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Sample records for mri fetales mrt

  1. MRI of the Fetal Brain.

    PubMed

    Weisstanner, C; Kasprian, G; Gruber, G M; Brugger, P C; Prayer, D

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the possibilities for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the fetal brain. For brain pathologies, fetal MRI is usually performed when an abnormality is detected by previous prenatal ultrasound, and is, therefore, an important adjunct to ultrasound. The most commonly suspected brain pathologies referred to fetal MRI for further evaluation are ventriculomegaly, missing corpus callosum, and abnormalities of the posterior fossa. We will briefly discuss the most common indications for fetal brain MRI, as well as recent advances.

  2. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  3. Fetal ocular measurements by MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Bing; Kasprian, Gregor; Hodge, Jacqueline C; Jiang, Xiao Li; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    To present fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ocular measurement ranges by gestational age (GA) in normal and growth-restricted fetuses. A total of 298 pregnant women from the 18th to the 39th week of gestation were imaged using MRI. Ocular measurements including binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), transverse ocular diameter (OD) and anterior-posterior (AP) OD were measured. The curve estimation analyses for linear, logarithmic and quadratic models were performed. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were compared with that of the normal fetuses. The fetal eye resembles an ellipsoid with significantly longer OD and shorter AP (t = - 22.07, p < 0.001). The quadratic model was the best model in predicting growth of the fetal BOD, IOD, OD and AP. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with IUGR were significantly different from that of the normal fetuses (BOD: t = 3.58, p < 0.001; IOD: t = 5.73, p < 0.001; OD: t = 3.52, p < 0.001; AP: t = 2.19, p < 0.05). Fetal ocular growth can be readily assessed by fetal MRI. Using the normative data provided in this study, fetal ocular anomalies may be detected. Ocular size is frequently reduced in the condition of IUGR, with potential pathologic impact on postnatal vision.

  4. [Fetal lung development on MRT. Normal course and impairment due to premature rupture of membranes].

    PubMed

    Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Helmer, H; Langer, M; Balassy, C; Prayer, D

    2006-02-01

    A well-organized interplay between many molecular factors as well as mechanical forces influence fetal lung development. At the end of this complex process a sufficiently sized and structurally mature organ should ensure the postnatal survival of the newborn. Besides prenatal ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now be used to investigate normal and pathological human lung growth in utero. Oligohydramnios, due to premature rupture of membranes (PROM), is an important risk factor for compromised fetal lung growth. In these situations MR volumetry can be used to measure the size of the fetal lung quite accurately. Together with the evaluation of lung signal intensities on T2-weighted sequences, fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia can be readily detected.

  5. Diagnostic pitfalls in fetal brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Al-Mukhtar, Ali; Kasprian, Gregor; Schmook, Maria T; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Recent technological advances in fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and increased reliability of MRI in depicting abnormalities and lesions, especially in the central nervous system, are increasingly bringing up challenging issues with regard to accurate diagnosis. There are also pitfalls not only attributable to image acquisition but also in clinical interpretation. The misinterpretation of findings because of insufficient knowledge about fetal brain development as visualized by MRI may also be regarded as an important limitation of fetal MRI. We provide an overview of the most common pitfalls experienced in fetal MRI in routine practice, demonstrate how to identify some of the factors that lead to imaging misinterpretation, and suggest ways to tackle these problems, with an emphasis on MR techniques and image calibration.

  6. [Advanced MRI techniques of the fetal brain].

    PubMed

    Schöpf, V; Dittrich, E; Berger-Kulemann, V; Kasprian, G; Kollndorfer, K; Prayer, D

    2013-02-01

    Evaluation of the normal and pathological fetal brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI of the fetal brain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used in clinical practice, all other methods are used at a research level. Serving as standard methods in the future. Combined structural and functional data for all gestational ages will allow more specific insight into the developmental processes of the fetal brain. This gain of information will help provide a common understanding of complex spatial and temporal procedures of early morphological features and their impact on cognitive and sensory abilities.

  7. Fetal MRI of clubfoot associated with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Servaes, Sabah; Hernandez, Andrea; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Victoria, Teresa; Johnson, Mark; Jaramillo, Diego; Christopher Edgar, J; Johnson, Ann

    2010-12-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of evaluating clubfoot deformity by MR in high-risk fetuses is currently unknown. To correlate fetal MRI with US in the assessment of clubfoot and to identify the MRI features most characteristic of clubfoot. With IRB approval and informed consent, the presence of fetal clubfoot was prospectively evaluated in mothers referred for MRI for a fetus with myelomeningocele. Two radiologists blind to the US results independently reviewed the MRI for the presence of clubfoot. MRI results were compared with US results obtained the same day and birth outcomes. Of 20 patients enrolled, there were 13 clubfeet. Interobserver agreement for the presence of clubfoot was 100%. The sensitivity of the MRI exam was 100% and the specificity 85.2%. A dedicated sagittal imaging plane through the ankle region allowed the most confident diagnosis; medial deviation of the foot relative to the leg was seen in all 13 fetuses with clubfoot. The correlation of fetal MRI with US in the evaluation of clubfoot yields a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85.2%. The sagittal plane provided the most useful information.

  8. MRI of normal fetal brain development.

    PubMed

    Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Krampl, Elisabeth; Ulm, Barbara; Witzani, Linde; Prayer, Lucas; Brugger, Peter C

    2006-02-01

    Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from the 18th gestational week (GW) to term, and relies primarily on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences. These maturational changes must be interpreted with a knowledge of the histological background and the temporal course of the respective developmental steps. In addition, MR presentation of developing and transient structures must be considered. Signal changes associated with maturational processes can mainly be ascribed to the following changes in tissue composition and organization, which occur at the histological level: (1) a decrease in water content and increasing cell-density can be recognized as a shortening of T1- and T2-relaxation times, leading to increased T1-weighted and decreased T2-weighted intensity, respectively; (2) the arrangement of microanatomical structures to create a symmetrical or asymmetrical environment, leading to structural differences that may be demonstrated by DW-anisotropy; (3) changes in non-structural qualities, such as the onset of a membrane potential in premyelinating axons. The latter process also influences the appearance of a structure on DW sequences. Thus, we will review the in vivo MR appearance of different maturational states of the fetal brain and relate these maturational states to anatomical, histological, and in vitro MRI data. Then, the development of the cerebral cortex, white matter, temporal lobe, and cerebellum will be reviewed, and the MR appearance of transient structures of the fetal brain will be shown. Emphasis will be placed on the appearance of the different structures with the various sequences. In addition, the possible utility of dynamic fetal sequences in assessing spontaneous fetal movements is discussed.

  9. Normal renal development investigated with fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Witzani, Linde; Brugger, Peter Christian; Hörmann, Marcus; Kasprian, Gregor; Csapone-Balassy, Csilla; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate age-dependent changes in fetal kidney measurements with MRI. Fetal MRI examinations were used to study the kidney length (218 fetuses), signal intensities of renal tissue, renal pelvis, and liver tissue on T2-weighted images (223 fetuses), and the whole-kidney apparent diffusion coefficient (107 fetuses). A 1.5 T superconducting unit with a phased array coil was used in patients from 16 to 39 weeks' gestation. The imaging protocol included T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo, T2-weighted balanced angiography and diffusion-weighted sequences. Slice thickness ranged from 3 to 5mm. Fetal kidney length as a function of gestational age was expressed by the linear regression: kidney length (mm)=0.190 x gestational age (d) -8.034 (R(2) = 0.883, p < 0.001). Paired t-test analysis showed a highly statistically significant difference between the ratio of renal tissue signal intensity to renal pelvis signal intensity and the ratio of liver signal intensity to renal pelvis signal intensity on T2-weighted images (t = -50.963, d.f. = 162, p < 0.001), with renal tissue hyperintense to liver tissue. The apparent diffusion coefficient in relation to gestational age was described by the equation: ADC (microm(2)/s) = 0.0302 x square (gestational age (d)) -14.202 x gestational age (d) +2,728.6 (R(2) = 0.225, p < 0.001). The length, signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and apparent diffusion coefficient of the fetal kidney change significantly with gestational age. The presented data may help in the prenatal diagnosis of renal anomalies.

  10. Fetal MRI: A Technical Update with Educational Aspirations

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Ali; Estroff, Judith A.; Barnewolt, Carol E.; Robertson, Richard L.; Grant, P. Ellen; Gagoski, Borjan; Warfield, Simon K.; Afacan, Onur; Connolly, Susan A.; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Wolfberg, Adam; Mulkern, Robert V.

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations have become well-established procedures at many institutions and can serve as useful adjuncts to ultrasound (US) exams when diagnostic doubts remain after US. Due to fetal motion, however, fetal MRI exams are challenging and require the MR scanner to be used in a somewhat different mode than that employed for more routine clinical studies. Herein we review the techniques most commonly used, and those that are available, for fetal MRI with an emphasis on the physics of the techniques and how to deploy them to improve success rates for fetal MRI exams. By far the most common technique employed is single-shot T2-weighted imaging due to its excellent tissue contrast and relative immunity to fetal motion. Despite the significant challenges involved, however, many of the other techniques commonly employed in conventional neuro- and body MRI such as T1 and T2*-weighted imaging, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, as well as spectroscopic methods remain of interest for fetal MR applications. An effort to understand the strengths and limitations of these basic methods within the context of fetal MRI is made in order to optimize their use and facilitate implementation of technical improvements for the further development of fetal MR imaging, both in acquisition and post-processing strategies. PMID:26225129

  11. MRI of normal and pathological fetal lung development.

    PubMed

    Kasprian, Gregor; Balassy, Csilla; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    Normal fetal lung development is a complex process influenced by mechanical and many biochemical factors. In addition to ultrasound, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constitutes a new method to investigate this process in vivo during the second and third trimester. The techniques of MRI volumetry, assessment of signal intensities, and MRI spectroscopy of the fetal lung have been used to analyze this process and have already been applied clinically to identify abnormal fetal lung growth. Particularly in conditions such as oligohydramnios and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), pulmonary hypoplasia may be the cause of neonatal death. A precise diagnosis and quantification of compromised fetal lung development may improve post- and perinatal management. The main events in fetal lung development are reviewed and MR volumetric data from 106 normal fetuses, as well as different examples of pathological lung growth, are provided.

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of hypochondrogenesis using fetal MRI: a case report.

    PubMed

    Suzumura, Hiroshi; Kohno, Tatsuo; Nishimura, Gen; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Arisaka, Osamu

    2002-05-01

    We describe the successful prenatal diagnosis of hypochondrogenesis by MRI. Fetal MR findings were the presence of a conspicuous cartilaginous structure in the basioccipital region, ill-defined ossification of the cervical vertebral bodies, hypoplastic thorax, retarded ossification of the pubic bones, and broad, short long bones. In contrast, fetal US revealed only the presence of short long bones. MRI accurately delineated the axial skeleton in this case and is an effective clinical tool for diagnosing skeletal dysplasias in utero.

  13. Fetal akinesia and associated abnormalities on prenatal MRI.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Stefan F; Höftberger, Romana; Nemec, Ursula; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C; Kasprian, Gregor; Amann, Gabriele; Rotmensch, Siegfried; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Prayer, Daniela

    2011-05-01

    In view of the increasing role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to prenatal ultrasonography (US), this study sought to demonstrate the visualization of fetal akinesia and associated abnormalities on MRI. This retrospective study included six fetuses with akinesia and associated abnormalities, depicted on fetal MRI after suspicious prenatal US. The whole fetus was assessed for musculoskeletal abnormalities and associated pathological conditions elsewhere. Fetal outcome data were compared with prenatal imaging. US and MRI findings were also compared. Akinesia resulting in arthrogryposis was seen in 6/6 fetuses, with abnormal musculature in 5/6 fetuses. Associated brain abnormalities were found in 2/6 fetuses; facial abnormalities in 3/6; lung hypoplasia in 3/6; and polyhydramnios in 2/6. There were 5/6 pregnancies that were terminated and one individual died neonatally. MRI and brain autopsy were concordant in 4/6 cases. MRI and body autopsy were concordant in 1/6 cases and in 5/6 cases, autopsy revealed additional abnormalities. In addition to US, MRI correctly identified central nervous system findings in four cases and lung hypoplasia in three cases. Our MRI results demonstrate fetal akinesia and associated abnormalities, which may have an impact on perinatal management, as an adjunct to prenatal US. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images.

  15. Placental pathologies in fetal MRI with pathohistological correlation.

    PubMed

    Linduska, N; Dekan, S; Messerschmidt, A; Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Chalubinski, K; Weber, M; Prayer, D

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether currently available fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI/MR) techniques are sufficient for the assessment of placental pathologies. We hypothesized that placental pathologies as detected and evaluated by MRI, would correlate with histological findings. In a retrospective study, 45 singleton pregnancies from 19 to 35 gestational weeks, with placental pathologies on MR scans, were included. MRI was performed on a 1.5T unit using T2-, T1-, and diffusion-weighted and echo-planar sequences. Pathologies were categorized into infarction with/without hemorrhagic components, subchorionic/intervillous thrombi/hemorrhages, retroplacental hematoma, massive perivillous fibrin deposition, and chorioamnionitis. Pathohistological examination was performed postnatally within a median of seven days between MR examination and delivery. Pathologically, 26 placentas showed infarctions (96.2% on MR scans), two retroplacental hematomas were detected by MRI and confirmed by pathology, and 9 of 14 subchorionic hematomas were confirmed. Six of eight intervillous hemorrhages were seen on MRI, and three of six cases of severe chorioamnionitis were diagnosed prenatally. Placental hemorrhages (retroplacental hematoma, intervillous thrombi, subchorionic hematoma), and ischemic lesions could be detected with fetal MRI, while chorioamnionitis and even massive perivillous fibrin deposition showed few signal changes, probably reflecting small macroscopic changes in the placenta. Fetal MRI, therefore, seems to be a promising tool for the assessment of placental insufficiency.

  16. Fetal MRI at 3T-ready for routine use?

    PubMed

    Weisstanner, Christian; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Brugger, Peter C; Mitter, Christan; Diogo, Mariana C; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Fetal MR now plays an important role in the clinical work-up of pregnant females. It is performed mainly at 1.5 T. However, the desire to obtain a more precise fetal depiction or the fact that some institutions have access only to a 3.0 T scanner has resulted in a growing interest in performing fetal MR at 3.0 T. The aim of this article was to provide a reference for the use of 3.0 T MRI as a prenatal diagnostic method.

  17. Fetal MRI improves diagnostic accuracy in patients referred to a fetal center for suspected esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Ethun, Cecilia G; Fallon, Sara C; Cassady, Christopher I; Mehollin-Ray, Amy R; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Zamora, Irving J; Lee, Timothy C; Welty, Stephen E; Cass, Darrell L

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe prenatal imaging characteristics and outcomes of fetuses with suspected esophageal atresia (EA) in order to improve prenatal diagnosis, counseling, and management. The medical records of all patients referred to our multidisciplinary fetal center for suspected EA from January 2003 to April 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-three patients were referred with a prenatal diagnosis of possible EA. Following fetal center evaluation with MRI, EA was deemed unlikely in 6 (18%) fetuses. Of 27 fetuses in whom EA could not be excluded, EA was confirmed postnatally in 15 (56%), excluded in 7 (26%), and unconfirmed in 5 (3 fetal losses; 2 lost to follow-up). Imaging characteristics on fetal MRI associated with the highest positive predictive values (PPV) were an esophageal pouch (100%) and a small stomach (75%). The finding of polyhydramnios had high sensitivity (93%) but low specificity (31%) and PPV (61%) for a diagnosis of EA. Prenatal imaging and fetal center evaluation correctly identify the presence or absence of esophageal atresia in 78% of patients referred on suspicion of this condition. The presence of an esophageal pouch on fetal MRI has significant predictive value for EA. These data may assist with evidence-based prenatal family counseling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Normative biometrics for fetal ocular growth using volumetric MRI reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Gholipour, Ali; Afacan, Onur; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-04-01

    To determine normative ranges for fetal ocular biometrics between 19 and 38 weeks gestational age (GA) using volumetric MRI reconstruction. The 3D images of 114 healthy fetuses between 19 and 38 weeks GA were created using super-resolution volume reconstructions from MRI slice acquisitions. These 3D images were semi-automatically segmented to measure fetal orbit volume, binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), and ocular diameter (OD). All biometry correlated with GA (Volume, Pearson's correlation coefficient (CC) = 0.9680; BOD, CC = 0.9552; OD, CC = 0.9445; and IOD, CC = 0.8429), and growth curves were plotted against linear and quadratic growth models. Regression analysis showed quadratic models to best fit BOD, IOD, and OD and a linear model to best fit volume. Orbital volume had the greatest correlation with GA, although BOD and OD also showed strong correlation. The normative data found in this study may be helpful for the detection of congenital fetal anomalies with more consistent measurements than are currently available. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Reconstruction of scattered data in fetal diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Oubel, Estanislao; Koob, Mériam; Studholme, Colin; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Rousseau, François

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for reconstructing diffusion-weighted MRI data on regular grids from scattered data. The proposed method has the advantage that no specific diffusion model needs to be assumed. Previous work assume the tensor model, but this is not suitable under certain conditions like intravoxel orientational heterogeneity (IVOH). Data reconstruction is particularly important when studying the fetal brain in utero, since registration methods applied for movement and distortion correction produce scattered data in spatial and diffusion domains. We propose the use of a groupwise registration method, and a dual spatio-angular interpolation by using radial basis functions (RBF). Leave-one-out experiments performed on adult data showed a high accuracy of the method. The application to fetal data showed an improvement in the quality of the sequences according to objective criteria based on fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, and differences in the tractography results.

  20. Reconstruction of Scattered Data in Fetal Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Oubel, Estanislao; Koob, Mériam; Studholme, Colin; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Rousseau, François

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for reconstructing diffusion-weighted MRI data on regular grids from scattered data. The proposed method has the advantage that no specific diffusion model needs to be assumed. Previous work assume the tensor model, but this is not suitable under certain conditions like intravoxel orientational heterogeneity (IVOH). Data reconstruction is particularly important when studying the fetal brain in utero, since registration methods applied for movement and distortion correction produce scattered data in spatial and diffusion domains. We propose the use of a groupwise registration method, and a dual spatio-angular interpolation by using radial basis functions (RBF). Leave-one-out experiments performed on adult data showed a high accuracy of the method. The application to fetal data showed an improvement in the quality of the sequences according to objective criteria based on fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, and differences in the tractography results. PMID:21636311

  1. Reconstruction of Scattered Data in Fetal Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Oubel, Estanislao; Koob, Meriam; Studholme, Colin; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Rousseau, François

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for reconstructing D-MRI data on regular grids from sparse data without assuming specific diffusion models. This is particularly important when studying the fetal brain in utero, since registration methods applied for movement and distortion correction produce scattered data in spatial and angular (gradient) domains. We propose the use of a groupwise registration method, and a dual spatio-angular interpolation by using radial basis functions (RBF). Experiments performed on adult data showed a high accuracy of the method when estimating diffusion images in unavailable directions. The application to fetal data showed an improvement in the quality of the sequences according to criteria based on fractional anisotropy (FA) maps, and differences in the tractography results. PMID:20879277

  2. Fetal MRI for prediction of neonatal mortality following preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Agnes; Pataraia, Anna; Helmer, Hanns; Kasprian, Gregor; Sauer, Alexandra; Brugger, Peter C; Pollak, Arnold; Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela

    2011-11-01

    Lung MRI volumetrics may be valuable for fetal assessment following early preterm premature rupture of the foetal membranes (pPROM). To evaluate the predictive value of MRI lung volumetrics after pPROM. Retrospective cohort study of 40 fetuses after pPROM in a large, tertiary, perinatal referral center. Fetuses underwent MRI lung volumetrics. Estimated lung volume was expressed as percentage of expected lung volume (our own normal references). Primary outcome was neonatal mortality due to respiratory distress before discharge from hospital. Gestational age range was 16-27 weeks. Estimated-to-expected lung volume was 73% in non-survivors and 102% in survivors (P < 0.05). There were no survivors with a lung volume less than 60% of expected. By logistic regression, mortality could be predicted with a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86% and accuracy of 85%. Fetal MR lung volumetrics may be useful for predicting mortality due to respiratory distress in children with early gestational pPROM.

  3. Fetal cardiac disease and fetal lung volume: an in utero MRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Mlczoch, Elisabeth; Schmidt, Lisa; Schmid, Maximilian; Kasprian, Gregor; Frantal, Sophie; Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Prayer, Daniela; Michel-Behnke, Ina; Salzer-Muhar, Ulrike

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful, noninvasive tool to study fetal lung volumes after 18 weeks of gestation in vivo. In neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD), proper lung function is essential for postnatal survival. Antenatal detection of abnormal pulmonary development may help to optimize prenatal and perinatal management of at-risk fetuses. We aimed to investigate lung volumes in fetuses with prenatally diagnosed heart disease. A cross-sectional, retrospective study of 105 consecutive singleton pregnancies with CHD and a control, non-CHD group (n = 115), that underwent fetal MRI was performed. The heart defects detected were divided into four groups. Lung volumes of fetuses with heart disease were compared with control, non-CHD fetuses. In addition, z-scores of lung volumes were calculated for the CHD group (normal range z-scores from -2-+2). As a group, fetuses with CHD have significantly smaller lung volumes compared with control fetuses when corrected by gestational age (GA) (p = 0.049). Of the 105 CHD fetuses studied, 18 had lung volumes with a z-score < -2. Fetuses with different types of CHD showed similar lung volumes. Our data indicate that postpartum pulmonary symptoms and outcome in neonates with congenital heart disease may be attributed to the cardiac disease itself and in part to smaller lung volumes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Vein of Galen Aneurysmal Malformation: Prognostic Markers Depicted on Fetal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W; Vaught, Arthur J; Poretti, Andrea; Blakemore, Karin J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serves a dual role in the prenatal diagnostic work up of a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM). First, it may confirm the prenatal ultrasound findings and secondly it may identify prognostically important secondary complications of the VGAM. Progressive heart failure with development of fetal hydrops and hemispheric white matter injuries are associated with a poor outcome in children with a VGAM. We present the prenatal findings using both ultrasound and MRI of a fetus with VGAM including bilateral injury of the cerebral hemispheres, severe dilatation of the jugular veins, cardiomegaly, and hydrops fetalis. The neonate died within 30 minutes after delivery. Moreover, fetal MRI revealed complete placenta praevia, uterine fibroids, and wrapping of the umbilical cord around the fetal neck. This additional information is unrelated to the fetal pathology, but could have been of importance to plan the delivery. PMID:25924177

  5. Ultrasound and MRI comprehensive approach in prenatal diagnosis of fetal osteochondrodysplasias. Cases series.

    PubMed

    Berceanu, Costin; Gheonea, Ioana Andreea; Vlădăreanu, Simona; Cîrstoiu, Monica Mihaela; Vlădăreanu, Radu; Mehedinţu, Claudia; Berceanu, Sabina; Ciortea, Răzvan; Brătilă, Elvira

    2017-01-31

    To present the systematic ultrasonographic assessment in fetal osteochondrodysplasias and to evaluate the fetal MRI intake, as a complementary exploration to US, in the prenatal diagnosis and perinatal prognosis of fetal nonlethal osteochondrodysplasias. Material and methods: In this tertiary multicentre study were included 37 cases diagnosed prenatally with various entities in the category of nonlethal fetal osteochondrodysplasias. The initial diagnosis was carried out by the routine or detailed ultrasound examination. Fetal MRI was accomplished for selected cases. Nonlethal skeletal dysplasia was suspected and then diagnosed after 17 gestational weeks. The suspicion of osteochondrodysplasia as a reference diagnosis element has required systematic and thorough ultrasound examination. Fetal MRI is a valuable exploration, complementary to prenatal ultrasound bringing in very useful details for the diagnosis of osteochondrodysplasias. The global diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia depends to a great extent on the genetic or biochemical abnormality that causes them. US is always the fundamental screening exploration for fetal assessment in nonlethal osteochondrodysplasias. The details brought by the fetal MRI are useful, and the exploration is harmless for the fetus and the mother. Certain diagnosis cannot be accurate and complete without the contribution of genetics, maternal and fetal medicine, obstetrics or radiology.

  6. Abnormalities of the penis in utero--hypospadias on fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Stefan F; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Bettelheim, Dieter; Nemec, Ursula; Krestan, Christian R; Rotmensch, Siegfried; Rimoin, David L; Graham, John M; Prayer, Daniela

    2011-07-01

    To demonstrate the visualization of penile abnormalities on fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study included five fetuses (25+0 to 31+6 gestational weeks) with penile abnormalities, positively depicted on fetal MRI, using prenatal ultrasonography (US) as a standard of reference. On MRI, the penis, as well as the scrotum and testicles, were evaluated. All fetal organs were reviewed to define penile abnormalities as isolated or in association with other anomalies. Furthermore, US and MRI findings were compared. Posterior hypospadias were demonstrated in all five fetuses, and abnormal testicular descent in two. Associated anomalies were present in all five fetuses on MRI, including abdominal/urogenital pathologies in four; brain pathologies in three; and craniofacial, cardiac, musculoskeletal, pathologies each in one fetus, and intrauterine growth retardation in one fetus. Compared to US, additional MRI findings were shown in four of five fetuses. Our MRI results demonstrate the visualization of fetal penile abnormalities and associated pathologies, which may provide information for perinatal management. MRI may show additional findings compared to prenatal US in certain cases.

  7. Ultrasound versus MRI in the diagnosis of fetal head and trunk anomalies.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Chandrasekharan, Anupama; Joseph, Santhosh; Venkata Sai, P M; Dev, Bhawna; Reddy, Sanjeeva

    2009-02-01

    To compare antenatal sonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of fetal head and trunk anomalies. Forty pregnant women with fetal anomalies on ultrasound (US) examination underwent MRI. The MR examination was done by a radiologist who was provided with the US data. The MR images were then read by one of the two radiologists who were blinded to the US data. They were however told that the region of interest was (1) head-neck or (2) trunk or (3) both. Antenatal US and MRI findings were compared with postnatal diagnosis. Postnatal evaluation included plain radiograph, US, computed tomography, MRI, surgery, physical evaluation and autopsy. Sixty anomalies were detected in the 40 women studied. This included 36 central nervous system (CNS), 7 thoracic, 7 gastrointestinal, 8 genitourinary and 2 face-neck anomalies. In the evaluation of CNS and thoracic anomalies, more number of confident diagnoses could be obtained by MRI when compared with that by US. In the detection of gastrointestinal and genitourinary anomalies, there was no significant difference between the two modalities. More number of confident diagnoses could be obtained by MRI when compared with that by US, in the evaluation of fetal CNS and thoracic anomalies. MRI can be used in complex fetal anomalies as a supplementary tool following US.

  8. Effects of Maternal Valium Administration on Fetal MRI Motion Artifact: A Comparison Study at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Mariana L; Mirsky, David M; Dannull, Kimberly A; Tong, Suhong; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    Fetal MRI is performed without sedation. In cases of maternal claustrophobia or when reduction of fetal motion is critical, benzodiazepines may help. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose benzodiazepine on fetal motion MRI and its effect on maternal oxygen levels at higher elevation. A total of 131 fetal MRI scans performed from March 2012 through December 2013 were studied. Nineteen of the cases were performed following Valium administration. Images were graded with a 5-point Likert scale. Using pulse oximetry, maternal oxygen levels were recorded. Results were analyzed for each category combining 3 readers' interpretations. Using a 2-sample t test model, the average imaging scores were better for the control than the Valium group (p = 0.0139). Maternal oxygen levels at different times and positions were compared using independent 2-sample t test between the Valium and control groups showing no change in O2 saturation, except when controlling for altitude and gestational age (p = 0.0326). Administration of low-dose Valium did not decrease fetal motion on MRI. Valium did not pose any risk of maternal hypoxemia, except when controlling for altitude and gestational age on supine position. Thus, caution should be exercised to prevent the risk of fetal hypoxemia. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Different information by MRI compare to ultrasound in fetal intracranial space occupying lesions.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Kasprian, Gregor; Hu, Daoyu; Xiao, Peng; Yang, Wenzhong; Chen, Xinlin

    2017-07-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in characterizing fetal intracranial space occupying lesions in comparison to prenatal ultrasound. This retrospective study included 50 fetuses (mean age 26 years, mean gestational weeks 31 + 1 GW) with intracranial space occupying lesions, suspected by prenatal screening ultrasound. T2-weighted, T1-weighted, SSFP, and diffusion-weighted sequences of the fetal brain were obtained on a 1.5 T unit. Pathology (n = 5), postmortem MRI (n = 3), or postnatal US (n = 42) was available as standard of reference. The fetal MRI provided correct diagnosis in 49 cases (98%), while 35 (70%) by ultrasound, and MRI failed in 1 case (2%), while ultrasound failed in 15 cases (30%). Fetal MR and ultrasound were concordant in 35 of 50 cases (70%), completely discordant in 4 (8%), and partially discordant in 11 (22%) cases. MRI could provide detailed information about the minor lesions, such as focal hemorrhage and periventricular nodules. Meanwhile, it could provide whole view of the lesion in order to delineate the surrounding anatomical structure. But there are still some limitations of its soft-tissue resolution in a case with teratoma; more effort is needed to improve the sequences.

  10. Mapping Fetal Brain Development in utero Using MRI: The Big Bang of Brain Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The development of tools to construct and investigate probabilistic maps of the adult human brain from MRI have led to advances in both basic neuroscience and clinical diagnosis. These tools are increasingly being applied to brain development in adolescence, childhood and even neonatal and premature neonatal imaging. Looking even earlier in development, parallel developments in clinical fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have led to its growing use as a tool in challenging medical conditions. This has motivated new engineering developments that combine optimal fast MRI scans with techniques derived from computer vision that allow full 3D imaging of the moving fetal brain in utero without sedation. These promise to provide a new and unprecedented window into early human brain growth. This article will review the developments that have led us to this point, and examine the current state of the art in the fields of fast fetal imaging, motion correction and the tools to analyze dynamically changing fetal brain structure. New methods to deal with developmental tissue segmentation and the construction of spatio-temporal atlases will be examined, together with techniques to map fetal brain growth patterns. PMID:21568716

  11. Can we make an accurate diagnosis of pyriform sinus fistula by fetal MRI?

    PubMed

    Zeng, S H; Liu, H S; Zhong, W; Liu, Z Q; He, Q M; Han, J; Wang, Z

    2016-09-01

    To review the fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of pyriform sinus fistula (PSF) and to compare them with the postnatal clinical and surgical findings. The relevant medical literature is also discussed. The location, shape, signal, effects of adjacent structures and in utero changes detected on fetal MRI were reviewed in three cases of PSF. The patient's respiratory status at birth, the application of ex utero intrapartum therapy (EXIT), infectious complications in the neonatal period, and the surgical and pathological findings were also reviewed and discussed. The study consisted of three pregnant women between 18 and 38 years of age, each with a single fetus. Fetal MRI was performed at 26 and 38 weeks of gestation in case 1, at 34 weeks of gestation in case 2, and at 34 and 38 weeks of gestation in case 3. Postnatal clinical follow-up extended from 9 months to 3 years. All lesions were well-circumscribed unilobular cysts with slightly thickened walls at the neck area. Case 1 was irregular in shape, and the other two cases were oval and extended longitudinally along the neck. The fluid contents showed signals consistent with amniotic fluid. Close contact with the thyroid gland was demonstrated to be a fairly characteristic feature that could be recognised on fetal MRI. The in utero follow-up detected slight changes in the signal, wall characteristics, contour, and airway deviation. Case 1 was bilaterally affected, causing it to be initially mistaken as macro-cystic lymphangioma. The diagnosis was corrected with the aid of postnatal imaging; however, a prenatal diagnosis was correctly made in cases 2 and 3. Airway obstruction was not observed in any of the three cases, and thus, EXIT was not applied. The fetal MRI findings were in good agreement with the postnatal clinical and surgical findings. In addition to the higher spatial delineation provided by fetal MRI, as described in the literature, the observation of close contact with the thyroid gland

  12. A new look at the fetus: thick-slab T2-weighted sequences in fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Peter C; Mittermayer, Christoph; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the fetus is considered an established adjunct to fetal ultrasound, stacks of images alone cannot provide an overall impression of the fetus. The present study evaluates the use of thick-slab T2-weighted MR images to obtain a three-dimensional impression of the fetus using MRI. A thick-slab T2-weighted sequence was added to the routine protocol in 100 fetal MRIs obtained for various indications (19th to 37th gestational weeks) on a 1.5 T magnet using a five-element phased-array surface coil. Slice thickness adapted to fetal size and uterine geometry varied between 25 and 50mm, as did the field of view (250-350 mm). Acquisition of one image took less than 1s. The pictorial essay shows that these images visualize fetal anatomy in a more comprehensive way than is possible with a series of 3-4mm thick slices. These thick-slab images facilitate the assessment of the whole fetus, fetal proportions, surface structures, and extremities. Fetal pathology may be captured in one image. Thick-slab T2-weighted images provide additional information that cannot be gathered from a series of images and are considered a valuable adjunct to conventional 2D MR images.

  13. Fetal tracheolaryngeal airway obstruction: prenatal evaluation by sonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Courtier, Jesse; Poder, Liina; Wang, Zhen J.; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the sonographic and MRI findings of tracheolaryngeal obstruction in the fetus. Conditions that can cause tracheolaryngeal obstruction include extrinsic causes such as lymphatic malformation, cervical teratoma and vascular rings and intrinsic causes such as congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS). Accurate distinction of these conditions by sonography or MRI can help facilitate parental counseling and management, including the decision to utilize the ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure. PMID:20737145

  14. Bilateral subependymal heterotopia, ventriculomegaly and cerebellar asymmetry: fetal MRI findings of a rare association of brain anomalies.

    PubMed

    Manganaro, Lucia; Saldari, Matteo; Bernardo, Silvia; Aliberti, Camilla; Silvestri, Evelina

    2013-11-01

    Subependymal heterotopia (SEH) is a neuronal migration disorder characterized by nodules of gray matter along the lateral ventricular walls and often associated with other brain malformations. We present two cases of SEH associated with ventriculomegaly and cerebellar abnormalities diagnosed by fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 20 and 23 weeks' gestation respectively. Fetal MRI findings of this association of abnormalities have never been reported in literature. This report emphasizes the role of fetal MRI in recognition of subependymal heterotopia and other associated brain anomalies at early age of gestation along with its importance for a more targeted counseling and management strategies.

  15. Localisation of the brain in fetal MRI using bundled SIFT features.

    PubMed

    Keraudren, Kevin; Kyriakopoulou, Vanessa; Rutherford, Mary; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Fetal MRI is a rapidly emerging diagnostic imaging tool. Its main focus is currently on brain imaging, but there is a huge potential for whole body studies. We propose a method for accurate and robust localisation of the fetal brain in MRI when the image data is acquired as a stack of 2D slices misaligned due to fetal motion. We first detect possible brain locations in 2D images with a Bag-of-Words model using SIFT features aggregated within Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (called bundled SIFT), followed by a robust fitting of an axis-aligned 3D box to the selected regions. We rely on prior knowledge of the fetal brain development to define size and shape constraints. In a cross-validation experiment, we obtained a median error distance of 5.7mm from the ground truth and no missed detection on a database of 59 fetuses. This 2D approach thus allows a robust detection even in the presence of substantial fetal motion.

  16. [Clinical value of prenatal MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of fetal bronchopulmonary sequestration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Ming; Dong, Suzhen; Luo, Zhiqin; Fei, Zhenghua; Fang, Xiangming; Qi, Linghong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical value of prenatal MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of congenital bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS). From January 2009 to December 2014, 16 fetuses with BPS were diagnosed by fetal MRI in Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital and Shanghai Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine. The clinical data of these cases were analyzed retrospectively. All were singleton pregnancy, and MRI was carried out within 24-48 hours after routine prenatal ultrasound. All the neonates underwent postnatal enhanced CT scan or surgical biopsy after birth, and the results were compared to prenatal MRI diagnosis. (1) With prenatal MRI, 16 cases were diagnosed BPS. The lesions located in left lung in 10 cases, and right lung in 6 cases. As the scope of the lesion, 3 cases located in the whole left lung, 6 cases limited to the left lower lobe, and 1 case was subdiaphragmatic on the left side. 2 cases located in the whole right lung and 4 cases limited to the right lower lobe. One case complicated oligoamnios, and one had pleural effusion. Supplying vessels could be found in 14 cases. (2) When the postnatal results were compared with prenatal MRI, 15 cases were comfirmed as BPS (15/16), including 10 intralobar cases 5 extralobar cases. One that was diagnosed as BPS by prenatal MRI was confirmed to be congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) by pathology. The accuracy of prenatal MRI diagnosis of BPS was 15/16. Prenatal ultrasound missed one case and misdiagnosed two cases, as one was mistakened as CCAM and the other as cystic teratoma. Prenatal MRI has good clinical value in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of fetal BPS.

  17. Fetal cardiac cine imaging using highly accelerated dynamic MRI with retrospective motion correction and outlier rejection.

    PubMed

    van Amerom, Joshua F P; Lloyd, David F A; Price, Anthony N; Kuklisova Murgasova, Maria; Aljabar, Paul; Malik, Shaihan J; Lohezic, Maelene; Rutherford, Mary A; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Razavi, Reza; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2017-04-03

    Development of a MRI acquisition and reconstruction strategy to depict fetal cardiac anatomy in the presence of maternal and fetal motion. The proposed strategy involves i) acquisition and reconstruction of highly accelerated dynamic MRI, followed by image-based ii) cardiac synchronization, iii) motion correction, iv) outlier rejection, and finally v) cardiac cine reconstruction. Postprocessing entirely was automated, aside from a user-defined region of interest delineating the fetal heart. The method was evaluated in 30 mid- to late gestational age singleton pregnancies scanned without maternal breath-hold. The combination of complementary acquisition/reconstruction and correction/rejection steps in the pipeline served to improve the quality of the reconstructed 2D cine images, resulting in increased visibility of small, dynamic anatomical features. Artifact-free cine images successfully were produced in 36 of 39 acquired data sets; prolonged general fetal movements precluded processing of the remaining three data sets. The proposed method shows promise as a motion-tolerant framework to enable further detail in MRI studies of the fetal heart and great vessels. Processing data in image-space allowed for spatial and temporal operations to be applied to the fetal heart in isolation, separate from extraneous changes elsewhere in the field of view. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. On Super-Resolution for Fetal Brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, F.; Kim, K.; Studholme, C.; Koob, M.; Dietemann, J.-L.

    2012-01-01

    Super-resolution techniques provide a route to studying fine scale anatomical detail using multiple lower resolution acquisitions. In particular, techniques that do not depend on regular sampling can be used in medical imaging situations where imaging time and resolution are limited by subject motion. We investigate in this work the use of super-resolution technique for anisotropic fetal brain MR data reconstruction without modifying the data acquisition protocol. The approach, which consists of iterative motion correction and high resolution image estimation, is compared with a previously used scattered data interpolation-based reconstruction method. To optimize acquisition time, an evaluation of the influence of the number of input images and image noise is also performed. Evaluation on simulated MR images and real data show significant improvements in performance provided by the super-resolution approach. PMID:20879335

  19. Automated fetal brain segmentation from 2D MRI slices for motion correction.

    PubMed

    Keraudren, K; Kuklisova-Murgasova, M; Kyriakopoulou, V; Malamateniou, C; Rutherford, M A; Kainz, B; Hajnal, J V; Rueckert, D

    2014-11-01

    Motion correction is a key element for imaging the fetal brain in-utero using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Maternal breathing can introduce motion, but a larger effect is frequently due to fetal movement within the womb. Consequently, imaging is frequently performed slice-by-slice using single shot techniques, which are then combined into volumetric images using slice-to-volume reconstruction methods (SVR). For successful SVR, a key preprocessing step is to isolate fetal brain tissues from maternal anatomy before correcting for the motion of the fetal head. This has hitherto been a manual or semi-automatic procedure. We propose an automatic method to localize and segment the brain of the fetus when the image data is acquired as stacks of 2D slices with anatomy misaligned due to fetal motion. We combine this segmentation process with a robust motion correction method, enabling the segmentation to be refined as the reconstruction proceeds. The fetal brain localization process uses Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER), which are classified using a Bag-of-Words model with Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features. The segmentation process is a patch-based propagation of the MSER regions selected during detection, combined with a Conditional Random Field (CRF). The gestational age (GA) is used to incorporate prior knowledge about the size and volume of the fetal brain into the detection and segmentation process. The method was tested in a ten-fold cross-validation experiment on 66 datasets of healthy fetuses whose GA ranged from 22 to 39 weeks. In 85% of the tested cases, our proposed method produced a motion corrected volume of a relevant quality for clinical diagnosis, thus removing the need for manually delineating the contours of the brain before motion correction. Our method automatically generated as a side-product a segmentation of the reconstructed fetal brain with a mean Dice score of 93%, which can be used for further processing. Copyright

  20. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27.

    PubMed

    Schmook, Maria T; Brugger, Peter C; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-06-01

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average +/- sd: gw 22 +/- 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p = 0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p < 0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided.

  1. Ultrasound versus MRI: is there a difference in measurements of the fetal lateral ventricles?

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Nicholas; Zaretsky, Michael V; West, Nancy A; Galan, Henry L; Crombleholme, Timothy M; Meyers, Mariana L

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate whether fetal brain lateral ventricle measurements differ between ultrasound (US) and MRI. We evaluated 115 fetuses with US and MRI performed within 24 h of each other. Ventricular measurements were performed in the axial plane at the level of the atria for both modalities and the right and left ventricles were evaluated separately. We compared mean measurements; mean differences, association with gestational age (GA), association with the presence of a brain anomaly, and agreement between MRI and US. The LV and RV were measured in 65 and 64 cases, respectively. LV and RV size estimates were significantly greater when measured by MRI compared with US (p < 0.001). Therefore, LV and RV were 0.87 mm and 0.89 mm larger in MRI versus US, respectively. Neither GA at measurement or presence/absence of a brain anomaly was significantly associated with differences in measurements. When comparing the agreement between the US and MRI measurements for ventriculomegaly; the kappa level of agreement for the LV and RV was 0.74 for each. MRI measurements of ventricles are significantly larger than the measurements by US by ∼1 mm. There is a good level of agreement when categorizing by normal, mild and severe ventriculomegaly.

  2. Maternal smoking and fetal lung volume-an in utero MRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Maximilian; Kasprian, Gregor; Marschalek, Julian; Posch, Angela; Balassy, Csilla; Prayer, Daniela

    2011-05-01

    To investigate whether fetal lung volume and fetal lung volume growth over gestation are different in mothers who reported smoking during pregnancy compared to non-smoking controls. Cross-sectional retrospective study of the data of 200 consecutive singleton pregnancies that underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fetal lung volumes of 32 fetuses of mothers who reported smoking during pregnancy were compared to 168 fetuses of non-smoking controls. Cases reported smoking between 2 and 30 cigarettes per day. The mean number of cigarettes per day for cases was 10.2 ± 6.1. After logarithmic transformation, lung volumes showed a linear increase with gestational age (r(2) = 0.7). Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant influence of gestational age (p < 0.0001) but not maternal smoking status (p = 1.0) on fetal lung volumes. Comparison of the relative difference between observed and predicted lung volumes for both groups by means of unpaired t-test revealed no significant influence of maternal smoking status on this variable (p = 0.9). Fetuses of mothers who reported smoking during pregnancy show similar lung volumes and lung volume growth in MRI compared to non-smoking controls. Our data suggest that a reduced lung volume is not responsible for the increase in respiratory symptoms associated with prenatal smoking. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Skew ocular deviation: a catastrophic sign on MRI of fetal glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yu-Ming; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Ho, Donald Ming-Tak; Wong, Tai-Tong; Hung, Jeng-Hsiu; Chen, Shu-Jen; Sheu, Ming-Huei; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2003-06-01

    We report the prenatal observation of fetal ocular skew deviation in a case of a glioblastoma found prenatally at 33 weeks' gestation by MRI. The fetal MRI, obtained by half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) pulse sequences, showed a tumor (80 mm in maximum diameter) in the right deep cerebral hemisphere with extension to the mid-cranial fossa and tentorial hiatus in addition to severe hydrocephalus. On coronal MR images a vertical dysconjugated gaze was recognized. One week after the MRI, frequent delayed deceleration prompted an emergency cesarean section. The baby was born with left hemiparesis and central neurogenic hyperventilation, which evolved into decerebrate rigidity and apneustic breathing within 2 h. Post-mortem examination revealed a glioblastoma in the right deep hemisphere, a tumor with brain stem involvement, and transtentorial herniation. We suggest, therefore, that recognition of ocular skew deviation on fetal MR images would indicate brain stem involvement and poor postnatal prognosis. Early recognition of the catastrophic sign would lead to proper management.

  4. Growth trajectories of the human fetal brain tissues estimated from 3D reconstructed in utero MRI.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Hamzelou, Kia S; Corbett-Detig, James M; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-08-01

    In the latter half of gestation (20-40 gestational weeks), human brain growth accelerates in conjunction with cortical folding and the deceleration of ventricular zone progenitor cell proliferation. These processes are reflected in changes in the volume of respective fetal tissue zones. Thus far, growth trajectories of the fetal tissue zones have been extracted primarily from 2D measurements on histological sections and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, the volumes of major fetal zones-cortical plate (CP), subplate and intermediate zone (SP+IZ), germinal matrix (GMAT), deep gray nuclei (DG), and ventricles (VENT)--are calculated from automatic segmentation of motion-corrected, 3D reconstructed MRI. We analyzed 48 T2-weighted MRI scans from 39 normally developing fetuses in utero between 20.57 and 31.14 gestational weeks (GW). The supratentorial volume (STV) increased linearly at a rate of 15.22% per week. The SP+IZ (14.75% per week) and DG (15.56% per week) volumes increased at similar rates. The CP increased at a greater relative rate (18.00% per week), while the VENT (9.18% per week) changed more slowly. Therefore, CP increased as a fraction of STV and the VENT fraction declined. The total GMAT volume slightly increased then decreased after 25 GW. We did not detect volumetric sexual dimorphisms or total hemispheric volume asymmetries, which may emerge later in gestation. Further application of the automated fetal brain segmentation to later gestational ages will bridge the gap between volumetric studies of premature brain development and normal brain development in utero. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Growth trajectories of the human fetal brain tissues estimated from 3D reconstructed in utero MRI

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Julia A.; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Hamzelou, Kia S.; Corbett-Detig, James M.; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In the latter half of gestation (20 to 40 gestational weeks), human brain growth accelerates in conjunction with cortical folding and the deceleration of ventricular zone progenitor cell proliferation. These processes are reflected in changes in the volume of respective fetal tissue zones. Thus far, growth trajectories of the fetal tissue zones have been extracted primarily from 2D measurements on histological sections and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, the volumes of major fetal zones—cortical plate (CP), subplate and intermediate zone (SP+IZ), germinal matrix (GMAT), deep gray nuclei (DG), and ventricles (VENT)—are calculated from automatic segmentation of motion-corrected, 3D reconstructed MRI. We analyzed 48 T2-weighted MRI scans from 39 normally developing fetuses in utero between 20.57 and 31.14 gestational weeks (GW). The supratentorial volume (STV) increased linearly at a rate of 15.22% per week. The SP+IZ (14.75% per week) and DG (15.56% per week) volumes increased at similar rates. The CP increased at a greater relative rate (18.00% per week), while the VENT (9.18% per week) changed more slowly. Therefore, CP increased as a fraction of STV and the VENT fraction declined. The total GMAT volume slightly increased then decreased after 25 GW. We did not detect volumetric sexual dimorphisms or total hemispheric volume asymmetries, which may emerge later in gestation. Further application of the automated fetal brain segmentation to later gestational ages will bridge the gap between volumetric studies of premature brain development and normal brain development in utero. PMID:21530634

  6. Fetal MRI correlates with postnatal CT angiogram assessment of pulmonary anatomy in tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve.

    PubMed

    Sun, Heather Y; Boe, Justin; Rubesova, Erika; Barth, Richard A; Tacy, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    In tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve, pulmonary stenosis and regurgitation results in significant pulmonary artery dilatation. Branch pulmonary artery dilatation often compresses the tracheobronchial tree, causing fluid trapping in fetal life and air trapping and/or atelectasis after birth. Prenatal diagnosis predicts poor prognosis, which depends on the degree of respiratory insufficiency from airway compromise and lung parenchymal disease after birth. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been useful in evaluating the effects of congenital lung lesions on lung development and indicating severity of pulmonary hypoplasia. This report is the first demonstrating the utility of fetal MRI in tetralogy of Fallot/absent pulmonary valve patients, which predicted postnatal pulmonary artery size and visualized airway compression and lung parenchymal lesions. The distribution of lobar fluid trapping on fetal MRI correlated with air trapping on postnatal computed tomography angiogram. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Motion corrected 3D reconstruction of the fetal thorax from prenatal MRI.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Bernhard; Malamateniou, Christina; Murgasova, Maria; Keraudren, Kevin; Rutherford, Mary; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a semi-automatic method for analysis of the fetal thorax in genuine three-dimensional volumes. After one initial click we localize the spine and accurately determine the volume of the fetal lung from high resolution volumetric images reconstructed from motion corrupted prenatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). We compare the current state-of-the-art method of segmenting the lung in a slice-by-slice manner with the most recent multi-scan reconstruction methods. We use fast rotation invariant spherical harmonics image descriptors with Classification Forest ensemble learning methods to extract the spinal cord and show an efficient way to generate a segmentation prior for the fetal lung from this information for two different MRI field strengths. The spinal cord can be segmented with a DICE coefficient of 0.89 and the automatic lung segmentation has been evaluated with a DICE coefficient of 0.87. We evaluate our method on 29 fetuses with a gestational age (GA) between 20 and 38 weeks and show that our computed segmentations and the manual ground truth correlate well with the recorded values in literature.

  8. Robust Super-resolution Volume Reconstruction from Slice Acquisitions: Application to Fetal Brain MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Ali; Estroff, Judy A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2013-01-01

    Fast magnetic resonance imaging slice acquisition techniques such as single shot fast spin echo are routinely used in the presence of uncontrollable motion. These techniques are widely used for fetal MRI and MRI of moving subjects and organs. Although high-quality slices are frequently acquired by these techniques, inter-slice motion leads to severe motion artifacts that are apparent in out-of-plane views. Slice sequential acquisitions do not enable 3D volume representation. In this study, we have developed a novel technique based on a slice acquisition model, which enables the reconstruction of a volumetric image from multiple-scan slice acquisitions. The super-resolution volume reconstruction is formulated as an inverse problem of finding the underlying structure generating the acquired slices. We have developed a robust M-estimation solution which minimizes a robust error norm function between the model-generated slices and the acquired slices. The accuracy and robustness of this novel technique has been quantitatively assessed through simulations with digital brain phantom images as well as high-resolution newborn images. We also report here successful application of our new technique for the reconstruction of volumetric fetal brain MRI from clinically acquired data. PMID:20529730

  9. Multivariate analyses applied to fetal, neonatal and pediatric MRI of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Levman, Jacob; Takahashi, Emi

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate analysis (MVA) is a class of statistical and pattern recognition methods that involve the processing of data that contains multiple measurements per sample. MVA can be used to address a wide variety of medical neuroimaging-related challenges including identifying variables associated with a measure of clinical importance (i.e. patient outcome), creating diagnostic tests, assisting in characterizing developmental disorders, understanding disease etiology, development and progression, assisting in treatment monitoring and much more. Compared to adults, imaging of developing immature brains has attracted less attention from MVA researchers. However, remarkable MVA research growth has occurred in recent years. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of the literature focusing on MVA technologies applied to neurodevelopmental disorders in fetal, neonatal and pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. The goal of this manuscript is to provide a concise review of the state of the scientific literature on studies employing brain MRI and MVA in a pre-adult population. Neurological developmental disorders addressed in the MVA research contained in this review include autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, schizophrenia and more. While the results of this review demonstrate considerable interest from the scientific community in applications of MVA technologies in pediatric/neonatal/fetal brain MRI, the field is still young and considerable research growth remains ahead of us. PMID:26640765

  10. Risk of inferior vena cava compression syndrome during fetal MRI in the supine position - a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kienzl, Daniela; Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Weber, Michael; Bettelheim, Dieter; Pusch, Franz; Prayer, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    Inferior vena cava compression syndrome (VCCS) is a serious complication of supine fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations, particularly during late gestation. This morphologic study correlated the occurrence of VCCS with the grade of inferior vena cava (IVC) compression. There were 56 fetal MRI in the supine position [median gestational weeks (GW) 27+4] and 16 fetal MRI in the lateral position (median GW 30+6) retrospectively analyzed. The grade of maternal IVC compression was determined by the maximal anterior-posterior diameter (DAP) at the level of L4/L5. Fetal head position and right-sided uterus volume were analyzed. Clinical VCCS-related symptoms during fetal MRI were assessed. A noncompressed IVC was present in 1.8% (n=1) and a DAP of 5 to <10 mm in 33.3% (n=19) and 1 to <5 mm in 64.9% (n=36). The DAP was independent of fetal head position (P=0.99) and showed no significant correlation with gestational age (r=0.33). IVC compression increased with right-sided uterus volume (r=-0.328; P=0.014). There was a significant difference in DAP in the lateral position compared with the supine position (P<0.001). Clinical assessment revealed no symptoms of VCCS in any woman. The presented data support the concept of physiologic compensation for significantly reduced venous backflow in the supine position during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy.

  11. Construction of a deformable spatiotemporal MRI atlas of the fetal brain: evaluation of similarity metrics and deformation models.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Ali; Limperopoulos, Catherine; Clancy, Sean; Clouchoux, Cedric; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2014-01-01

    The development and identification of best methods in fetal brain MRI analysis is crucial as we expect an outburst of studies on groupwise and longitudinal analysis of early brain development in the upcoming years. To address this critical need, in this paper, we have developed a mathematical framework for the construction of an unbiased deformable spatiotemporal atlas of the fetal brain MRI and compared it to alternative configurations in terms of similarity metrics and deformation models. Our contributions are twofold: first we suggest a novel approach to fetal brain spatiotemporal atlas construction that shows high capability in capturing anatomic variation between subjects; and second, within our atlas construction framework we evaluate and compare a set of plausible configurations for inter-subject fetal brain MRI registration and identify the most accurate approach that can potentially lead to most accurate results in population atlas construction, atlas-based segmentation, and group analysis. Our evaluation results indicate that symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration with cross correlation similarity metric outperforms other configurations in this application and results in sharp unbiased atlases that can be used in fetal brain MRI analysis.

  12. A normative spatiotemporal MRI atlas of the fetal brain for automatic segmentation and analysis of early brain growth.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Ali; Rollins, Caitlin K; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Ouaalam, Abdelhakim; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Afacan, Onur; Ortinau, Cynthia M; Clancy, Sean; Limperopoulos, Catherine; Yang, Edward; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2017-03-28

    Longitudinal characterization of early brain growth in-utero has been limited by a number of challenges in fetal imaging, the rapid change in size, shape and volume of the developing brain, and the consequent lack of suitable algorithms for fetal brain image analysis. There is a need for an improved digital brain atlas of the spatiotemporal maturation of the fetal brain extending over the key developmental periods. We have developed an algorithm for construction of an unbiased four-dimensional atlas of the developing fetal brain by integrating symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration in space with kernel regression in age. We applied this new algorithm to construct a spatiotemporal atlas from MRI of 81 normal fetuses scanned between 19 and 39 weeks of gestation and labeled the structures of the developing brain. We evaluated the use of this atlas and additional individual fetal brain MRI atlases for completely automatic multi-atlas segmentation of fetal brain MRI. The atlas is available online as a reference for anatomy and for registration and segmentation, to aid in connectivity analysis, and for groupwise and longitudinal analysis of early brain growth.

  13. Multivariate Analyses Applied to Healthy Neurodevelopment in Fetal, Neonatal, and Pediatric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Levman, Jacob; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    Multivariate analysis (MVA) is a class of statistical and pattern recognition techniques that involve the processing of data that contains multiple measurements per sample. MVA can be used to address a wide variety of neurological medical imaging related challenges including the evaluation of healthy brain development, the automated analysis of brain tissues and structures through image segmentation, evaluating the effects of genetic and environmental factors on brain development, evaluating sensory stimulation's relationship with functional brain activity and much more. Compared to adult imaging, pediatric, neonatal and fetal imaging have attracted less attention from MVA researchers, however, recent years have seen remarkable MVA research growth in pre-adult populations. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of the literature focusing on MVA applied to healthy subjects in fetal, neonatal and pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. While the results of this review demonstrate considerable interest from the scientific community in applications of MVA technologies in brain MRI, the field is still young and significant research growth will continue into the future. PMID:26834576

  14. Prenatal assessment of cerebellar vermian lobulation: fetal MRI with 3 Tesla post-mortem correlation.

    PubMed

    Dovjak, Gregor O; Brugger, Peter C; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Song, Jae W; Weber, Michael; Langs, Georg; Bettelheim, Dieter; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2017-08-06

    To optimize the imaging assessment of fetal hindbrain malformations, this observational MRI study aimed to provide quantitative biometric data in normal vermian development in human fetal brains in vivo. In this retrospective, review board approved study, 78 fetuses (18-32 gestational weeks (GW)) scanned prenatally at 1.5T, and seven fetuses (16-30GW), scanned within 24 hours post-mortem at 3T,were included. All fetal brains were segmented on a T2-weighted midline sagittal slice. The mean relative area contribution (MRAC, proportion of the lobule relative to total vermian area) of all discernable vermian lobules was determined. Inter- and intrarater variability of a representative selection (22 cases) was determined with the Intraclass correlation coefficient based on voxel based differences. Furthermore, a linear regression model was used to assess the correlation between vermian lobules and gestational age. After 22GW 7 of 9 vermian lobules could be reliably discriminated. MRAC showed a mean difference of 2.89 ± 3.01% between in vivo and post-mortem measurements. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of voxel based interrater differences was 0.91 ± 0.05 and intrarater ICC was 0.95 ± 0.03. Growth of cerebellar lobules was non-uniform - the MRAC of Culmen and DFT (Declive + Folium + Tuber) increased with gestational age, whereas Lingula, Centralis, Pyramis and Nodulus decreased. Vermian lobulation can be accurately and reliably assessed prenatally, on exact midsagittal T2-weighted sequences after 22GW. Fetal vermian lobules show non-uniform growth, with an expansion of DFT and Culmen at the expense of spinocerebellar structures. An evaluation of vermian lobulation could supply a better characterization of fetuses with hindbrain malformations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Differences in cortical development assessed by fetal MRI in late-onset intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Egaña-Ugrinovic, Gabriela; Sanz-Cortes, Magdalena; Figueras, Francesc; Bargalló, Nuria; Gratacós, Eduard

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate cortical development parameters by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in late-onset intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) fetuses and normally grown fetuses. A total of 52 IUGR and 50 control fetuses were imaged using a 3T MRI scanner at 37 weeks of gestational age. T2 half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo anatomical acquisitions were obtained in 3 planes. Cortical sulcation (fissures depth corrected by biparietal diameter), brain volumetry, and asymmetry indices were assessed by means of manual delineation and compared between cases and controls. Late-onset IUGR fetuses had significantly deeper measurements in the left insula (late-onset IUGR: 0.293 vs control: 0.267; P = .02) and right insula (0.379 vs 0.318; P < .01) and the left cingulate fissure (0.096 vs 0.087; P = .03) and significantly lower intracranial (441.25 cm(3) vs 515.82 cm(3); P < .01), brain (276.47 cm(3) vs 312.07 cm(3); P < .01), and left opercular volumes (2.52 cm(3) vs 3.02 cm(3); P < .01). IUGR fetuses showed significantly higher right insular asymmetry indices. Late-onset IUGR fetuses had a different pattern of cortical development assessed by MRI, supporting the existence of in utero brain reorganization. Cortical development could be useful to define fetal brain imaging-phenotypes characteristic of IUGR. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Automated Template-based Brain Localization and Extraction for Fetal Brain MRI Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tourbier, Sébastien; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Taimouri, Vahid; Hagmann, Patric; Meuli, Reto; Warfield, Simon K; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Gholipour, Ali

    2017-04-10

    Most fetal brain MRI reconstruction algorithms rely only on brain tissue-relevant voxels of low-resolution (LR) images to enhance the quality of inter-slice motion correction and image reconstruction. Consequently the fetal brain needs to be localized and extracted as a first step, which is usually a laborious and time consuming manual or semi-automatic task. We have proposed in this work to use age-matched template images as prior knowledge to automatize brain localization and extraction. This has been achieved through a novel automatic brain localization and extraction method based on robust template-to-slice block matching and deformable slice-to-template registration. Our template-based approach has also enabled the reconstruction of fetal brain images in standard radiological anatomical planes in a common coordinate space. We have integrated this approach into our new reconstruction pipeline that involves intensity normalization, inter-slice motion correction, and super-resolution (SR) reconstruction. To this end we have adopted a novel approach based on projection of every slice of the LR brain masks into the template space using a fusion strategy. This has enabled the refinement of brain masks in the LR images at each motion correction iteration. The overall brain localization and extraction algorithm has shown to produce brain masks that are very close to manually drawn brain masks, showing an average Dice overlap measure of 94.5%. We have also demonstrated that adopting a slice-to-template registration and propagation of the brain mask slice-by-slice leads to a significant improvement in brain extraction performance compared to global rigid brain extraction and consequently in the quality of the final reconstructed images. Ratings performed by two expert observers show that the proposed pipeline can achieve similar reconstruction quality to reference reconstruction based on manual slice-by-slice brain extraction. The proposed brain mask refinement and

  17. Self-gated fetal cardiac MRI with tiny golden angle iGRASP: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Haris, Kostas; Hedström, Erik; Bidhult, Sebastian; Testud, Frederik; Maglaveras, Nicos; Heiberg, Einar; Hansson, Stefan R; Arheden, Håkan; Aletras, Anthony H

    2017-07-01

    To develop and assess a technique for self-gated fetal cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using tiny golden angle radial sampling combined with iGRASP (iterative Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel) for accelerated acquisition based on parallel imaging and compressed sensing. Fetal cardiac data were acquired from five volunteers in gestational week 29-37 at 1.5T using tiny golden angles for eddy currents reduction. The acquired multicoil radial projections were input to a principal component analysis-based compression stage. The cardiac self-gating (CSG) signal for cardiac gating was extracted from the acquired radial projections and the iGRASP reconstruction procedure was applied. In all acquisitions, a total of 4000 radial spokes were acquired within a breath-hold of less than 15 seconds using a balanced steady-state free precession pulse sequence. The images were qualitatively compared by two independent observers (on a scale of 1-4) to a single midventricular cine image from metric optimized gating (MOG) and real-time acquisitions. For iGRASP and MOG images, good overall image quality (2.8 ± 0.4 and 2.6 ± 1.3, respectively, for observer 1; 3.6 ± 0.5 and 3.4 ± 0.9, respectively, for observer 2) and cardiac diagnostic quality (3.8 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 0.9, respectively, for observer 1; 3.6 ± 0.5 and 3.6 ± 0.9, respectively, for observer 2) were obtained, with visualized myocardial thickening over the cardiac cycle and well-defined myocardial borders to ventricular lumen and liver/lung tissue. For iGRASP, MOG, and real time, left ventricular lumen diameter (14.1 ± 2.2 mm, 14.2 ± 1.9 mm, 14.7 ± 1.1 mm, respectively) and wall thickness (2.7 ± 0.3 mm, 2.6 ± 0.3 mm, 3.0 ± 0.4, respectively) showed agreement and no statistically significant difference was found (all P > 0.05). Images with iGRASP tended to have higher overall image quality scores compared with MOG and particularly

  18. Prediction of postnatal outcomes in congenital diaphragmatic hernia using MRI signal intensity of the fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Terui, K; Omoto, A; Osada, H; Hishiki, T; Saito, T; Sato, Y; Nakata, M; Komatsu, S; Ono, S; Yoshida, H

    2011-04-01

    Prognostic prediction in prenatally diagnosed congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is needed. The aim of the study was to evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity of the fetal lung as a predictor of prognosis in CDH. The subjects consisted of 12 fetuses with prenatally diagnosed CDH, who were treated soon after the birth in our institution. They all underwent MRI at 29 to 37 weeks of gestation. The ratio of the lung signal intensity to the spinal fluid signal intensity (L/SF) was calculated using region-of-interest analysis of T2-weighted images. The relationship between L/SF and clinical data was then examined. L/SF were significantly larger in survivors compared with deaths (0.815 vs 0.614, P<0.05). In survivors, L/SF significantly correlated with duration of tracheal intubation (rs=-0.938, P<0.01). L/SF is a unique factor to predict the survival prognosis and likely to quantify the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia in CDH.

  19. SLIMMER: SLIce MRI motion estimation and reconstruction tool for studies of fetal anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    We describe a free software tool which combines a set of algorithms that provide a framework for building 3D volumetric images of regions of moving anatomy using multiple fast multi-slice MRI studies. It is specifically motivated by the clinical application of unsedated fetal brain imaging, which has emerged as an important area for image analysis. The tool reads multiple DICOM image stacks acquired in any angulation into a consistent patient coordinate frame and allows the user to select regions to be locally motion corrected. It combines algorithms for slice motion estimation, bias field inconsistency correction and 3D volume reconstruction from multiple scattered slice stacks. The tool is built onto the RView (http://rview.colin-studholme.net) medical image display software and allows the user to inspect slice stacks, and apply both stack and slice level motion estimation that incorporates temporal constraints based on slice timing and interleave information read from the DICOM data. Following motion estimation an algorithm for bias field inconsistency correction provides the user with the ability to remove artifacts arising from the motion of the local anatomy relative to the imaging coils. Full 3D visualization of the slice stacks and individual slice orientations is provided to assist in evaluating the quality of the motion correction and final image reconstruction. The tool has been evaluated on a range of clinical data acquired on GE, Siemens and Philips MRI scanners.

  20. Brain volume estimation from post-mortem newborn and fetal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Orasanu, Eliza; Melbourne, Andrew; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Modat, Marc; Taylor, Andrew M.; Thayyil, Sudhin; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive autopsy using post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valid alternative to conventional autopsy in fetuses and infants. Estimation of brain weight is an integral part of autopsy, but manual segmentation of organ volumes on MRI is labor intensive and prone to errors, therefore unsuitable for routine clinical practice. In this paper we aim to show that volumetric measurements of the post-mortem fetal and neonatal brain can be accurately estimated using semi-automatic techniques and a high correlation can be found with the weights measured from conventional autopsy results. Methods The brains of 17 newborn subjects, part of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Autopsy Study (MaRIAS), were segmented from post-mortem MR images into cerebrum, cerebellum and brainstem using a publicly available neonate brain atlas and semi-automatic segmentation algorithm. The results of the segmentation were averaged to create a new atlas, which was then used for the automated atlas-based segmentation of 17 MaRIAS fetus subjects. As validation, we manually segmented the MR images from 8 subjects of each cohort and compared them with the automatic ones. The semi-automatic estimation of cerebrum weight was compared with the results of the conventional autopsy. Results The Dice overlaps between the manual and automatic segmentations are 0.991 and 0.992 for cerebrum, 0.873 and 0.888 for cerebellum and 0.819 and 0.815 for brainstem, for newborns and fetuses, respectively. Excellent agreement was obtained between the estimated MR weights and autopsy gold standard ones: mean absolute difference of 5 g and 2% maximum error for the fetus cohort and mean absolute difference of 20 g and 11% maximum error for the newborn one. Conclusions The high correlation between the obtained segmentation and autopsy weights strengthens the idea of using post-mortem MRI as an alternative for conventional autopsy of the brain. PMID:25379457

  1. Signal intensity changes of the fetal liver on MRI in-phase and out-of-phase sequence.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Brugger, Peter C; Huang, Min; Kasprian, Gregor; Li, Hong; Bettelheim, Dieter; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    To study signal intensity (SI) of the fetal liver by MRI in-phase and out-of-phase over gestational age (GA). A total of 91 pregnant women from 19 to 38 gestational weeks were imaged using MRI. Liver-to-spleen SI ratios of the right and left fetal liver lobes on in-phase and out-of-phase were measured, calculated, and compared with each other. Curves of liver-to-spleen SI ratio of the right and left liver lobe were plotted by GA. Liver-to-spleen SI ratio of the right lobe on in-phase was different from that of the left liver lobe (t = 3.95; p < 0.001). A statistically significant difference was also found for out-of-phase SI ratios (t = 3.69; p < 0.001). Curves of liver-to-spleen SI ratio of the fetal liver on in-phase and out-of-phase showed changes against GA. Liver-to-spleen SI ratio is different between the right and left liver lobe, which probably results from the different blood supply. Curves of liver-to-spleen SI ratios between 19 to 38 gestational weeks reflect the changes of decreasing function of blood production by fetal liver. In-phase and out-of-phase may have clinical use in the early detection of disordered fetal growth and metabolism. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Multi-Atlas Multi-Shape Segmentation of Fetal Brain MRI for Volumetric and Morphometric Analysis of Ventriculomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Ali; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Estroff, Judy A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of motion robust super-resolution fetal brain MRI holds out the potential for dramatic new advances in volumetric and morphometric analysis. Volumetric analysis based on volumetric and morphometric biomarkers of the developing fetal brain must include segmentation. Automatic segmentation of fetal brain MRI is challenging, however, due to the highly variable size and shape of the developing brain; possible structural abnormalities; and the relatively poor resolution of fetal MRI scans. To overcome these limitations, we present a novel, constrained, multi-atlas, multi-shape automatic segmentation method that specifically addresses the challenge of segmenting multiple structures with similar intensity values in subjects with strong anatomic variability. Accordingly, we have applied this method to shape segmentation of normal, dilated, or fused lateral ventricles for quantitative analysis of ventriculomegaly (VM), which is a pivotal finding in the earliest stages of fetal brain development, and warrants further investigation. Utilizing these innovative techniques, we introduce novel volumetric and morphometric biomarkers of VM comparing these values to those that are generated by standard methods of VM analysis, i.e., by measuring the ventricular atrial diameter (AD) on manually selected sections of 2D ultrasound or 2D MRI. To this end, we studied 25 normal and abnormal fetuses in the gestation age (GA) range of 19 to 39 weeks (mean=28.26, stdev=6.56). This heterogenous dataset was essentially used to 1) validate our segmentation method for normal and abnormal ventricles; and 2) show that the proposed biomarkers may provide improved detection of VM as compared to the AD measurement. PMID:22500924

  3. Multi-atlas multi-shape segmentation of fetal brain MRI for volumetric and morphometric analysis of ventriculomegaly.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Ali; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Estroff, Judy A; Warfield, Simon K

    2012-04-15

    The recent development of motion robust super-resolution fetal brain MRI holds out the potential for dramatic new advances in volumetric and morphometric analysis. Volumetric analysis based on volumetric and morphometric biomarkers of the developing fetal brain must include segmentation. Automatic segmentation of fetal brain MRI is challenging, however, due to the highly variable size and shape of the developing brain; possible structural abnormalities; and the relatively poor resolution of fetal MRI scans. To overcome these limitations, we present a novel, constrained, multi-atlas, multi-shape automatic segmentation method that specifically addresses the challenge of segmenting multiple structures with similar intensity values in subjects with strong anatomic variability. Accordingly, we have applied this method to shape segmentation of normal, dilated, or fused lateral ventricles for quantitative analysis of ventriculomegaly (VM), which is a pivotal finding in the earliest stages of fetal brain development, and warrants further investigation. Utilizing these innovative techniques, we introduce novel volumetric and morphometric biomarkers of VM comparing these values to those that are generated by standard methods of VM analysis, i.e., by measuring the ventricular atrial diameter (AD) on manually selected sections of 2D ultrasound or 2D MRI. To this end, we studied 25 normal and abnormal fetuses in the gestation age (GA) range of 19 to 39 weeks (mean=28.26, stdev=6.56). This heterogeneous dataset was essentially used to 1) validate our segmentation method for normal and abnormal ventricles; and 2) show that the proposed biomarkers may provide improved detection of VM as compared to the AD measurement.

  4. Fetal MRI of the cardiovascular system: role of steady-state free precession sequences for the evaluation of normal and pathological appearances.

    PubMed

    Manganaro, L; Savelli, S; Di Maurizio, M; Francioso, A; Fierro, F; Tomei, A; Coratella, F; Ballesio, L; Ventriglia, F

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences to visualise the normal and pathological appearances of the cardiovascular system. This is a prospective observational study of 83 pregnant women who underwent fetal cardiac MRI: 43 patients (cases) had echocardiographic suspicion of congenital heart disease; 40 patients (controls) did not. Fetal cardiac MRI consisted of a static phase with multiplanar SSFP sequences and a dynamic phase with real-time SSFP sequences. Two radiologists evaluated the diagnostic quality of the SSFP images in both the controls and cases, the MRI morphological and functional features in the controls and the MRI signs of congenital heart disease in the cases. In both groups, SSFP sequences produced goodquality MR images and good visualisation of morphological features. Functional data appeared to be unavailable due to the current small temporal resolution and the technical impossibility of fetal cardiac triggering. MRI detected direct signs of congenital heart disease in 21 fetuses, indirect signs in six and both signs in 15. SSFP sequences are effective in demonstrating the morphological features of the cardiovascular system, whereas dynamic SSFP cine-MRI sequences may provide adjunctive albeit suboptimal functional information.

  5. Gaining Insight of Fetal Brain Development with Diffusion MRI and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Vasung, Lana

    2013-01-01

    Human brain is extraordinarily complex and yet its origin is a simple tubular structure. Its development during the fetal period is characterized by a series of accurately organized events which underlie the mechanisms of dramatic structural changes during fetal development. Revealing detailed anatomy at different stages of human fetal brain development provides insight on understanding not only this highly ordered process, but also the neurobiological foundations of cognitive brain disorders such as mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia, bipolar and language impairment. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and histology are complementary tools which are capable of delineating the fetal brain structures at both macroscopic and microscopic level. In this review, the structural development of the fetal brains has been characterized with DTI and histology. Major components of the fetal brain, including cortical plate, fetal white matter and cerebral wall layer between the ventricle and subplate, have been delineated with DTI and histology. Anisotropic metrics derived from DTI were used to quantify the microstructural changes during the dynamic process of human fetal cortical development and prenatal development of other animal models. Fetal white matter pathways have been traced with DTI-based tractography to reveal growth patterns of individual white matter tracts and corticocortical connectivity. These detailed anatomical accounts of the structural changes during fetal period may provide the clues of detecting developmental and cognitive brain disorders at their early stages. The anatomical information from DTI and histology may also provide reference standards for diagnostic radiology of premature newborns. PMID:23796901

  6. Gaining insight of fetal brain development with diffusion MRI and histology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Vasung, Lana

    2014-02-01

    Human brain is extraordinarily complex and yet its origin is a simple tubular structure. Its development during the fetal period is characterized by a series of accurately organized events which underlie the mechanisms of dramatic structural changes during fetal development. Revealing detailed anatomy at different stages of human fetal brain development provides insight on understanding not only this highly ordered process, but also the neurobiological foundations of cognitive brain disorders such as mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia, bipolar and language impairment. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and histology are complementary tools which are capable of delineating the fetal brain structures at both macroscopic and microscopic levels. In this review, the structural development of the fetal brains has been characterized with DTI and histology. Major components of the fetal brain, including cortical plate, fetal white matter and cerebral wall layer between the ventricle and subplate, have been delineated with DTI and histology. Anisotropic metrics derived from DTI were used to quantify the microstructural changes during the dynamic process of human fetal cortical development and prenatal development of other animal models. Fetal white matter pathways have been traced with DTI-based tractography to reveal growth patterns of individual white matter tracts and corticocortical connectivity. These detailed anatomical accounts of the structural changes during fetal period may provide the clues of detecting developmental and cognitive brain disorders at their early stages. The anatomical information from DTI and histology may also provide reference standards for diagnostic radiology of premature newborns.

  7. Fetal MRI as Complementary Study of Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation During Pregnancy: A Single Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Paanakker, Alberto; Gomez-Leal, Paloma; Navarro-Sanchez, Patricia; Bueno-Crespo, Andres; Martinez-Cendan, Juan Pedro; Remezal-Solano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Fetal lung masses are rare findings in prenatal ultrasound scanning in general population, of which congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation is the most commonly diagnosed type. This paper reports a single case of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation detected at our hospital and the subsequent clinical follow-up using ultrasound scanning and fetal magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27186452

  8. Fetal lung apparent diffusion coefficient measurement using diffusion-weighted MRI at 3 Tesla: Correlation with gestational age.

    PubMed

    Afacan, Onur; Gholipour, Ali; Mulkern, Robert V; Barnewolt, Carol E; Estroff, Judy A; Connolly, Susan A; Parad, Richard B; Bairdain, Sigrid; Warfield, Simon K

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to assess the fetal lung apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at 3 Tesla (T). Seventy-one pregnant women (32 second trimester, 39 third trimester) were scanned with a twice-refocused Echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging sequence with 6 different b-values in 3 orthogonal diffusion orientations at 3T. After each scan, a region-of-interest (ROI) mask was drawn to select a region in the fetal lung and an automated robust maximum likelihood estimation algorithm was used to compute the ADC parameter. The amount of motion in each scan was visually rated. When scans with unacceptable levels of motion were eliminated, the lung ADC values showed a strong association with gestational age (P < 0.01), increasing dramatically between 16 and 27 weeks and then achieving a plateau around 27 weeks. We show that to get reliable estimates of ADC values of fetal lungs, a multiple b-value acquisition, where motion is either corrected or considered, can be performed. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1650-1655. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Maternal smoking and fetal lung signals--an in utero MRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Maximilian; Marschalek, Julian; Springer, Stephanie; Klein, Katharina; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether fetal lung signals and fetal lung signal progression over gestation observed on magnetic resonance imaging are different in mothers who reported smoking during pregnancy compared with nonsmoking controls. Cross-sectional retrospective study of 100 consecutive singleton pregnancies that underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Fetal lung-liver signal intensity ratios of 18 fetuses of mothers who reported smoking during pregnancy were compared with 82 fetuses of nonsmoking controls. Average gestational age at magnetic resonance imaging was 26.4 ± 5.2 weeks (Range 18.4-38.2 weeks). Cases reported smoking between 2 and 15 cigarettes per day. The mean number of cigarettes per day for cases was 9.2 ± 3.4. Mean fetal lung-liver signal intensity ratios did not differ significantly between the two groups (p = 0.8). They showed a linear increase with gestational age (r(2) = 0.3). Multiple regression analysis of lung-liver signal intensity ratios using gestational age and smoking status as predictors revealed a significant influence of gestational age (p < 0.0001) but not maternal smoking status (p = 0.8) on fetal lung-liver signal intensity ratios. Fetuses of mothers who reported smoking during pregnancy show similar lung signals and lung signal progression over gestation on magnetic resonance imaging as nonsmoking controls. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Sparse Bayesian framework applied to 3D super-resolution reconstruction in fetal brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Laura C.; Velasco Toledo, Nelson; Romero Castro, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Magnetic Resonance (FMR) is an imaging technique that is becoming increasingly important as allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities, spatial resolution is limited by the short acquisition time and the unpredictable fetus movements, in consequence the resulting images are characterized by non-parallel projection planes composed by anisotropic voxels. The sparse Bayesian representation is a flexible strategy which is able to model complex relationships. The Super-resolution is approached as a regression problem, the main advantage is the capability to learn data relations from observations. Quantitative performance evaluation was carried out using synthetic images, the proposed method demonstrates a better reconstruction quality compared with standard interpolation approach. The presented method is a promising approach to improve the information quality related with the 3-D fetal brain structure. It is important because allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities.

  11. Correlation between morphological MRI findings and specific diagnostic categories in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Boronat, S; Sánchez-Montañez, A; Gómez-Barros, N; Jacas, C; Martínez-Ribot, L; Vázquez, E; Del Campo, M

    2017-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) include physical and neurodevelopmental abnormalities related to prenatal alcohol exposure. Some neuroimaging findings have been clearly related to FASD, including corpus callosum and cerebellar anomalies. However, detailed studies correlating with specific FASD categories, that is, the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), partial FAS (pFAS) and alcohol related neurodevelopmental disorders (ARND), are lacking. We prospectively performed clinical assessment and brain MR imaging to 72 patients with suspected FASD, and diagnosis was confirmed in 62. The most frequent findings were hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and/or of the cerebellar vermis. Additional findings were vascular anomalies, gliosis, prominent perivascular spaces, occipito-cervical junction and cervical vertebral anomalies, pituitary hypoplasia, arachnoid cysts, and cavum septum pellucidum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Accelerated MRI of the fetal heart using compressed sensing and metric optimized gating.

    PubMed

    Roy, Christopher W; Seed, Mike; Macgowan, Christopher K

    2017-06-01

    To develop and validate a method for accelerated time-resolved imaging of the fetal heart using a combination of compressed sensing (CS) and metric optimized gating (MOG). Joint optimization of CS and MOG reconstructions was used to suppress competing artifact from random undersampling and ungated cardiac motion. Retrospectively and prospectively undersampled adult and fetal data were used to validate the proposed reconstruction algorithm qualitatively based on visual assessment, and quantitatively based on reconstruction error, blur, and MOG timing error. Excellent agreement was observed between the fully sampled and retrospectively undersampled reconstructions, up to an undersampling factor of four. Visually, differences between ECG and MOG reconstructions of adult data were negligible. This was consistent with quantitative comparisons of reconstruction error (RMSEECG  = 0.07-0.13; RMSEMOG  = 0.08-0.13), and image blur (BECG  = 1.03-1.20; BMOG  = 1.03-1.20). The calculated MOG timing error (2-42 ms) was comparable to the acquired temporal resolution (∼60 ms). Quantitative evaluation of retrospectively undersampled (R = 2-8) fetal data (RMSEMOG  = 0.06-0.12; BMOG  = 1.04-1.27) was comparable to the adult volunteer results. CS-MOG for dynamic imaging of the fetal heart was developed and validated. Using CS-MOG, images were obtained up to four times faster than conventional acquisitions. Magn Reson Med 77:2125-2135, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Volumetric and surface-based 3D MRI analyses of fetal isolated mild ventriculomegaly: brain morphometry in ventriculomegaly.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Habas, Piotr A; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2013-05-01

    Diagnosis of fetal isolated mild ventriculomegaly (IMVM) is the most common brain abnormality on prenatal ultrasound. We have set to identify potential alterations in brain development specific to IMVM in tissue volume and cortical and ventricular local surface curvature derived from in utero magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multislice 2D T2-weighted MRI were acquired from 32 fetuses (16 IMVM, 16 controls) between 22 and 25.5 gestational weeks. The images were motion-corrected and reconstructed into 3D volumes for volumetric and curvature analyses. The brain images were automatically segmented into cortical plate, cerebral mantle, deep gray nuclei, and ventricles. Volumes were compared between IMVM and control subjects. Surfaces were extracted from the segmentations for local mean surface curvature measurement on the inner cortical plate and the ventricles. Linear models were estimated for age-related and ventricular volume-associated changes in local curvature in both the inner cortical plate and ventricles. While ventricular volume was enlarged in IMVM, all other tissue volumes were not different from the control group. Ventricles increased in curvature with age along the atrium and anterior body. Increasing ventricular volume was associated with reduced curvature over most of the ventricular surface. The cortical plate changed in curvature with age at multiple sites of primary sulcal formation. Reduced cortical folding was detected near the parieto-occipital sulcus in IMVM subjects. While tissue volume appears to be preserved in brains with IMVM, cortical folding may be affected in regions where ventricles are dilated.

  14. Feasibility and Success Rate of a Fetal MRI and MR Spectroscopy Research Protocol Performed at Term Using a 3.0-Tesla Scanner.

    PubMed

    Sanz Cortes, Magdalena; Bargallo, Nuria; Arranz, Angela; Simoes, Rui; Figueras, Francesc; Gratacos, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    To report the feasibility and main factors affecting the success of a fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) research protocol performed at term using a 3-tesla scanner. Pregnant patients at term underwent an MRI. Specific measures were taken to prevent maternal discomfort and distress, such as detailed counseling and maternal repositioning if needed. MRS data were acquired from the frontal lobe and basal ganglia, and processed applying quality control criteria. The mean gestational age at MRI was 37.4 ± 0.9 weeks. From a total of 245 patients that showed up for the MRI, 11 referred claustrophobia which prevented the test from starting, and 30 patients started the test but decided to discontinue due to discomfort. Thus, the examination was complete in 204 patients. MRS data could be obtained in 170 cases from the frontal lobe and 165 cases from the basal ganglia, of which 52.4 and 68.6%, respectively, complied with our defined quality criteria. The mean scanning time was 34:16 ± 9:30 min:s after excluding those cases presenting initial intolerance to the test. Minor abnormalities were described in 11 MRI reports. The fetal MRI/MRS protocol was feasible and generally well tolerated at term on a 3-tesla scanner, but a significant number of cases were lost to analysis. The rate of patients that eventually provided usable research information was 95.5% for anatomical examination and 52.4-68.6% for MRS. This information should be taken into account in the design of fetal brain MRI studies. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Comparing consistency of R2* and T2*-weighted BOLD analysis of resting state fetal fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Blazejewska, Anna I.; Gatenby, Christopher; Mckown, Susan; Caucutt, Jason; Dighe, Manjiri; Studholme, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Understanding when and how resting state brain functional activity begins in the human brain is an increasing area of interest in both basic neuroscience and in the clinical evaluation of the brain during pregnancy and after premature birth. Although fMRI studies have been carried out on pregnant women since the 1990's, reliable mapping of brain function in utero is an extremely challenging problem due to the unconstrained fetal head motion. Recent studies have employed scrubbing to exclude parts of the time series and whole subjects from studies in order to control the confounds of motion. Fundamentally, even after correction of the location of signals due to motion, signal intensity variations are a fundamental limitation, due to coil sensitivity and spin history effects. An alternative technique is to use a more parametric MRI signal derived from multiple echoes that provides a level of independence from basic MRI signal variation. Here we examine the use of R2* mapping combined with slice based multi echo geometric distortion correction for in-utero studies. The challenges for R2* mapping arise from the relatively low signal strength of in-utero data. In this paper we focus on comparing activation detection in-utero using T2W and R2* approaches. We make use a subset of studies with relatively limited motion to compare the activation patterns without the additional confound of significant motion. Results at different gestational ages indicate comparable agreement in many activation patterns when limited motion is present, and the detection of some additional networks in the R2* data, not seen in the T2W results.

  16. Fetal MRI detects early alterations of brain development in Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Schellen, Christoph; Ernst, Schwartz; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Mlczoch, Elisabeth; Weber, Michael; Brugger, Peter C; Ulm, Barbara; Langs, Georg; Salzer-Muhar, Ulrike; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Prenatal imaging has identified alterations of brain growth in fetuses with congenital heart disease. However, little is known about the timing of altered brain development and its occurrence in specific congenital heart disease subgroups. This magnetic resonance imaging study aimed to identify early (median, 25 gestational weeks [GW]) changes in fetal total brain (TBV), gray matter (GMV), and subcortical brain (SBV) volumes in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) cases in utero. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 Tesla) was performed in 24 fetuses who were diagnosed with TOF and 24 normal age-matched control fetuses (20-34 GW). TBV, GMV, SBV, intracranial cavity, cerebellar, ventricular, and external cerebrospinal fluid volumes were quantified by manual segmentation based on coronal T2-weighted sequences. Mixed model analyses of variance and t-tests were conducted to compare cases and control fetuses. TBV was significantly lower (P < .001) in early (<25 GW) and late TOF cases. Both GMV (P = .003) and SBV (P = .001) were affected. The GMV-to-SBV ratio declined in fetuses with TOF (P = .026). Compared with normal fetuses, ventricular volume was increased (P = .0048). External cerebrospinal fluid was enlarged in relation to head size (P < .001). Intracranial cavity volume (P = .314) and cerebellar volume (P = .074) were not significantly reduced in fetuses with TOF. TOF is associated with smaller volumes of gray and white matter and enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces. These changes are present at ≤25 GW and indicate altered fetal brain growth in this pathophysiologic entity during early stages of human brain development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolving indications for the EXIT procedure: the usefulness of combining ultrasound and fetal MRI.

    PubMed

    Mota, Raquel; Ramalho, Carla; Monteiro, Joaquim; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Rodrigues, Manuela; Guimarães, Hercília; Spratley, Jorge; Macedo, Filipe; Matias, Alexandra; Montenegro, Nuno

    2007-01-01

    The EXIT procedure (EX utero Intrapartum Treatment) encompasses a multidisciplinary approach to situations in which airway obstruction is anticipated. Uteroplacental circulation is maintained to avoid neonatal hypoxemia while intubation is attempted. Not only is it useful in congenital diaphragmatic hernia with intrauterine tracheal occlusion, but new indications have been proposed. We present two cases in which EXIT procedure was adopted (huge cervical mass with tracheal compression and a highly vascularized cephalocervical mass) for the same purpose on different grounds. Our two cases stress once more the importance of combining fetal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of cervical masses and its usefulness in programming the procedure with a multidisciplinary team.

  18. Mapping Primary Gyrogenesis During Fetal Development in Primate Brains: High-Resolution in Utero Structural MRI of Fetal Brain Development in Pregnant Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Castro, Carlos; Davis, Duff; Dudley, Donald; Brewer, Jordan; Zhang, Yi; Kroenke, Christopher D.; Purdy, David; Fox, Peter T.; Simerly, Calvin; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The global and regional changes in the fetal cerebral cortex in primates were mapped during primary gyrification (PG; weeks 17–25 of 26 weeks total gestation). Studying pregnant baboons using high-resolution MRI in utero, measurements included cerebral volume, cortical surface area, gyrification index and length and depth of 10 primary cortical sulci. Seven normally developing fetuses were imaged in two animals longitudinally and sequentially. We compared these results to those on PG that from the ferret studies and analyzed them in the context of our recent studies of phylogenetics of cerebral gyrification. We observed that in both primates and non-primates, the cerebrum undergoes a very rapid transformation into the gyrencephalic state, subsequently accompanied by an accelerated growth in brain volume and cortical surface area. However, PG trends in baboons exhibited some critical differences from those observed in ferrets. For example, in baboons, the growth along the long (length) axis of cortical sulci was unrelated to the growth along the short (depth) axis and far outpaced it. Additionally, the correlation between the rate of growth along the short sulcal axis and heritability of sulcal depth was negative and approached significance (r = −0.60; p < 0.10), while the same trend for long axis was positive and not significant (p = 0.3; p = 0.40). These findings, in an animal that shares a highly orchestrated pattern of PG with humans, suggest that ontogenic processes that influence changes in sulcal length and depth are diverse and possibly driven by different factors in primates than in non-primates. PMID:20631812

  19. MRI investigation of normal fetal lung maturation using signal intensities on different imaging sequences.

    PubMed

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Weber, Michael; Csapo, Bence; Mittermayer, Christoph; Hörmann, Marcus; Prayer, Daniela

    2007-03-01

    To purpose of this paper is to study the relation between normal lung maturation signal and changes in intensity ratios (SIR) and to determine which magnetic resonance imaging sequence provides the strongest correlation of normal lung SIs with gestational age. 126 normal singleton pregnancies (20-37 weeks) were examined with a 1.5 Tesla unit. Mean SIs for lungs, liver, and gastric fluid were assessed on six different sequences, and SIRs of lung/liver (LLSIR) and lung/gastric fluid (LGSIR) were correlated with gestational age for each sequence. To evaluate the feasibility of SIRs in the prediction of the state of the lung maturity, accuracy of the predicted SIRs (D*) was measured by calculating relative residuals (D*-D)/D for each sequence. LLSIRs showed significant changes in every sequence (p<0.05), while LGSIRs only on two sequences. Significant differences were shown for the mean of absolute residuals for both LLSIRs (p<0.001) and for LGSIRs (p=0.003). Relative residuals of LLSIRs were significantly smaller on T1-weighted sequence, whereas they were significantly higher for LGSIRs on FLAIR sequence. Fetal liver seems to be adequate reference for the investigation of lung maturation. T1-weighted sequence was the most accurate for the measurement of the lung SIs; thus, we propose to determine LLSIR on T1-weighted sequence when evaluating lung development.

  20. Longitudinal MRI reveals altered trajectory of brain development during childhood and adolescence in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Treit, Sarah; Lebel, Catherine; Baugh, Lauren; Rasmussen, Carmen; Andrew, Gail; Beaulieu, Christian

    2013-06-12

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of brain development in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) has revealed structural abnormalities, but studies have been limited by the use of cross-sectional designs. Longitudinal scans can provide key insights into trajectories of neurodevelopment within individuals with this common developmental disorder. Here we evaluate serial DTI and T1-weighted volumetric MRI in a human sample of 17 participants with FASD and 27 controls aged 5-15 years who underwent 2-3 scans each, ∼2-4 years apart (92 scans total). Increases of fractional anisotropy and decreases of mean diffusivity (MD) were observed between scans for both groups, in keeping with changes expected of typical development, but mixed-models analysis revealed significant age-by-group interactions for three major white matter tracts: superior longitudinal fasciculus and superior and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. These findings indicate altered developmental progression in these frontal-association tracts, with the FASD group notably showing greater reduction of MD between scans. ΔMD is shown to correlate with reading and receptive vocabulary in the FASD group, with steeper decreases of MD in the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus and superior longitudinal fasciculus between scans correlating with greater improvement in language scores. Volumetric analysis revealed reduced total brain, white, cortical gray, and deep gray matter volumes and fewer significant age-related volume increases in the FASD group, although age-by-group interactions were not significant. Longitudinal DTI indicates delayed white matter development during childhood and adolescence in FASD, which may underlie persistent or worsening behavioral and cognitive deficits during this critical period.

  1. Atlas-based Segmentation of the Germinal Matrix from in Utero Clinical MRI of the Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kio; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James

    2012-01-01

    Recently developed techniques for reconstruction of high-resolution 3D images from fetal MR scans allows us to study the morphometry of developing brain tissues in utero. However, existing adult brain analysis methods cannot be directly applied as the anatomy of the fetal brain is significantly different in terms of geometry and tissue morphology. We describe an approach to atlas-based segmentation of the fetal brain with particular focus on the delineation of the germinal matrix, a transient structure related to brain growth. We segment 3D images reconstructed from in utero clinical MR scans and measure volumes of different brain tissue classes for a group of fetal subjects at gestational age 20.5–22.5 weeks. We also include a partial validation of the approach using manual tracing of the germinal matrix at different gestational ages. PMID:18979766

  2. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Brochard, T.; Prezado, Y.; Bravin, A.; Berkvens, P.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.

    2010-07-23

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow ({approx}25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 {mu}m microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy

  3. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams of 50-600 keV, produced by 2nd and 3rd generation synchrotron sources, such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in the U.S., and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in France, respectively. High dose rates are necessary to deliver therapeutic doses in microscopic volumes, to avoid spreading of the microbeams by cardiosynchronous movement of the tissues. A small beam divergence and a filtered white beam spectrum in the energy range between 30 and 250 keV results in the advantage of steep dose gradients with a sharper penumbra than that produced in conventional radiotherapy. MRT research over the past 20 years has allowed a vast number of results from preclinical trials on different animal models, including mice, rats, piglets and rabbits. Microbeams in the range between 10 and 100 micron width show an unprecedented sparing of normal radiosensitive tissues as well as preferential damage to malignant tumor tissues. Typically, MRT uses arrays of narrow (˜25-100 micron-wide) microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns centre-to-centre, c-t-c) microplanar spaces. We note that thicker microbeams of 0.1-0.68 mm used by investigators at the NSLS are still called microbeams, although some invesigators in the community prefer to call them minibeams. This report, however, limits it discussion to 25-100 μm microbeams. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are surprisingly well tolerated by normal tissues. High resolution dosimetry has been developed over the last two decades, but typical dose ranges are adapted to dose delivery in conventional Radiation Therapy (RT). Spatial resolution in the sub-millimetric range has been achieved, which is currently required for quality assurance measurements in Gamma-knife RT. Most typical commercially available detectors are not suitable for MRT applications at a dose rate of 16000 Gy/s, micron

  4. Semi-automatic segmentation of the placenta into fetal and maternal compartments using intravoxel incoherent motion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wonsang; Andescavage, Nickie; Zun, Zungho; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2017-03-01

    Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging non-invasive technique that has been recently applied to quantify in vivo global placental perfusion. We propose a robust semi-automated method for segmenting the placenta into fetal and maternal compartments from IVIM data, using a multi-label image segmentation algorithm called `GrowCut'. Placental IVIM data were acquired on a 1.5T scanner from 16 healthy pregnant women between 21-37 gestational weeks. The voxel-wise perfusion fraction was then estimated after non-rigid image registration. The seed regions of the fetal and maternal compartments were determined using structural T2-weighted reference images, and improved progressively through an iterative process of the GrowCut algorithm to accurately encompass fetal and maternal compartments. We demonstrated that the placental perfusion fraction decreased in both fetal (-0.010/week) and maternal compartments (-0.013/week) while their relative difference (ffetal-fmaternal) gradually increased with advancing gestational age (+0.003/week, p=0.065). Our preliminary results show that the proposed method was effective in distinguishing placental compartments using IVIM.

  5. Fast fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Lall, Chandana; Aisen, Alex A; Rajesh, Arumugam; Cohen, Mervyn D

    2005-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a problem-solving tool when ultrasonic findings are equivocal. The role of fetal MRI has increased as obstetricians become aware of its potential and in utero therapy for anomalies becomes increasingly sophisticated. In this pictorial essay, we present a wide range of anomalies diagnosed or confirmed using MRI and discuss findings that help in the differential diagnosis.

  6. [Clinical value of prenatal MRI in the diagnosis of fetal simple expansion of lateral ventricle and follow-up after birth].

    PubMed

    Li, Z; He, P Y; Luo, Z Q; Pan, L M; Chen, Y N; Shen, G S; Fei, Z H; Li, M Y; Fang, X M; Qi, L H; Liu, M S

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To explore the value of prenatal MRI in the diagnosis of fetal simple expansion of lateral ventricle (ventriculomegaly) , and follow up the nervous system development status after birth. Methods: Simple expansion of the lateral ventricle fetus by prenatal MRI examination were collected in Huzhou Maternal and Child Care Hospital from May 2013 to June 2015, 126 cases of live births in expansion group, 50 normal cases were recruited in the same period as the control group. In expansion group, fetal subgroup analysis was done: (1) unilateral or bilateral lateral ventricle expasion: one group was 98 cases was lateral ventricle expansion (77.8%, 98/126), expansion of bilateral ventricle group was 28 cases (22.2%, 28/126). (2) Prenatal MRI in the diagnosis of the lateral ventricle of expansion: expansion of the lateral ventricle width was greater than 10.0 mm, if both sides were expanding, the expand width was the heavier one side, divided into 3 subgroups: ①Expansion in group A (lateral ventricle width 10.0-12.0 mm) were 88 cases (69.8%, 88/126). ②Expansion in group B (lateral ventricle width 12.1-15.0 mm) were 29 cases (23.0%, 29/126). ③Expansion of group C (lateral ventricle width> 15.0 mm) were 9 cases (7.12%, 9/126). All 176 cases were followed up after birth at the 3rd, 6th, 12th, 18th month (corrected age was used for premature babies), and Gesell developmental schedules (GDS) were used to evaluate the neurobehavioral development. Results: (1) The MRI results after birth: 21 cases were followed up by MRI after birth. In group A, 11 cases had MRI and 9 were normal (the ventricular width <10.0 mm after birth), the other 2 cases were stable (the ventricular width measured first time after birth was ≥10.0 mm, but the difference was within 2.0 mm from the MRI before birth). In group B, 4 cases had MRI, 1 was normal, 1 was stable, and 2 cases were getting better (the ventricular width measured first time after birth was ≥10.0 mm, but the width

  7. Intersection Based Motion Correction of Multi-Slice MRI for 3D in utero Fetal Brain Image Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, Anthony J.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years post-processing of fast multi-slice MR imaging to correct fetal motion has provided the first true 3D MR images of the developing human brain in utero. Early approaches have used reconstruction based algorithms, employing a two step iterative process, where slices from the acquired data are re-aligned to an approximate 3D reconstruction of the fetal brain, which is then refined further using the improved slice alignment. This two step slice-to-volume process, although powerful, is computationally expensive in needing a 3D reconstruction, and is limited in its ability to recover sub-voxel alignment. Here, we describe an alternative approach which we term slice intersection motion correction (SIMC), that seeks to directly co-align multiple slice stacks by considering the matching structure along all intersecting slice pairs in all orthogonally planned slices that are acquired in clinical imaging studies. A collective update scheme for all slices is then derived, to simultaneously drive slices into a consistent match along their lines of intersection. We then describe a 3D reconstruction algorithm that, using the final motion corrected slice locations, suppresses through-plane partial volume effects to provide a single high isotropic resolution 3D image. The method is tested on simulated data with known motions and is applied to retrospectively reconstruct 3D images from a range of clinically acquired imaging studies. The quantitative evaluation of the registration accuracy for the simulated data sets demonstrated a significant improvement over previous approaches. An initial application of the technique to studying clinical pathology is included, where the proposed method recovered up to 15 mm of translation and 30 degrees of rotation for individual slices, and produced full 3D reconstructions containing clinically useful additional information not visible in the original 2D slices. PMID:19744911

  8. Homography-Based Correction of Positional Errors in MRT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A.; Daiboo, S.; Udaya Shankar, N.

    2009-09-01

    The Mauritius Radio Telescope (MRT) images show systematics in the positional errors of sources when compared to source positions in the Molonglo Reference Catalogue (MRC). We have applied two-dimensional homography to correct positional errors in the image domain and avoid re-processing the visibility data. Positions of bright (above 15 σ) sources, common to MRT and MRC catalogues, are used to set up an over-determined system to solve for the 2-D homography matrix. After correction, the errors are found to be within 10% of the beamwidth for these bright sources and the systematics are eliminated from the images.

  9. [MRT of the liver in Wilson's disease].

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Steiner, S; Hammerstingl, R; Schwarz, S; Kraft, E; Weinzierl, M; Felix, R

    1994-01-01

    To show that Wilson's disease is one likely cause of multiple low-intensity nodules of the liver we obtained MR images in 16 patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed Wilson's disease. Corresponding to morphological changes MRI enabled the subdivision of the patients into two groups. Using a T2-weighted spin-echo sequence (TR/TE = 2000/45-90) liver parenchyma showed multiple tiny low-intensity-nodules surrounded by high-intensity septa in 10 out of 16 patients. 5 patients had also low-intensity nodules in T1-weighted images (TR/TE = 600/20). In patients of this group histopathology revealed liver cirrhosis (n = 7) and fibrosis (n = 2). Common feature of this patient group was marked inflammatory cell infiltration into fibrous septa, increase of copper concentration in liver parenchyma and distinct pathological changes of laboratory data. In the remaining 6 patients no pathological change of liver morphology was demonstrated by MRI corresponding to slight histopathological changes of parenchyma and normal laboratory data. As low-intensity nodules surrounded by high intensity septa can be demonstrated in patients with marked inflammatory infiltration of liver parenchyma MRI may help to define Wilson patients with poorer prognosis. In patients with low-intensity nodules of the liver and unknown cause of liver cirrhosis laboratory data and histopathology should be checked when searching for disorders of copper metabolism.

  10. Fetal MR imaging of Kniest dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Zeynep; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Laor, Tal; Tinkle, Bradley T

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of Kniest dysplasia, a rare form of the type II collagenopathies, with prenatal MRI. Sonography revealed only short limbs in the fetus. Fetal MRI findings included enlarged hyaline cartilaginous structures with abnormally high T2 signal intensity, delayed ossification of the pubic and ischial bones, and platyspondyly. By delineating the cartilaginous abnormalities, fetal MRI can contribute to the prenatal diagnosis of chondrodysplasias.

  11. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Value Changes and Clinical Correlation in 90 Cases of Cytomegalovirus-Infected Fetuses with Unremarkable Fetal MRI Results.

    PubMed

    Kotovich, D; Guedalia, J S B; Hoffmann, C; Sze, G; Eisenkraft, A; Yaniv, G

    2017-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the leading intrauterine infection. Fetal MR imaging is an accepted tool for fetal brain evaluation, yet it still lacks the ability to accurately predict the extent of the neurodevelopmental impairment, especially in fetal MR imaging scans with unremarkable findings. Our hypothesis was that intrauterine cytomegalovirus infection causes diffusional changes in fetal brains and that those changes may correlate with the severity of neurodevelopmental deficiencies. A retrospective analysis was performed on 90 fetal MR imaging scans of cytomegalovirus-infected fetuses with unremarkable results and compared with a matched gestational age control group of 68 fetal head MR imaging scans. ADC values were measured and averaged in the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal lobes; basal ganglia; thalamus; and pons. For neurocognitive assessment, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition (VABS-II) was used on 58 children in the cytomegalovirus-infected group. ADC values were reduced for the cytomegalovirus-infected fetuses in most brain areas studied. The VABS-II showed no trend for the major domains or the composite score of the VABS-II for the cytomegalovirus-infected children compared with the healthy population distribution. Some subdomains showed an association between ADC values and VABS-II scores. Cytomegalovirus infection causes diffuse reduction in ADC values in the fetal brain even in unremarkable fetal MR imaging scans. Cytomegalovirus-infected children with unremarkable fetal MR imaging scans do not deviate from the healthy population in the VABS-II neurocognitive assessment. ADC values were not correlated with VABS-II scores. However, the lack of clinical findings, as seen in most cytomegalovirus-infected fetuses, does not eliminate the possibility of future neurodevelopmental pathology. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. Cerebral Lesions at Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neurologic Outcome After Single Fetal Death in Monochorionic Twins.

    PubMed

    Jatzko, Birgit; Rittenschober-Böhm, Judith; Mailath-Pokorny, Mariella; Worda, Christof; Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Worda, Katharina

    2015-10-01

    Single fetal death (sFD) in monochorionic twin pregnancies is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in the survivor. The aim of our study was to evaluate the rate of cerebral lesions detected at fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and to correlate the results with the neurologic outcome of the survivors of monochorionic twin pregnancies after sFD. Between 2005 and 2012, 11 monochorionic twin pregnancies with sFD and subsequent fetal MRI of the survivor were included. All neonates underwent neurologic assessment after birth and 56% of surviving infants underwent long-term neurologic assessment. MRI findings and neurologic outcome of the survivors were evaluated. Gestational age at sFD was 20.9 (±2.9) weeks; 55% (6/11) of survivors of monochorionic twin pregnancies after sFD showed cerebral lesions at fetal MRI; 72% (8/11) of all survivors had normal neonatal neurologic outcome: all survivors with normal fetal MRI and 50% of survivors with cerebral lesions at fetal MRI. Long-term neurologic assessment was normal in all tested patients with normal fetal MRI and in one of three tested patients with cerebral lesions at fetal MRI. Survivors of monochorionic twin pregnancies after sFD show a high rate of cerebral lesions at fetal MRI. The importance of cerebral lesions at fetal MRI in survivors after sFD in monochorionic twin pregnancies is uncertain. All tested survivors with normal fetal MRI showed normal neurologic outcome but only one of three survivors with cerebral lesions at fetal MRI showed normal long-term neurologic outcome.

  13. Fetal Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John T.; Sladek, John R.

    1989-11-01

    This article reviews some of the significant contributions of fetal research and fetal tissue research over the past 20 years. The benefits of fetal research include the development of vaccines, advances in prenatal diagnosis, detection of malformations, assessment of safe and effective medications, and the development of in utero surgical therapies. Fetal tissue research benefits vaccine development, assessment of risk factors and toxicity levels in drug production, development of cell lines, and provides a source of fetal cells for ongoing transplantation trials. Together, fetal research and fetal tissue research offer tremendous potential for the treatment of the fetus, neonate, and adult.

  14. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    PubMed

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fetal akinesia.

    PubMed

    Hammond, E; Donnenfeld, A E

    1995-03-01

    Normal fetal growth and development during pregnancy is highly dependent upon adequate fetal movement. Limitation of movement, regardless of the underlying cause, can result in a particular pattern of abnormal fetal morphogenesis. This phenotype is termed the fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS). The etiology of fetal akinesia may be generally classified into one of five categories: neuropathy, myopathy, restrictive dermopathy, teratogen exposure, or restricted movement due to intrauterine constraint. In this article, the differential diagnosis of fetal akinesia is systematically reviewed and information regarding prenatal diagnosis, prognosis, perinatal management, and recurrence risks are discussed.

  16. TU-F-BRF-09: Feasibility Study of Spatial and Temporal Fractionation Using a Table-Top Image-Guided MRT System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L; Inscoe, C; Yuan, H; Burk, L; Ger, R; Chtcheprov, P; Lu, J; Chang, S; Zhou, O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy is a promising experimental radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron studies have shown that MRT can preferentially ablate tumors while mostly preserving the surrounding normal tissues. Our purpose is to develop a compact microbeam irradiator that can be accessible for laboratory research on MRT's therapeutic mechanism, with the ultimate goal of translating this technique for clinical applications. Utilizing a carbon nanotube field emission X-ray source array, our lab has developed a first of its kind table-top microbeam irradiator. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of increasing the total dose to the tumor region using spatial and temporal fractionation. Methods: MRI and CT scans were acquired and registered to locate both the target region and the landmark in the treatment coordinate space. A crossbeam treatment configuration was planned to achieve the desired dosage and tumor coverage. One array of 300 μm-thick microbeams was delivered to the target on the first day. Another array, perpendicular to the first one, was delivered the next day targeting the same region. The feasibility of this image-guided MRT procedure was evaluated using a phantom. Gafchromic EBT2 film was employed to characterize the targeting accuracy and the delivered tumor dose. Results: The preliminary phantom study showed that a cross-pattern of microbeam arrays was successfully delivered with sub-millimeter targeting accuracy. The delivered dose in the target region was doubled. The fraction of tumor volume that received the peak dose was increased. Conclusion: Temporal fractionation of crosspatterned microbeams can be delivered to the same target region. The feasibility of this procedure was investigated with a phantom study. Once implemented, this procedure has the potential of increasing the tumor control effect of MRT and of achieving better normal tissue recovery.

  17. Fetal endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S. V. S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition. PMID:23961471

  18. Fetal endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S V S; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2013-07-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition.

  19. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Köşüş, Aydın; Köşüş, Nermin; Usluoğulları, Betül; Duran, Müzeyyen; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk; Tekşam, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary imaging method for prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities since its discovery. Although it is the primary method of fetal imaging, it cannot provide sufficient information about the fetus in some conditions such as maternal obesity, oligohydramnios and engagement of the fetal head. At this stage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitates examination by providing more specific information. The need and importance of fetal MRI applications further increased by the intrauterine surgery which is currently gaining popularity. Some advantages of fetal MRI over USG are the good texture of contrast, a greater study area and visualization of the lesion and neighbourhood relations, independence of the operators. Also it is not affected by maternal obesity and severe oligohydramnios. However, MRI is inadequate in detecting fetal limb and cardiac abnormalities when compared to USG. MRI is not used routinely in pregnancy. It is used in situations where nonionizing imaging methods are inadequate or ionizing radiation is required in pregnant women. It is not recommended during the first trimester. Contrast agent (Godalinium) is not used during pregnancy. It is believed that MRI is not harmful to the fetus, although the biological risk of MRI application is not known. MRI technique is superior to USG in the detection of corpus callosum dysgenesis, third-trimester evaluation of posterior fossa malformations, bilateral renal agenesis, diaphragmatic hernia and assessment of lung maturation. Especially, it is the method of choice for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. Fetal MRI has a complementary role with USG. It provides important information for prenatal diagnosis, increases diagnostic accuracy, and in turn affects the prenatal treatment, prenatal interventions and birth plan.

  20. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takayoshi

    2006-05-01

    The electrical activities of the heart causes weak changes of the magnetic field, which can be recorded as magnetocardiogram (MCG). Fetal cardiac magnetic activity is measured in the order of less than 10 pT. An advance of the novel technology of a superconducting quantum interference device enabled the first recording of fetal MCG (FMCG) in 1974. In Japan, FMCG instrument (MC6400, Hitachi High-Technologies Ltd) was approved as a diagnostic tool by Japanese Government in 2003 owing to the cooperative studies of Tsukuba University, National Cardiovascular Center and Hitachi Ltd. FMCG offers similar information to a fetal electrocardiogram, which is difficult to be recorded because the fetal skin is covered with fatty caseous vernix of weak electrical conductivity in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic flux can pass through the fat layer, and thus FMCG can measure the electrical activity of the fetal heart. Besides FMCG has far higher resolutions in time domain than echocardiography does. The amplitude of FMCG signals depends on the size of fetal heart and the distance between the sensors and the fetal heart. The amplitudes of the QRS, P and T waves increases with gestational age. Since the amplitudes of P and T waves are often weak, averaging of FMCG signals is needed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Current-arrow map is a useful mapping technique even in FMCG. FMCG has been applied in the prenatal diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias such as bradyarrhythmia (atrioventricular block, long QT syndrome, etc), tachyarrhythmia (supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation and WPW syndrome, etc) and extrasystoles. Fetal cardiomegaly with myocardial abnormalities can be also diagnosed by FMCG. Applications of FMCG for fetal heart rate monitoring using beat-to-beat variability have been also studied to obtain better information on fetal well-beings.

  1. Identification and mechanism of action of the acylguanidine MRT-83, a novel potent Smoothened antagonist.

    PubMed

    Roudaut, Hermine; Traiffort, Elisabeth; Gorojankina, Tatiana; Vincent, Ludwig; Faure, Helene; Schoenfelder, Angele; Mann, Andre; Manetti, Fabrizio; Solinas, Antonio; Taddei, Maurizio; Ruat, Martial

    2011-03-01

    There is a clear need to develop novel pharmacological tools to improve our understanding of Smoothened (Smo) function in normal and pathological states. Here, we report the discovery, the mechanism of action, and the in vivo activity of N-(2-methyl-5-(3-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)guanidino)phenyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (MRT-83), a novel potent antagonist of Smo that belongs to the acylguanidine family of molecules. MRT-83 fits to a proposed pharmacophoric model for Smo antagonists with three hydrogen bond acceptor groups and three hydrophobic regions. MRT-83 blocks Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in various assays with an IC50 in the nanomolar range, showing greater potency than the reference Smo antagonist cyclopamine. MRT-83 inhibits Bodipy-cyclopamine binding to human and mouse Smo but does not modify Wnt signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 transiently transfected with a Tcf/Lef-dependent Firefly luciferase reporter together with a Renilla reniformis luciferase control reporter. MRT-83 abrogates the agonist-induced trafficking of endogenous mouse or human Smo to the primary cilium of C3H10T1/2 or NT2 cells that derive from a pluripotent testicular carcinoma. Stereotaxic injection into the lateral ventricle of adult mice of MRT-83 but not of a structurally related compound inactive at Smo abolished up-regulation of Patched transcription induced by Sonic Hedgehog in the neighboring subventricular zone. These data demonstrate that MRT-83 efficiently antagonizes Hh signaling in vivo. All together, these molecular, functional and biochemical studies provide evidence that MRT-83 interacts with Smo. Thus, this novel Smo antagonist will be useful for manipulating Hh signaling and may help develop new therapies against Hh-pathway related diseases.

  2. Usefulness of additional fetal magnetic resonance imaging in the prenatal diagnosis of congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    We, Ji Sun; Young, Lee; Park, In Yang; Shin, Jong Chul; Im, Soo Ah

    2012-12-01

    Our aim was to compare the value of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with detailed ultrasound in the prenatal diagnosis of congenital abnormalities. This retrospective study reviewed the medical records of pregnant women and their neonates who, after ultrasound, were suspected to have congenital abnormalities. They then underwent a detailed ultrasound examination and a fetal MRI in our institutions. Fetal MRI was performed in 81 cases. Each prenatal presumptive diagnosis, based on detailed ultrasound examination and fetal MRI, was compared with the postnatal confirmed diagnosis. In 58 cases, the data collected were confirmed by the postnatal diagnosis. Supplemental information from fetal MRI was useful in 17 of the 22 cases involving the central nervous system (CNS), two of two cases involving the thorax, nine of nine cases involving the genitourinary system, two of eight cases involving the gastrointestinal system, and ten of ten cases involving complex malformations. Fetal MRI did not provide significantly useful information or facilitate a more accurate diagnosis except for CNS abnormalities. Fetal MRI was not superior to an ultrasound examination in the prenatal detection of congenital abnormalities. A detailed ultrasound examination performed by experienced obstetricians had satisfactory accuracy in the diagnosis of fetal abnormalities compared with fetal MRI. Fetal MRI might be useful in appropriate cases in Korea. Greater effort is required to increase the ultrasound knowledge and skill of competent obstetricians.

  3. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  4. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  5. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine J

    2011-02-01

    Fetal developmental anomalies consist of central nervous system malformations, brain injury, and tumors. Overlap is often seen especially between malformation and injury because malformation may be genetically determined or related to external causative agent, whereas brain injury may be, on one hand, caused by malformation as with intracranial vascular malformation and, on another, can cause brain malformation when cerebral insult occurs during organogenesis and histogenesis. The goal of this review was not to describe by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) all fetal developmental anomalies encountered in utero; it is most likely to focus on fetal brain anomalies that either are most commonly seen in fetal tertiary care facility or are extremely challenging for MRI. Consequently, the potential of advanced MR techniques such as proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging is also described especially when a challenge is highlighted. This review is therefore organized in subchapters as follows. The first section gives the place of MRI in prenatal development and cites the standard protocol and the advanced techniques. The rules of fetal brain MRI, the challenge and pitfalls, and the selection of MRI cases follow as 3 subchapters. Also, abnormalities are described as 3 separate subchapters entitled ventriculomegalies (hydrocephalus), malformations, and brain injury.

  7. Frequencies of Six (Five Novel) STR Markers Linked to TUSC3 (MRT7) or NSUN2 (MRT5) Genes Used for Homozygosity Mapping of Recessive Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Ghadami, Shirin; Mohammadi, Hossein Malek; Malbin, Jamileh; Masoodifard, Mahboobeh; Sarhaddi, Amene Bandehi; Tavakkoly-Bazzaz, Javad; Zeinali, Sirous

    2015-01-01

    Non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability (NS-ARID) is an extremely heterogeneous genetic disorder. Therefore, to investigate these genes, more research is required. One approach to investigate the NS-ARID loci is homozygosity mapping which requires appropriate STR markers within or flanking the gene/s of interest. In this research, we aimed to find novel STRs for two common NS-ARID genes (TUSC3 and NSUN2) and, in addition, to identify allele frequencies of those STR markers. The study group included 119 unrelated healthy individuals. STR markers were investigated using the UCSC genome browser web site and SERV software. Genotyping was determined by multiplex PCR. Data were evaluated using Gene Mapper software. Allele frequencies and observed heterozygosity rates were calculated using PowerStatV12. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and expected heterozygosity were assessed using the DNAView software. In total, 56 alleles were detected. According to our research, D8TUSC3SU8.3 and D5NSUN2SU0.5 were the most informative STR markers in MRT7 and MRT5 loci, respectively and showed a high percentage of heterozygosity in Iranian population. The observed range of allele frequencies was from 3.4% to 32.4% and 0.8% to 18.9% for MRT5 and MRT7 loci, respectively. Further, we have evaluated other statistical surveys of these STR markers and discovered that all of the six listed STRs were informative and five meet the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the tester group. Finding novel STRs, with high allele heterozygosity, is one of the most significant current finding in the present study for the two common NSARID genes. The recognized heterozygosity of these markers make MRT flanking STR markers very efficient to be used in diagnostic medical genetics labs or homozygosity mapping on NS-ARID.

  8. Fetal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... needle placement during certain prenatal tests, such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Determine fetal position before ... home. Accessed Aug. 11, 2015. Ghidini A. Diagnostic amniocentesis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 11, ...

  9. Fetal echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Fetal echocardiography is a test that uses sound waves ( ultrasound ) to evaluate the baby's heart for ... moved over the area. The probe sends out sound waves, which bounce off the baby's heart and ...

  10. Fetal stroke.

    PubMed

    Ozduman, Koray; Pober, Barbara R; Barnes, Patrick; Copel, Joshua A; Ogle, Eileen A; Duncan, Charles C; Ment, Laura R

    2004-03-01

    Fetal stroke, or that which occurs between 14 weeks of gestation and the onset of labor resulting in delivery, has been associated with postnatal epilepsy, mental retardation, and cerebral palsy. The entity is caused by antenatal ischemic, thrombotic, or hemorrhagic injury. We present seven new cases of fetal stroke diagnosed in utero and review the 47 cases reported in the literature. Although risk factors could not be assigned to 50% of the fetuses with stroke, the most common maternal conditions associated with fetal stroke were alloimmune thrombocytopenia and trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging was optimal for identifying fetal stroke, and prenatal imaging revealed hemorrhagic lesions in over 90% of studies; porencephalies were identified in just 13%. Seventy-eight percent of cases with reported outcome resulted in either death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcome at ages 3 months to 6 years. Fetal stroke appears to have different risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes than other perinatal or childhood stroke syndromes. A better understanding of those risk factors predisposing a fetus to cerebral infarction may provide a basis for future therapeutic intervention trials. Ozduman K, Pober BR, Barnes P, Copel JA, Ogle EA, Duncan CC, Ment LR. Fetal stroke.

  11. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  12. Alignment and position visualization methods for the biomedical imaging and therapy (BMIT) MRT lift

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Michael Miller, Denise; Kerr, Graham; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Dolton, Wade

    2016-07-27

    The Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) Lift is an eight stage positioning and scanning system at the Canadian Light Source’s BMIT Facility. Alignment of the sample with the beam using the MRT Lift is a time consuming and challenging task. The BMIT Group has developed a Python-based MRT Lift positioning and control program that uses a combination of computational and iterative methods to independently adjust the sample’s X, Y, Z, pitch and roll positions. The program offers “1-Click” alignment of the sample to the beam. Use of a wireframe visualization technique enables even minute movements to be illustrated. Proposed movements and the resulting MRT Lift position can be manually verified before being applied. Optional integration with the SolidWorks modelling platform allows high quality renderings of the MRT Lift in its current or proposed position to be displayed in real time. Human factors principles are incorporated into the program with the objective of delivering easy to use controls for this complex device.

  13. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P

    1997-09-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is a new, alternative method for prenatal surveillance. The fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) registers the magnetic field produced by conduction currents in the fetal heart. Compared to the fetal electrocardiogram, the propagation of magnetic fields is relatively undisturbed by surrounding tissue. The FMCG thus has the advantage of a higher signal-to-noise ratio and can be acquired earlier pregnancy. Also, the high temporal resolution of the signal permits a significantly more precise determination of fetal heart rate parameters than fetal ultrasound. FMCG registration using a biomagnetometer is noninvasive and can be performed as of the second trimeter. It can be used to examine signal morphology, cardiac time intervals, heart rate variability as well as cardiac magnetic fields. To date, arrhythmic activity has been observed in the form of supraventricular and ventricular ectopies as well as atrial flutter, atrio-ventricular block, atrial tachycardia and Torsades de Pointes tachycardia. We also report here on the presence of short episodes of bradycardia in the second trimester of normal pregnancy. Measurement of the magnetic field strength at various locations above the abdomen has allowed the reconstruction of the fetal cardiac magnetic field and the determination of its relation to the position of the fetus. Signal averaging has permitted the precise examination of signal amplitude and cardiac time intervals and has shown that they increase in the course of pregnancy. Heart rate variability could be quantified in the time and frequency domain as well as using parameters of nonlinear dynamics. The results demonstrated an increase of variability and complexity over gestational age. Furthermore spectral analysis of fetal heart arte data could be associated with sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as, with respiration. Although the studies presenting these results have involved only limited numbers of observations, they

  14. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Morris, Rachel K; Kilby, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction affects 2.2 per 10,000 births. It is a consequence of a range of pathological processes, most commonly posterior urethral valves (64%) or urethral atresia (39%). It is a condition of high mortality and morbidity associated with progressive renal dysfunction and oligohydramnios, and hence fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Accurate detection is possible via ultrasound, but the underlying pathology is often unknown. In future, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be increasingly used alongside ultrasound in the diagnosis and assessment of fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Fetal urine analysis may provide improvements in prenatal determination of renal prognosis, but the optimum criteria to be used remain unclear. It is now possible to decompress the obstruction in utero via percutaneous vesico-amniotic shunting or cystoscopic techniques. In appropriately selected fetuses intervention may improve perinatal survival, but long-term renal morbidity amongst survivors remains problematic.

  15. Segmentierung des Femurs aus MRT-Daten mit Shape-Based Level-Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekomien, Claudia; Busch, Martin; Teske, Wolfram; Winter, Susanne

    Inhalt dieser Arbeit ist die Segmentierung des Femurs aus MRT-Datensätzen mit einem Shape-based Level-Set-Ansatz. Der Algorithmus besteht aus zwei Phasen, der Modellerstellung und der Segmentierungsphase. In der Segmentierungsphase wurde ein kantenbasiertes und ein auf Intensitäten basierendes Optimierungskriterium mit einander kombiniert. Für eine lokale Verbesserung des Ergebnisses wurde zusätzlich ein Laplacian Level-Set-Verfahren angewendet. Der Femur konnte mit diesem Ansatz in drei verschiedenen MRT-Sequenzen und einem Fusionsdatensatz gut segmentiert werden.

  16. Fetal Macrosomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... previously been diagnosed with diabetes, after childbirth your health care provider will test you for the condition. During future pregnancies, you'll be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of gestational diabetes — a type ... health care provider suspects fetal macrosomia during your pregnancy, you ...

  17. MRI Based Diagnostics for Temperature Measurements in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Lauren Sascha; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the thermal diffusion in the complex turbulent flows related to cooling high temperature gas turbine blades is critical to optimize the performance and predict the lifetime of the blades. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques for temperature measurement in simple but related flows are being developed in an effort to obtain full field thermal measurements to better understand diffusion processes and support the development of more accurate computational models in these flows. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) utilizes the temperature dependence of the hydrogen proton resonant frequency (PRF) in water. MRT is now routinely used to measure tissue temperatures during medical procedures, and a few previous studies have made velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent pipe flows. In this study, MRT is applied to the flow of a heated single hole film cooling jet (Reynolds number 3000) inclined at 30 degrees injected into a cold developing turbulent channel flow (Reynolds number 25,000 based on bulk velocity and channel height.) The jet fluid temperature is 30 degrees Celsius above the temperature in the channel. The temperature measurements compare well to previously published results for measured passive scalar concentration in the same flow although the temperature measurements show higher uncertainties of 5--10 % of the temperature difference. Techniques for reducing this uncertainty will be presented as well as procedures for applying MRT to quantify the turbulent heat transfer coefficient in turbulent internal flows.

  18. Mrt, a gene unique to fungi, encodes an oligosaccharide transporter and facilitates rhizosphere competency in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weiguo; St Leger, Raymond J

    2010-11-01

    The symbiotic associations between rhizospheric fungi and plants have enormous environmental impact. Fungi are crucial to plant health as antagonists of pathogens and herbivores and facilitate the uptake of soil nutrients. However, little is known about the plant products obtained by fungi in exchange or how they are transported through the symbiotic interface. Here, we demonstrate that sucrose and raffinose family oligosaccharides in root exudates are important for rhizosphere competence in the insect pathogen Metarhizium robertsii (formerly known as Metarhizium anisopliae). We identified mutants in the Metarhizium raffinose transporter (Mrt) gene of M. robertsii that grew poorly in root exudate and were greatly reduced in rhizosphere competence on grass roots. Studies on sugar uptake, including competition assays, revealed that MRT was a sucrose and galactoside transporter. Disrupting MRT resulted in greatly reduced or no growth on sucrose and galactosides but did not affect growth on monosaccharides or oligosaccharides composed entirely of glucose subunits. Consistent with this, expression of Mrt is exclusively up-regulated by galactosides and sucrose. Expressing a green fluorescent protein gene under the control of the Mrt promoter confirmed that MRT was expressed by germlings in the vicinity of grass roots but not in surrounding bulk soil. Disrupting Mrt did not reduce virulence to insects, demonstrating that Mrt is exclusively involved in M. robertsii's interactions with plants. To our knowledge, MRT is the first oligosaccharide transporter identified and characterized in a fungus and is unique to filamentous fungi, but homologous genes in Magnaporthe, Ustilago, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Epichloe, and Penicillium species indicate that oligosaccharide transport is of widespread significance.

  19. Fetal electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Heriberto; Andrade, Armando; Puente, Ernestina; Lizana, Pablo R.; Mendoza, Diego

    2002-11-01

    The high intra-uterine death rate is due to failure in appropriately diagnosing some problems in the cardiobreathing system of the fetus during pregnancy. The electrocardiograph is one apparatus which might detect problems at an early stage. With electrodes located near the womb and uterus, in a way similar to the normal technique, the detection of so-called biopotential differences, caused by concentrations of ions, can be achieved. The fetal electrocardiograph is based on an ultrasound technique aimed at detecting intrauterine problems in pregnant women, because it is a noninvasive technique due to the very low level of ultrasound power used. With this system, the following tests can be done: Heart movements from the ninth week onwards; Rapid and safe diagnosis of intrauterine fetal death; Location and size of the placenta. The construction of the fetal electrocardiograph requires instrument level components directly mounted on the printed circuit board, in order to avoid stray capacitance in the cabling which prevents the detection of the E.C.G. activity. The low cost of the system makes it affordable to low budget institutions; in contrast, available commercial systems are priced in U.S. Dollars. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  20. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  1. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  2. MRI of the placenta - a short review.

    PubMed

    Dekan, Sabine; Linduska, Nina; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-05-01

    While ultrasound is still the gold standard method of placental investigation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has certain benefits. In advanced gestational age, obese women, and posterior placental location, MRI is advantageous due to the larger field of view and its multiplanar capabilities. Some pathologies are seen more clearly in MRI, such as infarctions and placental invasive disorders. The future development is towards functional placental MRI. Placental MRI has become an important complementary method for evaluation of placental anatomy and pathologies contributing to fetal problems such as intrauterine growth restriction.

  3. The current state and future of fetal imaging.

    PubMed

    Chung, Romy; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may add important diagnostic information to prenatal sonography and has the power to confirm or change decisions at critical points in clinical care. Recent studies have shown MRI to be a critical clinical adjunct in the evaluation of the developing central nervous system (CNS), especially at early gestational ages, and MRI has been used in three significant ways: (1) for the quantification of brain growth and structural abnormalities using biometry, (2) for the qualitative evaluation of CNS microstructure, and (3) for the qualitative assessment of dynamic fetal movements in utero.

  4. MRI Helps Assess Fetal Brain Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about their pregnancy," said lead author Paul Griffiths. He's a professor of radiology at the University ... the fetus may have a suspected brain abnormality," Griffiths said in a journal news release. In this ...

  5. Generierung korrespondierender Schichtbilder zur verbesserten lokalen Analyse des linken Ventrikels in 4D-MRT-Bildsequenzen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Säring, D.; Müllerleile, K.; Groth, M.; Handels, H.

    Die genaue Erfassung lokaler Veränderungen des linken Ventrikels insbesondere bei der Verlaufskontrolle nach einem Infarkt erfordert die Extraktion lokaler Form- und Funktionsparameter. Die für den Inter- und Intrapatientenvergleich notwendige räumliche Korrespondenz der MRT-Schichtbilder ist durch die manuelle Planung der Schichtpositionen beim Aufnahmeverfahren i.A. nicht gewährleistet. In dieser Arbeit wird daher ein Verfahren vorgestellt, das unter Berücksichtigung der anatomischen Grenzen des linken Ventrikels räumlich korrespondierende Positionen bestimmt, zu denen anschließend unter Verwendung der originären Daten und der strukturerhaltenden Interpolation neue Schichtbilder generiert werden. Dadurch wird eine bessere Übereinstimmung der räumlichen Position der zu vergleichenden Schichten erzielt. Das Verfahren wurde an zu Evaluationszwecken generierten Probandendatensätzen getestet. Dabei konnte gezeigt werden, dass die Generierung korrespondierender Kurzachsen-MRT-Schichtbilder zu einer verbesserten Extraktion lokaler Parameter führt.

  6. Fetal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rosa, F W; Turshen, M

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that "small-for-dates" infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960.Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy.

  7. Fetal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Franz W.; Turshen, Meredeth

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that ”small-for-dates” infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960. Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy. PMID:5314013

  8. Fetal yawning.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral patterns have been considered as indicators of nervous system development. Moreover, the capacity of 4-dimensional sonography to evaluate complex facial expressions allows recognition of common behaviors with which one can appreciate the prenatal functional development of the central nervous system. Using yawning as an example, we review this interpretation on the basis of knowledge derived from phylogeny and ontogeny. As a flip-flop switch, the reciprocal interactions between sleep- and wake-promoting brain regions allow the emergence of distinct states of arousal. By its ontogenic links with REM sleep, yawning appears to be a behavior which causes arousal reinforcement through the powerful stretching and the neuromuscular connections induced. Yawning indicates a harmonious progress in the development of both the brainstem and the peripheral neuromuscular function, testifying to the induction of an ultradian rhythm of vigilance. The lack of fetal yawn, frequently associated with lack of swallowing (associated or not with retrognathia), may be a key to predicting brainstem dysfunction after birth. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The GEANT4 toolkit for microdosimetry calculations: application to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT).

    PubMed

    Spiga, J; Siegbahn, E A; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Randaccio, P; Bravin, A

    2007-11-01

    Theoretical dose distributions for microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) are computed in this paper using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulation toolkit. MRT is an innovative experimental radiotherapy technique carried out using an array of parallel microbeams of synchrotron-wiggler-generated x rays. Although the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of microbeams are still largely unknown, the effectiveness of MRT can be traced back to the natural ability of normal tissues to rapidly repair small damages to the vasculature, and on the lack of a similar healing process in tumoral tissues. Contrary to conventional therapy, in which each beam is at least several millimeters wide, the narrowness of the microbeams allows a rapid regeneration of the blood vessels along the beams' trajectories. For this reason the calculation of the "valley" dose is of crucial importance and the correct use of MC codes for such purposes must be understood. GEANT4 offers, in addition to the standard libraries, a specialized package specifically designed to deal with electromagnetic interactions of particles with matter for energies down to 250 eV. This package implements two different approaches for electron and photon transport, one based on evaluated data libraries, the other adopting analytical models. These features are exploited to cross-check theoretical computations for MRT. The lateral and depth dose profiles are studied for the irradiation of a 20 cm diameter, 20 cm long cylindrical phantom, with cylindrical sources of different size and energy. Microbeam arrays are simulated with the aid of superposition algorithms, and the ratios of peak-to-valley doses are computed for typical cases used in preclinical assays. Dose profiles obtained using the GEANT4 evaluated data libraries and analytical models are compared with simulation results previously obtained using the PENELOPE code. The results show that dose profiles computed with GEANT4's analytical model are almost

  10. Abnormalities of the upper extremities on fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nemec, S F; Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Bettelheim, D; Amann, G; Nemec, U; Rotmensch, S; Graham, J M; Rimoin, D L; Lachman, R S; Prayer, D

    2011-11-01

    In view of the increasing use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to prenatal ultrasonography, we sought to demonstrate the visualization of upper extremity abnormalities and associated defects on MRI, with regard to fetal outcomes and compared with ultrasound imaging. This retrospective study included 29 fetuses with upper extremity abnormalities visualized with fetal MRI following suspicious ultrasound findings and confirmed by postnatal assessment or autopsy. On a 1.5-Tesla unit, dedicated sequences were applied to image the extremities. Central nervous system (CNS) and extra-CNS anomalies were assessed to define extremity abnormalities as isolated or as complex, with associated defects. Fetal outcome was identified from medical records. MRI and ultrasound findings, when available, were compared. Isolated upper extremity abnormalities were found in three (10.3%) fetuses. In 26 (89.7%) fetuses complex abnormalities, including postural extremity disorders (21/26) and structural extremity abnormalities (15/26), were demonstrated. Associated defects involved: face (15/26); musculoskeletal system (14/26); thorax and cardio/pulmonary system (12/26); lower extremities (12/26); brain and skull (10/26); and abdomen (8/26). Of the 29 cases, 18 (62.1%) pregnancies were delivered and 11 (37.9%) were terminated. MRI and US findings were compared in 27/29 cases: the diagnosis was concordant in 14 (51.9%) of these cases, and additional findings were made on MRI in 13/27 (48.1%) cases. Visualization of upper extremity abnormalities on fetal MRI enables differentiation between isolated defects and complex ones, which may be related to poor fetal prognosis. MRI generally confirms the ultrasound diagnosis, and may provide additional findings in certain cases. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  12. SU-C-BRE-04: Microbeam-Radiation-Therapy (MRT): Characterizing a Novel MRT Device Using High Resolution 3D Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q; Juang, T; Bache, S; Chang, S; Oldham, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of MRT has recently been demonstrated utilizing a new technology of Carbon-Nano-Tube(CNT) field emission x-ray sources.This approach can deliver very high dose(10's of Gy) in narrow stripes(sub-mm) of radiation which enables the study of novel radiation treatment approaches. Here we investigate the application of highresolution (50um isotropic) PRESAGE/Optical-CT 3D dosimetry techniques to characterize the radiation delivered in this extremely dosimetrically challenging scenario. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source irradiator comprises of a linear cathode array and a novel collimator alignment system. This allows a precise delivery of high-energy small beams up to 160 kVp. A cylindrical dosimeter (∼2.2cm in height ∼2.5cm in diameter) was irradiated by CNT MRT delivering 3 strips of radiation with a nominal entrance dose of 32 Gy.A second dosimeter was irradiated with similar entrance dose, with a regular x-ray irradiator collimated to microscopical strip-beams. 50um (isotropic) 3D dosimetry was performed using an in-house optical-CT system designed and optimized for high resolution imaging (including a stray light deconvolution correction).The percentage depth dose (PDD), peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) and beam width (FWHM) data were obtained and analyzed in both cases. Results: High resolution 3D images were successfully achieved with the prototype system, enabling extraction of PDD and dose profiles. The PDDs for the CNT irradiation showed pronounced attenuation, but less build-up effect than that from the multibeam irradiation. The beam spacing between the three strips has an average value of 0.9mm while that for the 13 strips is 1.5 mm at a depth of 16.5 mm. The stray light corrected image shows line profiles with reduced noise and consistent PVR values. Conclusion: MRT dosimetry is extremely challenging due to the ultra small fields involved.This preliminary application of a novel, ultra-high resolution, optical-CT 3D

  13. Fetal Eye Movements on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Woitek, Ramona; Kasprian, Gregor; Lindner, Christian; Stuhr, Fritz; Weber, Michael; Schöpf, Veronika; Brugger, Peter C.; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Furtner, Julia; Bettelheim, Dieter; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. Methods Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17–40 GW, three age groups [17–23 GW, 24–32 GW, 33–40 GW]). Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981): Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. Results In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%). Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03), Type Ia (p = 0.031), and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033). Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3–45%. Conclusions In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations. PMID:24194885

  14. Fetal eye movements on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Woitek, Ramona; Kasprian, Gregor; Lindner, Christian; Stuhr, Fritz; Weber, Michael; Schöpf, Veronika; Brugger, Peter C; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Furtner, Julia; Bettelheim, Dieter; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Eye movements are the physical expression of upper fetal brainstem function. Our aim was to identify and differentiate specific types of fetal eye movement patterns using dynamic MRI sequences. Their occurrence as well as the presence of conjugated eyeball motion and consistently parallel eyeball position was systematically analyzed. Dynamic SSFP sequences were acquired in 72 singleton fetuses (17-40 GW, three age groups [17-23 GW, 24-32 GW, 33-40 GW]). Fetal eye movements were evaluated according to a modified classification originally published by Birnholz (1981): Type 0: no eye movements; Type I: single transient deviations; Type Ia: fast deviation, slower reposition; Type Ib: fast deviation, fast reposition; Type II: single prolonged eye movements; Type III: complex sequences; and Type IV: nystagmoid. In 95.8% of fetuses, the evaluation of eye movements was possible using MRI, with a mean acquisition time of 70 seconds. Due to head motion, 4.2% of the fetuses and 20.1% of all dynamic SSFP sequences were excluded. Eye movements were observed in 45 fetuses (65.2%). Significant differences between the age groups were found for Type I (p = 0.03), Type Ia (p = 0.031), and Type IV eye movements (p = 0.033). Consistently parallel bulbs were found in 27.3-45%. In human fetuses, different eye movement patterns can be identified and described by MRI in utero. In addition to the originally classified eye movement patterns, a novel subtype has been observed, which apparently characterizes an important step in fetal brainstem development. We evaluated, for the first time, eyeball position in fetuses. Ultimately, the assessment of fetal eye movements by MRI yields the potential to identify early signs of brainstem dysfunction, as encountered in brain malformations such as Chiari II or molar tooth malformations.

  15. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features. PMID:27413248

  16. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  17. Aquaporins in Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Nora; Damiano, Alicia E

    2017-01-01

    Water homeostasis during fetal development is of crucial physiologic importance. The successful formation and development of the placenta is critical to maintain normal fetal growth and homeostasis. The expression of several aquaporins (AQPs ) was found from blastocyst stages to term placenta and fetal membranes. Therefore, AQPs are proposed to play important roles in normal pregnancy, fetal growth, and homeostasis of amniotic fluid volume, and water handling in other organs. However, the functional importance of AQPs in fetal development remains to be elucidated.

  18. Identification of a developmentally-regulated and psychostimulant-inducible novel rat gene mrt3 in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Muraoka, Shin-ichiro; Kajii, Yasushi; Umino, Asami; Nishikawa, Toru

    2014-10-01

    The psychotomimetic effects of stimulant drugs including amphetamines and cocaine are known to change during the postnatal development in humans and experimental animals. To obtain an insight into the molecular basis of the onset of stimulant-induced psychosis, we have explored the gene transcripts that differentially respond to methamphetamine (MAP) in the developing rat brains using a differential cloning technique, the RNA arbitrarily-primed PCR. We identified from the rat neocortex a novel and developmentally regulated MAP-inducible gene mrt3 (MAP responsive transcript 3) that is transcribed to a presumable non-coding RNA of 3.8kb and is located on the reverse strand of the F-box/LRR-repeat protein 17-like gene mapped on the rat chromosome Xq12. The mrt3 mRNAs are predominantly expressed in the brain and lung. Acute MAP injection upregulated the mrt3 expression in the neocortex at postnatal day 50, but not days 8, 15 and 23, in a D1 receptor antagonist-sensitive manner. This upregulation was mimicked by another stimulant, cocaine, whereas pentobarbital and D1 antagonist failed to alter the mrt3 expression. Moreover, repeated treatment with MAP for 5 days inhibited the ability of the challenge dose of MAP or cocaine to increase the neocortical mrt3 expression without affecting the basal mrt3 mRNA levels on day 14 of withdrawal. These late-developing, cocaine-cross reactive, D1 antagonist-sensitive and long-term regulations of mrt3 by MAP are similar to those of stimulant-induced behavioral sensitization, a model of the onset and relapse of stimulant-induced psychosis and schizophrenia, and therefore may be associated with the pathophysiology of the model.

  19. Situs anomalies on prenatal MRI.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Stefan F; Brugger, Peter C; Nemec, Ursula; Bettelheim, Dieter; Kasprian, Gregor; Amann, Gabriele; Rimoin, David L; Graham, John M; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-04-01

    Situs anomalies refer to an abnormal organ arrangement, which may be associated with severe errors of development. Due regard being given to prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US), this study sought to demonstrate the in utero visualization of situs anomalies on MRI, compared to US. This retrospective study included 12 fetuses with situs anomalies depicted on fetal MRI using prenatal US as a comparison modality. With an MRI standard protocol, the whole fetus was assessed for anomalies, with regard to the position and morphology of the following structures: heart; venous drainage and aorta; stomach and intestines; liver and gallbladder; and the presence and number of spleens. Situs inversus totalis was found in 3/12 fetuses; situs inversus with levocardia in 1/12 fetuses; situs inversus abdominis in 2/12 fetuses; situs ambiguous with polysplenia in 3/12 fetuses, and with asplenia in 2/12 fetuses; and isolated dextrocardia in 1/12 fetuses. Congenital heart defects (CHDs), vascular anomalies, and intestinal malrotations were the most frequent associated malformations. In 5/12 cases, the US and MRI diagnoses were concordant. Compared to US, in 7/12 cases, additional MRI findings specified the situs anomaly, but CHDs were only partially visualized in six cases. Our initial MRI results demonstrate the visualization of situs anomalies and associated malformations in utero, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Using a standard protocol, MRI may identify additional findings, compared to US, which confirm and specify the situs anomaly, but, with limited MRI visualization of fetal CHDs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  1. Fetal intracranial hemorrhage: sonographic criteria and merits of prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Mohamed Ali; Ramadan, Wafaa; Gabr, Amir A; Kamel, Ahmed; Abdelrahman, Rasha W

    2017-09-01

    To determine the sonographic criteria for diagnosis of fetal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), using both gray scale ultrasound, and tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI). A prospective multicenter study, recruiting patients at risk of fetal ICH over four years. All cases with fetal ICH had serial ultrasound assessments, including TUI, fetal and postnatal MRIs. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with fetal ICH, two cases had extracerebral (subdural) hemorrhage, 16 cases had intracerebral (intraventricular) hemorrhage and three cases had combined hemorrhage. The mean gestational age at which they were diagnosed was 29.8 ± 5.2 weeks. Seventy-six percent of cases had no identifiable risk factors. IUGR was associated with 57.9% of cases. Using grey scale ultrasound, we demonstrated clear cut sonographic criteria for diagnosis of fetal ICH. TUI enabled us to detect some midline cerebral lesions not detected by grey scale 2D ultrasound alone. Fetal and postnatal MRI confirmed those findings. Ultrasonography can be used in the detection, classification and monitoring the progression of various types of ICH. TUI is an additional diagnostic tool that might help to detect the exact size, and extent of those lesions. Fetal MRI is not superior, but might aid in the diagnosis.

  2. Adaptation of an articulated fetal skeleton model to three-dimensional fetal image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinder, Tobias; Wendland, Hannes; Wachter-Stehle, Irina; Roundhill, David; Lorenz, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    The automatic interpretation of three-dimensional fetal images poses specific challenges compared to other three-dimensional diagnostic data, especially since the orientation of the fetus in the uterus and the position of the extremities is highly variable. In this paper, we present a comprehensive articulated model of the fetal skeleton and the adaptation of the articulation for pose estimation in three-dimensional fetal images. The model is composed out of rigid bodies where the articulations are represented as rigid body transformations. Given a set of target landmarks, the model constellation can be estimated by optimization of the pose parameters. Experiments are carried out on 3D fetal MRI data yielding an average error per case of 12.03+/-3.36 mm between target and estimated landmark positions.

  3. Health co-benefits in mortality avoidance from implementation of the mass rapid transit (MRT) system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Soo Chen; Tainio, Marko; Woodcock, James; Hashim, Jamal Hisham

    2016-03-01

    The mass rapid transit (MRT) is the largest transport infrastructure project under the national key economic area (NKEA) in Malaysia. As urban rail is anticipated to be the future spine of public transport network in the Greater Kuala Lumpur city, it is important to mainstream climate change mitigation and public health benefits in the local transport development. This study quantifies the health co-benefits in terms of mortality among the urbanites when the first line of the 150 km MRT system in Kuala Lumpur commences by 2017. Using comparative health risk assessment, we estimated the potential health co-benefits from the establishment of the MRT system. We estimated the reduced CO2 emissions and air pollution (PM2.5) exposure reduction among the general population from the reduced use of motorized vehicles. Mortality avoided from traffic incidents involving motorcycles and passenger cars, and from increased physical activity from walking while using the MRT system was also estimated. A total of 363,130 tonnes of CO2 emissions could be reduced annually from the modal shift from cars and motorcycles to the MRT system. Atmospheric PM2.5 concentration could be reduced 0.61 μg/m3 annually (2%). This could avoid a total of 12 deaths, mostly from cardio-respiratory diseases among the city residents. For traffic injuries, 37 deaths could be avoided annually from motorcycle and passenger cars accidents especially among the younger age categories (aged 15-30). One additional death was attributed to pedestrian walking. The additional daily physical activity to access the MRT system could avoid 21 deaths among its riders. Most of the mortality avoided comes from cardiovascular diseases. Overall, a total of 70 deaths could be avoided annually among both the general population and the MRT users in the city. The implementation of the MRT system in Greater Kuala Lumpur could bring substantial health co-benefits to both the general population and the MRT users mainly from the

  4. Fetal ventriculomegaly: Diagnosis, treatment, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pisapia, Jared M; Sinha, Saurabh; Zarnow, Deborah M; Johnson, Mark P; Heuer, Gregory G

    2017-07-01

    Fetal ventriculomegaly (VM) refers to the enlargement of the cerebral ventricles in utero. It is associated with the postnatal diagnosis of hydrocephalus. VM is clinically diagnosed on ultrasound and is defined as an atrial diameter greater than 10 mm. Because of the anatomic detailed seen with advanced imaging, VM is often further characterized by fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fetal VM is a heterogeneous condition with various etiologies and a wide range of neurodevelopmental outcomes. These outcomes are heavily dependent on the presence or absence of associated anomalies and the direct cause of the ventriculomegaly rather than on the absolute degree of VM. In this review article, we discuss diagnosis, work-up, counseling, and management strategies as they relate to fetal VM. We then describe imaging-based research efforts aimed at using prenatal data to predict postnatal outcome. Finally, we review the early experience with fetal therapy such as in utero shunting, as well as the advances in prenatal diagnosis and fetal surgery that may begin to address the limitations of previous therapeutic efforts.

  5. [Evaluation of the Marburg Spelling Training (MRT) in 2nd- and 3rd-grade students with spelling difficulties].

    PubMed

    Barkmann, Claus; Kuhlmann, Ester; Rosenboom, Lea; Wessolowski, Nino; Schulte-Markwort, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Children with severe dyslexia are substantially impaired because reading and writing are key competencies necessary for a successful academic and occupational career. In this evaluation study, a cohort of 2nd- and 3rd-grade students from a variety of Hamburg primary schools was trained with the Marburger Rechtschreibtraining (MRT) by supervised university graduates. The research questions focused on the feasibility of the MRT as a within-school training, the improvement of spelling and reading skills of the participants, subjective assessments of success, as well as potential predictors. Besides established performance tests, we also considered the subjective appraisals of parents, teachers, and coaches. The results demonstrate that standardized spelling training methods like the MRT can be consistently used during morning hours at schools. Within a year of starting MRT exercises, mean effect sizes in writing and reading were observed in performance tests using test norms. However, parent, teacher, and coach reports failed to replicate these improvements. Changes in writing performance were mainly associated with school class level; improvements in reading ability were dependent on initial writing performance. The results provide starting points for optimizing current training practices in elementary schools and for posing questions regarding the effectiveness of the MRT, as well as for training programs in general.

  6. Two-dimensional homography-based correction of positional errors in widefield MRT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Arvind; Daiboo, Soobash; Shankar, N. Udaya

    2010-10-01

    A steradian of the southern sky has been imaged at 151.5 MHz using the Mauritius Radio Telescope (MRT). These images show systematics in the positional errors of sources when compared to source positions in the Molonglo Reference Catalogue (MRC). We have applied two-dimensional homography to correct for systematic positional errors in the image domain and thereby avoid re-processing the visibility data. Positions of bright (above 15σ) point sources, common to the MRT catalogue and MRC, are used to set up an over-determined system to solve for the homography matrix. After correction, the errors are found to be within 10 per cent of the beamwidth for these bright sources and the systematics are eliminated from the images. This technique will be of relevance to the new generation radio telescopes where, owing to huge data rates, only images after a certain integration would be recorded as opposed to raw visibilities. It is also interesting to note how our investigations cued to possible errors in the array geometry. The analysis of positional errors of sources showed that MRT images are stretched in declination by ~1 part in 1000. This translates to compression of the baseline scale in the visibility domain. The array geometry was re-estimated using the astrometry principle. The estimates show an error of ~1 mmm-1, which results in an error of about half a wavelength at 150 MHz for a 1-km north-south baseline. The estimates also indicate that the east-west arm is inclined by an angle of ~40 arcsec to the true east-west direction.

  7. Influence of polarization and a source model for dose calculation in MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartzsch, Stefan Oelfke, Uwe; Lerch, Michael; Petasecca, Marco; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), an alternative preclinical treatment strategy using spatially modulated synchrotron radiation on a micrometer scale, has the great potential to cure malignant tumors (e.g., brain tumors) while having low side effects on normal tissue. Dose measurement and calculation in MRT is challenging because of the spatial accuracy required and the arising high dose differences. Dose calculation with Monte Carlo simulations is time consuming and their accuracy is still a matter of debate. In particular, the influence of photon polarization has been discussed in the literature. Moreover, it is controversial whether a complete knowledge of phase space trajectories, i.e., the simulation of the machine from the wiggler to the collimator, is necessary in order to accurately calculate the dose. Methods: With Monte Carlo simulations in the Geant4 toolkit, the authors investigate the influence of polarization on the dose distribution and the therapeutically important peak to valley dose ratios (PVDRs). Furthermore, the authors analyze in detail phase space information provided byMartínez-Rovira et al. [“Development and commissioning of a Monte Carlo photon model for the forthcoming clinical trials in microbeam radiation therapy,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 119–131 (2012)] and examine its influence on peak and valley doses. A simple source model is developed using parallel beams and its applicability is shown in a semiadjoint Monte Carlo simulation. Results are compared to measurements and previously published data. Results: Polarization has a significant influence on the scattered dose outside the microbeam field. In the radiation field, however, dose and PVDRs deduced from calculations without polarization and with polarization differ by less than 3%. The authors show that the key consequences from the phase space information for dose calculations are inhomogeneous primary photon flux, partial absorption due to inclined beam incidence outside

  8. Assessment of fetal neurodevelopment via fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Ronald T

    2004-11-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) offers unique capabilities for assessment of fetal heart rate (FHR) and fetal behavior, which are fundamental aspects of neurodevelopment. The most important attribute of fMCG for FHR monitoring is its high precision, which allows accurate assessment of beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability (FHRV), including respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Using mathematical indices to assess FHRV, we find that short- and long-term FHRV both increase during gestation but not in the same manner. The largest increases in short-term FHRV occur during the last trimester, while the largest increases in long-term FHRV occur early on, with smaller changes occurring during the last trimester. The fMCG also allows assessment of fetal activity. This results from the high sensitivity of the signal to the position and orientation of the fetal heart. FMCG actograms are therefore specific for fetal trunk movement, which are thought to be more important than isolated extremity movements and other small fetal movements. The ability to assess FHR, FHRV, and fetal trunk movement simultaneously makes fMCG a valuable tool for neurodevelopment research.

  9. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Daily life skills, such as feeding and bathing Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, including wide-set and narrow ...

  10. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders with similar signs and symptoms. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders The range of consequences from drinking alcohol during pregnancy are collectively called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, as not all signs and symptoms are ...

  11. A hydrodynamically-consistent MRT lattice Boltzmann model on a 2D rectangular grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Min, Haoda; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2016-12-01

    A multiple-relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann (LB) model on a D2Q9 rectangular grid is designed theoretically and validated numerically in the present work. By introducing stress components into the equilibrium moments, this MRT-LB model restores the isotropy of diffusive momentum transport at the macroscopic level (or in the continuum limit), leading to moment equations that are fully consistent with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model is derived by an inverse design process which is described in detail. Except one moment associated with the energy square, all other eight equilibrium moments can be theoretically and uniquely determined. The model is then carefully validated using both the two-dimensional decaying Taylor-Green vortex flow and lid-driven cavity flow, with different grid aspect ratios. The corresponding results from an earlier model (Bouzidi et al. (2001) [28]) are also presented for comparison. The results of Bouzidi et al.'s model show problems associated with anisotropy of viscosity coefficients, while the present model exhibits full isotropy and is accurate and stable.

  12. Fetal behavioral teratology.

    PubMed

    Visser, Gerard H A; Mulder, Eduard J H; Tessa Ververs, F F

    2010-10-01

    Ultrasound studies of fetal motor behavior provide direct – in vivo – insight in the functioning of the motor component of the fetal central nervous system. In this article, studies are reviewed showing changes in the first timetable of appearance of fetal movements, changes in quality and/or quantity of movements and disturbances in the development of fetal behavioral states in case of endogenous malfunctions, maternal diseases and exogenous behavioral teratogens.

  13. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Denise Araujo Lapa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the main advances in fetal surgical therapy aiming to inform health care professionals about the state-of-the-art techniques and future challenges in this field. We discuss the necessary steps of technical evolution from the initial open fetal surgery approach until the development of minimally invasive techniques of fetal endoscopic surgery (fetoscopy). PMID:27074241

  14. Thick corpus callosum: a clue to the diagnosis of fetal septopreoptic holoprosencephaly?

    PubMed

    Koob, Mériam; Weingertner, Anne-sophie; Gasser, Bernard; Oubel, Estanislao; Dietemann, Jean-Louis

    2012-07-01

    We describe fetal septopreoptic holoprosencephaly (HPE) associated with a thick corpus callosum (CC) diagnosed with MRI in a fetus at 31 weeks' gestation. Our report supports a recently published study connecting a thick fetal CC to other brain abnormalities. On diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), the body of the CC contained an abnormal longitudinal bundle, presumed to be a congenital heterotopic cingulum. Prenatal and postmortem brain MRI with DTI, CT, and pathological analyses are described and illustrated.

  15. Clinical Application of Standardized Cognitive Assessment Using fMRI. I. Matrix Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mark D.; Fong, Alina K.

    2008-01-01

    Functional MRI is increasingly recognized for its potential as a powerful new tool in clinical neuropsychology. This is likely due to the fact that, with some degree of innovation, it is possible to convert practically any familiar cognitive test into one that can be performed in the MRI scanning environment. However, like any assessment approach, meaningful interpretation of fMRI data for the purpose of patient evaluation crucially requires normative data derived from a sample of unimpaired persons, against which individual patients may be compared. Currently, no such normative data are available for any fMRI-based cognitive testing protocol. In this paper, we report the first of a series of fMRI-compatible cognitive assessment protocols, a matrix reasoning test (f-MRT), for which normative samples of functional activation have been collected from unimpaired control subjects and structured in a manner that makes individual patient evaluation possible in terms of familiar z-score distributions. Practical application of the f-MRT is demonstrated via a contrastive case-study of two individuals with cognitive impairment in which fMRI data identifies subtleties in patient deficits otherwise missed by conventional measures of performance. PMID:19641250

  16. Fetal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher G B; Fauza, Dario O

    2009-06-01

    Attempts at harnessing the prospective benefits of the therapeutic use of fetal cells or tissues date many decades before the modern era of transplantation. The first reported transplantation of human fetal tissue took place in 1922. Fetal cells or tissues also have been used as helpful investigational tools since the 1930s. Still, it was only in the last three decades that fetal tissue transplantation in people has started to lead to favorable outcomes, yet by and large anecdotally. This article offers an outlook on a relatively new dimension in fetal cell-based therapies, namely the engineering of tissues in the laboratory, along with its prospective applications.

  17. Clubfeet and associated abnormalities on fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ursula; Nemec, Stefan F; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Bettelheim, Dieter; Wadhawan, Isha; Kolb, Alexander; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Clubfoot, or talipes equinovarus (TEV), is commonly diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound. This study sought to visualize TEV and associated abnormalities on fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with ultrasound. This retrospective study included the MRI scans of 44 fetuses with TEV using postnatal assessment and autopsy as standard of reference. Isolated TEV was differentiated from complex TEV with associated abnormalities. MRI findings and previous ultrasound diagnoses were compared. Isolated TEV was found in 19/44 (43.2%) fetuses and complex TEV in 25/44 (56.8%). Associated abnormalities consisted of the following: central nervous system/spinal abnormalities in 13/25 (52.0%) fetuses; musculoskeletal abnormalities in 7/25 (28.0%); thoracic abnormalities in 3/25 (12.0%); a tumor in one case; and hydrops fetalis in one. Of the 44 cases, 35 (79.5%) pregnancies were delivered, and nine (20.5%) pregnancies, which were terminated, all had complex TEV. Of the 42 available ultrasound reports, additional MRI findings were made in 8/42 (19.0%) cases. MRI did not add findings in isolated TEV on ultrasound. In 4/44 (9.1%) cases, autopsy revealed additional findings compared with prenatal imaging. Fetal MRI enables differentiation between isolated and complex TEV. Isolated TEV on ultrasound may not be an MRI indication, whereas MRI may be useful in cases of complex TEV. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Virtual screening-based discovery and mechanistic characterization of the acylthiourea MRT-10 family as smoothened antagonists.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Faure, Helene; Roudaut, Hermine; Gorojankina, Tatiana; Traiffort, Elisabeth; Schoenfelder, Angele; Mann, Andre; Solinas, Antonio; Taddei, Maurizio; Ruat, Martial

    2010-10-01

    The seven-transmembrane receptor Smoothened (Smo) is the major component involved in signal transduction of the Hedgehog (Hh) morphogens. Smo inhibitors represent a promising alternative for the treatment of several types of cancers linked to abnormal Hh signaling. Here, on the basis of experimental data, we generated and validated a pharmacophoric model for Smo inhibitors constituted by three hydrogen bond acceptor groups and three hydrophobic regions. We used this model for the virtual screening of a library of commercially available compounds. Visual and structural criteria allowed the selection of 20 top scoring ligands, and an acylthiourea, N-(3-benzamidophenylcarbamothioyl)-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzamide (MRT-10), was identified and characterized as a Smo antagonist. The corresponding acylurea, N-(3-benzamidophenylcarbamoyl)-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzamide (MRT-14), was synthesized and shown to display, in various Hh assays, an inhibitory potency comparable to or greater than that of reference Smo antagonists cyclopamine and N-((3S,5S)-1-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-ylmethyl)-5-(piperazine-1-carbonyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl)-N-(3-methoxybenzyl)-3,3-dimethylbutanamide (Cur61414). Focused virtual screening of the same library further identified five additional related antagonists. MRT-10 and MRT-14 constitute the first members of novel families of Smo antagonists. The described virtual screening approach is aimed at identifying novel modulators of Smo and of other G-protein coupled receptors.

  19. Fetal Neurosonogaphy: Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Competition.

    PubMed

    Tercanli, S; Prüfer, F

    2016-12-01

    Both in routine diagnostics and detailed, highly specialized workups, major advances have been observed in many areas of ultrasound due to an increase in expertise and improved technology in recent years. This is particularly true in the case of fetal neurosonography 1 2 3 4. Malformations of the CNS together with fetal heart defects are among the most common congenital anomalies. From the embryonic phase to the late third trimester, the CNS undergoes extensive development and maturation processes. The diagnosis of CNS anomalies is therefore primarily dependent on the time at which the examination is performed and the experience of the examiner. The introduction of transvaginal and 3 D ultrasound for evaluating fetal brain structures has made it possible to diagnose pathological findings of the CNS with increasing accuracy 5. The detection rates for CNS anomalies are up to 90 - 95 % depending on the finding 3 5. Today, detailed fetal neurosonography also includes differential diagnostic evaluation of the posterior cranial fossa, the corpus callosum (CC), and the gyri and therefore exceeds the primarily conspicuous, non-specific diagnosis of "ventricular dilation" often occurring as an accompanying symptom 6 7 The article "Prenatal Diagnosis of Corpus Callosum Anomalies" appearing in this issue shows an increase in the frequency of diagnosis and also shows that it is possible to differentiate between complete and partial corpus callosum agenesis and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum with differentiation between isolated and non-isolated cases is possible on ultrasound. In 4 of 44 cases in which both neurosonography and intrauterine MRI were performed, there was a discrepancy between the ultrasound diagnosis and the intrauterine MRI findings. In a comparison of the sonographic diagnoses and the MRI findings, additional pathologies were seen on MRI but not on ultrasound in only 3 of 44 cases. In a further case of CC hypoplasia, the sonographic diagnosis was

  20. Tumor disease and associated congenital abnormalities on prenatal MRI.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Stefan F; Horcher, Ernst; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Bettelheim, Dieter; Amann, Gabriele; Nemec, Ursula; Rotmensch, Siegfried; Rimoin, David L; Graham, John M; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-02-01

    Fetal tumors can have a devastating effect on the fetus, and may occur in association with congenital malformations. In view of the increasing role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to prenatal ultrasonography (US), we sought to demonstrate the visualization of fetal tumors, with regard to congenital abnormalities, on MRI. This retrospective study included 18 fetuses with tumors depicted on fetal MRI after suspicious US findings. An MRI standard protocol was used to diagnose tumors judged as benign or malignant. All organ systems were assessed for tumor-related complications and other congenital malformations. Available US results and histopathology were compared with MRI. There were 13/18 (72.2%) benign and 5/18 (27.8%) malignant tumors diagnosed: a cerebral primitive neuroectodermal tumor in 1/18, head-neck teratomas in 4/18; ventricular rhabdomyomas in 4/18; a cardiac teratoma in 1/18; a hepatoblastoma in 1/18; neuroblastomas in 2/18; a cystic hemorrhagic adrenal hyperplasia in 1/18; a pelvic leiomyoma in 1/18; sacrococcygeal teratomas in 3/18. Tumor-related complications were present in 13/18 (72.2%) cases; other congenital abnormalities in 3/18 (16.7%). MRI diagnosis and histology were concordant in 8/11 (72.7%) cases. In 6/12 (50%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were concordant, and, in 6/12 (50%) cases, additional MRI findings changed the US diagnosis. Our MRI results demonstrate the visualization of fetal tumors, with frequently encountered tumor-related complications, and other exceptional congenital abnormalities, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Compared to prenatal US, MRI may add important findings in certain cases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vorhersage des Krankheitsverlaufes von leichten kognitiven Beeinträchtigungen durch automatisierte MRT Morphometrie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Klaus H.; Schlindwein, Sarah; Stieltjes, Bram; Essig, Marco; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    Die leichte kognitive Beeinträchtigung (LKB) gilt als Anzeichen für ein erhöhtes Risiko der Entwicklung einer Alzheimerdemenz. Eine fundierte klinische Prognose für den Krankheitsverlauf kann aber bis dato nicht gegeben werden. Das Ziel dieser Arbeit besteht darin, eine möglichst präzise Vorhersage mittels automatisierter Morphometrie des Hippokampus im MRT-Bild zu treffen. In einer Studie mit 18 Probanden mit LKB wurde eine Prädiktionsgenauigkeit für die Entwicklung einer späteren Demenz von 83.3% erzielt. Eine manuelle Vergleichsmethode erreichte mit 55.6% Trefferquote keine signifikante Vorhersagegenauigkeit. Das automatische Verfahren erfüllt viele wichtige Voraussetzungen für den routinemäßigen klinischen Einsatz mit dem Potential, die klinische Vorhersage des Krankheitsverlaufes bei der LKB zu verbessern.

  2. Medical physics aspects of the synchrotron radiation therapies: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) and synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT).

    PubMed

    Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Adam, Jean-Francois; Alagoz, Enver; Bartzsch, Stefan; Crosbie, Jeff; DeWagter, Carlos; Dipuglia, Andrew; Donzelli, Mattia; Doran, Simon; Fournier, Pauline; Kalef-Ezra, John; Kock, Angela; Lerch, Michael; McErlean, Ciara; Oelfke, Uwe; Olko, Pawel; Petasecca, Marco; Povoli, Marco; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Siegbahn, Erik A; Sporea, Dan; Stugu, Bjarne

    2015-09-01

    Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy (SSRT) and Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) are both novel approaches to treat brain tumor and potentially other tumors using synchrotron radiation. Although the techniques differ by their principles, SSRT and MRT share certain common aspects with the possibility of combining their advantages in the future. For MRT, the technique uses highly collimated, quasi-parallel arrays of X-ray microbeams between 50 and 600 keV. Important features of highly brilliant Synchrotron sources are a very small beam divergence and an extremely high dose rate. The minimal beam divergence allows the insertion of so called Multi Slit Collimators (MSC) to produce spatially fractionated beams of typically ∼25-75 micron-wide microplanar beams separated by wider (100-400 microns center-to-center(ctc)) spaces with a very sharp penumbra. Peak entrance doses of several hundreds of Gy are extremely well tolerated by normal tissues and at the same time provide a higher therapeutic index for various tumor models in rodents. The hypothesis of a selective radio-vulnerability of the tumor vasculature versus normal blood vessels by MRT was recently more solidified. SSRT (Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiotherapy) is based on a local drug uptake of high-Z elements in tumors followed by stereotactic irradiation with 80 keV photons to enhance the dose deposition only within the tumor. With SSRT already in its clinical trial stage at the ESRF, most medical physics problems are already solved and the implemented solutions are briefly described, while the medical physics aspects in MRT will be discussed in more detail in this paper. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. In vitro MRI of brain development.

    PubMed

    Rados, Marko; Judas, Milos; Kostović, Ivica

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we demonstrate the developmental appearance, structural features, and reorganization of transient cerebral zones and structures in the human fetal brain using a correlative histological and MRI analysis. The analysis of postmortem aldehyde-fixed specimens (age range: 10 postovulatory weeks to term) revealed that, at 10 postovulatory weeks, the cerebral wall already has a trilaminar appearance and consists of: (1) a ventricular zone of high cell-packing density; (2) an intermediate zone; (3) the cortical plate (in a stage of primary consolidation) with high MRI signal intensity. The anlage of the hippocampus is present as a prominent bulging in the thin limbic telencephalon. The early fetal telencephalon impar also contains the first commissural fibers and fornix bundles in the septal area. The ganglionic eminence is clearly visible as an expanded continuation of the proliferative ventricular zone. The basal ganglia showed an initial aggregation of cells. The most massive fiber system is in the hemispheric stalk, which is in continuity with thalamocortical fibers. During the mid-fetal period (15-22 postovulatory weeks), the typical fetal lamination pattern develops and the cerebral wall consists of the following zones: (a) a marginal zone (visible on MRI exclusively in the hippocampus); (b) the cortical plate with high cell-packing density and high MRI signal intensity; (c) the subplate zone, which is the most prominent zone rich in extracellular matrix and with a very low MRI signal intensity; (d) the intermediate zone (fetal "white matter"); (e) the subventricular zone; (f) the periventricular fiber-rich zone; (g) the ventricular zone. The ganglionic eminence is still a very prominent structure with an intense proliferative activity. During the next period (22-26 postovulatory weeks), there is the developmental peak of transient MRI features, caused by the high content of hydrophyllic extracellular matrix in the subplate zone and the accumulation

  4. Ethics of fetal tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanders, L M; Giudice, L; Raffin, T A

    1993-09-01

    Now that the Clinton Administration has overturned the ban on federal funding for fetal tissue transplantation, old ethical issues renew their relevance and new ethical issues arise. Is fetal tissue transplantation necessary and beneficial? Are fetal rights violated by the use of fetal tissue in research? Is there a moral danger that the potential of fetal tissue donation will encourage elective abortions? Should pregnant women be allowed to designate specific fetal transplant recipients? What criteria should be used to select fetal tissue transplants? Whose consent should be required for the use of fetal tissue for transplantation? We review the current state of clinical research with fetal tissue transplantation, the legal history of fetal tissue research, the major arguments against the use of fetal tissue for transplantation, and the new postmoratorium ethical dilemmas. We include recommendations for guidelines to govern the medical treatment of fetal tissue in transplantation.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  6. Overview of fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shardha; Strasburger, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Though fetal arrhythmias account for a small proportion of referrals to a fetal cardiologist, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review outlines the current literature with regard to the diagnosis and, in brief, some management strategies in fetal arrhythmias. Recent findings Advances in echocardiography have resulted in significant improvements in our ability to elucidate the mechanism of arrhythmia at the bedside. At the same time, fetal magnetocardiography is broadening our understanding of mechanisms of arrhythmia especially as it pertains to ventricular arrhythmias and congenital heart block. It provides a unique window to study electrical properties of the fetal heart, unlike what has been available to date. Recent reports of bedside use of fetal ECG make it a promising new technology. The underlying mechanisms resulting in immune-mediated complete heart block in a small subset of ‘at-risk’ fetuses is under investigation. Summary There have been great strides in noninvasive diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias. However, we still need to improve our knowledge of the electromechanical properties of the fetal heart as well as the mechanisms of arrhythmia to further improve outcomes. Multiinstitutional collaborative studies are needed to help answer some of the questions regarding patient, drug selection and management algorithms. PMID:18781114

  7. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  8. Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the ontogeny of fetal autonomic, motoric, state, and interactive functioning in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through term. Found that male fetuses were more active than female fetuses, and that greater maternal stress appraisal was associated with reduced fetal heart rate variability. Found that an apparent period of…

  9. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  10. MRT-92 inhibits Hedgehog signaling by blocking overlapping binding sites in the transmembrane domain of the Smoothened receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Lucile; Faure, Helene; Roudaut, Hermine; Schoenfelder, Angele; Mann, Andre; Girard, Nicolas; Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier; Petricci, Elena; Taddei, Maurizio; Rognan, Didier; Ruat, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The Smoothened (Smo) receptor, a member of class F G protein-coupled receptors, is the main transducer of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway implicated in a wide range of developmental and adult processes. Smo is the target of anticancer drugs that bind to a long and narrow cavity in the 7-transmembrane (7TM) domain. X-ray structures of human Smo (hSmo) bound to several ligands have revealed 2 types of 7TM-directed antagonists: those binding mostly to extracellular loops (site 1, e.g., LY2940680) and those penetrating deeply in the 7TM cavity (site 2, e.g., SANT-1). Here we report the development of the acylguanidine MRT-92, which displays subnanomolar antagonist activity against Smo in various Hh cell-based assays. MRT-92 inhibits rodent cerebellar granule cell proliferation induced by Hh pathway activation through pharmacologic (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 0.4 nM) or genetic manipulation. Using [(3)H]MRT-92 (Kd = 0.3 nM for hSmo), we created a comprehensive framework for the interaction of small molecule modulators with hSmo and for understanding chemoresistance linked to hSmo mutations. Guided by molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis data, our work convincingly confirms that MRT-92 simultaneously recognized and occupied both sites 1 and 2. Our data demonstrate the existence of a third type of Smo antagonists, those entirely filling the Smo binding cavity from the upper extracellular part to the lower cytoplasmic-proximal subpocket. Our studies should help design novel potent Smo antagonists and more effective therapeutic strategies for treating Hh-linked cancers and associated chemoresistance. © FASEB.

  11. Demonstration of Removal, Separation, and Recovery of Heavy Metals from Industrial Wastestreams Using Molecular Recognition Technology (MRT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    Treatment Plant”, TM-2123-ENV, April 1995. 3. Ford, K.H., 1996, “ Heavy Metal Adsorption/ Biosorption Studies for Zero Discharge Industrial Wastewater...SEPARATION, AND RECOVERY OF HEAVY METALS FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTESTREAMS USING MOLECULAR RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY (MRT) Final Report by Dr. Katherine...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER DEMONSTRATION OF REMOVAL, SEPARATION, AND RECOVERY OF HEAVY METALS FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS USING

  12. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  13. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  14. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the shoulder uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  15. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  16. A multiphase three-dimensional multi-relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann model with surface tension adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, Sami; Pernaudat, Guillaume; Trépanier, Jean-Yves

    2017-08-01

    The interdependence of surface tension and density ratio is a weakness of pseudo-potential based lattice Boltzmann models (LB). In this paper, we propose a 3D multi-relaxation time (MRT) model for multiphase flows at large density ratios. The proposed model is capable of adjusting the surface tension independently of the density ratio. We also present the 3D macroscopic equations recovered by the proposed forcing scheme. A high order of isotropy for the interaction force is used to reduce the amplitude of spurious currents. The proposed 3D-MRT model is validated by verifying Laplace's law and by analyzing its thermodynamic consistency and the oscillation period of a deformed droplet. The model is then applied to the simulation of the impact of a droplet on a dry surface. Impact dynamics are determined and the maximum spread factor calculated for different Reynolds and Weber numbers. The numerical results are in agreement with data published in the literature. The influence of surface wettability on the spread factor is also investigated. Finally, our 3D-MRT model is applied to the simulation of the impact of a droplet on a wet surface. The propagation of transverse waves is observed on the liquid surface.

  17. MRI renaissance.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S

    1997-12-01

    A few years ago, magnetic resonance imaging was healthcare's version of a foreign sports car-flashy, expensive and impractical. Now, after years in the doldrums, sales of MRI systems are roaring back. An aging fleet of MRI scanners due for replacement and a hearty increase in doctors' use of the versatile imaging tools are combining to fuel the surge in demand, vendors and customers say.

  18. Aorta cross-section calculation and 3D visualization from CT or MRT data using VRML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabner, Guenther; Modritsch, Robert; Stiegmaier, Wolfgang; Grasser, Simon; Klinger, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Quantification of vessel diameters of artherosclerotic or congenital stenosis is very important for the diagnosis of vascular diseases. The aorta extraction and cross-section calculation is a software-based application that offers a three-dimensional, platform-independent, colorized visualization of the extracted aorta with augmented reality information of MRT or CT datasets. This project is based on different types of specialized image processing algorithms, dynamical particle filtering and complex mathematical equations. From this three-dimensional model a calculation of minimal cross sections is performed. In user specified distances, the aorta is cut in differently defined directions which are created through vectors with varying length. The extracted aorta and the derived minimal cross-sections are then rendered with the marching cube algorithm and represented together in a three-dimensional virtual reality with a very high degree of immersion. The aim of this study was to develop an imaging software that delivers cardiologists the possibility of (i) furnishing fast vascular diagnosis, (ii) getting precise diameter information, (iii) being able to process exact, local stenosis detection (iv) having permanent data storing and easy access to former datasets, and (v) reliable documentation of results in form of tables and graphical printouts.

  19. Female external genitalia on fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nemec, S F; Nemec, U; Weber, M; Rotmensch, S; Brugger, P C; Kasprian, G; Krestan, C R; Rimoin, D L; Graham, J M; Prayer, D

    2011-12-01

    To characterize the normal development of the female external genitalia on fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This retrospective study included MRI examinations of 191 female fetuses (20-36 gestational weeks) with normal anatomy or minor abnormalities, following suspicion of anomalies on prenatal ultrasound examination. Using a 1.5-Tesla unit, the bilabial diameter was measured on T2-weighted sequences. Statistical description, as well as correlation and regression analyses, was used to evaluate bilabial diameter in relation to gestational age. MRI measurements were compared with published ultrasound data. The morphological appearance and signal intensities of the external genitalia were also assessed. Mean bilabial diameters, with 95% CIs and percentiles, were defined. The bilabial diameter as a function of gestational age was expressed by the regression equation: bilabial diameter = - 11.336 + 0.836 × (gestational age in weeks). The correlation coefficient, r = 0.782, was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Bilabial diameter on MRI was not significantly different from that on ultrasound (P < 0.001). In addition, on MRI we observed changes in morphology of the external genitalia and in signal intensities with increasing gestational age. We have provided a reference range of fetal bilabial diameter on MRI, which, in addition to ultrasound findings, may be helpful in the identification of genital anomalies. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. [Hydro-MRT with fast sequences in Crohn's disease: a comparison with fractionated gastrointestinal passage].

    PubMed

    Schunk, K; Kern, A; Heussel, C P; Kalden, P; Orth, T; Wanitschke, R; Thelen, M

    1999-04-01

    To compare the value of hydro-MRI with that of barium studies in patients with Crohn's disease. After an oral bowel opacification using 1000 ml of a 2.5% mannitol solution, axial and coronal breath-hold sequences (T2W HASTE +/- FS, contrast-enhanced T1W FLASH FS) were acquired in 46 patients with Crohn's disease at 1.0 T. The findings of hydro-MRI were compared with those of barium studies. In the stomach and the small bowel, hydro-MRI and barium studies demonstrated similar numbers of Crohn's involvements (39 vs. 36); in the colon, hydro-MRI showed clearly more affections (23 vs. 10). Hydro-MRI showed 12.7 cm of inflamed bowel per patient, on average (barium studies: 10.4 cm; p = 0.004). There was a good agreement between the two methods regarding the assessment of the extent of Crohn's disease and the severity of bowel stenoses (r = 0.89 and 0.88, respectively). For the assessment of Crohn's disease, hydro-MRI is preferable to the barium study because of the superior imaging quality and the lack of radiation exposure.

  1. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Kathryn M.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the gold standard for the treatment of congenital malformations has been planned delivery at tertiary care center with attempted post-natal repair or amelioration of the lesion. Over the last few decades however, rapid advances in imaging and instrumentation technology combined with superior knowledge of fetal pathophysiology has led to the development of novel intrauterine interventions for most common fetal anomalies. Great success has already been seen the treatment of previous devastating anomalies such as myelomeningocele (MMC), congenital cystic malformations of the lung, twin-twin transfusion, and sacrococcygeal teratomas. Although still limited, these innovative techniques have unique potential to improve outcomes in the most devastating fetal anomalies. PMID:27867946

  3. In utero detection of retinoblastoma with fetal magnetic resonance and ultrasound: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Lisa B; Miller, David; Jackson, Hollie A; Lee, Thomas; Randolph, Linda; Murphree, A Lynn; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2012-11-01

    Purpose Our aim was to evaluate and compare the ability of prenatal ultrasound (US) and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect retinoblastoma lesions in utero. Methods Fetuses at risk for having bilateral retinoblastoma were enrolled in this prospective study. High-resolution US of the fetal eye was performed at 16 to 18 weeks' gestation, every 4 weeks until 32 weeks, then every 2 weeks until delivery. Fetal MRIs were performed every 8 weeks starting at 16 to 18 weeks of gestation. An exam under anesthesia (EUA) was performed postnatally, the gold standard of this study. Lesions were classified as being elevated or minimally elevated based upon their morphology. Results Of six fetuses suspected or confirmed to be at risk for developing bilateral retinoblastoma, one had tumors on her first postnatal EUA exam. A total of two minimally elevated lesions were seen by the EUA but not detected prenatally by imaging. One elevated lesion (2 mm in height) identified by postnatal EUA was initially identified by prenatal US. Fetal MRI did not detect any lesions. Conclusion Both prenatal US and fetal MRI are limited in the detection of minimally elevated retinoblastoma lesions. Prenatal US appears to be more sensitive than fetal MRI in the detection of elevated retinoblastoma lesions.

  4. In Utero Detection of Retinoblastoma with Fetal Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Lisa B.; Miller, David; Jackson, Hollie A.; Lee, Thomas; Randolph, Linda; Murphree, A. Lynn; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to evaluate and compare the ability of prenatal ultrasound (US) and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect retinoblastoma lesions in utero. Methods Fetuses at risk for having bilateral retinoblastoma were enrolled in this prospective study. High-resolution US of the fetal eye was performed at 16 to 18 weeks' gestation, every 4 weeks until 32 weeks, then every 2 weeks until delivery. Fetal MRIs were performed every 8 weeks starting at 16 to 18 weeks of gestation. An exam under anesthesia (EUA) was performed postnatally, the gold standard of this study. Lesions were classified as being elevated or minimally elevated based upon their morphology. Results Of six fetuses suspected or confirmed to be at risk for developing bilateral retinoblastoma, one had tumors on her first postnatal EUA exam. A total of two minimally elevated lesions were seen by the EUA but not detected prenatally by imaging. One elevated lesion (2 mm in height) identified by postnatal EUA was initially identified by prenatal US. Fetal MRI did not detect any lesions. Conclusion Both prenatal US and fetal MRI are limited in the detection of minimally elevated retinoblastoma lesions. Prenatal US appears to be more sensitive than fetal MRI in the detection of elevated retinoblastoma lesions. PMID:23946908

  5. Fetal hippocampal development: analysis by magnetic resonance imaging volumetry.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Francois Dominique; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Xu, Duan; Studholme, Colin; Glenn, Orit A

    2011-05-01

    The hippocampal formation plays an important role in learning and memory; however, data on its development in utero in humans are limited. This study was performed to evaluate hippocampal development in healthy fetuses using 3D reconstructed MRI. A cohort of 20 healthy pregnant women underwent prenatal MRI at a median GA of 24.9 wk (range, 21.3-31.9 wk); six of the women also had a second fetal MRI performed at a 6-wk interval. Routine 2D ultrafast T2-weighted images were used to reconstruct a 3D volume image, which was then used to manually segment the right and left hippocampi. Total hippocampal volume was calculated for each subject and compared against GA. There was a linear increase in total hippocampal volume with increasing GA (p < 0.001). For subjects scanned twice, there was an increase in hippocampal size on the second fetal MRI (p = 0.0004). This represents the first volumetric study of fetal hippocampal development in vivo. This normative volumetric data will be helpful for future comparison studies of suspected developmental abnormalities of hippocampal structure and function.

  6. Fetal Hippocampal Development: Analysis by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetry

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Francois Dominique; Habas, Piotr; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Xu, Duan; Studholme, Colin; Glenn, Orit A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampal formation plays an important role in learning and memory, however data on its development in utero in humans is limited. This study was performed to evaluate hippocampal development in healthy fetuses using 3D reconstructed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A cohort of 20 healthy pregnant women underwent prenatal MRI at a median gestational age of 24.9 weeks (range 21.3-31.9 weeks); 6 of the women also had a second fetal MRI performed at a 6 week interval. Routine 2D ultrafast T2-weighted images were used to reconstruct a 3D volume image, which was then used to manually segment the right and left hippocampi. Total hippocampal volume was calculated for each subject and compared against gestational age. There was a linear increase in total hippocampal volume with increasing gestational age (P<0.001). For subjects scanned twice, there was an increase in hippocampal size on the second fetal MRI (P=0.0004). This represents the first volumetric study of fetal hippocampal development in vivo. This normative volumetric data will be helpful for future comparison studies of suspected developmental abnormalities of hippocampal structure and function. PMID:21270675

  7. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetus grows and develops. There are specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems ...

  8. [Paradigms of fetal ethology].

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2006-03-19

    In utero, the fetus is protected against biological and social influences of the outside world. This circumstance offers an opportunity for sonographic investigation of inherited fetal behavior free of extraneous effects. Observation of fetal activities with ultrasound permits the recognition of certain uniform features of fetal behavior. Immediately after birth, the neonate continues repeating those activities that he/she became accustomed to in the womb. Later these become modified by environmental influences. Nonetheless, basic inherited behavioral characteristics continue to be expressed and may remain recognizable even during adulthood. Some aspects of adult behavior may derive from experience acquired during fetal life. These include the hand-face reflex, various types of facial expression, such as smiling, crying, yawning, grimaces of dissatification and desperation as well as sticking out one's tongue.

  9. Evolution of fetal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Avni, F E; Cos, T; Cassart, M; Massez, A; Donner, C; Ismaili, K; Hall, M

    2007-02-01

    The authors wish to highlight the evolution that has occurred in fetal ultrasound in recent years. A first significant evolution lies in the increasing contribution of first trimester ultrasound for the detection of fetal anomalies. Malformations of several organs and systems have been diagnosed during the first trimester. Furthermore the systematic measurement of the fetal neck translucency has led to increasing rate of detection of aneuploidies and heart malformations. For several years now, three-dimensional (3D) and 4D ultrasound (US) have been used as a complementary tool to 2D US for the evaluation of fetal morphology. This brings an improved morphologic assessment of the fetus. Applications of the techniques are increasing, especially for the fetal face, heart and extremities. The third field where fetal US is continuously providing important information is the knowledge of the natural history of diseases. This has brought significant improvement in the postnatal management of several diseases, especially urinary tract dilatation and broncho-pulmonary malformation.

  10. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  11. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  12. Fetal bile salt metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, R. A.; Lester, R.; Piasecki, G. J.; Klein, P. D.; Greco, R.; Jackson, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    Bile salt metabolism was studied in fetal dogs 1 wk before term. The size and distribution of the fetal bile salt pool were measured, and individual bile salts were identified. The hepatic excretion of endogenous bile salts was studied in bile fistula fetuses, and the capacity of this excretory mechanism was investigated by the i.v. infusion of a load of sodium taurocholate-14C up to 20 times the endogenous pool size. The total fetal bile salt pool was 30.9±2.7 μmoles, of which two-thirds was in the fetal gallbladder. Expressed on a body weight basis, this was equal to approximately one-half the estimated pool size in the adult dog (119.2±11.3 vs. 247.5±33.1 μmoles/kg body wt). Measurable quantities of bile salt were found in small bowel (6.0±1.8 μmoles), large bowel (1.1±0.3 μmoles), liver (1.2±0.5 μmoles), and plasma (0.1±0.03 μmoles). Plasma bile salt levels were significantly greater in fetal than in maternal plasma (1.01±0.24 μg/ml vs. 0.36±0.06 μg/ml; P < 0.05). Fetal hepatic bile salt excretion showed a fall over the period of study from 2.04±0.34 to 0.30±0.07 μmoles/hr. The maximal endogenous bile salt concentration in fetal hepatic bile was 18.7±1.5 μmoles/ml. The concentration in fetal gallbladder bile was 73.9±8.6 μmoles/ml; and, in those studies in which hepatic and gallbladder bile could be compared directly, the gallbladder appeared to concentrate bile four- to fivefold. Taurocholate, taurochenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxycholate were present in fetal bile, but no free bile salts were identified. The presence of deoxycholate was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography and gas liquid chromatography, and the absence of microorganisms in fetal gut suggests that it was probably transferred from the maternal circulation. After infusion of a taurocholate load, fetal hepatic bile salt excretion increased 30-fold, so that 85-95% of the dose was excreted by the fetal liver during the period of observation. Placental transfer accounted

  13. Fetal brain disruption sequence versus fetal brain arrest: A distinct autosomal recessive developmental brain malformation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; El-Khayat, Hamed A; Eid, Ola M; Saba, Soliman; Farag, Mona K; Saleem, Sahar N; Gaber, Khaled R

    2015-05-01

    The term fetal brain disruption sequence (FBDS) was coined to describe a number of sporadic conditions caused by numerous external disruptive events presenting with variable imaging findings. However, rare familial occurrences have been reported. We describe five patients (two sib pairs and one sporadic) with congenital severe microcephaly, seizures, and profound intellectual disability. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed unique and uniform picture of underdeveloped cerebral hemispheres with increased extraxial CSF, abnormal gyral pattern (polymicrogyria-like lesions in two sibs and lissencephaly in the others), loss of white matter, dysplastic ventricles, hypogenesis of corpus callosum, and hypoplasia of the brainstem, but hypoplastic cerebellum in one. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) of two patients showed the same developmental brain malformations in utero. These imaging findings are in accordance with arrested brain development rather than disruption. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as NDE1, MKL2, OCLN, and JAM3. These unique clinical and imaging findings were described before among familial reports with FBDS. However, our patients represent a recognizable phenotype of developmental brain malformations, that is, apparently distinguishable from either familial microhydranencephaly or microlissencephaly that were collectively termed FBDS. Thus, the use of the umbrella term FBDS is no longer helpful. Accordingly, we propose the term fetal brain arrest to distinguish them from other familial patients diagnosed as FBDS. The presence of five affected patients from three unrelated consanguineous families suggests an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. The spectrum of fetal brain disruption sequence is reviewed.

  14. Value of brain MRI when sonography raises suspicion of agenesis of the corpus callosum in fetuses.

    PubMed

    Jarre, A; Llorens Salvador, R; Montoliu Fornas, G; Montoya Filardi, A

    To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in fetuses with a previous sonographic suspicion of agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) to confirm the diagnosis and to detect associated intracranial anomalies. Single-center retrospective and descriptive observational study of the brain MRI performed in 78 fetuses with ACC sonographic suspicion between January 2006 and December 2015. Two experts in fetal imaging reviewed the MRI findings to evaluate the presence and morphology of the corpus callosum. When ACC was detected the whole fetal brain anatomy was thoroughly studied to determine the presence of associated anomalies. Prenatal MR imaging findings were compared to postnatal brain MRI or necropsy findings when available. Fetal MRI diagnosed 45 cases of ACC, 12 were partial (26.7%) and 33 complete (73.3%). In 28 cases (62,2%) associated intracranial anomalies were identified. The most often abnormality was ventriculomegaly (78,6%), followed by cortical malformations (53,6%), posterior fossa (25%) and midline anomalies (10,7%). Fetal brain MRI has an important role in the diagnosis of ACC and detection of associated anomalies. To perform a fetal brain MRI is important in fetuses with sonographic suspicion of ACC. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Fetal cystic lung lesions: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Peng; Chen, Chih-Ping; Shih, Shin-Lin; Chen, Yi-Fang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chen, Su-Chiu

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the diagnosis of fetal cystic lung lesions found on routine prenatal ultrasound (US). Experienced radiologists retrospectively reviewed 34 fetal MRI studies performed in 20 fetuses (from 20 to 35 gestational weeks; including 14 repeat studies 10 weeks after the initial MRI), focusing on shape, signal characteristics, feeding artery, volume change, and location of the cystic lesions. Diagnoses were confirmed after birth by postnatal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and/or surgery. Bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS) in the second trimester appeared as a well-defined, homogeneous, hyperintense mass (pure BPS) in eight cases or as a lobulated, inhomogeneous hyperintense mass (BPS mixed with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM)) in three cases. The feeding artery was visible in all 11 cases in the initial MRI, and regression of the mass was seen in 7 cases. As the mass regressed in the third trimester, the signal intensity decreased, becoming inhomogeneous, and the margins became lobulated. The mean initial ratio of the volume of the BPS lesion to the ipsilateral lung in lesions with partial regression was 82%; the mean initial ratio in lesions with nearly complete regression was 61%. CCAM (6) cases also appeared as a hyperintense lobulated mass, and as the lesions regressed, they decreased in size and signal intensity. As with BPS, the larger the lesion on initial MRI, the less likely it was to regress completely. Congenital lobar fluid overload in three cases appeared as a hyperintense, homogeneous lobe with stretched hilar vessels. Prenatal MRI is useful as a diagnostic tool complementary to US for evaluating fetal cystic lung lesions. Smaller lung lesions (<60%) may regress completely.

  16. Micronutrients and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Fall, Caroline H D; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Rao, Shobha; Davies, Anna A; Brown, Nick; Farrant, Hannah J W

    2003-05-01

    Fetal undernutrition affects large numbers of infants in developing countries, with adverse consequences for their immediate survival and lifelong health. It manifests as intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), defined as birth weight <10th percentile, which probably underestimates the number failing to achieve full growth potential. Birth weight is a crude measure of the dynamic process of fetal growth and does not capture effects of fetal undernutrition on body composition and the development of specific tissues. The link between maternal nutrition and fetal nutrition is indirect. The fetus is nourished by a complex supply line that includes the mother's diet and absorption, endocrine status and metabolism, cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy and placental function. Micronutrients are essential for growth, and maternal micronutrient deficiency, frequently multiple in developing countries, may be an important cause of IUGR. Supplementation of undernourished mothers with micronutrients has several benefits but there is little hard evidence of improved fetal growth. However, this has been inadequately tested. Most trials have only used single micronutrients and many were inconclusive because of methodological problems. Several food-based studies (some uncontrolled) suggest benefits from improving maternal dietary quality with micronutrient-dense foods. One trial of a multivitamin supplement (HIV-positive mothers, Tanzania) showed increased birth weight and fewer fetal deaths. Well-conducted randomized controlled trials of adequate sample size and including measures of effectiveness are needed in populations at high risk of micronutrient deficiency and IUGR and should include food-based interventions and better measurements of fetal growth, maternal metabolism, and long-term outcomes in the offspring.

  17. ALTERATIONS IN MATERNAL-FETAL CELLULAR TRAFFICKING AFTER FETAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Saadai, Payam; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Bautista, Geoanna; Gonzales, Kelly D.; Nijagal, Amar; Busch, Michael P.; Kim, CJ; Romero, Roberto; Lee, Hanmin; Hirose, Shinjiro; Rand, Larry; Miniati, Douglas; Farmer, Diana L.; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose Bi-directional trafficking of cells between the mother and the fetus is routine in pregnancy and a component of maternal-fetal tolerance. Changes in fetal-to-maternal cellular trafficking have been reported in prenatal complications, but maternal-to-fetal trafficking has never been studied in the context of fetal intervention. We hypothesized that patients undergoing open fetal surgery would have altered maternal-fetal cellular trafficking. Methods Cellular trafficking was analyzed in patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) who underwent open fetal surgical repair (n=5), MMC patients who had routine postnatal repair (n=6), and normal term patients (n=9). As a control for the fetal operation, trafficking was also analyzed in patients who were delivered by an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure (n=6). Microchimerism in maternal and cord blood was determined using quantitative real-time PCR for non-shared alleles. Results Maternal-to-fetal trafficking was significantly increased in patients who underwent open fetal surgery for MMC compared to normal controls, postnatal MMC repair, and EXIT patients. There were no differences in fetal-to-maternal cell trafficking between groups. Conclusion Patients undergoing open fetal surgery for MMC have elevated levels of maternal microchimerism. These results suggest altered trafficking and/or increased proliferation of maternal cells in fetal blood and may have important implications for preterm labor. PMID:22703775

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal pelvic cysts.

    PubMed

    Archontaki, Styliani; Vial, Yvan; Hanquinet, Sylviane; Meuli, Reto; Alamo, Leonor

    2016-12-01

    The detection of fetal anomalies has improved in the last years as a result of the generalization of ultrasound pregnancy screening exams. The presence of a cystic imaging in the fetal pelvis is a relatively common finding, which can correspond to a real congenital cystic lesion or result from the anomalous liquid accumulation in a whole pelvic organ, mainly the urinary bladder, the uterus, or the vagina. In selected cases with poor prognosis and/or inconclusive echographic findings, magnetic resonance may bring additional information in terms of the characterization, anatomical location, and real extension of the pathology. This pictorial essay describes the normal pelvic fetal anatomy, as well as the most common pelvic cysts. It also describes the causes of an anomalous distension of the whole pelvic organs detected in utero, with emphasis on prenatal magnetic resonance imaging exams. Moreover, it proposes practical teaching points to reduce the differential diagnosis of these lesions based on the sex of the fetus, the division of the pelvis in anatomical spaces, and the imaging findings of the pathology. Finally, it discusses the real utility of complementary MRI.

  19. Modeling the biomechanics of fetal movements.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Loo, Jessica H W; Hayat, Tayyib T A; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A; Phillips, Andrew T M; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2016-08-01

    Fetal movements in the uterus are a natural part of development and are known to play an important role in normal musculoskeletal development. However, very little is known about the biomechanical stimuli that arise during movements in utero, despite these stimuli being crucial to normal bone and joint formation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to create a series of computational steps by which the forces generated during a kick in utero could be predicted from clinically observed fetal movements using novel cine-MRI data of three fetuses, aged 20-22 weeks. A custom tracking software was designed to characterize the movements of joints in utero, and average uterus deflection of [Formula: see text] mm due to kicking was calculated. These observed displacements provided boundary conditions for a finite element model of the uterine environment, predicting an average reaction force of [Formula: see text] N generated by a kick against the uterine wall. Finally, these data were applied as inputs for a musculoskeletal model of a fetal kick, resulting in predicted maximum forces in the muscles surrounding the hip joint of approximately 8 N, while higher maximum forces of approximately 21 N were predicted for the muscles surrounding the knee joint. This study provides a novel insight into the closed mechanical environment of the uterus, with an innovative method allowing elucidation of the biomechanical interaction of the developing fetus with its surroundings.

  20. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the contrast dye is injected. The MRI machine is a large, tunnel-like machine that has a table. You will lie still ... table, and the table will slide into the machine. You will hear loud humming, tapping, and buzzing ...

  1. Cardiac MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the contrast dye is injected. The MRI machine is a large, tunnel-like machine that has a table. You will lie still ... table and the table will slide into the machine. You will hear loud humming, tapping, and buzzing ...

  2. Weanling piglet cerebellum: a surrogate for tolerance to MRT (microbeam radiation therapy) in pediatric neuro-oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Blattmann, Hans; Di Michiel, Marco; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Guzman, Raphael; Zimmermann, Werner; Birrer, Stephan; Bley, Tim; Kircher, Patrick; Stettler, Regina; Fatzer, Rosmarie; Jaggy, Andre; Smilowitz, Henry; Brauer, Elke; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Thomlinson, William C.; Stepanek, Jiri; Wagner, Hans-Peter

    2001-12-01

    The cerebellum of the weanling piglet (Yorkshire) was used as a surrogate for the radiosensitive human infant cerebellum in a Swiss-led program of experimental microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) at the ESRF. Five weanlings in a 47 day old litter of seven, and eight weanlings in a 40 day old litter of eleven were irradiated in November, 1999 and June, 2000, respectively. A 1.5 cm-wide x 1.5 xm-high array of equally space approximately equals 20-30 micrometers wide, upright microbeams spaced at 210 micrometers intervals was propagated horizontally, left to right, through the cerebella of the prone, anesthetized piglets. Skin-entrance intra-microbeam peak adsorbed doses were uniform, either 150, 300, 425, or 600 gray (Gy). Peak and inter-microbeam (valley) absorbed doses in the cerebellum were computed with the PSI version of the Monte Carlo code GEANT and benchmarked using Gafchromic and radiochromic film microdosimetry. For approximately equals 66 weeks [first litter; until euthanasia], or approximately equals 57 weeks [second litter; until July 30, 2001] after irradiation, the littermates were developmentally, behaviorally, neurologically and radiologically normal as observed and tested by experienced farmers and veterinary scientists unaware of which piglets were irradiated or sham-irradiated. Morever, MRT implemented at the ESRF with a similar array of microbeams and a uniform skin-entrance peak dose of 625 Gy, followed by immunoprophylaxis, was shown to be palliative or curative in young adult rats bearing intracerebral gliosarcomas. These observations give further credence to MRT's potential as an adjunct therapy for brain tumors in infancy, when seamless therapeutic irradiation of the brain is hazardous.

  3. Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations Associated with Heterotaxy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parinda H; Anderson, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as an investigation during fetal life, particularly for assessment of intracranial masses, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, and abdominal masses. As the number of scans increases, so is the variety of congenital malformations being recognized. It is axiomatic that interpretation of the findings is enhanced when attention is paid to the likely findings in the setting of known syndromes, this information then dictating the need for additional acquisition of images. One such syndrome is so-called “visceral heterotaxy”, in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations. In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.  PMID:26180693

  4. Sulfate in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an important nutrient for human growth and development, and is obtained from the diet and the intra-cellular metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. During pregnancy, fetal tissues have a limited capacity to produce sulfate, and rely on sulfate obtained from the maternal circulation. Sulfate enters and exits placental and fetal cells via transporters on the plasma membrane, which maintain a sufficient intracellular supply of sulfate and its universal sulfonate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) for sulfate conjugation (sulfonation) reactions to function effectively. Sulfotransferases mediate sulfonation of numerous endogenous compounds, including proteins and steroids, which biotransforms their biological activities. In addition, sulfonation of proteoglycans is important for maintaining normal structure and development of tissues, as shown for reduced sulfonation of cartilage proteoglycans that leads to developmental dwarfism disorders and four different osteochondrodysplasias (diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type II, achondrogenesis type IB and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia). The removal of sulfate via sulfatases is an important step in proteoglycan degradation, and defects in several sulfatases are linked to perturbed fetal bone development, including mesomelia-synostoses syndrome and chondrodysplasia punctata 1. In recent years, interest in sulfate and its role in developmental biology has expanded following the characterisation of sulfate transporters, sulfotransferases and sulfatases and their involvement in fetal growth. This review will focus on the physiological roles of sulfate in fetal development, with links to human and animal pathophysiologies.

  5. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  6. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  7. Fetal Glucocorticoid Exposure is Associated with Preadolescent Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Sandman, Curt A.; Buss, Claudia; Wing, Deborah A.; Head, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids play a critical role in normative regulation of fetal brain development. Exposure to excessive levels may have detrimental consequences and disrupt maturational processes. This may especially be true when synthetic glucocorticoids are administered during the fetal period, as they are to women in preterm labor. The present study investigated the consequences for brain development and affective problems of fetal exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Methods Brain development and affective problems were evaluated in fifty-four children (56% female), ages 6 to 10, who were full term at birth. Children were recruited into two groups: those with and without fetal exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired and cortical thickness was determined. Child affective problems were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist. Results Children in the fetal glucocorticoid exposure group showed significant and bilateral cortical thinning. The largest group differences were in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC). Over 30% of the rACC was thinner among children with fetal glucocorticoid exposure. Further, children with more affective problems had a thinner left rACC. Conclusions Fetal exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids has neurological consequences that persist for at least 6 to 10 years. Children with fetal glucocorticoid exposure had a thinner cortex primarily in the rACC. Our data indicating that the rACC is associated with affective problems in conjunction with evidence that this region is involved in affective disorders raises the possibility that glucocorticoid associated neurological changes increase vulnerability to mental health problems. PMID:23611262

  8. An Unusual Origin of Fetal Lymphangioma Filling Right Axilla.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ali Ozgur; Oztas, Efser; Saridogan, Erdinc; Ozler, Sibel; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-03-01

    Fetal lymphangioma is a hamartomatous congenital anomaly of the lymphatic system, which is embracing the fetal skin (sometimes mucous membranes) and the subcutaneous tissue. The general consensus is that it occurs as a result of failure in lymphatic drainage. A 36-year-old pregnant woman was referred to our perinatology clinic at 22 weeks' gestation, because of a fetal right-sided axillary mass revealed by ultrasonography. The mass measuring 5x7x7cm in three dimensions had a multilocular structure without colour Doppler flow and well-circumscribed borders. Amniocentesis revealed a normal constitutional karyotyping. Lymphangioma was considered as prediagnosis. A healthy female baby weighing 3470 grams was delivered at term. Neonatal examination and the postnatal MRI confirmed the diagnosis. The baby is still on follow-up with the medical treatment of Sirolimus an anti-proliferative drug, and the mass got smaller significantly in 8 months after delivery.

  9. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that ...

  10. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  11. Sodium MRI.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Sodium ((23)Na) imaging has a place somewhere between (1)H-MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Like MRS it potentially provides information on metabolic processes, but only one single resonance of ionic (23)Na is observed. Therefore pulse sequences do not need to code for a chemical shift dimension, allowing (23)Na images to be obtained at high resolutions as compared to MRS. In this chapter the biological significance of sodium in the brain will be discussed, as well as methods for observing it with (23)Na-MRI. Many vital cellular processes and interactions in excitable tissues depend on the maintenance of a low intracellular and high extracellular sodium concentration. Healthy cells maintain this concentration gradient at the cost of energy. Leaky cell membranes or an impaired energy metabolism immediately leads to an increase in cytosolic total tissue sodium. This makes sodium a biomarker for ischemia, cancer, excessive tissue activation, or tissue damage as might be caused by ablation therapy. Special techniques allow quantification of tissue sodium for the monitoring of disease or therapy in longitudinal studies or preferential observation of the intracellular component of the tissue sodium. New methods and high-field magnet technology provide new opportunities for (23)Na-MRI in clinical and biomedical research.

  12. Computer‐assisted surgical planning and intraoperative guidance in fetal surgery: a systematic review†

    PubMed Central

    Deprest, Jan; Vercauteren, Tom; Ourselin, Sebastien; David, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fetal surgery has become a clinical reality, with interventions for twin‐to‐twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and spina bifida demonstrated to improve outcome. Fetal imaging is evolving, with the use of 3D ultrasound and fetal MRI becoming more common in clinical practise. Medical imaging analysis is also changing, with technology being developed to assist surgeons by creating 3D virtual models that improve understanding of complex anatomy, and prove powerful tools in surgical planning and intraoperative guidance. We introduce the concept of computer‐assisted surgical planning, and present the results of a systematic review of image reconstruction for fetal surgical planning that identified six articles using such technology. Indications from other specialities suggest a benefit of surgical planning and guidance to improve outcomes. There is therefore an urgent need to develop fetal‐specific technology in order to improve fetal surgical outcome. © 2015 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26235960

  13. Fetal blood testing (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing is performed during labor to test the blood pH of the baby which can determine its well-being during delivery. A small puncture is made in the scalp and fetal blood droplets are collected in a thin glass tube. ...

  14. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  15. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  16. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  17. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  18. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mulder, E J; Beemer, F A; Stoutenbeek, P

    2001-07-01

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and growth but not until the end of the second trimester of pregnancy. Prominent at that time were prolonged periods of fetal quiescence and very low heart rate variability, together with abnormally executed body movements of short duration. Retarded femoral development and jerky abrupt fetal body movements (abnormal movement quality) were already present in the early second trimester of pregnancy. Facial anomalies emerged despite the presence of fetal mouth movements. The clinical features of RD were only partly explained by present knowledge of skin development and the fetal akinesia deformation sequence hypothesis. Quantitative assessment of fetal movements proved to be a poor early marker for antenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  19. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  20. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... the same breast or the other breast after breast cancer has been diagnosed Distinguish between scar tissue and ...

  1. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  2. Fetal congenital lobar emphysema.

    PubMed

    Chia, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Soon-Cen; Liu, Min-Chang; Se, Tung-Yi

    2007-03-01

    To report a rare fetal congenital lung anomaly characterized by over inflation of a pulmonary lobe. A 28-year-old systemic lupus erythematous mother, gravida 1 para 0, who had normal prenatal care in our department, was admitted for labor pain and an abnormal fetal heart location was noted incidentally during labor. The baby showed rib retraction in room air but no obvious cyanotic change after delivery. Both the fetus chest X-ray and ultrasound showed a hyperechogenic tumor in the left thoracic cavity with a right-side-shifted heart and trachea. Computed tomography showed a hypodense and multiseptal tumor in the left thoracic cavity with right-sided shift of the heart and trachea. It was a soft, solid tumor in the parenchyma of the left lung and the histopathology confirmed it to be benign congenital lobar emphysema. The favorable outcome in both asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic children suggests that a nonsurgical approach should be considered for these patients.

  3. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  4. [Comparison of noninvasive MRT procedures for temperature measuremnt for the application of medical heat therapies].

    PubMed

    Rademaker, Guido; Jenne, Jürgen W; Rastert, Ralf; Röder, Daniel; Schad, Lothar

    2003-01-01

    Novel methods for hyperthermia tumor therapy, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), require accurate non-invasive temperature monitoring. Non-invasive temperature measurement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is based on the analysis of changes in longitudinal relaxation time (T1), diffusion coefficient (D), or water proton resonance frequency (PRF). The purpose of this study was the development and comparative analysis of the three different approaches of MRI temperature monitoring (T1, D, and PRF). Measurements in phantoms (e.g., ultrasound gel) resulted in the following percent changes: T1-relaxation time: 1.98%/degree C; diffusion coefficient: 2.22%/degree C; and PRF: -0.0101 ppm/degree C. All measurements were in good agreement with the literature. Temperature resolutions could also be measured from the inverse correlation of the data over the whole calibration range: T1: 2.1 +/- 0.6 degrees C; D: 0.93 +/- 0.2 degree C; and PRF: 1.4 +/- 0.3 degrees C. The diffusion and PRF methods were not applicable in fatty tissue. The use of the diffusion method was restricted due to prolonged echo time and anisotropic diffusion in tissue. Initial tests with rabbit muscle tissue in vivo indicated that MR thermometry via T1 and PRF procedures is feasible to monitor the local heating process induced by HIFU. The ultrasound applicators in the MR scanner did not substantially interfere with image quality.

  5. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2012-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and central nervous system (CNS) disorganization, with specific structural abnormalities of the corpus callosum, cerebellum, caudate, and hippocampus. Advances in neuroimaging techniques have allowed detection of regional increases in cortical thickness and gray matter volume along with decreased volume and disorganization of white matter in individuals with FASD. In addition, functional imaging studies have found functional and neurochemical differences in those prenatally exposed to alcohol. Behavioral alterations noted in individuals with FASD are consistent with the findings noted in the brain imaging studies. Continued neuroimaging studies are needed to further advance understanding of the neuroteratogenic effects of alcohol. PMID:19731391

  6. Neurocysticercosis in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D'Cruz, Rebecca F.; Ng, Sher M.; Dassan, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection with the larvae of Taenia solium from contaminated pork. It is a leading cause of seizures in the developing world. Symptoms may be secondary to live or degenerating cysts, or previous infection causing calcification or gliosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, radiological confirmation of intracranial lesions and immunological testing. Management involves symptom control with antiepileptics and antiparasitic agents. Few cases have been described of maternal NCC during pregnancy. We describe a 25-year-old female presenting to a London hospital with secondary generalized seizures. MRI of the brain confirmed a calcified lesion in the right parietal lobe, and she gave a corroborative history of NCC during her childhood in India. She was stabilized initially on antiepileptics, but during her pregnancy presented with breakthrough seizures and radiological evidence of NCC reactivation. She was managed symptomatically with antiepileptics and completed the pregnancy to term with no fetal complications. PMID:27471595

  7. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  8. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  9. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The invention is an ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system. The invention incorporates piezoelectric polymer film combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted from a fetus inside an expectant mother and to provide means for filtering out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  10. Intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Alison G; Spain, Janine

    2015-06-01

    Intrapartum fetal monitoring to assess fetal well-being during the labor and delivery process has been a central component of intrapartum care for decades. Today, electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) is the most common method used to assess the fetus during labor without substantial evidence to suggest a benefit. A Cochrane review of 13 trials, which included over 37,000 women, found that continuous EFM provided no significant improvement in perinatal death rate [risk ratio (RR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.23] or cerebral palsy rate (RR 1.75; 95% CI, 0.84-3.63) as compared with intermittent auscultation; however, there was a significant decrease in neonatal seizures (RR 0.50; 95% CI, 0.31-0.80). In addition, there was a significant increase in cesarean delivery (RR 1.63; 95% CI, 1.29-2.07) and operative vaginal delivery (RR 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.33). Despite the lack of scientific support to suggest that EFM reduces adverse neonatal outcomes, its use is almost universal in the hospital setting and very likely has contributed to the rise in cesarean rate.

  11. The fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Torvid; Acharya, Ganesh

    2004-12-30

    Accumulating data on the human fetal circulation shows the similarity to the experimental animal physiology, but with important differences. The human fetus seems to circulate less blood through the placenta, shunt less through the ductus venosus and foramen ovale, but direct more blood through the lungs than the fetal sheep. However, there are substantial individual variations and the pattern changes with gestational age. The normalised umbilical blood flow decreases with gestational age, and, at 28 to 32 weeks, a new level of development seems to be reached. At this stage, the shunting through the ductus venosus and the foramen ovale reaches a minimum, and the flow through the lungs a maximum. The ductus venosus and foramen ovale are functionally closely related and represent an important distributional unit for the venous return. The left portal branch represents a venous watershed, and, similarly, the isthmus aorta an arterial watershed. Thus, the fetal central circulation is a very flexible and adaptive circulatory system. The responses to increased afterload, hypoxaemia and acidaemia in the human fetus are equivalent to those found in animal studies: increased ductus venosus and foramen ovale shunting, increased impedance in the lungs, reduced impedance in the brain, increasingly reversed flow in the aortic isthmus and a more prominent coronary blood flow.

  12. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Mapping fetal brain development in utero using magnetic resonance imaging: the Big Bang of brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Studholme, Colin

    2011-08-15

    The development of tools to construct and investigate probabilistic maps of the adult human brain from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has led to advances in both basic neuroscience and clinical diagnosis. These tools are increasingly being applied to brain development in adolescence and childhood, and even to neonatal and premature neonatal imaging. Even earlier in development, parallel advances in clinical fetal MRI have led to its growing use as a tool in challenging medical conditions. This has motivated new engineering developments encompassing optimal fast MRI scans and techniques derived from computer vision, the combination of which allows full 3D imaging of the moving fetal brain in utero without sedation. These promise to provide a new and unprecedented window into early human brain growth. This article reviews the developments that have led us to this point, examines the current state of the art in the fields of fast fetal imaging and motion correction, and describes the tools to analyze dynamically changing fetal brain structure. New methods to deal with developmental tissue segmentation and the construction of spatiotemporal atlases are examined, together with techniques to map fetal brain growth patterns.

  14. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation for facilitation of tests of fetal wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kelvin H; Smyth, Rebecca M D; Wei, Xing

    2013-12-07

    Acoustic stimulation of the fetus has been suggested to improve the efficiency of antepartum fetal heart rate testing. To assess the advantages and disadvantages of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2013). All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials assessing the merits of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. All review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Authors of published and unpublished trials were contacted for further information. Altogether 12 trials with a total of 6822 participants were included. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation reduced the incidence of non-reactive antenatal cardiotocography test (nine trials; average risk ratio (RR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.81). Vibroacoustic stimulation compared with mock stimulation evoked significantly more fetal movements when used in conjunction with fetal heart rate testing (one trial, RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.29). Vibroacoustic stimulation offers benefits by decreasing the incidence of non-reactive cardiotocography and reducing the testing time. Further randomised trials should be encouraged to determine not only the optimum intensity, frequency, duration and position of the vibroacoustic stimulation, but also to evaluate the efficacy, predictive reliability, safety and perinatal outcome of these stimuli with cardiotocography and other tests of fetal wellbeing.

  15. Development and validation of a new LBM-MRT hybrid model with enthalpy formulation for melting with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda Fuentes, Johann; Kuznik, Frédéric; Johannes, Kévyn; Virgone, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new model to simulate melting with natural convection of a phase change material. For the phase change problem, the enthalpy formulation is used. Energy equation is solved by a finite difference method, whereas the fluid flow is solved by the multiple relaxation time (MRT) lattice Boltzmann method. The model is first verified and validated using the data from the literature. Then, the model is applied to a tall brick filled with a fatty acid eutectic mixture and the results are presented. The main results are (1) the spatial convergence rate is of second order, (2) the new model is validated against data from the literature and (3) the natural convection plays an important role in the melting process of the fatty acid mixture considered in our work.

  16. Completion Report for Multi-Site Incentive MRT 2779 Implement ASC Tripod Initiative by 30SEP08

    SciTech Connect

    East, D; Cerutti, J; Noe, J; Cupps, K; Loncaric, J; Sturtevant, J

    2008-09-22

    This report provides documentation and evidence for the completion of the deployment of the Tripod common operating system (TripodOS, also known as and generally referred to below as TOSS). Background documents for TOSS are provided in Appendices A and B, including the initial TOSS proposal accepted by ASC HQ and Executives in July 2007 and a Governance Model defined by a Tri-Lab working group in September 2007. Appendix C contains a document that clarifies the intent and requirements for the completion criteria associated with MRT 2779. The deployment of TOSS is a Multi-Site Incentive from the ASC FY08-09 Implementation Plan due at the end of Quarter 4 in FY08.

  17. Robust motion correction and outlier rejection of in vivo functional MR images of the fetal brain and placenta during maternal hyperoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wonsang; Serag, Ahmed; Evangelou, Iordanis E.; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Subject motion is a major challenge in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies (fMRI) of the fetal brain and placenta during maternal hyperoxia. We propose a motion correction and volume outlier rejection method for the correction of severe motion artifacts in both fetal brain and placenta. The method is optimized to the experimental design by processing different phases of acquisition separately. It also automatically excludes high-motion volumes and all the missing data are regressed from ROI-averaged signals. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in enhancing motion correction in fetal fMRI without large data loss, compared to traditional motion correction methods.

  18. Scarless fetal healing. Therapeutic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to call attention to the fetal wound healing process as a blueprint for ideal tissue repair. Wound healing in the fetus is fundamentally different from healing in the adult. Fetal tissue repair occurs rapidly and in the absence of scar formation. Because scarring and fibrosis dominate some diseases in every area of medicine, an understanding of fetal wound healing should help develop therapeutic strategies to avert the devastating consequences of excessive scar formation. PMID:1731647

  19. Hormonal regulation of fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Le Bouc, Y

    2006-01-01

    Fetal growth is a complex process depending on the genetics of the fetus, the availability of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, maternal nutrition and various growth factors and hormones of maternal, fetal and placental origin. Hormones play a central role in regulating fetal growth and development. They act as maturational and nutritional signals in utero and control tissue development and differentiation according to the prevailing environmental conditions in the fetus. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, and IGF-I and IGF-II in particular, plays a critical role in fetal and placental growth throughout gestation. Disruption of the IGF1, IGF2 or IGF1R gene retards fetal growth, whereas disruption of IGF2R or overexpression of IGF2 enhances fetal growth. IGF-I stimulates fetal growth when nutrients are available, thereby ensuring that fetal growth is appropriate for the nutrient supply. The production of IGF-I is particularly sensitive to undernutrition. IGF-II plays a key role in placental growth and nutrient transfer. Several key hormone genes involved in embryonic and fetal growth are imprinted. Disruption of this imprinting causes disorders involving growth defects, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is associated with fetal overgrowth, or Silver-Russell syndrome, which is associated with intrauterine growth retardation. Optimal fetal growth is essential for perinatal survival and has long-term consequences extending into adulthood. Given the high incidence of intrauterine growth retardation and the high risk of metabolic and cardiovascular complications in later life, further clinical and basic research is needed to develop accurate early diagnosis of aberrant fetal growth and novel therapeutic strategies.

  20. [Fetal pulmonary artery blood flow depending on fetal lung maturity].

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Arkadiusz; Lech, Tomasz; Obcowska-Lech, Marta; Sobański, Andrzej; Sipiński, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The ultrasonographic assessment of fetal lung maturity by evaluating the elasticity of lung tissue, Dynamic Lung Score (DLS) has been being performed since 1986 in ObGyn Department in Tychy (Medical University of Silesia). The lung elasticity is evaluated on the cross sections of fetal thorax, on the level of heart ventricles. The result of the evaluation is given as the three degree scale, in which I degree indicates the lack of elasticity and fetal lung immaturity, II degrees indicates partially expressed elasticity, corresponding with incomplete maturity of lung tissue, and III degrees represents full elasticity and indicates complete maturity of fetal lungs. This study was designed to compare fetal pulmonary artery blood flow with the maturity of fetal lung tissue evaluated during the ultrasonographic assessment of fetal lung tissue elasticity. The examination was performed on pregnant women, beginning on 27th week gestation. During the examination the mean Pulsatility Index was decreased, particularly in fetuses with II degrees lung maturity. The Resistance Index (RI) was found to be stable and independent of gestational age. In the group with I degree lung maturity (DLS I), the mean PI = 2.643 (+/- 0.229), mean RI = 0.879 (+/- 0.036), in DLS II group PI = 2.039 (+/- 0.262), RI = 0.868 (+/- 0.037), and in DLS III group PI = 2,500 (+/- 0.100), RI = 0.900 (+/- 0.100). Comparing the ultrasonographic evaluation of fetal lung maturity with fetal pulmonary artery blood flow allows more accurate assessment of fetal lung maturity. Fetal lung maturity can not be evaluated univocally on the basis of blood flow assessment. Because of the divergence of blood flow parameters further studies including bigger population seem to be necessary for verification of the results and for establishing the reference values.

  1. Histograms of Oriented 3D Gradients for Fully Automated Fetal Brain Localization and Robust Motion Correction in 3 T Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Macnaught, Gillian; Denison, Fiona C.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly emerging diagnostic imaging tool. However, automated fetal brain localization is one of the biggest obstacles in expediting and fully automating large-scale fetal MRI processing. We propose a method for automatic localization of fetal brain in 3 T MRI when the images are acquired as a stack of 2D slices that are misaligned due to fetal motion. First, the Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) feature descriptor is extended from 2D to 3D images. Then, a sliding window is used to assign a score to all possible windows in an image, depending on the likelihood of it containing a brain, and the window with the highest score is selected. In our evaluation experiments using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy, we achieved 96% of complete brain localization using a database of 104 MRI scans at gestational ages between 34 and 38 weeks. We carried out comparisons against template matching and random forest based regression methods and the proposed method showed superior performance. We also showed the application of the proposed method in the optimization of fetal motion correction and how it is essential for the reconstruction process. The method is robust and does not rely on any prior knowledge of fetal brain development. PMID:28251155

  2. Histograms of Oriented 3D Gradients for Fully Automated Fetal Brain Localization and Robust Motion Correction in 3 T Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    Serag, Ahmed; Macnaught, Gillian; Denison, Fiona C; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Semple, Scott I; Boardman, James P

    2017-01-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly emerging diagnostic imaging tool. However, automated fetal brain localization is one of the biggest obstacles in expediting and fully automating large-scale fetal MRI processing. We propose a method for automatic localization of fetal brain in 3 T MRI when the images are acquired as a stack of 2D slices that are misaligned due to fetal motion. First, the Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) feature descriptor is extended from 2D to 3D images. Then, a sliding window is used to assign a score to all possible windows in an image, depending on the likelihood of it containing a brain, and the window with the highest score is selected. In our evaluation experiments using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy, we achieved 96% of complete brain localization using a database of 104 MRI scans at gestational ages between 34 and 38 weeks. We carried out comparisons against template matching and random forest based regression methods and the proposed method showed superior performance. We also showed the application of the proposed method in the optimization of fetal motion correction and how it is essential for the reconstruction process. The method is robust and does not rely on any prior knowledge of fetal brain development.

  3. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring during Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of monitoring? • How is auscultation performed? • How is electronic fetal monitoring performed? • How is external monitoring performed? • ... method of periodically listening to the fetal heartbeat. Electronic fetal monitoring is a procedure in which instruments ...

  4. Is fetal analgesia necessary during prenatal surgery?

    PubMed

    Bellieni, C V; Vannuccini, S; Petraglia, F

    2017-03-24

    Fetal anesthesia is still matter of debate: some authors hypothesize that several intrauterine endogenous neuroinhibitors (ENIn) anesthetize the fetus, keeping it in a constant state of sleep, and making pharmacological fetal anaesthesia useless for fetal surgery.

  5. Assessment of fetal heart disorder by means of fetal magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łozińska, Maria; Dunajski, Zbigniew

    2006-10-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is new method for investigations of electrical activity of the fetal heart. The idea and build of system for magnetic signal registration is described. Two cases of premature atrial contraction and complete AV block diagnosis by means of magnetic field recording system are described.

  6. Fetal breathing movements: antepartum monitoring of fetal condition.

    PubMed

    Manning, F A; Platt, L D

    1979-08-01

    Until recently, the relative inaccessibility of the human fetus to physical assessment has made antepartum assessment of its condition difficult. The development of methods for accurate antepartum fetal heart rate monitoring and the subsequent study of heart rate responses to various stimuli have resulted in a significant improvement in accuracy of antepartum fetal surveillance. The development of real time B-mode ultrasound enables the clinician to assess many additional fetal biophysical variables including fetal breathing movements. In our observations, the combination of heart rate and fetal breathing assessment has produced a significant improvement in differentiating the normal from the compromised fetus. The addition of other biophysical variables (tone, movements and amniotic fluid volume) have further refined the ability to identify the fetus at risk. At this point, we have evaluated only a few of many possible variables. It seems probable that, as other fetal biophysical variables are included with the overall assessment, for example fetal reflexes or fetal biophysical response to exogenous stimuli, the identification of the fetus at risk and the quantitation of the magnitude of risk will become increasingly more precise.

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects in Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pancratz, Diane R.

    This literature review defines Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and considers their causes, diagnoses, prevalence, and educational ramifications. Effects of alcohol during each of the trimesters of pregnancy are summarized. Specific diagnostic characteristics of FAS are listed: (1) growth deficiency, (2) a…

  8. Watching the fetal brain at 'rest'.

    PubMed

    Schöpf, V; Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Prayer, D

    2012-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has allowed insights into the spatiotemporal distribution of human brain networks. According to the neurophysiological property of the fetal brain to generate spontaneous activity, we aimed to determine the feasibility of investigating the maturation of intrinsic networks, beginning at gestational week 20 in healthy human fetuses by combining resting-state fMRI and an analytical approach, independent component analysis (ICA). In this study, functional images of 16 fetuses with morphologically normal brain development, from 20 to 36 gestational weeks of age, were acquired on a 1.5T unit (Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using single-shot, gradient-recalled echo-planar imaging. After preprocessing (motion correction, brain extraction), images were analyzed using single-subject ICA. We visualized a bilateral occipital network and medial and lateral prefrontal activity pattern that involved the future Brodmann areas 9-11. Furthermore, there was one either predominantly right (3/7 cases) or left (4/7 cases) hemispheric lateralized network that involved the superior temporal cortical regions (Brodmann areas 22 and 39). Frequency oscillations were in the range of 0.01-0.06Hz for all networks. This study shows that resting-state networks (RSNs) are shaped and are detectable in utero. Further investigations of resting-state measurements in the fetus may therefore allow developmental brain activity monitoring and may provide insights into early brain function. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An event-related analysis of P300 by simultaneous EEG/fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-qun; Wang, Mingshi; Mizuhara, Hiroaki

    2006-09-01

    In this study, P300 that induced by visual stimuli was examined with simultaneous EEG/fMRI. For the purpose of combine the best temporary resolution with the best special resolution together to estimate the brain function, event-related analysis contributed to this methodological trial. A 64 channel MRT-compatible MR EEG amplifier (BrainAmp: made of Brain Production GmbH, Gennany) was used in the measurement simultaneously with fMRI scanning. The reference channel is between Fz, Cz and Pz. Sampling rate of raw EEG was 5 kHz, and the MRT noise reduction was performed. EEG recording synchronized with MRI scan by our original stimulus system, and an oddball paradigm (four-oriented Landolt Ring presentation) was performed in the official manner. After P300 segmentation, the timing of P300 was exported to event-related analysis of fMRI data with SPM99 software. In single subject study, the significant activations appear in the left superior frontal, Broca's area and on both sides of the parietal lobule when P300 occurred. It is suggest that P300 may be an integration carried out by top-down signal from frontal to the parietal lobule, which regulates an Attention-Logical Judgment process. Compared with other current methods, the event related analysis by simultaneous EEG/IMRI is excellent in the point that can describe the cognitive process with reality unifying further temporary and spatial information. It is expected that examination and demonstration of the obtained result will supply with the promotion of this powerful methods.

  10. Complementary role of magnetic resonance imaging in the study of the fetal urinary system.

    PubMed

    Gómez Huertas, M; Culiañez Casas, M; Molina García, F S; Carrillo Badillo, M P; Pastor Pons, E

    2016-01-01

    Urinary system birth defects represent the abnormality most often detected in prenatal studies, accounting for 30% to 50% of all structural anomalies present at birth. The most common disorders are urinary tract dilation, developmental variants, cystic kidney diseases, kidney tumors, and bladder defects. These anomalies can present in isolation or in association with various syndromes. They are normally evaluated with sonography, and the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered only in inconclusive cases. In this article, we show the potential of fetal MRI as a technique to complement sonography in the study of fetal urinary system anomalies. We show the additional information that MRI can provide in each entity, especially in the evaluation of kidney function through diffusion-weighted sequences.

  11. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain in utero: Methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Biegon, Anat; Hoffmann, Chen

    2014-08-28

    Application of modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to the live fetus in utero is a relatively recent endeavor. The relative advantages and disadvantages of clinical MRI relative to the widely used and accepted ultrasonographic approach are the subject of a continuing debate; however the focus of this review is on the even younger field of quantitative MRI as applied to non-invasive studies of fetal brain development. The techniques covered under this header include structural MRI when followed by quantitative (e.g., volumetric) analysis, as well as quantitative analyses of diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional MRI. The majority of the published work reviewed here reflects information gathered from normal fetuses scanned during the 3(rd) trimester, with relatively smaller number of studies of pathological samples including common congenital pathologies such as ventriculomegaly and viral infection.

  12. [Prenatal diagnosis of fetal gray matter heteropia in one case and literature review].

    PubMed

    Zhagn, Kui; Li, Shengli; Wen, Huaxuan; Yuan, Ying

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the prenatal ultrasonic manifestations of fetal gray matter heterotopias (FGMH) and evaluate the optimal method its prenatal diagnosis. The prenatal and postnatal ultrasound images and MRI images were analyzed for a fetus with a definitive diagnosis of FGMH. The detection rates of FGMH by prenatal ultrasound and MRI reported in literature were compared. We identified 11 reports of FGMH from 1998 to 2015, involving 43 cases with prenatal diagnoses. Of the total of 44 cases (including our case), 32 that had been confirmed postpartum had prenatal ultrasound and MRI data, which showed a significantly lower detection rates of FGMH by prenatal ultrasound than by MRI (43.8% vs 93.8%, P<0.001). Prenatal ultrasound can only detect subependymal heterotopia with characteristic manifestations, and the detection of other types of FGMH relies on MRI, which is currently the best option for prenatal diagnosis of FGMH.

  13. Utility of fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to assess fetuses with right aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming

    2017-05-07

    To evaluate the utility of fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose right aortic arch (RAA) with right ductus arteriosus. This retrospective study included six fetuses with right aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus. The six fetal cases were examined using a 1.5-T magnetic resonance unit. The steady-state free precession (SSFP) and single-shot turbo spin echo (SSTSE) sequences were used to evaluate the fetal heart and airway. The gestational age of the six fetuses ranged from 22 to 35 weeks (mean, 26.5 weeks). The age of the pregnant women ranged from 23 to 40 years (mean 31 years). Fetal cardiac MRI diagnosed the six fetal cases with RAA with right ductus arteriosus correctly. Among the six fetuses, four were associated with other congenital heart defects. In three of six cases, the diagnoses established using prenatal echocardiography (echo) was correct when compared with postnatal diagnosis. Fetal cardiac MRI is a useful complementary tool to assess fetuses with RAA and right ductus arteriosus.

  14. Fetal Antecedents of Infant Temperament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined fetal heart rate and movement in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through birth and at age 6 months. Found that more active fetuses were more difficult, unpredictable, unadaptable, and active as infants that were less active fetuses, and that higher fetal heart rate was associated with lower emotional tone, activity level, and…

  15. Prenatal Depression Restricts Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether prenatal depression is a risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Methods Midgestation (18-20 weeks GA) estimated fetal weight and urine cortisol and birth weight and gestational age at birth data were collected on a sample of 40 depressed and 40 non-depressed women. Estimated fetal weight and birthweight data were then used to compute fetal growth rates. Results Depressed women had a 13% greater incidence of premature delivery (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61) and 15% greater incidence of low birthweight (OR = 4.75) than non-depressed women. Depressed women also had elevated prenatal cortisol levels (p = .006) and fetuses who were smaller (p = .001) and who showed slower fetal growth rates (p = .011) and lower birthweights (p = .008). Mediation analyses further revealed that prenatal maternal cortisol levels were a potential mediator for the relationship between maternal symptoms of depression and both gestational age at birth and the rate of fetal growth. After controlling for maternal demographic variables, prenatal maternal cortisol levels were associated with 30% of the variance in gestational age at birth and 14% of the variance in the rate of fetal growth. Conclusion Prenatal depression was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature delivery and slower fetal growth rates. Prenatal maternal cortisol levels appear to play a role in mediating these outcomes. PMID:18723301

  16. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  17. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  18. Feto-fetal transfusion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galea, P; Scott, J M; Goel, K M

    1982-01-01

    Out of 42 pairs of liveborn monochorial twins there were 32 pairs with vascular anastomoses. Of these, 11 pairs had feto-fetal transfusion syndrome. There were another 8 pairs of stillborn twin fetuses with vascular communications and in these chronic feto-fetal transfusion syndrome might have resulted in intrauterine death. PMID:6890328

  19. Impact of fetal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, John M

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease is now well established for a wide range of cardiac anomalies. Diagnosis of congenital heart disease during fetal life not only identifies the cardiac lesion but may also lead to detection of associated abnormalities. This information allows a detailed discussion of the prognosis with parents. For continuing pregnancies, appropriate preparation can be made to optimize the postnatal outcome. Reduced morbidity and mortality, following antenatal diagnosis, has been reported for coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and transposition of the great arteries. With regard to screening policy, most affected fetuses are in the “low risk” population, emphasizing the importance of appropriate training for those who undertake such obstetric anomaly scans. As a minimum, the four chamber view of the fetal heart should be incorporated into midtrimester anomaly scans, and where feasible, views of the outflow tracts should also be included, to increase the diagnostic yield. Newer screening techniques, such as measurement of nuchal translucency, may contribute to identification of fetuses at high risk for congenital heart disease and prompt referral for detailed cardiac assessment. PMID:20300268

  20. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Dörrie, Nora; Föcker, Manuel; Freunscht, Inga; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is one of the most prevalent and modifiable risk factors for somatic, behavioral, and neurological abnormalities. Affected individuals exhibit a wide range of such features referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). These are characterized by a more or less specific pattern of minor facial dysmorphic features, growth deficiency and central nervous system symptoms. Nevertheless, whereas the diagnosis of the full-blown fetal alcohol syndrome does not pose a major challenge, only a tentative diagnosis of FASD can be reached if only mild features are present and/or maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy cannot be verified. The respective disorders have lifelong implications. The teratogenic mechanisms induced by PAE can lead to various additional somatic findings and structural abnormalities of cerebrum and cerebellum. At the functional level, cognition, motor coordination, attention, language development, executive functions, memory, social perception and emotion processing are impaired to a variable extent. The long-term development is characterized by disruption and failure in many domains; an age-adequate independency is frequently not achieved. In addition to primary prevention, individual therapeutic interventions and tertiary prevention are warranted; provision of extensive education to affected subjects and their caregivers is crucial. Protective environments are often required to prevent negative consequences such as delinquency, indebtedness or experience of physical/sexual abuse.

  1. A history of fetal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jancelewicz, Tim; Harrison, Michael R

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 3 decades, fetal surgery for congenital disease has evolved from merely a fanciful concept to a medical field in its own right. Techniques for open hysterotomy, minimal-access hysteroscopy, and image-guided percutaneous fetal access have become well established, first in animal models and subsequently in humans. At the same time, major advances in fetal imaging and diagnosis, anesthesia, and tocolysis have allowed fetal intervention to become a vital tool for subsets of patients who would otherwise endure significant morbidity and mortality. This article offers a concise overview of the history of fetal surgery, from its tumultuous early days to its current status as an important means for the early treatment of potentially devastating congenital anomalies.

  2. [Fetal audition. Myth or reality].

    PubMed

    Chelli, D; Chanoufi, B

    2008-10-01

    Fetal sensory abilities have been considered for a long time as a philosophical question. The aim of this review is to investigate the scientifically proven knowledge about fetal audition. Fetal audition seems to depend on gestational age and sound characteristics. The onset of human fetal hearing is observed at about 26-28 weeks gestational age. Noises from the placenta, the maternal organs and the maternal voice play a major role as current in utero auditory stimuli. Many studies demonstrate that the fetus forms memories of his hearing experiences allowing some authors to use the term "fetal learning". The fetus can memorize not only his mother's voice but also more complex acoustic external sounds with a big ability of discrimination. Moreover, most studies strengthen the hypothesis of an implicit musical ability of the human brain.

  3. Fetal and Maternal Outcomes in Pregnancies Complicated with Fetal Macrosomia

    PubMed Central

    Alsammani, Mohamed Alkahatim; Ahmed, Salah Roshdy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fetal macrosomia remains a considerable challenge in current obstetrics due to the fetal and maternal complications associated with this condition. Aim: This study was designed to determine the prevalence of fetal macrosomia and associated fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality in the Al Qassim Region of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This register-based study was conducted from January 1, 2011 through December 30, 2011 at the Maternity and Child Hospital, Qassim, Saudi Arabia. Macrosomia was defined as birth weight of 4 kg or greater. Malformed babies and those born dead were excluded. Results: The total number of babies delivered was 9241; of these, 418 were macrosomic. Thus, the prevalence of fetal macrosomia was 4.5%. The most common maternal complications were postpartum hemorrhage (5 cases, 1.2%), perineal tear (7 cases, 1.7%), cervical lacerations (3 cases, 0.7%), and shoulder dystocia (40 cases, 9.6%) that resulted in 4 cases of Erb's palsy (0.96%), and 6 cases of bone fractures (1.4%). The rate of cesarean section among women delivering macrosomic babies was 47.6% (199), while 52.4% (219) delivered vaginally. Conclusion: Despite extensive efforts to reduce fetal and maternal complications associated with macrosomia, considerable fetal and maternal morbidity remain associated with this condition. PMID:22754881

  4. Fetal acoustic stimulation test for early intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, M; Hanwellage, K

    2011-03-01

    The fetal acoustic stimulation test (FAST) is a simple cost effective screening test for antenatal fetal monitoring. The aim of the study was to evaluate the FAST as a screening test for early intrapartum fetal well being. An initial non stress test (NST) followed by a FAST using corometric model 146 was carried out in 486 participants in early labour with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies and > 32 weeks gestation. A repeat NST was recorded in the participants who had an initial non reactive NST. The results of the NST and FAST were compared with fetal outcome. Maternal perception of fetal movements after FAST, results of NST before and after FAST, and the babies' 5 minute APGAR scores were measured. Of the 486 participants 413 (85%) noticed fetal movements after FAST. Initial NST was non reactive in 203 (42%) but 149 (31%) became reactive after FAST. Compared to the NST, FAST had a better sensitivity (97% vs 62%, p < 0.001), specificity (100% vs 87%, p = 0.017), positive predictive value (100% vs 98%, p = 0.024), negative predictive value (79% vs 17%, p < 0.001) and accuracy (99%vs 64%, p < 0.001) in predicting 5 minute APGAR < 7 in the baby. FAST is a reliable screening test for assessing fetal well being in early labour. It complements the NST and is better than the NST alone.

  5. Towards a new era in fetal medicine in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Sitras, Vasilis

    2016-08-01

    Fetal medicine is a subspecialty of obstetrics investigating the development, growth and disease of the human fetus. The advances in fetal imaging (ultrasonography, MRI) and molecular diagnostic techniques, together with the possibility of intervention in utero, make fetal medicine an important, rapidly developing field within women's healthcare. Therefore, a variety of specialists, such as neonatologists, pediatric cardiologists, medical geneticists, radiologists and pediatric surgeons, are necessary to adjunct in the diagnosis and treatment of the fetus as a patient. In this commentary, we provide a description of some organizational and educational aspects of fetal medicine in the Nordic countries, using examples of the management of specific conditions such as aneuploidy screening, red cell allo-immunization and fetal interventions. Clearly, there are several cultural, legal, organizational and practical differences between the Nordic countries; these are not necessarily negative, given the high standards of care in all Nordic countries. The scope of the newly founded Nordic Network of Fetal Medicine is to enhance cooperation in clinical practice, education and research between the participant countries. Hopefully, this initiative will find the necessary political and economic support from the national authorities and bring a new era in the field of fetal medicine in the Nordic region. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Movie MRI at five frames a second for evaluation of speech and swallowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, Masanobu; Mori, Koichi; Nakajima, Yasoichi; Nozaki, Seiji

    2004-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging method that is widely used in the medical field. One of the limitations of MRI is its low time-resolution images of MRI are usually obtained as still images. Here we introduced a newly developed method of ``movie'' MRI with high time-resolution at five images a second. Its good application would include study and evaluation of speech and swallowing. Instrument: MRT-2001 XG with Software ver.5.5. (Toshiba). Coil: head QD coil for the tongue; CTL ARRY coil (3ch) for the neck, Imaging condition: sagital FFE2D; TR=2.8 ms TE=1.2 ms FA=10 deg Matrix=64×128 ST=10 mm NAQ=1 AV FOV=23×35 ; ROAFI; sequential acquisition. Maximum imaging length=51 s. A healthy Japanese male (Tokyo dialect speaker, 39 years). Task: Repetitive utterance of /tenten.../ and intentional swallowing of saliva. Results: In the task of /tenten..../, we could detect, in temporal order, velopharyngeal (VP) closure, opening of the tongue-palate (TP) closure, VP opening, TP closure, VP closure, and so on. In the swallowing task of saliva, we could detect movement of the tongue for conveying saliva to the pharynx, VP closure, backward movement of the tongue root, elevation and descent of the larynx in this temporal order. Our ``Movie MRI'' seemed promising for the noninvasive evaluation of speech and deglutition. Appropriate materials for swallowing evaluation will be presented.

  7. Normative biometry of the fetal brain using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulou, Vanessa; Vatansever, Deniz; Davidson, Alice; Patkee, Prachi; Elkommos, Samia; Chew, Andrew; Martinez-Biarge, Miriam; Hagberg, Bibbi; Damodaram, Mellisa; Allsop, Joanna; Fox, Matt; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A

    2016-11-24

    The fetal brain shows accelerated growth in the latter half of gestation, and these changes can be captured by 2D and 3D biometry measurements. The aim of this study was to quantify brain growth in normal fetuses using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and to produce reference biometry data and a freely available centile calculator ( https://www.developingbrain.co.uk/fetalcentiles/ ). A total of 127 MRI examinations (1.5 T) of fetuses with a normal brain appearance (21-38 gestational weeks) were included in this study. 2D and 3D biometric parameters were measured from slice-to-volume reconstructed images, including 3D measurements of supratentorial brain tissue, lateral ventricles, cortex, cerebellum and extra-cerebral CSF and 2D measurements of brain biparietal diameter and fronto-occipital length, skull biparietal diameter and occipitofrontal diameter, head circumference, transverse cerebellar diameter, extra-cerebral CSF, ventricular atrial diameter, and vermis height, width, and area. Centiles were constructed for each measurement. All participants were invited for developmental follow-up. All 2D and 3D measurements, except for atrial diameter, showed a significant positive correlation with gestational age. There was a sex effect on left and total lateral ventricular volumes and the degree of ventricular asymmetry. The 5th, 50th, and 95th centiles and a centile calculator were produced. Developmental follow-up was available for 73.1% of cases [mean chronological age 27.4 (±10.2) months]. We present normative reference charts for fetal brain MRI biometry at 21-38 gestational weeks. Developing growth trajectories will aid in the better understanding of normal fetal brain growth and subsequently of deviations from typical development in high-risk pregnancies or following premature delivery.

  8. [A new method in fetal heart electrophysiology - fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    Wacker-Gussmann, A; Lim, M; Henes, J; Preissl, H; Abele, H; Kiefer, I

    2011-06-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is used as a non-invasive method for registering the electrophysiological fetal heart activity. Superconducting quantum interference device-based magnetometers are currently used to make fMCG recordings. In contrast to fetal ECG, this method is independent of signal loss due to isolating factors such as, especially, the vernix caesaroa between the 27th and 34th weeks of gestation. We report about a term newborn with a third degree AV block, examined by this method.

  9. Fetal cerebral magnetic resonance, neurosonography, the multiverse and the brave new world of fetal medicine.

    PubMed

    Malinger, Gustavo; Paladini, Dario; Pilu, Gianluigi; Timor, Ilan E

    2017-05-31

    Stuart Campbell was the first to use the metaphor of the parallel universes discussing the utilization of ultrasound in pregnancy.(1) The controversy around the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus sonography to diagnose cerebral malformations is just another example in this regard. In one spatio-temporal continuum fetal neurosonography allows an accurate diagnosis of central nervous system anatomy(2-5) and malformations (6-9) including complex lesions such as commissural anomalies (10, 11) , posterior fossa malformations (12, 13) , disruptions (14-16) , and cortical anomalies(17) ; it performs similarly to magnetic resonance in the second and third trimester(18, 19) ; eventually, it allows a precise diagnosis of many malformations since the first trimester.(20-22). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  11. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer D.; Warren, Kenneth R.; Hewitt, Brenda G.

    2010-01-01

    Forty years ago, alcohol was not commonly recognized as a teratogen, an agent that can disrupt the development of a fetus. Today, we understand that prenatal alcohol exposure induces a variety of adverse effects on physical, neurological, and behavioral development. Research supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has contributed to the identification of the range and prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), as well as methods for prevention and treatment of FASD. The worldwide prevalence and high personal and societal costs of FASD speak to the importance of this research. This article briefly examines some of the ways that NIAAA has contributed to our understanding of FASD, the challenges that we still face, and how this research is translated into changes in public policy. PMID:23579942

  12. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  13. The Future of Fetal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    J, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Fetal heart rate monitoring is the most common obstetric procedure, and yet it remains a frustrating technology, plagued by false-positive results and miscommunication between providers. A new generation of invasive and noninvasive monitoring technologies is under development and entering the clinic, including the STAN monitor (Neoventa Medical, Mölndal, Sweden), which improves monitoring accuracy by incorporating a proxy of the fetal ST-segment. New noninvasive fetal electrocardiography and uterine contraction monitoring technologies will bring novel metrics and potentially improved safety to obstetrics in coming years. PMID:23483429

  14. Fetal malposition: impact and management.

    PubMed

    Caughey, Aaron B; Sharshiner, Rita; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2015-06-01

    Fetal malposition, either occiput posterior or transverse (OT), leads to greater risk of cesarean delivery, prolonged labor, and increased perinatal morbidity. Historically, there is a known association between epidural use and malposition that was assumed to be due to the increased discomfort of laboring with a fetus in the occiput posterior position. However, evidence now suggests that the epidural itself may contribute to fetal malposition by impacting the probability of internal rotation. Fetal malposition may be impacted by manual rotation. Manual rotation has been associated with greater rates of delivering in the occiput anterior position and lower rates of cesarean delivery.

  15. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20 to 40 minutes. top of page Contrast material For some MRI exams, a contrast material called gadolinium will need to be injected into a vein in the arm. While contrast material sometimes improves the MRI images, during pregnancy the ...

  16. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  17. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... an image. Repeated exposure can be harmful.An MRI scan takes longer to perform (30 to 60 minutes, ... a treatment plan.Depending on your symptoms, an MRI will scan a specific portion of your body to diagnose: ...

  19. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20 to 40 minutes. top of page Contrast material For some MRI exams, a contrast material called gadolinium will need to be injected into a vein in the arm. While contrast material sometimes improves the MRI images, during pregnancy the ...

  20. Fetal and maternal analgesia/anesthesia for fetal procedures.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; De Buck, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    For many prenatally diagnosed conditions, treatment is possible before birth. These fetal procedures can range from minimal invasive punctions to full open fetal surgery. Providing anesthesia for these procedures is a challenge, where care has to be taken for both mother and fetus. There are specific physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy that have an impact on the anesthetic management of the mother. When providing maternal anesthesia, there is also an impact on the fetus, with concerns for potential negative side effects of the anesthetic regimen used. The question whether the fetus is capable of feeling pain is difficult to answer, but there are indications that nociceptive stimuli have a physiologic reaction. This nociceptive stimulation of the fetus also has the potential for longer-term effects, so there is a need for fetal analgesic treatment. The extent to which a fetus is influenced by the maternal anesthesia depends on the type of anesthesia, with different needs for extra fetal anesthesia or analgesia. When providing fetal anesthesia, the potential negative consequences have to be balanced against the intended benefits of blocking the physiologic fetal responses to nociceptive stimulation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Indices and Detectors for Fetal MCG Actography

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this work, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

  2. Indices and detectors for fetal MCG actography.

    PubMed

    Lutter, William J; Wakai, Ronald T

    2011-06-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this study, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity.

  3. Antenatal Sonography and MRI of Iniencephaly apertus and clausus.

    PubMed

    Gadodia, A; Gupta, P; Sharma, Raju; Kumar, S; Gupta, G

    2010-01-01

    Iniencephaly is a lethal and an extremely rare neural tube defect. It is characterized by fixed retroflection of the head, cervical dysraphism and occipital bone defect. Associated anomalies of the nervous and other systems are frequently present. Most cases are diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound. We report prenatal ultrasonographic, fetal MRI and pathological findings of 2 cases of iniencephaly (one each of iniencephaly apertus and clausus).

  4. Fetal immune response to chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, Suhas G; Presicce, Pietro; Rueda, Cesar M; Jobe, Alan H; Chougnet, Claire A

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a frequent cause of preterm birth and is associated with an increased risk for injury responses in the lung, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and other fetal organs. Chorioamnionitis is a polymicrobial nontraditional infectious disease because the organisms causing chorioamnionitis are generally of low virulence and colonize the amniotic fluid often for extended periods, and the host (mother and the fetus) does not have typical infection-related symptoms such as fever. In this review, we discuss the effects of chorioamnionitis in experimental animal models that mimic the human disease. Our focus is on the immune changes in multiple fetal organs and the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis-induced injury in different fetal compartments. As chorioamnionitis disproportionately affects preterm infants, we discuss the relevant developmental context for the immune system. We also provide a clinical context for the fetal responses. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Mowrey, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system and method for detecting and processing acoustic fetal heart signals transmitted by different signal transmission modes. One signal transmission mode, the direct contact mode, occurs in a first frequency band when the fetus is in direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. Another signal transmission mode, the fluid propagation mode, occurs in a second frequency band when the fetus is in a recessed position with no direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. The second frequency band is relatively higher than the first frequency band. The fetal heart monitoring system and method detect and process acoustic fetal heart signals that are in the first frequency band and in the second frequency band.

  6. Difficult Decisions: Fetal Cell Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.; Parakh, Jal S.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, techniques used, and details of the issues involved in the controversial issue of fetal cell transplantation are discussed. Questions for use in class discussion are provided. Suggestions for beginning a discussion are provided with accompanying questions. (CW)

  7. Fetal immune response to chorioamnionitis

    PubMed Central

    Kallapur, Suhas G.; Presicce, Pietro; Rueda, Cesar M.; Jobe, Alan H.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a frequent cause of preterm birth and is associated with an increased risk for injury responses in the lung, GI tract, brain and other fetal organs. Chorioamnionitis is a polymicrobial non-traditional infectious disease because the organisms causing chorioamnionitis are generally of low virulence and colonize the amniotic fluid often for extended periods, and the host (mother and the fetus) does not have typical infection related symptoms such as fever. In this review, we discuss the effects of chorioamnionitis in experimental animal models that mimic the human disease. Our focus is on the immune changes in multiple fetal organs and the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis induced injury in different fetal compartments. Since chorioamnionitis disproportionately affects preterm infants, we discuss the relevant developmental context for the immune system. We also provide a clinical context for the fetal responses. PMID:24390922

  8. Fetal programming of renal function.

    PubMed

    Dötsch, Jörg; Plank, Christian; Amann, Kerstin

    2012-04-01

    Results from large epidemiological studies suggest a clear relation between low birth weight and adverse renal outcome evident as early as during childhood. Such adverse outcomes may include glomerular disease, hypertension, and renal failure and contribute to a phenomenon called fetal programming. Other factors potentially leading to an adverse renal outcome following fetal programming are maternal diabetes mellitus, smoking, salt overload, and use of glucocorticoids during pregnancy. However, clinical data on the latter are scarce. Here, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms of fetal programming, including reduced nephron number via diminished nephrogenesis and other renal (e.g., via the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and non-renal (e.g., changes in endothelial function) alterations. It appears likely that the outcomes of fetal programming may be influenced or modified postnatally, for example, by the amount of nutrients given at critical times.

  9. Applicability of three-dimensional imaging techniques in fetal medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Werner Júnior, Heron; dos Santos, Jorge Lopes; Belmonte, Simone; Ribeiro, Gerson; Daltro, Pedro; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Marchiori, Edson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To generate physical models of fetuses from images obtained with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, occasionally, computed tomography (CT), in order to guide additive manufacturing technology. Materials and Methods We used 3D-US images of 31 pregnant women, including 5 who were carrying twins. If abnormalities were detected by 3D-US, both MRI and in some cases CT scans were then immediately performed. The images were then exported to a workstation in DICOM format. A single observer performed slice-by-slice manual segmentation using a digital high resolution screen. Virtual 3D models were obtained from software that converts medical images into numerical models. Those models were then generated in physical form through the use of additive manufacturing techniques. Results Physical models based upon 3D-US, MRI, and CT images were successfully generated. The postnatal appearance of either the aborted fetus or the neonate closely resembled the physical models, particularly in cases of malformations. Conclusion The combined use of 3D-US, MRI, and CT could help improve our understanding of fetal anatomy. These three screening modalities can be used for educational purposes and as tools to enable parents to visualize their unborn baby. The images can be segmented and then applied, separately or jointly, in order to construct virtual and physical 3D models. PMID:27818540

  10. Fetal Safety of Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Bahat Dinur, Anat; Koren, Gideon; Matok, Ilan; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Uziel, Elia; Gorodischer, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are largely used in pregnancy for different bacterial infections. Their fetal safety has been studied by several groups, yielding opposing results. In particular, there have been studies claiming an association between macrolides and cardiovascular malformations. Exposure in early infancy has been associated with pyloric stenosis and intussusception. This has led to an avoidance in prescribing macrolides to pregnant women in several Scandinavian countries. The Objectives of the present study was to investigate the fetal safety of this class of drug by linking a large administrative database of drug dispensing and pregnancy outcome in Southern Israel. A computerized database of medications dispensed from 1999 to 2009 to all women registered in the Clalit health maintenance organization in southern Israel was linked with two computerized databases containing maternal and infant hospitalization records. Also, medical pregnancy termination data were analyzed. The following confounders were controlled for: maternal age, ethnicity, maternal pregestational diabetes, parity, and the year the mother gave birth or went through medical pregnancy termination. First- and third-trimester exposures to macrolide antibiotics as a group and to individual drugs were analyzed. During the study period there were 105,492 pregnancies among Clalit women that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 104,380 ended in live births or dead fetuses and 1,112 in abortion due to medical reasons. In the first trimester of pregnancy, 1,033 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between macrolides and either major malformations [odds ratio (OR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84 to 1.38)] or specific malformations, after accounting for maternal age, parity, ethnicity, prepregnancy diabetes, and year of exposure. During the third trimester of pregnancy, 959 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between such exposure and perinatal

  11. Visualising uncertainty: Examining women's views on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kate; Kochetkova, Inna; Whitby, Elspeth

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal screening occupies a prominent role within sociological debates on medical uncertainty. A particular issue concerns the limitations of routine screening which tends to be based on risk prediction. Computer assisted visual technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are now starting to be applied to the prenatal realm to assist in the diagnosis of a range of fetal and maternal disorders (from problems with the fetal brain to the placenta). MRI is often perceived in popular and medical discourse as a technology of certainty and truth. However, little is known about the use of MRI as a tool to confirm or refute the diagnosis of a range of disorders in pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research with pregnant women attending a fetal medicine clinic in the North of England this paper examines the potential role that MRI can play in mediating pregnancy uncertainty. The paper will argue that MRI can create and manage women's feelings of uncertainty during pregnancy. However, while MRI may not always provide women with unequivocal answers, the detailed information provided by MR images combined with the interpretation and communication skills of the radiologist in many ways enables women to navigate the issue. Our analysis of empirical data therefore highlights the value of this novel technological application for women and their partners. It also seeks to stress the merit of taking a productive approach to the study of diagnostic uncertainty, an approach which recognises the concepts dual nature.

  12. Age-Related Increases in Long-Range Connectivity in Fetal Functional Neural Connectivity Networks In Utero

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Grove, Lauren E.; Lozon, Tim A.; Vila, Angela M.; Ye, Yongquan; Nye, Matthew J.; Manning, Janessa H.; Pappas, Athina; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Mody, Swati; Berman, Susan; Hassan, Sonia S.; Romero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Formation of operational neural networks is one of the most significant accomplishments of human fetal brain growth. Recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made it possible to obtain information about brain function during fetal development. Specifically, resting-state fMRI and novel signal covariation approaches have opened up a new avenue for non-invasive assessment of neural functional connectivity (FC) before birth. Early studies in this area have unearthed new insights about principles of prenatal brain function. However, very little is known about the emergence and maturation of neural networks during fetal life. Here, we obtained cross-sectional rs-fMRI data from 39 fetuses between 24 and 38 weeks postconceptual age to examine patterns of connectivity across ten neural FC networks. We identified primitive forms of motor, visual, default mode, thalamic, and temporal networks in the human fetal brain. We discovered the first evidence of increased long-range, cerebral-cerebellar, cortical-subcortical, and intra-hemispheric FC with advancing fetal age. Continued aggregation of data about fundamental neural connectivity systems in utero is essential to establishing principles of connectomics at the beginning of human life. Normative data provides a vital context against which to compare instances of abnormal neurobiological development. PMID:25284273

  13. Age-related increases in long-range connectivity in fetal functional neural connectivity networks in utero.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Moriah E; Grove, Lauren E; Lozon, Tim A; Vila, Angela M; Ye, Yongquan; Nye, Matthew J; Manning, Janessa H; Pappas, Athina; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Mody, Swati; Berman, Susan; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Formation of operational neural networks is one of the most significant accomplishments of human fetal brain growth. Recent advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have made it possible to obtain information about brain function during fetal development. Specifically, resting-state fMRI and novel signal covariation approaches have opened up a new avenue for non-invasive assessment of neural functional connectivity (FC) before birth. Early studies in this area have unearthed new insights about principles of prenatal brain function. However, very little is known about the emergence and maturation of neural networks during fetal life. Here, we obtained cross-sectional rs-fMRI data from 39 fetuses between 24 and 38 weeks postconceptual age to examine patterns of connectivity across ten neural FC networks. We identified primitive forms of motor, visual, default mode, thalamic, and temporal networks in the human fetal brain. We discovered the first evidence of increased long-range, cerebral-cerebellar, cortical-subcortical, and intra-hemispheric FC with advancing fetal age. Continued aggregation of data about fundamental neural connectivity systems in utero is essential to establishing principles of connectomics at the beginning of human life. Normative data provides a vital context against which to compare instances of abnormal neurobiological development.

  14. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Browne, Vaughn A; Julian, Colleen G; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-03-05

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100-4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. PMID:25602072

  16. [Experience with fetal pulsoxymetry].

    PubMed

    Koltai, M; Csécsei, K; Kovatsits, B

    2000-07-30

    The authors have had the opportunity to do research on an embryonic pulsoxymetre in twenty cases when traditional cardiotocographic observation and clinical symptoms had indicated intrauterine risk. The results obtained have been compared with those of a control group where embryonic pulsoxymetrical observation was not effected. The comparison was effected using the same criteria. The experiment aimed at defining how specific embryonic pulsoxymetrical observation may be if used as a screening method as well as whether its application would decrease the number of Cesarian sections. During the process of pulsoxymetrical observation, with positive change of the embryonic heart function with clear as well as meconium stained amniotic fluid, if the embryonic oxygen saturation reached levels over 30%, no Cesarian section was performed. At a saturation level under 30%, two Cesarian sections were required. In the control group without pulsoxymetrical analysis four Cesarian sections had to be performed. The oxygen saturation level of the umbilical cord artery blood of babies who underwent pulsoxymetrical observation and of those born with a Cesarian delivery were almost the same, the blood pH level was acidotic. On conclusion uterine pulsoxymetrical observation objectively reflects the intrauterine distress through fetal blood oxygenation and consequently, influences the number of Cesarian sections.

  17. Noninvasive Fetal ECG analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Gari D.; Silva, Ikaro; Behar, Joachim; Moody, George B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important advances achieved in the field of adult electrocardiography signal processing, the analysis of the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram (NI-FECG) remains a challenge. Currently no gold standard database exists which provides labelled FECG QRS complexes (and other morphological parameters), and publications rely either on proprietary databases or a very limited set of data recorded from few (or more often, just one) individuals. The PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2013 enables to tackle some of these limitations by releasing a set of NI-FECG data publicly to the scientific community in order to evaluate signal processing techniques for NI-FECG extraction. The Challenge aim was to encourage development of accurate algorithms for locating QRS complexes and estimating the QT interval in noninvasive FECG signals. Using carefully reviewed reference QRS annotations and QT intervals as a gold standard, based on simultaneous direct FECG when possible, the Challenge was designed to measure and compare the performance of participants’ algorithms objectively. Multiple challenge events were designed to test basic FHR estimation accuracy, as well as accuracy in measurement of inter-beat (RR) and QT intervals needed as a basis for derivation of other FECG features. This editorial reviews the background issues, the design of the Challenge, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. PMID:25071093

  18. Screening for fetal aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Rink, Britton D; Norton, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    Screening is currently recommended in pregnancy for a number of genetic disorders, chromosomal aneuploidy, and structural birth defects in the fetus regardless of maternal age or family history. There is an overwhelming array of sonographic and maternal serum-based options available for carrying out aneuploidy risk assessment in the first and/or second trimester. As with any screening test, the patient should be made aware that a "negative" test or "normal" ultrasound does not guarantee a healthy baby and a "positive" test does not mean the fetus has the condition. The woman should have both pre- and post-test counseling to discuss the benefits, limitations, and options for additional testing. Rapid advancements of genetic technologies have made it possible to screen for the common aneuploidies traditionally associated with advanced maternal age with improved levels of accuracy beyond serum and ultrasound based testing. Prenatal screening for fetal genetic disorders with cell-free DNA has transformed prenatal care with yet unanswered questions related to the financial, ethical, and appropriate application in the provision of prenatal risk assessment.

  19. Fetal testosterone and empathy.

    PubMed

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin; Hackett, Gerald

    2006-03-01

    In animals, fetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organizing the brain and in later social behavior. In humans, exposure to atypical levels of prenatal androgens may result in masculine behavior and ability patterns. Normal inter-individual variation in fT levels has also been correlated with later sex-typed behavior. In the current study, 38 children (24 male, 14 female), whose fT was analyzed in amniotic fluid, were followed up at age 4. They were asked to describe cartoons with 2 moving triangles whose interactions with each other suggested social relationships and psychological motivations. Females used more mental and affective state terms to describe the cartoons than males. fT was not associated with the frequency of mental or affective state terms. Females also used more intentional propositions than males. fT was negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions, taking sex differences into account. fT was also negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions when males were examined separately. Males used more neutral propositions than females. fT was directly correlated with the frequency of neutral propositions, taking sex differences into account. This relationship was not seen when males and females were examined separately. These findings implicate fT in human social development. The relevance of our findings to the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism is also discussed.

  20. Statistical model of laminar structure for atlas-based segmentation of the fetal brain from in utero MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Chandramohan, Dharshan; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2009-02-01

    Recent advances in MR and image analysis allow for reconstruction of high-resolution 3D images from clinical in utero scans of the human fetal brain. Automated segmentation of tissue types from MR images (MRI) is a key step in the quantitative analysis of brain development. Conventional atlas-based methods for adult brain segmentation are limited in their ability to accurately delineate complex structures of developing tissues from fetal MRI. In this paper, we formulate a novel geometric representation of the fetal brain aimed at capturing the laminar structure of developing anatomy. The proposed model uses a depth-based encoding of tissue occurrence within the fetal brain and provides an additional anatomical constraint in a form of a laminar prior that can be incorporated into conventional atlas-based EM segmentation. Validation experiments are performed using clinical in utero scans of 5 fetal subjects at gestational ages ranging from 20.5 to 22.5 weeks. Experimental results are evaluated against reference manual segmentations and quantified in terms of Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The study demonstrates that the use of laminar depth-encoded tissue priors improves both the overall accuracy and precision of fetal brain segmentation. Particular refinement is observed in regions of the parietal and occipital lobes where the DSC index is improved from 0.81 to 0.82 for cortical grey matter, from 0.71 to 0.73 for the germinal matrix, and from 0.81 to 0.87 for white matter.

  1. Failure to identify antenatal multiple congenital contractures and fetal akinesia--proposal of guidelines to improve diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Filges, Isabel; Hall, Judith G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the rate of prenatal detection of multiple congenital contractures, to identify reasons for the failure of prenatal diagnosis and to propose the first guidelines to improve prenatal diagnosis. We evaluated records on 107 individuals recognized at birth to have Amyoplasia. We reviewed the literature on the onset and development of fetal activity, antenatal clinical signs in fetal movement disorders, prenatal studies of fetal movement and contractures by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and existing guidelines. In 73.8%, the diagnosis was missed prenatally. Correct diagnosis was achieved by the identification of bilateral clubfeet on ultrasound or because mothers perceived reduced fetal movement. Ultrasound would be able to visualize contractures, joint positioning, the quality of fetal movements, lung size, muscle tissue, and bone growth in the first or early second trimester. MRI results are promising. Guidelines for assessing early fetal movement do not exist. Prenatal detection rate of multiple congenital contractures is appalling. Failure of diagnosis precludes further etiologic and diagnostic workup and deprives families of making informed pregnancy choices. Standards for prenatal diagnosis are lacking, but on the basis of current knowledge and expert opinion, we propose the first guidelines for a prenatal diagnostic strategy, discuss future directions and the need for multicentric studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Prenatal three-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of a fetal oral tumor in preparation for the ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure.

    PubMed

    Shih, J C; Hsu, W C; Chou, H C; Peng, S S; Chen, L K; Chang, Y L; Hsieh, F J

    2005-01-01

    Recent attempts at predelivery management of obstructed fetal airways have focused on the EXIT (ex-utero intrapartum treatment) procedure, which allows sufficient time to secure the fetal airway through preservation of uteroplacental gas exchange. We report a fetus with an exophytic oral tumor noted at 34 weeks of gestation. In this case, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound allowed a complete and interactive evaluation of the tumor and related facial anatomy, and confirmed that access to the fetal airway was unlikely during delivery. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) further demonstrated that the tumor originated in the nasopharynx and obstructed the upper airway. Both imaging results led to a final decision to offer an EXIT procedure for the neonate. At 36 weeks' gestation, a successful EXIT procedure was performed to reduce the risk of respiratory distress immediately after birth. This report highlights the value of 3D ultrasound and MRI as essential prerequisites for optimization of the triage process in selecting EXIT candidates.

  3. Cocaine is pharmacologically active in the nonhuman primate fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Benveniste, Helene; Fowler, Joanna S; Rooney, William D; Scharf, Bruce A; Backus, W Walter; Izrailtyan, Igor; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Volkow, Nora D

    2010-01-26

    Cocaine use during pregnancy is deleterious to the newborn child, in part via its disruption of placental blood flow. However, the extent to which cocaine can affect the function of the fetal primate brain is still an unresolved question. Here we used PET and MRI and show that in third-trimester pregnant nonhuman primates, cocaine at doses typically used by drug abusers significantly increased brain glucose metabolism to the same extent in the mother as in the fetus (approximately 100%). Inasmuch as brain glucose metabolism is a sensitive marker of brain function, the current findings provide evidence that cocaine use by a pregnant mother will also affect the function of the fetal brain. We are also unique in showing that cocaine's effects in brain glucose metabolism differed in pregnant (increased) and nonpregnant (decreased) animals, which suggests that the psychoactive effects of cocaine are influenced by the state of pregnancy. Our findings have clinical implications because they imply that the adverse effects of prenatal cocaine exposure to the newborn child include not only cocaine's deleterious effects to the placental circulation, but also cocaine's direct pharmacological effect to the developing fetal brain.

  4. Fetal MR Imaging Analysis of Sirenomelia with Clinico Radiographic Correlation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nori, Madhavi; Prasad, Raghavendra G; Reddy, Arvind K; Cheguri, Sandeep Reddy

    2016-06-01

    Sirenomelia is a social curiosity, a medical and diagnostic challenge prenatally compounded by varied diagnostic difficulties. Prenatal diagnosis of sirenomelia was and continues to be a challenge although von klippel et al., described a case at 10 weeks of gestational age. However, they needed a second imaging at 12(th) week for confirmation. First trimester or early second trimester anatomic survey on ultrasound and MRI is accurate for the diagnosis thereby avoiding unnecessary complex pregnancy. We report a case of second trimester diagnosed sirenomelia, with detailed analysis of image findings on ultrasound and fetal MRI.

  5. Fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) for fetal monitoring during labour.

    PubMed

    Neilson, James P

    2015-12-21

    Hypoxaemia during labour can alter the shape of the fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform, notably the relation of the PR to RR intervals, and elevation or depression of the ST segment. Technical systems have therefore been developed to monitor the fetal ECG during labour as an adjunct to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring with the aim of improving fetal outcome and minimising unnecessary obstetric interference. To compare the effects of analysis of fetal ECG waveforms during labour with alternative methods of fetal monitoring. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (latest search 23 September 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials comparing fetal ECG waveform analysis with alternative methods of fetal monitoring during labour. One review author independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. One review author assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Seven trials (27,403 women) were included: six trials of ST waveform analysis (26,446 women) and one trial of PR interval analysis (957 women). The trials were generally at low risk of bias for most domains and the quality of evidence for ST waveform analysis trials was graded moderate to high. In comparison to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring alone, the use of adjunctive ST waveform analysis made no obvious difference to primary outcomes: births by caesarean section (risk ratio (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96 to 1.08; six trials, 26,446 women; high quality evidence); the number of babies with severe metabolic acidosis at birth (cord arterial pH less than 7.05 and base deficit greater than 12 mmol/L) (average RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.20; six trials, 25,682 babies; moderate quality evidence); or babies with neonatal encephalopathy (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.22; six trials, 26,410 babies; high quality evidence). There were, however, on average

  6. Fetal maceration and retention of fetal bones in a mare.

    PubMed

    Burns, T E; Card, C E

    2000-09-15

    A 19-year-old Quarter Horse mare was evaluated because of bloody vaginal discharge that was apparent immediately following breeding. On transrectal ultrasonography, it was evident that the uterus was filled with fluid containing echogenic particles; linear hyperechoic structures were also visible. Endoscopy was performed, which revealed a number of bones adhered to the cranial wall and floor of the right uterine horn as well as purulent fluid in both uterine horns. Bacterial endometritis and fetal maceration were diagnosed. The mare was treated with antibiotics, and the fetal bones were manually removed from the uterus. Fetal maceration with intrauterine retention of bones is rare in mares. Use of hysteroscopy supplements ultrasonography in the diagnosis of uncommon conditions of the uterus. Macerated bones may be adhered to the endometrium, thereby requiring manual removal.

  7. 3D morphometric analysis of human fetal cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Hamzelou, Kia S; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2012-09-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R (2) = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R (2) = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R (2) = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure.

  8. 3D Morphometric Analysis of Human Fetal Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Hamzelou, Kia S.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R2 = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R2 = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R2 = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R2 = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure. PMID:22198870

  9. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  10. Prenatal brain MRI of fetuses with Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Guillemette-Artur, Prisca; Besnard, Marianne; Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique; Jouannic, Jean-Marie; Garel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    An outbreak of Zika virus was observed in French Polynesia in 2013-2014. Maternal Zika virus infection has been associated with fetal microcephaly and severe cerebral damage. To analyze the MRI cerebral findings in fetuses with intrauterine Zika virus infection. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data. Inclusion criteria comprised cases with (1) estimated conception date between June 2013 and May 2014, (2) available US and MRI scans revealing severe fetal brain lesions and (3) positive polymerase chain reaction for Zika virus in the amniotic fluid. We recorded pregnancy history of Zika virus infection and analyzed US and MRI scans. Three out of 12 cases of severe cerebral lesions fulfilled all inclusion criteria. History of maternal Zika virus infection had been documented in two cases. Calcifications and ventriculomegaly were present at US in all cases. MRI showed micrencephaly (n = 3), low cerebellar biometry (n = 2), occipital subependymal pseudocysts (n = 2), polymicrogyria with laminar necrosis and opercular dysplasia (n = 3), absent (n = 1) or hypoplastic (n = 1) corpus callosum and hypoplastic brainstem (n = 1). Severe cerebral damage was observed in our series, with indirect findings suggesting that the germinal matrix is the principal target for Zika virus. The lesions are very similar to severe forms of congenital cytomegalovirus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections.

  11. Olfactory Development, Part 1: Function, From Fetal Perception to Adult Wine-Tasting.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura; Wei, Xing-Chang

    2017-05-01

    Discrimination of odorous molecules in amniotic fluid occur after 30 weeks' gestation; fetuses exhibit differential responses to maternal diet. Olfactory reflexes enable reliable neonatal testing. Olfactory bulbs can be demonstrated reliably by MRI after 30 weeks' gestation, and their hypoplasia or aplasia also documented by late prenatal and postnatal MRI. Olfactory axons project from nasal epithelium to telencephalon before olfactory bulbs form. Fetal olfactory maturation remains incomplete at term for neuronal differentiation, synaptogenesis, myelination, and persistence of the transitory fetal ventricular recess. Immaturity does not signify nonfunction. Olfaction is the only sensory system without thalamic projection because of its own intrinsic thalamic equivalent. Diverse malformations of the olfactory bulb can be diagnosed by clinical examination, imaging, and neuropathology. Some epileptic auras might be primarily generated in the olfactory bulb. Cranial nerve 1 should be tested in all neonates and especially in patients with brain malformations, endocrinopathies, chromosomopathies, and genetic/metabolic diseases.

  12. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  13. Fetal tissue engineering: diaphragmatic replacement.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Marler, J J; Koka, R; Forse, R A; Mayer, J E; Vacanti, J P

    2001-01-01

    Prosthetic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia has been associated with high complication rates. This study was aimed at applying fetal tissue engineering to diaphragmatic replacement. Fetal lambs underwent harvest of skeletal muscle specimens. Once expanded in vitro, fetal myoblasts were suspended in a collagen hydrogel submitted to controlled radial tension. The construct was then placed in a bioreactor. After birth, all animals underwent creation of 2 diaphragmatic defects. One defect was repaired with the autologous-engineered construct placed in between 2 acellular supporting membranes and the other with an identical construct but without any cells. Each animal was its own control (graft, n = 10). Animals were killed at different time-points postimplantation for histologic examination. Statistical analysis was by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Fetal myoblasts expanded up to twice as fast as neonatal cells. Hydrogel-based radial tension enhanced construct architecture by eliciting cell organization within the scaffold. No eventration was present in 4 of 5 engineered constructs but in 0 of 5 acellular grafts (P<.05). At harvest, engineered constructs were thick and histologically resembled normal skeletal muscle, whereas acellular grafts were thin, floppy, and showed low cell density with increased fibrosis. Unlike acellular grafts, engineered cellular diaphragmatic constructs are anatomically and histologically similar to normal muscle. Fetal tissue engineering may be a viable alternative for diaphragmatic replacement.

  14. Fetal nutrition and adult disease.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, K M; Barker, D J

    2000-05-01

    Recent research suggests that several of the major diseases of later life, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes, originate in impaired intrauterine growth and development. These diseases may be consequences of "programming," whereby a stimulus or insult at a critical, sensitive period of early life has permanent effects on structure, physiology, and metabolism. Evidence that coronary heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes are programmed came from longitudinal studies of 25,000 UK men and women in which size at birth was related to the occurrence of the disease in middle age. People who were small or disproportionate (thin or short) at birth had high rates of coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal glucose-insulin metabolism. These relations were independent of the length of gestation, suggesting that cardiovascular disease is linked to fetal growth restriction rather than to premature birth. Replication of the UK findings has led to wide acceptance that low rates of fetal growth are associated with cardiovascular disease in later life. Impaired growth and development in utero seem to be widespread in the population, affecting many babies whose birth weights are within the normal range. Although the influences that impair fetal development and program adult cardiovascular disease remain to be defined, there are strong pointers to the importance of the fetal adaptations invoked when the maternoplacental nutrient supply fails to match the fetal nutrient demand.

  15. Fetal risk in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cheri P; Goodman, Lawrence H

    2012-02-01

    It is not uncommon to encounter situations in which radiologic examinations are necessary for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of an expectant mother. The potential deleterious health consequences to the developing embryo and fetus from in utero irradiation include fetal death, congenital malformations, growth retardation, and carcinogenic and mutagenic effects. The likelihood of each effect is greatly dependent on the radiation dose and the gestational age of the conceptus at the time of exposure. In general, the average fetal doses from diagnostic imaging are <50 mGy (5 rad) and have not been associated with any significant adverse fetal effects. However, each case should be evaluated on an individual basis, and the risks should be explained to the patient before the examination. In addition, every effort should be made to reduce the fetal dose to as low as reasonably achievable. The biological effects of in utero radiation exposure, estimated fetal doses from various radiologic examinations, and general guidelines regarding diagnostic imaging during pregnancy will be discussed in this article. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Two cases of fetal goiter

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Ashish; Reddy, Murli Manohar; Panchani, Roopal; Varma, Tarun; Gupta, Nitinranjan; Tripathi, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior fetal neck masses are rarely encountered. Careful routine ultrasound screening can reveal intrauterine fetal goiters (FGs). The incidence of goitrous hypothyroidism is 1 in 30,000-50,000 live births. The consequences of both FG and impaired thyroid function are serious. Aims and Objectives: To emphasize role of ultrasound in both invasive and non-invasive management of FG. Materials and Methods: Two pregnant patients, during second trimester, underwent routine antenatal ultrasound revealing FG, were investigated and managed. Results: Case 1: Revealed FG with fetal hypothyroidism. Intra-amniotic injection l-thyroxine given. Follow-up ultrasound confirmed the reduction of the goiter size. At birth, thyroid dyshormogenesis was suspected and neonate discharged on 50 mcg levothyroxine/day with normal growth and development so far. Case 2: Hypothyroid mother with twin pregnancy revealed FG, in twin 1, confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 × 1.63 cm). The other twin had no thyroid swelling. Cordocentesis confirmed hypothyroidism in twin 1. Maternal thyroxine dose increased as per biochemical parameters leading to reduction in FG size. Mother delivered preterm and none of the twins had thyroid swelling. Fetal euthyroidism was confirmed on biochemical screening. Conclusion: FG during pregnancy should be thoroughly evaluated, diagnosed and immediately treated; although in utero options for fetal hypothyroidism management are available, emphasis should be laid on non-invasive procedures. Newer and better resolution techniques in ultrasonography are more specific and at the same time are less harmful. PMID:23565428

  17. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ≤5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ≤5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI

  18. Parietal dysfunction during number processing in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Woods, K.J.; Meintjes, E.M.; Molteno, C.D.; Jacobson, S.W.; Jacobson, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Number processing deficits are frequently seen in children prenatally exposed to alcohol. Although the parietal lobe, which is known to mediate several key aspects of number processing, has been shown to be structurally impaired in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), effects on functional activity in this region during number processing have not previously been investigated. This fMRI study of 49 children examined differences in activation associated with prenatal alcohol exposure in five key parietal regions involved in number processing, using tasks involving simple addition and magnitude comparison. Despite generally similar behavioral performance, in both tasks greater prenatal alcohol exposure was related to less activation in an anterior section of the right horizontal intraparietal sulcus known to mediate mental representation and manipulation of quantity. Children with fetal alcohol syndrome and partial fetal alcohol syndrome appeared to compensate for this deficit by increased activation of the angular gyrus during the magnitude comparison task. PMID:26199871

  19. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    PubMed Central

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO presented at 31 + 3/7 weeks with eclampsia, HELLP and subsequent fetal death. MRI confirmed PRES. NMO may be associated with eclampsia and leads to adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Posited mechanisms include antibody-mediated placental damage and a heightened risk of eclampsia-associated PRES. Further characterization of the course of NMO and its relationship with pregnancy outcomes in larger series would be invaluable. PMID:25584107

  20. Parietal dysfunction during number processing in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Woods, K J; Meintjes, E M; Molteno, C D; Jacobson, S W; Jacobson, J L

    2015-01-01

    Number processing deficits are frequently seen in children prenatally exposed to alcohol. Although the parietal lobe, which is known to mediate several key aspects of number processing, has been shown to be structurally impaired in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), effects on functional activity in this region during number processing have not previously been investigated. This fMRI study of 49 children examined differences in activation associated with prenatal alcohol exposure in five key parietal regions involved in number processing, using tasks involving simple addition and magnitude comparison. Despite generally similar behavioral performance, in both tasks greater prenatal alcohol exposure was related to less activation in an anterior section of the right horizontal intraparietal sulcus known to mediate mental representation and manipulation of quantity. Children with fetal alcohol syndrome and partial fetal alcohol syndrome appeared to compensate for this deficit by increased activation of the angular gyrus during the magnitude comparison task.

  1. [Temporomandibular joint: MRI diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Kress, B; Schmitter, M

    2005-09-01

    MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) requires 1.5 T. The radiologist must be familiar with the anatomy and pathology of the TMJ. This review gives a description of MRI protocols for the TMJ, and MRI anatomy and pathology of the TMJ (open and closed mouth) by means of MR images and drawings. Diagnosing of the TMJ related diseases depends on standardized clinical and MR examinations. Therefore close interdisciplinary cooperation between dentist and radiologist is necessary.

  2. MRI brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are expected to be allowed to request MRI scans for adults for selected clinically appropriate indications from November 2013 as part of the expansion of Medicare-funded MRI services announced by the Federal Government in 2011. This article aims to give a brief overview of MRI brain imaging relevant to GPs, which will facilitate explanation of scan findings and management planning with their patients. Basic imaging techniques, common findings and terminology are presented using some illustrative case examples.

  3. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor); Wynkoop, Mark W. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. H. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system preferably comprising a backing plate having a generally concave front surface and a generally convex back surface, and at least one sensor element attached to the concave front surface for acquiring acoustic fetal heart signals produced by a fetus within a body. The sensor element has a shape that conforms to the generally concave back surface of the backing plate. In one embodiment, the at least one sensor element comprises an inner sensor, and a plurality of outer sensors surrounding the inner sensor. The fetal heart monitoring system can further comprise a web belt, and a web belt guide movably attached to the web belt. The web belt guide being is to the convex back surface of the backing plate.

  4. Fetal effects of psychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Amy L; Ponder, Kathryn L; Padbury, James F; Lester, Barry M

    2009-09-01

    Psychoactive drug use by pregnant women has the potential to effect fetal development; the effects are often thought to be drug-specific and gestational age dependent. This article describes the effects of three drugs with similar molecular targets that involve monoaminergic transmitter systems: cocaine, methamphetamine, and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used to treat maternal depression during pregnancy. We propose a possible common epigenetic mechanism for their potential effects on the developing child. We suggest that exposure to these substances acts as a stressor that affects fetal programming, disrupts fetal placental monoamine transporter expression and alters neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter system development. We also discuss neurobehavioral techniques that may be useful in the early detection of the effects of in utero drug exposure.

  5. [Fetal macrosomia: mode of delivery].

    PubMed

    Tatarova, S; Popov, I; Khristova, P

    2004-01-01

    This study was provided among 1847 deliveries from January, 1 to December, 31, 2003. The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" and the mode of delivery. We found that among the cases with birth weight > or = 4000 g and antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" the rate of cesarean section was fourfold higher than among the cases without such a diagnosis. There weren't statistically significant correlation between the cases with antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia " and the cases with estimated birth weight < or = 3999g in reference to the mother's age and weight, parity, fundal height and abdominal circumference. There are insignificant differences between both of groups in reference to gestacional age and birth.

  6. Physiology of the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Torvid

    2005-12-01

    Our understanding of fetal circulatory physiology is based on experimental animal data, and this continues to be an important source of new insight into developmental mechanisms. A growing number of human studies have investigated the human physiology, with results that are similar but not identical to those from animal studies. It is time to appreciate these differences and base more of our clinical approach on human physiology. Accordingly, the present review focuses on distributional patterns and adaptational mechanisms that were mainly discovered by human studies. These include cardiac output, pulmonary and placental circulation, fetal brain and liver, venous return to the heart, and the fetal shunts (ductus venosus, foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus). Placental compromise induces a set of adaptational and compensational mechanisms reflecting the plasticity of the developing circulation, with both short- and long-term implications. Some of these aspects have become part of the clinical physiology of today with consequences for surveillance and treatment.

  7. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  8. Fetal heart and uterine contraction monitor (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fetal heart monitor and uterine contraction monitor provide a continuous record of the baby's heart rate and the mother's contraction rate as labor progresses. This device can provide early warning of fetal distress.

  9. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome a Global Problem

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163096.html Fetal Alcohol Syndrome a Global Problem: Report Countries with highest alcohol ... 000 children worldwide are born each year with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a new report finds. The syndrome refers ...

  10. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that ...

  11. Verification of fetal brain responses by coregistration of fetal ultrasound and fetal magnetoencephalography data.

    PubMed

    Micheli, C; McCubbin, J; Murphy, P; Eswaran, H; Lowery, C L; Ortiz, E; Preissl, H

    2010-01-15

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is used to study neurological functions of the developing fetus by measuring magnetic signals generated by electrical sources within the fetal brain. For this aim either auditory or visual stimuli are presented and evoked brain activity or spontaneous activity is measured at the sensor level. However a limiting factor of this approach is the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of recorded signals. To overcome this limitation, advanced signal processing techniques such as spatial filters (e.g., beamformer) can be used to increase SNR. One crucial aspect of this technique is the forward model and, in general, a simple spherical head model is used. This head model is an integral part of a model search approach to analyze the data due to the lack of exact knowledge about the location of the fetal head. In the present report we overcome this limitation by a coregistration of volumetric ultrasound images with fMEG data. In a first step we validated the ultrasound to fMEG coregistration with a phantom and were able to show that the coregistration error is below 2 cm. In the second step we compared the results gained by the model search approach to the exact location of the fetal head determined on pregnant mothers by ultrasound. The results of this study clearly show that the results of the model search approach are in accordance with the location of the fetal head.

  12. Local tissue growth patterns underlying normal fetal human brain gyrification quantified in utero

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Existing knowledge of growth patterns in the living fetal human brain is based upon in utero imaging studies by MRI and ultrasound, which describe overall growth and provided mainly qualitative findings. However, formation of the complex folded cortical structure of the adult brain requires, in part, differential rates of regional tissue growth. To better understand these local tissue growth patterns, we applied recent advances in fetal MRI motion correction and computational image analysis techniques to 40 normal fetal human brains covering a period of primary sulcal formation (20-28 gestational weeks). Growth patterns were mapped by quantifying tissue locations that were expanding more or less quickly than the overall cerebral growth rate, which reveal increasing structural complexity. We detected increased local relative growth rates in the formation of the pre- and post-central gyri, right superior temporal gyrus and opercula, which differentiated between the constant growth rate in underlying cerebral mantle and the accelerating rate in the cortical plate undergoing folding. Analysis focused on the cortical plate revealed greater volume increases in parietal and occipital regions compared to the frontal lobe. Cortical plate growth patterns constrained to narrower age ranges showed that gyrification, reflected by greater growth rates, was more pronounced after 24 gestational weeks. Local hemispheric volume asymmetry was located in the posterior peri-Sylvian area associated with structural lateralization in the mature brain. These maps of fetal brain growth patterns construct a spatially specific baseline of developmental biomarkers with which to correlate abnormal development in the human. PMID:21414909

  13. Reconstruction of a geometrically correct diffusion tensor image of a moving human fetal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. J.; Koob, Meriam; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Robinson, Ashley J.; Poskitt, Kenneth J.; Miller, Steven P.; Studholme, Colin

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies reported the development of methods for rigid registration of 2D fetal brain imaging data to correct for unconstrained fetal and maternal motion, and allow the formation of a true 3D image of conventional fetal brain anatomy from conventional MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging provides additional valuable insight into the developing brain anatomy, however the correction of motion artifacts in clinical fetal diffusion imaging is still a challenging problem. This is due to the challenging problem of matching lower signal-to-noise ratio diffusion weighted EPI slice data to recover between-slice motion, compounded by the presence of possible geometric distortions in the EPI data. In addition, the problem of estimating a diffusion model (such as a tensor) on a regular grid that takes into account the inconsistent spatial and orientation sampling of the diffusion measurements needs to be solved in a robust way. Previous methods have used slice to volume registration within the diffusion dataset. In this work, we describe an alternative approach that makes use of an alignment of diffusion weighted EPI slices to a conventional structural MRI scan which provides a geometrically correct reference image. After spatial realignment of each diffusion slice, a tensor field representing the diffusion profile is estimated by weighted least squared fitting. By qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the results, we confirm the proposed algorithm successfully corrects the motion and reconstructs the diffusion tensor field.

  14. Gestational diabetes affects fetal autophagy.

    PubMed

    Avagliano, Laura; Massa, Valentina; Terraneo, Laura; Samaja, Michele; Doi, Patrizia; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2017-07-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in the preservation of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation has been implicated in the development of metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Gestational diabetes mellitus represents a risk for fetal morbidity and mortality. The present study focuses on the autophagy process in human diabetic placenta and fetal pancreas, compared with controls. Analysis of the autophagy markers LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 suggests an impairment of the autophagy process in diabetic placentas. Results indicate an association between gestational diabetes and autophagy, emphasizing the importance of unravelling the mechanisms regulating this relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic requirements for fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Milley, J R; Simmons, M A

    1979-09-01

    Table 1 outlines a metabolic balance sheet for the sheep fetus. It is clear that maternal substrate concentrations as well as placental function are important in assuring the provision of adequate substrate to meet fetal metabolic and growth requirements. It is intriguing that the fetus appears to use substrates not usually regarded as important in extrauterine diets (lactate) and to use substrates for catabolic purposes normally thought to be primarily anabolic substrates (amino acids). This information emphasizes the hazards of extrapolating metabolic and nutritional patterns seen in extrauterine life in reaching conclusions concerning the fetus. It likewise emphasizes the importance of ongoing studies in maternal and fetal nutrition and metabolism.

  16. Fetal origins of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barker, D J

    1999-04-01

    Low birthweight, thinness and short body length at birth are now known to be associated with increased rates of cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes in adult life. The fetal origins hypothesis proposes that these diseases originate through adaptations which the fetus makes when it is undernourished. These adaptations may be cardiovascular, metabolic or endocrine. They permanently change the structure and function of the body. Prevention of the diseases may depend on prevention of imbalances in fetal growth or imbalances between prenatal and postnatal growth, or imbalances in nutrient supply to the fetus.

  17. A Sensitive Magnetocardiograph for Fetal Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract-To use fetal magnetocardiography for diagnostic purposes, it is important to know the requirements for the instrument. One of the... magnetocardiography , fetal arrhythmia I. INTRODUCTION The fetal magnetocardiograph is intended to measure magnetic fields arising from currents generated in... Magnetocardiography in the diagnosis of fetal arrhythmia” Br. J. Obstet. Gynaecol., 1999, 106, pp. 1200-1208. [2] T. Menéndes, S. Achenbach, E

  18. The fetal patient – ethical aspects of fetal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deprest, J.; Toelen, J.; Debyser, Z.; Rodrigues, C.; Devlieger, R.; De Catte, L.; Lewi, L.; Van Mieghem, T.; Naulaers, G.; Vandevelde, M.; Claus, F.; Dierickx, K.

    2011-01-01

    The pregnant patient is a vulnerable subject, and even more so when a serious fetal condition is diagnosed. (Invasive) fetal therapy should only be offered when there is a good chance that the life of the fetus will be saved, or irreversible damage by the disease or disability is prevented. Following diagnosis of a potentially treatable condition, the patient needs to be referred to a center with sufficient expertise in diagnosis and all therapeutic options. Preferences of the physician towards one or another antenatal intervention is not at stake prior to that moment. When fetal therapy is justified, it should be offered with full respect for maternal choice and individual assessment and perception of potential risks, and should be at the location where there is sufficient expertise. For therapies of unproven benefit, the absence of evidence must be disclosed, and therapy should only be undertaken with full voluntary consent of the mother. These ought to be undertaken within well designed and approved trials and only by experts in the treatment modality. Potential risks and eventual morbidities in case of therapeutic failure should be part of the counselling, neither should fetal therapy be presented as an alternative to termination of pregnancy PMID:24753868

  19. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Principles for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess,Donna M.; Streissguth, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the leading cause of mental retardation, often goes unrecognized because of social and emotional taboos about alcohol and alcoholism. This article describes medical and behavioral characteristics of FAS children and describes guiding principles for educators, based on early intervention, teaching communication and…

  20. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Principles for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess,Donna M.; Streissguth, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the leading cause of mental retardation, often goes unrecognized because of social and emotional taboos about alcohol and alcoholism. This article describes medical and behavioral characteristics of FAS children and describes guiding principles for educators, based on early intervention, teaching communication and…

  1. Investigation of multichannel phased array performance for fetal MR imaging on 1.5T clinical MR system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Pang, Yong; Vigneron, Daniel; Glenn, Orit; Xu, Duan; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2011-01-01

    Fetal MRI on 1.5T clinical scanner has been increasingly becoming a powerful imaging tool for studying fetal brain abnormalities in vivo. Due to limited availability of dedicated fetal phased arrays, commercial torso or cardiac phased arrays are routinely used for fetal scans, which are unable to provide optimized SNR and parallel imaging performance with a small number coil elements, and insufficient coverage and filling factor. This poses a demand for the investigation and development of dedicated and efficient radiofrequency (RF) hardware to improve fetal imaging. In this work, an investigational approach to simulate the performance of multichannel flexible phased arrays is proposed to find a better solution to fetal MR imaging. A 32 channel fetal array is presented to increase coil sensitivity, coverage and parallel imaging performance. The electromagnetic field distribution of each element of the fetal array is numerically simulated by using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The array performance, including B(1) coverage, parallel reconstructed images and artifact power, is then theoretically calculated and compared with the torso array. Study results show that the proposed array is capable of increasing B(1) field strength as well as sensitivity homogeneity in the entire area of uterus. This would ensure high quality imaging regardless of the location of the fetus in the uterus. In addition, the paralleling imaging performance of the proposed fetal array is validated by using artifact power comparison with torso array. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the 32 channel flexible array for fetal MR imaging at 1.5T.

  2. Practice Bulletin No. 173: Fetal Macrosomia.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    Suspected fetal macrosomia is encountered commonly in obstetric practice. As birth weight increases, the likelihood of labor abnormalities, shoulder dystocia, birth trauma, and permanent injury to the neonate increases. The purpose of this document is to quantify those risks, address the accuracy and limitations of methods for estimating fetal weight, and suggest clinical management for a pregnancy with suspected fetal macrosomia.

  3. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  5. MRI Scans - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... español) Ukrainian (українська ) Arabic (العربية) Expand Section MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section MRI ( ...

  6. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    All Indian Pueblo Council, Albuquerque, NM.

    The guide was developed to assist professionals working with American Indian people as a resource in obtaining printed and non-printed materials on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. The resource guide is divided into the following sections: films (4), books (5), bibliographies (2), pamphlets (16), posters (5), slides (2), training curriculum (3), and…

  9. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa

    This resource guide provides information on programs, publications, organizations, and other resources related to prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The purpose of this guide is to assist health care providers to comply with Indian Health Service (IHS) FAS goals and objectives. It gives examples of community approaches to FAS prevention,…

  10. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    All Indian Pueblo Council, Albuquerque, NM.

    The guide was developed to assist professionals working with American Indian people as a resource in obtaining printed and non-printed materials on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. The resource guide is divided into the following sections: films (4), books (5), bibliographies (2), pamphlets (16), posters (5), slides (2), training curriculum (3), and…

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa

    This resource guide provides information on programs, publications, organizations, and other resources related to prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The purpose of this guide is to assist health care providers to comply with Indian Health Service (IHS) FAS goals and objectives. It gives examples of community approaches to FAS prevention,…

  12. Fetal growth restriction: current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Caetano, Ana Carolina Rabachini; Zamarian, Ana Cristina Perez; Mazzola, Jaqueline Brandão; Silva, Carolina Pacheco; Marçal, Vivian Macedo Gomes; Lobo, Thalita Frutuoso; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2017-05-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a condition that affects 5-10% of pregnancies and is the second most common cause of perinatal mortality. This review presents the most recent knowledge on FGR and focuses on the etiology, classification, prediction, diagnosis, and management of the condition, as well as on its neurological complications. The Pubmed, SCOPUS, and Embase databases were searched using the term "fetal growth restriction". Fetal growth restriction (FGR) may be classified as early or late depending on the time of diagnosis. Early FGR (<32 weeks) is associated with substantial alterations in placental implantation with elevated hypoxia, which requires cardiovascular adaptation. Perinatal morbidity and mortality rates are high. Late FGR (≥32 weeks) presents with slight deficiencies in placentation, which leads to mild hypoxia and requires little cardiovascular adaptation. Perinatal morbidity and mortality rates are lower. The diagnosis of FGR may be clinical; however, an arterial and venous Doppler ultrasound examination is essential for diagnosis and follow-up. There are currently no treatments to control FGR; the time at which pregnancy is interrupted is of vital importance for protecting both the mother and fetus. Early diagnosis of FGR is very important, because it enables the identification of the etiology of the condition and adequate monitoring of the fetal status, thereby minimizing risks of premature birth and intrauterine hypoxia.

  13. Fetal programming and environmental exposures ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs from uterine tissue, the placenta, the maternal blood supply, and other sources. Recent evidence has made clear that the process is not based entirely on genetics, but rather on a delicate series of interactions between genes and the environment. It is likely that epigenctic (“above the genome”) changes are responsible for modifying gene expression in the developing fetus, and these modifications can have long-lasting health impacts. Determining which epigenetic regulators are most vital in embryonic development will improve pregnancy outcomes and our ability to treat and prevent disorders that emerge later in life. “Fetal Programming and Environmental Exposures: Implications for Prenatal Care and Preterm Birth’ began with a keynote address by Frederick vom Saal, who explained that low-level exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) perturbs hormone systems in utero and can have negative effects on fetal development. vom Saal presented data on the LOC bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking compound found in many plastics. He suggested that low-dose exposure to LOCs can alter the development process and enhance chances of acquiring adult diseases, such as breastcancer, diabetes, and even developmental disorders such as attention deficit disorder (ADHD).’ Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs

  14. Fetal programming of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Faa, Gavino; Manchia, Mirko; Pintus, Roberta; Gerosa, Clara; Marcialis, Maria Antonietta; Fanos, Vassilios

    2016-09-01

    Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia. The perinatal epigenetic factors have been divided in two main groups: maternal factors and fetal factors. The maternal factors include diet, smoking, alcoholism, hypertension, malnutrition, trace elements, stress, diabetes, substance abuse, and exposure to environmental toxicants, while the fetal factors include hypoxia/asphyxia, placental insufficiency, prematurity, low birth weight, drugs administered to the mother or to the baby, and all factors causing intrauterine growth restriction. A better comprehension of the possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases may help researchers and clinicians develop new diagnostic tools and treatments to offer these patients a tailored medical treatment strategy to improve their quality of life. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:207-223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Hypoxia and Fetal Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A.J.; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although “normal” hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart’s development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation. PMID:20712587

  16. [Fetal alcohol syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cahuana, A; Krauel, J; Molina, V; Lizárraga, I; Alfonso, H

    1977-01-01

    A case of fetal alcohol syndrome is reported in a intrauterine growth retarded female newborn with dysmorphic features and congenital cardiopathy whose mother suffered from a chronic ethylism during pregnancy. Authors compare this case findings with the reported revisions of other authors.

  17. The influence of fetal ethanol exposure on subsequent development of the cerebral cortex as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Leigland, Lindsey A; Ford, Matthew M; Lerch, Jason P; Kroenke, Christopher D

    2013-06-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome and related disorders (commonly referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, or FASD) cause significant hardships to the individuals affected. Previously, histological studies in animals have characterized developmental cerebral cortical abnormalities that result from prenatal ethanol (EtOH) exposure. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have identified abnormalities associated with fetal EtOH exposure in the cerebral cortices of human children and adolescents. However, there is still a need to bridge the gap between human MRI studies and animal histological studies. The goal of the research presented here was to perform postmortem MRI experiments on rodents, during time periods relative to late human gestation through adulthood, to characterize anomalies associated with FASD throughout development. Additionally, by determining how histologically identified abnormalities are manifest in MRI measurements specifically during the critical early time points, neuroimaging-based biomarkers of FASD can potentially be identified at much earlier ages in humans, thus reducing the impact of these disorders. Cerebral cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were characterized by ex vivo MRI in Long-Evans rat pups born from dams that were EtOH-treated, maltose/dextrin-treated, or untreated throughout gestation at 6 developmental time points (postnatal day [P] 0, P3, P6, P11, P19, and P60). Brain volume, isocortical volume, isocortical thickness, and isocortical surface area were all demonstrated to be reduced following prenatal exposure to EtOH. Significant differences among the treatment groups were observed throughout the range of time points studied, allowing for a comprehensive view of FASD influenced MRI outcomes throughout development. Isocortical surface area and isocortical thickness results contributed independent information important to interpreting effects of prenatal EtOH exposure on cerebral cortical development

  18. [Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) of the scrotum--initial results and comparison with sonography. II: Intratesticular pathology].

    PubMed

    Hajek, P C

    1987-11-01

    The wide differences in signal intensity in the scrotum provide an excellent background for the assessment of intratesticular pathology. Besides hemorrhage, all intratesticular pathologic changes have lower signal intensities than surrounding normal testicular tissue. Proton density- and T1-weighted images are essential for the characterization of hematomas, abscesses and hydroceles. Clear delineation of the tunica albuginea is necessary for precise assessment of trauma and tumors. Because a ruptured tunica albuginea can be visualized and because of its high sensitivity, MRI is superior to sonography in the diagnosis of trauma and orchitis. In addition, MRI is the imaging modality of choice for characterization and precise assessment of tumor size as well as for the exclusion of pathologic changes.

  19. Temperature-sensitive mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MRT4, GRC5, SLA2 and THS1 genes result in defects in mRNA turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, D; Belk, J P; Jacobson, A

    1999-01-01

    In a screen for factors involved in mRNA turnover, four temperature-sensitive yeast strains (ts1189, ts942, ts817, and ts1100) exhibited defects in the decay of several mRNAs. Complementation of the growth and mRNA decay defects, and genetic experiments, revealed that ts1189 is mutated in the previously unknown MRT4 gene, ts942 is mutated in GRC5 (encoding the L9 ribosomal protein), ts817 contains a mutation in SLA2 (encoding a membrane protein), and ts1100 contains a mutation in THS1 (encoding the threonyl-tRNA synthetase). Three of the four mutants (mrt4, grc5, and sla2) were not defective in protein synthesis, suggesting that these strains contain mutations in factors that may play a specific role in mRNA decay. The mRNA stabilization observed in the ths1 strain, however, could be due to the significant drop in translation observed in this mutant at 37 degrees. While the three interesting mutants appear to encode novel mRNA decay factors, at least one could be linked to a previously characterized mRNA decay pathway. The growth and mRNA decay defects of ts942 (grc5) cells were suppressed by overexpression of the NMD3 gene, encoding a protein shown to participate in a two-hybrid interaction with the nonsense-mediated decay protein Upf1p. PMID:10471698

  20. [Prenatal diagnosis and management of fetal megacystis].

    PubMed

    El Fekih, Chiraz; Ouerdiane, Nadia; Mourali, Mechaal; Oueslati, Seddik; Oueslati, Boujemaa; Binous, Naoufel; Chaabène, Mounira; Ben Zineb, Nabil

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of fetal megacystis particularly in the first trimester requires assessement of pronostic and aetiologycal criteria. Report a new case. we report a case of severe megacystis in female fetus diagnosed at 23 weeks of gestation. There are no other associated ultrasound findings. Fetal karyotyping was normal (46XX). Termination of pregnancy for medical indications was realised because of progressive enlargement of the fetal bladder. Post-mortem examination shown megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. Fetal megacystis is a severe condition when diagnosed early in pregnancy. Ultrasonography follow-up and fetal karyotyping are important to evaluate prognosis.

  1. Fetal neurosurgery: current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Saadai, Payam; Runyon, Timothy; Farmer, Diana L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital CNS abnormalities have been targets for prenatal intervention since the founding of fetal surgery 30 years ago, but with historically variable results. Open fetal neurosurgery for myelomenigocele has demonstrated the most promising results of any CNS malformation. Improvements in the understanding of congenital diseases and in fetal surgical techniques have reopened the door to applying fetal surgery to other congenital CNS abnormalities. Advances in gene therapy, bioengineering and neonatal neuroprotection will aid in the future expansion of fetal neurosurgery to other CNS disorders. PMID:21709818

  2. Fetal alcohol exposure leads to abnormal olfactory bulb development and impaired odor discrimination in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Children whose mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy exhibit widespread brain abnormalities and a complex array of behavioral disturbances. Here, we used a mouse model of fetal alcohol exposure to investigate relationships between brain abnormalities and specific behavioral alterations during adulthood. Results Mice drank a 10% ethanol solution throughout pregnancy. When fetal alcohol-exposed offspring reached adulthood, we used high resolution MRI to conduct a brain-wide screen for structural changes and found that the largest reduction in volume occurred in the olfactory bulbs. Next, we tested adult mice in an associative olfactory task and found that fetal alcohol exposure impaired discrimination between similar odors but left odor memory intact. Finally, we investigated olfactory bulb neurogenesis as a potential mechanism by performing an in vitro neurosphere assay, in vivo labeling of new cells using BrdU, and in vivo labeling of new cells using a transgenic reporter system. We found that fetal alcohol exposure decreased the number of neural precursor cells in the subependymal zone and the number of new cells in the olfactory bulbs during the first few postnatal weeks. Conclusions Using a combination of techniques, including structural brain imaging, in vitro and in vivo cell detection methods, and behavioral testing, we found that fetal alcohol exposure results in smaller olfactory bulbs and impairments in odor discrimination that persist into adulthood. Furthermore, we found that these abnormalities in olfactory bulb structure and function may arise from deficits in the generation of new olfactory bulb neurons during early postnatal development. PMID:21736737

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  4. Scarless fetal skin wound healing update.

    PubMed

    Lo, David D; Zimmermann, Andrew S; Nauta, Allison; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2012-09-01

    Scar formation, a physiologic process in adult wound healing, can have devastating effects for patients; a multitude of pathologic outcomes, affecting all organ systems, stems from an amplification of this process. In contrast to adult wound repair, the early-gestation fetal skin wound heals without scar formation, a phenomenon that appears to be intrinsic to fetal skin. An intensive research effort has focused on unraveling the mechanisms that underlie scarless fetal wound healing in an attempt to improve the quality of healing in both children and adults. Unique properties of fetal cells, extracellular matrix, cytokine profile, and gene expression contribute to this scarless repair. Despite the great increase in knowledge gained over the past decades, the precise mechanisms regulating scarless fetal healing remain unknown. Herein, we describe the current proposed mechanisms underlying fetal scarless wound healing in an effort to recapitulate the fetal phenotype in the postnatal environment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Gas-liquid Phase Distribution and Void Fraction Measurements Using the MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daidzic, N. E.; Schmidt, E.; Hasan, M. M.; Altobelli, S.

    2004-01-01

    We used a permanent-magnet MRI system to estimate the integral and spatially- and/or temporally-resolved void-fraction distributions and flow patterns in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Air was introduced at the bottom of the stagnant liquid column using an accurate and programmable syringe pump. Air flow rates were varied between 1 and 200 ml/min. The cylindrical non-conducting test tube in which two-phase flow was measured was placed in a 2.67 kGauss MRI with MRT spectrometer/imager. Roughly linear relationship has been obtained for the integral void-fraction, obtained by volume-averaging of the spatially-resolved signals, and the air flow rate in upward direction. The time-averaged spatially-resolved void fraction has also been obtained for the quasi-steady flow of air in a stagnant liquid column. No great accuracy is claimed as this was an exploratory proof-of-concept type of experiment. Preliminary results show that MRI a non-invasive and non-intrusive experimental technique can indeed provide a wealth of different qualitative and quantitative data and is especially well suited for averaged transport processes in adiabatic and diabatic multi-phase and/or multi-component flows.

  6. MRI compared to conventional diagnostic work-up in the detection and evaluation of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: a review of existing literature

    PubMed Central

    Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Blickman, Johan G.; Boetes, Carla

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The clinical diagnosis and management of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast presents difficulties. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of ILC. Small studies addressing different aspects of MRI in ILC have been presented but no large series to date. To address the usefulness of MRI in the work-up of ILC, we performed a review of the currently published literature. Materials and methods We performed a literature search using the query “lobular AND (MRI OR MR OR MRT OR magnetic)” in the Cochrane library, PubMed and scholar.google.com, to retrieve all articles that dealt with the use of MRI in patients with ILC. We addressed sensitivity, morphologic appearance, correlation with pathology, detection of additional lesions, and impact of MRI on surgery as different endpoints. Whenever possible we performed meta-analysis of the pooled data. Results Sensitivity is 93.3% and equal to overall sensitivity of MRI for malignancy in the breast. Morphologic appearance is highly heterogeneous and probably heavily influenced by interreader variability. Correlation with pathology ranges from 0.81 to 0.97; overestimation of lesion size occurs but is rare. In 32% of patients, additional ipsilateral lesions are detected and in 7% contralateral lesions are only detected by MRI. Consequently, MRI induces change in surgical management in 28.3% of cases. Conclusion This analysis indicates MRI to be valuable in the work-up of ILC. It provides additional knowledge that cannot be obtained by conventional imaging modalities which can be helpful in patient treatment. PMID:18043894

  7. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging: exposure times and functional outcomes at preschool age.

    PubMed

    Bouyssi-Kobar, Marine; du Plessis, Adré J; Robertson, Richard L; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been routinely used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for more than a decade; however, there is a paucity of follow-up studies examining the effects of prenatal exposure to 1.5-T MRI on developmental outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the safety of 1.5-T fetal MRI by evaluating functional outcomes of preschool children who were exposed in utero. In the context of a prospective observational study, healthy pregnant women underwent a 1.5-T MRI study using single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The study was approved by the institutional review board at our institution, and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. MRI scanning times were recorded, and prenatal/postnatal clinical data were collected prospectively. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS), a widely used, norm-referenced and psychometrically sound functional assessment. We studied 72 healthy pregnant women, who underwent fetal MRI at a mean gestational age of 30.5 ± 3.1 weeks. The cohort of fetuses was composed of 43% females, and 18 fetuses were scanned during the second trimester. All fetuses were born at term with appropriate birth weights (3.54 ± 0.5 kg) for gestational age. Mean age at follow-up testing was 24.5 ± 6.7 months. All children had age-appropriate scores in the communication, daily living, socialization and motor skills subdomains of the VABS (z-scores, P > 0.05). Furthermore, all children passed their newborn otoacoustic emission test and had normal hearing at preschool age. MRI study duration and exposure time to radio frequency waves and SSFSE sequences were not associated with adverse functional outcomes or hearing impairment. Prenatal exposure to 1.5-T MRI during the second or third trimester of pregnancy in a cohort of healthy fetuses is not associated with disturbances in

  8. Maternal buprenorphine treatment and fetal neurobehavioral development.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lauren M; Velez, Martha; McConnell, Krystle; Spencer, Nancy; Tuten, Michelle; Jones, Hendree E; King, Van L; Gandotra, Neeraj; Milio, Lorraine A; Voegtline, Kristin; DiPietro, Janet A

    2017-05-01

    Gestational opioid use/misuse is escalating in the United States; however, little is understood about the fetal effects of medications used to treat maternal opioid use disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of maternal buprenorphine administration on longitudinal fetal neurobehavioral development. Forty-nine buprenorphine-maintained women who attended a substance use disorder treatment facility with generally uncomplicated pregnancies underwent fetal monitoring for 60 minutes at times of trough and peak maternal buprenorphine levels. Data were collected at 24, 28, 32, and 36 weeks gestation. Fetal neurobehavioral indicators (ie, heart rate, motor activity, and their integration [fetal movement-fetal heart rate coupling]) were collected via an actocardiograph, digitized and quantified. Longitudinal data analysis relied on hierarchic linear modeling. Fetal heart rate, heart rate variability, and heart rate accelerations were significantly reduced at peak vs trough maternal buprenorphine levels. Effects were significant either by or after 28 weeks gestation and tended to intensify with advancing gestation. Fetal motor activity and fetal movement-fetal heart rate coupling were depressed from peak to trough at 36 weeks gestation. Polysubstance exposure did not significantly affect fetal neurobehavioral parameters, with the exception that fetuses of heavier smokers moved significantly less than those of lighter smokers at 36 weeks gestation. By the end of gestation, higher maternal buprenorphine dose was related to depression of baseline fetal cardiac measures at trough. Maternal buprenorphine administration has acute suppressive effects on fetal heart rate and movement, and the magnitude of these effects increases as gestation progresses. Higher dose (≥13 mg) appears to exert greater depressive effects on measures of fetal heart rate and variability. These findings should be balanced against comparisons to gestational methadone effects

  9. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, Robert A., III (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate is presented. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  10. Passive fetal heart rate monitoring apparatus and method with enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahorian, Stephen A. (Inventor); Livingston, David L. (Inventor); Pretlow, III, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring signals emitted by a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats and determining a fetal heart rate. Multiple sensor signals are outputted by a passive fetal heart rate monitoring sensor. Multiple parallel nonlinear filters filter these multiple sensor signals to identify fetal heart beats in the signal data. A processor determines a fetal heart rate based on these identified fetal heart beats. The processor includes the use of a figure of merit weighting of heart rate estimates based on the identified heart beats from each filter for each signal. The fetal heart rate thus determined is outputted to a display, storage, or communications channel. A method for enhanced fetal heart beat discrimination includes acquiring signals from a fetus, identifying fetal heart beats from the signals by multiple parallel nonlinear filtering, and determining a fetal heart rate based on the identified fetal heart beats. A figure of merit operation in this method provides for weighting a plurality of fetal heart rate estimates based on the identified fetal heart beats and selecting the highest ranking fetal heart rate estimate.

  11. Management of fetal pain during invasive fetal procedures. A review.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Deprest, J; Missant, C; Van de Velde, M

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, fetal stress and analgesia draw more and more attention. Evidence that fetuses show a significant endocrinological and hemodynamical response to invasive stimuli, and that these responses can be blocked by analgesia, suggests that fetuses experience a stress response, even if this does not signify they experience "pain". Moreover, it is becoming increasingly clear that experiences of pain of a fetus will be "remembered" by the developing nervous system, perhaps for the entire life of the individual, which can probably lead to abnormal behavioural patterns or altered nociception. But up to now, the entire mechanism of fetal stress response and the optimal analgesic drug, dose and route of administration is not so clear.

  12. [Biochemical aspects of fetal hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Biringer, K; Danko, J; Dókus, K; Mat'asová, K; Zibolen, M; Pullmann, R

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate validity of biochemical diagnostic methods of fetal hypoxia. A case-control study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Martin, Slovak Republic. We included 67 patients, and they were retrospectively divided into group of controls (n=36), and studied group (n=31) according to pH in umbilical artery (UA) <7.15. Acid-base parameters were assessed with Rapidlab 248, Bayer Healthcare LLC, East Walpole, USA. We determined criterion for metabolic acidosis (MAC) as pH UA <7.15, resp. base deficit (BD) UA >12 mmol/l. Postpartal lactate concentration in umbilical vein (UV) and UA was determined with lactatemeter Accutrend Lactate, Roche Diagnostics, Switzerland. Quantitative assessment of fetal human protein S100B was provided with ELISA (Sangtec 100 ELISA, DiaSorin Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota, USA). Fetal erythropoietin concentration in UV was examined with immunoenzymatic assessment Access EPO (Beckman Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA). histograms, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Mann-Whitney test, Spearman's rho; statistical significance: p<0.05, Receiver Operating Characteristic curves, Area Under the Curve. The best correlation was between fetal acid-base parameters and lactate in UA (p<0.0005). Significant correlation was between EPO in UV, and protein S100B in UV (p<0.05). EPO in UV significantly correlated with lactate in UA (p<0.05). Correlation between EPO in UV and protein S100B was not significant. According to ROC curves in prediction of fetal hypoxia, we found an excellent accuracy (AUC>0.9) for lactate in UA, good accuracy (AUC>0.7) had EPO in UV. Results for protein S100B were not significant. The highest sensitivity had EPO in UV, while the highest specificity has had lactate in UA. An indisputable evidence of labor management quality is the fetal metabolic status. On the basis of our results, the suitable clinical markers are lactate and EPO, in addition to acid-base parameters.

  13. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of fetal lung maturation in sheep: effect of prenatal cortisone administration on ADC values.

    PubMed

    Much, Chressen Catharina; Schoennagel, Björn Phillip; Yamamura, Jin; Buchert, Ralph; Kooijman, Hendrik; Schätzle, Anne-Kathrin; Adam, Gerhard; Wedegaertner, Ulrike

    2013-07-01

    To assess changes in diffusion properties in the fetal lung after cortisone administration with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in fetal sheep. DWI was performed on 11 pregnant sheep with singleton pregnancies on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Four animals received cortisone injections before baseline imaging. Seven animals served as controls. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured on DWI in the fetal lungs by two independent readers. The Pearson test was used to correlate ADC and gestational age. A t-test was performed to compare differences in ADC values at the baseline and follow-up images within and between groups. Inter-rater reliability was calculated. In the cortisone group, ADC values increased about 10 % between the baseline and follow-up images (P = 0.039). Comparing the cortisone and control groups, ADC values of the baseline images did not differ; whereas in the follow-up imaging, ADC values were significantly higher in the cortisone group (P = 0.024). Lung ADC values did not correlate with gestational age (P = 0.970). Inter-rater reliability was high (0.970, P = 0.000). In this experimental model, MR-DWI can detect cortisone-induced changes in diffusion properties of the fetal lung. • Corticosteroids are frequently administered antenatally to prevent fetal lung immaturity at birth • DWI can detect changes in the fetal lung after corticosteroid administration • Changes can be detected as early as 5 days after treatment • Fetal MRI may offer a non-invasive method of monitoring lung maturation.

  14. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  15. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  16. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO₂) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO₂ was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO₂ was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO₂ was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO₂ without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO₂ in any condition of the fetus.

  17. Fetal origins of adult diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina

    2010-09-01

    According to the fetal origin of adult diseases hypothesis, the intrauterine environment through developmental plasticity may permanently influence long-term health and disease. Therefore, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), due either to maternal, placental, or genetic factors, may permanently alter the endocrine-metabolic status of the fetus, driving an insulin resistance state that can promote survival at the short term but that facilitates the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in adult life, especially when the intrauterine nutrient restriction is followed by a postnatal obesogenic environment. Furthermore, an energy-rich environment during fetal programming may also drive the development of excess abdominal fat and type 2 diabetes in later life, demonstrating that both intrauterine nutrient restriction as well as intrauterine nutrient excessive supply may predispose for the development of adult diabetes. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. Prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fröschl, Barbara; Brunner-Ziegler, Sophie; Wirl, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    The fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most avoidable handicap of newborns. It describes prenatal damages which result from the alcohol consumption of the mother. These can be: reduced body length and weight (pre- and postnatal), microcephaly, musculoskeletal, mental and statomotoric developmental retardations and impaired coordinative ability. There are preventive measures of which the efficiency is examined. Already, short counseling interviews, so-called short interventions, increase the abstinence of pregnant women. PMID:24009646

  19. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  20. MRI of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  1. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  2. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  3. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  4. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  5. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the breast uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  6. Fetal programming in meat production.

    PubMed

    Du, Min; Wang, Bo; Fu, Xing; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Nutrient fluctuations during the fetal stage affects fetal development, which has long-term impacts on the production efficiency and quality of meat. During the early development, a pool of mesenchymal progenitor cells proliferate and then diverge into either myogenic or adipogenic/fibrogenic lineages. Myogenic progenitor cells further develop into muscle fibers and satellite cells, while adipogenic/fibrogenic lineage cells develop into adipocytes, fibroblasts and resident fibro-adipogenic progenitor cells. Enhancing the proliferation and myogenic commitment of progenitor cells during fetal development enhances muscle growth and lean production in offspring. On the other hand, promoting the adipogenic differentiation of adipogenic/fibrogenic progenitor cells inside the muscle increases intramuscular adipocytes and reduces connective tissue, which improves meat marbling and tenderness. Available studies in mammalian livestock, including cattle, sheep and pigs, clearly show the link between maternal nutrition and the quantity and quality of meat production. Similarly, chicken muscle fibers develop before hatching and, thus, egg and yolk sizes and hatching temperature affect long-term growth performance and meat production of chicken. On the contrary, because fishes are able to generate new muscle fibers lifelong, the impact of early nutrition on fish growth performance is expected to be minor, which requires further studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Coarse- and fine-grid numerical behavior of MRT/TRT lattice-Boltzmann schemes in regular and random sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khirevich, Siarhei; Ginzburg, Irina; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the intrinsic impact of free-tunable combinations of the relaxation rates controlling viscosity-independent accuracy of the multiple-relaxation-times (MRT) lattice-Boltzmann models. Preserving all MRT degrees of freedom, we formulate the parametrization conditions which enable the MRT schemes to provide viscosity-independent truncation errors for steady state solutions, and support them with the second- and third-order accurate ("linear" and "parabolic", respectively) boundary schemes. The parabolic schemes demonstrate the advanced accuracy with weak dependency on the relaxation rates, as confirmed by the simulations with the D3Q15 model in three regular arrays (SC, BCC, FCC) of touching spheres. Yet, the low-order, bounce-back boundary rule remains appealing for pore-scale simulations where the precise distance to the boundaries is undetermined. However, the effective accuracy of the bounce-back crucially depends on the free-tunable combinations of the relaxation rates. We find that the combinations of the kinematic viscosity rate with the available "ghost" antisymmetric collision mode rates mainly impact the accuracy of the bounce-back scheme. As the first step, we reduce them to the one combination (presented by so-called "magic" parameter Λ in the frame of the two-relaxation-times (TRT) model), and study its impact on the accuracy of the drag force/permeability computations with the D3Q19 velocity set in two different, dense, random packings of 8000 spheres each. We also run the simulations in the regular (BCC and FCC) packings of the same porosity for the broad range of the discretization resolutions, ranging from 5 to 750 lattice nodes per sphere diameter. A special attention is given to the discretization procedure resulting in significantly reduced scatter of the data obtained at low resolutions. The results reveal the identical Λ-dependency versus the discretization resolution in all four packings, regular and random. While very small

  8. Molecular fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Barandov, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of brain function depends on understanding the dynamics of diverse neural signaling processes over large tissue volumes in intact animals and humans. Most existing approaches to measuring brain signaling suffer from limited tissue penetration, poor resolution, or lack of specificity for well-defined neural events. Here we discuss a new brain activity mapping method that overcomes some of these problems by combining MRI with contrast agents sensitive to neural signaling. The goal of this “molecular fMRI” approach is to permit noninvasive whole-brain neuroimaging with specificity and resolution approaching current optical neuroimaging methods. In this article, we describe the context and need for molecular fMRI as well as the state of the technology today. We explain how major types of MRI probes work and how they can be sensitized to neurobiological processes, such as neurotransmitter release, calcium signaling, and gene expression changes. We comment both on past work in the field and on challenges and promising avenues for future development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain researchers currently have a choice between measuring neural activity using cellular-level recording techniques, such as electrophysiology and optical imaging, or whole-brain imaging methods, such as fMRI. Cellular level methods are precise but only address a small portion of mammalian brains; on the other hand, whole-brain neuroimaging techniques provide very little specificity for neural pathways or signaling components of interest. The molecular fMRI techniques we discuss have particular potential to combine the specificity of cellular-level measurements with the noninvasive whole-brain coverage of fMRI. On the other hand, molecular fMRI is only just getting off the ground. This article aims to offer a snapshot of the status and future prospects for development of molecular fMRI techniques. PMID:27076413

  9. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  10. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  11. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  12. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  13. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  14. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  15. 21 CFR 884.1560 - Fetal blood sampler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal blood sampler. 884.1560 Section 884.1560... § 884.1560 Fetal blood sampler. (a) Identification. A fetal blood sampler is a device used to obtain fetal blood transcervically through an endoscope by puncturing the fetal skin with a short blade...

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal respiratory function: evaluation of fetal lung maturity using lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio at magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yasuko; Rahman, Mosfequr; Sasakura, Chihaya; Waseda, Tomoo; Watanabe, Yukio; Fujii, Ryota; Makinoda, Satoru

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the fetal lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio (LLSIR) on T2-weighted images for the prediction of neonatal respiratory outcome. One hundred ten fetuses who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination for various indications after 22 weeks of gestation participated in this study. LLSIR was measured as the ratio of signal intensities of the fetal lung and liver on T2-weighted images at MRI. We examined the changes of the ratio with advancing gestation and the relations between LLSIR and the presence of the severe respiratory disorder (SRD) after birth. The best cut-off value of the LLSIR to predict respiratory outcome after birth was calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio correlated significantly with advancing gestational age (R = 0.35, p < 0.001). The non-SRD group had higher LLSIR compared with the SRD group (2.15 ± 0.30 vs. 1.53 ± 0.40, p < 0.001). ROC curve analysis showed that fetuses with an LLSIR < 2.00 were more likely to develop SRD [sensitivity: 100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 52-100%; specificity: 73%, 95% CI 54-88%]. The fetal LLSIR on T2-weighted images is an accurate marker to diagnose the fetal lung maturity. © 2014 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Haemodynamic assessment of fetal heart arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lingman, G; Dahlström, J A; Eik-Nes, S H; Marsál, K; Ohlin, P; Ohrlander, S

    1984-07-01

    The effects of fetal heart arrhythmias were examined serially in two pregnancies by three non-invasive methods: fetal ECG, fetal phonocardiography and ultrasonic measurement of fetal blood flow. In a case of supraventricular arrhythmia, there was evidence suggesting that the stroke volume varied with ventricular filling according to the Frank-Starling law. In a case of total atrioventricular block the mean blood flow in the fetal descending aorta and in the umbilical vein was within the normal range. Blood flow velocity in the inferior vena cava of the fetus reflected atrial contractions. In the phonocardiogram, a phenomenon similar to 'bruit de canon' was found. Both pregnancies had good outcomes and subsequent development of the infants was normal except for the persisting dysrhythmias. The two cases exemplify how fetal heart function can be assessed in utero.

  18. Maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sklansky, Mark; Tang, Alvin; Levy, Denis; Grossfeld, Paul; Kashani, Iraj; Shaughnessy, Robin; Rothman, Abraham

    2002-02-01

    The maternal psychological impact of fetal echocardiography may be deleterious in the face of newly diagnosed congenital heart disease. This questionnaire-based study prospectively examined the psychological impact of both normal and abnormal fetal echocardiography. Normal fetal echocardiography decreased maternal anxiety, increased happiness, and increased the closeness women felt toward their unborn children. In contrast, when fetal echocardiography detected congenital heart disease, maternal anxiety typically increased, and mothers commonly felt less happy about being pregnant. However, among women who had recently delivered infants with congenital heart disease, those who had had fetal echocardiography during the pregnancy felt less responsible for their infants' defects and tended to have improved their relationships with the infants' fathers after the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Further study of the psychological and medical impact of fetal echocardiography will be necessary to define and optimize the clinical value of this powerful diagnostic tool.

  19. Fetal alcohol exposure: consequences, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Dawn; Waterman, Emily Hubbard; Caughey, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Maternal alcohol use during pregnancy is prevalent, with as many as 12% of pregnant women consuming alcohol. Alcohol intake may vary from an occasional drink, to weekly binge drinking, to chronic alcohol use throughout pregnancy. Whereas there are certain known consequences from fetal alcohol exposure, such as fetal alcohol syndrome, other effects are less well defined. Craniofacial dysmorphologies, abnormalities of organ systems, behavioral and intellectual deficits, and fetal death have all been attributed to maternal alcohol consumption. This review article considers the theoretical mechanisms of how alcohol affects the fetus, including the variable susceptibility to fetal alcohol exposure and the implications of ethanol dose and timing of exposure. Criteria for diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome are discussed, as well as new methods for early detection of maternal alcohol use and fetal alcohol exposure, such as the use of fatty acid ethyl esters. Finally, current and novel treatment strategies, both in utero and post utero, are reviewed.

  20. Fetal tissue banking: standards and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Newman-Gage, H

    1996-04-01

    There has been a long-standing interest in collection and study of fetal tissues for the purpose of understanding normal ontogeny, as well as aberrant processes in development. As the unique features and capabilities of fetal tissues have become elucidated, it is evident that fetal tissues could potentially be used to ameliorate adult degenerative diseases through transplantation. Indeed, there has been significant work surrounding the transplantation of fetal-derived hematopoietic stem cells, islet cells, and central nervous system cells. Many involved with collection and transplantation of fetal tissues seem poised on the edge of the federal regulatory playing field. This article discusses the history of regulations related to cellular and tissue-derived products and current regulatory issues facing cell and tissue banks in the United States from the tissue bank perspective and focuses on these issues as they relate to the use of cells derived from fetal tissue.

  1. Successful delivery of fetus with fetal inherited thrombophilia after two fetal deaths.

    PubMed

    Juras, Josip; Ivanisević, Marina; Oresković, Slavko; Mihaljević, Slobodan; Vujić, Goran; Delmis, Josip

    2013-12-01

    A pregnant woman with inherited thrombophilia (factor II mutation--20210A) had two late pregnancy losses. The first pregnancy was not well documented, but the second pregnancy was complicated by fetal thrombophilia and umbilical artery thrombosis, proven after fetal death. During the third pregnancy enoxaparine was introduced in the therapy and early amniocentesis was performed. Fetal thrombophilia was proven again. Early delivery was induced and performed with no complications, resulting in a live healthy infant. A history of miscarriages or recurrent fetal loss should raise suspicion of thrombophilia as a potential cause. It is debatable whether amniocentesis in pursuit of fetal thrombophilia should be performed and whether this will lead to a better perinatal outcome. When fetal thrombophilia is diagnosed, an earlier induction of delivery should be considered, taking into account the fetal extrauterine viability. The aforementioned approach of early delivery in cases of inherited fetal thrombophilia could be a possible solution for better perinatal outcomes.

  2. Spatiotemporal alignment of in utero BOLD-MRI series.

    PubMed

    Turk, Esra Abaci; Luo, Jie; Gagoski, Borjan; Pascau, Javier; Bibbo, Carolina; Robinson, Julian N; Grant, P Ellen; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Golland, Polina; Malpica, Norberto

    2017-08-01

    To present a method for spatiotemporal alignment of in-utero magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) time series acquired during maternal hyperoxia for enabling improved quantitative tracking of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes that characterize oxygen transport through the placenta to fetal organs. The proposed pipeline for spatiotemporal alignment of images acquired with a single-shot gradient echo echo-planar imaging includes 1) signal nonuniformity correction, 2) intravolume motion correction based on nonrigid registration, 3) correction of motion and nonrigid deformations across volumes, and 4) detection of the outlier volumes to be discarded from subsequent analysis. BOLD MRI time series collected from 10 pregnant women during 3T scans were analyzed using this pipeline. To assess pipeline performance, signal fluctuations between consecutive timepoints were examined. In addition, volume overlap and distance between manual region of interest (ROI) delineations in a subset of frames and the delineations obtained through propagation of the ROIs from the reference frame were used to quantify alignment accuracy. A previously demonstrated rigid registration approach was used for comparison. The proposed pipeline improved anatomical alignment of placenta and fetal organs over the state-of-the-art rigid motion correction methods. In particular, unexpected temporal signal fluctuations during the first normoxia period were significantly decreased (P < 0.01) and volume overlap and distance between region boundaries measures were significantly improved (P < 0.01). The proposed approach to align MRI time series enables more accurate quantitative studies of placental function by improving spatiotemporal alignment across placenta and fetal organs. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:403-412. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (<10th percentile) and large (>90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner; (5) a different pattern of

  4. Fetal movements as a predictor of health.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jonathan; Nowlan, Niamh C; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Shaw, Caroline J; Lees, Christoph C

    2016-09-01

    The key determinant to a fetus maintaining its health is through adequate perfusion and oxygen transfer mediated by the functioning placenta. When this equilibrium is distorted, a number of physiological changes, including reduced fetal growth, occur to favor survival. Technologies have been developed to monitor these changes with a view to prolong intrauterine maturity while reducing the risks of stillbirth. Many of these strategies involve complex interpretation, for example Doppler ultrasound for fetal blood flow and computerized analysis of fetal heart rate changes. However, even with these modalities of fetal assessment to determine the optimal timing of delivery, fetal movements remain integral to clinical decision-making. In high-risk cohorts with fetal growth restriction, the manifestation of a reduction in perceived movements may warrant an expedited delivery. Despite this, there has been little evolution in the development of technologies to objectively evaluate fetal movement behavior for clinical application. This review explores the available literature on the value of fetal movement analysis as a method of assessing fetal wellbeing, and demonstrates how interdisciplinary developments in this area may aid in the improvement of clinical outcomes. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology (NFOG).

  5. Fetal akinesia deformation sequence in previable fetuses.

    PubMed

    Davis, J E; Kalousek, D K

    1988-01-01

    We reviewed the morphologic findings of 948 previable fetuses and identified the fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) in 16 cases. In eight fetuses who had joint contractures, micrognathia, and pulmonary hypoplasia, the cause of fetal akinesia could be attributed to an abnormal intrauterine environment restricting fetal movement. The other eight fetuses had pterygia across the immobilized joints, in addition to main manifestations of FADS. Since most of the fetuses with pterygia were of only 8-9 weeks developmental age, we suggest that embryonic onset of immobility interferes with limb development and results in joint fixation and pterygium formation, in contrast to fetal-onset immobility, which causes joint contractures alone.

  6. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Facts and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Maria; Cook, Martha

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) including characteristics, incidence, current government programs, successful local programs, and implications for school administrators. (DB)

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Facts and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Maria; Cook, Martha

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) including characteristics, incidence, current government programs, successful local programs, and implications for school administrators. (DB)

  8. Intrapulmonary perfluorooctyl bromide instillation in fetal rabbits.

    PubMed

    Muensterer, Oliver J; Klis, Verena J; Till, Holger; Bergmann, Florian; Metzger, Roman; Simbruner, Georg

    2005-07-01

    Instilling perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) into the fetal lung may lead to alveolar distension. The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety of PFOB instillation into fetal lungs and to determine the radiographic distribution and tissue concentration of PFOB in New Zealand white rabbits. Sibling fetuses of pregnant (day 27) New Zealand white rabbits were randomized to intratracheal instillation of 1 mL PFOB with tracheal ligation, instillation without ligation, and unmanipulated controls. The maternal animals were killed directly after instillation, at 3 or 6 hours (n = 10 each). For each study cohort, we determined fetal lung/body weight (FLBW) ratios, the radiographic distribution of PFOB, as well as pulmonary PFOB and water content by tissue distillation. PFOB concentrations in maternal and fetal tissues were assessed by gas chromatography. The relative amount of fetal lung PFOB recovered by fractional distillation was highest in ligated (25%) and lower in unligated lungs (9%). Extrapulmonary PFOB was found in the fetal brain (2.0 +/- 0.7 ppm), but not in any other fetal or maternal tissues. Mean FLBW ratios were highest in ligated fetuses, followed by unligated fetuses and controls. PFOB partially displaced fetal lung water. PFOB was visible in the lungs of all treated fetuses. Fetal survival between manipulated and unmanipulated fetuses did not differ. After prenatal intrapulmonary instillation, some PFOB remains in the lung, even if the trachea is not ligated, and may exert distending pressure on the alveoli.

  9. Unexplained fetal loss: the fetal side of thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Tranquilli, Andrea Luigi; Saccucci, Franca; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; Cecati, Monia; Nocchi, Linda; Lorenzi, Sara; Emanuelli, Monica

    2010-06-01

    Carrier status of the fetus for factor V polymorphism or double homozygosity for mutant alleles of the PAI-1 4 G/4 G and MTHFR T677 T polymorphisms must be considered risk factors for intrauterine fetal death. The clinical implications of these data need to be addressed in a prospective study to confirm our preliminary data and to answer the question of whether or not double homozygous individuals should be treated with low molecular-weight heparin and/or low-dose aspirin.

  10. Automatic Measurement of Fetal Brain Development from Magnetic Resonance Imaging: New Reference Data.

    PubMed

    Link, Daphna; Braginsky, Michael B; Joskowicz, Leo; Ben Sira, Liat; Harel, Shaul; Many, Ariel; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Malinger, Gustavo; Artzi, Moran; Kapoor, Cassandra; Miller, Elka; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2017-09-13

    Accurate fetal brain volume estimation is of paramount importance in evaluating fetal development. The aim of this study was to develop an automatic method for fetal brain segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and to create for the first time a normal volumetric growth chart based on a large cohort. A semi-automatic segmentation method based on Seeded Region Growing algorithm was developed and applied to MRI data of 199 typically developed fetuses between 18 and 37 weeks' gestation. The accuracy of the algorithm was tested against a sub-cohort of ground truth manual segmentations. A quadratic regression analysis was used to create normal growth charts. The sensitivity of the method to identify developmental disorders was demonstrated on 9 fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The developed method showed high correlation with manual segmentation (r2 = 0.9183, p < 0.001) as well as mean volume and volume overlap differences of 4.77 and 18.13%, respectively. New reference data on 199 normal fetuses were created, and all 9 IUGR fetuses were at or below the third percentile of the normal growth chart. The proposed method is fast, accurate, reproducible, user independent, applicable with retrospective data, and is suggested for use in routine clinical practice. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Quantifying and modelling tissue maturation in the living human fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Studholme, Colin; Rousseau, François

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in medical imaging are beginning to allow us to quantify brain tissue maturation in the growing human brain prior to normal term age, and are beginning to shed new light on early human brain growth. These advances compliment the work already done in cellular level imaging in animal and post mortem studies of brain development. The opportunities for collaborative research that bridges the gap between macroscopic and microscopic windows on the developing brain are significant. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the current research into MR imaging of the living fetal brain with the aim of motivating improved interfaces between the two fields. The review begins with a description of faster MRI techniques that are capable of freezing motion of the fetal head during the acquisition of a slice, and how these have been combined with advanced post-processing algorithms to build 3D images from motion scattered slices. Such rich data has motivated the development of techniques to automatically label developing tissue zones within MRI data allowing their quantification in 3D and 4D within the normally growing fetal brain. These methods have provided the basis for later work that has created the first maps of tissue growth rate and cortical folding in normally developing brains in-utero. These measurements provide valuable findings that compliment those derived from post-mortem anatomy, and additionally allow for the possibility of larger population studies of the influence of maternal environmental and genes on early brain development.

  12. Is there a relationship between fetal brain function and the fetal behavioral state? A fetal MEG-study.

    PubMed

    Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle; Raufer, Julia; Brändle, Johanna; Münßinger, Jana; Abele, Harald; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Eswaran, Hari; Preissl, Hubert

    2013-09-01

    Fetal magnetography enables the recording of biomagnetic fetal signals, including fetal heart and fetal brain signals. These signals allow the determination of fetal behavioral states and functional brain signals with auditory evoked responses (AER). In the current study, we investigated how the behavioral state influences the AER and how stimulation affects fetal state. One hundred and four fetuses in three age groups (28-31 weeks, 32-35 weeks and 36-41 weeks) were recorded with and without auditory stimulation. Both sessions were scored for fetal states. The AER latency was determined for each state separately. Forty-five additional subjects were recorded with two sessions of 10 min without stimulation to investigate a possible time effect on state changes. The state distribution was significantly different between stimulation and no stimulation conditions. The AER latencies were significantly shorter in active sleep (P=0.013) and active wakefulness (P=0.004) compared to quiet sleep. Auditory stimulation has an effect on fetal states. The state information should be taken into account for the analysis of AER latencies.

  13. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Transient Fetal Compartments during Prenatal Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Vasung, Lana; Lepage, Claude; Radoš, Milan; Pletikos, Mihovil; Goldman, Jennifer S.; Richiardi, Jonas; Raguž, Marina; Fischi-Gómez, Elda; Karama, Sherif; Huppi, Petra S.; Evans, Alan C.; Kostovic, Ivica

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral wall of the human fetal brain is composed of transient cellular compartments, which show characteristic spatiotemporal relationships with intensity of major neurogenic events (cell proliferation, migration, axonal growth, dendritic differentiation, synaptogenesis, cell death, and myelination). The aim of the present study was to obtain new quantitative data describing volume, surface area, and thickness of transient compartments in the human fetal cerebrum. Forty-four postmortem fetal brains aged 13–40 postconceptional weeks (PCW) were included in this study. High-resolution T1 weighted MR images were acquired on 19 fetal brain hemispheres. MR images were processed using in-house software (MNI-ACE toolbox). Delineation of fetal compartments was performed semi-automatically by co-registration of MRI with histological sections of the same brains, or with the age-matched brains from Zagreb Neuroembryological Collection. Growth trajectories of transient fetal compartments were reconstructed. The composition of telencephalic wall was quantitatively assessed. Between 13 and 25 PCW, when the intensity of neuronal proliferation decreases drastically, the relative volume of proliferative (ventricular and subventricular) compartments showed pronounced decline. In contrast, synapse- and extracellular matrix-rich subplate compartment continued to grow during the first two trimesters, occupying up to 45% of telencephalon and reaching its maximum volume and thickness around 30 PCW. This developmental maximum coincides with a period of intensive growth of long cortico-cortical fibers, which enter and wait in subplate before approaching the cortical plate. Although we did not find significant age related changes in mean thickness of the cortical plate, the volume, gyrification index, and surface area of the cortical plate continued to exponentially grow during the last phases of prenatal development. This cortical expansion coincides developmentally with the

  14. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  15. Atomic Gradiometers for Fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Deland, Zack; Wahl, Colin; Bulatowicz, Michael; Wakai, Ron; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We present results on development of 87 Rb atomic magnetometers configured as magnetic field gradiometers for fetal Magnetocardiography (fMCG). Operating in the Spin Exchange Relaxation Free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers have a sensitivity 1 fT /√{ Hz} . Magnetic field gradient measurements significantly reduce the interference of uniform background fields. In fMCG applications, the field from the mother's heart is one such background and cannot be passively shielded. We report schemes for implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  16. A Percutaneously Implantable Fetal Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Vest, Adriana N.; Chmait, Ramen H.; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Pruetz, Jay; Silka, Michael; Zheng, Kaihui; Peck, Ray; Loeb, Gerald E.

    2015-01-01

    A miniaturized, self-contained pacemaker that could be implanted with a minimally invasive technique would dramatically improve the survival rate for fetuses that develop hydrops fetalis as a result of congenital heart block. We are currently validating a device that we developed to address this bradyarrhythmia. Preclinical studies in a fetal sheep model are underway to demonstrate that the device can be implanted via a minimally invasive approach, can mechanically withstand the harsh bodily environment, can induce effective contractions of the heart muscle with an adequate safety factor, and can successfully operate for the required device lifetime of three months using the previously-developed closed loop transcutaneous recharging system. PMID:25570982

  17. Fetal intracranial teratoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Hart

    2014-01-01

    A literature and institutional review of fetal intracranial teratomas yielded 90 tumors. The mean age at ultrasound diagnosis was 32 weeks, ranging from 21 to 41 weeks. Males and females were equally affected. The average, maximum tumor size was 10 cm, varying between 3.5 and 23 cm. Forty-two percent of patients died within the first week of life. Death rate was exceptionally high before 30 weeks gestation where almost half the affected fetuses expired. The overall survival rate for 90 fetuses with intracranial teratoma was only 7.8%.

  18. Ultra-low field MRI: bringing MRI to new arenas

    DOE PAGES

    Magnelind, Per Erik; Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Newman, Shaun Garrett; ...

    2016-11-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is moving toward the use of stronger and stronger magnetic fields with 3T, and even 7 T systems being increasingly used in routine clinical applications. However there is another branch of MRI, namely Ultra Low Field MRI (ULF-MRI) where the magnetic fields during readout are several orders of magnitude smaller, namely 1–100 μT. While conventional high-field MRI remains the gold standard there are several situations such as in military emergencies or in developing countries where for cost and logistical reasons, conventional MRI is not practical. In such scenarios, ULF-MRI could provide a solution. Lastly, thismore » article describes the basic principles and the potential of ULF-MRI.« less

  19. Ultra-low field MRI: bringing MRI to new arenas

    SciTech Connect

    Magnelind, Per Erik; Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Newman, Shaun Garrett; Sandin, Henrik; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Espy, Michelle A.

    2016-11-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is moving toward the use of stronger and stronger magnetic fields with 3T, and even 7 T systems being increasingly used in routine clinical applications. However there is another branch of MRI, namely Ultra Low Field MRI (ULF-MRI) where the magnetic fields during readout are several orders of magnitude smaller, namely 1–100 μT. While conventional high-field MRI remains the gold standard there are several situations such as in military emergencies or in developing countries where for cost and logistical reasons, conventional MRI is not practical. In such scenarios, ULF-MRI could provide a solution. Lastly, this article describes the basic principles and the potential of ULF-MRI.

  20. GPU-accelerated nonparametric kinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data from glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Han H; Ferl, Gregory Z; Ng, Chee M

    2013-05-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is often used to examine vascular function in malignant tumors and noninvasively monitor drug efficacy of antivascular therapies in clinical studies. However, complex numerical methods used to derive tumor physiological properties from DCE-MRI images can be time-consuming and computationally challenging. Recent advancement of computing technology in graphics processing unit (GPU) makes it possible to build an energy-efficient and high-power parallel computing platform for solving complex numerical problems. This study develops the first reported fast GPU-based method for nonparametric kinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data using clinical scans of glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab (Avastin®). In the method, contrast agent concentration-time profiles in arterial blood and tumor tissue are smoothed using a robust kernel-based regression algorithm in order to remove artifacts due to patient motion and then deconvolved to produce the impulse response function (IRF). The area under the curve (AUC) and mean residence time (MRT) of the IRF are calculated using statistical moment analysis, and two tumor physiological properties that relate to vascular permeability, volume transfer constant between blood plasma and extravascular extracellular space (K(trans)) and fractional interstitial volume (ve) are estimated using the approximations AUC/MRT and AUC. The most significant feature in this method is the use of GPU-computing to analyze data from more than 60,000 voxels in each DCE-MRI image in parallel fashion. All analysis steps have been automated in a single program script that requires only blood and tumor data as the sole input. The GPU-accelerated method produces K(trans) and ve estimates that are comparable to results from previous studies but reduces computational time by more than 80-fold compared to a previously reported central processing unit-based nonparametric method. Furthermore, it is at

  1. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  2. On the flow through the normal fetal aortic arc at late gestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Kerem; Nourparvar, Paymon; Yerneni, Srinivasu; Dasi, Lakshmi; de Zelicourt, Diane; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2006-11-01

    During the fetal stage, the aortic arc is a complex junction of great vessels (right and left ventricular outflow tracks (RVOT, LVOT), pulmonary arteries (PA), ductus, head-neck vessels, decending aorta (Dao)) delicately distributing the oxygenated blood flow to the lungs and the body -preferential to the brain. Experimental and computational studies are performed in idealized models of the fetal aorta to understand and visualize the unsteady hemodynamics. Unsteady in vitro flow, generated by two peristaltic pumps (RVOT and LVOT) is visualized with two colored dyes and a red laser in a rigid glass model with physiological diameters. Helical flow patterns at the PA's and ductal shunting to the Dao are visualized. Computational fluid dynamics of the same geometry is modeled using the commercial code Fidap with porous boundary conditions representing systemic and pulmonary resistances (˜400000 tetrahedral elements). Combined (RVOT+LVOT) average flow rates ranging from 1.9 to 2.1-L/min for 34 to 38-weeks gestation were simulated with the Reynolds and Womersly numbers (Dao) of 500 and 8. Computational results are compared qualitatively with the flow visualizations at this target flow condition. Understanding fetal hemodynamics is critical for congenital heart defects, tissue engineering, fetal cardiac MRI and surgeries.

  3. Characteristics of children whose siblings have fetal alcohol syndrome or incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kvigne, Valborg L; Leonardson, Gary R; Borzelleca, Joseph; Neff-Smith, Martha; Welty, Thomas K

    2009-03-01

    To describe the clinical features of American Indian children born just before and just after a sibling with fetal alcohol syndrome or incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome. Two retrospective case-control studies were conducted of Northern Plains American Indian children with fetal alcohol syndrome or incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome identified from 1981 to 1993 by using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 760.71. Compared with the controls, the 39 siblings born just before children with fetal alcohol syndrome (study 1) and 30 siblings born just before children with incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome (study 2) had more facial dysmorphology (23.1% and 16.7%, respectively), growth delay (38.5% and 10.0%), and central nervous system impairment (48.7% and 33.3%). The 20 siblings born just after children with fetal alcohol syndrome (study 1) and 22 siblings born just after children with incomplete fetal alcohol syndrome (study 2) had more facial dysmorphology (20.0% and 9.1%, respectively), growth delay (45.0% and 22.7%), and central nervous system impairment (50.0% and 31.8%) than the control siblings. The "before" siblings had characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome that could have predicted that the next child was at risk for fetal alcohol syndrome. The "after" siblings had better outcomes than the previous siblings with fetal alcohol syndrome, a finding that was associated with a decrease in maternal alcohol consumption during the after-sibling pregnancy.

  4. Characterization of fetal arrhythmias by means of fetal magnetocardiography in three cases of difficult ultrasonographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Comani, Silvia; Liberati, Marco; Mantini, Dante; Gabriele, Elisabetta; Brisinda, Donatella; Di Luzio, Silvano; Fenici, Riccardo; Romani, Gian Luca

    2004-12-01

    Characterization of ultrasound detected fetal arrhythmias is generally performed by means of M-mode and pulsed Doppler echocardiography (fECHO), sonographic techniques that allow only indirect and approximate reconstruction of the true electrophysiological events that occur in the fetal heart. Several studies demonstrated the ability of fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) to identify fetal arrhythmias. We report on three women, studied after the 32nd gestational week, who were referred for fMCG because of unsatisfying fetal cardiac visualization with fECHO due to maternal obesity, fetus in constant dorsal position hiding the fetal heart, intrauterine growth retardation, and oligohydramnios. Minor pericardial effusion was present in the third patient and digoxin therapy was given. FMCG were recorded with a 77-channel MCG system working in a shielded room. Independent Component Analysis (FastICA algorithm) was used to reconstruct fetal signals. The good quality of the retrieved fetal signals allowed real-time detection of arrhythmias and their classification as supraventricular extrasystoles (SVE), with/without aberrant ventricular conduction and/or atrioventricular block. The time course of the fetal cardiac rhythm was reconstructed for the entire recording duration; hence, fetal heart rate variability could be studied in time and frequency. Since isolated extrasystoles may progress to more hazardous supraventricular tachycardias, the noninvasive antenatal characterization of, even transient, fetal arrhythmias and their monitoring during pregnancy can be of great clinical impact.

  5. Measurement of cardiac contractility using fetal isovolumetric contraction time in fetal tachyarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yasuyuki; Athayde, Neil; Tokunaga, Shoji; Trudinger, Brian

    2011-02-01

    The isovolumetric contraction time (ICT) is known to be an index of cardiac contractility. In this study, we examined the relationship between the fetal ICT and fetal heart rate (FHR) and evaluated the usefulness of ICT in the assessment of fetal cardiac contractility in cases with fetal tachyarrhythmia. Seven cases with fetal tachyarrhythmia between 32 and 40 weeks' gestation were included in this study. The fetal ICT was measured using a continuous Doppler device and digital filters. The relationship between the fetal ICT and FHR was analyzed using the Spearman's rank correlation test in each fetus. Based on the FHR and ultrasound findings of hydrops at the measurement of ICT, the obtained data were divided into three groups: normal, tachyarrhythmia only and hydrops. The clinical usefulness of ICT was assessed using the random effect model. In 7 fetuses, a total of 60 data points were obtained. A significant correlation between fetal ICT and FHR was not noted in each fetus. The ICT of the hydrops group was significantly prolonged compared with those of the normal and tachyarrhythmia-only groups (p < 0.01). An association between the fetal ICT and FHR is not noted and the fetal ICT might have some utility to detect impaired fetal cardiac contractility even in fetuses with tachyarrhythmia.

  6. [Evolution of electronic fetal monitoring in labor].

    PubMed

    Dell'Anna, A; Portuesi, A; Angioli, R

    2014-04-01

    Intrapartum fetal hypoxia remains an important cause of neonatal permanent handicap and death, and in many cases it is related to lack of optimal fetal surveillance. In the last 40 years cardiotocography (CTG) has been routinely used for fetal monitoring yet this technique lacks reproducibility and its interpretation by healthcare professionals remains an important variable. Indeed, this technology not only does not improve clinically important outcomes, but also, on the contrary, leads to an increase in the number of caesarean sections carried out. Recent research has focused the attention on specific components of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) tracings, such as ST-segment analysis (STAN) or fetal pulse oximetry (FPO). Fetal ST-segment analysis and pulse oximetry provide important parameters when used in addition to CTG, but their combined use obviously does not eliminate CTG interpretation limits. Although continuous electronic fetal monitoring is now ubiquitously utilized in modern practice, risks and benefits associated with its use are worth analysing. The analysis of the research and clinical practices carried out in the past several decades may provide useful insights into the current use of electronic fetal monitoring and new system associated procedures (STAN and FPO), which have influenced what has now become a routine modern obstetric practice.

  7. Aspects of Fetal Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirix, Chantal E. H.; Nijhuis, Jan G.; Jongsma, Henk W.; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Ninety-three pregnant women were recruited to assess fetal learning and memory, based on habituation to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation of fetuses of 30-38 weeks gestational age (GA). Each habituation test was repeated 10 min later to estimate the fetal short-term memory. For Groups 30-36, both measurements were replicated in a second session…

  8. Advances in evaluating the fetal skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Ann-Edwidge; Brown, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss aspects of the prenatal diagnosis of fetal skeletal malformations, concentrating on the advantages offered by different imaging techniques and the approaches that are of value in evaluating a suspected skeletal dysplasia. We also briefly address the findings in some of the commoner malformations of the fetal skeleton that may be encountered. PMID:24868173

  9. Fetal deaths in Brazil: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barbeiro, Fernanda Morena dos Santos; Fonseca, Sandra Costa; Tauffer, Mariana Girão; Ferreira, Mariana de Souza Santos; da Silva, Fagner Paulo; Ventura, Patrícia Mendonça; Quadros, Jesirée Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the frequency of and factors associated with fetal death in the Brazilian scientific literature. METHODS A systematic review of Brazilian studies on fetal deaths published between 2003 and 2013 was conducted. In total, 27 studies were analyzed; of these, 4 studies addressed the quality of data, 12 were descriptive studies, and 11 studies evaluated the factors associated with fetal death. The databases searched were PubMed and Lilacs, and data extraction and synthesis were independently performed by two or more examiners. RESULTS The level of completeness of fetal death certificates was deficient, both in the completion of variables, particularly sociodemographic variables, and in defining the underlying causes of death. Fetal deaths have decreased in Brazil; however, inequalities persist. Analysis of the causes of death indicated maternal morbidities that could be prevented and treated. The main factors associated with fetal deaths were absent or inadequate prenatal care, low education level, maternal morbidity, and adverse reproductive history. CONCLUSIONS Prenatal care should prioritize women that are most vulnerable (considering their social environment or their reproductive history and morbidities) with the aim of decreasing the fetal mortality rate in Brazil. Adequate completion of death certificates and investment in the committees that investigate fetal and infant deaths are necessary. PMID:25902565

  10. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: An International Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    1987-01-01

    Describes Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) in infants, caused by mothers' consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Both disabilities found in relatively high proportions of American Indian children. Discusses impact of disabilities on education. Discusses parent education programs in United States and abroad. (TES)

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: An International Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    1987-01-01

    Describes Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) in infants, caused by mothers' consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Both disabilities found in relatively high proportions of American Indian children. Discusses impact of disabilities on education. Discusses parent education programs in United States and abroad. (TES)

  12. Future perspectives in intrapartum fetal surveillance.

    PubMed

    Devoe, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    Electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) has aided intrapartum fetal surveillance for more than four decades. In spite of numerous trials comparing EFM with standard fetal heart rate (FHR) auscultation, it remains unclear that this modality has led to improved perinatal outcomes, especially lower rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A variety of ancillary methods have been developed to improve the accuracy of EFM for predicting fetal compromise. At present, a limited number of studies have shown that the addition of fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis to visual interpretation of FHR patterns resulted in better fetal outcomes. However, the shortcomings of visual interpretation of FHR patterns persist. Although automated systems for FHR analysis have been developed, they have not been widely used or proven to enhance the value of intrapartum fetal surveillance. This article discusses future directions for novel intrapartum fetal surveillance systems that leverage the long experience gained from EFM to enhance the level of risk assessment and prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sonography in Fetal Birth Weight Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Oyekan, O. O.

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of fetal birth weight is an important factor in the management of high risk pregnancies. The information and knowledge gained through this study, comparing a combination of various fetal parameters using computer assisted analysis, will help the obstetrician to screen the high risk pregnancies, monitor the growth and development,…

  14. Aspects of Fetal Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirix, Chantal E. H.; Nijhuis, Jan G.; Jongsma, Henk W.; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    Ninety-three pregnant women were recruited to assess fetal learning and memory, based on habituation to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation of fetuses of 30-38 weeks gestational age (GA). Each habituation test was repeated 10 min later to estimate the fetal short-term memory. For Groups 30-36, both measurements were replicated in a second session…

  15. Fetal Brain Behavior and Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on prenatal brain development, detailing the functions controlled by the medulla, pons, and midbrain, and the implications for cognitive development. Concludes that fetal cognitive motor activity, including auditory discrimination, orienting, the wake-sleep cycle, fetal heart rate accelerations, and defensive reactions,…

  16. Fetal tissue transplant research: ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Farnam, C R

    1996-01-01

    The transplant of cells from fetal tissue shows promise as a therapy for certain diseases. The use and research of fetal tissue, and methods of obtaining the tissue, have raised ethical dilemmas. Consideration must be given concerning the mother, the fetus, and the tissue recipient.

  17. Fetal pain, abortion, viability, and the Constitution.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I Glenn; Sayeed, Sadath

    2011-01-01

    In early 2010, the Nebraska state legislature passed a new abortion restricting law asserting a new, compelling state interest in preventing fetal pain. In this article, we review existing constitutional abortion doctrine and note difficulties presented by persistent legal attention to a socially derived viability construct. We then offer a substantive biological, ethical, and legal critique of the new fetal pain rationale.

  18. Fetal Brain Behavior and Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents information on prenatal brain development, detailing the functions controlled by the medulla, pons, and midbrain, and the implications for cognitive development. Concludes that fetal cognitive motor activity, including auditory discrimination, orienting, the wake-sleep cycle, fetal heart rate accelerations, and defensive reactions,…

  19. Sonography in Fetal Birth Weight Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinola, R. A.; Akinola, O. I.; Oyekan, O. O.

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of fetal birth weight is an important factor in the management of high risk pregnancies. The information and knowledge gained through this study, comparing a combination of various fetal parameters using computer assisted analysis, will help the obstetrician to screen the high risk pregnancies, monitor the growth and development,…

  20. Fetal hemoglobin silencing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Oneal, Patricia A.; Gantt, Nicole M.; Schwartz, Joseph D.; Bhanu, Natarajan V.; Lee, Y. Terry; Moroney, John W.; Reed, Christopher H.; Schechter, Alan N.; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2006-01-01

    Interruption of the normal fetal-to-adult transition of hemoglobin expression should largely ameliorate sickle cell and beta-thalassemia syndromes. Achievement of this clinical goal requires a robust understanding of gamma-globin gene and protein silencing during human development. For this purpose, age-related changes in globin phenotypes of circulating human erythroid cells were examined from 5 umbilical cords, 99 infants, and 5 adult donors. Unexpectedly, an average of 95% of the cord blood erythrocytes and reticulocytes expressed HbA and the adult beta-globin gene, as well as HbF and the gamma-globin genes. The distribution of hemoglobin and globin gene expression then changed abruptly due to the expansion of cells lacking HbF or gamma-globin mRNA (silenced cells). In adult reticulocytes, less than 5% expressed gamma-globin mRNA. These data are consistent with a “switching” model in humans that initially results largely from gamma- and beta-globin gene coexpression and competition during fetal development. In contrast, early postnatal life is marked by the rapid accumulation of cells that possess undetectable gamma-globin mRNA and HbF. The silencing phenomenon is mediated by a mechanism of cellular replacement. This novel silencing pattern may be important for the development of HbF-enhancing therapies. PMID:16735596

  1. Monitoring fetal development with magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Padhye, N S; Brazdeikis, A; Verklan, M T

    2004-01-01

    Fetal heart rate variability (fHRV) is useful for noninvasive assessment of the status of the autonomic nervous system of the developing fetus. In this pilot study we acquired fetal magnetocardiograms (fMCG) in a magnetically shielded environment. Each recording was of 5-minute duration and was subsequently repeated in a high-frequency noise environment to examine the feasibility of conducting future recordings in clinical environments that lack facilities for magnetic shielding. The fMCG (n=17) were recorded at 9 spatial locations above the pregnant abdomen at 26 to 35 weeks gestational age (GA) by a second-order SQUID gradiometer. The signal-to-noise was adequate for reliable QRS detection even in the noisy environment, especially for GA >/= 30. The total spectral power of the RR-series, as well as band powers at low (0.05 to 0.25 Hz) and high (0.25 to 1.00 Hz) frequencies independently exhibited an increasing trend with GA. There was no evidence of bias in spectral power due to lack of shielding. These results provide experimental evidence supporting further studies in magnetically unshielded environments and may have an important implication for future clinical use of fMCG in the assessment of fHRV.

  2. HTS magnetometers for fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Wakai, R T; Paulson, D N; Schwartz, B

    2004-11-30

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUID sensors have adequate magnetic field sensitivity for adult magnetocardiography (MCG) measurements, but it remains to be seen how well they perform for fetal MCG (fMCG), where the heart signals are typically ten times smaller than the adult signals. In this study, we assess the performance of a prototype HTS SQUID system; namely, a three-SQUID gradiometer formed from three vertically-aligned HTS dc-SQUID magnetometers integrated into a fiberglass liquid nitrogen dewar of diameter 12.5 cm and height 30 cm. Axial gradiometers with short or long baseline, as well as a second order gradiometer, can be formed out of these magnetometers via electronic subtraction. The calibrated magnetometer sensitivities at 1 kHz are 109 fT/square root of Hz, 155 fT/square root of Hz and 51 fT/square root of Hz. Direct comparison is made between the HTS SQUID system and a LTS SQUID system by making recordings with both systems during the same session on adult and fetal subjects. Although the fMCG could be resolved with the HTS SQUID system in most near-term subjects, the signal-to-noise ratio was relatively low and the system could not be operated outside of a shielded room.

  3. Arthrogryposis and fetal hypomobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Haliloglu, Goknur; Topaloglu, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Arthrogryposis is a heterogeneous condition, evident from birth, which can be defined as multiple contractures of the joints. The etiology is multifold: genetic disorders of the central or peripheral nervous system, or of the connective tissue leading to decreased fetal movements, and vascular and environmental causes. The problem begins in utero. There may be overlapping conditions between sporadic, syndromic, neurogenic, myopathic and metabolic types. The workup should include a family tree. Systemic involvement, for example of the renal and pulmonary systems, may be encountered in associated syndromes. Motor neuron disorders leading to the condition are the most commonly seen type. Fetal or neonatal akinesia/hypokinesia is at the severe end of the spectrum, in which there is literally intrauterine limitation of movement. Children with amyplasia are born with little or diminished muscle bulk of the extremities. Distal arthrogryposis is almost always a dominantly inherited condition. A multidisciplinary care approach is required in order to provide optimum healthcare. The management team should include a nutritionist and a physiotherapist. Genetic counseling is possible in most instances. A truly genetic cause can be identified in more than 50% of cases. Survivors, though handicapped, can lead near normal lives.

  4. Fetal sex and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Challis, J; Newnham, J; Petraglia, F; Yeganegi, M; Bocking, A

    2013-02-01

    Rates of preterm birth vary between different populations and ethnic groups. Epidemiologic studies have suggested that the incidence of preterm birth is also higher in pregnancies carrying a male fetus; the male:female difference is greater in earlier preterm pregnancy. Placental or chorion trophoblast cells from pregnancies with a male fetus produced more pro-inflammatory TNFα in response to LPS stimulation and less anti-inflammatory IL-10 and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) than cells from pregnancies with a female fetus, more prostaglandin synthase (PTGS-2) and less prostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH). These results suggest that in the presence of a male fetus the trophoblast has the potential to generate a more pro-inflammatory environment. Maturation of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and expression of placental genes, particularly 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 are also expressed in a sex dependent manner, consistent with the sex-biasing influences on gene networks. Sex differences in these activities may affect clinical outcomes of pre- and post-dates pregnancies and fetal/newborn wellbeing. These factors need consideration in studies of placental function and in the development of personalized strategies for the diagnosis of preterm labor and postnatal health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism: diagnostic and therapeutic approachment

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Özdemir, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal hyperthyroidism may occur in mothers with Graves’ disease. Fetal thyrotoxicosis manifestation is observed with the transition of TSH receptor stimulating antibodies to the fetus from the 17th–20th weeks of pregnancy and with the fetal TSH receptors becoming responsive after 20 weeks. The diagnosis is confirmed by fetal tachycardia, goiter and bone age advancement in pregnancy and maternal treatment is conducted in accordance. The probability of neonatal hyperthyroidism is high in the babies of mothers that have ongoing antithyroid requirement and higher antibody levels in the last months of pregnancy. Clinical manifestation may be delayed by 7–17 days because of the antithyroid drugs taken by the mother. Neonatal hyperthyroidism symptoms can be confused with sepsis and congenital viral infections. Herein, the diagnosis and therapeutic approach are reviewed in cases of fetal neonatal hyperthyroidism. PMID:28439194

  6. Fetal motor activity and maternal cortisol

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    The contemporaneous association between maternal salivary cortisol and fetal motor activity was examined at 32 and 36 weeks gestation. Higher maternal cortisol was positively associated with the amplitude of fetal motor activity at 32 weeks, r(48) = .39, p < .01, and 36 weeks, r(77)=.27, p < .05, and the amount of time fetuses spent moving at 32 weeks during the 50 minute observation period, r(48) = 33, p < .05. Observation of periods of unusually intense fetal motor activity were more common in fetuses of women with higher cortisol, Mann-Whitney U = 58.5. There were no sex differences in fetal motor activity, but the associations between maternal cortisol and fetal motor amplitude and overall movement were significantly stronger for male than female fetuses. PMID:19630038

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... the area being scanned include: Metallic spinal rod Plates, pins, screws, or metal mesh used to repair ...

  8. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of the pain cannot be found. An MRI scan is an imaging test that creates detailed pictures ... neck pain often gets better on its own. MRI scans create detailed pictures of your spine. It can ...

  9. Propofol Pharmacokinetics and Estimation of Fetal Propofol Exposure during Mid-Gestational Fetal Surgery: A Maternal-Fetal Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Ngamprasertwong, Pornswan; Dong, Min; Niu, Jing; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Vinks, Alexander A; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Measuring fetal drug concentrations is extremely difficult in humans. We conducted a study in pregnant sheep to simultaneously describe maternal and fetal concentrations of propofol, a common intravenous anesthetic agent used in humans. Compared to inhalational anesthesia, propofol supplemented anesthesia lowered the dose of desflurane required to provide adequate uterine relaxation during open fetal surgery. This resulted in better intraoperative fetal cardiac outcome. This study describes maternal and fetal propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) using a chronically instrumented maternal-fetal sheep model. Fetal and maternal blood samples were simultaneously collected from eight mid-gestational pregnant ewes during general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and desflurane. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was performed by using NONMEM software. Total body weight, gestational age and hemodynamic parameters were tested in the covariate analysis. The final model was validated by bootstrapping and visual predictive check. A total of 160 propofol samples were collected. A 2-compartment maternal PK model with a third fetal compartment appropriately described the data. Mean population parameter estimates for maternal propofol clearance and central volume of distribution were 4.17 L/min and 37.7 L, respectively, in a typical ewe with a median heart rate of 135 beats/min. Increase in maternal heart rate significantly correlated with increase in propofol clearance. The estimated population maternal-fetal inter-compartment clearance was 0.0138 L/min and the volume of distribution of propofol in the fetus was 0.144 L. Fetal propofol clearance was found to be almost negligible compared to maternal clearance and could not be robustly estimated. For the first time, a maternal-fetal PK model of propofol in pregnant ewes was successfully developed. This study narrows the gap in our knowledge in maternal-fetal PK model in human. Our study confirms that maternal heart rate has an

  10. Propofol Pharmacokinetics and Estimation of Fetal Propofol Exposure during Mid-Gestational Fetal Surgery: A Maternal-Fetal Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Vinks, Alexander A.; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2016-01-01

    Background Measuring fetal drug concentrations is extremely difficult in humans. We conducted a study in pregnant sheep to simultaneously describe maternal and fetal concentrations of propofol, a common intravenous anesthetic agent used in humans. Compared to inhalational anesthesia, propofol supplemented anesthesia lowered the dose of desflurane required to provide adequate uterine relaxation during open fetal surgery. This resulted in better intraoperative fetal cardiac outcome. This study describes maternal and fetal propofol pharmacokinetics (PK) using a chronically instrumented maternal-fetal sheep model. Methods Fetal and maternal blood samples were simultaneously collected from eight mid-gestational pregnant ewes during general anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and desflurane. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was performed by using NONMEM software. Total body weight, gestational age and hemodynamic parameters were tested in the covariate analysis. The final model was validated by bootstrapping and visual predictive check. Results A total of 160 propofol samples were collected. A 2-compartment maternal PK model with a third fetal compartment appropriately described the data. Mean population parameter estimates for maternal propofol clearance and central volume of distribution were 4.17 L/min and 37.7 L, respectively, in a typical ewe with a median heart rate of 135 beats/min. Increase in maternal heart rate significantly correlated with increase in propofol clearance. The estimated population maternal-fetal inter-compartment clearance was 0.0138 L/min and the volume of distribution of propofol in the fetus was 0.144 L. Fetal propofol clearance was found to be almost negligible compared to maternal clearance and could not be robustly estimated. Conclusions For the first time, a maternal-fetal PK model of propofol in pregnant ewes was successfully developed. This study narrows the gap in our knowledge in maternal-fetal PK model in human. Our study confirms

  11. Zika Virus Infection with Prolonged Maternal Viremia and Fetal Brain Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Driggers, Rita W; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Korhonen, Essi M; Kuivanen, Suvi; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Smura, Teemu; Rosenberg, Avi; Hill, D Ashley; DeBiasi, Roberta L; Vezina, Gilbert; Timofeev, Julia; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Levanov, Lev; Razak, Jennifer; Iyengar, Preetha; Hennenfent, Andrew; Kennedy, Richard; Lanciotti, Robert; du Plessis, Adre; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-06-02

    The current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been associated with an apparent increased risk of congenital microcephaly. We describe a case of a pregnant woman and her fetus infected with ZIKV during the 11th gestational week. The fetal head circumference decreased from the 47th percentile to the 24th percentile between 16 and 20 weeks of gestation. ZIKV RNA was identified in maternal serum at 16 and 21 weeks of gestation. At 19 and 20 weeks of gestation, substantial brain abnormalities were detected on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the presence of microcephaly or intracranial calcifications. On postmortem analysis of the fetal brain, diffuse cerebral cortical thinning, high ZIKV RNA loads, and viral particles were detected, and ZIKV was subsequently isolated.

  12. Magnetic Resonance-based imaging in animal models of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Parnell, Scott E.; Lipinski, Robert J.; Sulik, Kathleen K.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), have recently been applied to the study of both normal and abnormal structure and neurochemistry in small animals. Herein, findings from studies in which these methods have been used for the examination of animal models of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) are discussed. Emphasis is placed on results of imaging studies in fetal and postnatal mice that have highlighted the developmental stage dependency of prenatal ethanol exposure-induced CNS defects. Consideration is also given to the promise of methodological advances to allow in vivo studies of aberrant brain and behavior relationships in model animals and to the translational nature of this work. PMID:21445552

  13. Hemimegalencephaly misdiagnosed as a congenital brain tumor by fetal cerebral ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, Shigeru; Endo, Masaya; Seki, Kazuo; Yokota, Shumpei

    2004-04-01

    To describe a case of hemimegalencephaly misdiagnosed prenatally. We presented a neonate with hemimegalencephaly, who was thought to have a congenital brain tumor by fetal cerebral ultrasonography. Postnatal MRI findings showed hemimegalencephaly characterized by mild enlargement of the affected hemisphere with a predominantly abnormal signal in the frontal lobe. The appearance of an echogenic round-shaped mass may have resulted from predominant hypermyelination and/or dysplastic neural/glial tissue in the frontal white matter. In prenatal diagnosis with fetal cerebral ultrasonography, it is difficult to distinguish between congenital brain tumor and hemimegalencephaly in which enlargement of the hemisphere is mild and the affected area of the brain is localized or predominantly in part of a cerebral hemisphere. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. MRI of intact plants.

    PubMed

    Van As, Henk; Scheenen, Tom; Vergeldt, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transport in the stem, e.g., as a function of environmental (stress) conditions. Non-spatially resolved portable NMR is becoming available to study leaf water content and distribution of water in different (sub-cellular) compartments. These parameters directly relate to stomatal water conductance, CO(2) uptake, and photosynthesis. MRI applied on plants is not a straight forward extension of the methods discussed for (bio)medical MRI. This educational review explains the basic physical principles of plant MRI, with a focus on the spatial resolution, factors that determine the spatial resolution, and its unique information for applications in plant water relations that directly relate to plant photosynthetic activity. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

  15. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  16. Fetal sulcation and gyrification in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) obtained by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sawada, K; Hikishima, K; Murayama, A Y; Okano, H J; Sasaki, E; Okano, H

    2014-01-17

    The present study characterized fetal sulcation patterns and gyrification in the cerebrum of the New World monkey group, common marmosets, using a 3D T2-weighted high-resolution anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence from the fixed brain at 7-tesla ex vivo. Fetal sulcation in the marmoset cerebrum began to indent the lateral fissure and hippocampal sulcus in gestational week (GW) 12, and then the following sulci emerged: the callosal and calcarine sulci on GW 15; the superior temporal sulcus on GW 17; and the circular and occipitotemporal sulci on GW 18. The degree of cortical convolution was evaluated quantitatively based on 2D MRI slices by the gyrification index (GI) and based on 3D MRI data by sulcation index (SI). Both the mean GI and SI increased from GW 16, and were closely correlated with the cortical volume and the cortical surface area during fetal periods (their correlation coefficients marked more than 0.95). After birth, both the mean GI and SI decreased slightly by 2years of age, whereas the cortical volume and surface area continuously increased. Notably, histological analysis showed that the outer subventricular zone (oSVZ) in non-sulcal regions was thicker than that in the presumptive calcarine sulcal region on GW 13, preceding the infolding of the calcarine sulcus. The present results showed definite sulcal infolding on the cerebral cortical surface of the marmosets, with similar pattern and sequence of their emergences to other higher-order primates such as macaques and humans. Differential expansion of the oSVZ may be involved in gyral convolution and sulcal infolding in the developing cerebrum.

  17. Segmented independent component analysis for improved separation of fetal cardiac signals from nonstationary fetal magnetocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Murta, Luiz O.; Guzo, Mauro G.; Moraes, Eder R.; Baffa, Oswaldo; Wakai, Ronald T.; Comani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetocardiograms (fMCGs) have been successfully processed with independent component analysis (ICA) to separate the fetal cardiac signals, but ICA effectiveness can be limited by signal nonstation-arities due to fetal movements. We propose an ICA-based method to improve the quality of fetal signals separated from fMCG affected by fetal movements. This technique (SegICA) includes a procedure to detect signal nonstationarities, according to which the fMCG recordings are divided in stationary segments that are then processed with ICA. The first and second statistical moments and the signal polarity reversal were used at different threshold levels to detect signal transients. SegICA effectiveness was assessed in two fMCG datasets (with and without fetal movements) by comparing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the signals extracted with ICA and with SegICA. Results showed that the SNR of fetal signals affected by fetal movements improved with SegICA, whereas the SNR gain was negligible elsewhere. The best measure to detect signal nonstationarities of physiological origin was signal polarity reversal at threshold level 0.9. The first statistical moment also provided good results at threshold level 0.6. SegICA seems a promising method to separate fetal cardiac signals of improved quality from nonstationary fMCG recordings affected by fetal movements. PMID:25781658

  18. Effects of Maternal and Fetal Characteristics on Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Zhu, Zhongyi; Gao, Ya; Yuan, Yuying; Guo, Yulai; Zhou, Lijun; Liao, KaiKai; Wang, Jun; Du, Bole; Hou, Yumei; Chen, Zhonglin; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Hongyun; Yu, Cong; Zhao, Lijian; Lau, T K; Jiang, Fuman; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    To study factors that influence the concentration of cell-free fetal DNA (fetal fraction) using a large clinical data set of pregnancies with male fetus. A retrospective analysis of 23 067 pregnancies that received noninvasive prenatal testing from January 2012 to October 2013, including 22 650 normal singleton pregnancies (control group) and 417 pregnancies with aneuploidy, twin pregnancy, or various maternal conditions including preexisting hypertension, preexisting diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and carrier of the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus (HBsAg; study group). Multiples of the median (MoM) analysis was performed in the control group to derive gestation and body mass index (BMI)-corrected fetal fraction. The effects of study group conditions on fetal fraction were examined by calculating the ratio of MoM (RMoM) values. Fetal fraction showed a positive correlation with gestational age (r(2) = .10, P < .001) and increased rapidly after the 21 weeks of gestation (r(2) = .26, P < .001). Negative association with maternal BMI was found with fetal fraction (r(2) = .04, P < .001). In study group, fetal fraction was higher among pregnant women with a trisomy 21 fetus (RMoM = 1.24, P < .001) and lower among trisomy 18 (RMoM = 0.84, P < .001). A 1.6-fold incensement of fetal fraction was observed in twin fetuses comparing to singleton pregnancy (RMoM = 1.62, P < .001). Women with preexisting hypertension had significantly lower fetal fraction (RMoM = 0.85, P = .02). Preexisting diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or carrier of HBsAg did not affect fetal fraction. The fetal fraction was affected by fetal aneuploidy, maternal BMI, and the number of gestation. Maternal preexisting of hypertension appeared to reduce fetal fraction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Modeling photon transport in transabdominal fetal oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Vishnoi, Gargi; Choe, Regine; Chance, Britton

    2000-07-01

    The possibility of optical oximetry of the blood in the fetal brain measured across the maternal abdomen just prior to birth is under investigated. Such measurements could detect fetal distress prior to birth and aid in the clinical decision regarding Cesarean section. This paper uses a perturbation method to model photon transport through a 8- cm-diam fetal brain located at a constant 2.5 cm below a curved maternal abdominal surface with an air/tissue boundary. In the simulation, a near-infrared light source delivers light to the abdomen and a detector is positioned up to 10 cm from the source along the arc of the abdominal surface. The light transport [W/cm2 fluence rate per W incident power] collected at the 10 cm position is Tm equals 2.2 X 10-6 cm-2 if the fetal brain has the same optical properties as the mother and Tf equals 1.0 X 10MIN6 cm-2 for an optically perturbing fetal brain with typical brain optical properties. The perturbation P equals (Tf - Tm)/Tm is -53% due to the fetal brain. The model illustrates the challenge and feasibility of transabdominal oximetry of the fetal brain.

  20. Fetal RHD genotyping after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thurik, Florentine F; Page-Christiaens, Godelieve C M L; Ait Soussan, Aicha; Ligthart, Peter C; Cheroutre, Goedele M A F; Bossers, Bernadette; Veldhuisen, Barbera; van der Schoot, C Ellen; de Haas, Masja

    2016-08-01

    Fetal RHD genotyping allows targeted diagnostic testing, fetal surveillance, and eventually intrauterine treatment to D-alloimmunized pregnant women who carry an RHD+ fetus. However, false-positive and false-negative results of noninvasive prenatal fetal RHD genotyping have been described due to a variety of causes. In this case report we present two cases where noninvasive fetal RHD typing was complicated by a previous bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We describe two women with a history of allogeneic BMT in early childhood. Both were born D+ and received a transplant of their D- male sibling. Anti-D were detected during pregnancy in one of them. The biologic father of this pregnancy was D+. In both cases polymerase chain reaction procedures specific for RHD on maternal plasma DNA were positive whereas a D- neonate was born in one case (Case 1). False-positive results of noninvasive fetal RHD genotyping occur in D+ women transplanted with marrow of a D- donor, due to circulating cell-free DNA originating from nonhematopoietic tissue. The cases highlight that health care professionals and laboratories should be aware that allogeneic BMT can be a cause for false-positive results in fetal RHD genotyping with cell-free DNA in maternal plasma, and likewise the wrong fetal sex can be reported in the case of a male donor and a female fetus. Based on one of the cases we also recommend giving D- blood products to young female patients who receive a BMT of D- donors. © 2016 AABB.

  1. Fetal tissue engineering: chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Terada, Shinichi; Hannouche, Didier; Ochoa, Erin R; Vacanti, Joseph P; Fauza, Dario O

    2003-08-01

    This study was aimed at applying fetal tissue engineering to chest wall reconstruction. Fetal lambs underwent harvest of elastic and hyaline cartilage specimens. Once expanded in vitro, fetal chondrocytes were seeded onto synthetic scaffolds, which then were placed in a bioreactor. After birth, fetal cartilage constructs (n = 10) were implanted in autologous fashion into the ribs of all lambs (n = 6) along with identical, but acellular scaffolds, as controls (n = 6). Engineered and acellular specimens were harvested for analysis at 4 to 12 weeks postimplantation. Standard histology and matrix-specific staining were performed both before implantation and after harvest on all constructs. Regardless of the source of chondrocytes, all fetal constructs resembled hyaline cartilage, both grossly and histologically, in vitro. In vivo, engineered implants retained hyaline characteristics for up to 10 weeks after implantation but remodeled into fibrocartilage by 12 weeks postoperatively. Mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates surrounding residual PGA/PLLA polymer fibers were noted in all specimens but most prominently in the acellular controls. Engineered fetal cartilage can provide structural replacement for at least up to 10 weeks after autologous, postnatal implantation in the chest wall. Fetal tissue engineering may prove useful for the treatment of severe congenital chest wall defects at birth.

  2. Adiponectin Enhances Mouse Fetal Fat Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liping; Yoo, Hyung sun; Madon, Alysha; Kinney, Brice; Hay, William W.; Shao, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Maternal obesity increases offspring birth weight and susceptibility to obesity. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with a prominent function in maintaining energy homeostasis. In contrast to adults, neonatal blood adiponectin levels are positively correlated with anthropometric parameters of adiposity. This study was designed to investigate the role of adiponectin in maternal obesityenhanced fetal fat deposition. By using high-fat diet–induced obese mouse models, our study showed that maternal obesity increased fetal fat tissue mass, with a significant elevation in fetal blood adiponectin. However, adiponectin gene knockout (Adipoq−/−) attenuated maternal obesity-induced high fetal fat tissue mass. We further studied the effects of fetal adiponectin on fetal fat deposition by using a cross breeding approach to create Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− offspring, whereas maternal adiponectin was null. Adipoq−/+ offspring had more fat tissue mass at both birth and adulthood. Significantly high levels of lipogenic genes, such as sterol regulatory element–binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase, were detected in the livers of Adipoq−/+ fetuses. In addition, expression of genes for placental fatty acid transport was significantly increased in Adipoq−/+ fetuses. Together, our study indicates that adiponectin enhances fetal fat deposition and plays an important role in maternal obesity-induced high birth weight. PMID:22872236

  3. Neurodevelopment after fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Baschat, Ahmet A

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) can emerge as a complication of placental dysfunction and increases the risk for neurodevelopmental delay. Marked elevations of umbilical artery (UA) Doppler resistance that set the stage for cardiovascular and biophysical deterioration with subsequent preterm birth characterize early-onset FGR. Minimal, or absent UA Doppler abnormalities and isolated cerebral Doppler changes with subtle deterioration and a high risk for unanticipated term stillbirth are characteristic for late-onset FGR. Nutritional deficiency manifested in lagging head growth is the most powerful predictor of developmental delay in all forms of FGR. Extremes of blood flow resistance and cardiovascular deterioration, prematurity and intracranial hemorrhage increase the risks for psychomotor delay and cerebral palsy. In late-onset FGR, regional cerebral vascular redistribution correlates with abnormal behavioral domains. Irrespective of the phenotype of FGR, prenatal tests that provide precise and independent stratification of risks for adverse neurodevelopment have yet to be determined.

  4. Atrioventricular block during fetal life

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lindsey E.; Simpson, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular (AV) block occurs in approximately 1 in 20,000 live births and is known to result in significant mortality and morbidity both during fetal life and postnatally. Complete AV block can occur as a result of an immune or a non-immune mediated process. Immune mediated AV block is a multifactorial disease, but is associated with the trans-placental passage of maternal autoantibodies (anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB). These autoantibodies attach to and subsequently damage the cardiomyocytes and conduction tissue in susceptible fetuses. In this report, we examine the evidence in reference to means of assessment, pathophysiology, and potential prenatal therapy of atrioventricular block. PMID:26136631

  5. Atomic Magnetometry for fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Walker, Thad; Wakai, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    We present results of using an array of atomic magnetometers in detecting fetal Magnetocardiograms(fMCG). The array consists of four 87-Rb atomic magnetometers operating in the spin exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime. They have a demonstrated sensitivity of 5 - 10 fT /√{ Hz } -limited by the Johnson noise of the magnetic shielding. We report measurements of fMCG on gestational ages as small as 21 weeks and describe the technical challenges and design features that make the measurements possible. We present a method for minimizing the impact of AC Stark Shifts on the magnetometer array performance by relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms from a pumping region to an AC Stark shift free active region. This work was supported by the NIH.

  6. Fetal pain: an infantile debate.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, S W G

    2001-02-01

    The question of whether a fetus can experience pain is an immense challenge. The issue demands consideration of the physical and psychological basis of being and the relation between the two. At the center of this debate is the question of how it is that we are conscious, a question that has inspired the writing of some of our most brilliant contemporary philosophers and scientists, with one commentary suggesting surrender. In my earlier review I attempted to draw together the various strands of thinking that had attacked the question of fetal pain and relate them back to the bigger question of consciousness. In their vituperative response, Benatar and Benatar bite off my finger before looking to where I am pointing. I will examine each of their criticisms.

  7. [FETAL PROGRAMMING OF METABOLIC DISORDERS].

    PubMed

    Varadinova, M R; Metodieva, R; Boyadzhieva, N

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of fetal programming has developed notably over the years and recent data suggest that an unbalanced diet prior and during pregnancy can have early-onset and long-lasting consequences on the health of the offspring. Specific negative influences of high dietary glucose and lipid consumption, as well as undernutrition, are associated with development of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and diabetes in the offspring. The mechanisms underlying the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on the fetus may involve structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes. The aim of this review is to illustrate how adverse intrauterine environment may influence molecular modifications in the fetus and cause epigenetic alterations in particular. It has been demonstrated that prenatal epigenetic modifications may be linked to the pathogenesis and progression of the adult chronic disorders. Studies on epigenetic alterations will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term effects of in utero exposure and may open new perspectives for disease prevention and treatment.

  8. Fetal alcohol syndrome: neuropsychiatric phenomics.

    PubMed

    Burd, Larry; Klug, Marilyn G; Martsolf, John T; Kerbeshian, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common developmental disorder with impairments in multiple neuropsychiatric spheres of varying severity. Few population-derived studies of the behavioral phenotype are available. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders in three groups: subjects who met criteria for FAS (n=152); subjects who met criteria for partial FAS/ARND (n=150); and referred subjects who did not meet criteria for either FAS or partial FAS/ARND (n=86). Each subject had a standardized evaluation by a medical geneticist. All subjects were from North Dakota. We found increases in the prevalence rates of neuropsychiatric disorders in subjects with FAS compared to subjects with partial FAS/ARND and the lowest rates in the group that did not meet criteria for either FAS or partial FAS/ARND. Comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder occurred in 73% of cases with FAS, in 72% cases with partial FAS/ARND, and in 36% subjects who did not meet criteria for either. For other neuropsychiatric disorders, a similar distribution of comorbidity was found. This study supports the concept of a continuum of impairment resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure. The presence of complex cognitive, behavioral, and physical symptomatology in the affected subjects with prenatal alcohol exposure would seem to fit well under the diagnostic rubric of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Diagnosis and long-term management will require increasing access to multidisciplinary child development teams including mental health professionals who treat children and adolescents. Adults will require care primarily from teams with expertise in mental health and developmental disabilities.

  9. Weak functional connectivity in the human fetal brain prior to preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Scheinost, Dustin; Manning, Janessa H.; Grove, Lauren E.; Hect, Jasmine; Marshall, Narcis; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Berman, Susan; Pappas, Athina; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S.; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.; Romero, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that neurological problems more frequent in those born preterm are expressed prior to birth, but owing to technical limitations, this has been difficult to test in humans. We applied novel fetal resting-state functional MRI to measure brain function in 32 human fetuses in utero and found that systems-level neural functional connectivity was diminished in fetuses that would subsequently be born preterm. Neural connectivity was reduced in a left-hemisphere pre-language region, and the degree to which connectivity of this left language region extended to right-hemisphere homologs was positively associated with the time elapsed between fMRI assessment and delivery. These results provide the first evidence that altered functional connectivity in the preterm brain is identifiable before birth. They suggest that neurodevelopmental disorders associated with preterm birth may result from neurological insults that begin in utero. PMID:28067865

  10. Weak functional connectivity in the human fetal brain prior to preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Moriah E; Scheinost, Dustin; Manning, Janessa H; Grove, Lauren E; Hect, Jasmine; Marshall, Narcis; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Berman, Susan; Pappas, Athina; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R; Romero, Roberto

    2017-01-09

    It has been suggested that neurological problems more frequent in those born preterm are expressed prior to birth, but owing to technical limitations, this has been difficult to test in humans. We applied novel fetal resting-state functional MRI to measure brain function in 32 human fetuses in utero and found that systems-level neural functional connectivity was diminished in fetuses that would subsequently be born preterm. Neural connectivity was reduced in a left-hemisphere pre-language region, and the degree to which connectivity of this left language region extended to right-hemisphere homologs was positively associated with the time elapsed between fMRI assessment and delivery. These results provide the first evidence that altered functional connectivity in the preterm brain is identifiable before birth. They suggest that neurodevelopmental disorders associated with preterm birth may result from neurological insults that begin in utero.

  11. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth

    PubMed Central

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I.; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M.; Parker, Corette B.; Silver, Robert M.; Dudley, Donald J.; Stoll, Barbara J.; Saade, George R.; Koch, Matthew A.; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W.; Conway, Deborah L.; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Methods and findings Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (<10th percentile) and large (>90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner

  12. Fetal akinesia sequence caused by nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lammens, M; Moerman, P; Fryns, J P; Lemmens, F; van de Kamp, G M; Goemans, N; Dom, R

    1997-04-01

    Nine patients with the characteristic signs of fetal akinesia sequence (polyhydramnion, multiple joint contractures and lung hypoplasia) are described. In 8 of the 9 patients nemaline myopathy could be demonstrated with histology. The ninth patient presented the same phenotype as his 4 affected siblings in whom the nemaline myopathy could be histologically proven. Seven of the patients belonged to 2 families; the other 2 patients were isolated cases. In one fetal case nemaline myopathy was documented at week 22 of gestation. These observations demonstrate that nemaline myopathy can cause the fetal akinesia sequence, with onset of first symptoms as early as the beginning of the second trimester of pregnancy.

  13. Fetal Surgery for Myelomeningocele: Trials and Tribulations

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N.Scott

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for in utero repair of myelomeningocele (MMC) in the context of pathologic observations, animal models, and outcomes from the initial experience with human fetal myelomeningocele repair is presented. This has now culminated in a randomized trial, Management of Myelomeningocele Study (the MOMS Trial), the findings of which are listed. The story is focused on the milestone contributions of members of the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) on the road to successful fetal surgery for spina bifida. This is now performed in selected patients and presents an additional therapeutic alternative for expectant mothers carrying a fetus with MMC. PMID:22325376

  14. Medical legal issues in fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schifrin, Barry S; Cohen, Wayne R

    2007-06-01

    Despite almost universal fetal monitoring during labor, debates over its role and benefits persist in the medical community and in obstetric negligence lawsuits. Irrespective, there is widespread agreement that improvement in perinatal outcome is possible and that the events of labor contribute significantly to perinatal hazards. Timely application and proper interpretation of the fetal heart rate pattern in concert with evaluations of the maternal condition and the feasibility of safe vaginal delivery permit an evaluation of the quality of care and the preventability of fetal injury whether in peer review or in malpractice cases.

  15. Doppler colour flow imaging of fetal intracerebral arteries relative to fetal behavioural states in normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Noordam, M J; Hoekstra, F M; Hop, W C; Wladimiroff, J W

    1994-09-30

    In 14 normally developing term fetuses, the relationship between the blood flow velocity waveforms at cerebral arterial level (internal carotid artery, anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery) and fetal behavioural states was studied using Doppler colour flow imaging. Behavioural state dependent changes in absolute flow velocities occurred in all vessels, except for the middle cerebral artery. These changes suggest preferential blood flow to the left heart resulting in increased flow to the cerebrum during fetal behavioural state 2F (active sleep) when compared with fetal behavioural state 1F (quiet sleep). The middle cerebral artery supplies the neocerebrum. This developing part of the cerebrum does not seem to take part in the regulation of fetal behaviour. In the internal carotid artery, an inverse relationship between peak systolic velocity and fetal heart rate could be established, which can be explained by a shorter rapid filling phase at raised fetal heart rate according to the Frank-Starling Law.

  16. Free Amino-acid Concentrations in Fetal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, F.; Robins, S. P.; Forfar, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    The pattern of free amino-acid concentrations in maternal venous plasma, fetal umbilical arterial plasma, fetal urine, and amniotic fluid at 15 to 20 weeks' gestation has been determined. Free amino-acid concentrations were greater in fetal plasma than in maternal plasma, amniotic fluid, or fetal urine. The ratios of amino-acid concentrations in fetal umbilical arterial plasma and urine indicate that the fetal kidney can effectively conserve amino-acids, possibly reaching an adult level of competence in this respect. There was little correlation between amino-acid concentrations in the fluids analysed with the exception of that between amniotic fluid and fetal urine. PMID:5472758

  17. Spatial-temporal atlas of human fetal brain development during the early second trimester.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jinfeng; Dinov, Ivo D; Li, Junning; Zhang, Zhonghe; Hobel, Sam; Shi, Yonggang; Lin, Xiangtao; Zamanyan, Alen; Feng, Lei; Teng, Gaojun; Fang, Fang; Tang, Yuchun; Zang, Fengchao; Toga, Arthur W; Liu, Shuwei

    2013-11-15

    During the second trimester, the human fetal brain undergoes numerous changes that lead to substantial variation in the neonatal in terms of its morphology and tissue types. As fetal MRI is more and more widely used for studying the human brain development during this period, a spatiotemporal atlas becomes necessary for characterizing the dynamic structural changes. In this study, 34 postmortem human fetal brains with gestational ages ranging from 15 to 22 weeks were scanned using 7.0 T MR. We used automated morphometrics, tensor-based morphometry and surface modeling techniques to analyze the data. Spatiotemporal atlases of each week and the overall atlas covering the whole period with high resolution and contrast were created. These atlases were used for the analysis of age-specific shape changes during this period, including development of the cerebral wall, lateral ventricles, Sylvian fissure, and growth direction based on local surface measurements. Our findings indicate that growth of the subplate zone is especially striking and is the main cause for the lamination pattern changes. Changes in the cortex around Sylvian fissure demonstrate that cortical growth may be one of the mechanisms for gyration. Surface deformation mapping, revealed by local shape analysis, indicates that there is global anterior-posterior growth pattern, with frontal and temporal lobes developing relatively quickly during this period. Our results are valuable for understanding the normal brain development trajectories and anatomical characteristics. These week-by-week fetal brain atlases can be used as reference in in vivo studies, and may facilitate the quantification of fetal brain development across space and time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MRI of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T2 sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis. PMID:23118102

  19. MRI of the penis.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, A

    2012-11-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T(2) sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis.

  20. Abnormal fetal-maternal interactions: an evolutionary value?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Jimmy

    2012-08-01

    There is clinical and ultrasonographic evidence that "abnormal fetal-maternal interactions" or "fetal-maternal conflicts" may be central to the mechanisms of injury in pregnancy complications such as fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia, fetal death, gestational diabetes, and a subset of patients with preterm parturition. This conceptual framework integrates abnormalities in the placental bed, placental vasculature, and other areas of fetal-maternal interactions with pregnancy complications in light of their possible evolutionary value.

  1. MRI of the knee.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard in noninvasive investigation of knee pain. It has a very high negative predictive value and may assist in avoiding unnecessary knee arthroscopy; its accuracy in the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is greater than 89%; it has a greater than 90% sensitivity for the detection of medial meniscal tears; and it is probably better at assessing the posterior horn than arthroscopy.

  2. Performance Analysis of Dual-hop MIMO Relay Systems with MRT&RAS in the Presence of Co-channel Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoming; Cai, Yueming; Yang, Weiwei

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on the downlink dual-hop multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) amplify-and-forward (AF) relay systems that employ the maximal-ratio transmission and receive antenna selection scheme (MRT&RAS) for use in each hop. The system under consideration is equipped with arbitrary NS, NR, and ND antennas at the base station (BS), relay station (RS), and mobile station (MS), respectively. The system performance has been investigated over Nakagami-m fading in presence of independent but not necessarily identically distributed co-channel interferences (CCIs) at both the RS and MS. First, we derive an accurate closed-form approximate expression for the outage probability and a single-integral expression for the average symbol error rate (SER), respectively. Besides, to render direct insights into the combined effect of multiple-antenna and interference on the system performance, the asymptotic expressions for the outage probability and the average SER are also presented. Furthermore, we determine the optimal power allocation (OPA) by using the exact and asymptotic methods, respectively, such that the outage probability is minimized. Finally, numerical results validate the correctness of the derived expressions and show that OPA offers superior performance over uniform power allocation. Our analysis and results provide insights on investigating and optimizing the performance of the downlink MIMO relay transmission in practical interference-limited wireless networks.

  3. Quiet Technology of MRI.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yuichi

    A number of clinical applications for MRI have been developed in accordance with the advancement in imaging technology. Recently, medical checkup of brain or heart are becoming popular. In this situation, there is a growing need for performance improvement of MRI and thus acoustic noise during examinations tends to become louder with the use of higher static magnetic field and higher gradient performance. Noise reduction measures for MRI are classified into two categories, pulse sequence optimization and hardware renovation. For pulse sequence, noise is reduced by decreasing the changes of the current applied for gradient coil. Since there exist solid-borne sound and airborne sound, for hardware measure, not only making gradient coil itself vibration suppressed structure but also controlling vibration to prevent propagation of sounds to the other structure is required. Pianissimo(TM) mechanism employs both solid-borne sound suppression and airborne sound suppression by vacuum-encapsulating the gradient coil, and realizes 33 dB noise reduction. Pianissimo(TM) mechanism, in contrast to the noise reduction by pulse sequence modification, reduces the acoustic noise produced by scans of all kinds and can be readily adapted to the newly developed applications regardless of imaging technique.

  4. MRI of human hair.

    PubMed

    Mattle, Eveline; Weiger, Markus; Schmidig, Daniel; Boesiger, Peter; Fey, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Hair care for humans is a major world industry with specialised tools, chemicals and techniques. Studying the effect of hair care products has become a considerable field of research, and besides mechanical and optical testing numerous advanced analytical techniques have been employed in this area. In the present work, another means of studying the properties of hair is added by demonstrating the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the human hair. Established dedicated nuclear magnetic resonance microscopy hardware (solenoidal radiofrequency microcoils and planar field gradients) and methods (constant time imaging) were adapted to the specific needs of hair MRI. Images were produced at a spatial resolution high enough to resolve the inner structure of the hair, showing contrast between cortex and medulla. Quantitative evaluation of a scan series with different echo times provided a T*(2) value of 2.6 ms for the cortex and a water content of about 90% for hairs saturated with water. The demonstration of the feasibility of hair MRI potentially adds a new tool to the large variety of analytical methods used nowadays in the development of hair care products.

  5. Piracetam for fetal distress in labour.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Kulier, Regina

    2012-06-13

    Piracetam is thought to promote the metabolism of brain cells when they are hypoxic. It has been used to prevent adverse effects of fetal distress. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of piracetam for suspected fetal distress in labour on method of delivery and perinatal morbidity. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (15 February 2012). Randomised trials of piracetam compared with placebo or no treatment for suspected fetal distress in labour. Both review authors assessed eligibility and trial quality. One study of 96 women was included. Piracetam compared with placebo was associated with a trend to reduced need for caesarean section (risk ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 1.03). There were no statistically significant differences between the piracetam and placebo group for neonatal morbidity (measured by neonatal respiratory distress) or Apgar score. There is not enough evidence to evaluate the use of piracetam for fetal distress in labour.

  6. Special Tests for Monitoring Fetal Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy, such as fetal growth problems, Rh sensitization , or high blood pressure • Decreased movement of the ... A pregnancy that extends beyond 42 weeks. Rh Sensitization: A condition in which an Rh-negative mother ...

  7. Micronutrients in fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    McArdle, H J; Ashworth, C J

    1999-01-01

    The roles that the different vitamins and minerals play in fetal growth and development are reviewed, primarily with respect to growth and differentiation in humans; but, as appropriate, data provided from animal and cellular studies are also considered.

  8. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by air... ultrasonic energy. This device is designed to eliminate noise interference commonly caused by handling...

  9. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by air... ultrasonic energy. This device is designed to eliminate noise interference commonly caused by handling...

  10. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by air... ultrasonic energy. This device is designed to eliminate noise interference commonly caused by handling...

  11. [Effect of music on fetal behaviour].

    PubMed

    Malinova, M; Malinova, M

    2004-01-01

    Antenatal music stimulation shown to elicit fetal heart rate and body movement responses, indicating that prenatal experience with music influences auditory functional development. The slower tempo resulted in less movement variation.

  12. Fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Kleihauer-Betke stain; Flow cytometry - fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution; Rh incompatibility - erythrocyte distribution ... slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor ...

  13. Fetal magnetocardiography: Methods for rapid data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, John C.; Flynn, Edward R.; Quinn, A.; Weir, A.; Shahani, U.; Bain, R. J. P.; Maas, P.; Donaldson, G. B.

    1997-03-01

    Fetal magnetocardigraphy (fMCG) provides a unique method for noninvasive observations of the fetal heart. Electrical currents generated by excitable tissues within the fetal heart yield measurable external magnetic fields. Measurements are performed with superconducting quantum interference devices inductively coupled to magnetometer or gradiometer coils, and the resulting signals are converted to digital form in the data acquisition system. The measured fields are usually contaminated by fetal and maternal movements (usually respiration), other physiological fields such as skeletal muscle contraction, the maternal cardiac signal, and environmental electromagnetic fields. Sensitivity to relatively distant sources, both physiological and environmental, is substantially reduced by the use of magnetic gradiometers. Other contaminants may be removed by proper signal conditioning which may be automatically applied using "black box" algorithms that are transparent to the user and highly efficient. These procedures can rapidly reduce the complex signal plus noise waveforms to the desired fMCG with minimal operator interference.

  14. Fetal diffusion imaging: pearls and solutions.

    PubMed

    Kasprian, Gregor; Del Río, Maria; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-12-01

    Recently, diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging of the fetus has evolved from a basic research application to an important diagnostic imaging tool in fetal magnetic resonance imaging. Although technically challenging and still plagued with several sources of artifacts, DWI can add clinically important information, which cannot be provided by any other prenatal imaging modality. Its potential to noninvasively probe tissue structures on the basis of Brownian molecular motion enables the detection of early changes associated with acute fetal diseases, as well as structural alterations of functionally diverse compartments of different fetal organs. In this article, the current clinical applications of fetal brain and body DWI are outlined, as well as its current limitations.

  15. Fetal origins of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xita, Nektaria; Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2010-09-01

    The natural history of metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which shares many components of metabolic syndrome, may originate in intrauterine life. Evidence from epidemiological observations, clinical, and experimental animal studies suggest that the nutritional, hormonal, and metabolic environment afforded by the mother may permanently program differentiating target tissues of the offspring toward the development of metabolic syndrome/PCOS phenotype in adult life. The mechanisms of fetal programming are not well understood. Thus, the altered tissue differentiation may be the result of fetal adaptive responses representing homeostatic adaptations due to alterations in fetal nutrition. Also, tissues under the influence of androgen excess may be directed toward a more masculine phenotype with regard to reproductive, neuroendocrine, and metabolic traits, while the importance of epigenetics in fetal origin of metabolic syndrome/PCOS cannot be overlooked.

  16. Erythropoietin elevation in the chronically hyperglycemic fetal lamb

    SciTech Connect

    Philipps, A.F. Widness, J.A.; Garcia, J.F.; Raye, J.R.; Swartz, R.

    1982-05-01

    The effects of chronic fetal glucose infusion upon fetal oxygenation and endogenous erythropoietin (Ep) production were studied using the chronically catheterized fetal lamb. Fetal glucose infusion at rates between 5 and 20 mg/kg/min resulted in sustained fetal hyperglycemia. During glucose infusion (maximal glucose concentration achieved = 55.4 +/- 3.7 mg/dl) fetal arterial oxygen contents fell from 5.8 +/- 0.9 to 4.2 +/- 1.0 ml/dl while no changes were observed in simultaneously sampled, noninfused twins. Although plasma insulin concentration rose in the infused fetuses, the elevations were inconstant and no relationship between fetal plasma insulin concentration and decrement in fetal oxygen content was evident. The changes in plasma Ep concentration were noted prior to any significant fetal metabolic acidosis (as evidence of tissue hypoxia) and no changes in plasma Ep concentration were observed in simultaneously sampled noninfused twins. No relationship was apparent between fetal arterial plasma insulin and Ep concentrations. Since neither fetal anemia nor hemodilution occurred in these preparations, glucose-induced fetal hyposemia is the likely mechanism behind elevated fetal Ep concentrations in these experiments. Similarities between this animal model and human fetuses and infants of diabetic mothers suggest that chronic in utero hypoxemia may be a common feature responsible for such diverse abnomalities as polycythemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and late fetal demise. The mechanism behind the glucose-induced fetal hypoxemia is not known.

  17. Diagnosis and management of common fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Roland; Stambach, Dominik; Jaeggi, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are detected in at least 2% of unselected pregnancies during routine obstetrical scans. Most common are transient, brief episodes of a slow or fast heart rate or of an irregular heart rhythm. Less common are prolonged or persistent abnormalities such as supraventricular tachycardia and complete heart block which may lead to low cardiac output, fetal hydrops and demise. The objectives of this review are to update the reader on the diagnosis and management of the more common arrhythmias. PMID:23960639

  18. Fetal akinesia and multiple perinatal fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Blackburn, W R; Wertelecki, W

    1995-02-13

    Two newborn infants with fetal akinesia sequence were noted to have multiple perinatal fractures of the long bones. The radiographic manifestations are characterized by gracile ribs, thin long bones, and multiple diaphyseal fractures. Consistent histopathologic changes of bone are irregular with focal areas of extreme diaphyseal thinning, thin and long marrow spicules, and with or without callous formation at fracture sites. Pathogenic mechanisms of bone fractures in fetal akinesia sequence and the differential diagnoses of congenital/perinatal bone fractures are discussed.

  19. Fetal toxicology of environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Koren, G

    1995-04-01

    During the past decade, new evidence has been collected regarding the fetal risks of environmental tobacco smoke. Throughout gestation, the unborn baby is exposed to increasing concentrations of nicotine through maternal blood and gastrointestinal and skin absorption of the nicotine in the amniotic fluid. Recent research shows measurable concentrations of cotinine in the hair of infants born to passively smoking mothers. This exposure has been recently associated with effects on fetal growth.

  20. Impact of oxidative stress in fetal programming.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Loren P; Al-Hasan, Yazan

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that protect against organ dysfunction in the programmed offspring.