DNA postreplication errors and initiation of the mismatch repair is carried out by two MutS homologs: MutSα and MutSβ. MutSα recognizes base mismatches and 1 to 2 unpaired nucleotides whereas MutSβ recognizes longer insertion-deletion loops (IDLs) with 1 to 15 unpaired nucleotides as well as certain mismatches. Results from molecular dynamics simulations of native MutSβ:IDL-containing DNA and MutSα:mismatch DNA complexes as well as complexes with swapped DNA substrates provide mechanistic insight into how the differential substrate specificities are achieved by MutSα and MutSβ, respectively. Our simulations results suggest more extensive interactions between MutSβ and IDL-DNA and between MutSα and mismatch-containing DNA that suggest corresponding differences in stability. Furthermore, our simulations suggest more expanded mechanistic details involving a different degree of bending when DNA is bound to either MutSα or MutSβ and a more likely opening of the clamp domains when noncognate substrates are bound. The simulation results also provide detailed information on key residues in MutSβ and MutSα that are likely involved in recognizing IDL-DNA and mismatch-containing DNA, respectively.

  16. Long-range order instead of phase separation in large lattice-mismatch isovalent AX-BX systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiuwen; Trimarchi, Giancarlo; d'Avezac, Mayeul; Zunger, Alex

    2009-12-15

    Large atomic size mismatch between compounds discourages their binding into a common lattice because of the ensuing cost in strain energy. This central paradigm in the theory of isovalent alloys long used to disqualify alloys with highly mismatched components from technological use is clearly broken by the occurrence of stable spontaneous long-range order in mixtures of alkali halides with as much as 40% size mismatch (e.g., LiF-CsF). Our theoretical analysis of these failures uncovered a different design principle for stable alloys: very large atomic size mismatch can lead to spontaneous ordering if the large (small) components have the ability to raise (lower) their coordination number (CN) within the mixed phase. This heuristic design principle has led us to explore via first-principles structure search a few very largely mismatched binary systems whose components have a propensity for CN disproportionation. We find ordered structures for BeO-BaO (37% size mismatch) and BeO-SrO (30%), and ordering in LiCl-KCl (20%), whereas BN-InN (33%) is found to lower its positive formation enthalpy by ~60% when CN disproportionation is allowed. This new design principle could be used to explore phases unsuspected to order by the common paradigm of strain instability.

  17. The Combined Effect of Hydrophobic Mismatch and Bilayer Local Bending on the Regulation of Mechanosensitive Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Bavi, Omid; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Naghdabadi, Reza; Jamali, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic mismatch between the lipid bilayer and integral membrane proteins has well-defined effect on mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Also, membrane local bending is suggested to modulate MS channel activity. Although a number of studies have already shown the significance of each individual factor, the combined effect of these physical factors on MS channel activity have not been investigated. Here using finite element simulation, we study the combined effect of hydrophobic mismatch and local bending on the archetypal mechanosensitive channel MscL. First we show how the local curvature direction impacts on MS channel modulation. In the case of MscL, we show inward (cytoplasmic) bending can more effectively gate the channel compared to outward bending. Then we indicate that in response to a specific local curvature, MscL inserted in a bilayer with the same hydrophobic length is more expanded in the constriction pore region compared to when there is a protein-lipid hydrophobic mismatch. Interestingly in the presence of a negative mismatch (thicker lipids), MscL constriction pore is more expanded than in the presence of positive mismatch (thinner lipids) in response to an identical membrane curvature. These results were confirmed by a parametric energetic calculation provided for MscL gating. These findings have several biophysical consequences for understanding the function of MS channels in response to two major physical stimuli in mechanobiology, namely hydrophobic mismatch and local membrane curvature. PMID:26958847

  18. Ohmic spin injection from a half-metal at finite temperatures: Is the conductivity mismatch problem relevant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasbrenner, James; Wysocki, Aleksander; Belashchenko, Kirill

    2011-03-01

    Spin injection from a normal ferromagnet into a semiconductor requires a highly-resistive tunnel or Schottky barrier at the interface to overcome the conductivity mismatch problem. This barrier limits the current that can be achieved in a device. A half-metallic ferromagnet used as a spin injector obviously overcomes this problem at zero temperature, but the situation at finite temperatures is nontrivial. We argue that the two-current model is inapplicable to half-metals, and that Ohmic (barrierless) spin injection from a half-metal is possible even at finite temperatures. This conclusion is reached using an intuitive model which sums up multiple scatterings at the interface. To complement this model, we calculate the spin injection efficiency for a half-metallic electrode using a single-band tight-binding model with explicit statistical averaging over thermal spin fluctuations. The results are contrasted with the case of a normal ferromagnet. We also consider a practically interesting case of a CrAs electrode within the tight-binding LMTO method.

  19. Recognition of Damaged DNA for Nucleotide Excision Repair: A Correlated Motion Mechanism with a Mismatched cis-syn Thymine Dimer Lesion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair requires lesion recognition by XPC, whose detailed binding mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we have delineated the dynamic molecular pathway and energetics of lesion-specific and productive binding by the Rad4/yeast XPC lesion recognition factor, as it forms the open complex [Min, J. H., and Pavletich, N. P. (2007) Nature 449, 570–575; Chen, X., et al. (2015) Nat. Commun. 6, 5849] that is required for excision. We investigated extensively a cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in mismatched duplex DNA, using high-level computational approaches. Our results delineate a preferred correlated motion mechanism, which provides for the first time an atomistic description of the sequence of events as Rad4 productively binds to the damaged DNA. PMID:26270861

  20. Recruitment Variability in North Atlantic Cod and Match-Mismatch Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Trond; Drinkwater, Kenneth F.; Lough, R. Gregory; Sundby, Svein

    2011-01-01

    Background Fisheries exploitation, habitat destruction, and climate are important drivers of variability in recruitment success. Understanding variability in recruitment can reveal mechanisms behind widespread decline in the abundance of key species in marine and terrestrial ecosystems. For fish populations, the match-mismatch theory hypothesizes that successful recruitment is a function of the timing and duration of larval fish abundance and prey availability. However, the underlying mechanisms of match-mismatch dynamics and the factors driving spatial differences between high and low recruitment remain poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We used empirical observations of larval fish abundance, a mechanistic individual-based model, and a reanalysis of ocean temperature data from 1960 to 2002 to estimate the survival of larval cod (Gadus morhua). From the model, we quantified how survival rates changed during the warmest and coldest years at four important cod spawning sites in the North Atlantic. The modeled difference in survival probability was not large for any given month between cold or warm years. However, the cumulative effect of higher growth rates and survival through the entire spawning season in warm years was substantial with 308%, 385%, 154%, and 175% increases in survival for Georges Bank, Iceland, North Sea, and Lofoten cod stocks, respectively. We also found that the importance of match-mismatch dynamics generally increased with latitude. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses indicate that a key factor for enhancing survival is the duration of the overlap between larval and prey abundance and not the actual timing of the peak abundance. During warm years, the duration of the overlap between larval fish and their prey is prolonged due to an early onset of the spring bloom. This prolonged season enhances cumulative growth and survival, leading to a greater number of large individuals with enhanced potential for survival to recruitment

  1. Influenza virus reassortment occurs with high frequency in the absence of segment mismatch.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Nicolle; Priyamvada, Lalita; Ende, Zachary; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C

    2013-01-01

    Reassortment is fundamental to the evolution of influenza viruses and plays a key role in the generation of epidemiologically significant strains. Previous studies indicate that reassortment is restricted by segment mismatch, arising from functional incompatibilities among components of two viruses. Additional factors that dictate the efficiency of reassortment remain poorly characterized. Thus, it is unclear what conditions are favorable for reassortment and therefore under what circumstances novel influenza A viruses might arise in nature. Herein, we describe a system for studying reassortment in the absence of segment mismatch and exploit this system to determine the baseline efficiency of reassortment and the effects of infection dose and timing. Silent mutations were introduced into A/Panama/2007/99 virus such that high-resolution melt analysis could be used to differentiate all eight segments of the wild-type and the silently mutated variant virus. The use of phenotypically identical parent viruses ensured that all progeny were equally fit, allowing reassortment to be measured without selection bias. Using this system, we found that reassortment occurred efficiently (88.4%) following high multiplicity infection, suggesting the process is not appreciably limited by intracellular compartmentalization. That co-infection is the major determinant of reassortment efficiency in the absence of segment mismatch was confirmed with the observation that the proportion of viruses with reassortant genotypes increased exponentially with the proportion of cells co-infected. The number of reassortants shed from co-infected guinea pigs was likewise dependent on dose. With 10⁶ PFU inocula, 46%-86% of viruses isolated from guinea pigs were reassortants. The introduction of a delay between infections also had a strong impact on reassortment and allowed definition of time windows during which super-infection led to reassortment in culture and in vivo. Overall, our results

  2. Variable flowering phenology and pollinator use in a community suggest future phenological mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petanidou, Theodora; Kallimanis, Athanasios S.; Sgardelis, Stefanos P.; Mazaris, Antonios D.; Pantis, John D.; Waser, Nickolas M.

    2014-08-01

    Recent anthropogenic climate change is strongly associated with average shifts toward earlier seasonal timing of activity (phenology) in temperate-zone species. Shifts in phenology have the potential to alter ecological interactions, to the detriment of one or more interacting species. Recent models predict that detrimental phenological mismatch may increasingly occur between plants and their pollinators. One way to test this prediction is to examine data from ecological communities that experience large annual weather fluctuations. Taking this approach, we analyzed interactions over a four-year period among 132 plant species and 665 pollinating insect species within a Mediterranean community. For each plant species we recorded onset and duration of flowering and number of pollinator species. Flowering onset varied among years, and a year of earlier flowering of a species tended to be a year of fewer species pollinating its flowers. This relationship was attributable principally to early-flowering species, suggesting that shifts toward earlier phenology driven by climate change may reduce pollination services due to phenological mismatch. Earlier flowering onset of a species also was associated with prolonged flowering duration, but it is not certain that this will counterbalance any negative effects of lower pollinator species richness on plant reproductive success. Among plants with different life histories, annuals were more severely affected by flowering-pollinator mismatches than perennials. Specialized plant species (those attracting a smaller number of pollinator species) did not experience disproportionate interannual fluctuations in phenology. Thus they do not appear to be faced with disproportionate fluctuations in pollinator species richness, contrary to the expectation that specialists are at greatest risk of losing mutualistic interactions because of climate change.

  3. The Significance of Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Young Patients With Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mandy Man-Yee; Liu, Stephanie Si; Tam, Kar-Fai; Ip, Philip Pun-Ching; Cheung, Annie Nga-Yin; Ngan, Hextan Yuen-Sheung

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the tumor characteristics associated with mismatch repair deficiency in young patients with endometrial carcinoma. Young patients (45 yr old or younger) with endometrial carcinoma treated by hysterectomy in our institution between July 2001 and June 2009 were identified. The clinical and pathologic data were obtained by review of clinical records. Among the 122 cases identified, paraffin sections were available in 67 cases for immunohistochemical staining and frozen tissue available in 62 cases for microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis. Both paraffin sections and frozen tissue were available in 36 cases. Among the 67 cases with immunohistochemical staining, 22 (32.8%) showed loss of expression of at least 1 mismatch repair protein. Defective MLH1 or MSH2 expression was associated with poor prognostic factors, including a higher incidence of pelvic lymph nodes metastasis (P=0.018) and higher stage (P=0.022) for MLH1, and an increased risk of lymphovascular permeation (P=0.015) for MSH2. On the contrary, defective MSH6 protein expression was associated with a lower incidence of high-grade tumors (P=0.04). Among the 62 cases with MSI analysis, 12 (19.4%) tumors were classified as microsatellite-high (MSI-H), whereas 2 (3.2%) were classified as microsatellite-low (MSI-L). There was no difference in the pathologic characteristics between MSI-stable and MSI-H tumor. We concluded that defective mismatch repair expression is important in young patients with endometrial carcinoma, with MSH6 protein being most commonly affected. The phenotype resulting from defective MSH6 expression was different from that caused by MLH1 or MSH2 loss.

  4. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): selective filters and signal mismatch on two time scales.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as "Gryllus assimilis", the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2-3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  5. The Steppengrille (Gryllus spec./assimilis): Selective Filters and Signal Mismatch on Two Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Rothbart, Matti Michael; Hennig, Ralf Matthias

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, several species of crickets are available commercially as pet food. Here we investigated the calling song and phonotactic selectivity for sound patterns on the short and long time scales for one such a cricket, Gryllus spec., available as “Gryllus assimilis”, the Steppengrille, originally from Ecuador. The calling song consisted of short chirps (2–3 pulses, carrier frequency: 5.0 kHz) emitted with a pulse period of 30.2 ms and chirp rate of 0.43 per second. Females exhibited high selectivity on both time scales. The preference for pulse period peaked at 33 ms which was higher then the pulse period produced by males. Two consecutive pulses per chirp at the correct pulse period were already sufficient for positive phonotaxis. The preference for the chirp pattern was limited by selectivity for small chirp duty cycles and for chirp periods between 200 ms and 500 ms. The long chirp period of the songs of males was unattractive to females. On both time scales a mismatch between the song signal of the males and the preference of females was observed. The variability of song parameters as quantified by the coefficient of variation was below 50% for all temporal measures. Hence, there was not a strong indication for directional selection on song parameters by females which could account for the observed mismatch. The divergence of the chirp period and female preference may originate from a founder effect, when the Steppengrille was cultured. Alternatively the mismatch was a result of selection pressures exerted by commercial breeders on low singing activity, to satisfy customers with softly singing crickets. In the latter case the prominent divergence between male song and female preference was the result of domestication and may serve as an example of rapid evolution of song traits in acoustic communication systems. PMID:22970154

  6. Mismatch Negativity (MMN) in Freely-Moving Rats with Several Experimental Controls

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Lauren; Fulham, W. Ross; Todd, Juanita; Budd, Timothy W.; Hunter, Michael; Meehan, Crystal; Penttonen, Markku; Schall, Ulrich; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Hodgson, Deborah M.; Michie, Patricia T.

    2014-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a scalp-recorded electrical potential that occurs in humans in response to an auditory stimulus that defies previously established patterns of regularity. MMN amplitude is reduced in people with schizophrenia. In this study, we aimed to develop a robust and replicable rat model of MMN, as a platform for a more thorough understanding of the neurobiology underlying MMN. One of the major concerns for animal models of MMN is whether the rodent brain is capable of producing a human-like MMN, which is not a consequence of neural adaptation to repetitive stimuli. We therefore tested several methods that have been used to control for adaptation and differential exogenous responses to stimuli within the oddball paradigm. Epidural electroencephalographic electrodes were surgically implanted over different cortical locations in adult rats. Encephalographic data were recorded using wireless telemetry while the freely-moving rats were presented with auditory oddball stimuli to assess mismatch responses. Three control sequences were utilized: the flip-flop control was used to control for differential responses to the physical characteristics of standards and deviants; the many standards control was used to control for differential adaptation, as was the cascade control. Both adaptation and adaptation-independent deviance detection were observed for high frequency (pitch), but not low frequency deviants. In addition, the many standards control method was found to be the optimal method for observing both adaptation effects and adaptation-independent mismatch responses in rats. Inconclusive results arose from the cascade control design as it is not yet clear whether rats can encode the complex pattern present in the control sequence. These data contribute to a growing body of evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat brain is indeed capable of exhibiting human-like MMN, and that the rat model is a viable platform for the further investigation of the

  7. Hydrophobic Mismatch Drives the Interaction of E5 with the Transmembrane Segment of PDGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Dirk; Ziegler, Colin; Grage, Stephan L.; Bürck, Jochen; Zeitler, Marcel; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic E5 protein from bovine papillomavirus is a short (44 amino acids long) integral membrane protein that forms homodimers. It activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β in a ligand-independent manner by transmembrane helix-helix interactions. The nature of this recognition event remains elusive, as numerous mutations are tolerated in the E5 transmembrane segment, with the exception of one hydrogen-bonding residue. Here, we examined the conformation, stability, and alignment of the E5 protein in fluid lipid membranes of substantially varying bilayer thickness, in both the absence and presence of the PDGFR transmembrane segment. Quantitative synchrotron radiation circular dichroism analysis revealed a very long transmembrane helix for E5 of ∼26 amino acids. Oriented circular dichroism and solid-state 15N-NMR showed that the alignment and stability of this unusually long segment depend critically on the membrane thickness. When reconstituted alone in exceptionally thick DNPC lipid bilayers, the E5 helix was found to be inserted almost upright. In moderately thick bilayers (DErPC and DEiPC), it started to tilt and became slightly deformed, and finally it became aggregated in conventional DOPC, POPC, and DMPC membranes due to hydrophobic mismatch. On the other hand, when E5 was co-reconstituted with the transmembrane segment of PDGFR, it was able to tolerate even the most pronounced mismatch and was stabilized by binding to the receptor, which has the same hydrophobic length. As E5 is known to activate PDGFR within the thin membranes of the Golgi compartment, we suggest that the intrinsic hydrophobic mismatch of these two interaction partners drives them together. They seem to recognize each other by forming a closely packed bundle of mutually aligned transmembrane helices, which is further stabilized by a specific pair of hydrogen-bonding residues. PMID:26287626

  8. Coherent piezoelectric strain transfer to thick epitaxial ferromagnetic films with large lattice mismatch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang-Yong; Yao, Lide; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2013-02-27

    Strain control of epitaxial films using piezoelectric substrates has recently attracted significant scientific interest. Despite its potential as a powerful test bed for strain-related physical phenomena and strain-driven electronic, magnetic, and optical technologies, detailed studies on the efficiency and uniformity of piezoelectric strain transfer are scarce. Here, we demonstrate that full and uniform piezoelectric strain transfer to epitaxial films is not limited to systems with small lattice mismatch or limited film thickness. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of 100 nm thick CoFe(2)O(4) and La(2/3)Sr(1/3)MnO(3) epitaxial films on piezoelectric 0.72Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-0.28PbTiO(3) substrates (+4.3% and -3.8% lattice mismatch) indicate that misfit dislocations near the interface do not hamper the transfer of piezoelectric strain. Instead, the epitaxial magnetic oxide films and PMN-PT substrates are strained coherently and their lattice parameters change linearly as a function of applied electric field when their remnant growth-induced strain state is negligible. As a result, ferromagnetic properties such as the coercive field, saturation magnetization, and Curie temperature can be reversibly tuned by electrical means. The observation of efficient piezoelectric strain transfer in large-mismatch heteroepitaxial structures opens up new possibilities for the engineering of strain-controlled physical properties in a broad class of hybrid material systems. PMID:23370268

  9. Influenza Virus Reassortment Occurs with High Frequency in the Absence of Segment Mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nicolle; Priyamvada, Lalita; Ende, Zachary; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C.

    2013-01-01

    Reassortment is fundamental to the evolution of influenza viruses and plays a key role in the generation of epidemiologically significant strains. Previous studies indicate that reassortment is restricted by segment mismatch, arising from functional incompatibilities among components of two viruses. Additional factors that dictate the efficiency of reassortment remain poorly characterized. Thus, it is unclear what conditions are favorable for reassortment and therefore under what circumstances novel influenza A viruses might arise in nature. Herein, we describe a system for studying reassortment in the absence of segment mismatch and exploit this system to determine the baseline efficiency of reassortment and the effects of infection dose and timing. Silent mutations were introduced into A/Panama/2007/99 virus such that high-resolution melt analysis could be used to differentiate all eight segments of the wild-type and the silently mutated variant virus. The use of phenotypically identical parent viruses ensured that all progeny were equally fit, allowing reassortment to be measured without selection bias. Using this system, we found that reassortment occurred efficiently (88.4%) following high multiplicity infection, suggesting the process is not appreciably limited by intracellular compartmentalization. That co-infection is the major determinant of reassortment efficiency in the absence of segment mismatch was confirmed with the observation that the proportion of viruses with reassortant genotypes increased exponentially with the proportion of cells co-infected. The number of reassortants shed from co-infected guinea pigs was likewise dependent on dose. With 106 PFU inocula, 46%–86% of viruses isolated from guinea pigs were reassortants. The introduction of a delay between infections also had a strong impact on reassortment and allowed definition of time windows during which super-infection led to reassortment in culture and in vivo. Overall, our results

  10. A Qualitative Assessment of Mismatch Between Dialysis Modality Selection and Initiation.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowski, Susan; Liebman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    At our institution, we have noted that end-stage renal disease patients choosing a home dialysis modality after education often initiate renal replacement therapy with in-center hemodialysis (HD) instead. We interviewed 24 such patients (23 choosing peritoneal dialysis [PD], one choosing home HD) to determine reasons for this mismatch. The most common reasons cited for not starting home dialysis were: lack of confidence/concerns about complications, lack of space or home-related issues, a feeling of insufficient education, and perceived medical or social contraindications. We propose several potential strategies to help patients start with their preferred modality.

  11. On the axial and interfacial shear stresses due to thermal mismatch in hybrid composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rossettos, J.N.; Shen, X.

    1994-12-31

    An analytical model is formulated which attempts to account for the axial and the interfacial shear stresses which can develop in hybrid fiber composites due to the mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion and Youngs modulus. A finite width hybrid composite monolayer with alternating high modulus and low modulus fibers is considered. To properly account for the interfacial shear between fiber and matrix, a modified shear lag model is used, which permits extensional deformation in the matrix in the fiber direction. Typical stresses due solely to temperature changes are calculated, and show steep boundary layer edge stresses at free corners.

  12. Evaluation of hemangiomas with technetium 99m-labeled RBCs: the perfusion-blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Joachims, H.; Brown, Y.; Eliachar, I.

    1983-03-18

    A case report is presented of a woman with a tumor mass in the nasopharynx. Early and delayed scintigraphy with Technetium 99m-labeled RBCs showed a large area of increased uptake which was later shown to be a hemangioma by contrast angiography. The perfusion-blood pool mismatch observed in hemangiomas is characteristic of these lesions and has not been described in any other abnormalities. The Tc-RBC using both early and delayed scintigraphy is a simple, noninvasive method for assessing the vascular characteristics of these tumors. (JMT)

  13. Role of Deficient Mismatch Repair in the Personalized Management of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cong-Min; Lv, Jin-Feng; Gong, Liang; Yu, Lin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Fan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents the third most common type of cancer in developed countries and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Personalized management of CRC has gained increasing attention since there are large inter-individual variations in the prognosis and response to drugs used to treat CRC owing to molecular heterogeneity. Approximately 15% of CRCs are caused by deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) characterized by microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. The present review is aimed at highlighting the role of MMR status in informing prognosis and personalized treatment of CRC including adjuvant chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy to guide the individualized therapy of CRC. PMID:27618077

  14. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  15. Longitudinal versus polar wrinkling of core-shell fibers with anisotropic size mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrício, P.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Trindade, A. C.; Godinho, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a fiber made of a soft elastic material, encased in a stiff elastic shell (core-shell geometry). If the core and shell dimensions are mismatched, e.g., because the core shrinks while the shell does not, but the two remain attached, then an elastic instability is triggered whereby wrinkles may appear on the shell. The wrinkle orientation may be longitudinal (along the fiber axis), polar (along the fiber perimeter), or a mixture of both, depending on the fiber's geometrical and material parameters. Here we investigate under what conditions longitudinal or polar wrinkling will occur.

  16. Hypertension: a problem of organ blood flow supply-demand mismatch.

    PubMed

    Koeners, Maarten P; Lewis, Kirsty E; Ford, Anthony P; Paton, Julian Fr

    2016-05-01

    This review introduces a new hypothesis that sympathetically mediated hypertensive diseases are caused, in the most part, by the activation of visceral afferent systems that are connected to neural circuits generating sympathetic activity. We consider how organ hypoperfusion and blood flow supply-demand mismatch might lead to both sensory hyper-reflexia and aberrant afferent tonicity. We discuss how this may drive sympatho-excitatory-positive feedback and extend across multiple organs initiating, or at least amplifying, sympathetic hyperactivity. The latter, in turn, compounds the challenge to sufficient organ blood flow through heightened vasoconstriction that both maintains and exacerbates hypertension. PMID:27091483

  17. Role of Deficient Mismatch Repair in the Personalized Management of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong-Min; Lv, Jin-Feng; Gong, Liang; Yu, Lin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Fan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents the third most common type of cancer in developed countries and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Personalized management of CRC has gained increasing attention since there are large inter-individual variations in the prognosis and response to drugs used to treat CRC owing to molecular heterogeneity. Approximately 15% of CRCs are caused by deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) characterized by microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. The present review is aimed at highlighting the role of MMR status in informing prognosis and personalized treatment of CRC including adjuvant chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy to guide the individualized therapy of CRC. PMID:27618077

  18. Influence of Hydrophobic Mismatch on Structures and Dynamics of Gramicidin A and Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Kyu Il; Morris, Phillip; Pastor, Richard W.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) is a 15-amino-acid antibiotic peptide with an alternating L-D sequence, which forms (dimeric) bilayer-spanning, monovalent cation channels in biological membranes and synthetic bilayers. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of gA dimers and monomers in all-atom, explicit dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers. The variation in acyl chain length among these different phospholipids provides a way to alter gA-bilayer interactions by varying the bilayer hydrophobic thickness, and to determine the influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the structure and dynamics of both gA channels (and monomeric subunits) and the host bilayers. The simulations show that the channel structure varied little with changes in hydrophobic mismatch, and that the lipid bilayer adapts to the bilayer-spanning channel to minimize the exposure of hydrophobic residues. The bilayer thickness, however, did not vary monotonically as a function of radial distance from the channel. In all simulations, there was an initial decrease in thickness within 4–5 Å from the channel, which was followed by an increase in DOPC and POPC or a further decrease in DLPC and DMPC bilayers. The bilayer thickness varied little in the monomer simulations—except one of three independent simulations for DMPC and all three DLPC simulations, where the bilayer thinned to allow a single subunit to form a bilayer-spanning water-permeable pore. The radial dependence of local lipid area and bilayer compressibility is also nonmonotonic in the first shell around gA dimers due to gA-phospholipid interactions and the hydrophobic mismatch. Order parameters, acyl chain dynamics, and diffusion constants also differ between the lipids in the first shell and the bulk. The lipid behaviors in the first shell around gA dimers are more complex than predicted from a simple mismatch

  19. Risks and benefits of sex-mismatched hematopoietic cell transplantation differ according to conditioning strategy.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Hideki; Remberger, Mats; Tian, Lu; Brodin, Petter; Sahaf, Bita; Wu, Fang; Mattsson, Jonas; Lowsky, Robert; Negrin, Robert; Miklos, David B; Meyer, Everett

    2015-11-01

    Sex-mismatched hematopoietic cell transplantation is linked to increased graft-versus-host disease and mortality in myeloablative conditioning. Here we evaluated outcomes of 1,041 adult transplant recipients at two centers between 2006 and 2013 and investigated how the effect of sex-mismatching differed in myeloablative, reduced-intensity, and non-myeloablative total lymphoid irradiation with anti-thymocyte globulin conditioning. Among patients who underwent myeloablative conditioning, male recipients with female donors had increased chronic graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio 1.83, P<0.01), increased non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.84, P=0.022) and inferior overall survival (hazard ratio 1.59, P=0.018). In contrast, among patients who received reduced-intensity conditioning, male recipients with female donors had increased acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio 1.96, P<0.01) but no difference in non-relapse mortality or overall survival. Among the patients who underwent total lymphoid irradiation with anti-thymocyte globulin, male recipients with female donors showed no increase in graft-versus-host disease or non-relapse mortality. Notably, only in the cohort receiving total lymphoid irradiation with anti-thymocyte globulin were male recipients with female donors significantly associated with reduced relapse (hazard ratio 0.64, P<0.01), and allo-antibody responses against H-Y antigens were predictive of reduced relapse. In the cohort given total lymphoid irradiation with anti-thymocyte globulin, the graft-versus-leukemia effect resulted in superior overall survival in recipients of sex-mismatched grafts (HR 0.69, P=0.037). In addition, only in the cohort treated with total lymphoid irradiation with anti-thymocyte globulin were female recipients with male donors associated with reduced relapse (hazard ratio 0.59, P<0.01) and superior survival (hazard ratio 0.61, P=0.014) compared with sex-matched pairs. We conclude that the risks and benefits of

  20. DNA-Functionalized Nanotube Membranes with Single-Base Mismatch Selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Punit; Harrell, C. Chad; Cao, Zehui; Gasparac, Rahela; Tan, Weihong; Martin, Charles R.

    2004-08-01

    We describe synthetic membranes in which the molecular recognition chemistry used to accomplish selective permeation is DNA hybridization. These membranes contain template-synthesized gold nanotubes with inside diameters of 12 nanometers, and a ``transporter'' DNA-hairpin molecule is attached to the inside walls of these nanotubes. These DNA-functionalized nanotube membranes selectively recognize and transport the DNA strand that is complementary to the transporter strand, relative to DNA strands that are not complementary to the transporter. Under optimal conditions, single-base mismatch transport selectivity can be obtained.

  1. Nonepitaxial Growth of Hybrid Core-Shell Nanostructures with Large Lattice Mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiatao; Tang, Yun; Lee, Kwan; Ouyang, Min

    2010-03-01

    We report a synthetic route to achieving nanoscale heterostructures consisting of a metal core and monocrystalline semiconductor shell with substantial lattice mismatches between them, which cannot be obtained by conventional epitaxial techniques. By controlling soft acid-base coordination reactions between molecular complexes and colloidal nanostructures, we show that chemical thermodynamics can drive nanoscale monocrystalline growth of the semiconductor shell with a lattice structure incommensurate with that of the core. More complex hybrid core-shell structures with azimuthal and radial nanotailoring of structures and compositions of the monocrystalline semiconductor shell are also demonstrated.

  2. Errors in short circuit measurements due to spectral mismatch between sunlight and solar simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Errors in short circuit current measurement were calculated for a variety of spectral mismatch conditions. The differences in spectral irradiance between terrestrial sunlight and three types of solar simulator were studied, as well as the differences in spectral response between three types of reference solar cells and various test cells. The simulators considered were a short arc xenon lamp AMO sunlight simulator, an ordinary quartz halogen lamp, and an ELH-type quartz halogen lamp. Three types of solar cells studied were a silicon cell, a cadmium sulfide cell and a gallium arsenide cell.

  3. The mismatch negativity (MMN) in basic research of central auditory processing: a review.

    PubMed

    Näätänen, R; Paavilainen, P; Rinne, T; Alho, K

    2007-12-01

    In the present article, the basic research using the mismatch negativity (MMN) and analogous results obtained by using the magnetoencephalography (MEG) and other brain-imaging technologies is reviewed. This response is elicited by any discriminable change in auditory stimulation but recent studies extended the notion of the MMN even to higher-order cognitive processes such as those involving grammar and semantic meaning. Moreover, MMN data also show the presence of automatic intelligent processes such as stimulus anticipation at the level of auditory cortex. In addition, the MMN enables one to establish the brain processes underlying the initiation of attention switch to, conscious perception of, sound change in an unattended stimulus stream.

  4. Effect of discontinuities as a means to alleviate thermal expansion mismatch damage in laminar composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of Nichrome/tungsten laminar composites showed that intentionally introduced discontinuities, such as perforations through or grooves on the surface of the matrix laminae, improved thermal expansion mismatch damage resistance. It was found that specimens having smooth matrix laminate surfaces were virtually destroyed by delamination in 21 or fewer fast cool cycles in which they were water quenched from 981 C. Specimens having interior matrix laminae with discontinuities and relatively thin, nondiscontinuous, surface matrix laminae resisted 50 similar cycles without evident delamination damage.

  5. Lattice mismatch induced ripples and wrinkles in planar graphene/boron nitride superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Nandwana, Dinkar; Ertekin, Elif

    2015-06-21

    A continuum theory to describe periodic ripple formation in planar graphene/boron nitride superlattices is formulated. Due to the lattice mismatch between the two materials, it is shown that flat superlattices are unstable with respect to ripple formation of appropriate wavelengths. A competition between bending energy and transverse stretching energy gives rise to an optimal ripple wavelength that depends on the superlattice pitch. The optimal wavelengths predicted by the continuum theory are in good agreement with atomic scale total energy calculations previously reported by Nandwana and Ertekin [Nano Lett. 15, 1468 (2015)].

  6. Diffusion–Perfusion Mismatch: An Opportunity for Improvement in Cortical Function

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Melissa; Ramadan, Amanda; Hillis, Argye E.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Leigh, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There has been controversy over whether diffusion–perfusion mismatch provides a biomarker for the ischemic penumbra. In the context of clinical stroke trials, regions of the diffusion–perfusion mismatch that do not progress to infarct in the absence of reperfusion are considered to represent “benign oligemia.” However, at least in some cases (particularly large vessel stenosis), some of this hypoperfused tissue may remain dysfunctional for a prolonged period without progressing to infarct and may recover function if eventually reperfused. We hypothesized that patients with persistent diffusion–perfusion mismatch using a hypoperfusion threshold of 4–5.9 s delay on time-to-peak (TTP) maps at least sometimes have persistent cognitive deficits relative to those who show some reperfusion of this hypoperfused tissue. Methods: We tested this hypothesis in 38 patients with acute ischemic stroke who had simple cognitive tests (naming or line cancelation) and MRI with diffusion and perfusion imaging within 24 h of onset and again within 10 days, most of whom had large vessel stenosis or occlusion. Results: A persistent perfusion deficit of 4–5.9 s delay in TTP on follow up MRI was associated with a persistent cognitive deficit at that time point (p < 0.001). When we evaluated only patients who did not have infarct growth (n = 14), persistent hypoperfusion (persistent mismatch) was associated with a lack of cognitive improvement compared with those who had reperfused. The initial volume of hypoperfusion did not correlate with the later infarct volume (progression to infarct), but change in volume of hypoperfusion correlated with change in cognitive performance (p = 0.0001). Moreover, multivariable regression showed that the change in volume of hypoperfused tissue of 4–5.9 s delay (p = 0.002), and change in volume of ischemic tissue on diffusion weighted imaging (p = 0.02) were independently associated with change in

  7. Influence of hydrophobic mismatch on structures and dynamics of gramicidin a and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Kyu Il; Morris, Phillip; Pastor, Richard W; Andersen, Olaf S; Im, Wonpil

    2012-04-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) is a 15-amino-acid antibiotic peptide with an alternating L-D sequence, which forms (dimeric) bilayer-spanning, monovalent cation channels in biological membranes and synthetic bilayers. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of gA dimers and monomers in all-atom, explicit dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers. The variation in acyl chain length among these different phospholipids provides a way to alter gA-bilayer interactions by varying the bilayer hydrophobic thickness, and to determine the influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the structure and dynamics of both gA channels (and monomeric subunits) and the host bilayers. The simulations show that the channel structure varied little with changes in hydrophobic mismatch, and that the lipid bilayer adapts to the bilayer-spanning channel to minimize the exposure of hydrophobic residues. The bilayer thickness, however, did not vary monotonically as a function of radial distance from the channel. In all simulations, there was an initial decrease in thickness within 4-5 Å from the channel, which was followed by an increase in DOPC and POPC or a further decrease in DLPC and DMPC bilayers. The bilayer thickness varied little in the monomer simulations-except one of three independent simulations for DMPC and all three DLPC simulations, where the bilayer thinned to allow a single subunit to form a bilayer-spanning water-permeable pore. The radial dependence of local lipid area and bilayer compressibility is also nonmonotonic in the first shell around gA dimers due to gA-phospholipid interactions and the hydrophobic mismatch. Order parameters, acyl chain dynamics, and diffusion constants also differ between the lipids in the first shell and the bulk. The lipid behaviors in the first shell around gA dimers are more complex than predicted from a simple mismatch model

  8. Expectations of Competency: The Mismatch between Employers' and Graduates' Views of End-User Computing Skills Requirements in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Shirley; Steel, Gary; Kuiper, Alison

    2011-01-01

    The use of computers has become part of everyday life. The high prevalence of computer use appears to lead employers to assume that university graduates will have the good computing skills necessary in many graduate level jobs. This study investigates how well the expectations of employers match the perceptions of near-graduate students about the…

  9. Involvement of pelvic inflammation-related mismatch repair abnormalities and microsatellite instability in the malignant transformation of ovarian endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Fuseya, Chiho; Horiuchi, Akiko; Hayashi, Akiko; Suzuki, Akihisa; Miyamoto, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Takuma; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2012-11-01

    Inflammation in the ovary, including ovulation and pelvic inflammatory disease, has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Endometriotic lesions trigger a local inflammatory reaction and have been reported to be associated with an increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of ovarian cancer arising from endometriosis are still to be elucidated. To clarify the involvement of mismatch repair (MMR) abnormalities in the inflammation-associated malignant transformation of endometriosis, the immunohistochemical expression of mismatch repair proteins (human mutL homolog 1 [hMLH1] and human mutS homolog 2 [hMSH2]) was examined in 27 cases of ovarian endometriosis, 25 cases of ovarian carcinoma accompanied by endometriosis, and 39 cases of solitary ovarian carcinoma. In addition, the relationship between mismatch repair abnormalities including the microsatellite instability, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) mutation, and clinicopathologic parameters was analyzed. The expression of mismatch repair proteins was stepwisely decreased in endometriosis, ovarian carcinoma accompanied by endometriosis, and ovarian carcinoma. Tumors harboring multiple microsatellite instability (high-frequency microsatellite instability [MSI-H]) were detected in 4 (14.8%) of 27 cases of endometriosis and 7 (30.4%) of 23 cases of ovarian carcinomas. The frequency of PTEN mutations was higher in MSI-H cases than in microsatellite instability-stable (MSI-S) cases. In 2 cases of ovarian carcinoma accompanied by endometriosis, the decreased expression of mismatch repair proteins and MSI-H was observed in both the endometriosis and carcinoma lesions. Clinicopathologically, the MSI-H cases were associated with elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein and higher white blood cell counts. These findings suggest that mismatch repair abnormalities might be involved in the malignant transformation of ovarian endometriosis and that

  10. Evidence for independent mismatch repair processing on opposite sides of a double-strand break in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Y S; Nickoloff, J A

    1998-01-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) induced gene conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during meiosis and MAT switching is mediated primarily by mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA (hDNA). We used nontandem ura3 duplications containing palindromic frameshift insertion mutations near an HO nuclease recognition site to test whether mismatch repair also mediates DSB-induced mitotic gene conversion at a non-MAT locus. Palindromic insertions included in hDNA are expected to produce a stem-loop mismatch, escape repair, and segregate to produce a sectored (Ura+/-) colony. If conversion occurs by gap repair, the insertion should be removed on both strands, and converted colonies will not be sectored. For both a 14-bp palindrome, and a 37-bp near-palindrome, approximately 75% of recombinant colonies were sectored, indicating that most DSB-induced mitotic gene conversion involves mismatch repair of hDNA. We also investigated mismatch repair of well-repaired markers flanking an unrepaired palindrome. As seen in previous studies, these additional markers increased loop repair (likely reflecting corepair). Among sectored products, few had additional segregating markers, indicating that the lack of repair at one marker is not associated with inefficient repair at nearby markers. Clear evidence was obtained for low levels of short tract mismatch repair. As seen with full gene conversions, donor alleles in sectored products were not altered. Markers on the same side of the DSB as the palindrome were involved in hDNA less often among sectored products than nonsectored products, but markers on the opposite side of the DSB showed similar hDNA involvement among both product classes. These results can be explained in terms of corepair, and they suggest that mismatch repair on opposite sides of a DSB involves distinct repair tracts. PMID:9475721

  11. Penumbra detection using PWI/DWI mismatch MRI in a rat stroke model with and without comorbidity: comparison of methods

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Emma; Graham, Delyth; Lopez-Gonzalez, M Rosario; Holmes, William M; Macrae, I Mhairi; McCabe, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Perfusion-diffusion (perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)/diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)) mismatch is used to identify penumbra in acute stroke. However, limitations in penumbra detection with mismatch are recognized, with a lack of consensus on thresholds, quantification and validation of mismatch. We determined perfusion and diffusion thresholds from final infarct in the clinically relevant spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHRSP) rat and its normotensive control strain, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and compared three methods for penumbra calculation. After permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (WKY n=12, SHRSP n=15), diffusion-weighted (DWI) and perfusion-weighted (PWI) images were obtained for 4 hours post stroke and final infarct determined at 24 hours on T2 scans. The PWI/DWI mismatch was calculated from volumetric assessment (perfusion deficit volume minus apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-defined lesion volume) or spatial assessment of mismatch area on each coronal slice. The ADC-derived lesion growth provided the third, retrospective measure of penumbra. At 1 hour after MCAO, volumetric mismatch detected smaller volumes of penumbra in both strains (SHRSP: 31±50 mm3, WKY: 22±59 mm3, mean±s.d.) compared with spatial assessment (SHRSP: 36±15 mm3, WKY: 43±43 mm3) and ADC lesion expansion (SHRSP: 41±45 mm3, WKY: 65±41 mm3), although these differences were not statistically significant. Spatial assessment appears most informative, using both diffusion and perfusion data, eliminating the influence of negative mismatch and allowing the anatomical location of penumbra to be assessed at given time points after stroke. PMID:22669479

  12. Iterative dual energy material decomposition from spatial mismatched raw data sets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing; Hu, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Yun-Song; Zhang, Hui-Tao; Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Today's clinical dual energy computed tomography (DECT) scanners generally measure different rays for different energy spectra and acquire spatial mismatched raw data sets. The deficits in clinical DECT technologies suggest that mainly image based material decomposition methods are in use nowadays. However, the image based material decomposition is an approximate technique, and beam hardening artifacts remain in decomposition results. A recently developed image based iterative method for material decomposition from inconsistent rays (MDIR) can achieve much better image quality than the conventional image based methods. Inspired by the MDIR method, this paper proposes an iterative method to indirectly perform raw data based DECT even with completely mismatched raw data sets. The iterative process is initialized by density images that were obtained from an image based material decomposition. Then the density images are iteratively corrected by comparing the estimated polychromatic projections and the measured polychromatic projections. Only three iterations of the method are sufficient to greatly improve the qualitative and quantitative information in material density images. Compared with the MDIR method, the proposed method needs not to perform additional water precorrection. The advantages of the method are verified with numerical experiments from inconsistent noise free and noisy raw data.

  13. Mismatch discrimination in fluorescent in situ hybridization using different types of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fontenete, Silvia; Silvia, Fontenete; Barros, Joana; Joana, Barros; Madureira, Pedro; Pedro, Madureira; Figueiredo, Céu; Céu, Figueiredo; Wengel, Jesper; Jesper, Wengel; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Filipe, Azevedo Nuno

    2015-05-01

    In the past few years, several researchers have focused their attention on nucleic acid mimics due to the increasing necessity of developing a more robust recognition of DNA or RNA sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an example of a method where the use of these novel nucleic acid monomers might be crucial to the success of the analysis. To achieve the expected accuracy in detection, FISH probes should have high binding affinity towards their complementary strands and discriminate effectively the noncomplementary strands. In this study, we investigate the effect of different chemical modifications in fluorescent probes on their ability to successfully detect the complementary target and discriminate the mismatched base pairs by FISH. To our knowledge, this paper presents the first study where this analysis is performed with different types of FISH probes directly in biological targets, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter acinonychis. This is also the first study where unlocked nucleic acids (UNA) were used as chemistry modification in oligonucleotides for FISH methodologies. The effectiveness in detecting the specific target and in mismatch discrimination appears to be improved using locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-O-methyl RNA (2'OMe) or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) in comparison to LNA/DNA, LNA/UNA, or DNA probes. Further, the use of LNA modifications together with 2'OMe monomers allowed the use of shorter fluorescent probes and increased the range of hybridization temperatures at which FISH would work.

  14. Recipient-derived hepatocytes in liver transplants: a rare event in sex-mismatched transplants.

    PubMed

    Fogt, Franz; Beyser, Kurt H; Poremba, Christopher; Zimmerman, Robert L; Khettry, Urmila; Ruschoff, Josef

    2002-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells have been shown to engraft and populate native tissues during repair and in transplanted animal tissues. Very few studies have been performed in humans to evaluate the possibility of stem cell engraftment in transplanted tissues. In human renal transplants, recipient cells have been demonstrated within vascular and interstitial structures. In a previous study of patients with hepatic transplants, hepatocytes with XY chromosome patterns have been detected in sex-mismatched female to male transplanted livers in a small number of cases. Because of the possibility of Y chromosome microchimerism of females with male offspring, we analyzed the presence of X and Y chromosomes in liver biopsies of 13 patients with sex-mismatched liver transplants (8 female to male, 5 male to female) and long transplant to biopsy intervals (1.2 to 12 years; mean, 4.5 years). We were able to detect recipient-specific sex chromosomal patterns in inflammatory cells by fluorescent in situ hybridization/immunohistochemistry combination within the liver parenchyma but not within hepatocytes. In conclusion, recipient engraftment of stem cells may be an early feature in liver transplant but may be an infrequent persistent feature in long-term grafts.

  15. Temperature-induced mismatches between consumption and metabolism reduce consumer fitness.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Nathan P; Burkepile, Deron E

    2012-11-01

    As physiological processes of ectotherms are coupled to environmental temperature, climate change will likely alter their fundamental biological rates, including metabolism, consumption, growth, and reproduction. Here we combine the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) with metabolism and consumption measurements of a model organism, the urchin Lytechinus variegatus, to test how climate change will affect consumer fitness. Unexpectedly, we found that metabolism and consumption exhibit different scaling relationships with temperature and are mismatched at high temperatures. This led to a dramatic reduction in ingestion efficiency and potentially in consumer fitness. Using metaanalysis, we showed that such temperature-driven mismatches between consumption and metabolism are common across taxa and frequently lead to reduced consumer fitness. Our empirical and synthetic analyses identify a mechanism by which climate change reduces the fitness of ectotherm consumers that may be applied to a broad array of taxonomic groups. Moreover, we showed that the assumptions of MTE do not hold at temperatures near the upper range of species' thermal tolerances for a wide array of taxa. Models using MTE to predict the effects of climate change on consumer-resource dynamics may therefore be underestimating the consequences of rising temperatures on population and community dynamics.

  16. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs’ configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  17. Columnar structured FePt films epitaxially grown on large lattice mismatched intermediate layer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, K. F.; Deng, J. Y.; Peng, Y. G.; Ju, G.; Chow, G. M.; Chen, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and magnetic properties of the FePt films grown on large mismatched ZrN (15.7%) intermediate layer were investigated. With using ZrN intermediate layer, FePt 10 nm films exhibited (001) texture except for some weaker FePt (110) texture. Good epitaxial relationships of FePt (001) <100>//ZrN (001) <100>//TiN (001) <100> among FePt and ZrN/TiN were revealed from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. As compared with TiN intermediate layer, although FePt-SiO2-C films grown on ZrN/TiN intermediate layer showed isotropic magnetic properties, the large interfacial energy and lattice mismatch between FePt and ZrN would lead to form columnar structural FePt films with smaller grain size and improved isolation. By doping ZrN into the TiN layer, solid solution of ZrTiN was formed and the lattice constant is increased comparing with TiN and decreased comparing with ZrN. Moreover, FePt-SiO2-C films grown on TiN 2 nm-20 vol.% ZrN/TiN 3 nm intermediate layer showed an improved perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Simultaneously, columnar structure with smaller grain size retained. PMID:27686046

  18. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method. PMID:27556471

  19. Measurement Matrix Optimization and Mismatch Problem Compensation for DLSLA 3-D SAR Cross-Track Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian; Jiang, Chenglong; Lin, Yun; Tan, Weixian; Wang, Zhirui; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-22

    With a short linear array configured in the cross-track direction, downward looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) can obtain the 3-D image of an imaging scene. To improve the cross-track resolution, sparse recovery methods have been investigated in recent years. In the compressive sensing (CS) framework, the reconstruction performance depends on the property of measurement matrix. This paper concerns the technique to optimize the measurement matrix and deal with the mismatch problem of measurement matrix caused by the off-grid scatterers. In the model of cross-track reconstruction, the measurement matrix is mainly affected by the configuration of antenna phase centers (APC), thus, two mutual coherence based criteria are proposed to optimize the configuration of APCs. On the other hand, to compensate the mismatch problem of the measurement matrix, the sparse Bayesian inference based method is introduced into the cross-track reconstruction by jointly estimate the scatterers and the off-grid error. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the proposed APCs' configuration schemes and the proposed cross-track reconstruction method.

  20. Interfacial Octahedral Rotation Mismatch Control of the Symmetry and Properties of SrRuO3.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ran; Dong, Yongqi; Xu, Han; Zhou, Hua; Yuan, Yakun; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Gao, Chen; Fong, Dillon D; Chen, Zuhuang; Luo, Zhenlin; Martin, Lane W

    2016-06-15

    Epitaxial strain can be used to tune the properties of complex oxides with perovskite structure. Beyond just lattice mismatch, the use of octahedral rotation mismatch at heterointerfaces could also provide an effective route to manipulate material properties. Here, we examine the evolution of the structural motif (i.e., lattice parameters, symmetry, and octahedral rotations) of SrRuO3 films grown on substrates engineered to have the same lattice parameters, but different octahedral rotations. SrRuO3 films grown on SrTiO3 (001) (no octahedral rotations) and GdScO3-buffered SrTiO3 (001) (with octahedral rotations) substrates are found to exhibit monoclinic and tetragonal symmetry, respectively. Electrical transport and magnetic measurements reveal that the tetragonal films exhibit higher resistivity, lower magnetic Curie temperatures, and more isotropic magnetism as compared to those with monoclinic structure. Synchrotron-based quantification of the octahedral rotation network reveals that the tilting pattern in both film variants is the same (albeit with slightly different magnitudes of in-plane rotation angles). The abnormal rotation pattern observed in tetragonal SrRuO3 indicates a possible decoupling between the internal octahedral rotation and lattice symmetry, which could provide new opportunities to engineer thin-film structure and properties.

  1. From coherent to incoherent mismatched interfaces: A generalized continuum formulation of surface stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingreville, Rémi; Hallil, Abdelmalek; Berbenni, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The equilibrium of coherent and incoherent mismatched interfaces is reformulated in the context of continuum mechanics based on the Gibbs dividing surface concept. Two surface stresses are introduced: a coherent surface stress and an incoherent surface stress, as well as a transverse excess strain. The coherent surface stress and the transverse excess strain represent the thermodynamic driving forces of stretching the interface while the incoherent surface stress represents the driving force of stretching one crystal while holding the other fixed and thereby altering the structure of the interface. These three quantities fully characterize the elastic behavior of coherent and incoherent interfaces as a function of the in-plane strain, the transverse stress and the mismatch strain. The isotropic case is developed in detail and particular attention is paid to the case of interfacial thermo-elasticity. This exercise provides an insight on the physical significance of the interfacial elastic constants introduced in the formulation and illustrates the obvious coupling between the interface structure and its associated thermodynamics quantities. Finally, an example based on atomistic simulations of Cu/Cu2O interfaces is given to demonstrate the relevance of the generalized interfacial formulation and to emphasize the dependence of the interfacial thermodynamic quantities on the incoherency strain with an actual material system.

  2. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation. PMID:26739522

  3. Impact of DNA mismatch repair system alterations on human fertility and related treatments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min-hao; Liu, Shu-yuan; Wang, Ning; Wu, Yan; Jin, Fan

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is one of the biological pathways, which plays a critical role in DNA homeostasis, primarily by repairing base-pair mismatches and insertion/deletion loops that occur during DNA replication. MMR also takes part in other metabolic pathways and regulates cell cycle arrest. Defects in MMR are associated with genomic instability, predisposition to certain types of cancers and resistance to certain therapeutic drugs. Moreover, genetic and epigenetic alterations in the MMR system demonstrate a significant relationship with human fertility and related treatments, which helps us to understand the etiology and susceptibility of human infertility. Alterations in the MMR system may also influence the health of offspring conceived by assisted reproductive technology in humans. However, further studies are needed to explore the specific mechanisms by which the MMR system may affect human infertility. This review addresses the physiological mechanisms of the MMR system and associations between alterations of the MMR system and human fertility and related treatments, and potential effects on the next generation.

  4. Brain responses to audiovisual speech mismatch in infants are associated with individual differences in looking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kushnerenko, Elena; Tomalski, Przemyslaw; Ballieux, Haiko; Ribeiro, Helena; Potton, Anita; Axelsson, Emma L; Murphy, Elizabeth; Moore, Derek G

    2013-11-01

    Research on audiovisual speech integration has reported high levels of individual variability, especially among young infants. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that this variability results from individual differences in the maturation of audiovisual speech processing during infancy. A developmental shift in selective attention to audiovisual speech has been demonstrated between 6 and 9 months with an increase in the time spent looking to articulating mouths as compared to eyes (Lewkowicz & Hansen-Tift. (2012) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 109, 1431-1436; Tomalski et al. (2012) Eur. J. Dev. Psychol., 1-14). In the present study we tested whether these changes in behavioural maturational level are associated with differences in brain responses to audiovisual speech across this age range. We measured high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to videos of audiovisually matching and mismatched syllables /ba/ and /ga/, and subsequently examined visual scanning of the same stimuli with eye-tracking. There were no clear age-specific changes in ERPs, but the amplitude of audiovisual mismatch response (AVMMR) to the combination of visual /ba/ and auditory /ga/ was strongly negatively associated with looking time to the mouth in the same condition. These results have significant implications for our understanding of individual differences in neural signatures of audiovisual speech processing in infants, suggesting that they are not strictly related to chronological age but instead associated with the maturation of looking behaviour, and develop at individual rates in the second half of the first year of life.

  5. Race, spatial mismatch, and job accessibility: evidence from a plant relocation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Roberto M

    2008-09-01

    One of the most prominent explanations for minority underachievement in the labor market is what has been termed the spatial mismatch hypothesis. The original formulation of the hypothesis by John Kain focused on the effects of racially segregated housing on workers' labor market outcomes assuming race-neutral employers. This paper reports the results of a case study designed to test Kain's original conception of this important hypothesis within the context of a longitudinal analysis of a relocating food processing plant. Because the workers in this study did not choose the firm's new location, the relocation can be treated as an exogenous, demand-side shock to the local labor market. This natural experiment design solves the major problem of extant approaches to the theory, i.e., the selective migration of minorities to areas with high concentrations of jobs. The study design also eliminates the confounding factor of non-race-neutral employers using space as a means to discriminate against minorities since the circumstances of this move make us confident that the firm is not moving for racial motives. We find support in favor of Kain's version of the spatial mismatch hypothesis. Despite the firm's best intentions and work to minimize the impact of the spatial disruption caused by the relocation, the racial segregation of the area's housing market hampered minorities' adjustments to the relocation. Consistent with Kain's formulation, spatially discriminating employers are not needed to produce race differences in job accessibility; racially segregated housing markets alone can generate such outcomes.

  6. Cultural mismatch and the education of Aboriginal youths: the interplay of cultural identities and teacher ratings.

    PubMed

    Fryberg, Stephanie A; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; D'Arrisso, Alexandra; Flores, Heidi; Ponizovskiy, Vladimir; Ranney, John D; Mandour, Tarek; Tootoosis, Curtis; Robinson, Sandy; Russo, Natalie; Burack, Jacob A

    2013-01-01

    In response to the enduring "deficit" approach to the educational attainment of Aboriginal students in North America, we hypothesized that academic underperformance is related to a cultural mismatch between Aboriginal students' cultural background, which emphasizes connectedness and interdependence, and the mainstream White model of education, which focuses on independence and assertiveness. The participants included virtually all the secondary students (N = 115) in the Naskapi community of Kawawachikamach, Quebec, Canada. We obtained self-reports of identification with Aboriginal and White culture, teacher reports of assertiveness, and official grades. We found that high identification with either Aboriginal or White culture was related to higher grades, regardless of whether the students were perceived as assertive by their teacher. Conversely, at low levels of cultural identification toward Aboriginal or White culture, being perceived as low in assertiveness by one's teacher predicted lower grades. This suggests that both high cultural identification and assertiveness can contribute to enhancing the educational outcomes of Aboriginal students, but that Aboriginal students with low levels of both cultural identification and assertiveness are at particular risk as they are mismatched with the culture of mainstream schools and do not benefit from the protective effects of identity. The relationships among identity, cultural values, and academic performance point to the need to reject the notion of an inherent deficit in education among Aboriginal youths in favor of a different framework in which success can be attained when alternative ways of being are fostered and nurtured in schools.

  7. Method for reducing or eliminating interface defects in mismatched semiconductor epilayers

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, E.A. Jr.; Ast, D.G.

    1992-10-20

    The present invention and process relates to crystal lattice mismatched semiconductor composite having a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor growth layer deposited thereon to form an interface wherein the growth layer can be deposited at thicknesses in excess of the critical thickness, even up to about 10[times] critical thickness. Such composite has an interface which is substantially free of interface defects. For example, the size of the growth areas in a mismatched In[sub 0.05]Ga[sub 0.95]As/(001)GaAs interface was controlled by fabricating 2-[mu]m high pillars of various lateral geometries and lateral dimensions before the epitaxial deposition of 3500 [angstrom] of In[sub 0.05]Ga[sub 0.95]As. The linear dislocation density at the interface was reduced from >5000 dislocations/cm to about zero for 25-[mu]m lateral dimensions and to less than 800 dislocations/cm for lateral dimensions as large as 100 [mu]m. The fabricated pillars control the lateral dimensions of the growth layer and block the glide of misfit dislocations with the resultant decrease in dislocation density. 7 figs.

  8. Method for reducing or eliminating interface defects in mismatched semiconductor epilayers

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, Jr., Eugene A.; Ast, Dieter G.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention and process relates to crystal lattice mismatched semiconductor composite having a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor growth layer deposited thereon to form an interface wherein the growth layer can be deposited at thicknesses in excess of the critical thickness, even up to about 10.times. critical thickness. Such composite has an interface which is substantially free of interface defects. For example, the size of the growth areas in a mismatched In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As/(001)GaAs interface was controlled by fabricating 2-.mu.m high pillars of various lateral geometries and lateral dimensions before the epitaxial deposition of 3500.ANG. of In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As. The linear dislocation density at the interface was reduced from >5000 dislocations/cm to about zero for 25-.mu.m lateral dimensions and to less than 800 dislocations/cm for lateral dimensions as large as 100 .mu.m. The fabricated pillars control the lateral dimensions of the growth layer and block the glide of misfit dislocations with the resultant decrease in dislocation density.

  9. Method for reducing or eliminating interface defects in mismatched semiconductor eiplayers

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, Jr., Eugene A.; Ast, Dieter G.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention and process relates to crystal lattice mismatched semiconductor composite having a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor growth layer deposited thereon to form an interface wherein the growth layer can be deposited at thicknesses in excess of the critical thickness, even up to about 10x critical thickness. Such composite has an interface which is substantially free of interface defects. For example, the size of the growth areas in a mismatched In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As/(001)GaAs interface was controlled by fabricating 2-.mu.m high pillars of various lateral geometries and lateral dimensions before the epitaxial deposition of 3500.ANG. of In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As. The linear dislocation density at the interface was reduced from >5000 dislocations/cm to about zero for 25-.mu.m lateral dimensions and to less than 800 dislocations/cm for lateral dimensions as large as 100 .mu.m. The fabricated pillars control the lateral dimensions of the growth layer and block the glide of misfit dislocations with the resultant decrease in dislocation density.

  10. Dielectric Mismatch Mediates Carrier Mobility in Organic-Intercalated Layered TiS2.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunlei; Kodama, Yumi; Kondo, Mami; Sasai, Ryo; Qian, Xin; Gu, Xiaokun; Koga, Kenji; Yabuki, Kazuhisa; Yang, Ronggui; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2015-10-14

    The dielectric constant is a key parameter that determines both optical and electronic properties of materials. It is desirable to tune electronic properties though dielectric engineering approach. Here, we present a systematic approach to tune carrier mobilities of hybrid inorganic/organic materials where layered two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide TiS2 is electrochemically intercalated with polar organic molecules. By manipulating the dielectric mismatch using polar organic molecules with different dielectric constants, ranging from 10 to 41, the electron mobility of the TiS2 layers was changed three times due to the dielectric screening of the Coulomb-impurity scattering processes. Both the overall thermal conductivity and the lattice thermal conductivity were also found to decrease with an increasing dielectric mismatch. The enhanced electrical mobility along with the decreased thermal conductivity together gave rise to a significantly improved thermoelectric figure of merit of the hybrid inorganic/organic materials at room temperature, which might find applications in wearable electronics.

  11. Investigation of MTH1 activity via mismatch-based DNA chain elongation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tao; Gu, Shiyu; Liu, Fengzhen; Li, Liudi; Wang, Zhaoxia; Yang, Jie; Li, Genxi

    2016-01-28

    Accumulation and misincorporation of oxidative damaged 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine triphosphates (8-oxo-dGTP) in genomic DNA may cause serious cellular function disorders. MutT Homolog 1 (MTH1), a protein enzyme that can help to prevent 8-oxo-dGTP misincorporation, plays critical roles in oxidative stress neutralization, oncogene-associated tumor malignancy, and anticancer therapies. So, in this work, a simple and function-oriented method is developed for the assay of MTH1 activity. Specifically, a mismatch-based ("8-oxoG: A" mismatch) DNA chain elongation strategy (MB-DCE) is firstly proposed to reveal the misincorporation efficiency of 8-oxo-dGTP. Then, further coupled with the inherent activity of MTH1 to prevent 8-oxo-dGTP misincorporation, a relationship can be established to reveal the activity of MTH1 through MB-DCE. As the method is designed directly towards the cellular function of MTH1, activity of MTH1 in different breast cancer cell lines has been detected, implying the potential application of this assay method for biomedical research and clinical diagnose in the future. PMID:26755138

  12. Assessing dissimilarity of genes by comparing their RNAse A mismatch cleavage patterns.

    PubMed

    Rzhetsky, A; Dopazo, J; Snyder, E; Dangler, C A; Ayala, F J

    1996-12-01

    We propose a simple algorithm for estimating the number of nucleotide differences between a pair of RNA or DNA sequences through comparison of their RNAse A mismatch cleavage patterns. In the RNAse A mismatch cleavage technique two or more sample sequences are hybridized to the same RNA probe, the hybrids are partially digested with RNAse A, and the digestion products are compared on an electrophoretic gel. Here we provide an algorithm for converting the numbers of unique and matching electrophoretic bands into an estimate of the number of nucleotide differences between the sequences. Computer simulation indicates that the proposed method yields a robust estimate of the genetic distance despite stochastic errors and occasional violation of certain assumptions. Our study suggests that the method performs best when the distance between the sequences is < 15 differences. When the sequences under analysis are likely to have larger distances, we advise to substitute one long riboprobe with a set of shorter nonoverlapping probes. The new algorithm is applied to infer the proximity of several strains of pseudorabies virus. PMID:8978080

  13. Predictive genetic testing in children: constitutional mismatch repair deficiency cancer predisposing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruwer, Zandrè; Algar, Ursula; Vorster, Alvera; Fieggen, Karen; Davidson, Alan; Goldberg, Paul; Wainwright, Helen; Ramesar, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Biallelic germline mutations in mismatch repair genes predispose to constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome (CMMR-D). The condition is characterized by a broad spectrum of early-onset tumors, including hematological, brain and bowel and is frequently associated with features of Neurofibromatosis type 1. Few definitive screening recommendations have been suggested and no published reports have described predictive testing. We report on the first case of predictive testing for CMMR-D following the identification of two non-consanguineous parents, with the same heterozygous mutation in MLH1: c.1528C > T. The genetic counseling offered to the family, for their two at-risk daughters, is discussed with a focus on the ethical considerations of testing children for known cancer-causing variants. The challenges that are encountered when reporting on heterozygosity in a child younger than 18 years (disclosure of carrier status and risk for Lynch syndrome), when discovered during testing for homozygosity, are addressed. In addition, the identification of CMMR-D in a three year old, and the recommended clinical surveillance that was proposed for this individual is discussed. Despite predictive testing and presymptomatic screening, the sudden death of the child with CMMR-D syndrome occurred 6 months after her last surveillance MRI. This report further highlights the difficulty of developing guidelines, as a result of the rarity of cases and diversity of presentation.

  14. From coherent to incoherent mismatched interfaces. A generalized continuum formulation of surface stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Dingreville, Rémi; Hallil, Abdelmalek; Berbenni, Stéphane

    2014-08-19

    The equilibrium of coherent and incoherent mismatched interfaces is reformulated in the context of continuum mechanics based on the Gibbs dividing surface concept. Two surface stresses are introduced: a coherent surface stress and an incoherent surface stress, as well as a transverse excess strain. Additionally, the coherent surface stress and the transverse excess strain represent the thermodynamic driving forces of stretching the interface while the incoherent surface stress represents the driving force of stretching one crystal while holding the other fixed and thereby altering the structure of the interface. These three quantities fully characterize the elastic behavior of coherent and incoherent interfaces as a function of the in-plane strain, the transverse stress and the mismatch strain. The isotropic case is developed in detail and particular attention is paid to the case of interfacial thermo-elasticity. This exercise provides an insight on the physical significance of the interfacial elastic constants introduced in the formulation and illustrates the obvious coupling between the interface structure and its associated thermodynamics quantities. Finally, an example based on atomistic simulations of Cu/Cu2O interfaces is given to demonstrate the relevance of the generalized interfacial formulation and to emphasize the dependence of the interfacial thermodynamic quantities on the incoherency strain with an actual material system.

  15. From coherent to incoherent mismatched interfaces. A generalized continuum formulation of surface stresses

    DOE PAGES

    Dingreville, Rémi; Hallil, Abdelmalek; Berbenni, Stéphane

    2014-08-19

    The equilibrium of coherent and incoherent mismatched interfaces is reformulated in the context of continuum mechanics based on the Gibbs dividing surface concept. Two surface stresses are introduced: a coherent surface stress and an incoherent surface stress, as well as a transverse excess strain. Additionally, the coherent surface stress and the transverse excess strain represent the thermodynamic driving forces of stretching the interface while the incoherent surface stress represents the driving force of stretching one crystal while holding the other fixed and thereby altering the structure of the interface. These three quantities fully characterize the elastic behavior of coherent andmore » incoherent interfaces as a function of the in-plane strain, the transverse stress and the mismatch strain. The isotropic case is developed in detail and particular attention is paid to the case of interfacial thermo-elasticity. This exercise provides an insight on the physical significance of the interfacial elastic constants introduced in the formulation and illustrates the obvious coupling between the interface structure and its associated thermodynamics quantities. Finally, an example based on atomistic simulations of Cu/Cu2O interfaces is given to demonstrate the relevance of the generalized interfacial formulation and to emphasize the dependence of the interfacial thermodynamic quantities on the incoherency strain with an actual material system.« less

  16. Physical and functional interactions between Werner syndrome helicase and mismatch-repair initiation factors

    PubMed Central

    Saydam, Nurten; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Dietschy, Tobias; Garcia, Patrick L.; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Shevelev, Igor; Stagljar, Igor; Janscak, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a severe recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, cancer predisposition and genomic instability. The gene mutated in WS encodes a bi-functional enzyme called WRN that acts as a RecQ-type DNA helicase and a 3′-5′ exonuclease, but its exact role in DNA metabolism is poorly understood. Here we show that WRN physically interacts with the MSH2/MSH6 (MutSα), MSH2/MSH3 (MutSβ) and MLH1/PMS2 (MutLα) heterodimers that are involved in the initiation of mismatch repair (MMR) and the rejection of homeologous recombination. MutSα and MutSβ can strongly stimulate the helicase activity of WRN specifically on forked DNA structures with a 3′-single-stranded arm. The stimulatory effect of MutSα on WRN-mediated unwinding is enhanced by a G/T mismatch in the DNA duplex ahead of the fork. The MutLα protein known to bind to the MutS α–heteroduplex complexes has no effect on WRN-mediated DNA unwinding stimulated by MutSα, nor does it affect DNA unwinding by WRN alone. Our data are consistent with results of genetic experiments in yeast suggesting that MMR factors act in conjunction with a RecQ-type helicase to reject recombination between divergent sequences. PMID:17715146

  17. Characteristics of InGaAsBi with various lattice mismatches on InP substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Gu, Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Xi, S. P.; Du, B.; Ma, Y. J.; Ji, W. Y.; Shi, Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    To develop bismuth-containing infrared optoelectronic devices, InGaAsBi/InP films with different lattice mismatches have been investigated. The lattice mismatch was tailored by changing the Bi content in conjunction with the In content simultaneously. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that alloy lattice constants have been extended positively by incorporation of Bi into the crystal lattice. Electrical and optical characteristics were investigated by Hall-effect, optical absorption and photoluminescence measurements. A bandgap shrinking of about 56.4 meV/Bi% was deduced by X-ray diffraction and optical absorption measurements. From the excitation dependent photoluminescence measurement at 10 K, the donor-acceptor pair emissions were inferred for samples containing moderate and high levels of Bi. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy is as small as 0.06 meV/K in In0.5Ga0.5As0.987Bi0.013, which is fairly low compared with that of In0.5Ga0.5As.

  18. Direct evidence of mismatching effect on H emission in laser-induced atmospheric helium gas plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zener Sukra Lie; Koo Hendrik Kurniawan; May On Tjia; Rinda, Hedwig; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Syahrun Nur Abdulmadjid; Nasrullah Idris; Alion Mangasi Marpaung; Marincan Pardede; Jobiliong, Eric; Muliadi Ramli; Heri Suyanto; Fukumoto, Kenichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2013-02-07

    A time-resolved orthogonal double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with helium surrounding gas is developed for the explicit demonstration of time mismatch between the passage of fast moving impurity hydrogen atoms and the formation of thermal shock wave plasma generated by the relatively slow moving major host atoms of much greater masses ablated from the same sample. Although this so-called 'mismatching effect' has been consistently shown to be responsible for the gas pressure induced intensity diminution of hydrogen emission in a number of LIBS measurements using different ambient gases, its explicit demonstration has yet to be reported. The previously reported helium assisted excitation process has made possible the use of surrounding helium gas in our experimental set-up for showing that the ablated hydrogen atoms indeed move faster than the simultaneously ablated much heavier major host atoms as signaled by the earlier H emission in the helium plasma generated by a separate laser prior to the laser ablation. This conclusion is further substantiated by the observed dominant distribution of H atoms in the forward cone-shaped target plasma.

  19. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed “bursts” where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments.

  20. Defective mismatch repair and benefit from bevacizumab for colon cancer: findings from NSABP C-08.

    PubMed

    Pogue-Geile, Kay; Yothers, Greg; Taniyama, Yusuke; Tanaka, Noriko; Gavin, Patrick; Colangelo, Linda; Blackmon, Nicole; Lipchik, Corey; Kim, Seong Rim; Sharif, Saima; Allegra, Carmen; Petrelli, Nicholas; O'Connell, Michael J; Wolmark, Norman; Paik, Soonmyung

    2013-07-01

    National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol C-08 tested the worth of adding 1 year of bevacizumab to oxaliplatin-based standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen in the treatment of stage II/III colon cancer. Although the overall result was negative, the possibility that a molecularly defined subset could benefit from bevacizumab cannot be ruled out. We performed post hoc Cox regression analyses to test for marker-by-treatment interactions for standard pathological features and survival analyses using the Kaplan-Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided and considered statistically significant at the .05 level. Patients diagnosed with mismatch repair defective (dMMR) tumors derived statistically significant survival benefit from the addition of bevacizumab (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.29 to 0.94; P = .02) in contrast with no benefit in patients diagnosed with mismatch repair proficient tumors (HR = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.84 to 1.27; p = .78; P(interaction)= .04). Although a post hoc finding, this data suggests that a molecularly defined subset of colon cancer patients may derive clinical benefit from antiangiogenesis agents and underscores the need for independent validation in other clinical trials.

  1. Defective Mismatch Repair and Benefit from Bevacizumab for Colon Cancer: Findings from NSABP C-08

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol C-08 tested the worth of adding 1 year of bevacizumab to oxaliplatin-based standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen in the treatment of stage II/III colon cancer. Although the overall result was negative, the possibility that a molecularly defined subset could benefit from bevacizumab cannot be ruled out. We performed post hoc Cox regression analyses to test for marker-by-treatment interactions for standard pathological features and survival analyses using the Kaplan–Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided and considered statistically significant at the .05 level. Patients diagnosed with mismatch repair defective (dMMR) tumors derived statistically significant survival benefit from the addition of bevacizumab (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.29 to 0.94; P = .02) in contrast with no benefit in patients diagnosed with mismatch repair proficient tumors (HR = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.84 to 1.27; p = .78; P interaction = .04). Although a post hoc finding, this data suggests that a molecularly defined subset of colon cancer patients may derive clinical benefit from antiangiogenesis agents and underscores the need for independent validation in other clinical trials. PMID:23821759

  2. Dynamics of spontaneous flipping of a mismatched base in DNA duplex

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yandong; Yang, Lijiang; Zheng, Guanqun; Gu, Chan; Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2014-01-01

    DNA base flipping is a fundamental theme in DNA biophysics. The dynamics for a B-DNA base to spontaneously flip out of the double helix has significant implications in various DNA–protein interactions but are still poorly understood. The spontaneous base-flipping rate obtained previously via the imino proton exchange assay is most likely the rate of base wobbling instead of flipping. Using the diffusion-decelerated fluorescence correlation spectroscopy together with molecular dynamics simulations, we show that a base of a single mismatched base pair (T–G, T–T, or T–C) in a double-stranded DNA can spontaneously flip out of the DNA duplex. The extrahelical lifetimes are on the order of 10 ms, whereas the intrahelical lifetimes range from 0.3 to 20 s depending on the stability of the base pairs. These findings provide detailed understanding on the dynamics of DNA base flipping and lay down foundation to fully understand how exactly the repair proteins search and locate the target mismatched base among a vast excess of matched DNA bases. PMID:24843124

  3. Genomic analysis identifies class II mismatches in serologically DR-compatible human renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Bushell, A; Wood, K J; Morris, P J

    1988-11-01

    Many studies, including those from our own center, have shown that matching the donor and recipient for HLA-DR antigens has a beneficial effect on the outcome of cadaveric renal transplantation. However, cases of irreversible graft rejection are sometimes seen in patients who have received an HLA-DR-compatible kidney, suggesting that serologic compatibility for HLA-DR may not always ensure reduced alloreactivity toward the graft. We have examined a number of recipients and their serologically DR-compatible cadaveric donors by Southern blotting and hybridization with locus specific HLA class II probes in order to determine whether in these patients there were class II mismatches that had been undetected by serology. The results show that the analysis of DR beta restriction fragment patterns does little more than complement and confirm the serologic identification of HLA-DR. Hybridization with DQ alpha and DQ beta probes, however, significantly extends the number of DQ specificities that can be detected and suggests that DQ mismatches in DR-compatible donor-recipient pairs may be more common than previously supposed, although it is not possible to draw any conclusions on the influence of DQ incompatibilities in the presence of DR compatibility on graft outcome.

  4. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA. Progress report, March 1, 1990--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  5. Strategies for tuning phonon transport in multilayered structures using a mismatch-based particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Nam Q.; Duda, John C.; English, Timothy S.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2012-04-01

    The performance of many micro- and nanoscale devices depends on the ability to control interfacial thermal transport, which is predominantly mediated by phonons in semiconductor systems. The phonon transmissivity at an interface is therefore a quantity of interest. In this work, an empirical model, termed the thermal mismatch model, is developed to predict transmissivity at ideal interfaces between semiconductor materials, producing an excellent agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of wave packets. To investigate propagation through multilayered structures, this thermal mismatch model is then incorporated into a simulation scheme that represents wave packets as particles, showing a good agreement with a similar scheme that used molecular dynamics simulations as input [P. K. Schelling and S. R. Phillpot, J. Appl. Phys. 93, 5377 (2003)]. With these techniques validated for both single interfaces and superlattices, they are further used to identify ways to tune the transmissivity of multilayered structures. It is shown that by introducing intermediate layers of certain atomic masses, the total transmissivity can either be systematically enhanced or reduced compared to that of a single interface. Thus, this model can serve as a computationally inexpensive means of developing strategies to control phonon transmissivity in applications that may benefit from either enhancement (e.g., microelectronics) or reduction (e.g., thermoelectrics) in thermal transport.

  6. Study of cover source mismatch in steganalysis and ways to mitigate its impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodovský, Jan; Sedighi, Vahid; Fridrich, Jessica

    2014-02-01

    When a steganalysis detector trained on one cover source is applied to images from a different source, generally the detection error increases due to the mismatch between both sources. In steganography, this situation is recognized as the so-called cover source mismatch (CSM). The drop in detection accuracy depends on many factors, including the properties of both sources, the detector construction, the feature space used to represent the covers, and the steganographic algorithm. Although well recognized as the single most important factor negatively affecting the performance of steganalyzers in practice, the CSM received surprisingly little attention from researchers. One of the reasons for this is the diversity with which the CSM can manifest. On a series of experiments in the spatial and JPEG domains, we refute some of the common misconceptions that the severity of the CSM is tied to the feature dimensionality or their "fragility." The CSM impact on detection appears too difficult to predict due to the effect of complex dependencies among the features. We also investigate ways to mitigate the negative effect of the CSM using simple measures, such as by enlarging the diversity of the training set (training on a mixture of sources) and by employing a bank of detectors trained on multiple different sources and testing on a detector trained on the closest source.

  7. Symmetry and lattice mismatch induced strain accommodation near and away from correlated perovskite interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vailionis, A.; Boschker, H.; Liao, Z.; Smit, J. R. A.; Rijnders, G.; Huijben, M.; Koster, G.

    2014-09-01

    Distinct MnO6 octahedral distortions near and away from the La0.67Sr0.33MnO3/SrTiO3(001) (LSMO/STO) interface are quantified using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and dynamical x-ray diffraction simulations. Three structural regions of stress accommodation throughout the film thickness were resolved: near the LSMO/STO interface, intermediate region farther from the interface, and the main layer away from the interface. The results show that within the first two unit cells stress is accommodated by the suppression of octahedral rotations in the film, leading to the expansion of the c-axis lattice parameter. Farther from the interface film structure acquires octahedral tilts similar to thicker perovskite films under tensile stress, leading to a reduced c-axis parameter. We demonstrate that these regions are related to two different strain coupling mechanisms: symmetry mismatch at the interface and lattice mismatch in the rest of the film. The findings suggest new routes for strain engineering in correlated perovskite heterostructures.

  8. Modulation of gramicidin channel conformation and organization by hydrophobic mismatch in saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Devaki A; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-05-01

    The matching of hydrophobic lengths of integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer is an important factor that influences both structure and function of integral membrane proteins. The ion channel gramicidin is known to be uniquely sensitive to membrane properties such as bilayer thickness and membrane mechanical properties. The functionally important carboxy terminal tryptophan residues of gramicidin display conformation-dependent fluorescence which can be used to monitor gramicidin conformations in membranes [S.S. Rawat, D.A. Kelkar, A. Chattopadhyay, Monitoring gramicidin conformations in membranes: a fluorescence approach, Biophys. J. 87 (2004) 831-843]. We have examined the effect of hydrophobic mismatch on the conformation and organization of gramicidin in saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers of varying thickness utilizing the intrinsic conformation-dependent tryptophan fluorescence. Our results utilizing steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic approaches, in combination with circular dichroism spectroscopy, show that gramicidin remains predominantly in the channel conformation and gramicidin tryptophans are at the membrane interfacial region over a range of mismatch conditions. Interestingly, gramicidin conformation shifts toward non-channel conformations in extremely thick gel phase membranes although it is not excluded from the membrane. In addition, experiments utilizing self quenching of tryptophan fluorescence indicate peptide aggregation in thicker gel phase membranes.

  9. Plasticity in Human Pitch Perception Induced by Tonotopically Mismatched Electro-Acoustic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lina A.J.; Turner, Christopher W.; Karsten, Sue A.; Gantz, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the acoustic pitch percept of a pure tone is determined mainly by the tonotopic place of the stimulation along the cochlea. Unlike acoustic stimulation, electric stimulation of a cochlear implant (CI) allows for the direct manipulation of the place of stimulation in human subjects. CI sound processors analyze the range of frequencies needed for speech perception and allocate portions of this range to the small number of electrodes distributed in the cochlea. Because the allocation is assigned independently of the original resonant frequency of the basilar membrane associated with the location of each electrode, CI users who have access to residual hearing in either or both ears often have tonotopic mismatches between the acoustic and electric stimulation. Here we demonstrate plasticity of place pitch representations of up to 3 octaves in Hybrid CI users after experience with combined electro-acoustic stimulation. The pitch percept evoked by single CI electrodes, measured relative to acoustic tones presented to the non-implanted ear, changed over time in directions that reduced the electro-acoustic pitch mismatch introduced by the CI programming. This trend was particularly apparent when the allocations of stimulus frequencies to electrodes were changed over time, with pitch changes even reversing direction in some subjects. These findings show that pitch plasticity can occur more rapidly and on a greater scale in the mature auditory system than previously thought possible. Overall, the results suggest that the adult auditory system can impose perceptual order on disordered arrays of inputs. PMID:24157931

  10. Two Ears Are Not Always Better than One: Mandatory Vowel Fusion Across Spectrally Mismatched Ears in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Lina A J; Eggleston, Jessica L; Walker, Emily P; Oh, Yonghee

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss and auditory prostheses can alter auditory processing by inducing large pitch mismatches and broad pitch fusion between the two ears. Similar to integration of incongruent inputs in other sensory modalities, the mismatched, fused pitches are often averaged across ears for simple stimuli. Here, we measured parallel effects on complex stimulus integration using a new technique based on vowel classification in five bilateral hearing aid users and eight bimodal cochlear implant users. Continua between five pairs of synthetic vowels were created by varying the first formant spectral peak while keeping the second formant constant. Comparison of binaural and monaural vowel classification functions for each vowel pair continuum enabled visualization of the following frequency-dependent integration trends: (1) similar monaural and binaural functions, (2) ear dominance, (3) binaural averaging, and (4) binaural interference. Hearing aid users showed all trends, while bimodal cochlear implant users showed mostly ear dominance or interference. Interaural pitch mismatches, frequency ranges of binaural pitch fusion, and the relative weightings of pitch averaging across ears were also measured using tone and/or electrode stimulation. The presence of both large interaural pitch mismatches and broad pitch fusion was not sufficient to predict vowel integration trends such as binaural averaging or interference. The way that pitch averaging was weighted between ears also appears to be important for determining binaural vowel integration trends. Abnormally broad spectral fusion and the associated phoneme fusion across mismatched ears may underlie binaural speech perception interference observed in hearing aid and cochlear implant users. PMID:27220769

  11. The Prevention of Repeat-Associated Deletions in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae by Mismatch Repair Depends on Size and Origin of Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Tran, H. T.; Gordenin, D. A.; Resnick, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of mismatch repair on 1- to 61-bp deletions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The deletions are likely to involve unpaired loop intermediates resulting from DNA polymerase slippage. The mutator effects of mutations in the DNA polymerase δ (POL3) gene and the recombinational repair RAD52 gene were studied in combination with mismatch repair defects. The pol3-t mutation increased up to 1000-fold the rate of extended (7-61 bp) but not of 1-bp deletions. In a rad52 null mutant only the 1-bp deletions were increased (12-fold). The mismatch repair mutations pms1, msh2 and msh3 did not affect 31- and 61-bp deletions in the pol3-t but increased the rates of 7- and 1-bp deletions. We propose that loops less than or equal to seven bases generated during replication are subject to mismatch repair by the PMS1, MSH2, MSH3 system and that it cannot act on loops >=31 bases. In contrast to the pol3-t, the enhancement of 1-bp deletions in a rad52 mutant is not altered by a pms1 mutation. Thus, mismatch repair appears to be specific to errors of DNA synthesis generated during semiconservative replication. PMID:8844147

  12. Effect of mismatched place-of-stimulation on binaural fusion and lateralization in bilateral cochlear-implant usersa

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Alan; Stoelb, Corey; Litovsky, Ruth Y.; Goupell, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) have provided some success in improving spatial hearing abilities to patients, but with large variability in performance. One reason for the variability is that there may be a mismatch in the place-of-stimulation arising from electrode arrays being inserted at different depths in each cochlea. Goupell et al. [(2013b). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133(4), 2272–2287] showed that increasing interaural mismatch led to non-fused auditory images and poor lateralization of interaural time differences in normal hearing subjects listening to a vocoder. However, a greater bandwidth of activation helped mitigate these effects. In the present study, the same experiments were conducted in post-lingually deafened bilateral CI users with deliberate and controlled interaural mismatch of single electrode pairs. Results show that lateralization was still possible with up to 3 mm of interaural mismatch, even when off-center, or multiple, auditory images were perceived. However, mismatched inputs are not ideal since it leads to a distorted auditory spatial map. Comparison of CI and normal hearing listeners showed that the CI data were best modeled by a vocoder using Gaussian-pulsed tones with 1.5 mm bandwidth. These results suggest that interaural matching of electrodes is important for binaural cues to be maximally effective. PMID:24116428

  13. Specific Mismatch Recognition in Heteroduplex Intermediates by p53 Suggests a Role in Fidelity Control of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dudenhöffer, Christine; Rohaly, Gabor; Will, Katrin; Deppert, Wolfgang; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that wild-type p53 inhibits homologous recombination. To analyze DNA substrate specificities in this process, we designed recombination experiments such that coinfection of simian virus 40 mutant pairs generated heteroduplexes with distinctly unpaired regions. DNA exchanges producing single C-T and A-G mismatches were inhibited four- to sixfold more effectively than DNA exchanges producing G-T and A-C single-base mispairings or unpaired regions of three base pairs comprising G-T/A-C mismatches. p53 bound specifically to three-stranded DNA substrates, mimicking early recombination intermediates. The KD values for the interactions of p53 with three-stranded substrates displaying differently paired and unpaired regions reflected the mismatch base specificities observed in recombination assays in a qualitative and quantitative manner. On the basis of these results, we would like to advance the hypothesis that p53, like classical mismatch repair factors, checks the fidelity of homologous recombination processes by specific mismatch recognition. PMID:9710617

  14. The poor homology stringency in the heteroduplex allows strand exchange to incorporate desirable mismatches without sacrificing recognition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Danilowicz, Claudia; Yang, Darren; Kelley, Craig; Prévost, Chantal; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. In bacteria, homology search begins after RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site, forming the presynaptic filament. Once the filament is formed, it interrogates double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). During the interrogation, bases in the dsDNA attempt to form Watson–Crick bonds with the corresponding bases in the initiating strand. Mismatch dependent instability in the base pairing in the heteroduplex strand exchange product could provide stringent recognition; however, we present experimental and theoretical results suggesting that the heteroduplex stability is insensitive to mismatches. We also present data suggesting that an initial homology test of 8 contiguous bases rejects most interactions containing more than 1/8 mismatches without forming a detectable 20 bp product. We propose that, in vivo, the sparsity of accidental sequence matches allows an initial 8 bp test to rapidly reject almost all non-homologous sequences. We speculate that once the initial test is passed, the mismatch insensitive binding in the heteroduplex allows short mismatched regions to be incorporated in otherwise homologous strand exchange products even though sequences with less homology are eventually rejected. PMID:26089391

  15. Assessment of primer/template mismatch effects on real-time PCR amplification of target taxa for GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Ghedira, Rim; Papazova, Nina; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Ruttink, Tom; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2009-10-28

    GMO quantification, based on real-time PCR, relies on the amplification of an event-specific transgene assay and a species-specific reference assay. The uniformity of the nucleotide sequences targeted by both assays across various transgenic varieties is an important prerequisite for correct quantification. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) frequently occur in the maize genome and might lead to nucleotide variation in regions used to design primers and probes for reference assays. Further, they may affect the annealing of the primer to the template and reduce the efficiency of DNA amplification. We assessed the effect of a minor DNA template modification, such as a single base pair mismatch in the primer attachment site, on real-time PCR quantification. A model system was used based on the introduction of artificial mismatches between the forward primer and the DNA template in the reference assay targeting the maize starch synthase (SSIIb) gene. The results show that the presence of a mismatch between the primer and the DNA template causes partial to complete failure of the amplification of the initial DNA template depending on the type and location of the nucleotide mismatch. With this study, we show that the presence of a primer/template mismatch affects the estimated total DNA quantity to a varying degree.

  16. Assessment of primer/template mismatch effects on real-time PCR amplification of target taxa for GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Ghedira, Rim; Papazova, Nina; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Ruttink, Tom; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc

    2009-10-28

    GMO quantification, based on real-time PCR, relies on the amplification of an event-specific transgene assay and a species-specific reference assay. The uniformity of the nucleotide sequences targeted by both assays across various transgenic varieties is an important prerequisite for correct quantification. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) frequently occur in the maize genome and might lead to nucleotide variation in regions used to design primers and probes for reference assays. Further, they may affect the annealing of the primer to the template and reduce the efficiency of DNA amplification. We assessed the effect of a minor DNA template modification, such as a single base pair mismatch in the primer attachment site, on real-time PCR quantification. A model system was used based on the introduction of artificial mismatches between the forward primer and the DNA template in the reference assay targeting the maize starch synthase (SSIIb) gene. The results show that the presence of a mismatch between the primer and the DNA template causes partial to complete failure of the amplification of the initial DNA template depending on the type and location of the nucleotide mismatch. With this study, we show that the presence of a primer/template mismatch affects the estimated total DNA quantity to a varying degree. PMID:19778057

  17. Luminescent platinum(II) complexes with functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene or diphosphine selectively probe mismatched and abasic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Sin Ki; Zou, Taotao; Cao, Bei; Chen, Tianfeng; To, Wai-Pong; Yang, Chen; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The selective targeting of mismatched DNA overexpressed in cancer cells is an appealing strategy in designing cancer diagnosis and therapy protocols. Few luminescent probes that specifically detect intracellular mismatched DNA have been reported. Here we used Pt(II) complexes with luminescence sensitive to subtle changes in the local environment and report several Pt(II) complexes that selectively bind to and identify DNA mismatches. We evaluated the complexes' DNA-binding characteristics by ultraviolet/visible absorption titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. These Pt(II) complexes show up to 15-fold higher emission intensities upon binding to mismatched DNA over matched DNA and can be utilized for both detecting DNA abasic sites and identifying cancer cells and human tissue samples with different levels of mismatch repair. Our work highlights the potential of luminescent Pt(II) complexes to differentiate between normal cells and cancer cells which generally possess more aberrant DNA structures. PMID:26883164

  18. Double threading through DNA: NMR structural study of a bis-naphthalene macrocycle bound to a thymine–thymine mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Muriel; Granzhan, Anton; Guillot, Regis; Dumy, Pascal; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule

    2012-01-01

    The macrocyclic bis-naphthalene macrocycle (2,7-BisNP), belonging to the cyclobisintercalator family of DNA ligands, recognizes T–T mismatch sites in duplex DNA with high affinity and selectivity, as evidenced by thermal denaturation experiments and NMR titrations. The binding of this macrocycle to an 11-mer DNA oligonucleotide containing a T–T mismatch was studied using NMR spectroscopy and NMR-restrained molecular modeling. The ligand forms a single type of complex with the DNA, in which one of the naphthalene rings of the ligand occupies the place of one of the mismatched thymines, which is flipped out of the duplex. The second naphthalene unit of the ligand intercalates at the A-T base pair flanking the mismatch site, leading to encapsulation of its thymine residue via double stacking. The polyammonium linking chains of the macrocycle are located in the minor and the major grooves of the oligonucleotide and participate in the stabilization of the complex by formation of hydrogen bonds with the encapsulated thymine base and the mismatched thymine remaining inside the helix. The study highlights the uniqueness of this cyclobisintercalation binding mode and its importance for recognition of DNA lesion sites by small molecules. PMID:22362757

  19. Structural, molecular and cellular functions of MSH2 and MSH6 during DNA mismatch repair, damage signaling and other noncanonical activities

    PubMed Central

    Edelbrock, Michael A.; Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan; Williams, Kandace J.

    2013-01-01

    The field of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) has rapidly expanded after the discovery of the MutHLS repair system in bacteria. By the mid 1990s yeast and human homologues to bacterial MutL and MutS had been identified and their contribution to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome) was under intense investigation. The human MutS homologue 6 protein (hMSH6), was first reported in 1995 as a G:T binding partner (GTBP) of hMSH2, forming the hMutSα mismatch-binding complex. Signal transduction from each DNA-bound hMutSα complex is accomplished by the hMutLα heterodimer (hMLH1 and hPMS2). Molecular mechanisms and cellular regulation of individual MMR proteins are now areas of intensive research. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms associated with mismatch binding, as well as emerging evidence that MutSα and in particular, MSH6, is a key protein in MMR-dependent DNA damage response and communication with other DNA repair pathways within the cell. MSH6 is unstable in the absence of MSH2, however it is the DNA lesion-binding partner of this heterodimer. MSH6, but not MSH2, has a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif that recognizes and binds several different DNA structural distortions, initiating different cellular responses. hMSH6 also contains the nuclear localization sequences required to shuttle hMutSα into the nucleus. For example, upon binding to O6meG:T, MSH6 triggers a DNA damage response that involves altered phosphorylation within the N-terminal disordered domain of this unique protein. While many investigations have focused on MMR as a post-replication DNA repair mechanism, MMR proteins are expressed and active in all phases of the cell cycle. There is much more to be discovered about regulatory cellular roles that require the presence of MutSα and, in particular, MSH6. PMID:23391514

  20. Seam-line determination for image mosaicking: A technique minimizing the maximum local mismatch and the global cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Jaechoon; Kim, Hyongsuk; Lin, Chun-Shin

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm that selects seam-lines for mosaicking image patches. This technique uses Dijkstra's algorithm to find a seam-line with the minimal objective function. Since a segment of seam-line with significant mismatch, even if it is short, is more visible than a lengthy one with small differences, a direct summation of the mismatch scores is inadequate. Limiting the level of the maximum difference along a seam-line should be part of the objective in the seam-line selection process. Our technique first determines this desired level of maximum difference, then applies Dijkstra's algorithm to find the best seam-line. A quantitative measure to evaluate a seam-line is proposed. The measure is defined as the sum of a fixed number of top mismatch scores. The proposed algorithm is compared with other techniques quantitatively and visually about various types of images.

  1. Refractive index and dielectric constants of lattice matched and mismatched Cdx Zn1-x Sey Te1-y quaternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezrag, F.; Bouarissa, N.; Boucenna, M.; Hannachi, L.

    2010-09-01

    We report on a study of optical properties, namely the refractive index and high-frequency and static dielectric constants of zinc-blende Cdx Zn1-x Sey Te1-y under conditions of lattice matching and lattice mismatching to ZnTe substrates. The calculations are mainly based on the pseudopotential approach under a virtual crystal approximation. Our results show that the Cdx Zn1-x Sey Te1-y lattice matched to ZnTe is a direct band-gap semiconductor for all possible values of x and y (0 <=x<=1, 0<=y<=0.879). The studied features are found to be strongly dependent on the lattice mismatch percentage. The present investigation provides more opportunities to obtain diverse refractive indices and dielectric constants, while still controlling the composition parameters (x and y) and/or the lattice mismatch percentage.

  2. Influence of the Strength Mismatch of a Narrow Gap Welded Joint of SA508 on the Plastic η Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J. M.; Huh, Y.; Seok, C. S.

    2012-11-01

    In this article, the influence of the strength mismatch of a narrow gap welded joint of SA508 on the η factor was evaluated. The η factor is the principal parameter that determines the plastic portion of the J-integral. The specimens for tensile and hardness tests were collected from piping with narrow gap welding and the stress-strain curve and hardness were obtained from those. From these results, the Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) constant was obtained. Also, the finite element analysis was performed with variations in the strength mismatch and the weld width. The η factor equation considering the strength mismatch and the weld width of a narrow gap welded joint was suggested.

  3. Restriction endonucleases HindII and TaqI cleave DNA with mismatched nucleotides within their recognition sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Jiricny, J; Martin, D

    1986-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases HindII and TaqI, but not SalI, were found to efficiently cleave synthetic hexadecanucleotide duplexes which contained either an A/C or a G/T mismatch within their respective restriction sites. Double-stranded M13 DNAs with identical mismatches were also cleaved under the assay conditions. These results suggest that the distortion of the DNA duplex, caused by these purine/pyrimidine mismatches is not sufficiently large so as to interfere with the recognition and the subsequent cleavage of the DNA by these two enzymes. HindII and SalI, but not TaqI, were furthermore shown to hydrolyze the two strands of the duplex with different rates. The differences between the mode of recognition of their respective restriction sites by these three enzymes are discussed. Images PMID:3008080

  4. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions.

  5. Occupational stratification, job-mismatches, and child poverty: understanding the disadvantage of Black immigrants in the US.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kevin J A

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the implications of occupational stratification and job mismatches for the welfare of children, using data from the 2005-2009 American Community Survey. The results show that Black children of immigrants have household heads that are more likely to have occupations with low SEI scores than children in US-born households. More importantly, they demonstrate that intersections between parental job-mismatches and employment in the bottom rather than upper levels of the occupational distribution have important implications for understanding poverty differences among children. Job mismatches within occupations with low SEI scores are associated with greater poverty risks among Black than White, Asian, or Hispanic children of immigrants. However, racial poverty disparities are considerably lower among children with household heads in the highest occupational strata. PMID:25592931

  6. UGT2B17 minor histocompatibility mismatch and clinical outcome after HLA-identical sibling donor stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Santos, N; Rodríguez-Romanos, R; Nieto, J B; Buño, I; Vallejo, C; Jiménez-Velasco, A; Brunet, S; Buces, E; López-Jiménez, J; González, M; Ferrá, C; Sampol, A; de la Cámara, R; Martínez, C; Gallardo, D

    2016-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility Ags (mHags) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B17 (UGT2B17) gene deletion may act as a mHag and its association with acute GVHD (aGVHD) has been described. We retrospectively studied the clinical impact of a UGT2B17 mismatch in a cohort of 1127 patients receiving a HSCT from an HLA-identical sibling donor. UGT2B17 mismatch was present in 69 cases (6.1%). Incidence of severe aGVHD was higher in the UGT2B17 mismatched pairs (22.7% vs 14.6%), but this difference was not statistically significant (P: 0.098). We did not detect differences in chronic GVHD, overall survival, relapse-free survival, transplant-related mortality or relapse. Nevertheless, when we analyzed only those patients receiving grafts from a male donor (616 cases), aGVHD was significantly higher in the UGT2B17 mismatched group (25.1% vs 12.8%; P: 0.005) and this association was confirmed by the multivariate analysis (P: 0.043; hazard ratio: 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-4.57). Overall survival was worse for patients mismatched for UGT2B17 (P: 0.005). We conclude that UGT2B17 mismatch has a negative clinical impact in allogeneic HSCT from HLA-identical sibling donors only when a male donor is used. These results should be confirmed by other studies. PMID:26367234

  7. Cross-scale feedbacks and scale mismatches as influences on cultural services and the resilience of protected areas.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Kristine; De Vos, Alta; Cumming, Graeme S; Moore, Christine; Biggs, Duan

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are a central strategy for achieving global conservation goals, but their continued existence depends heavily on maintaining sufficient social and political support to outweigh economic interests or other motives for land conversion. Thus, the resilience of protected areas can be considered a function of their perceived benefits to society. Nature-based tourism (NBT), a cultural ecosystem service, provides a key source of income to protected areas, facilitating a sustainable solution to conservation. The ability of tourism to generate income depends, however, on both the scales at which this cultural service is provided and the scales at which tourists respond to services on offer. This observation raises a set of location-, context-, and scale-related questions that need to be confronted before we can understand and value cultural service provision appropriately. We combine elements of resilience analysis with a systems ecology framework and apply this to NBT in protected areas to investigate cross-scale interactions and scale mismatches. We postulate that cross-scale effects can either have a positive effect on protected area resilience or lead to scale mismatches, depending on their interactions with cross-scale feedbacks. To demonstrate this, we compare spatial scales and nested levels of institutions to develop a typology of scale mismatches for common scenarios in NBT. In our new typology, the severity of a scale mismatch is expressed as the ratio of spatial scale to institutional level, producing 25 possible outcomes with differing consequences for system resilience. We predict that greater differences between interacting scales and levels, and greater magnitudes of cross-scale interactions, will lead to greater magnitudes of scale mismatch. Achieving a better understanding of feedbacks and mismatches, and finding ways of aligning spatial and institutional scales, will be critical for strengthening the resilience of protected areas that

  8. Phenological mismatch with abiotic conditions implications for flowering in Arctic plants.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Helen C; Høye, Toke T; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Forchhammer, Mads C

    2015-03-01

    Although many studies have examined the phenological mismatches between interacting organisms, few have addressed the potential for mismatches between phenology and seasonal weather conditions. In the Arctic, rapid phenological changes in many taxa are occurring in association with earlier snowmelt. The timing of snowmelt is jointly affected by the size of the late winter snowpack and the temperature during the spring thaw. Increased winter snowpack results in delayed snowmelt, whereas higher air temperatures and faster snowmelt advance the timing of snowmelt. Where interannual variation in snowpack is substantial, changes in the timing of snowmelt can be largely uncoupled from changes in air temperature. Using detailed, long-term data on the flowering phenology of four arctic plant species from Zackenberg, Greenland, we investigate whether there is a phenological component to the temperature conditions experienced prior to and during flowering. In particular, we assess the role of timing of flowering in determining pre-flowering exposure to freezing temperatures and to the temperatures-experienced prior to flowering. We then examine the implications of flowering phenology for flower abundance. Earlier snowmelt resulted in greater exposure to freezing conditions, suggesting an increased potential for a mismatch between the timing of flowering and seasonal weather conditions and an increased potential for negative consequences, such as freezing 'damage. We also found a parabolic relationship between the timing of flowering and the temperature experienced during flowering after taking interannual temperature effects into account. If timing of flowering advances to a cooler period of the growing season, this may moderate the effects of a general warming trend across years. Flower abundance was quadratically associated with the timing of flowering, such that both early and late flowering led to lower flower abundance than did intermediate flowering. Our results

  9. Nitrogen fluxes at the root-soil interface show a mismatch of nitrogen fertilizer supply and sugarcane root uptake capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inselsbacher, Erich; Schmidt, Susanne; Näsholm, Torgny; Robinson, Nicole; Guillou, Stéphane; Vinall, Kerry; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Brackin, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) uptake by agricultural crops is a key constituent of the global N cycle, as N captured by roots has a markedly different fate than N remaining in the soil. Global evidence indicates that only approximately 50% of applied N fertilizer is captured by crops, and the remainder can cause pollution via runoff and gaseous emissions. This inefficiency is of global concern, and requires innovation based on improved understanding of which N forms are available for and ultimately taken up by crops. However, current soil analysis methods based on destructive soil sampling provide little insight into delivery and acquisition of N forms by roots. Here, we present the results of a study in sugarcane fields receiving different fertilizer regimes comparing soil N supply rates with potential root N uptake rates. We applied microdialysis, a novel technique for in situ quantification of soil nutrient fluxes, to measure flux rates of inorganic N and amino acid N, and analyzed N uptake capacities of sugarcane roots using 15N labelled tracers. We found that in fertilized sugarcane soils, fluxes of inorganic N exceed the uptake capacities of sugarcane roots by several orders of magnitude. Contrary, fluxes of organic N closely matched roots' uptake capacity. These results indicate root uptake capacity constrains plant acquisition of inorganic N. This mismatch between soil N supply and root N uptake capacity is a likely key driver for low N efficiency in the studied crop system. Our results also suggest that the relative contribution of inorganic N for plant nutrition may be overestimated when relying on soil extracts as indicators for root-available N, and organic N may contribute more to crop N supply than is currently assumed. Overall, we show a new approach for examining in situ N relations in soil in context of crop N physiology, which provides a new avenue towards tailoring N fertilizer supply to match the specific uptake abilities and N demand of crops over the growth

  10. Role of cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in auditory sensory memory and mismatch negativity generation: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, D C; Steinschneider, M; Schroeder, C E; Arezzo, J C

    1996-01-01

    Working memory refers to the ability of the brain to store and manipulate information over brief time periods, ranging from seconds to minutes. As opposed to long-term memory, which is critically dependent upon hippocampal processing, critical substrates for working memory are distributed in a modality-specific fashion throughout cortex. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a crucial role in the initiation of long-term memory. Neurochemical mechanisms underlying the transient memory storage required for working memory, however, remain obscure. Auditory sensory memory, which refers to the ability of the brain to retain transient representations of the physical features (e.g., pitch) of simple auditory stimuli for periods of up to approximately 30 sec, represents one of the simplest components of the brain working memory system. Functioning of the auditory sensory memory system is indexed by the generation of a well-defined event-related potential, termed mismatch negativity (MMN). MMN can thus be used as an objective index of auditory sensory memory functioning and a probe for investigating underlying neurochemical mechanisms. Monkeys generate cortical activity in response to deviant stimuli that closely resembles human MMN. This study uses a combination of intracortical recording and pharmacological micromanipulations in awake monkeys to demonstrate that both competitive and noncompetitive NMDA antagonists block the generation of MMN without affecting prior obligatory activity in primary auditory cortex. These findings suggest that, on a neurophysiological level, MMN represents selective current flow through open, unblocked NMDA channels. Furthermore, they suggest a crucial role of cortical NMDA receptors in the assessment of stimulus familiarity/unfamiliarity, which is a key process underlying working memory performance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8876245

  11. Identifying structural and energetic trends in isovalent core-shell nanoalloys as a function of composition and size mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, Andrés; López, José M.

    2011-10-01

    We locate the putative global minimum structures of NaxCs55 - x and LixCs55 - x nanoalloys through combined empirical potential and density functional theory calculations, and compare them to the structures of 55-atom Li-Na and Na-K nanoalloys obtained in a recent paper [A. Aguado and J. M. López, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 094302 (2010), 10.1063/1.3479396]. Alkali nanoalloys are representative of isovalent metallic mixtures with a strong tendency towards core-shell segregation, and span a wide range of size mismatches. By comparing the four systems, we analyse how the size mismatch and composition affect the structures and relative stabilities of these mixtures, and identify useful generic trends. The Na-K system is found to possess a nearly optimal size mismatch for the formation of poly-icosahedral (pIh) structures with little strain. In systems with a larger size mismatch (Na-Cs and Li-Cs), frustration of the pIh packing induces for some compositions a reconstruction of the core, which adopts instead a decahedral packing. When the size mismatch is smaller than optimal (Li-Na), frustration leads to a partial amorphization of the structures. The excess energies are negative for all systems except for a few compositions, demonstrating that the four mixtures are reactive. Moreover, we find that Li-Cs and Li-Na mixtures are more reactive (i.e., they have more negative excess energies) than Na-K and Na-Cs mixtures, so the stability trends when comparing the different materials are exactly opposite to the trends observed in the bulk limit: the strongly non-reactive Li-alkali bulk mixtures become the most reactive ones at the nanoscale. For each material, we identify the magic composition xm which minimizes the excess energy. xm is found to increase with the size mismatch due to steric crowding effects, and for LixCs55 - x the most stable cluster has almost equiatomic composition. We advance a simple geometric packing rule that suffices to systematize all the observed trends

  12. Effects of Emotional Intelligence on the Impression of Irony Created by the Mismatch between Verbal and Nonverbal Cues

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Heike; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Nizielski, Sophia; Schütz, Astrid; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Emotional information is conveyed through verbal and nonverbal signals, with nonverbal cues often being considered the decisive factor in the judgment of others’ emotional states. The aim of the present study was to examine how verbal and nonverbal cues are integrated by perceivers. More specifically, we tested whether the mismatch between verbal and nonverbal information was perceived as an expression of irony. Moreover, we investigated the effects of emotional intelligence on the impression of irony. The findings revealed that the mismatch between verbal and nonverbal information created the impression of irony. Furthermore, participants higher in emotional intelligence were faster at rating such stimuli as ironic expressions. PMID:27716831

  13. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  14. Influence of very short patch mismatch repair on SOS inducing lesions after aminoglycoside treatment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Mazel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Low concentrations of aminoglycosides induce the SOS response in Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli. In order to determine whether a specific factor present in E. coli prevents this induction, we developed a genetic screen where only SOS inducing mutants are viable. We identified the vsr gene coding for the Vsr protein of the very short patch mismatch repair (VSPR) pathway. The effect of mismatch repair (MMR) mutants was also studied. We propose that lesions formed upon aminoglycoside treatment are preferentially repaired by VSPR without SOS induction in E. coli and by MMR when VSPR is impaired.

  15. Functional mismatch in a bumble bee pollination mutualism under climate change.

    PubMed

    Miller-Struttmann, Nicole E; Geib, Jennifer C; Franklin, James D; Kevan, Peter G; Holdo, Ricardo M; Ebert-May, Diane; Lynn, Austin M; Kettenbach, Jessica A; Hedrick, Elizabeth; Galen, Candace

    2015-09-25

    Ecological partnerships, or mutualisms, are globally widespread, sustaining agriculture and biodiversity. Mutualisms evolve through the matching of functional traits between partners, such as tongue length of pollinators and flower tube depth of plants. Long-tongued pollinators specialize on flowers with deep corolla tubes, whereas shorter-tongued pollinators generalize across tube lengths. Losses of functional guilds because of shifts in global climate may disrupt mutualisms and threaten partner species. We found that in two alpine bumble bee species, decreases in tongue length have evolved over 40 years. Co-occurring flowers have not become shallower, nor are small-flowered plants more prolific. We argue that declining floral resources because of warmer summers have favored generalist foraging, leading to a mismatch between shorter-tongued bees and the longer-tubed plants they once pollinated. PMID:26404836

  16. Altering the primacy bias--how does a prior task affect mismatch negativity?

    PubMed

    Mullens, Daniel; Woodley, Jessica; Whitson, Lisa; Provost, Alexander; Heathcote, Andrew; Winkler, István; Todd, Juanita

    2014-05-01

    The role in which two tones are first encountered in an unattended oddball sequence affects how deviance detection, reflected by mismatch negativity, treats them later when the roles reverse: a "primacy bias." We tested whether this effect is modulated by previous behavioral relevance assigned to the two tones. To this end, sequences in which the roles of the two tones alternated were preceded by a go/no-go task in which tones were presented with equal probability. Half of the participants were asked to respond to the short sounds, the other half to long sounds. Primacy bias was initially abolished but returned dependent upon the go-stimulus that the participant was assigned. Results demonstrate a long-term impact of prior learning on deviance detection, and that even when prior importance/equivalence is learned, the bias ultimately returns. Results are discussed in terms of persistent go-stimulus specific changes in responsiveness to sound.

  17. Global mismatch between species richness and vulnerability of reef fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, Valeriano; Villéger, Sébastien; McClanahan, Tim R; Arias-González, Jesus Ernesto; Bellwood, David R; Belmaker, Jonathan; Chabanet, Pascale; Floeter, Sergio R; Friedlander, Alan M; Guilhaumon, François; Vigliola, Laurent; Kulbicki, Michel; Mouillot, David

    2014-09-01

    The impact of anthropogenic activity on ecosystems has highlighted the need to move beyond the biogeographical delineation of species richness patterns to understanding the vulnerability of species assemblages, including the functional components that are linked to the processes they support. We developed a decision theory framework to quantitatively assess the global taxonomic and functional vulnerability of fish assemblages on tropical reefs using a combination of sensitivity to species loss, exposure to threats and extent of protection. Fish assemblages with high taxonomic and functional sensitivity are often exposed to threats but are largely missed by the global network of marine protected areas. We found that areas of high species richness spatially mismatch areas of high taxonomic and functional vulnerability. Nevertheless, there is strong spatial match between taxonomic and functional vulnerabilities suggesting a potential win-win conservation-ecosystem service strategy if more protection is set in these locations. PMID:24985880

  18. Management of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia in a Child With Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Elhasid, Ronit; Dvir, Rina; Rosenfeld Keidar, Hila; Ben Shachar, Shay; Bitan, Menachem; Solar, Irit; Durno, Carol; Aronson, Melyssa; Malkin, David; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri

    2015-11-01

    Germline biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) results in a unique cancer predisposition syndrome in which the affected children are susceptible to the development of malignancies, especially brain, gastrointestinal, and lymphoid cancers. Acute myeloblastic leukemia is rarely reported in this syndrome. Here we report the decision-making challenges in a bMMRD child with acute myeloblastic leukemia. Our experience should alert physicians to include bMMRD in the differential diagnosis of a child with hyper/hypopigmented spots and leukemia. Furthermore, the presence of the above and consanguinity emphasizes the need to rule out bMMRD when an allogeneic bone marrow transplant is considered and to enable the surveillance of other family members for earlier detection of cancers in these children.

  19. Auditory Discrimination Between Function Words in Children and Adults: A Mismatch Negativity Study

    PubMed Central

    Strotseva-Feinschmidt, Anna; Cunitz, Katrin; Friederici, Angela D.; Gunter, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Previous behavioral studies showed that it is not until around the age of seven that German children reliably use case markers for the interpretation of complex sentences. Some explanations of this late development suggested that children might have difficulties in perceptual differentiation between function words that carry case information. We tested this hypothesis by using the neurophysiological index of pre-attentive discrimination, the mismatch negativity (MMN). Our data showed that children at the age of 3 years are able to automatically discriminate between the two determiner forms der and den when presented out of sentential context. The determiner form der elicited a more mature MMN response in children than the form den. In adults, the MMN pattern also differed with der showing an earlier peak than den. These findings indicate that der is easier to process than den, which in turn is related to the occurrence frequency of the determiner forms in language. PMID:26733918

  20. Mode-mismatched confocal thermal-lens microscope with collimated probe beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Humberto; Korte, Dorota; Franko, Mladen

    2015-05-15

    We report a thermal lens microscope (TLM) based on an optimized mode-mismatched configuration. It takes advantage of the coaxial counter propagating tightly focused excitation and collimated probe beams, instead of both focused at the sample, as it is in currently known TLM setups. A simple mathematical model that takes into account the main features of the instrument is presented. The confocal detection scheme and the introduction of highly collimated probe beam allow enhancing the versatility, limit of detection (LOD), and sensitivity of the instrument. The theory is experimentally verified measuring ethanol’s absorption coefficient at 532.8 nm. Additionally, the presented technique is applied for detection of ultra-trace amounts of Cr(III) in liquid solution. The achieved LOD is 1.3 ppb, which represents 20-fold enhancement compared to transmission mode spectrometric techniques and a 7.5-fold improvement compared to previously reported methods for Cr(III) based on thermal lens effect.

  1. Simultaneous dual-wavelength photoacoustic radar imaging using waveform engineering with mismatched frequency modulated excitation.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Bahman; Sean Choi, Sung Soo; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The spectroscopic imaging capability of photoacoustics (PA) without the depth limitations of optical methods offers a major advantage in preclinical and clinical applications. Consecutive PA measurements with properly chosen wavelengths allow composition related information about blood or tissue. In this work, we propose and experimentally introduce modulation waveform engineering through the use of mismatched (uncorrelated or weakly correlated) linear frequency modulated signals for PA characterization and imaging. The feasibility of the method was tested on oxygen saturated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin in vitro in a blood circulating rig. The method was also employed for in vivo imaging of a neck carcinoma tumor grown in a mouse thigh. The proposed method can increase the accuracy and speed of functional imaging by simultaneous PA probing with two wavelengths using portable laser-diode based PA imaging systems.

  2. Experimental evidence of deterministic coherence resonance in coupled chaotic systems with frequency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vellisca, M. A.; Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present the experimental evidence of deterministic coherence resonance in unidirectionally coupled two and three Rössler electronic oscillators with mismatch between their natural frequencies. The regularity in both the amplitude and the phase of chaotic fluctuations is experimentally proven by the analyses of normalized standard deviations of the peak amplitude and interpeak interval and Lyapunov exponents. The resonant chaos suppression appears when the coupling strength is increased and the oscillators are in phase synchronization. In two coupled oscillators, the coherence enhancement is associated with negative third and fourth Lyapunov exponents, while the largest first and second exponents remain positive. Distinctly, in three oscillators coupled in a ring, all exponents become negative, giving rise to periodicity. Numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experiments.

  3. Cancer risk and prevention in a globalised world: solving the public policy mismatch.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R; Homberg, L; Purushotham, A D

    2012-09-01

    The world faces an unprecedented growth in cancer incidence over the next fifty years, the majority of the burden falling on low-middle income countries. At the same time as the changing demographic profiles, including global population ageing we are also seeing the rapid globalisation of pro-cancer behaviours and commodities such as tobacco. The human and economic impact will continue to be severe unless radical changes occur to current public policy mismatches in cancer prevention. At the same time high level political actions through bodies such as the UN suggest that supra-national approaches are needed to solve these issues. However, we argue that only local nation-state approaches can fundamentally address cancer risk and enhance prevention in a globalised world. PMID:22336662

  4. When the face fits: recognition of celebrities from matching and mismatching faces and voices.

    PubMed

    Stevenage, Sarah V; Neil, Greg J; Hamlin, Iain

    2014-01-01

    The results of two experiments are presented in which participants engaged in a face-recognition or a voice-recognition task. The stimuli were face-voice pairs in which the face and voice were co-presented and were either "matched" (same person), "related" (two highly associated people), or "mismatched" (two unrelated people). Analysis in both experiments confirmed that accuracy and confidence in face recognition was consistently high regardless of the identity of the accompanying voice. However accuracy of voice recognition was increasingly affected as the relationship between voice and accompanying face declined. Moreover, when considering self-reported confidence in voice recognition, confidence remained high for correct responses despite the proportion of these responses declining across conditions. These results converged with existing evidence indicating the vulnerability of voice recognition as a relatively weak signaller of identity, and results are discussed in the context of a person-recognition framework.

  5. Effects of musical meditation training on auditory mismatch negativity and P300 in normal children.

    PubMed

    Luo, Y; Wei, J; Weekes, B

    1999-06-01

    The auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) and P300 of event-related potentials were compared in normal children either with or without musical meditation training. The experimental group consisted of 11 subjects who had been trained with musical meditation for six months and the control group consisted of 12 subjects (matched for age, sex and grade) who had not received musical meditation. MMN amplitudes in the trained children were larger than those in the control group. In addition, the MMN amplitudes were identical in attend and ignore conditions for both groups. This evidence suggests that auditory brain function has been affected by musical meditation training. It thus suggests that the MMN is capable of assessing changes to the brain function in normal subjects. There were no significant differences in the P300 latencies and amplitudes between the two groups. This result suggests that MMN and P300 may reflect different aspects of the brain function.

  6. Somatostatin Interneurons Control a Key Component of Mismatch Negativity in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-07-19

    Patients with schizophrenia have deficient sensory processing, undermining how they perceive and relate to a changing environment. This impairment can be captured by the reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) index, an electroencephalographic biomarker of psychosis. The biological factors contributing to MMN are unclear, though mouse research, in which genetic and optical methods could be applied, has given some insight. Using fast two-photon calcium imaging and multielectrode recordings in awake mice, we find that visual cortical circuits display adapted (decreased) responses to repeated stimuli and amplified responses to a deviant stimulus, the key component of human MMN. Moreover, pharmacogenetic silencing of somatostatin-containing interneurons specifically eliminated this amplification, along with its associated theta/alpha-band response, leaving stimulus-specific adaption and related gamma-band modulations intact. Our results validate a mouse model of MMN and suggest that abnormalities in somatostatin-containing interneurons cause sensory deficits underlying MMN and schizophrenia. PMID:27396334

  7. Combined mismatch repair and POLE/POLD1 defects explain unresolved suspected Lynch syndrome cancers.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Anne Ml; van Wezel, Tom; van den Akker, Brendy Ewm; Ventayol Garcia, Marina; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli Mj; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom Gw; Gómez-García, Encarna B; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Many suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) patients who lack mismatch repair (MMR) germline gene variants and MLH1 or MSH2 hypermethylation are currently explained by somatic MMR gene variants or, occasionally, by germline POLE variants. To further investigate unexplained sLS patients, we analyzed leukocyte and tumor DNA of 62 sLS patients using gene panel sequencing including the POLE, POLD1 and MMR genes. Forty tumors showed either one, two or more somatic MMR variants predicted to affect function. Nine sLS tumors showed a likely ultramutated phenotype and were found to carry germline (n=2) or somatic variants (n=7) in the POLE/POLD1 exonuclease domain (EDM). Six of these POLE/POLD1-EDM mutated tumors also carried somatic MMR variants. Our findings suggest that faulty proofreading may result in loss of MMR and thereby in microsatellite instability.

  8. Biomarkers for immune therapy in colorectal cancer: mismatch-repair deficiency and others

    PubMed Central

    Bupathi, Manojkumar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease for which the treatment backbone has primarily been cytotoxic chemotherapy. With better understanding of the involved molecular mechanisms, it is now known that there are a number of epigenetic and genetic events, which are involved in CRC pathogenesis. Specific biomarkers have been identified which can be used to determine the clinical outcome of patients beyond tumor staging and predict for treatment efficacy. Molecular testing is now routinely performed to select for patients that will benefit the most from targeted agents and immunotherapy. In addition to KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutation (MT), analysis of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and checkpoint protein expression may be helpful to determine whether patients are eligible for certain therapies. The focus of this article is to discuss present and upcoming biomarkers for immunotherapy in CRC. PMID:27747085

  9. Atypical mismatch negativity in response to emotional voices in people with autism spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Teng; Cheng, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are characterized by heterogeneous impairments of social reciprocity and sensory processing. Voices, similar to faces, convey socially relevant information. Whether voice processing is selectively impaired remains undetermined. This study involved recording mismatch negativity (MMN) while presenting emotionally spoken syllables dada and acoustically matched nonvocal sounds to 20 subjects with ASC and 20 healthy matched controls. The people with ASC exhibited no MMN response to emotional syllables and reduced MMN to nonvocal sounds, indicating general impairments of affective voice and acoustic discrimination. Weaker angry MMN amplitudes were associated with more autistic traits. Receiver operator characteristic analysis revealed that angry MMN amplitudes yielded a value of 0.88 (p<.001). The results suggest that people with ASC may process emotional voices in an atypical fashion already at the automatic stage. This processing abnormality can facilitate diagnosing ASC and enable social deficits in people with ASC to be predicted. PMID:25036143

  10. Mismatch Negativity to Tonal Contours Suggests Preattentive Perception of Prosodic Content

    PubMed Central

    Leitman, David I.; Foxe, John J.; Sehatpour, Pejman; Shpaner, Marina; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of speech conveys information that is decoded within audio-sensory structures. For example, the termination of an utterance with a rise in pitch distinguishes statements and questions. This study evaluated the sensitivity of early auditory structures to such linguistic prosodic distinctions using mismatch negativity (MMN). MMN is a preattentive auditory event-related potential (ERP) sensitive to stimulus deviance. High-density ERP to pitch contour stimuli were collected in a passive listening oddball paradigm from 11 healthy subjects. Voltage analysis revealed significant MMN responses to declarative and interrogative oddball stimuli. Further, MMN was significantly larger to interrogative, than declarative, deviants, indicating non-symmetric brain processing. These MMNs demonstrate that pitch contour abstractions reflecting interrogative/declarative distinctions can be represented in preattentive auditory sensory memory. PMID:22005991

  11. The swi4+ gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes a homologue of mismatch repair enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, O; Michael, H; Heim, L

    1992-01-01

    The swi4+ gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in termination of copy-synthesis during mating-type switching. The gene was cloned by functional complementation of a swi4 mutant transformed with a genomic library. Determination of the nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame of 2979 nucleotides which is interrupted by a 68 bp long intron. The putative Swi4 protein shows homology to Duc-1 (human), Rep-3 (mouse), HexA (Streptococcus pneumoniae) and MutS (Salmonella typhimurium). The prokaryotic proteins are known as essential components involved in mismatch repair. A strain with a disrupted swi4+ gene was constructed and analysed with respect to the switching process. As in swi4 mutants duplications occur in the mating-type region of the swi4 (null) strain, reducing the efficiency of switching. Images PMID:1317550

  12. Auditory sensory memory and language abilities in former late talkers: a mismatch negativity study.

    PubMed

    Grossheinrich, Nicola; Kademann, Stefanie; Bruder, Jennifer; Bartling, Juergen; Von Suchodoletz, Waldemar

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigated whether (a) a reduced duration of auditory sensory memory is found in late talking children and (b) whether deficits of sensory memory are linked to persistent difficulties in language acquisition. Former late talkers and children without delayed language development were examined at the age of 4 years and 7 months using mismatch negativity (MMN) with interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 500 ms and 2000 ms. Additionally, short-term memory, language skills, and nonverbal intelligence were assessed. MMN mean amplitude was reduced for the ISI of 2000 ms in former late talking children both with and without persistent language deficits. In summary, our findings suggest that late talkers are characterized by a reduced duration of auditory sensory memory. However, deficits in auditory sensory memory are not sufficient for persistent language difficulties and may be compensated for by some children.

  13. [DNA mismatch repair and BRAF status in colorectal cancer: Interest for the therapeutic management?].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Romain; Cervera, Pascale; Svrcek, Magali; Dumont, Clément; Garcia, Marie-Line; Chibaudel, Benoist; de Gramont, Aimery; Pocard, Marc; Duval, Alex; Fléjou, Jean-François; André, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in France. Recently, colorectal cancer subtyping consortium (CRCSC) identified 4 consensus molecular subtypes (CMS). CMS1 is enriched for CRC with deficient DNA mismatch repair system (dMMR) and tumors with mutated BRAF. Intriguingly, CMS1 is characterized by better relapse-free survival but worse survival after relapse, compared with the other subtypes. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of prognostic and predictive impacts of MMR and BRAF status. We highlight immune checkpoints inhibitors as potentially future therapeutics for CRC with deficient MMR. We also focus on the management of BRAF mutant metastatic CRC, with a particular interest on targeted therapies. PMID:26118880

  14. New Therapeutic Opportunities Based on DNA Mismatch Repair and BRAF Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Romain; Svrcek, Magali; Dreyer, Chantal; Cervera, Pascale; Duval, Alex; Pocard, Marc; Fléjou, Jean-François; de Gramont, Aimery; André, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Recently, colorectal cancer (CRC) subtyping consortium identified four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS1-4). CMS1 is enriched for deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) and BRAF (V600E) tumors. Intriguingly, this subtype has better relapse-free survival but worse overall survival after relapse compared with the other subtypes. Growing evidence is accumulating on the benefit of specific therapeutic strategies such as immune checkpoint inhibition therapy in dMMR tumors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway targeted therapy in tumors harboring BRAF (V600E) mutation. After reviewing dMMR prognostic value, immune checkpoints as major targets for dMMR carcinomas will be highlighted. Following, BRAF (V600E) prognostic impact will be reviewed and therapeutic strategies with the combination of cytotoxic agents and especially the combinations of BRAF and MAPK inhibitors will be discussed. PMID:26861657

  15. Halo formation and emittance growth in the transport of spherically symmetric mismatched bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corrêa da Silva, Thales M. Pakter, Renato; Rizzato, Felipe B.; Levin, Yan

    2015-02-15

    The effect of an initial envelope mismatch on the transport of bunched spherically symmetric beams is investigated. A particle-core model is used to estimate the maximum radius that halo particles can reach. The theory is used to obtain an empirical formula that provides the halo size as a function of system parameters. Taking into account, the incompressibility property of the Vlasov dynamics and the resulting Landau damping, an explicit form for the final stationary distribution attained by the beam is proposed. The distribution is fully self-consistent, presenting no free fitting parameters. The theory is used to predict the relevant beam transport properties, such as the final particle density distribution, the emittance growth, and the fraction of particles that will be expelled to form halo. The theoretical results are compared to the explicit N-particle dynamics simulations, showing a good agreement.

  16. Loudness summation and the mismatch negativity event-related brain potential in humans

    PubMed Central

    OCEÁK, ATTILA; WINKLER, ISTVÁN; SUSSMAN, ELYSE; ALHO, KIMMO

    2010-01-01

    Infrequently omitting a sound from a repetitive sequence elicits the mismatch negativity (MMN) ERP response when the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) is less than 200 ms. We contrasted two alternative explanations of omission MMN. (1) Each sound starts a separate temporal integration process. Omissions violate the constancy of the temporal structure within the integration window. (2) Sounds preceding an omission are perceived to be louder than those followed by a sound within the integration period, because omissions allow the full stimulus aftereffect to be included in perceived loudness. We varied the SOA between 117 and 217 ms. For this case, the temporal structure explanation predicts that no MMN will be elicited, whereas the loudness summation explanation predicts that MMN will be elicited. MMN was elicited by tone omissions with random SOA, suggesting that loudness summation plays an important role in the elicitation of omission MMN. PMID:16629681

  17. Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, Scott Phillip

    2013-06-30

    The project focused on development of new approaches and materials combinations to expand and improve the quality and versatility of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V semiconductor epilayers for use in high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices. To address these goals, new capabilities for materials synthesis and characterization were established at SDSM&T that have applications in modern opto- and nano-electronics, including epitaxial crystal growth and transmission electron microscopy. Advances were made in analyzing and controlling the strain profiles and quality of compositional grades used for these technologies. In particular, quaternary compositional grades were demonstrated, and a quantitative method for characteristic X-ray analysis was developed. The project allowed enhanced collaboration between scientists at NREL and SDSM&T to address closely related research goals, including materials exchange and characterization.

  18. Combined mismatch repair and POLE/POLD1 defects explain unresolved suspected Lynch syndrome cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Anne ML; van Wezel, Tom; van den Akker, Brendy EWM; Ventayol Garcia, Marina; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli MJ; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom GW; Gómez-García, Encarna B; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Many suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) patients who lack mismatch repair (MMR) germline gene variants and MLH1 or MSH2 hypermethylation are currently explained by somatic MMR gene variants or, occasionally, by germline POLE variants. To further investigate unexplained sLS patients, we analyzed leukocyte and tumor DNA of 62 sLS patients using gene panel sequencing including the POLE, POLD1 and MMR genes. Forty tumors showed either one, two or more somatic MMR variants predicted to affect function. Nine sLS tumors showed a likely ultramutated phenotype and were found to carry germline (n=2) or somatic variants (n=7) in the POLE/POLD1 exonuclease domain (EDM). Six of these POLE/POLD1-EDM mutated tumors also carried somatic MMR variants. Our findings suggest that faulty proofreading may result in loss of MMR and thereby in microsatellite instability. PMID:26648449

  19. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR. PMID:12470637

  20. Warming, plant phenology and the spatial dimension of trophic mismatch for large herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Post, Eric; Pedersen, Christian; Wilmers, Christopher C; Forchhammer, Mads C

    2008-01-01

    Temporal advancement of resource availability by warming in seasonal environments can reduce reproductive success of vertebrates if their own reproductive phenology does not also advance with warming. Indirect evidence from large-scale analyses suggests, however, that migratory vertebrates might compensate for this by tracking phenological variation across landscapes. Results from our two-year warming experiment combined with seven years of observations of plant phenology and offspring production by caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Greenland, however, contradict evidence from large-scale analyses. At spatial scales relevant to the foraging horizon of individual herbivores, spatial variability in plant phenology was reduced—not increased—by both experimental and observed warming. Concurrently, offspring production by female caribou declined with reductions in spatial variability in plant phenology. By highlighting the spatial dimension of trophic mismatch, these results reveal heretofore unexpected adverse consequences of climatic warming for herbivore population ecology. PMID:18495618

  1. Residential Segregation,Spatial Mismatch and Economic Growth across US Metropolitan Area

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Dr Harrison; Li, Huiping

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the detrimental influence of residential segregation on poor inner-city residents. This study examines the impact of residential segregation on the welfare of populations in US metropolitan areas using economic growth as the indicator. Panel data of US metropolitan areas spanning 25 years, 1980 2005, are used to analyze the effect of segregation on economic growth. The results show that both racial and skill segregation have a negative impact on short and long-term economic growth, which have increased over time. Further, the negative impact of the variables associated with spatial mismatch is also revealed. The results clearly point to the need for mobility policies that favor non-White households and comprehensive strategies that promote economic opportunities in low-resource communities in the US.

  2. Somatostatin Interneurons Control a Key Component of Mismatch Negativity in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-07-19

    Patients with schizophrenia have deficient sensory processing, undermining how they perceive and relate to a changing environment. This impairment can be captured by the reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) index, an electroencephalographic biomarker of psychosis. The biological factors contributing to MMN are unclear, though mouse research, in which genetic and optical methods could be applied, has given some insight. Using fast two-photon calcium imaging and multielectrode recordings in awake mice, we find that visual cortical circuits display adapted (decreased) responses to repeated stimuli and amplified responses to a deviant stimulus, the key component of human MMN. Moreover, pharmacogenetic silencing of somatostatin-containing interneurons specifically eliminated this amplification, along with its associated theta/alpha-band response, leaving stimulus-specific adaption and related gamma-band modulations intact. Our results validate a mouse model of MMN and suggest that abnormalities in somatostatin-containing interneurons cause sensory deficits underlying MMN and schizophrenia.

  3. Management of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia in a Child With Biallelic Mismatch Repair Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Elhasid, Ronit; Dvir, Rina; Rosenfeld Keidar, Hila; Ben Shachar, Shay; Bitan, Menachem; Solar, Irit; Durno, Carol; Aronson, Melyssa; Malkin, David; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri

    2015-11-01

    Germline biallelic mismatch repair deficiency (bMMRD) results in a unique cancer predisposition syndrome in which the affected children are susceptible to the development of malignancies, especially brain, gastrointestinal, and lymphoid cancers. Acute myeloblastic leukemia is rarely reported in this syndrome. Here we report the decision-making challenges in a bMMRD child with acute myeloblastic leukemia. Our experience should alert physicians to include bMMRD in the differential diagnosis of a child with hyper/hypopigmented spots and leukemia. Furthermore, the presence of the above and consanguinity emphasizes the need to rule out bMMRD when an allogeneic bone marrow transplant is considered and to enable the surveillance of other family members for earlier detection of cancers in these children. PMID:26274037

  4. When the face fits: recognition of celebrities from matching and mismatching faces and voices.

    PubMed

    Stevenage, Sarah V; Neil, Greg J; Hamlin, Iain

    2014-01-01

    The results of two experiments are presented in which participants engaged in a face-recognition or a voice-recognition task. The stimuli were face-voice pairs in which the face and voice were co-presented and were either "matched" (same person), "related" (two highly associated people), or "mismatched" (two unrelated people). Analysis in both experiments confirmed that accuracy and confidence in face recognition was consistently high regardless of the identity of the accompanying voice. However accuracy of voice recognition was increasingly affected as the relationship between voice and accompanying face declined. Moreover, when considering self-reported confidence in voice recognition, confidence remained high for correct responses despite the proportion of these responses declining across conditions. These results converged with existing evidence indicating the vulnerability of voice recognition as a relatively weak signaller of identity, and results are discussed in the context of a person-recognition framework. PMID:23531227

  5. Functional mismatch in a bumble bee pollination mutualism under climate change.

    PubMed

    Miller-Struttmann, Nicole E; Geib, Jennifer C; Franklin, James D; Kevan, Peter G; Holdo, Ricardo M; Ebert-May, Diane; Lynn, Austin M; Kettenbach, Jessica A; Hedrick, Elizabeth; Galen, Candace

    2015-09-25

    Ecological partnerships, or mutualisms, are globally widespread, sustaining agriculture and biodiversity. Mutualisms evolve through the matching of functional traits between partners, such as tongue length of pollinators and flower tube depth of plants. Long-tongued pollinators specialize on flowers with deep corolla tubes, whereas shorter-tongued pollinators generalize across tube lengths. Losses of functional guilds because of shifts in global climate may disrupt mutualisms and threaten partner species. We found that in two alpine bumble bee species, decreases in tongue length have evolved over 40 years. Co-occurring flowers have not become shallower, nor are small-flowered plants more prolific. We argue that declining floral resources because of warmer summers have favored generalist foraging, leading to a mismatch between shorter-tongued bees and the longer-tubed plants they once pollinated.

  6. Variation in the Relationship Between Education and Marriage: Marriage Market Mismatch?

    PubMed Central

    Musick, Kelly; Brand, Jennie E.; Davis, Dwight

    2011-01-01

    Educational expansion has led to greater diversity in the social backgrounds of college students. We ask how schooling interacts with this diversity to influence marriage formation among men and women. Relying on data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 3208), we use a propensity score approach to group men and women into social strata and multilevel event history models to test differences in the effects of college attendance across strata. We find a statistically significant, positive trend in the effects of college attendance across strata, with the largest effects of college on first marriage among the more advantaged and the smallest—indeed, negative—effects among the least advantaged men and women. These findings appear consistent with a mismatch in the marriage market between individuals’ education and their social backgrounds. PMID:22563132

  7. Role descriptions induce gender mismatch effects in eye movements during reading

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Chiara; Esaulova, Yulia; Öttl, Anton; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The present eye-tracking study investigates the effect of gender typicality on the resolution of anaphoric personal pronouns in English. Participants read descriptions of a person performing a typically male, typically female or gender-neutral occupational activity. The description was followed by an anaphoric reference (he or she) which revealed the referent's gender. The first experiment presented roles which were highly typical for men (e.g., blacksmith) or for women (e.g., beautician), the second experiment presented role descriptions with a moderate degree of gender typicality (e.g., psychologist, lawyer). Results revealed a gender mismatch effect in early and late measures in the first experiment and in early stages in the second experiment. Moreover, eye-movement data for highly typical roles correlated with explicit typicality ratings. The results are discussed from a cross-linguistic perspective, comparing natural gender languages and grammatical gender languages. An interpretation of the cognitive representation of typicality beliefs is proposed. PMID:26579003

  8. Group velocity and pulse lengthening of mismatched laser pulses in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Esarey, Eric; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-07

    Analytic solutions are presented to the non-paraxial wave equation describing an ultra-short, low-power, laser pulse propagating in aplasma channel. Expressions for the laser pulse centroid motion and laser group velocity are derived, valid for matched and mismatchedpropagation in a parabolic plasma channel, as well as in vacuum, for an arbitrary Laguerre-Gaussian laser mode. The group velocity of amismatched laser pulse, for which the laser spot size is strongly oscillating, is found to be independent of propagation distance andsignificantly less than that of a matched pulse. Laser pulse lengthening of a mismatched pulse owing to laser mode slippage isexamined and found to dominate over that due to dispersive pulse spreading for sufficiently long pulses. Analytic results are shown tobe in excellent agreement with numerical solutions of the full Maxwell equations coupled to the plasma response. Implications for plasmachannel diagnostics are discussed.

  9. Discrimination of stress in speech and music: a mismatch negativity (MMN) study.

    PubMed

    Peter, Varghese; McArthur, Genevieve; Thompson, William Forde

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if duration-related stress in speech and music is processed in a similar way in the brain. To this end, we tested 20 adults for their abstract mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potentials to two duration-related stress patterns: stress on the first syllable or note (long-short), and stress on the second syllable or note (short-long). A significant MMN was elicited for both speech and music except for the short-long speech stimulus. The long-short stimuli elicited larger MMN amplitudes for speech and music compared to short-long stimuli. An extra negativity-the late discriminative negativity (LDN)-was observed only for music. The larger MMN amplitude for long-short stimuli might be due to the familiarity of the stress pattern in speech and music. The presence of LDN for music may reflect greater long-term memory transfer for music stimuli.

  10. Cancer risk and prevention in a globalised world: solving the public policy mismatch.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R; Homberg, L; Purushotham, A D

    2012-09-01

    The world faces an unprecedented growth in cancer incidence over the next fifty years, the majority of the burden falling on low-middle income countries. At the same time as the changing demographic profiles, including global population ageing we are also seeing the rapid globalisation of pro-cancer behaviours and commodities such as tobacco. The human and economic impact will continue to be severe unless radical changes occur to current public policy mismatches in cancer prevention. At the same time high level political actions through bodies such as the UN suggest that supra-national approaches are needed to solve these issues. However, we argue that only local nation-state approaches can fundamentally address cancer risk and enhance prevention in a globalised world.

  11. Role descriptions induce gender mismatch effects in eye movements during reading.

    PubMed

    Reali, Chiara; Esaulova, Yulia; Öttl, Anton; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The present eye-tracking study investigates the effect of gender typicality on the resolution of anaphoric personal pronouns in English. Participants read descriptions of a person performing a typically male, typically female or gender-neutral occupational activity. The description was followed by an anaphoric reference (he or she) which revealed the referent's gender. The first experiment presented roles which were highly typical for men (e.g., blacksmith) or for women (e.g., beautician), the second experiment presented role descriptions with a moderate degree of gender typicality (e.g., psychologist, lawyer). Results revealed a gender mismatch effect in early and late measures in the first experiment and in early stages in the second experiment. Moreover, eye-movement data for highly typical roles correlated with explicit typicality ratings. The results are discussed from a cross-linguistic perspective, comparing natural gender languages and grammatical gender languages. An interpretation of the cognitive representation of typicality beliefs is proposed. PMID:26579003

  12. Evidence That the DNA Mismatch Repair System Removes 1-Nucleotide Okazaki Fragment Flaps*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kadyrova, Lyudmila Y.; Dahal, Basanta K.; Kadyrov, Farid A.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system plays a major role in promoting genome stability and suppressing carcinogenesis. In this work, we investigated whether the MMR system is involved in Okazaki fragment maturation. We found that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MMR system and the flap endonuclease Rad27 act in overlapping pathways that protect the nuclear genome from 1-bp insertions. In addition, we determined that purified yeast and human MutSα proteins recognize 1-nucleotide DNA and RNA flaps. In reconstituted human systems, MutSα, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and replication factor C activate MutLα endonuclease to remove the flaps. ATPase and endonuclease mutants of MutLα are defective in the flap removal. These results suggest that the MMR system contributes to the removal of 1-nucleotide Okazaki fragment flaps. PMID:26224637

  13. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR.

  14. Growth mechanisms and crystallographic structure of InP nanowires on lattice-mismatched substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moewe, Michael; Chuang, Linus C.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2008-08-01

    We present a growth model that predicts the growth phase and mechanism of InP nanowires (NWs) and the experimental verifications of the model. The NWs were grown on lattice-mismatched GaAs substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition via Au nanodrop-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth. Nanodrops with larger diameters are shown to grow longer NWs because growth is governed mainly by direct precursor impingement on the nanodrop surface. The theoretical and experimental results also show that growth phase is dependent on NW diameter. We show that InP NWs with a diameter less than a certain value exhibit coherent growth of a single crystalline wurtzite (WZ) phase, whereas larger diameter InP NWs often contain sequences of WZ and zincblende phases and stacking faults. These findings allow one to achieve coherent NW growth and WZ phases free from twinning if the NW diameter is below certain material-dependent critical diameters.

  15. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  16. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins - MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 - using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. RESULTS A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. CONCLUSIONS In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  17. Immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability analysis in molecular subtyping of colorectal carcinoma based on mismatch repair competency

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lin; Chi, Yayun; Chen, Weixiang; Chen, Xiaochen; Wei, Ping; Sheng, Weiqi; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Shi, Daren

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch repair defective (MMRd) colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is a distinct molecular phenotype of colorectal cancer, including 12% of sporadic CRC and 3% of Lynch Syndrome. In order to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics of MMRd colorectal carcinoma, and to find the most effective method for preliminary screening, 296 CRC fulfilled revised Bethesda Guideline (RB) were selected from 1450 CRCs to perform both IHC staining for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2 and MSI analysis. Sixty-eight tumors were classified as MSI-H by MSI test. Colorectal carcinomas with MSI-H were prone to be proximal located, poorly differentiated, and relatively early staged, with infrequent metastasis to lymph node as well as to distant organs, compared with MSS ones. All of the 68 MMRd CRCs presented abnormal expression of at least one mismatch repair protein (MMRP), with 48 concurrent negative of MLH1 and PMS2, 14 concurrent negative of MSH2 and MSH6, 4 isolated negative of MSH6, 1 isolated negative of PMS2, and 1 concurrent negative of 4 MMRPs. All of the MLH1 negative tumors also showed abnormal expression of PMS2. All of the MSH2 negative cases also presented negative expression of MSH6. The sensitivity and specificity of the 2-antibody IHC test contained only PMS2 and MSH6 for screening for MMRd CRC were 100% and 98.2% respectively, exactly the same as that of the 4-antibody IHC test with all of the 4 MMRPs. The diagnostic accordance rate of the 2-antibody approach and MSI analysis was 98.6%. In conclusion, MMRd CRC has characteristic clinicopathological features different from MSS CRCs. The 2-antibody IHC approach containing MSH6 and PMS2 is the most easy and effective way to detecting MMR deficiency in CRC. PMID:26885030

  18. Germline variants in POLE are associated with early onset mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Fadwa A; Kets, C Marleen; Ruano, Dina; van den Akker, Brendy; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Schrumpf, Melanie; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Vasen, Hans FA; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Germline variants affecting the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 predispose to multiple colorectal adenomas and/or colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of previously described heterozygous germline variants POLE c.1270C>G, p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 c.1433G>A, p.(Ser478Asn) in a Dutch series of unexplained familial, early onset CRC and polyposis index cases. We examined 1188 familial CRC and polyposis index patients for POLE p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variants using competitive allele-specific PCR. In addition, protein expression of the POLE and DNA mismatch repair genes was studied by immunohistochemistry in tumours from POLE carriers. Somatic mutations were screened using semiconductor sequencing. We detected three index patients (0.25%) with a POLE p.(Leu424Val) variant. In one patient, the variant was found to be de-novo. Tumours from three patients from two families were microsatellite instable, and immunohistochemistry showed MSH6/MSH2 deficiency suggestive of Lynch syndrome. Somatic mutations but no germline MSH6 and MSH2 variants were subsequently found, and one tumour displayed a hypermutator phenotype. None of the 1188 patients carried the POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variant. POLE germline variant carriers are also associated with a microsatellite instable CRC. POLE DNA analysis now seems warranted in microsatellite instable CRC, especially in the absence of a causative DNA mismatch repair gene germline variant. PMID:25370038

  19. Impedance Mismatch study between the Microwave Generator and the PUPR Plasma Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudier, Jorge R.; Castellanos, Ligeia; Encarnación, Kabir; Zavala, Natyaliz; Rivera, Ramón; Farahat, Nader; Leal, Edberto

    2006-12-01

    Impedance mismatch inside the connection from the microwave power generator to the plasma machine is studied. A magnetron power generator transmits microwaves of 2.45 GHz and variable power from 50W to 5000W, through a flexible rectangular waveguide to heat plasma inside a Mirror Cusp devise located at the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. Before the production of plasma, the residual gas of the devise must be extracted by a vacuum system (5Torr or better), then Argon gas is injected to the machine. The microwaves heat the Argon ions to initiate ionization and plasma is produced. A dielectric wall is used inside the rectangular waveguide to isolate the plasma machine and maintain vacuum. Even though the dielectric will not block the wave propagation, some absorption of microwaves will occur. This absorption will cause reflection, reducing the efficiency of the power transfer. Typically a thin layer of Teflon is used, but measurements using this dielectric show a significant reflection of power back to the generator. Due to the high-power nature of the generator (5KW), this mismatch is not desirable. An electromagnetic field solver based on the Finite Difference Time Domain Method(FDTD) is used to model the rectangular waveguide connection. The characteristic impedance of the simulation is compared with the analytical formula expression and a good agreement is obtain. Furthermore the Teflon-loaded guide is modeled using the above program and the input impedance is computed. The reflection coefficient is calculated based on the transmission line theory with the characteristic and input impedances. Based on the simulation results it is possible to optimize the thickness, shape and dielectric constant of the material, in order to seal the connection with a better match.

  20. Nucleation, Growth, and Strain Relaxation of Lattice-Mismatched III-V Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111) B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer / GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approx. 7.20%), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites Instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy, we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters -- susceptor temperature, TMIn flux, and AsH3 flux -- have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approx. 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer / substrate interface.