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Sample records for mri fluoroscopic image

  1. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  2. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data for digital reconstruction of objects from their projections is examined. The fluoroscopic and the scanning apparatus used for the experiments are of a commercial type already in existence in most hospitals. It is shown that for beams with divergence up to about 15 deg, one can use a convolution algorithm designed for the parallel radiation case with negligible degradation both quantitatively and from a visual quality standpoint. This convolution algorithm is computationally more efficient than either the algebraic techniques or the convolution algorithms for radially diverging data. Results from studies on Lucite phantoms and a freshly sacrificed rat are included.

  3. Fluoroscopic image-guided intervention system for transbronchial localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Keast, Thomas M.; Wibowo, Henky; Yu, Kun-Chang; Draper, Jeffrey W.; Gibbs, Jason D.

    2012-02-01

    Reliable transbronchial access of peripheral lung lesions is desirable for the diagnosis and potential treatment of lung cancer. This procedure can be difficult, however, because accessory devices (e.g., needle or forceps) cannot be reliably localized while deployed. We present a fluoroscopic image-guided intervention (IGI) system for tracking such bronchoscopic accessories. Fluoroscopy, an imaging technology currently utilized by many bronchoscopists, has a fundamental shortcoming - many lung lesions are invisible in its images. Our IGI system aligns a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) defined from a pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scan with live fluoroscopic images. Radiopaque accessory devices are readily apparent in fluoroscopic video, while lesions lacking a fluoroscopic signature but identifiable in the CT scan are superimposed in the scene. The IGI system processing steps consist of: (1) calibrating the fluoroscopic imaging system; (2) registering the CT anatomy with its depiction in the fluoroscopic scene; (3) optical tracking to continually update the DRR and target positions as the fluoroscope is moved about the patient. The end result is a continuous correlation of the DRR and projected targets with the anatomy depicted in the live fluoroscopic video feed. Because both targets and bronchoscopic devices are readily apparent in arbitrary fluoroscopic orientations, multiplane guidance is straightforward. The system tracks in real-time with no computational lag. We have measured a mean projected tracking accuracy of 1.0 mm in a phantom and present results from an in vivo animal study.

  4. Fluoroscopic "heart chamber" anatomy - the case for imaging modality-independent terminology.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Nicolo; Mylotte, Darren; Theriault Lauzier, Pascal

    2016-09-18

    Interventional cardiologists have traditionally relied upon fluoro-scopic imaging for percutaneous coronary interventions. Transcatheter structural heart interventions, however, require additional imaging modalities such as echocardiography and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for pre-, intra- and post-procedural assistance. MSCT has emerged as the critical imaging modality for patient and device selection prior to transcatheter structural heart interventions. MSCT is unique as it provides a complete 3-dimensional (3D) dataset of the heart and vasculature that is amenable to multiplanar reconstruction for 2-dimensional (2D) or volume-rendered interpretations. Herein, we present a modality-independent terminology for understanding volumetric images in the context of transcatheter heart valve therapies. The goal of this system is to allow physicians to readily interpret the orientation of fluoroscopic, MSCT, echocardiographic and MRI images, thus generalising their understanding of cardiac anatomy to all imaging modalities. PMID:27640046

  5. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  6. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  16. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data. PMID:20879411

  17. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data.

  18. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  19. The response of fluoroscopic image intensifier-TV systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Three different types of X-ray fluoroscopic TV chains were investigated: two standard clinical units, one with a vidicon camera tube, the other with a plumbicon camera tube; and the third was a large flat-screen unit. In each an X-ray beam generated at 100 kVp was passed through 10 cm of H2O before aluminum absorbers of varying thickness were introduced. Five video recordings were made at each absorber thickness. The video image was digitized directly from the disk recording and quantized into 128 gray levels. The five recordings were averaged on a point-to-point basis, and the central 900 averaged points were again averaged to yield a value for the gray level assigned to each particular image. This 30 by 30 matrix of points corresponds to input screen areas of 29, 8.2, and 3.6 sq cm for the three units investigated.

  20. [The Time Sequence Noise Characteristics of the X- ray Fluoroscopic Image].

    PubMed

    Umehara, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Kazuma; Fujita, Tomoko; Maeda, Katsuhiko; Ikeuchi, Youko; Hagihara, Yoshiaki; Fujikawa, Keita

    2016-01-01

    The role of the X-ray fluoroscopic image during interventional radiology (IVR) is not only the real-time dynamic image for the catheter operation but also to confirm the vascular anatomy using stored image, so that the importance increases more. For the purpose of measuring the time sequence characteristics of X-ray fluoroscopic image, we sampled the digital value of the same coordinate from each X-ray fluoroscopic image and calculated the frequency properties of the noise for the time sequence order as NPStime by performing Fourier transform on the digital value. The parameters, except k-factor which is the time sequence filter, did not influence NPStime. NPStime, which was examined in this study, showed that it is valuable for the method to analyze the time sequence noise characteristics. And, it also showed that it is possible to evaluate the time sequence image processing parameters of X-ray fluoroscopic image by NPStime. Nowadays, each manufacture of the X-ray angiographic system performs the original image processing to their own X-ray fluoroscopic images. The results of the discussion in this study could show the quantitative analysis on the frequency modulation. And it is possible to calculate NPStime by measuring the digital value of stored X-ray fluoroscopic image. The analysis by this method is also technically convenient for the time sequence noise characteristics of the X-ray fluoroscopic image. PMID:26796929

  1. Auto-shape lossless compression of pharynx and esophagus fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Arif, Arif Sameh; Mansor, Sarina; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran; Karim, Hezerul Abdul

    2015-02-01

    The massive number of medical images produced by fluoroscopic and other conventional diagnostic imaging devices demand a considerable amount of space for data storage. This paper proposes an effective method for lossless compression of fluoroscopic images. The main contribution in this paper is the extraction of the regions of interest (ROI) in fluoroscopic images using appropriate shapes. The extracted ROI is then effectively compressed using customized correlation and the combination of Run Length and Huffman coding, to increase compression ratio. The experimental results achieved show that the proposed method is able to improve the compression ratio by 400 % as compared to that of traditional methods.

  2. The AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: general overview of fluoroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Schueler, B A

    2000-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is used to visualize the motion of internal fluids, structures, and devices. During a fluoroscopic examination, the operator controls activation of the x-ray tube for real-time imaging of the patient. The article provides a general overview of fluoroscopic imaging from its initial development to modern use. Early fluoroscopes produced a dim image on a fluorescent screen that required dark adaptation of the physician's eyes to optimize viewing conditions. Image intensifiers were later developed to replace the fluorescent screen and increase image brightness. Modern fluoroscopy systems include an image intensifier with television image display and a choice of several different types of image recording devices. Fluoroscopic equipment is available in many different configurations for use in a wide variety of clinical applications.

  3. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic images fusion by autonomous ultrasound probe detection.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Kaizer, Markus; Mamaghani, Sina; Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    New minimal-invasive interventions such as transcatheter valve procedures exploit multiple imaging modalities to guide tools (fluoroscopy) and visualize soft tissue (transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)). Currently, these complementary modalities are visualized in separate coordinate systems and on separate monitors creating a challenging clinical workflow. This paper proposes a novel framework for fusing TEE and fluoroscopy by detecting the pose of the TEE probe in the fluoroscopic image. Probe pose detection is challenging in fluoroscopy and conventional computer vision techniques are not well suited. Current research requires manual initialization or the addition of fiducials. The main contribution of this paper is autonomous six DoF pose detection by combining discriminative learning techniques with a fast binary template library. The pose estimation problem is reformulated to incrementally detect pose parameters by exploiting natural invariances in the image. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated on synthetic, phantom and in vivo data. The practical application of this technique is supported by accurate results (< 5 mm in-plane error) and computation time of 0.5s.

  4. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic images fusion by autonomous ultrasound probe detection.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Kaizer, Markus; Mamaghani, Sina; Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    New minimal-invasive interventions such as transcatheter valve procedures exploit multiple imaging modalities to guide tools (fluoroscopy) and visualize soft tissue (transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)). Currently, these complementary modalities are visualized in separate coordinate systems and on separate monitors creating a challenging clinical workflow. This paper proposes a novel framework for fusing TEE and fluoroscopy by detecting the pose of the TEE probe in the fluoroscopic image. Probe pose detection is challenging in fluoroscopy and conventional computer vision techniques are not well suited. Current research requires manual initialization or the addition of fiducials. The main contribution of this paper is autonomous six DoF pose detection by combining discriminative learning techniques with a fast binary template library. The pose estimation problem is reformulated to incrementally detect pose parameters by exploiting natural invariances in the image. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated on synthetic, phantom and in vivo data. The practical application of this technique is supported by accurate results (< 5 mm in-plane error) and computation time of 0.5s. PMID:23286091

  5. Dosimetric properties of the Theraview fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, A G; Bonnett, D E

    2000-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) can be used for non-imaging applications in radiotherapy such as patient dosimetry. Of the systems available, the fluoroscopic camera-based EPID Theraview (InfiMed Inc.) has not been studied to date, and a review of the dosimetric properties of the system is presented here. In the "single set-up" mode of image acquisition, pixel intensity increases sublinearly with applied dose. The response was dependent on the system's video signal gain and showed a threshold dose to the detector in the range 0.05-0.35 cGy, and pixel saturation at detector doses in the range 1.2-1.6 cGy. Repeated exposures of the EPID were observed to be extremely reproducible (standard deviation 0.5%). The sensitivity of the system showed a linear decline of 0.04% day-1 over a 68-day period, during which time the relative off-axis response within 10 x 10 cm2 field was constant to within a standard deviation of 0.56%. The system shows spatial non-uniformity, which requires correction for application to dose measurements in two-dimensions. Warm-up of the camera control unit required a period of at least 40 min and was associated with an enhancement in pixel intensity of up to 12%. A radiation dose history effect was observed at doses as low as 0.2 Gy. Camera dark current was shown to be negligible at normal accelerator operation. No discernible image distortion was found. Mechanical stability on gantry rotation was also assessed and image displacement of up to 5 mm at the isocentre was observed. It was concluded that the device could be used for dosimetry provided necessary precautions were observed and corrections made. PMID:10884749

  6. Combined MRI and Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Renal Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolas I.; Sabharwal, Tarun; Gangi, Afshin; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-15

    Percutaneous CT- and ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been shown to have very promising medium-term results. We present a unique case of recurrent RCC after partial nephrectomy in a patient with a single kidney and impaired renal function. This tumor could not be visualized either with CT or with ultrasound. A combination of magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopic guidance was used, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, to ablate the tumor with radiofrequency. The patient was cancer-free and off dialysis at 30-month follow up.

  7. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models.

    PubMed

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Mishra, P; Cai, W; Rottmann, J; Li, R; Williams, C; Wagar, M; Berbeco, R; Ionascu, D; Lewis, J H

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  8. A kernel-based method for markerless tumor tracking in kV fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Abe, Makoto; Sugita, Norihiro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    Markerless tracking of respiration-induced tumor motion in kilo-voltage (kV) fluoroscopic image sequence is still a challenging task in real time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Most of existing markerless tracking methods are based on a template matching technique or its extensions that are frequently sensitive to non-rigid tumor deformation and involve expensive computation. This paper presents a kernel-based method that is capable of tracking tumor motion in kV fluoroscopic image sequence with robust performance and low computational cost. The proposed tracking system consists of the following three steps. To enhance the contrast of kV fluoroscopic image, we firstly utilize a histogram equalization to transform the intensities of original images to a wider dynamical intensity range. A tumor target in the first frame is then represented by using a histogram-based feature vector. Subsequently, the target tracking is then formulated by maximizing a Bhattacharyya coefficient that measures the similarity between the tumor target and its candidates in the subsequent frames. The numerical solution for maximizing the Bhattacharyya coefficient is performed by a mean-shift algorithm. The proposed method was evaluated by using four clinical kV fluoroscopic image sequences. For comparison, we also implement four conventional template matching-based methods and compare their performance with our proposed method in terms of the tracking accuracy and computational cost. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is superior to conventional template matching-based methods.

  9. Radiation Dose Reduction Methods For Use With Fluoroscopic Imaging, Computers And Implications For Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Hynes, D. M.; Rowlands, J. A.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1988-06-01

    The use of a beam splitting device for medical gastro-intestinal fluoroscopy has demonstrated that clinical images obtained with a 100mm photofluorographic camera, and a 1024 X 1024 digital matrix with pulsed progressive readout acquisition techniques, are identical. In addition, it has been found that clinical images can be obtained with digital systems at dose levels lower than those possible with film. The use of pulsed fluoroscopy with intermittent storage of the fluoroscopic image has also been demonstrated to reduce the fluoroscopy part of the examination to very low dose levels, particularly when low repetition rates of about 2 frames per second (fps) are used. The use of digital methods reduces the amount of radiation required and also the heat generated by the x-ray tube. Images can therefore be produced using a very small focal spot on the x-ray tube, which can produce further improvement in the resolution of the clinical images.

  10. MR cone-beam CT fusion image overlay for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous biopsies in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Patel, Premal A; Gu, Richard; Rea, Vanessa; Amaral, Joao; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2016-03-01

    Lesions only visible on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging cannot easily be targeted for image-guided biopsy using ultrasound or X-rays but instead require MR guidance with MR-compatible needles and long procedure times (acquisition of multiple MR sequences). We developed an alternative method for performing these difficult biopsies in a standard interventional suite, by fusing MR with cone-beam CT images. The MR cone-beam CT fusion image is then used as an overlay to guide a biopsy needle to the target area under live fluoroscopic guidance. Advantages of this technique include (i) the ability for it to be performed in a conventional interventional suite, (ii) three-dimensional planning of the needle trajectory using cross-sectional imaging, (iii) real-time fluoroscopic guidance for needle trajectory correction and (iv) targeting within heterogeneous lesions based on MR signal characteristics to maximize the potential biopsy yield.

  11. MRI brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are expected to be allowed to request MRI scans for adults for selected clinically appropriate indications from November 2013 as part of the expansion of Medicare-funded MRI services announced by the Federal Government in 2011. This article aims to give a brief overview of MRI brain imaging relevant to GPs, which will facilitate explanation of scan findings and management planning with their patients. Basic imaging techniques, common findings and terminology are presented using some illustrative case examples.

  12. Nonrigid 2D registration of fluoroscopic coronary artery image sequence with layered motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewoo; Jung, Hoyup; Yun, Il Dong

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method for nonrigid registration of coronary artery models with layered motion information. 2D nonrigid registration method is proposed that brings layered motion information into correspondence with fluoroscopic angiograms. The registered model is overlaid on top of interventional angiograms to provide surgical assistance during image-guided chronic total occlusion procedures. The proposed methodology is divided into two parts: layered structures alignments and local nonrigid registration. In the first part, inpainting method is used to estimate a layered rigid transformation that aligns layered motion information. In the second part, a nonrigid registration method is implemented and used to compensate for any local shape discrepancy. Experimental evaluation conducted on a set of 7 fluoroscopic angiograms results in a reduced target registration error, which showed the effectiveness of the proposed method over single layered approach.

  13. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  14. Solid-state fluoroscopic imager for high-resolution angiography: Parallel-cascaded linear systems analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded linear systems based modeling techniques have been used in the past to predict important system parameters that have a direct impact on image quality. Such models are also useful in optimizing system parameters to improve image quality. In this work, detailed analysis of a solid-state fluoroscopic imaging system intended for high-resolution angiography is presented with the use of such a model. The imaging system analyzed through this model uses four 8×8 cm three-side buttable interlined charge-coupled devices (CCDs) specifically designed for high-resolution angiography and tiled in a seamless fashion to achieve a field of view (FOV) of 16×16 cm. Larger FOVs can be achieved by tiling more CCDs in a similar manner. The system employs a CsI:Tl scintillator coupled to the CCDs by straight (nontapering) fiberoptics and can potentially be operated in 78, 156, or 234 μm pixel pitch modes. The system parameters analyzed through this model include presampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The results of the simulations performed indicate that DQE(0) in excess of 0.6 is achievable, with the imager operating at 156 μm pixel pitch, 30 frames/s, and employing a 450-μm-thick CsI:Tl scintillator, even at a low fluoroscopic exposure rate of 1 μR/frame. Further, at a nominal fluoroscopic exposure rate of 2.5 μR/frame there was no noticeable degradation of the DQE even at the 78 μm pixel pitch mode suggesting that it is feasible to perform high-resolution angiography hitherto unattainable in clinical practice. PMID:15191318

  15. A C-arm calibration method with application to fluoroscopic image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Gibbs, Jason D.; Wibowo, Henky

    2012-02-01

    C-arm fluoroscopy units provide continuously updating X-ray video images during surgical procedure. The modality is widely adopted for its low cost, real-time imaging capabilities, and its ability to display radio-opaque tools in the anatomy. It is, however, important to correct for fluoroscopic image distortion and estimate camera parameters, such as focal length and camera center, for registration with 3D CT scans in fluoroscopic imageguided procedures. This paper describes a method for C-arm calibration and evaluates its accuracy in multiple C-arm units and in different viewing orientations. The proposed calibration method employs a commerciallyavailable unit to track the C-arm and a calibration plate. The method estimates both the internal calibration parameters and the transformation between the coordinate systems of tracker and C-arm. The method was successfully tested on two C-arm units (GE OEC 9800 and GE OEC 9800 Plus) of different image intensifier sizes and verified with a rigid airway phantom model. The mean distortion-model error was found to be 0.14 mm and 0.17 mm for the respective C-arms. The mean overall system reprojection error (which measures the accuracy of predicting an image using tracker coordinates) was found to be 0.63 mm for the GE OEC 9800.

  16. Multiresolution parametric estimation of transparent motions and denoising of fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Vincent; Liénard, Jean; Bouthemy, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel multiresolution parametric framework to estimate transparent motions typically present in X-Ray exams. Assuming the presence if two transparent layers, it computes two affine velocity fields by minimizing an appropriate objective function with an incremental Gauss-Newton technique. We have designed a realistic simulation scheme of fluoroscopic image sequences to validate our method on data with ground truth and different levels of noise. An experiment on real clinical images is also reported. We then exploit this transparent-motion estimation method to denoise two layers image sequences using a motion-compensated estimation method. In accordance with theory, we show that we reach a denoising factor of 2/3 in a few iterations without bringing any local artifacts in the image sequence.

  17. MRI of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain creates a detailed image of the complex structures in the brain. An MRI can give a three-dimensional depiction of the brain, making location of problems such ...

  18. Contrast changes in fluoroscopic imaging systems and statistical variations of these changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental studies have indicated that: (1) The response of digitized fluoroscopic imaging systems is linear systems is linear with contrast over a rather wide range of absorber and cavity thicknesses. (2) Contrast changes associated with the addition of aluminum, iodine containing contrast agents and air of thicknesses 1mm or less can be detected with a 95% confidence level. (3) The standard deviation associated with such determination using clinically available X-ray generators and video disc recording is less than 1 percent. A large flat screen X-ray image intensifier has been constructed and some preliminary results obtained. Sensitivity achieved makes dose reduction a factor often greater than previously reported for a system using a conventional X-ray image intensifier.

  19. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  20. X-ray region of interest imaging system for rapid-sequence angiography and fluoroscopy: The micro-angiographic fluoroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ye

    Neuro-endovascular interventional diagnosis and treatment require high resolution x-ray imaging guidance of fluoroscopy and angiography. Our group has developed a small field of view, 5 frames per second, high-resolution micro-angiographic imager. This imager has demonstrated substantial high-resolution advantages for angiography over the conventional image intensifier. The work of this dissertation is to build a new micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) to expand the capabilities of the micro-angiographic imager to include fluoroscopic imaging over a small field of view. The components of the MAF are all commercially available including CsI (T1) scintillator, fiber-optic taper, light image intensifier (LII), mirror, lens, and CCD camera. The critical component is the microchannel plate based LII with very high spatial resolution. The LII has a large range of gain that can be controlled easily by a 5V to 9V DC voltage. This property enables the MAF to be used for angiography with a low gain of the LII, and for fluoroscopy with a high gain of the LII. This design was justified by the quantum accounting diagram calculation. The preliminary experimental results from the test model MAF demonstrated the feasibility of this design. The improved prototype MAF model demonstrates high-resolution imaging for both fluoroscopy and angiography. The performance descriptors of the prototype MAF such as MTF, NPS, and DQE, were measured in both angiographic mode and fluoroscopic mode. For angiographic mode, at spatial frequencies of 4 and 10 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 14% and 1.5% respectively, the DQE for the MAF was 12% and 1.2% respectively, while the DQE (0) was about 60%. For fluoroscopic mode, at spatial frequency of 4 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 11%, and the DQE for the MAF was 9.5%. The image lag for the MAF in fluoroscopic mode at a rate of 30 fps was measured to be minimal. The allowable maximum entrance exposure rate was found to be related with the maximum LII

  1. Variability in Fluoroscopic Image Acquisition During Operative Fixation of Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Harris, Dorothy Y; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether injury, level of surgeon training, and patient factors are associated with increased use of fluoroscopy during open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. These relationships are not well defined. The study was a retrospective chart review of patients treated at an academic institution with primary open reduction and internal fixation of an ankle. Patient demographics, including sex, age, and body mass index, were collected, as was surgeon year of training (residency and fellowship). Image acquisition data included total number of images, total imaging time, and cumulative dose. Ankle fractures were classified according to the Weber and Lauge-Hansen classifications and the number of fixation points. Bivariate analysis and multiple regression models were used to predict increasing fluoroscopic image acquisition. Alpha was set at 0.05. Of 158 patients identified, 58 were excluded. After bivariate analysis, fracture complexity and year of training showed a significant correlation with increasing image acquisition. After multiple regression analysis, fracture complexity and year of training remained clinically significant and were independent predictors of increased image acquisition. Increasing fracture complexity resulted in 20 additional images, 16 additional seconds, and an increase in radiation of 0.7 mGy. Increasing year of training resulted in an additional 6 images and an increase of 0.35 mGy in cumulative dose. The findings suggest that protocols to educate trainee surgeons in minimizing the use of fluoroscopy would be beneficial at all levels of training and should target multiple fracture patterns.

  2. Image intensifier distortion correction for fluoroscopic RSA: the need for independent accuracy assessment.

    PubMed

    Kedgley, Angela E; Fox, Anne-Marie V; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroscopic images suffer from multiple modes of image distortion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of correction using a range of two-dimensional polynomials and a global approach. The primary measure of interest was the average error in the distances between four beads of an accuracy phantom, as measured using RSA. Secondary measures of interest were the root mean squared errors of the fit of the chosen polynomial to the grid of beads used for correction, and the errors in the corrected distances between the points of the grid in a second position. Based upon the two-dimensional measures, a polynomial of order three in the axis of correction and two in the perpendicular axis was preferred. However, based upon the RSA reconstruction, a polynomial of order three in the axis of correction and one in the perpendicular axis was preferred. The use of a calibration frame for these three-dimensional applications most likely tempers the effects of distortion. This study suggests that distortion correction should be validated for each of its applications with an independent "gold standard" phantom.

  3. Optimization of multi-image pose recovery of fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in an image-guided femoroplasty system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen P.; Armand, Mehran; Otake, Yoshito; Taylor, Russell H.

    2011-03-01

    Percutaneous femoroplasty [1], or femoral bone augmentation, is a prospective alternative treatment for reducing the risk of fracture in patients with severe osteoporosis. We are developing a surgical robotics system that will assist orthopaedic surgeons in planning and performing a patient-specific, augmentation of the femur with bone cement. This collaborative project, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has been the topic of previous publications [2],[3] from our group. This paper presents modifications to the pose recovery of a fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial during our process of 2D/3D registration of X-ray intraoperative images to preoperative CT data. We show improved automata of the initial pose estimation as well as lower projection errors with the advent of a multiimage pose optimization step.

  4. A simple method for the generation of organ and vessel contours from roentgenographic or fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. D.; Keller, R. A.; Baily, N. A.

    1974-01-01

    A simple method for outlining or contouring any area defined by a change in film density or fluoroscopic screen intensity is described. The entire process, except for the positioning of an electronic window, is accomplished using a small computer having appropriate softwave. The electronic window is operator positioned over the area to be processed. The only requirement is that the window be large enough to encompass the total area to be considered.

  5. In-vitro validation of a non-invasive dual fluoroscopic imaging technique for measurement of the hip kinematics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Wang, Shaobai; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Guoan; Kwon, Young-Min

    2013-03-01

    Measurement of accurate in vivo hip joint kinematics in 6-DOF is difficult. Few studies have reported non-invasive measurements of the hip kinematics. The objective of this study was to validate a non-invasive dual fluoroscopic imaging system (DFIS) for measurement of hip kinematics. Bi-lateral hip joints of a cadaveric pelvic specimen were CT scanned to create bone models of the femur and pelvis, and subsequently tested in static and dynamic conditions inside the DFIS. The poses of the hip in space were then determined by matching the bone models with the fluoroscopic images. The pose data was compared to those obtained using a radio-stereometric analysis to determine the accuracy of the DFIS. The accuracy ± precision for measuring the hip kinematics were less than 0.93 ± 1.13 mm for translations and 0.59 ± 0.82° for rotations in all conditions. The repeatability of the DFIS technique was less than ± 0.77 mm and ± 0.64° in position and orientation for measuring hip kinematics in both static and dynamic positions. This technique could thus be a promising tool for determining 6-DOF poses of the hip during functional activities, which may help to understand biomechanical factors in hip pathologic conditions such as osteoarthritis and femoroacetabular impingement before and after surgical treatment.

  6. SU-E-J-01: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Estimation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models

    SciTech Connect

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Lewis, J; Mishra, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: 3D motion modeling derived from 4DCT images, taken days or weeks before treatment, cannot reliably represent patient anatomy on the day of treatment. We develop a method to generate motion models based on 4DCBCT acquired at the time of treatment, and apply the model to estimate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Methods: Motion models are derived through deformable registration between each 4DCBCT phase, and principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated based on cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging. PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively through comparison of these cone-beam projections and projections estimated based on the motion model. Digital phantoms reproducing ten patient motion trajectories, and a physical phantom with regular and irregular motion derived from measured patient trajectories, are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization, and the global voxel intensity difference compared to ground truth. Results: Experiments included: 1) assuming no anatomic or positioning changes between 4DCT and treatment time; and 2) simulating positioning and tumor baseline shifts at the time of treatment compared to 4DCT acquisition. 4DCBCT were reconstructed from the anatomy as seen at treatment time. In case 1) the tumor localization error and the intensity differences in ten patient were smaller using 4DCT-based motion model, possible due to superior image quality. In case 2) the tumor localization error and intensity differences were 2.85 and 0.15 respectively, using 4DCT-based motion models, and 1.17 and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based models. 4DCBCT performed better due to its ability to reproduce daily anatomical changes. Conclusion: The study showed an advantage of 4DCBCT-based motion models in the context of 3D fluoroscopic images estimation. Positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties were mitigated by the 4DCBCT

  7. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  8. Investigation of first ray mobility during gait by kinematic fluoroscopic imaging-a novel method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that sagittal instability at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level is a primary factor for hallux valgus and that sagittal instability increases with the progression of the deformity. The assessment of the degree of vertical instability is usually made by clinical evaluation while any measurements mostly refer to a static assessment of medial ray mobility (i.e. the plantar/dorsal flexion in the sagittal plane). Testing methods currently available cannot attribute the degree of mobility to the corresponding anatomical joints making up the medial column of the foot. The aim of this study was to develop a technique which allows for a quantification of the in-vivo sagittal mobility of the joints of the medial foot column during the roll-over process under full weight bearing. Methods Mobility of first ray bones was investigated by dynamic distortion-free fluoroscopy (25 frames/s) of 14 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with manifested clinical instability of the first ray. A CAD-based evaluation method allowed the determination of mobility and relative displacements and rotations of the first ray bones within the sagittal plane during the stance phase of gait. Results Total flexion of the first ray was found to be 13.63 (SD 6.14) mm with the healthy volunteers and 13.06 (SD 8.01) mm with the patients (resolution: 0.245 mm/pixel). The dorsiflexion angle was 5.27 (SD 2.34) degrees in the healthy volunteers and increased to 5.56 (SD 3.37) degrees in the patients. Maximum rotations were found at the naviculo-cuneiform joints and least at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level in both groups. Conclusions Dynamic fluoroscopic assessment has been shown to be a valuable tool for characterisation of the kinematics of the joints of the medial foot column during gait. A significant difference in first ray flexion and angular rotation between the patients and healthy volunteers however could not be found. PMID:22316084

  9. Real-time equalization of region-of-interest fluoroscopic images using binary masks.

    PubMed

    Rudin, S; Bednarek, D R; Yang, C Y

    1999-07-01

    In region-of-interest (ROI) radiologic imaging, the x-ray beam is attenuated peripherally to the region of interest to reduce patient exposure. This attenuation reduces the peripheral image brightness which may cause contrast in the periphery to also be reduced due to video chain nonlinearity. For optimal viewing, it is necessary that the image brightness and contrast in the periphery be brought back to the levels in the ROI. Previously, digital subtraction angiography roadmapping equipment has been used for this equalization; however, the procedure is not independent of patient and gantry motion. A new motion independent method to achieve this equalization involves dividing the real-time video signal into two digital streams one of which is brightness and contrast enhanced. A pre-acquired binary mask image is created by thresholding the image of a uniform object obtained with the ROI filter in place. This binary mask is used to control the recombination of the two image streams in a digital pipeline processor in order to select the ROI from the unprocessed stream and the periphery from the enhanced stream. This system provides image equalization at 30 frame/s for real-time ROI imaging display. Images from this method demonstrate excellent image quality even for peripheral exposure reduction factors exceeding 10. PMID:10435538

  10. Approaches to interventional fluoroscopic dose curves.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Kevin A; Rakowski, Joseph T; Dong, Frank F

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluoroscopes used for image-based guidance in interventional procedures are complex X-ray machines, with advanced image acquisition and processing systems capable of automatically controlling numerous parameters based on defined protocol settings. This study evaluated and compared approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and variable copper filter thickness over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within each vendor's default abdomen or body imaging protocol. The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ Cu filtration within the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Some vendors have also enhanced the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes which, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these increased output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and may provide opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. PMID

  11. DQE of image-intensifier-CCD fluoroscopic systems: a nonseparable case of the spatial-temporal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltschmidt, Rainer G.; Baetz, Lothar; Ludwig, Markus

    2002-05-01

    In a real fluoroscopic system experimental evaluations of the DQE may pretty soon run into difficulties. Easy as it might be to satisfy the need for linearity by means of correction look-up tables, the evaluation of the NPS is more tricky, because of various time integration mechanisms. In order to deal with such effects in a quantitatively correct manner the concept of a spatial-temporal1 DQE has been suggested. We have performed computer-aided DQE-evaluations 2,4,5 on a surgical C-arm, using MTF and NPS. Furthermore, we have attempted to estimate the time behavior of the spatial-temporal system transfer function. Using X-ray pulses in the ms regime, we have generated nearly 'lag-free' flat-field images. Our experiments showed two interesting results. The comparison of flat-field images in the continuous 'Fluoro' mode and the 'lag-free' mode revealed the theoretically expected highly overestimated DQE in the first case. The corresponding scaling factor could be derived quantitatively from the motion experiments with an X-ray contrast pulse (Cu-rod). More worth while noticing is the fact that we observed structural anomalies in the two-dimensional NPS that could not compensated for by a simple scaling factor but vanished only in the 'lag-free' mode. This can be explained theoretically by taking into account a mixing behavior between the spatial and temporal NPS components, i.e. the failure of the spatial-temporal separability of the system transfer function.

  12. Effects of uncertainty in camera geometry on three-dimensional catheter reconstruction from biplane fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Anthony; Kynor, David B.; Friets, Eric; Triedman, John; Hammer, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Clinical procedures that rely on biplane x-ray images for three-dimensional (3-D) information may be enhanced by three-dimensional reconstructions. However, the accuracy of reconstructed images is dependent on the uncertainty associated with the parameters that define the geometry of the camera system. In this paper, we use a numerical simulation to examine the effect of these uncertainties and to determine the limits required for adequate three-dimensional reconstruction. We then test our conclusions with images of a calibration phantom recorded using a clinical system. A set of reconstruction routines, developed for a cardiac mapping system, were used in this evaluation. The routines include procedures for correcting image distortion and for automatically locating catheter electrodes. Test images were created using a numerical simulation of a biplane x-ray projection system. The reconstruction routines were then applied using accurate and perturbed camera geometries and error maps were produced. Our results indicate that useful catheter reconstructions are possible with reasonable bounds on the uncertainty of camera geometry provided the locations of the camera isocenters are accurate. The results of this study provide a guide for the specification of camera geometry display systems and for researchers evaluating possible methodologies for determining camera geometry.

  13. Automatic segmentation of seeds and fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in prostate brachytherapy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Lee, Junghoon; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny; Burdette, E. Clif; Prince, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy-based radioactive seed localization for intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. The fluoroscopy tracking (FTRAC) fiducial is an image-based tracking device composed of radio-opaque BBs, lines, and ellipses that provides an effective means for pose estimation so that three-dimensional reconstruction of the implanted seeds from multiple X-ray images can be related to the ultrasound-computed prostate volume. Both the FTRAC features and the brachytherapy seeds must be segmented quickly and accurately during the surgery, but current segmentation algorithms are inhibitory in the operating room (OR). The first reason is that current algorithms require operators to manually select a region of interest (ROI), preventing automatic pipelining from image acquisition to seed reconstruction. Secondly, these algorithms fail often, requiring operators to manually correct the errors. We propose a fast and effective ROI-free automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm to minimize such human intervention. The proposed algorithm exploits recent image processing tools to make seed reconstruction as easy and convenient as possible. Preliminary results on 162 patient images show this algorithm to be fast, effective, and accurate for all features to be segmented. With near perfect success rates and subpixel differences to manual segmentation, our automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm shows promising results to save crucial time in the OR while reducing errors.

  14. 4D flow imaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Zoran; Allen, Bradley D.; Garcia, Julio; Jarvis, Kelly B.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease. Since its introduction in the late 1980s, 2-dimensional phase contrast MRI (2D PC-MRI) has become a routine part of standard-of-care cardiac MRI for the assessment of regional blood flow in the heart and great vessels. More recently, time-resolved PC-MRI with velocity encoding along all three flow directions and three-dimensional (3D) anatomic coverage (also termed ‘4D flow MRI’) has been developed and applied for the evaluation of cardiovascular hemodynamics in multiple regions of the human body. 4D flow MRI allows for the comprehensive evaluation of complex blood flow patterns by 3D blood flow visualization and flexible retrospective quantification of flow parameters. Recent technical developments, including the utilization of advanced parallel imaging techniques such as k-t GRAPPA, have resulted in reasonable overall scan times, e.g., 8-12 minutes for 4D flow MRI of the aorta and 10-20 minutes for whole heart coverage. As a result, the application of 4D flow MRI in a clinical setting has become more feasible, as documented by an increased number of recent reports on the utility of the technique for the assessment of cardiac and vascular hemodynamics in patient studies. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential of 4D flow MRI to provide an improved assessment of hemodynamics which might aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe the methods used for 4D flow MRI acquisition, post-processing and data analysis. In addition, the article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D flow MRI and includes a review of applications in the heart, thoracic aorta and hepatic system. PMID:24834414

  15. Geometric Verification of Dynamic Wave Arc Delivery With the Vero System Using Orthogonal X-ray Fluoroscopic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Burghelea, Manuela; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Gevaert, Thierry; Depuydt, Tom; Tournel, Koen; Hung, Cecilia; Simon, Viorica; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ridder, Mark de

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to define an independent verification method based on on-board orthogonal fluoroscopy to determine the geometric accuracy of synchronized gantry–ring (G/R) rotations during dynamic wave arc (DWA) delivery available on the Vero system. Methods and Materials: A verification method for DWA was developed to calculate O-ring-gantry (G/R) positional information from ball-bearing positions retrieved from fluoroscopic images of a cubic phantom acquired during DWA delivery. Different noncoplanar trajectories were generated in order to investigate the influence of path complexity on delivery accuracy. The G/R positions detected from the fluoroscopy images (DetPositions) were benchmarked against the G/R angulations retrieved from the control points (CP) of the DWA RT plan and the DWA log files recorded by the treatment console during DWA delivery (LogActed). The G/R rotational accuracy was quantified as the mean absolute deviation ± standard deviation. The maximum G/R absolute deviation was calculated as the maximum 3-dimensional distance between the CP and the closest DetPositions. Results: In the CP versus DetPositions comparison, an overall mean G/R deviation of 0.13°/0.16° ± 0.16°/0.16° was obtained, with a maximum G/R deviation of 0.6°/0.2°. For the LogActed versus DetPositions evaluation, the overall mean deviation was 0.08°/0.15° ± 0.10°/0.10° with a maximum G/R of 0.3°/0.4°. The largest decoupled deviations registered for gantry and ring were 0.6° and 0.4° respectively. No directional dependence was observed between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Doubling the dose resulted in a double number of detected points around each CP, and an angular deviation reduction in all cases. Conclusions: An independent geometric quality assurance approach was developed for DWA delivery verification and was successfully applied on diverse trajectories. Results showed that the Vero system is capable of following complex

  16. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  17. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  18. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  19. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  20. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  1. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  2. Measuring glomerular number from kidney MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Natesan Ramamurthy, Karthikeyan; Kanberoglu, Berkay; Frakes, David; Bennett, Kevin; Spanias, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the glomerular number in the entire, intact kidney using non-destructive techniques is of immense importance in studying several renal and systemic diseases. Commonly used approaches either require destruction of the entire kidney or perform extrapolation from measurements obtained from a few isolated sections. A recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, based on the injection of a contrast agent (cationic ferritin), has been used to effectively identify glomerular regions in the kidney. In this work, we propose a robust, accurate, and low-complexity method for estimating the number of glomeruli from such kidney MRI images. The proposed technique has a training phase and a low-complexity testing phase. In the training phase, organ segmentation is performed on a few expert-marked training images, and glomerular and non-glomerular image patches are extracted. Using non-local sparse coding to compute similarity and dissimilarity graphs between the patches, the subspace in which the glomerular regions can be discriminated from the rest are estimated. For novel test images, the image patches extracted after pre-processing are embedded using the discriminative subspace projections. The testing phase is of low computational complexity since it involves only matrix multiplications, clustering, and simple morphological operations. Preliminary results with MRI data obtained from five kidneys of rats show that the proposed non-invasive, low-complexity approach performs comparably to conventional approaches such as acid maceration and stereology.

  3. Percutaneous Cervical Vertebroplasty in a MultifunctionalImage-Guided Therapy Suite: Hybrid Lateral Approach to C1 andC4 Under CT and Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Huegli, R.W. Schaeren, S.; Jacob, A.L.; Martin, J.B.; Wetzel, S.G.

    2005-06-15

    A 76-year-old patient suffering from two painful osteolytic metastases in C1 and C4 underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty by a hybrid technique in a multi-functional image-guided therapy suite (MIGTS). Two trocars were first placed into the respective bodies of C1 and C4 under fluoroscopic computed tomography guidance using a lateral approach. Thereafter, the patient was transferred on a moving table to the digital subtraction angiography unit in the same room for implant injection. Good pain relief was achieved by this minimally invasive procedure without complications. A hybrid approach for vertebroplasty in a MIGTS appears to be safe and feasible and might be indicated in selected cases for difficult accessible lesions.

  4. Novel Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI, MRI/US, and PET.

    PubMed

    Koo, Phillip J; Kwak, Jennifer J; Pokharel, Sajal; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-12-01

    Imaging of prostate cancer presents many challenges to the imaging community. There has been much progress in this space in large part due to MRI and PET radiopharmaceuticals. Though MRI has been focused on the evaluation of local disease and PET on the detection of metastatic disease, these two areas do converge and will be complementary especially with the growth of new PET/MRI technologies. In this review article, we review novel MRI, MRI/US, and PET radiopharmaceuticals which will offer insight into the future direction of imaging in prostate cancer.

  5. Novel Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI, MRI/US, and PET.

    PubMed

    Koo, Phillip J; Kwak, Jennifer J; Pokharel, Sajal; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-12-01

    Imaging of prostate cancer presents many challenges to the imaging community. There has been much progress in this space in large part due to MRI and PET radiopharmaceuticals. Though MRI has been focused on the evaluation of local disease and PET on the detection of metastatic disease, these two areas do converge and will be complementary especially with the growth of new PET/MRI technologies. In this review article, we review novel MRI, MRI/US, and PET radiopharmaceuticals which will offer insight into the future direction of imaging in prostate cancer. PMID:26462919

  6. Target image search using fMRI signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shi; Song, Sutao; Zhan, Yu; Zhang, Jiacai

    2014-03-01

    Recent neural signal decoding studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have identified the specific image presenting to the subject from a set of potential images, and some studies extend neural decoding into image reconstruction, i.e. image contents that the subject perceived were decoded from the fMRI signals recorded during the subject looking at images. In this paper, we decoded the target images using fMRI signals and described a target image searching method based on the relationship between target image stimuli and fMRI activity. We recorded fMRI data during a serial visual stimuli image presentation task, some of the stimuli images were target images and the rest images were non-target ones. Our fMRI data analysis results showed that in the serial visual presentation task, target images elicited a stereotypical response in the fMRI, which can be detected by multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA). Classifiers designed with support vector machine (SVM) used this response to decipher target images from non-target images. The leave-one-run-out cross-validation showed that we can pick out the target images with a possibility far above the chance level, which indicate that there's a neural signatures correlated with the target image recognition process in the human systems.

  7. Clinical image: MRI during migraine with aura

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, A.C.

    1996-03-01

    Migraine refers to severe headaches that are usually unilateral, throbbing, and associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia. Migraine with aura (formerly called {open_quotes}classic migraine{close_quotes}) consists of the headache preceded or accompanied by neurological dysfunction. This dysfunction (aura) usually involves visual and sensory symptoms. The patient described herein experienced migraine with aura. MRI during and after the attack showed a reversible abnormality of the right posterior cerebral artery, with no parenchymal lesions. This appears to be the first report of abnormal MR vascular imaging during migraine with aura. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  9. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  10. Multiresolution segmentation technique for spine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyun; Yan, Chye H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Chui, Cheekong K.; Teoh, Swee H.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a hybrid method for segmentation of spinal magnetic resonance imaging that has been developed based on the natural phenomenon of stones appearing as water recedes. The candidate segmentation region corresponds to the stones with characteristics similar to that of intensity extrema, edges, intensity ridge and grey-level blobs. The segmentation method is implemented based on a combination of wavelet multiresolution decomposition and fuzzy clustering. First thresholding is performed dynamically according to local characteristic to detect possible target areas, We then use fuzzy c-means clustering in concert with wavelet multiscale edge detection to identify the maximum likelihood anatomical and functional target areas. Fuzzy C-Means uses iterative optimization of an objective function based on a weighted similarity measure between the pixels in the image and each of c cluster centers. Local extrema of this objective function are indicative of an optimal clustering of the input data. The multiscale edges can be detected and characterized from local maxima of the modulus of the wavelet transform while the noise can be reduced to some extent by enacting thresholds. The method provides an efficient and robust algorithm for spinal image segmentation. Examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the technique on some spinal MRI images.

  11. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 {mu}m thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography. Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles/mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually. Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  12. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 μm thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography.Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles∕mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually.Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  13. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  14. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-21

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  15. Beyond whole-body imaging: advanced imaging techniques of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Barnwell, James; Raptis, Constantine A; McConathy, Jonathan E; Laforest, Richard; Siegel, Barry A; Woodard, Pamela K; Fowler, Kathryn

    2015-02-01

    PET/MRI is a hybrid imaging modality that is gaining clinical interest with the first Food and Drug Administration-approved simultaneous imaging system recently added to the clinical armamentarium. Several advanced PET/MRI applications, such as high-resolution anatomic imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, motion correction, and cardiac imaging, show great potential for clinical use. The purpose of this article is to highlight several advanced PET/MRI applications through case examples and review of the current literature.

  16. Magnetization transfer prepared gradient echo MRI for CEST imaging.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhuozhi; Ji, Jim; Xiao, Gang; Yan, Gen; Li, Shengkai; Zhang, Guishan; Lin, Yan; Shen, Zhiwei; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an emerging MRI contrast mechanism that is capable of noninvasively imaging dilute CEST agents and local properties such as pH and temperature, augmenting the routine MRI methods. However, the routine CEST MRI includes a long RF saturation pulse followed by fast image readout, which is associated with high specific absorption rate and limited spatial resolution. In addition, echo planar imaging (EPI)-based fast image readout is prone to image distortion, particularly severe at high field. To address these limitations, we evaluated magnetization transfer (MT) prepared gradient echo (GRE) MRI for CEST imaging. We proved the feasibility using numerical simulations and experiments in vitro and in vivo. Then we optimized the sequence by serially evaluating the effects of the number of saturation steps, MT saturation power (B1), GRE readout flip angle (FA), and repetition time (TR) upon the CEST MRI, and further demonstrated the endogenous amide proton CEST imaging in rats brains (n = 5) that underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. The CEST images can identify ischemic lesions in the first 3 hours after occlusion. In summary, our study demonstrated that the readily available MT-prepared GRE MRI, if optimized, is CEST-sensitive and remains promising for translational CEST imaging. PMID:25384020

  17. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  18. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Usman; Mallia, Andrew; Stirling, James; Joemon, John; MacKewn, Jane; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Goh, Vicky; Cook, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging. PMID:26854157

  19. SU-E-I-37: Low-Dose Real-Time Region-Of-Interest X-Ray Fluoroscopic Imaging with a GPU-Accelerated Spatially Different Bilateral Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H; Lee, J; Pua, R; Cho, S; Jung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to reduce imaging radiation dose while maintaining image quality of region of interest (ROI) in X-ray fluoroscopy. A low-dose real-time ROI fluoroscopic imaging technique which includes graphics-processing-unit- (GPU-) accelerated image processing for brightness compensation and noise filtering was developed in this study. Methods: In our ROI fluoroscopic imaging, a copper filter is placed in front of the X-ray tube. The filter contains a round aperture to reduce radiation dose to outside of the aperture. To equalize the brightness difference between inner and outer ROI regions, brightness compensation was performed by use of a simple weighting method that applies selectively to the inner ROI, the outer ROI, and the boundary zone. A bilateral filtering was applied to the images to reduce relatively high noise in the outer ROI images. To speed up the calculation of our technique for real-time application, the GPU-acceleration was applied to the image processing algorithm. We performed a dosimetric measurement using an ion-chamber dosimeter to evaluate the amount of radiation dose reduction. The reduction of calculation time compared to a CPU-only computation was also measured, and the assessment of image quality in terms of image noise and spatial resolution was conducted. Results: More than 80% of dose was reduced by use of the ROI filter. The reduction rate depended on the thickness of the filter and the size of ROI aperture. The image noise outside the ROI was remarkably reduced by the bilateral filtering technique. The computation time for processing each frame image was reduced from 3.43 seconds with single CPU to 9.85 milliseconds with GPU-acceleration. Conclusion: The proposed technique for X-ray fluoroscopy can substantially reduce imaging radiation dose to the patient while maintaining image quality particularly in the ROI region in real-time.

  20. [MRI of the prostate: optimization of imaging protocols].

    PubMed

    Rouvière, O

    2006-02-01

    This article details the imaging protocols for prostate MRI and the influence on image quality of each particular setting: type of coils to be used (endorectal or external phased-array coils?), patient preparation, type of sequences, spatial resolution parameters. The principle and technical constraints of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI are also presented, as well as the predictable changes due to the introduction of high-field strength (3T) scanners.

  1. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  2. Multi-modal image registration: matching MRI with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alic, Lejla; Haeck, Joost C.; Klein, Stefan; Bol, Karin; van Tiel, Sandra T.; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Bijster, Magda; Niessen, Wiro J.; Bernsen, Monique; Veenland, Jifke F.; de Jong, Marion

    2010-03-01

    Spatial correspondence between histology and multi sequence MRI can provide information about the capabilities of non-invasive imaging to characterize cancerous tissue. However, shrinkage and deformation occurring during the excision of the tumor and the histological processing complicate the co registration of MR images with histological sections. This work proposes a methodology to establish a detailed 3D relation between histology sections and in vivo MRI tumor data. The key features of the methodology are a very dense histological sampling (up to 100 histology slices per tumor), mutual information based non-rigid B-spline registration, the utilization of the whole 3D data sets, and the exploitation of an intermediate ex vivo MRI. In this proof of concept paper, the methodology was applied to one tumor. We found that, after registration, the visual alignment of tumor borders and internal structures was fairly accurate. Utilizing the intermediate ex vivo MRI, it was possible to account for changes caused by the excision of the tumor: we observed a tumor expansion of 20%. Also the effects of fixation, dehydration and histological sectioning could be determined: 26% shrinkage of the tumor was found. The annotation of viable tissue, performed in histology and transformed to the in vivo MRI, matched clearly with high intensity regions in MRI. With this methodology, histological annotation can be directly related to the corresponding in vivo MRI. This is a vital step for the evaluation of the feasibility of multi-spectral MRI to depict histological groundtruth.

  3. Prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): multidisciplinary standpoint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Feng, Zhaoyan; Hu, Zhiquan; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xianglin; Wang, He; Hu, Daoyu

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men and a leading cause of death. Accurate assessment is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management and therapy selection of prostate cancer. There are several parameters and nomograms to differentiate between patients with clinically insignificant disease and patients in need of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique which provides more detailed anatomical images due to high spatial resolution, superior contrast resolution, and multiplanar capability. State-of-the-art MRI techniques, such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), improve interpretation of prostate cancer imaging. In this article, we review the major role of MRI in the advanced management of prostate cancer to noninvasively improve tumor staging, biologic potential, treatment planning, therapy response, local recurrence, and to guide target biopsy for clinical suspected cancer with previous negative biopsy. Finally, future challenges and opportunities in prostate cancer management in the area of functional MRI are discussed as well. PMID:23630657

  4. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  5. Implementation of a high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) for in-vivo endovascular image guided interventions (EIGI) and region-of-interest computed tomography (ROI-CT)

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, C N; Keleshis, C.; Patel, V.; Yadava, G.; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R; Jain, A.; Rudin, S

    2008-01-01

    New advances in catheter technology and remote actuation for minimally invasive procedures are continuously increasing the demand for better x-ray imaging technology. The new x-ray high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) detector offers high resolution and real-time image-guided capabilities which are unique when compared with commercially available detectors. This detector consists of a 300 μm CsI input phosphor coupled to a dual stage GEN2 micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII), followed by minifying fiber-optic taper coupled to a CCD chip. The HS-MAF detector image array is 1024×1024 pixels, with a 12 bit depth capable of imaging at 30 frames per second. The detector has a round field of view with 4 cm diameter and 35 microns pixels. The LII has a large variable gain which allows usage of the detector at very low exposures characteristic of fluoroscopic ranges while maintaining very good image quality. The custom acquisition program allows real-time image display and data storage. We designed a set of in-vivo experimental interventions in which placement of specially designed endovascular stents were evaluated with the new detector and with a standard x-ray image intensifier (XII). Capabilities such fluoroscopy, angiography and ROI-CT reconstruction using rotational angiography data were implemented and verified. The images obtained during interventions under radiographic control with the HS-MAF detector were superior to those with the XII. In general, the device feature markers, the device structures, and the vessel geometry were better identified with the new detector. High-resolution detectors such as HS-MAF can vastly improve the accuracy of localization and tracking of devices such stents or catheters. PMID:18958294

  6. A robust fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ameet K.; Mustufa, Tabish; Zhou, Yu; Burdette, E. C.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: C-arm fluoroscopy is ubiquitous in contemporary surgery, but it lacks the ability to accurately reconstruct 3D information. A major obstacle in fluoroscopic reconstruction is discerning the pose of the X-ray image, in 3D space. Optical/magnetic trackers are prohibitively expensive, intrusive and cumbersome. Method: We present single-image-based fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) with the use of an external radiographic fiducial consisting of a mathematically optimized set of points, lines, and ellipses. The fiducial encodes six degrees of freedom in a single image by creating a unique view from any direction. A non-linear optimizer can rapidly compute the pose of the fiducial using this image. The current embodiment has salient attributes: small dimensions (3 x 3 x 5 cm), it need not be close to the anatomy of interest and can be segmented automatically. Results: We tested the fiducial and the pose recovery method on synthetic data and also experimentally on a precisely machined mechanical phantom. Pose recovery had an error of 0.56 mm in translation and 0.33° in orientation. Object reconstruction had a mean error of 0.53 mm with 0.16 mm STD. Conclusion: The method offers accuracies similar to commercial tracking systems, and is sufficiently robust for intra-operative quantitative C-arm fluoroscopy.

  7. Imaging of the aortic valve with MRI and CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J J; Hoey, E T D; Ganeshan, A

    2013-12-01

    The aortic valve may be affected by a wide range of congenital and acquired diseases. Echocardiography is the main non-invasive imaging technique for assessing patho-anatomical alterations of the aortic valve and adjacent structures and in many cases is sufficient to establish a diagnosis and/or guide treatment decisions. Recent technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) have enabled these techniques to play a complimentary role in certain clinical scenarios and as such can be useful problem-solving tools. Radiologists should be familiar with the indications, advantages, and limitations of MRI and MDCT in order to advise and direct an appropriate imaging strategy depending upon the clinical scenario. This article reviews the role of MRI and MDCT angiography for assessment of the aortic valve including relevant anatomy, scan acquisition protocols, and post-processing methods. An approach to interpretation and the key imaging features of commonly encountered aortic valvular diseases are discussed.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT.

  9. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  10. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  11. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: a report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-05-01

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology "automatic dose rate and image quality" (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  12. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: A Report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-05-15

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology ''automatic dose rate and image quality'' (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  13. Molecular Imaging with MRI: Potential Application in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wu, Chang Qiang; Chen, Tian Wu; Tang, Meng Yue; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of approaches that have been improved to achieve a good understanding of pancreatic cancer (PC), the prognosis of PC remains poor, and the survival rates are dismal. The lack of early detection and effective interventions is the main reason. Therefore, considerable ongoing efforts aimed at identifying early PC are currently being pursued using a variety of methods. In recent years, the development of molecular imaging has made the specific targeting of PC in the early stage possible. Molecular imaging seeks to directly visualize, characterize, and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels. Among different imaging technologies, the magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging has potential in this regard because it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of PC. This topic is reviewed in terms of the contrast agents for MR molecular imaging, the biomarkers related to PC, targeted molecular probes for MRI, and the application of MRI in the diagnosis of PC. PMID:26579537

  14. MRI and PET image fusion using fuzzy logic and image local features.

    PubMed

    Javed, Umer; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin; Ghafoor, Abdul; Ali, Syed Sohaib; Cheema, Tanveer Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    An image fusion technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using local features and fuzzy logic is presented. The aim of proposed technique is to maximally combine useful information present in MRI and PET images. Image local features are extracted and combined with fuzzy logic to compute weights for each pixel. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme produces significantly better results compared to state-of-art schemes.

  15. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Richard B.

    2013-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm3 spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology.

  16. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm3 spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology. PMID:24006360

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A review of genetic damage investigations.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Fatahi, Mahsa; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful, non-invasive diagnostic medical imaging technique widely used to acquire detailed information about anatomy and function of different organs in the body, in both health and disease. It utilizes electromagnetic fields of three different frequency bands: static magnetic field (SMF), time-varying gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in the kHz range and pulsed radiofrequency fields (RF) in the MHz range. There have been some investigations examining the extent of genetic damage following exposure of bacterial and human cells to all three frequency bands of electromagnetic fields, as used during MRI: the rationale for these studies is the well documented evidence of positive correlation between significantly increased genetic damage and carcinogenesis. Overall, the published data were not sufficiently informative and useful because of the small sample size, inappropriate comparison of experimental groups, etc. Besides, when an increased damage was observed in MRI-exposed cells, the fate of such lesions was not further explored from multiple 'down-stream' events. This review provides: (i) information on the basic principles used in MRI technology, (ii) detailed experimental protocols, results and critical comments on the genetic damage investigations thus far conducted using MRI equipment and, (iii) a discussion on several gaps in knowledge in the current scientific literature on MRI. Comprehensive, international, multi-centered collaborative studies, using a common and widely used MRI exposure protocol (cardiac or brain scan) incorporating several genetic/epigenetic damage end-points as well as epidemiological investigations, in large number of individuals/patients are warranted to reduce and perhaps, eliminate uncertainties raised in genetic damage investigations in cells exposed in vitro and in vivo to MRI.

  18. Simultaneous imaging using Si-PM-based PET and MRI for development of an integrated PET/MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Imaizumi, Masao; Kanai, Yasukazu; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photo-detector for PET for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems because it has high gain and is insensitive to static magnetic fields. Recently we developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction PET system for small animals and performed simultaneous measurements by combining the Si-PM-based PET and the 0.15 T permanent MRI to test the interferences between the Si-PM-based PET and an MRI. When the Si-PM was inside the MRI and installed around the radio frequency (RF) coil of the MRI, significant noise from the RF sequence of the MRI was observed in the analog signals of the PET detectors. However, we did not observe any artifacts in the PET images; fluctuation increased in the count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system. On the MRI side, there was significant degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the MRI images compared with those without PET. By applying noise reduction procedures, the degradation of the S/N was reduced. With this condition, simultaneous measurements of a rat brain using a Si-PM-based PET and an MRI were made with some degradation in the MRI images. We conclude that simultaneous measurements are possible using Si-PM-based PET and MRI.

  19. Application of three-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation in neural surgical operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changzheng; Ding, Qian; Liu, Changhong

    2006-01-01

    The major shortcoming of image-guided navigational systems is the use of presurgically acquired image data, which does not account for intraoperative changes in brain morphology. The occurrence of these surgically induced volumetric deformations, or "brain shift", has been well established. Maximum measurements for surface and midline shifts were reported. There is no detailed analysis, however, of the changes occurring throughout the entire surgery. Intraoperative MRI provides a unique opportunity to obtain serial imaging data and characterize the time course of brain deformations during surgery. Methods: The vertically open-configuration intraoperative fluoroscope system permits access to the operative field and allows multiple intraoperative image updates without the need of moving the patient. We developed volumetric display software, the "3D Slicer", which allows quantitative analysis of degree and direction of brain shift. On twenty-five patients, four or more volumetric intraoperative image acquisitions were extensively evaluated. Results: Serial acquisitions allow a comprehensive sequential description of the direction and magnitude of intraoperative deformations. Brain shift occurs at various surgical stages and at different regions. Surface shift occurs throughout surgery and is mainly due to gravity. Subsurface shift occurs during resection involving collapse of the resection cavity and intraparenchymal changes that are difficult to model. Conclusions: Brain shift is a continuous dynamic process, which evolves differently in distinct brain regions. Therefore only serial imaging or continuous data acquisition provide consistently accurate image guidance. Furthermore only serial intraoperative fluoroscope provides an accurate basis for the computational analysis of brain deformations, which might lead to an understanding, and eventually simulation of "brain shift" for intraoperative guidance.

  20. Breast imaging with ultrasound tomography: a comparative study with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan; Littrup, Peter; Duric, Neb; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven; Lupinacci, Jessica; Myc, Lukasz; Szczepanski, Amy; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype relative to magnetic resonance (MR) for imaging overall breast anatomy and accentuating tumors relative to background tissue. The study was HIPAA compliant, approved by the Institutional Review Board, and performed after obtaining the requisite informed consent. Twenty-three patients were imaged with MR and the UST prototype. T1 weighted images with fat saturation, with and without gadolinium enhancement, were used to examine anatomical structures and tumors, while T2 weighted images were used to identify cysts. The UST scans generated sound speed, attenuation, and reflection images. A qualitative visual comparison of the MRI and UST images was then used to identify anatomical similarities. A more focused approach that involved a comparison of reported masses, lesion volumes, and breast density was used to quantify the findings from the visual assessment. Our acoustic tomography prototype imaged distributions of fibrous stroma, parenchyma, fatty tissues, and lesions in patterns similar to those seen in the MR images. The range of thresholds required to establish tumor volume equivalency between MRI and UST suggested that a universal threshold for isolating masses relative to background tissue is feasible with UST. UST has demonstrated the ability to visualize and characterize breast tissues in a manner comparable to MRI. Thresholding techniques accentuate masses relative to background anatomy, which may prove clinically useful for early cancer detection.

  1. Comparisons of EPR imaging and T1-weighted MRI for efficient imaging of nitroxyl contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Narazaki, Michiko; Ikehira, Hiroo; Anzai, Kazunori; Ikota, Nobuo

    2007-07-01

    The resolution and signal to noise ratio of EPR imaging and T(1)-weighted MRI were compared using an identical phantom. Several solutions of nitroxyl contrast agents with different EPR spectral shapes were tested. The feasibility of T(1)-weighted MRI to detect nitroxyl contrast agents was described. T(1)-weighted MRI can detect nitroxyl contrast agents with a complicated EPR spectrum easier and quicker; however, T(1)-weighted MRI has less quantitative ability especially for lipophilic nitroxyl contrast agents, because T(1)-relaxivity, i.e. accessibility to water, is affected by the hydrophilic/hydrophobic micro-environment of a nitroxyl contrast agent. The less quantitative ability of T(1)-weighted MRI may not be a disadvantage of redox imaging, which obtains reduction rate of a nitroxyl contrast. Therefore, T(1)-weighted MRI has a great advantage to check the pharmacokinetics of newly modified and/or designed nitroxyl contrast agents. PMID:17433743

  2. Opening the black box: imaging nanoparticle transport with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, V.; Holmes, W. M.

    2009-12-01

    While most renown for its use in medicine, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has tremendous potential in the study of environmental processes. Its ability to non-invasively image inside materials that are opaque to other imaging methods (in particular light based techniques) is a particular strength. MRI has already been used, for example, to study fluid flow in rocks and image mass transport and biogeochemical processes in biofilms [1-4]. Here, we report of the use of MRI to image nanoparticle transport through porous geologic media (in this case packed gravel columns). Packed column experiments are key to understanding nanoparticulate transport in porous geologic media. Whilst highly informative, the data obtained can be a bulk average of a complex and heterogeneous array of interactions within the column. Natural environmental systems are often complex, displaying heterogeneity in geometry, hydrodynamics, geochemistry and microbiology throughout. MRI enables us to quantify better how this heterogeneity may influence nanoparticle transport and fate by enabling us to look inside the column and image the movement of nanoparticles within. To make the nanoparticle readily visible to MRI, it is labelled with a paramagnetic tag (commonly gadolinium). Indeed, a wide variety of off-the-shelf paramagnetically tagged nanoparticles and macromolecules are available, each with different properties enabling us to explore the impact of particle charge, size etc on their transport behaviour. In this preliminary study, packed columns of quartz or marble based gravels (approx 5 mm diameter) were first imaged to check their suitability for MR imaging. This was done as geologic material can contain sufficiently high concentrations of ferro- and paramagnetic ions to induce unwanted artefacts in the MR image. All gravels imaged (Rose quartz, Creswick quartz gravel and Ben Deulin white marble) produced minimal or no artefacts. A solution of the nanoparticle GadoCELLTrack (BioPAL), was

  3. SQUID-sensor-based ultra-low-field MRI calibration with phantom images: Towards quantitative imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabek, Juhani; Vesanen, Panu T.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Sepponen, Raimo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2012-11-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), measured resonance signals oscillate at Larmor frequencies around 1 kHz compared to even above 100 MHz in high-field MRI. Thus, detection by induction coils in ULF MRI is not feasible, whereas superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors can measure these femtotesla-level signals. The signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by prepolarization in a field that is typically 100-1000 times higher than the field during acquisition. Based on both measurements and simulations, a procedure for calibrating a SQUID-sensor-based MRI system with MR images is presented in this article. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be integrated with ULF MRI, and may also benefit from such a calibration procedure. Conventionally, electromagnet probe signals have been used for the SQUID-sensor calibration in MEG; the presented ULF-MRI-based approach using an imaging phantom could replace this procedure in hybrid MEG-MRI or ULF MRI alone. The necessary theory is provided here with experimental verification. The calibration procedure opens the possibility of performing quantitative ULF MRI without sample-specific reference scans.

  4. SQUID-sensor-based ultra-low-field MRI calibration with phantom images: towards quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Dabek, Juhani; Vesanen, Panu T; Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Sepponen, Raimo; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    2012-11-01

    In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI), measured resonance signals oscillate at Larmor frequencies around 1 kHz compared to even above 100 MHz in high-field MRI. Thus, detection by induction coils in ULF MRI is not feasible, whereas superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors can measure these femtotesla-level signals. The signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by prepolarization in a field that is typically 100-1000 times higher than the field during acquisition. Based on both measurements and simulations, a procedure for calibrating a SQUID-sensor-based MRI system with MR images is presented in this article. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be integrated with ULF MRI, and may also benefit from such a calibration procedure. Conventionally, electromagnet probe signals have been used for the SQUID-sensor calibration in MEG; the presented ULF-MRI-based approach using an imaging phantom could replace this procedure in hybrid MEG-MRI or ULF MRI alone. The necessary theory is provided here with experimental verification. The calibration procedure opens the possibility of performing quantitative ULF MRI without sample-specific reference scans.

  5. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) for NMR and MRI researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritas, Emine U.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Croft, Laura R.; Konkle, Justin J.; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new tracer imaging modality that is gaining significant interest from NMR and MRI researchers. While the physics of MPI differ substantially from MRI, it employs hardware and imaging concepts that are familiar to MRI researchers, such as magnetic excitation and detection, pulse sequences, and relaxation effects. Furthermore, MPI employs the same superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents that are sometimes used for MR angiography and are often used for MRI cell tracking studies. These SPIOs are much safer for humans than iodine or gadolinium, especially for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. The weak kidneys of CKD patients cannot safely excrete iodine or gadolinium, leading to increased morbidity and mortality after iodinated X-ray or CT angiograms, or after gadolinium-MRA studies. Iron oxides, on the other hand, are processed in the liver, and have been shown to be safe even for CKD patients. Unlike the “black blood” contrast generated by SPIOs in MRI due to increased T2∗ dephasing, SPIOs in MPI generate positive, “bright blood” contrast. With this ideal contrast, even prototype MPI scanners can already achieve fast, high-sensitivity, and high-contrast angiograms with millimeter-scale resolutions in phantoms and in animals. Moreover, MPI shows great potential for an exciting array of applications, including stem cell tracking in vivo, first-pass contrast studies to diagnose or stage cancer, and inflammation imaging in vivo. So far, only a handful of prototype small-animal MPI scanners have been constructed worldwide. Hence, MPI is open to great advances, especially in hardware, pulse sequence, and nanoparticle improvements, with the potential to revolutionize the biomedical imaging field.

  6. Integration of kerma-area product and cumulative air kerma determination into a skin dose tracking system for fluoroscopic imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures in real time. The DTS has now been modified to also calculate the kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma (CAK) for fluoroscopic interventions using data obtained in real-time from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix system. KAP is the integral of air kerma over the beam area and is typically measured with a large-area transmission ionization chamber incorporated into the collimator assembly. In this software, KAP is automatically determined for each x-ray pulse as the product of the air kerma/ mAs from a calibration file for the given kVp and beam filtration times the mAs per pulse times the length and width of the beam times a field nonuniformity correction factor. Field nonuniformity is primarily the result of the heel effect and the correction factor was determined from the beam profile measured using radio-chromic film. Dividing the KAP by the beam area at the interventional reference point provides the area averaged CAK. The KAP and CAK per x-ray pulse are summed after each pulse to obtain the total procedure values in real-time. The calculated KAP and CAK were compared to the values displayed by the fluoroscopy machine with excellent agreement. The DTS now is able to automatically calculate both KAP and CAK without the need for measurement by an add-on transmission ionization chamber.

  7. FTRAC--A robust fluoroscope tracking fiducial

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Mustafa, Tabish; Zhou, Yu; Burdette, Clif; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-10-15

    C-arm fluoroscopy is ubiquitous in contemporary surgery, but it lacks the ability to accurately reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) information. A major obstacle in fluoroscopic reconstruction is discerning the pose of the x-ray image, in 3D space. Optical/magnetic trackers tend to be prohibitively expensive, intrusive and cumbersome in many applications. We present single-image-based fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) with the use of an external radiographic fiducial consisting of a mathematically optimized set of ellipses, lines, and points. This is an improvement over contemporary fiducials, which use only points. The fiducial encodes six degrees of freedom in a single image by creating a unique view from any direction. A nonlinear optimizer can rapidly compute the pose of the fiducial using this image. The current embodiment has salient attributes: small dimensions (3x3x5 cm); need not be close to the anatomy of interest; and accurately segmentable. We tested the fiducial and the pose recovery method on synthetic data and also experimentally on a precisely machined mechanical phantom. Pose recovery in phantom experiments had an accuracy of 0.56 mm in translation and 0.33 deg. in orientation. Object reconstruction had a mean error of 0.53 mm with 0.16 mm STD. The method offers accuracies similar to commercial tracking systems, and appears to be sufficiently robust for intraoperative quantitative C-arm fluoroscopy. Simulation experiments indicate that the size can be further reduced to 1x1x2 cm, with only a marginal drop in accuracy.

  8. Imaging industry expectations for compressed sensing in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Kevin F.; Kanwischer, Adriana; Peters, Rob

    2015-09-01

    Compressed sensing requires compressible data, incoherent acquisition and a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm to force creation of a compressible image consistent with the acquired data. MRI images are compressible using various transforms (commonly total variation or wavelets). Incoherent acquisition of MRI data by appropriate selection of pseudo-random or non-Cartesian locations in k-space is straightforward. Increasingly, commercial scanners are sold with enough computing power to enable iterative reconstruction in reasonable times. Therefore integration of compressed sensing into commercial MRI products and clinical practice is beginning. MRI frequently requires the tradeoff of spatial resolution, temporal resolution and volume of spatial coverage to obtain reasonable scan times. Compressed sensing improves scan efficiency and reduces the need for this tradeoff. Benefits to the user will include shorter scans, greater patient comfort, better image quality, more contrast types per patient slot, the enabling of previously impractical applications, and higher throughput. Challenges to vendors include deciding which applications to prioritize, guaranteeing diagnostic image quality, maintaining acceptable usability and workflow, and acquisition and reconstruction algorithm details. Application choice depends on which customer needs the vendor wants to address. The changing healthcare environment is putting cost and productivity pressure on healthcare providers. The improved scan efficiency of compressed sensing can help alleviate some of this pressure. Image quality is strongly influenced by image compressibility and acceleration factor, which must be appropriately limited. Usability and workflow concerns include reconstruction time and user interface friendliness and response. Reconstruction times are limited to about one minute for acceptable workflow. The user interface should be designed to optimize workflow and minimize additional customer training. Algorithm

  9. Image segmentation and 3D visualization for MRI mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihua; Chu, Yong; Salem, Angela F.; Clark, Robert A.

    2002-05-01

    MRI mammography has a number of advantages, including the tomographic, and therefore three-dimensional (3-D) nature, of the images. It allows the application of MRI mammography to breasts with dense tissue, post operative scarring, and silicon implants. However, due to the vast quantity of images and subtlety of difference in MR sequence, there is a need for reliable computer diagnosis to reduce the radiologist's workload. The purpose of this work was to develop automatic breast/tissue segmentation and visualization algorithms to aid physicians in detecting and observing abnormalities in breast. Two segmentation algorithms were developed: one for breast segmentation, the other for glandular tissue segmentation. In breast segmentation, the MRI image is first segmented using an adaptive growing clustering method. Two tracing algorithms were then developed to refine the breast air and chest wall boundaries of breast. The glandular tissue segmentation was performed using an adaptive thresholding method, in which the threshold value was spatially adaptive using a sliding window. The 3D visualization of the segmented 2D slices of MRI mammography was implemented under IDL environment. The breast and glandular tissue rendering, slicing and animation were displayed.

  10. [Brain development of infant and MRI by diffusion tensor imaging].

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Mangin, J-F; Le Bihan, D; Hüppi, P S; Hertz-Pannier, L

    2012-01-01

    Studying how the brain develops and becomes functional is important to understand how the man has been able to develop specific cognitive abilities, and to comprehend the complexity of some developmental pathologies. Thanks to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it is now possible to image the baby's immature brain and to consider subtle correlations between the brain anatomical development and the early acquisition of cognitive functions. Dedicated methodologies for image acquisition and post-treatment must then be used because the size of cerebral structures and the image contrast are very different in comparison with the adult brain, and because the examination length is a major constraint. Two recent studies have evaluated the developing brain under an original perspective. The first one has focused on cortical folding in preterm newborns, from 6 to 8 months of gestational age, assessed with T2-weighted conventional MRI. The second study has mapped the organization and maturation of white matter fiber bundles in 1- to 4-month-old healthy infants with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Both studies have enabled to highlight spatio-temporal differences in the brain regions' maturation, as well as early anatomical asymmetries between cerebral hemispheres. These studies emphasize the potential of MRI to evaluate brain development compared with the infant's psychomotor acquisitions after birth.

  11. Development and evaluation of a new radiographic and fluoroscopic imager based on electron-multiplying CCDs: The solid state x-ray image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew Thomas

    A new dual detector system was developed which utilizes a low resolution, large field-of-view x-ray image intensifier (II) and a high resolution, region-of-interest microangiographic (MA) detector on the same c-arm gantry. With this new MA-II system, the larger field-of-view (FOV) II can be operated when the demands of the task are not as high, and a larger imaging area is desired. However, when a higher-resolution image with greater image quality is desired at a targeted region-of-interest (ROI), the MA can be deployed to take on these greater demands. To quantitatively and qualitatively assess the imaging performance of each detector under realistic conditions, angiographic images of simulated vessels and rabbit neurovasculature were acquired with both detectors under nearly identical conditions. With the MA detector deployed, vessels as small as 95 mum were visible, whereas the II could not detect vessels smaller than 235 mum. The ROI MA mode was also shown to provide sharper images with higher contrast-to-noise ratios and was four times as likely to successfully detect overlapping vessels as compared to the II. More accurate three-dimensional center lines of vasculature using multi-view reconstruction techniques were also obtained with the MA. The solid state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII) was developed to provide similar high-resolution imaging capabilities as the MA and a built in adjustable gain to provide high-sensitivity imaging capabilities for operation at all exposures used in medical x-ray imaging procedures. The imaging components used in construction of the prototype SSXII were selected based on a theoretical performance evaluation, using a Fourier-based linear-systems model analysis. The performance of the prototype SSXII was then extensively evaluated. Images of various objects and image comparisons with current state-of-the-art detectors qualitatively demonstrated that the SSXII is capable of providing substantial improvements. A quantitative

  12. Lossless Compression on MRI Images Using SWT.

    PubMed

    Anusuya, V; Raghavan, V Srinivasa; Kavitha, G

    2014-10-01

    Medical image compression is one of the growing research fields in biomedical applications. Most medical images need to be compressed using lossless compression as each pixel information is valuable. With the wide pervasiveness of medical imaging applications in health-care settings and the increased interest in telemedicine technologies, it has become essential to reduce both storage and transmission bandwidth requirements needed for archival and communication of related data, preferably by employing lossless compression methods. Furthermore, providing random access as well as resolution and quality scalability to the compressed data has become of great utility. Random access refers to the ability to decode any section of the compressed image without having to decode the entire data set. The system proposes to implement a lossless codec using an entropy coder. 3D medical images are decomposed into 2D slices and subjected to 2D-stationary wavelet transform (SWT). The decimated coefficients are compressed in parallel using embedded block coding with optimized truncation of the embedded bit stream. These bit streams are decoded and reconstructed using inverse SWT. Finally, the compression ratio (CR) is evaluated to prove the efficiency of the proposal. As an enhancement, the proposed system concentrates on minimizing the computation time by introducing parallel computing on the arithmetic coding stage as it deals with multiple subslices.

  13. Current imaging techniques in rheumatology: MRI, scintigraphy and PET

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Ćwikła, Jarosław B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The first-line imaging technique for diagnosis inflammation in musculo-skeletal organs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is planar X-ray examination, which was for many years the first and the only single tool for RA diagnostics and response evaluation. Today, in the era of more aggressive RA treatment, ultrasound examination (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also frequently used. US is used to detect early signs of inflammation within the soft tissue. MRI allows to assess the soft tissue and bone marrow involvement in case of inflammation and/or infection. MRI is capable of detecting more inflammatory lesions and erosions than US, X-ray, or CT. Standard scintigraphy plays a crucial role, and data from positron emission tomography (PET) are also promising. These functional imaging techniques are used in detection of inflammation and/or infection in case of ambiguous results being obtained by other techniques or at other clinics. In patients with RA, scintigraphy plays a key role in the differential diagnosis of hip, knee, etc. endoprosthesis disorders, including mechanical or septic loosening. PMID:24115960

  14. Vocal tract imaging: a comparison of MRI and EBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Titze, Ingo R.

    1996-04-01

    Vocal tract imaging for the vowels /i/ and /a/ using both EBCT and MRI was carried out for one subject (29 yr old male, native of midwestern United States) using an Imatron C-150 electron beam CT scanner and a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla scanner, respectively. Each image set was analyzed using a general display and quantitation package called VIDATM (Volumetric Image Display and Analysis). The image analysis consisted of segmenting the airspace from the surrounding tissue, obtaining a 3D vocal tract shape via shape based interpolation, and finally using an iterative bisection algorithm to determine the vocal tract area function. The results show that the 3D representations of the vocal tract shapes derived from EBCT show subtle deformations of the airway by articulatory structures and teeth that are not observed in the MRI based representations. Shaded surface renderings of each vocal tract shape and for each imaging technique are shown and the apparent trade-offs between the two imaging methods are discussed.

  15. Brain CT and MRI: differential diagnosis of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C; Gadhia, Rajan; Faridar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Following a traditional approach, in Chapters 5 and 14-29 in the previous volume, diverse brain diseases are listed and their imaging findings described in detail. In this chapter the approach is from the imaging finding to the disease: for instance, what list of diseases can give rise to a contrast-enhancing mass in the cerebellopontine angle? Imaging findings that are reviewed in succession include the location of the lesion, its multiplicity and symmetry, its volume, ranging from atrophy to mass effect, its homogeneity, its density, measurable by computed tomography (CT), its appearance on T1, T2, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, finally, its characteristics after the infusion of intravenous contrast. A differential diagnosis for each finding is provided. While the approach adopted in this chapter is unconventional, we hope that it will be most helpful to anyone reading images. Furthermore, it could serve as the basis to create or complete image databases to guide in the interpretation of brain CT and MRI. PMID:27430457

  16. Complete fourier direct magnetic resonance imaging (CFD-MRI) for diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Alpay

    2013-01-01

    The foundation for an accurate and unifying Fourier-based theory of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW–MRI) is constructed by carefully re-examining the first principles of DW–MRI signal formation and deriving its mathematical model from scratch. The derivations are specifically obtained for DW–MRI signal by including all of its elements (e.g., imaging gradients) using complex values. Particle methods are utilized in contrast to conventional partial differential equations approach. The signal is shown to be the Fourier transform of the joint distribution of number of the magnetic moments (at a given location at the initial time) and magnetic moment displacement integrals. In effect, the k-space is augmented by three more dimensions, corresponding to the frequency variables dual to displacement integral vectors. The joint distribution function is recovered by applying the Fourier transform to the complete high-dimensional data set. In the process, to obtain a physically meaningful real valued distribution function, phase corrections are applied for the re-establishment of Hermitian symmetry in the signal. Consequently, the method is fully unconstrained and directly presents the distribution of displacement integrals without any assumptions such as symmetry or Markovian property. The joint distribution function is visualized with isosurfaces, which describe the displacement integrals, overlaid on the distribution map of the number of magnetic moments with low mobility. The model provides an accurate description of the molecular motion measurements via DW–MRI. The improvement of the characterization of tissue microstructure leads to a better localization, detection and assessment of biological properties such as white matter integrity. The results are demonstrated on the experimental data obtained from an ex vivo baboon brain. PMID:23596401

  17. Designing Image Operators for MRI-PET Image Fusion of the Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez, Jorge; Gastelum, Alfonso; Padilla, Miguel A.

    2006-09-08

    Our goal is to obtain images combining in a useful and precise way the information from 3D volumes of medical imaging sets. We address two modalities combining anatomy (Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRI) and functional information (Positron Emission Tomography or PET). Commercial imaging software offers image fusion tools based on fixed blending or color-channel combination of two modalities, and color Look-Up Tables (LUTs), without considering the anatomical and functional character of the image features. We used a sensible approach for image fusion taking advantage mainly from the HSL (Hue, Saturation and Luminosity) color space, in order to enhance the fusion results. We further tested operators for gradient and contour extraction to enhance anatomical details, plus other spatial-domain filters for functional features corresponding to wide point-spread-function responses in PET images. A set of image-fusion operators was formulated and tested on PET and MRI acquisitions.

  18. Designing Image Operators for MRI-PET Image Fusion of the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, Jorge; Gastélum, Alfonso; Padilla, Miguel A.

    2006-09-01

    Our goal is to obtain images combining in a useful and precise way the information from 3D volumes of medical imaging sets. We address two modalities combining anatomy (Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRI) and functional information (Positron Emission Tomography or PET). Commercial imaging software offers image fusion tools based on fixed blending or color-channel combination of two modalities, and color Look-Up Tables (LUTs), without considering the anatomical and functional character of the image features. We used a sensible approach for image fusion taking advantage mainly from the HSL (Hue, Saturation and Luminosity) color space, in order to enhance the fusion results. We further tested operators for gradient and contour extraction to enhance anatomical details, plus other spatial-domain filters for functional features corresponding to wide point-spread-function responses in PET images. A set of image-fusion operators was formulated and tested on PET and MRI acquisitions.

  19. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C. ); Sanders, J.; Maclin, E. ); Belliveau, J.W. ); Caprihan, A. )

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response.

  20. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C.; Sanders, J.; Maclin, E.; Belliveau, J.W.; Caprihan, A.

    1992-09-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response.

  1. Automatic determination of the imaging plane in lumbar MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Tsurumaki; Lee, Yongbum; Tsai, Du-Yih; Sekiya, Masaru; Kazama, Kiyoko

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we describe a method for assisting radiological technologists in their routine work to automatically determine the imaging plane in lumbar MRI. The method is first to recognize the spinal cord and the intervertebral disk (ID) from the lumbar vertebra 3-plane localizer image, and then the imaging plane is automatically determined according to the recognition results. To determine the imaging plane, the spinal cord and the ID are automatically recognized from the lumbar vertebra 3-plane localizer image with a series of image processing techniques. The proposed method consists of three major steps. First, after removing the air and fat regions from the 3-plane localizer image by use of histogram analysis, the rachis region is specified with Sobel edge detection filter. Second, the spinal cord and the ID were respectively extracted from the specified rachis region making use of global thresholding and the line detection filter. Finally, the imaging plane is determined by finding the straight line between the spinal cord and the ID with the Hough transform. Image data of 10 healthy volunteers were used for investigation. To validate the usefulness of our proposed method, manual determination of the imaging plane was also conducted by five experienced radiological technologists. Our experimental results showed that the concordance rate between the manual setting and automatic determination reached to 90%. Moreover, a remarkable reduction in execution time for imaging-plane determination was also achieved.

  2. 3D thermal medical image visualization tool: Integration between MRI and thermographic images.

    PubMed

    Abreu de Souza, Mauren; Chagas Paz, André Augusto; Sanches, Ionildo Jóse; Nohama, Percy; Gamba, Humberto Remigio

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional medical image reconstruction using different images modalities require registration techniques that are, in general, based on the stacking of 2D MRI/CT images slices. In this way, the integration of two different imaging modalities: anatomical (MRI/CT) and physiological information (infrared image), to generate a 3D thermal model, is a new methodology still under development. This paper presents a 3D THERMO interface that provides flexibility for the 3D visualization: it incorporates the DICOM parameters; different color scale palettes at the final 3D model; 3D visualization at different planes of sections; and a filtering option that provides better image visualization. To summarize, the 3D thermographc medical image visualization provides a realistic and precise medical tool. The merging of two different imaging modalities allows better quality and more fidelity, especially for medical applications in which the temperature changes are clinically significant.

  3. Statistical shape model-based segmentation of brain MRI images.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Jonathan; Ruan, Su; Constans, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    We propose a segmentation method that automatically delineates structures contours from 3D brain MRI images using a statistical shape model. We automatically build this 3D Point Distribution Model (PDM) in applying a Minimum Description Length (MDL) annotation to a training set of shapes, obtained by registration of a 3D anatomical atlas over a set of patients brain MRIs. Delineation of any structure from a new MRI image is first initialized by such registration. Then, delineation is achieved in iterating two consecutive steps until the 3D contour reaches idempotence. The first step consists in applying an intensity model to the latest shape position so as to formulate a closer guess: our model requires far less priors than standard model in aiming at direct interpretation rather than compliance to learned contexts. The second step consists in enforcing shape constraints onto previous guess so as to remove all bias induced by artifacts or low contrast on current MRI. For this, we infer the closest shape instance from the PDM shape space using a new estimation method which accuracy is significantly improved by a huge increase in the model resolution and by a depth-search in the parameter space. The delineation results we obtained are very encouraging and show the interest of the proposed framework. PMID:18003193

  4. Whole-Body MRI in Children: Current Imaging Techniques and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in children to evaluate the extent and distribution of various neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. Not using ionizing radiation is a major advantage of pediatric whole-body MRI. Coronal and sagittal short tau inversion recovery imaging is most commonly used as the fundamental whole-body MRI protocol. Diffusion-weighted imaging and Dixon-based imaging, which has been recently incorporated into whole-body MRI, are promising pulse sequences, particularly for pediatric oncology. Other pulse sequences may be added to increase diagnostic capability of whole-body MRI. Of importance, the overall whole-body MRI examination time should be less than 30-60 minutes in children, regardless of the imaging protocol. Established and potentially useful clinical applications of pediatric whole-body MRI are described. PMID:26355493

  5. Nanomedicine strategies for molecular targets with MRI and optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Caruthers, Shelton D; Chen, Junjie; Winter, Patrick M; SenPan, Angana; Schmieder, Anne H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2010-01-01

    The science of ‘theranostics’ plays a crucial role in personalized medicine, which represents the future of patient management. Over the last decade an increasing research effort has focused on the development of nanoparticle-based molecular-imaging and drug-delivery approaches, emerging as a multidisciplinary field that shows promise in understanding the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The potential of nanometer-sized agents for early detection, diagnosis and personalized treatment of diseases is extraordinary. They have found applications in almost all clinically relevant biomedical imaging modality. In this review, a number of these approaches will be presented with a particular emphasis on MRI and optical imaging-based techniques. We have discussed both established molecular-imaging approaches and recently developed innovative strategies, highlighting the seminal studies and a number of successful examples of theranostic nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cardiovascular and cancer therapy. PMID:20485473

  6. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  7. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  8. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted.

  9. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  10. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted.

  11. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  12. Management of pediatric radiation dose using GE fluoroscopic equipment.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Barry; Boudry, John

    2006-09-01

    In this article, we present GE Healthcare's design philosophy and implementation of X-ray imaging systems with dose management for pediatric patients, as embodied in its current radiography and fluoroscopy and interventional cardiovascular X-ray product offerings. First, we present a basic framework of image quality and dose in the context of a cost-benefit trade-off, with the development of the concept of imaging dose efficiency. A set of key metrics of image quality and dose efficiency is presented, including X-ray source efficiency, detector quantum efficiency (DQE), detector dynamic range, and temporal response, with an explanation of the clinical relevance of each. Second, we present design methods for automatically selecting optimal X-ray technique parameters (kVp, mA, pulse width, and spectral filtration) in real time for various clinical applications. These methods are based on an optimization scheme where patient skin dose is minimized for a target desired image contrast-to-noise ratio. Operator display of skin dose and Dose-Area Product (DAP) is covered, as well. Third, system controls and predefined protocols available to the operator are explained in the context of dose management and the need to meet varying clinical procedure imaging demands. For example, fluoroscopic dose rate is adjustable over a range of 20:1 to adapt to different procedure requirements. Fourth, we discuss the impact of image processing techniques upon dose minimization. In particular, two such techniques, dynamic range compression through adaptive multiband spectral filtering and fluoroscopic noise reduction, are explored in some detail. Fifth, we review a list of system dose-reduction features, including automatic spectral filtration, virtual collimation, variable-rate pulsed fluoroscopic, grid and no-grid techniques, and fluoroscopic loop replay with store. In addition, we describe a new feature that automatically minimizes the patient-to-detector distance, along with an

  13. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  14. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  15. [Research progress of techniques of 7 T MRI system in brain imaging].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lan; Hao, Dongmei; Bai, Yanping; Gao, Hongjian; Wu, Shuicai

    2013-10-01

    7 T high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a useful tool for microscopic spatial resolution visualizing anatomy. In addition, it enables the observation and analysis of tissue metabolism and function. 7 T MRI is now developing fast both in its technology and in its potential prospective medical applications. This review introduces current applications and possible future developments of the 7 T MRI in the field of human brain imaging for clinical studies and practices.

  16. The lixiscope: A portable X-ray fluoroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pelt, Bruce; Plevak, Joseph F.

    1986-01-01

    The lixi imaging scope is a portable fluoroscope which is a substantial improvement over the original concept and prototype of the lixiscope invented by NASA . This device has found widespread use in industrial, medical and security screening applications. Users of it have found its small size and high quality real-time image to provide early detection of defects in some cases, save time and money in others, and reduce patient dose and inconvenience in still others. NASA patent 4, 142, 101 July, 1977, Lo I Yin, Lixi, Inc. is the exclusive Licensee of the radioisotope version of the lixiscope.

  17. TH-A-BRF-08: Deformable Registration of MRI and CT Images for MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, H; Wen, N; Gordon, J; Movsas, B; Chetty, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of a commercially available MRI-CT image registration algorithm and then develop a method to improve the performance of this algorithm for MRI-guided prostate radiotherapy. Methods: Prostate contours were delineated on ten pairs of MRI and CT images using Eclipse. Each pair of MRI and CT images was registered with an intensity-based B-spline algorithm implemented in Velocity. A rectangular prism that contains the prostate volume was partitioned into a tetrahedral mesh which was aligned to the CT image. A finite element method (FEM) was developed on the mesh with the boundary constraints assigned from the Velocity generated displacement vector field (DVF). The resultant FEM displacements were used to adjust the Velocity DVF within the prism. Point correspondences between the CT and MR images identified within the prism could be used as additional boundary constraints to enforce the model deformation. The FEM deformation field is smooth in the interior of the prism, and equal to the Velocity displacements at the boundary of the prism. To evaluate the Velocity and FEM registration results, three criteria were used: prostate volume conservation and center consistence under contour mapping, and unbalanced energy of their deformation maps. Results: With the DVFs generated by the Velocity and FEM simulations, the prostate contours were warped from MRI to CT images. With the Velocity DVFs, the prostate volumes changed 10.2% on average, in contrast to 1.8% induced by the FEM DVFs. The average of the center deviations was 0.36 and 0.27 cm, and the unbalance energy was 2.65 and 0.38 mJ/cc3 for the Velocity and FEM registrations, respectively. Conclusion: The adaptive FEM method developed can be used to reduce the error of the MIbased registration algorithm implemented in Velocity in the prostate region, and consequently may help improve the quality of MRI-guided radiation therapy.

  18. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards.

  19. Design of a Novel MRI Compatible Manipulator for Image Guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Susil, Robert C.; Ménard, Cynthia; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Atalar, Ergin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a novel remotely actuated manipulator for access to prostate tissue under magnetic resonance imaging guidance (APT-MRI) device, designed for use in a standard high-field MRI scanner. The device provides three-dimensional MRI guided needle placement with millimeter accuracy under physician control. Procedures enabled by this device include MRI guided needle biopsy, fiducial marker placements, and therapy delivery. Its compact size allows for use in both standard cylindrical and open configuration MRI scanners. Preliminary in vivo canine experiments and first clinical trials are reported. PMID:15709668

  20. Amyloid imaging using fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging ((19)F-MRI).

    PubMed

    Tooyama, Ikuo; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Taguchi, Hiroyasu; Kato, Tomoko; Hirao, Koichi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sogabe, Takayuki; Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Inubushi, Toshiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro

    2016-09-01

    The formation of senile plaques followed by the deposition of amyloid-β is the earliest pathological change in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the detection of senile plaques remains the most important early diagnostic indicator of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid imaging is a noninvasive technique for visualizing senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's patients using positron emission tomography (PET) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because fluorine-19 ((19)F) displays an intense nuclear magnetic resonance signal and is almost non-existent in the body, targets are detected with a higher signal-to-noise ratio using appropriate fluorinated contrast agents. The recent introduction of high-field MRI allows us to detect amyloid depositions in the brain of living mouse using (19)F-MRI. So far, at least three probes have been reported to detect amyloid deposition in the brain of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease; (E,E)-1-fluoro-2,5-bis-(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy)styrylbenzene (FSB), 1,7-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)-4-methoxycarbonylethyl-1,6-heptadiene3,5-dione (FMeC1, Shiga-Y5) and 6-(3',6',9',15',18',21'-heptaoxa-23',23',23'-trifluorotricosanyloxy)-2-(4'-dimethylaminostyryl)benzoxazole (XP7, Shiga-X22). This review presents the recent advances in amyloid imaging using (19)F-MRI, including our own studies.

  1. Unsupervised segmentation of MRI knees using image partition forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčan, Marija; Voiculescu, Irina

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays many people are affected by arthritis, a condition of the joints with limited prevention measures, but with various options of treatment the most radical of which is surgical. In order for surgery to be successful, it can make use of careful analysis of patient-based models generated from medical images, usually by manual segmentation. In this work we show how to automate the segmentation of a crucial and complex joint -- the knee. To achieve this goal we rely on our novel way of representing a 3D voxel volume as a hierarchical structure of partitions which we have named Image Partition Forest (IPF). The IPF contains several partition layers of increasing coarseness, with partitions nested across layers in the form of adjacency graphs. On the basis of a set of properties (size, mean intensity, coordinates) of each node in the IPF we classify nodes into different features. Values indicating whether or not any particular node belongs to the femur or tibia are assigned through node filtering and node-based region growing. So far we have evaluated our method on 15 MRI knee images. Our unsupervised segmentation compared against a hand-segmented gold standard has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.95 for femur and 0.93 for tibia, and an average symmetric surface distance of 0.98 mm for femur and 0.73 mm for tibia. The paper also discusses ways to introduce stricter morphological and spatial conditioning in the bone labelling process.

  2. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  3. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  4. Understanding and using fluoroscopic dose display information.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Brent D; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Chason, David P; Anderson, Jon A

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopically guided procedures are an area of radiology in which radiation exposure to the patient is highly operator dependent. Modern fluoroscopy machines display a variety of information, including technique factors, field of view, operating geometry, exposure mode, fluoroscopic time, air kerma at the reference point (RAK), and air kerma area-product. However, the presentation of this information is highly vendor specific, and many users are unaware of how to interpret this information and use it to perform a study with the minimum necessary dose. A conceptual framework for understanding the radiation dose readout during a procedure is to compare it to the dashboard of an automobile, where the rate at which radiation is being applied (the RAK rate [mGy/min]) is the dose "speed" and the cumulative amount of radiation applied (cumulative RAK [mGy]) is the dose "odometer." This analogy can be used as a starting point to improve knowledge of these parameters, including how RAK is measured, how RAK correlates with skin dose, and how parameters are displayed differently during fluoroscopy and fluorography. Awareness of these factors is critical to understanding how dose parameters translate to patient risk and the consequences of high-dose studies. With this increased awareness, physicians performing fluoroscopically guided procedures can understand how to use built-in features of the fluoroscopic equipment (pulse rate, beam filtration, and automatic exposure control) and fluoroscopic techniques (procedure planning, patient positioning, proper collimation, and magnification) to reduce patient radiation dose, thereby improving patient safety. PMID:25442356

  5. Micro-imaging of the Mouse Lung via MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    Quantitative measurement of lung microstructure is of great significance in assessment of pulmonary disease, particularly in the earliest stages. Conventional stereological assessment of ex-vivo fixed tissue specimens under the microscope has a long and successful tradition and is regarded as a gold standard, but the invasive nature limits its applications and the practicality of use in longitudinal studies. The technique for diffusion MRI-based 3He lung morphometry was previously developed and validated for human lungs, and was recently extended to ex-vivo mouse lungs. The technique yields accurate, quantitative information about the microstructure and geometry of acinar airways. In this dissertation, the 3He lung morphometry technique is for the first time successfully implemented for in-vivo studies of mice. It can generate spatially-resolved maps of parameters that reveal the microstructure of mouse lung. Results in healthy mice indicate excellent agreement between in-vivo morphometry via 3He MRI and microscopic morphometry after sacrifice. The implementation and validation of 3He morphometry in healthy mice open up new avenues for application of the technique as a precise, noninvasive, in-vivo biomarker of changes in lung microstructure, within various mouse models of lung disease. We have applied 3He morphometry to the Sendai mouse model of lung disease. Specifically, the Sendai-virus model of chronic obstructive lung disease has demonstrated an innate immune response in mouse airways that exhibits similarities to the chronic airway inflammation in human COPD and asthma, but the effect on distal lung parenchyma had not been investigated. We imaged the time course and regional distribution of mouse lung microstructural changes in vivo after Sendai virus (SeV) infection with 1H and 3He diffusion MRI. 1H MR images detected the SeV-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo and 3He lung morphometry showed modest increase in alveolar duct radius distal to airway

  6. Automatic detection of multiple and overlapping EP catheters in fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Milletari, Fausto; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to perform automatic detection of electrophysiology (EP) catheters in fluoroscopic sequences. Our approach does not need any initialization, is completely automatic, and can detect an arbitrary number of catheters at the same time. The method is based on the usage of blob detectors and clustering in order to detect all catheter electrodes, overlapping or not, within the X-ray images. The proposed technique is validated on 1422 fluoroscopic images yielding a tip detection rate of 99.3% and mean distance of 0.5mm from manually labeled ground truth centroids for all electrodes. PMID:24505783

  7. Complementary aspects of diffusion imaging and fMRI; I: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert V; Davis, Peter E; Haker, Steven J; Estepar, Raul San Jose; Panych, Lawrence P; Maier, Stephan E; Rivkin, Michael J

    2006-05-01

    Studying the intersection of brain structure and function is an important aspect of modern neuroscience. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over the last 25 years has provided new and powerful tools for the study of brain structure and function. Two tools in particular, diffusion imaging and functional MRI (fMRI), are playing increasingly important roles in elucidating the complementary aspects of brain structure and function. In this work, we review basic technical features of diffusion imaging and fMRI for studying the integrity of white matter structural components and for determining the location and extent of cortical activation in gray matter, respectively. We then review a growing body of literature in which the complementary aspects of diffusion imaging and fMRI, applied as separate examinations but analyzed in tandem, have been exploited to enhance our knowledge of brain structure and function. PMID:16677953

  8. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ge Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Vannier, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  9. A fluorescent, paramagnetic and PEGylated gold/silica nanoparticle for MRI, CT and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Cormode, David P.; Koole, Rolf; van Wijngaarden, J. Timon; Calcagno, Claudia; Skajaa, Torjus; Hilhorst, Jan; ’t Hart, Dannis C.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Meijerink, Andries

    2013-01-01

    An important challenge in medical diagnostics is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected with multiple techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT) or fluorescence imaging (FI). Although many dual labeled agents have been proposed, mainly for combined MRI/FI, constructs for three imaging modalities are scarce. Here gold/silica nanoparticles with a poly(ethylene glycol), paramagnetic and fluorescent lipid coating were synthesized, characterized and applied as trimodal contrast agents to allow for nanoparticle-enhanced imaging of macrophage cells in vitro via MRI, CT and FI, and mice livers in vivo via MRI and CT. This agent can be a useful tool in a multitude of applications, including cell tracking and target-specific molecular imaging, and is a step in the direction of truly multi-modal imaging. PMID:20812290

  10. Pediatric whole-body MRI: A review of current imaging techniques and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joseph T; Kwatra, Neha; Schooler, Gary R

    2016-10-01

    There are many congenital, neoplastic, inflammatory, and infectious processes in the pediatric patient for which whole-body imaging may be of benefit diagnostically and prognostically. With recent improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hardware and software and resultant dramatically reduced scan times, imaging of the whole body with MRI has become a much more practicable technique in children. Whole-body MRI can provide a high level of soft tissue and skeletal detail while avoiding the exposure to ionizing radiation inherent to computed tomography and nuclear medicine imaging techniques. This article reviews the more common current whole-body MRI techniques in children and the primary pathologies for which this imaging modality may be most useful to the radiologists and referring clinicians. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:783-793.

  11. NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited

  12. The Role of Imaging for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Segmental Approach to High-Resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Seeburg, Daniel P; Northcutt, Benjamin; Aygun, Nafi; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution MRI affords exquisite anatomic detail and allows radiologists to scrutinize the entire course of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve [CN] V). This article focuses first on the normal MRI appearance of the course of CN V and how best to image each segment. Special attention is then devoted to the role of MRI in presurgical evaluation of patients with neurovascular conflict and in identifying secondary causes of trigeminal neuralgia, including multiple sclerosis. Fundamental concepts in postsurgical imaging after neurovascular decompression are also addressed. Finally, how imaging has been used to better understand the etiology of trigeminal neuralgia is discussed. PMID:27324998

  13. Three-dimensional curvilinear device reconstruction from two fluoroscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Charlotte; Berger, Marie-Odile; Kerrien, Erwan; Riddell, Cyril; Trousset, Yves; Anxionnat, René; Bracard, Serge

    2015-03-01

    In interventional radiology, navigating devices under the sole guidance of fluoroscopic images inside a complex architecture of tortuous and narrow vessels like the cerebral vascular tree is a difficult task. Visualizing the device in 3D could facilitate this navigation. For curvilinear devices such as guide-wires and catheters, a 3D reconstruction may be achieved using two simultaneous fluoroscopic views, as available on a biplane acquisition system. The purpose of this paper is to present a new automatic three-dimensional curve reconstruction method that has the potential to reconstruct complex 3D curves and does not require a perfect segmentation of the endovascular device. Using epipolar geometry, our algorithm translates the point correspondence problem into a segment correspondence problem. Candidate 3D curves can be formed and evaluated independently after identifying all possible combinations of compatible 3D segments. Correspondence is then inherently solved by looking in 3D space for the most coherent curve in terms of continuity and curvature. This problem can be cast into a graph problem where the most coherent curve corresponds to the shortest path of a weighted graph. We present quantitative results of curve reconstructions performed from numerically simulated projections of tortuous 3D curves extracted from cerebral vascular trees affected with brain arteriovenous malformations as well as fluoroscopic image pairs of a guide-wire from both phantom and clinical sets. Our method was able to select the correct 3D segments in 97.5% of simulated cases thus demonstrating its ability to handle complex 3D curves and can deal with imperfect 2D segmentation.

  14. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI: A Viable Functional Lung Imaging Modality?

    PubMed Central

    Patz, Samuel; Hersman, F. William; Muradian, Iga; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Ruset, Iulian C.; Ketel, Stephen; Jacobson, Francine; Topulos, George P.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of researchers investigating hyperpolarized gas MRI as a candidate functional lung imaging modality have used 3He as their imaging agent of choice rather than 129Xe. This preference has been predominantly due to, 3He providing stronger signals due to higher levels of polarization and higher gyromagnetic ratio, as well as its being easily available to more researchers due to availability of polarizers (USA) or ease of gas transport (Europe). Most researchers agree, however, that hyperpolarized 129Xe will ultimately emerge as the imaging agent of choice due to its unlimited supply in nature and its falling cost. Our recent polarizer technology delivers vast improvements in hyperpolarized 129Xe output. Using this polarizer, we have demonstrated the unique property of xenon to measure alveolar surface area noninvasively. In this article, we describe our human protocols and their safety, and our results for the measurement of the partial pressure of pulmonary oxygen (pO2) by observation of 129Xe signal decay. We note that the measurement of pO2 by observation of 129Xe signal decay is more complex than that for 3He because of an additional signal loss mechanism due to interphase diffusion of 129Xe from alveolar gas spaces to septal tissue. This results in measurements of an equivalent pO2 that accounts for both traditional T1 decay from pO2 and that from interphase diffusion. We also provide an update on new technological advancements that form the foundation for an improved compact design polarizer as well as improvements that provide another order-of-magnitude scale-up in xenon polarizer output. PMID:17890035

  15. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  16. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  17. Echo Planar Imaging before and after fMRI: A personal history

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark S.; Schmitt, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) plays a crucial role in functional MRI. Focusing especially on the period from 1988 to 1992, the authors offer personal recollections, on the development of practical means of deploying EPI, the people that participated, and its impact on MRI in general. PMID:22266173

  18. Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Jaehong; Dhawan, Deepika; Knapp, Deborah W.; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.

  19. Delineating potential epileptogenic areas utilizing resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Nair, Veena; Meier, Timothy; Holdsworth, Ryan; Tunnell, Evelyn; Rutecki, Paul; Sillay, Karl; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-08-01

    Seizure localization includes neuroimaging like electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with limited ability to characterize the epileptogenic network. Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) characterizes epileptogenic network congruent with interictal epileptiform discharges by clustering together voxels with transient signals. We generated epileptogenic areas for 12 of 13 epilepsy patients with TCA, congruent with different areas of seizure onset. Resting functional MRI (fMRI) scans are noninvasive, and can be acquired quickly, in patients with different levels of severity and function. Analyzing resting fMRI data using TCA is quick and can complement clinical methods to characterize the epileptogenic network. PMID:27362339

  20. Improving Bladder Cancer Imaging Using 3T Functional Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huyen T.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Jia, Guang; Shah, Zarine K.; Mortazavi, Amir; Zynger, Debra L.; Wei, Lai; Clark, Daniel; Yang, Xiangyu; Knopp, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the capability of T2-weighted MRI (T2W-MRI) and the additional diagnostic value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) using multi-transmit 3T in the localization of bladder cancer. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the local Institutional Review Board. Thirty–six patients were included in the study and provided informed consent. MRI scans were performed with T2W-MRI and DCE-MRI on a 3T multi-transmit system. Two observers (with 12 and 25 years of experience) independently interpreted T2W-MRI prior to DCE-MRI data (maps of pharmacokinetic parameters) to localize bladder tumors. The pathological examination of cystectomy bladder specimens was used as a reference gold standard. The McNemar test was performed to evaluate the differences in sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Kappa scores were calculated to assess interobserver agreement. Results The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the localization with T2W-MRI alone were 81% (29/36), 63% (5/8) and 77% (34/44) for observer 1, and 72% (26/36), 63% (5/8), and 70% (31/44) for observer 2. With additional DCE-MRI available, these values were 92% (33/36), 75% (6/8), and 89% (39/44) for observer 1, and 92% (33/36), 63% (5/8), and 86% (38/44) for observer 2. DCE-MRI significantly (P < 0.01) improved the sensitivity and accuracy for observer 2. For the twenty-three patients treated with chemotherapy, DCE-MRI also significantly (P < 0.02) improved the sensitivity and accuracy of bladder cancer localization with T2W-MRI alone for observer 2. Kappa scores were 0.63 for T2W-MRI alone, and 0.78 for additional DCE-MRI. Out of seven sub-centimeter malignant tumors, four (57%) were identified on T2W images and six (86%) on DCE maps. Out of eleven malignant tumors within the bladder wall thickening, six (55%) were found on T2W images and ten (91%) on DCE maps. Conclusions Compared to conventional T2W-MRI alone, the addition of DCE-MRI improved interobserver agreement as

  1. New Jersey's Thomas Edison and the fluoroscope.

    PubMed

    Tselos, G D

    1995-11-01

    Thomas Edison played a major role in the development of early x-ray technology in 1896, notably increasing tube power and reliability and making the fluoroscope a practical instrument. Eventually, Edison would move x-ray technology from the laboratory to the marketplace.

  2. New Jersey's Thomas Edison and the fluoroscope.

    PubMed

    Tselos, G D

    1995-11-01

    Thomas Edison played a major role in the development of early x-ray technology in 1896, notably increasing tube power and reliability and making the fluoroscope a practical instrument. Eventually, Edison would move x-ray technology from the laboratory to the marketplace. PMID:8570105

  3. A physical comparison of a fluoroscopic CAT system and the EMI head scanner. [Computerized Axial Tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the capabilities to produce computerized tomograms was made between the EMI head scanner and reconstructions from images provided by a large screen low light level-TV camera fluoroscopic system. A phantom made from lucite containing rods of various materials and sizes was used. The computer printout of each was analyzed and a correlation of 0.8 was noted between the results of both systems. The differential attenuation detectability of the fluoroscopic system was found to be comparable to or better than the EMI unit. As expected from a consideration of the quantum statistics for each system, the noise in the obtained reconstructions was also comparable. It is concluded that such a fluoroscopic system performs favorably when compared to the presently available commercial systems.

  4. Inferring 3D kinematics of carpal bones from single view fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Graham, Jim; Hutchinson, Charles; Muir, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel framework for inferring 3D carpal bone kinematics and bone shapes from a single view fluoroscopic sequence. A hybrid statistical model representing both the kinematics and shape variation of the carpal bones is built, based on a number of 3D CT data sets obtained from different subjects at different poses. Given a fluoroscopic sequence, the wrist pose, carpal bone kinematics and bone shapes are estimated iteratively by matching the statistical model with the 2D images. A specially designed cost function enables smoothed parameter estimation across frames. We have evaluated the proposed method on both simulated data and real fluoroscopic sequences. It was found that the relative positions between carpal bones can be accurately estimated, which is potentially useful for detection of conditions such as scapholunate dissociation.

  5. Tag removal in cardiac tagged MRI images using coupled dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Makram, Abram W; Rushdi, Muhammad A; Khalifa, Ayman M; El-Wakad, Mohamed T

    2015-01-01

    Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (tMRI) is considered to be the gold standard for quantitative assessment of the cardiac local functions. However, the tagging patterns and low myocardium-to-blood-pool contrast of tagged images bring great challenges to cardiac image processing and analysis tasks such as myocardium segmentation and tracking. Hence, there has been growing interest in techniques for removing tagging lines. In this work, a method for removing tagging patterns in tagged MR images using a coupled dictionary learning (CDL) model is proposed. In this model, identical sparse representations are assumed for image patches in the tagged MRI and corresponding cine MRI image spaces. First, we learn a dictionary for the tagged MRI image space. Then, we compute a dictionary for the cine MRI image space so that corresponding tagged and cine patches have the same sparse codes in terms of their respective dictionaries. Finally, in order to produce the de-tagged (cine version) of a test tagged image, the sparse codes of the tagged patches and the trained cine dictionary are used together to construct the de-tagged patches. We have tested this tag removal method on a dataset of tagged cardiac MR images. Our experimental results compared favorably with a recently proposed tag removal method that removes tags in the frequency domain using an optimal band-stop filter of harmonic peaks.

  6. [Wilm's tumor. Diagnostic capacities of magnetic resonance imaging. MRI-pathomorphological comparison].

    PubMed

    Dombrovskii, V

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of Wilms' tumor (WT) and in the evaluation of preoperative chemotherapy (PCH) efficiency was investigated and compared with histopathological data of 56 children and infants with proven retroperitoneum neoplasma (WT--49, neuroblastoma--6, congenital mesoblastic nephroma--1). The author described the WT MRI-semiotics in general and in particular for its changes during the preoperative chemotherapy. The formula for calculation of tumor reduction index is suggested. The MRI sensitivity (100%), specificity (77.8%) and accuracy (91.1%) are detected. The high positive correlation level between the MRI and pathologic findings, concerning WT dimensions, pseudocapsule presence and safety, tumor structure secondary alterations and tumor spreading was found. At the same time, the specific MRI criteria for the different histological types of WT were not found. MRI is confirmed to be an accurate tool for diagnostic monitoring of patients with WT and other retroperitoneum neoplasms.

  7. Intrapelvic obturator internus muscle injections: a novel fluoroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Valovska, Assia; Zaccagnino, Michael P; Weaver, Michael J; Valovski, Ivan; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    The obturator internus (OI) muscle is important in adult chronic noninfectious pelvic, perineal, gluteal, and retrotrochanteric pain syndromes. Evaluation and management of these patients' pain can be challenging because of the complex anatomy of this region, broad differential diagnosis, and lack of specific physical examination findings. Consequently, several clinicians have advocated the use of image guided injections to assist in the accurate diagnosis of OI-related symptoms and provide symptomatic relief to affected patients. We present 2 case series describing a novel fluoroscopically guided contrast controlled transpectineal approach to intrapelvic OI injections. Unlike prior fluoroscopically guided OI injection techniques, the approach described in the present 2 cases utilized multiple standard pelvic views, thus facilitating optimal needle positioning in three-dimensional space. This technique utilized standard fluoroscopic pelvic views to accurately measure needle depth within the pelvic cavity permitting the bulk of the OI to be injected in a controlled and safe fashion. The first patient underwent a left intrapelvic OI muscle injection with bupivacaine 0.25% and 40 mg methylprednisolone. The average pre- and postprocedural visual analog pain scale scores were 5 out of 10 and 2 out of 10, respectively, with a self-reported 75% pain reduction. The second patient underwent a right intrapelvic OI muscle injection with bupivacaine 0.25% and 40 mg methylprednisolone. The average pre- and postprocedural visual analog scale scores were 8 out of 10 and 1 out of 10, respectively, with a self-reported 90% pain reduction. Larger scale studies should be undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and generalized accuracy of this technique.

  8. Structural Image Analysis of the Brain in Neuropsychology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain provides exceptional image quality for visualization and neuroanatomical classification of brain structure. A variety of image analysis techniques provide both qualitative as well as quantitative methods to relate brain structure with neuropsychological outcome and are reviewed herein. Of particular importance are more automated methods that permit analysis of a broad spectrum of anatomical measures including volume, thickness and shape. The challenge for neuropsychology is which metric to use, for which disorder and the timing of when image analysis methods are applied to assess brain structure and pathology. A basic overview is provided as to the anatomical and pathoanatomical relations of different MRI sequences in assessing normal and abnormal findings. Some interpretive guidelines are offered including factors related to similarity and symmetry of typical brain development along with size-normalcy features of brain anatomy related to function. The review concludes with a detailed example of various quantitative techniques applied to analyzing brain structure for neuropsychological outcome studies in traumatic brain injury.

  9. [The Diagnostic Value of Pre-Biopsy Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Detecting Prostate Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yoneyama, Shuko; Ishida, Hiroaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Kondo, Keiichi; Noguchi, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the value of pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting prostate cancer. We analyzed 267 men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 3-10 ng/ml who underwent systematic prostate needle biopsy. From April 2009 to March 2011, a total of 98 male patients underwent 16-core prostatic biopsies without pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (nonenforcement group). From April 2011 to March 2013, 169 men underwent pre-biopsy MRI [T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] (enforcement group). When MRI findings indicated cancer in the latter group, in addition to the systematic 16-core biopsy one or two targeted biopsies were performed. Patients without suspicious MRI findings underwent only systematic 16-core biopsy. Cancer detection rates in the nonenforcement and enforcement groups were 42.9% (48/92) and 46. 2% (78/169), respectively. The difference did not reach significance (p=0.612). Although the cancer detection rates were 39.4% (41/104) in the MRI-negative group and 56. 9% (37/65) in the MRI-positive group (p=0.039), the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection by MRI were relatively low: 47.4% and 69.2%, respectively. By receiver-operating curve analysis, the area under the curve for cancer detection by MRI was only 0.583. There were two study limitations. First, the patient sample size was small. Second, it is unclear whether an adequate sample of the suspicious lesion was obtained by biopsy. We thus demonstrated that it might be improper to base a diagnosis solely on pre-biopsy MRI (T2WI and DWI) findings in men with serum PSA levels of 3-10 ng/ml.

  10. Computer-assisted scheme for automated determination of imaging planes in cervical spinal cord MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumaki, Masaki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Sekiya, Masaru; Kazama, Kiyoko

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a computerized scheme to assist MRI operators in accurate and rapid determination of sagittal sections for MRI exam of cervical spinal cord. The algorithm of the proposed scheme consisted of 6 steps: (1) extraction of a cervical vertebra containing spinal cord from an axial localizer image; (2) extraction of spinal cord with sagittal image from the extracted vertebra; (3) selection of a series of coronal localizer images corresponding to various, involved portions of the extracted spinal cord with sagittal image; (4) generation of a composite coronal-plane image from the obtained coronal images; (5) extraction of spinal cord from the obtained composite image; (6) determination of oblique sagittal sections from the detected location and gradient of the extracted spinal cord. Cervical spine images obtained from 25 healthy volunteers were used for the study. A perceptual evaluation was performed by five experienced MRI operators. Good agreement between the automated and manual determinations was achieved. By use of the proposed scheme, average execution time was reduced from 39 seconds/case to 1 second/case. The results demonstrate that the proposed scheme can assist MRI operators in performing cervical spinal cord MRI exam accurately and rapidly.

  11. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging overlay to assist with percutaneous transhepatic access at the time of cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Wendy; Christensen, Jason; Zampi, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Multimodality image overlay is increasingly used for complex interventional procedures in the cardiac catheterization lab. We report a case in which three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI) overlay onto live fluoroscopic imaging was utilized to safely obtain transhepatic access in a 12-year-old patient with prune belly syndrome, complex and distorted abdominal anatomy, and a vascular mass within the liver.

  12. Free Radical Imaging Using In Vivo Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-MRI.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori

    2015-01-01

    Redox reactions that generate free radical intermediates are essential to metabolic processes, and their intermediates can produce reactive oxygen species, which may promote diseases related to oxidative stress. The development of an in vivo electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer and its imaging enables us noninvasive and direct measurement of in vivo free radical reactions in living organisms. The dynamic nuclear polarization magnetic resonance imaging (DNP-MRI), also called PEDRI or OMRI, is also a new imaging method for observing free radical species in vivo. The spatiotemporal resolution of free radical imaging with DNP-MRI is comparable with that in MRI, and each of the radical species can be distinguished in the spectroscopic images by changing the frequency or magnetic field of ESR irradiation. Several kinds of stable nitroxyl radicals were used as spin probes to detect in vivo redox reactions. The signal decay of nitroxyl probes, which is determined with in vivo DNP-MRI, reflects the redox status under oxidative stress, and the signal decay is suppressed by prior administration of antioxidants. In addition, DNP-MRI can also visualize various intermediate free radicals from the intrinsic redox molecules. This noninvasive method, in vivo DNP-MRI, could become a useful tool for investigating the mechanism of oxidative injuries in animal disease models and the in vivo effects of antioxidant drugs.

  13. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools—and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids’ apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas. PMID:24969421

  14. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools--and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids' apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas. PMID:24969421

  15. Reliability of Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Necessity of Repeating MRI in Noncooled and Cooled Infants With Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Miller, Steven P; Zwicker, Jill G; Xu, Qi; Wong, Darren S T; Roland, Elke H; Hill, Alan; Chau, Vann

    2016-04-01

    In cooled newborns with encephalopathy, although late magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan (10-14 days of age) is reliable in predicting long-term outcome, it is unknown whether early scan (3-6 days of life) is. We compared the predominant pattern and extent of lesion between early and late MRI in 89 term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-three neonates (48%) were cooled. The predominant pattern of lesions and the extent of lesion in the watershed region agreed near perfectly in noncooled (kappa = 0.94; k = 0.88) and cooled (k = 0.89; k = 0.87) infants respectively. There was perfect agreement in the extent of lesion in the basal nuclei in noncooled infants (k = 0.83) and excellent agreement in cooled infants (k = 0.67). Changes in extent of lesions on late MRI occurred in 19 of 89 infants, with higher risk in infants with hypoglycemia and moderate-severe lesions in basal nuclei. In most term neonates with neonatal encephalopathy, early MRI (relative to late scan) robustly predicts the predominant pattern and extent of injury.

  16. Major mouse placental compartments revealed by diffusion-weighted MRI, contrast-enhanced MRI, and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Eddy; Avni, Reut; Hadas, Ron; Raz, Tal; Garbow, Joel Richard; Bendel, Peter; Frydman, Lucio; Neeman, Michal

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian models, and mouse studies in particular, play a central role in our understanding of placental development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be a valuable tool to further these studies, providing both structural and functional information. As fluid dynamics throughout the placenta are driven by a variety of flow and diffusion processes, diffusion-weighted MRI could enhance our understanding of the exchange properties of maternal and fetal blood pools--and thereby of placental function. These studies, however, have so far been hindered by the small sizes, the unavoidable motions, and the challenging air/water/fat heterogeneities, associated with mouse placental environments. The present study demonstrates that emerging methods based on the spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) of the MRI information can robustly overcome these obstacles. Using SPEN MRI in combination with albumin-based contrast agents, we analyzed the diffusion behavior of developing placentas in a cohort of mice. These studies successfully discriminated the maternal from the fetal blood flows; the two orders of magnitude differences measured in these fluids' apparent diffusion coefficients suggest a nearly free diffusion behavior for the former and a strong flow-based component for the latter. An intermediate behavior was observed by these methods for a third compartment that, based on maternal albumin endocytosis, was associated with trophoblastic cells in the interphase labyrinth. Structural features associated with these dynamic measurements were consistent with independent intravital and ex vivo fluorescence microscopy studies and are discussed within the context of the anatomy of developing mouse placentas.

  17. The Rightful Role of MRI after Negative Conventional Imaging in the Management of Bloody Nipple Discharge.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Linda M; Daigle, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Nipple discharge is a frequent presenting complaint at breast clinics. Bloody nipple discharge (BND) has the highest risk of malignancy, albeit low. If mammogram and ultrasound are unrevealing, central duct excision (CDE) has been considered the gold standard in its management. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely confirmed as a highly sensitive test for detection of breast cancer, with an accompanying high negative predictive value. This article presents a retrospective review of patients with BND and negative conventional imaging, comparing outcome of patients who went directly to CDE without MRI to those patients who underwent preoperative MRI. Of 115 patients who underwent mammography and US alone prior to CDE, eight cancers were detected (seven ductal carcinoma in situ [DCIS] and 1 IDC, 7 mm [T1b]; incidence: 7%). Of 85 patients who underwent conventional imaging followed by MRI prior to surgery, eight cancers were detected (all DCIS; incidence: 9.4%), seven of which were identified by MRI. The one false-negative MRI had subtle findings which, in retrospect, were misinterpreted; however, a clinically apparent nipple lesion prompted surgical biopsy. Of 56 patients with a negative or benign MRI, CDE was negative for malignancy in all but that one patient. Sensitivity and specificity were 87.5%/71.4%. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value (NPV) were 24.1%/98.2%. MRI should be performed in all patients with BND and negative conventional imaging. The extremely high NPV of MRI suggests that a negative study could obviate CDE in most patients unless overriding clinical factors prevail. PMID:26684050

  18. Characterizing Response to Elemental Unit of Acoustic Imaging Noise: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic imaging noise produced during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies can hinder auditory fMRI research analysis by altering the properties of the acquired time-series data. Acoustic imaging noise can be especially confounding when estimating the time course of the hemodynamic response (HDR) in auditory event-related fMRI (fMRI) experiments. This study is motivated by the desire to establish a baseline function that can serve not only as a comparison to other quantities of acoustic imaging noise for determining how detrimental is one's experimental noise, but also as a foundation for a model that compensates for the response to acoustic imaging noise. Therefore, the amplitude and spatial extent of the HDR to the elemental unit of acoustic imaging noise (i.e., a single ping) associated with echoplanar acquisition were characterized and modeled. Results from this fMRI study at 1.5 T indicate that the group-averaged HDR in left and right auditory cortex to acoustic imaging noise (duration of 46 ms) has an estimated peak magnitude of 0.29% (right) to 0.48% (left) signal change from baseline, peaks between 3 and 5 s after stimulus presentation, and returns to baseline and remains within the noise range approximately 8 s after stimulus presentation. PMID:19304477

  19. A technique to consider mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources for fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging: a preliminary simulation study.

    PubMed

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2006-12-01

    fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging can be a powerful tool in studying human brain functions with enhanced spatial and temporal resolutions. Recent studies on the combination of fMRI and EEG/MEG have suggested that fMRI prior information could be readily implemented by simply imposing different weighting factors to cortical sources overlapping with the fMRI activations. It has been also reported, however, that such a hard constraint may cause severe distortions or elimination of meaningful EEG/MEG sources when there are distinct mismatches between the fMRI activations and the EEG/MEG sources. If one wants to obtain the actual EEG/MEG source locations and uses the fMRI prior information as just an auxiliary tool to enhance focality of the distributed EEG/MEG sources, it is reasonable to weaken the strength of fMRI constraint when severe mismatches between fMRI and EEG/MEG sources are observed. The present study suggests an efficient technique to automatically adjust the strength of fMRI constraint according to the mismatch level. The use of the proposed technique rarely affects the results of conventional fMRI-constrained EEG/MEG source imaging if no major mismatch between the two modalities is detected; while the new results become similar to those of typical EEG/MEG source imaging without fMRI constraint if the mismatch level is significant. A preliminary simulation study using realistic EEG signals demonstrated that the proposed technique can be a promising tool to selectively apply fMRI prior information to EEG/MEG source imaging.

  20. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  1. Human vision model for the objective evaluation of perceived image quality applied to MRI and image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Kyle A.; Wilson, David L.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a method to objectively quantify image quality and applying it to the optimization of interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI). In iMRI, images are used for live-time guidance of interventional procedures such as the minimally invasive treatment of cancer. Hence, not only does one desire high quality images, but they must also be acquired quickly. In iMRI, images are acquired in the Fourier domain, or k-space, and this allows many creative ways to image quickly such as keyhole imaging where k-space is preferentially subsampled, yielding suboptimal images at very high frame rates. Other techniques include spiral, radial, and the combined acquisition technique. We have built a perceptual difference model (PDM) that incorporates various components of the human visual system. The PDM was validated using subjective image quality ratings by naive observers and task-based measures defined by interventional radiologists. Using the PDM, we investigated the effects of various imaging parameters on image quality and quantified the degradation due to novel imaging techniques. Results have provided significant information about imaging time versus quality tradeoffs aiding the MR sequence engineer. The PDM has also been used to evaluate other applications such as Dixon fat suppressed MRI and image restoration. In image restoration, the PDM has been used to evaluate the Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) image restoration method and to examine the ability to appropriately determine a stopping condition for such iterative methods. The PDM has been shown to be an objective tool for measuring image quality and can be used to determine the optimal methodology for various imaging applications.

  2. [Radiation exposure from shoe-fitting fluoroscopes].

    PubMed

    Busch, Uwe

    2015-03-01

    It is 40 years ago that a very popular X-ray device disappeared in German shoe shops: the shoe-fitting fluoroscope or Pedoskop. Since the 1930s, these X-ray machines were an integral part of any good shoe business. Following the entry into force X-Ray Regulation (RöV 1973) the use of these devices was prohibited in Germany. PMID:25023417

  3. Imaging of the myocardium using (18)F-FDG-PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Ferda, Jiří; Hromádka, Milan; Baxa, Jan

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of the integrated hybrid PET/MRI equipment creates the possibility to perform PET and MRI simultaneously. Depending on the clinical question, the metabolic conversion to glycolytic activity or beta-oxidation is performed before the application of FDG. Since FDG aids to evaluate the energetic metabolism of the myocytes and myocardial MRI reaches the imaging capabilities of perfusion and tissue characterization in the daily routine, FDG-PET/MRI looks to be a promising method of PET/MRI exploitation in cardiac imaging. When myocardial FDG uptake should be evaluated in association with the perfusion distribution, the cross-evaluation of FDG accumulation distribution and perfusion distribution pattern is necessary. The different scenarios may be used in the assessment of myocardium, the conversion to glycolytic activity is used in the imaging of the viable myocardium, but the glycolytic activity suppression might be used in the indications of the identification of injured myocardium by ischemia or inflammation. FDG-PET/MRI might aid to answer the clinical tasks according to the structure, current function and possibilities to improve the function in ischemic heart disease or to display the extent or activity of myocardial inflammation in sarcoidosis. The tight coupling between metabolism, perfusion and contractile function offers an opportunity for the simultaneous assessment of cardiac performance using one imaging modality. PMID:27470994

  4. PET/MRI: THE NEXT GENERATION OF MULTI-MODALITY IMAGING?

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Bernd; Wehrl, Hans F; Kolb, Armin; Judenhofer, Martin S

    2009-01-01

    Multi-modal imaging is now well-established in routine clinical practice. Especially in the field of Nuclear Medicine, new PET installations are comprised almost exclusively of combined PET/CT scanners rather than PET-only systems. However, PET/CT has certain notable shortcomings, including the inability to perform simultaneous data acquisition and the significant radiation dose to the patient contributed by CT. MRI offers, compared to CT, better contrast among soft tissues as well as functional-imaging capabilities. Therefore, the combination of PET with MRI provides many advantages which go far beyond simply combining functional PET information with structural MRI information. Many technical challenges, including possible interference between these modalities, have to be solved when combining PET and MRI and various approaches have been adapted to resolving these issues. Here we present an overview of current working prototypes of combined PET/MRI scanners from different groups. In addition, besides PET/MR images of mice, the first such images of a rat PET/MR, acquired with the first commercial clinical PET/MRI scanner, are presented. The combination of PET and MR is a promising tool in pre-clinical research and will certainly progress to clinical application. PMID:18396179

  5. Imaging of the myocardium using (18)F-FDG-PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Ferda, Jiří; Hromádka, Milan; Baxa, Jan

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of the integrated hybrid PET/MRI equipment creates the possibility to perform PET and MRI simultaneously. Depending on the clinical question, the metabolic conversion to glycolytic activity or beta-oxidation is performed before the application of FDG. Since FDG aids to evaluate the energetic metabolism of the myocytes and myocardial MRI reaches the imaging capabilities of perfusion and tissue characterization in the daily routine, FDG-PET/MRI looks to be a promising method of PET/MRI exploitation in cardiac imaging. When myocardial FDG uptake should be evaluated in association with the perfusion distribution, the cross-evaluation of FDG accumulation distribution and perfusion distribution pattern is necessary. The different scenarios may be used in the assessment of myocardium, the conversion to glycolytic activity is used in the imaging of the viable myocardium, but the glycolytic activity suppression might be used in the indications of the identification of injured myocardium by ischemia or inflammation. FDG-PET/MRI might aid to answer the clinical tasks according to the structure, current function and possibilities to improve the function in ischemic heart disease or to display the extent or activity of myocardial inflammation in sarcoidosis. The tight coupling between metabolism, perfusion and contractile function offers an opportunity for the simultaneous assessment of cardiac performance using one imaging modality.

  6. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, I.; Cornelissen, S. A. P.; Duppen, J. C.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Herk, M. van; Steenbakkers, R. J. H. M.; Peeters, S. T. H.; Hoebers, F. J. P.; Kaanders, J. H. A. M.; Nowak, P. J. C. M.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a delineation tool that refines physician-drawn contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in nasopharynx cancer, using combined pixel value information from x-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during delineation. Methods: Operator-guided delineation assisted by a so-called ''snake'' algorithm was applied on weighted CT-MRI registered images. The physician delineates a rough tumor contour that is continuously adjusted by the snake algorithm using the underlying image characteristics. The algorithm was evaluated on five nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Different linear weightings CT and MRI were tested as input for the snake algorithm and compared according to contrast and tumor to noise ratio (TNR). The semi-automatic delineation was compared with manual contouring by seven experienced radiation oncologists. Results: A good compromise for TNR and contrast was obtained by weighing CT twice as strong as MRI. The new algorithm did not notably reduce interobserver variability, it did however, reduce the average delineation time by 6 min per case. Conclusions: The authors developed a user-driven tool for delineation and correction based a snake algorithm and registered weighted CT image and MRI. The algorithm adds morphological information from CT during the delineation on MRI and accelerates the delineation task.

  7. Tracing and quantification of pharmaceuticals using MR imaging and spectroscopy at clinical MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun-Kee; Liu, Xin; Shi, Xianfeng; Yu, Y. Bruce; Lu, Zeng-Rong

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) is very powerful modality for imaging and localized investigation of biological tissue. Medical MRI measures nuclear magnetization of the water protons, which consists of 70 % of our body. MRI provides superior contrast among different soft tissues to all other existing medical imaging modalities, including ultrasound, X-ray CT, PET, and SPECT. In principle, MRI/S may be an ideal non-invasive tool for drug delivery research. However, because of its low sensitivity, a large dose is required for tracing pharmaceuticals. Therefore, its use for imaging of pharmaceuticals is very limited mostly to molecules that contain a paramagnetic metal ion, such as gadolinium (Gd3+) and manganese (Mn2+). The paramagnetic metal ion provides a large fluctuating magnetic field at the proton in the water molecule via a coordinate site. The measurement of local drug concentration is the first step for further quantification. Local concentration of the paramagnetic-ion based MRI contrast agent can be indirectly measured via the change in the water signal intensity. 19F MRI/S of fluorinated complex may be an option for drug delivery and tracing agent, because the fluorinated molecule may be directly detected due to its large magnetic moment (94 % of proton) and 100 % abundance.

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of registered and fused Chinese Visible Human and patient MRI images.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Liu, Y X; Song, Z J

    2006-04-01

    Radiological images are commonly used as important tools in medical diagnoses and treatment. Different modalities of medical images provide uniquely different content. Hence, it is natural and desirable to combine different image modalities to obtain additional new information to enhance clinical assessment. However, given the current technology, radiological images are not always sufficiently informative to permit diagnosis and treatment. In order to address this problem, we fused selected portions of the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset with MRI images from a patient. Specifically, we segmented the caudate nucleus, the lentiform nucleus, and the thalamus in the CVH dataset and then registered and fused this dataset with corresponding MRI images using both rigid and nonrigid registration techniques. After rigid and nonrigid registration, the CVH and MRI images largely coincided with each other. The shape, relationship, and position of focal areas and neural structures were clearly displayed. Using volume and surface rendering, these images were three-dimensionally reconstructed to display the neural structures of interest within the brain. These structures can be rotated at will and observed from different angles. Our research indicates that the fusion of CVH and patients' MRI images can enhance the amount of neural information available to physicians and lay a foundation for the clinical use of the CVH dataset. PMID:16506210

  9. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  10. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  11. Electrical tissue property imaging using MRI at dc and Larmor frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Joonsung; In Kwon, Oh; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-08-01

    Cross-sectional imaging of conductivity and permittivity distributions inside the human body has been actively investigated in impedance imaging areas such as electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and magnetic induction tomography (MIT). Since the conductivity and permittivity values exhibit frequency-dependent changes, it is worthwhile to perform spectroscopic imaging from almost dc to hundreds of MHz. To probe the human body, we may inject current using surface electrodes or induce current using external coils. In EIT and MIT, measured data are only available on the boundary or exterior of the body unless we invasively place sensors inside the body. Their image reconstruction problems are nonlinear and ill-posed to result in images with a relatively low spatial resolution. Noting that an MRI scanner can noninvasively measure magnetic fields inside the human body, electrical tissue property imaging methods using MRI have lately been proposed. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) performs conductivity imaging at dc or below 1 kHz by externally injecting current into the human body and measuring induced internal magnetic flux density data using an MRI scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) produces both conductivity and permittivity images at the Larmor frequency of an MRI scanner based on B1-mapping techniques. Since internal data are only available in MREIT and MREPT, we may formulate well-posed inverse problems for image reconstructions. To develop related imaging techniques, we should clearly understand the basic principles of MREIT and MREPT, which are based on coupled physics of bioelectromagnetism and MRI as well as associated mathematical methods. In this paper, we describe the physical principles of MREIT and MREPT in a unified way and associate measurable quantities with the conductivity and permittivity. Clarifying the key relations among them, we examine existing image reconstruction algorithms to reveal their capabilities and

  12. Diagnoses in Pediatric Patients With Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Lesions Suspicious for Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael L; Kukreja, Marcia; Horn, Paul S; Standridge, Shannon M

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in pediatric patients frequently show abnormal white matter lesions, which may be concerning for demyelinating disease. This study aimed to determine the proportion of pediatric patients who have MRI lesions concerning for demyelinating disease at presentation and ultimately are diagnosed with a primary central nervous system demyelinating disease. A retrospective chart review was performed on MRI reports of patients who underwent imaging evaluation at a single tertiary pediatric hospital. Of 299 patients identified, 192 presented with acute neurologic complaints. In this group, ≥ 5 discrete lesions, African American race, and having brain stem, thalamic, cerebellar, or optic nerve lesions was associated with the patient being diagnosed with a disease that required further treatment. The other 107 patients underwent MRI for other indications. Among these subjects, having lesions within the corpus callosum or cerebellum was associated with being diagnosed with a disease requiring further treatment.

  13. In-vivo human brain molecular imaging with a brain-dedicated PET/MRI system.

    PubMed

    Cho, Zang Hee; Son, Young Don; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Hang Keun; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Yoon; Ogawa, Seiji; Kim, Young Bo

    2013-02-01

    Advances in the new-generation of ultra-high-resolution, brain-dedicated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) systems have begun to provide many interesting insights into the molecular dynamics of the brain. First, the finely delineated structural information from ultra-high-field MRI can help us to identify accurate landmark structures, thereby making it easier to locate PET activation sites that are anatomically well-correlated with metabolic or ligand-specific organs in the neural structures in the brain. This synergistic potential of PET/MRI imaging is discussed in terms of neuroscience and neurological research from both translational and basic research perspectives. Experimental results from the hippocampus, thalamus, and brainstem obtained with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and (11)C-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)benzonitrile are used to demonstrate the potential of this new brain PET/MRI system.

  14. Congruent MRI and near-infrared spectroscopy for functional and structural imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Gultekin; Yu, Hon; Wang, Jun; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Merritt, Sean; Bevilacqua, Frederic; Durkin, Anthony J; Cuccia, David J; Lanning, Ryan; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2002-12-01

    We present a combined near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system for the study of animal model tumors. A combined broadband steady-state and frequency domain optical spectroscopy apparatus was integrated with the MRI. The physiological properties of tissue rendered by MRI, including vascular volume fraction and water, were compared with chromophore concentrations as determined from the parameters obtained by optical measurements. DOS measurements provided oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, and water concentration locally in tumors. A method for co-registration of the information obtained by both modalities was developed. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the optically sampled volume was superimposed on the MR images, illustrating which tissue structure was probed optically. Finally, two optical contrast agents, indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB), were employed and their kinetics were measured by DOS system from different locations on the tumor and compared with Gd-DTPA enhancement maps obtained from MRI.

  15. Interpreting Intervention Induced Neuroplasticity with fMRI: The Case for Multimodal Imaging Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Lee B.; Boyd, Roslyn N.; Cunnington, Ross; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurement of recovery from brain injury is an important goal in neurorehabilitation, and requires reliable, objective, and interpretable measures of changes in brain function, referred to generally as “neuroplasticity.” One popular imaging modality for measuring neuroplasticity is task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (t-fMRI). In the field of neurorehabilitation, however, assessing neuroplasticity using t-fMRI presents a significant challenge. This commentary reviews t-fMRI changes commonly reported in patients with cerebral palsy or acquired brain injuries, with a focus on studies of motor rehabilitation, and discusses complexities surrounding their interpretations. Specifically, we discuss the difficulties in interpreting t-fMRI changes in terms of their underlying causes, that is, differentiating whether they reflect genuine reorganisation, neurological restoration, compensation, use of preexisting redundancies, changes in strategy, or maladaptive processes. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of heterogeneous disease states and essential t-fMRI processing steps on the interpretability of activation patterns. To better understand therapy-induced neuroplastic changes, we suggest that researchers utilising t-fMRI consider concurrently acquiring information from an additional modality, to quantify, for example, haemodynamic differences or microstructural changes. We outline a variety of such supplementary measures for investigating brain reorganisation and discuss situations in which they may prove beneficial to the interpretation of t-fMRI data. PMID:26839711

  16. 2D dose distribution images of a hybrid low field MRI-γ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, A.; Agulles-Pedrós, L.

    2016-07-01

    The proposed hybrid system is a combination of a low field MRI and dosimetric gel as a γ detector. The readout system is based on the polymerization process induced by the gel radiation. A gel dose map is obtained which represents the functional part of hybrid image alongside with the anatomical MRI one. Both images should be taken while the patient with a radiopharmaceutical is located inside the MRI system with a gel detector matrix. A relevant aspect of this proposal is that the dosimetric gel has never been used to acquire medical images. The results presented show the interaction of the 99mTc source with the dosimetric gel simulated in Geant4. The purpose was to obtain the planar γ 2D-image. The different source configurations are studied to explore the ability of the gel as radiation detector through the following parameters; resolution, shape definition and radio-pharmaceutical concentration.

  17. Multispectral image classification of MRI data using an empirically-derived clustering algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Osbourn, G.C.; Bouchard, A.M.; Sanders, J.A. |

    1998-08-01

    Multispectral image analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has been performed using an empirically-derived clustering algorithm. This algorithm groups image pixels into distinct classes which exhibit similar response in the T{sub 2} 1st and 2nd-echo, and T{sub 1} (with ad without gadolinium) MRI images. The grouping is performed in an n-dimensional mathematical space; the n-dimensional volumes bounding each class define each specific tissue type. The classification results are rendered again in real-space by colored-coding each grouped class of pixels (associated with differing tissue types). This classification method is especially well suited for class volumes with complex boundary shapes, and is also expected to robustly detect abnormal tissue classes. The classification process is demonstrated using a three dimensional data set of MRI scans of a human brain tumor.

  18. Effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the formation of mouse dentin and bone

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong-Hing, A.; Sandhu, H.S.; Prato, F.S.; Frappier, J.R.; Kavaliers, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on dentin and bone formation in mice were examined using standard autoradiographic and liquid scintillation procedures. It was observed that exposure to a standard 23.2 min clinical multislice MRI (0.15T) procedure caused a significant increase in the synthesis of the collagenous matrix of dentin in the incisors of mice. There were no significant effects on alveolar and tibial bone matrix synthesis. These results suggest that the magnetic fields associated with MRI can affect the activity of cells and/or tissues that are involved in rapid synthetic activity.

  19. High-resolution MRI of spinal cords by compressive sensing parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng Li; Xiangdong Yu; Griffin, Jay; Levine, Jonathan M; Jim Ji

    2015-08-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a common injury due to diseases or accidents. Noninvasive imaging methods play a critical role in diagnosing SCI and monitoring the response to therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), by the virtue of providing excellent soft tissue contrast, is the most promising imaging method for this application. However, spinal cord has a very small cross-section, which needs high-resolution images for better visualization and diagnosis. Acquiring high-resolution spinal cord MRI images requires long acquisition time due to the physical and physiological constraints. Moreover, long acquisition time makes MRI more susceptible to motion artifacts. In this paper, we studied the application of compressive sensing (CS) and parallel imaging to achieve high-resolution imaging from sparsely sampled and reduced k-space data acquired by parallel receive arrays. In particular, the studies are limited to the effects of 2D Cartesian sampling with different subsampling schemes and reduction factors. The results show that compressive sensing parallel MRI has the potential to provide high-resolution images of the spinal cord in 1/3 of the acquisition time required by the conventional methods.

  20. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  1. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianhua; Chu-Shern Lim, Jason; Townsend, David W.

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and 18F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data.

  2. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method

    PubMed Central

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies. PMID:26330231

  3. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method.

    PubMed

    Ngen, Ethel J; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-09-02

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies.

  4. Three-dimensional, in vivo MRI with self-gating and image coregistration in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Brian J; Szulc, Kamila U; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2009-05-01

    Motion during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans routinely results in undesirable image artifact or blurring. Since high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the mouse requires long scan times for satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality, motion-related artifacts are likely over much of the body and limit applications of mouse MRI. In this investigation, we explored the use of self-gated imaging methods and image coregistration for improving image quality in the presence of motion. Self-gated signal results from a modified 3D gradient-echo sequence showed detection of periodic respiratory and cardiac motion in the adult mouse-with excellent comparison to traditional measurements, sensitivity to respiration-induced tissue changes in the brain, and even detection of embryonic cardiac motion in utero. Serial image coregistration with rapidly-acquired, low-SNR volumes further enabled detection and correction of bulk changes in embryo location during in utero imaging sessions and subsequent reconstruction of high-quality images. These methods, in combination, are shown to expand the range of applications for 3D mouse MRI, enabling late-stage embryonic heart imaging and introducing the possibility of longitudinal developmental studies from embryonic stages through adulthood.

  5. High resolution MRI imaging at 1. 5T using surface coils

    SciTech Connect

    Blinder, R.A.; Herfkens, R.J.; Coleman, R.E.; Johnson, G.A.; Schenck, J.F.; Hart, H.R. Jr.; Foster, T.H.; Edelstein, W.A.

    1985-05-01

    The potential utility of high resolution MRI imaging in various pathologic conditions was explored. As the voxel size of MRI images is decreased the signal per pixel diminishes due to the geometric decrease in volume. In very high resolution images the signal can be small enough to be obscured by Johnson noise. High magnetic field strength (1.5T) coupled with surface coil imaging increases the signal to noise ratio. The surface coils used were single turn coils with diameters of 6 or 11 cm depending on the body part being imaged. A ''clam shell'' crossed coil was used for imaging the knees. Using a 1.5T prototype MRI imaging system we have obtained images with 14.5 cm field of view that are 256 by 256 pixels with a slice thickness of 3 mm. Good signal to noise is obtained using 2DTF imaging with only 2 excitations per phase encoding step (1 average). Images obtained of peripheral joints demonstrate articular cartilage, ligamentous structures, and trabeculae in medullary bone. These exams have demonstrated the changes of rheumatoid arthritis, and the extent of neoplastic involvement in bone. Images of the temporomandibular joint and the neck have been obtained. Parathyroid adenomas have been identified. Surface coil imaging and high magnetic fields allow for high resolution MRI imaging of various anatomic structures. Good signal to noise can be accomplished without extensive signal averaging so that reasonable imaging times and throughput can be realized with voxel dimensions of 0.6 x 0.6 x 3mm.

  6. Volumetric BOLD fMRI simulation: from neurovascular coupling to multivoxel imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) modality has been numerically simulated by calculating single voxel signals. However, the observation on single voxel signals cannot provide information regarding the spatial distribution of the signals. Specifically, a single BOLD voxel signal simulation cannot answer the fundamental question: is the magnetic resonance (MR) image a replica of its underling magnetic susceptibility source? In this paper, we address this problem by proposing a multivoxel volumetric BOLD fMRI simulation model and a susceptibility expression formula for linear neurovascular coupling process, that allow us to examine the BOLD fMRI procedure from neurovascular coupling to MR image formation. Methods Since MRI technology only senses the magnetism property, we represent a linear neurovascular-coupled BOLD state by a magnetic susceptibility expression formula, which accounts for the parameters of cortical vasculature, intravascular blood oxygenation level, and local neuroactivity. Upon the susceptibility expression of a BOLD state, we carry out volumetric BOLD fMRI simulation by calculating the fieldmap (established by susceptibility magnetization) and the complex multivoxel MR image (by intravoxel dephasing). Given the predefined susceptibility source and the calculated complex MR image, we compare the MR magnitude (phase, respectively) image with the predefined susceptibility source (the calculated fieldmap) by spatial correlation. Results The spatial correlation between the MR magnitude image and the magnetic susceptibility source is about 0.90 for the settings of TE = 30 ms, B0 = 3 T, voxel size = 100 micron, vessel radius = 3 micron, and blood volume fraction = 2%. Using these parameters value, the spatial correlation between the MR phase image and the susceptibility-induced fieldmap is close to 1.00. Conclusion Our simulation results show that the MR magnitude image is not an exact

  7. Single element ultrasonic imaging of limb geometry: an in-vivo study with comparison to MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Fincke, Jonathan R.; Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Despite advancements in medical imaging, current prosthetic fitting methods remain subjective, operator dependent, and non-repeatable. The standard plaster casting method relies on prosthetist experience and tactile feel of the limb to design the prosthetic socket. Often times, many fitting iterations are required to achieve an acceptable fit. Use of improper socket fittings can lead to painful pathologies including neuromas, inflammation, soft tissue calcification, and pressure sores, often forcing the wearer to into a wheelchair and reducing mobility and quality of life. Computer software along with MRI/CT imaging has already been explored to aid the socket design process. In this paper, we explore the use of ultrasound instead of MRI/CT to accurately obtain the underlying limb geometry to assist the prosthetic socket design process. Using a single element ultrasound system, multiple subjects' proximal limbs were imaged using 1, 2.25, and 5 MHz single element transducers. Each ultrasound transducer was calibrated to ensure acoustic exposure within the limits defined by the FDA. To validate image quality, each patient was also imaged in an MRI. Fiducial markers visible in both MRI and ultrasound were used to compare the same limb cross-sectional image for each patient. After applying a migration algorithm, B-mode ultrasound cross-sections showed sufficiently high image resolution to characterize the skin and bone boundaries along with the underlying tissue structures.

  8. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios.

    PubMed

    Hasselwander, Christopher J; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately $2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs. PMID:27394165

  9. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios.

    PubMed

    Hasselwander, Christopher J; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately $2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  10. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselwander, Christopher J.; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5 Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately 2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500 kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  11. Reconstruction of 7T-Like Images From 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Khosro; Shi, Feng; Zong, Xiaopeng; Shin, Hae Won; An, Hongyu; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    In the recent MRI scanning, ultra-high-field (7T) MR imaging provides higher resolution and better tissue contrast compared to routine 3T MRI, which may help in more accurate and early brain diseases diagnosis. However, currently, 7T MRI scanners are more expensive and less available at clinical and research centers. These motivate us to propose a method for the reconstruction of images close to the quality of 7T MRI, called 7T-like images, from 3T MRI, to improve the quality in terms of resolution and contrast. By doing so, the post-processing tasks, such as tissue segmentation, can be done more accurately and brain tissues details can be seen with higher resolution and contrast. To do this, we have acquired a unique dataset which includes paired 3T and 7T images scanned from same subjects, and then propose a hierarchical reconstruction based on group sparsity in a novel multi-level Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) space, to improve the quality of 3T MR image to be 7T-like MRI. First, overlapping patches are extracted from the input 3T MR image. Then, by extracting the most similar patches from all the aligned 3T and 7T images in the training set, the paired 3T and 7T dictionaries are constructed for each patch. It is worth noting that, for the training, we use pairs of 3T and 7T MR images from each training subject. Then, we propose multi-level CCA to map the paired 3T and 7T patch sets to a common space to increase their correlations. In such space, each input 3T MRI patch is sparsely represented by the 3T dictionary and then the obtained sparse coefficients are used together with the corresponding 7T dictionary to reconstruct the 7T-like patch. Also, to have the structural consistency between adjacent patches, the group sparsity is employed. This reconstruction is performed with changing patch sizes in a hierarchical framework. Experiments have been done using 13 subjects with both 3T and 7T MR images. The results show that our method outperforms previous

  12. Reconstruction of 7T-Like Images From 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Khosro; Shi, Feng; Zong, Xiaopeng; Shin, Hae Won; An, Hongyu; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    In the recent MRI scanning, ultra-high-field (7T) MR imaging provides higher resolution and better tissue contrast compared to routine 3T MRI, which may help in more accurate and early brain diseases diagnosis. However, currently, 7T MRI scanners are more expensive and less available at clinical and research centers. These motivate us to propose a method for the reconstruction of images close to the quality of 7T MRI, called 7T-like images, from 3T MRI, to improve the quality in terms of resolution and contrast. By doing so, the post-processing tasks, such as tissue segmentation, can be done more accurately and brain tissues details can be seen with higher resolution and contrast. To do this, we have acquired a unique dataset which includes paired 3T and 7T images scanned from same subjects, and then propose a hierarchical reconstruction based on group sparsity in a novel multi-level Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) space, to improve the quality of 3T MR image to be 7T-like MRI. First, overlapping patches are extracted from the input 3T MR image. Then, by extracting the most similar patches from all the aligned 3T and 7T images in the training set, the paired 3T and 7T dictionaries are constructed for each patch. It is worth noting that, for the training, we use pairs of 3T and 7T MR images from each training subject. Then, we propose multi-level CCA to map the paired 3T and 7T patch sets to a common space to increase their correlations. In such space, each input 3T MRI patch is sparsely represented by the 3T dictionary and then the obtained sparse coefficients are used together with the corresponding 7T dictionary to reconstruct the 7T-like patch. Also, to have the structural consistency between adjacent patches, the group sparsity is employed. This reconstruction is performed with changing patch sizes in a hierarchical framework. Experiments have been done using 13 subjects with both 3T and 7T MR images. The results show that our method outperforms previous

  13. Strain Rate Tensor Estimation in Cine Cardiac MRI Based on Elastic Image Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo Vegas; Vega, Antonio Tristán; Grande, Lucilio Cordero; de La Higuera, Pablo Casaseca; Fernández, Santiago Aja; Fernández, Marcos Martín; López, Carlos Alberola

    In this work we propose an alternative method to estimate and visualize the Strain Rate Tensor (SRT) in Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) when Phase Contrast MRI (PCMRI) and Tagged MRI (TMRI) are not available. This alternative is based on image processing techniques. Concretely, image registration algorithms are used to estimate the movement of the myocardium at each point. Additionally, a consistency checking method is presented to validate the accuracy of the estimates when no golden standard is available. Results prove that the consistency checking method provides an upper bound of the mean squared error of the estimate. Our experiments with real data show that the registration algorithm provides a useful deformation field to estimate the SRT fields. A classification between regional normal and dysfunctional contraction patterns, as compared with experts diagnosis, points out that the parameters extracted from the estimated SRT can represent these patterns. Additionally, a scheme for visualizing and analyzing the local behavior of the SRT field is presented.

  14. Identification and description of the axillary web syndrome (AWS) by clinical signs, MRI and US imaging.

    PubMed

    Leduc, O; Fumière, E; Banse, S; Vandervorst, C; Clément, A; Parijs, T; Wilputte, F; Maquerlot, F; Ezquer Echandia, M; Tinlot, A; Leduc, A

    2014-12-01

    The Axillary Web Syndrome (AWS) follows surgery for breast neoplasia and consists of one, or more frequently two or three, cords of subcutaneous tissue. Cords originate from the axilla, spread to the antero-medial surface of the arm down to the elbow and then move into the antero-medial aspect of the forearm and sometimes into the root of the thumb. The purpose of this study was to compare two techniques, ultrasound (US) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for their sensitivity and accuracy in identifying AWS cords and to provide insights to the origin of this pathology. US examinations were performed on fifteen patients using a high frequency probe (17 MHz). We first palpated and marked the cord with location aided by maximum abduction. To identify the cord with MRI (1.5 Tesla), a catheter filled with a gel detectable under MRI was placed on the skin at the site of the cord. We found that in some US cases, the dynamic abduction maneuver was essential to facilitate detection of the cord. This dynamic method on ultrasound confirmed the precise location of the cord even if it was located deeper in the hypodermis fascia junction. US and MRI images revealed features of the cords and surrounding tissues. Imaging the cords was difficult with either of the imaging modalities. However, US seemed to be more efficient than MRI and allowed dynamic evaluation. Overall analysis of our study results supports a lymphatic origin of the AWS cord.

  15. Identification and description of the axillary web syndrome (AWS) by clinical signs, MRI and US imaging.

    PubMed

    Leduc, O; Fumière, E; Banse, S; Vandervorst, C; Clément, A; Parijs, T; Wilputte, F; Maquerlot, F; Ezquer Echandia, M; Tinlot, A; Leduc, A

    2014-12-01

    The Axillary Web Syndrome (AWS) follows surgery for breast neoplasia and consists of one, or more frequently two or three, cords of subcutaneous tissue. Cords originate from the axilla, spread to the antero-medial surface of the arm down to the elbow and then move into the antero-medial aspect of the forearm and sometimes into the root of the thumb. The purpose of this study was to compare two techniques, ultrasound (US) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for their sensitivity and accuracy in identifying AWS cords and to provide insights to the origin of this pathology. US examinations were performed on fifteen patients using a high frequency probe (17 MHz). We first palpated and marked the cord with location aided by maximum abduction. To identify the cord with MRI (1.5 Tesla), a catheter filled with a gel detectable under MRI was placed on the skin at the site of the cord. We found that in some US cases, the dynamic abduction maneuver was essential to facilitate detection of the cord. This dynamic method on ultrasound confirmed the precise location of the cord even if it was located deeper in the hypodermis fascia junction. US and MRI images revealed features of the cords and surrounding tissues. Imaging the cords was difficult with either of the imaging modalities. However, US seemed to be more efficient than MRI and allowed dynamic evaluation. Overall analysis of our study results supports a lymphatic origin of the AWS cord. PMID:25915977

  16. Multimodal imaging with hybrid semiconductor detectors Timepix for an experimental MRI-SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajicek, J.; Jakubek, J.; Burian, M.; Vobecky, M.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of clinical applications are being based on multimodal imaging systems (MIS), including anatomical (CT, MRI) and functional (PET, SPECT) techniques to provide complex information in a single image. CT with one of the scintigraphic methods (PET or SPECT) is nowadays a combination of choice for clinical practice and it is mostly used in cardiography and tumour diagnostics. Combination with MRI is also being implemented as no radiation dose is imparted to the patient and it is possible to gain higher structural resolution of soft tissues (brain imaging). A major disadvantage of such systems is inability to operate scintillators with photomultipliers (used for detection of γ rays) in presence of high magnetic fields. In this work we present the application of the semiconductor pixel detector for SPECT method in combination with MR imaging. We propose a novel approach based on MRI compatible setup with CdTe pixel sensor Timepix and non-conductive collimator. Measurements were performed on high proton-density (PD) phantom (1H) with an embedded radioisotopic source inside the shielded RF coil by MRI animal scanner (4.7 T). Our results pave the way for a combined MRI-SPECT system. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  17. Evaluation of image quality of MRI data for brain tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckel, Frank; Arlt, Felix; Geisler, Benjamin; Zidowitz, Stephan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    3D medical images are important components of modern medicine. Their usefulness for the physician depends on their quality, though. Only high-quality images allow accurate and reproducible diagnosis and appropriate support during treatment. We have analyzed 202 MRI images for brain tumor surgery in a retrospective study. Both an experienced neurosurgeon and an experienced neuroradiologist rated each available image with respect to its role in the clinical workflow, its suitability for this specific role, various image quality characteristics, and imaging artifacts. Our results show that MRI data acquired for brain tumor surgery does not always fulfill the required quality standards and that there is a significant disagreement between the surgeon and the radiologist, with the surgeon being more critical. Noise, resolution, as well as the coverage of anatomical structures were the most important criteria for the surgeon, while the radiologist was mainly disturbed by motion artifacts.

  18. Visualising uncertainty: Examining women's views on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kate; Kochetkova, Inna; Whitby, Elspeth

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal screening occupies a prominent role within sociological debates on medical uncertainty. A particular issue concerns the limitations of routine screening which tends to be based on risk prediction. Computer assisted visual technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are now starting to be applied to the prenatal realm to assist in the diagnosis of a range of fetal and maternal disorders (from problems with the fetal brain to the placenta). MRI is often perceived in popular and medical discourse as a technology of certainty and truth. However, little is known about the use of MRI as a tool to confirm or refute the diagnosis of a range of disorders in pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research with pregnant women attending a fetal medicine clinic in the North of England this paper examines the potential role that MRI can play in mediating pregnancy uncertainty. The paper will argue that MRI can create and manage women's feelings of uncertainty during pregnancy. However, while MRI may not always provide women with unequivocal answers, the detailed information provided by MR images combined with the interpretation and communication skills of the radiologist in many ways enables women to navigate the issue. Our analysis of empirical data therefore highlights the value of this novel technological application for women and their partners. It also seeks to stress the merit of taking a productive approach to the study of diagnostic uncertainty, an approach which recognises the concepts dual nature. PMID:27451338

  19. Visualising uncertainty: Examining women's views on the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kate; Kochetkova, Inna; Whitby, Elspeth

    2016-09-01

    Prenatal screening occupies a prominent role within sociological debates on medical uncertainty. A particular issue concerns the limitations of routine screening which tends to be based on risk prediction. Computer assisted visual technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are now starting to be applied to the prenatal realm to assist in the diagnosis of a range of fetal and maternal disorders (from problems with the fetal brain to the placenta). MRI is often perceived in popular and medical discourse as a technology of certainty and truth. However, little is known about the use of MRI as a tool to confirm or refute the diagnosis of a range of disorders in pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research with pregnant women attending a fetal medicine clinic in the North of England this paper examines the potential role that MRI can play in mediating pregnancy uncertainty. The paper will argue that MRI can create and manage women's feelings of uncertainty during pregnancy. However, while MRI may not always provide women with unequivocal answers, the detailed information provided by MR images combined with the interpretation and communication skills of the radiologist in many ways enables women to navigate the issue. Our analysis of empirical data therefore highlights the value of this novel technological application for women and their partners. It also seeks to stress the merit of taking a productive approach to the study of diagnostic uncertainty, an approach which recognises the concepts dual nature.

  20. MRI reporter genes: applications for imaging of cell survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vandsburger, Moriel H; Radoul, Marina; Cohen, Batya; Neeman, Michal

    2013-07-01

    Molecular imaging strives to detect molecular events at the level of the whole organism. In some cases, the molecule of interest can be detected either directly or with targeted contrast media. However many genes and proteins and particularly those located in intracellular compartments are not accessible for targeted agents. The transcriptional regulation of these genes can nevertheless be detected, although indirectly, using reporter gene encoding for readily detectable proteins. Such reporter proteins can be expressed in the tissue of interest by genetically introducing the reporter gene in the target cells. Imaging of reporter genes has become a powerful tool in modern biomedical research. Typically, expression of fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins and the reaction product of expressed enzymes and exogenous substrates were examined using in vitro histological methods and in vivo whole body imaging methods. Recent advances in MRI reporter gene methods raised the possibility that MRI could become a powerful tool for concomitant high-resolution anatomical and functional imaging and for imaging of reporter gene activity. An immediate application of MRI reporter gene methods was by monitoring gene expression patterns in gene therapy and in vivo imaging of the survival, proliferation, migration and differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent cells used in cell-based regenerative therapies for cancer, myocardial infarction and neural degeneration. In this review, we characterized a variety of MRI reporter gene methods based on their applicability to report cell survival/proliferation, migration and differentiation. In particular, we discussed which methods were best suited for translation to clinical use in regenerative therapies.

  1. Carotid plaque characterization using CT and MRI scans for synergistic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzin, Matthew; Xu, Yiqin; Rao, Arhant; Madi, Saaussan; Bahadur, Ali; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive determination of plaque vulnerability has been a holy grail of medical imaging. Despite advances in tomographic technologies , there is currently no effective way to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with high sensitivity and specificity. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used, but neither provides sufficient information of plaque properties. Thus, we are motivated to combine CT and MRI imaging to determine if the composite information can better reflect the histological determination of plaque vulnerability. Two human endarterectomy specimens (1 symptomatic carotid and 1 stable femoral) were imaged using Scanco Medical Viva CT40 and Bruker Pharmascan 16cm 7T Horizontal MRI / MRS systems. μCT scans were done at 55 kVp and tube current of 70 mA. Samples underwent RARE-VTR and MSME pulse sequences to measure T1, T2 values, and proton density. The specimens were processed for histology and scored for vulnerability using the American Heart Association criteria. Single modality-based analyses were performed through segmentation of key imaging biomarkers (i.e. calcification and lumen), image registration, measurement of fibrous capsule, and multi-component T1 and T2 decay modeling. Feature differences were analyzed between the unstable and stable controls, symptomatic carotid and femoral plaque, respectively. By building on the techniques used in this study, synergistic CT+MRI analysis may provide a promising solution for plaque characterization in vivo.

  2. Plain radiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Which is better in assessing outcome in clinical trials of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs? Summary of a debate held at the World Congress of Osteoarthritis 2014.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Felix; Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common disease of synovial joints and currently lacks treatment options that modify structural pathology. Imaging is ideally suited for directly evaluating efficacy of disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs) in clinical trials, with plain radiography and MRI being most often applied. The current article is based on a debate held on April 26, 2014, at the World Congress of Osteoarthritis: The authors were invited to contrast strengths and limitations of both methods, highlighting scientific evidence on reliability, construct-validity, and correlations with clinical outcome, and comparing their sensitivity to change in knee OA and sensitivity to DMOAD treatment. The authors concluded that MRI provides more comprehensive information on articular tissues pathology, and that implementation of radiography in clinical trials remains a challenge. However, neither technique has thus far been demonstrated to be strongly superior over the other; for the time being it therefore appears advisable to use both in parallel in clinical trials, to provide more evidence on their relative performance. Radiographic JSW strongly depends on adequate positioning; it is not specific to cartilage loss but also to the meniscus. MRI provides somewhat superior sensitivity to change compared with the commonly used non-fluoroscopic radiographic acquisition protocols, and has recently provided non-location-dependent measures of cartilage thickness loss and gain, which are potentially more sensitive in detecting DMOAD effects than radiographic JSW or region-specific MRI. Non-location-dependent measures of cartilage thickness change should thus be explored further in context of anabolic and anti-catabolic DMOADs.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of head and neck disease.

    PubMed

    Supsupin, Emilio P; Demian, Nagi M

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to identify intracranial or perineural spread from a head and neck primary tumor. Perineural spread is a form of metastatic disease in which primary tumors spread along neural pathways. Orbital cellulitis is a sight-threatening, and potentially life-threatening condition. Urgent imaging is performed to assess the anatomic extent of disease, including postseptal, cavernous sinus, and intracranial involvement, and identify orbital abscesses that require exploration and drainage. MRI is useful in the evaluation of the brachial plexus.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of head and neck disease.

    PubMed

    Supsupin, Emilio P; Demian, Nagi M

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to identify intracranial or perineural spread from a head and neck primary tumor. Perineural spread is a form of metastatic disease in which primary tumors spread along neural pathways. Orbital cellulitis is a sight-threatening, and potentially life-threatening condition. Urgent imaging is performed to assess the anatomic extent of disease, including postseptal, cavernous sinus, and intracranial involvement, and identify orbital abscesses that require exploration and drainage. MRI is useful in the evaluation of the brachial plexus. PMID:24794270

  5. Crossed cerebral lateralization for verbal and visuo-spatial function in a pair of handedness discordant monozygotic twins: MRI and fMRI brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Silke; Keller, Simon; Mackay, Clare; Ebers, George; Marshall, John C; Cherkas, Lynne; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Roberts, Neil; Fink, Gereon R; Gurd, Jennifer M

    2008-01-01

    To examine the nature of hemispheric lateralization for neural processes underlying verbal fluency and visuo-spatial attention, we investigated a single pair of handedness discordant monozygotic (MzHd) twins. Imaging of the brain was undertaken using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in combination with manual performance tasks. The twins were discordant for MRI anatomical asymmetries of the pars triangularis and planum temporale, whose asymmetry was consistent with verbal laterality on fMRI. Thus, the right-handed twin had left lateralized verbal with right lateralized visuo-spatial attention, while the left-handed twin had right lateralized verbal with left lateralized visuo-spatial activation; these data lend further support for to the conclusions of Sommer et al. PMID:18304205

  6. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of the murine brain response to light: Temporal differentiation and negative functional MRI changes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei ||; Palyka, I. |; Li, HaiFang

    1996-06-11

    Using a 9.4 T MRI instrument, we have obtained images of the mouse brain response to photic stimulation during a period between deep anesthesia and the early stages of arousal. The large image enhancements we observe (often >30%) are consistent with literature results extrapolated to 9.4 T. However, there are also two unusual aspects to our findings. (i) The visual area of the brain responds only to changes in stimulus intensity, suggesting that we directly detect operations of the M visual system pathway. Such a channel has been observed in mice by invasive electrophysiology, and described in detail for primates. (ii) Along with the typical positive response in the area of the occipital portion of the brain containing the visual cortex; another area displays decreased signal intensity upon stimulation. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  8. The Movement of a Nerve in a Magnetic Field: Application to MRI Lorentz Effect Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Bradley J.; Luterek, Adam; Puwal, Steffan

    2014-01-01

    Direct detection of neural activity with MRI would be a breakthrough innovation in brain imaging. A Lorentz force method has been proposed to image nerve activity using MRI; a force between the action currents and the static MRI magnetic field causes the nerve to move. In the presence of a magnetic field gradient, this will cause the spins to precess at a different frequency, affecting the MRI signal. Previous mathematical modeling suggests that this effect is too small to explain the experimental data, but that model was limited because the action currents were assumed to be independent of position along the nerve, and because the magnetic field was assumed to be perpendicular to the nerve. In this paper, we calculate the nerve displacement analytically without these two assumptions. Using realistic parameter values, the nerve motion is less than 5 nm, which induced a phase shift in the MRI signal of less than 0.02°. Therefore, our results suggest that Lorentz force imaging is beyond the capabilities of current technology. PMID:24728667

  9. Imaging artifacts induced by electrical stimulation during conventional fMRI of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Andrea; Bikson, Marom; Datta, Abhishek; Lafon, Belen; Dechent, Peter; Parra, Lucas C.; Paulus, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain activation during transcranial electrical stimulation is used to provide insight into the mechanisms of neuromodulation and targeting of particular brain structures. However, the passage of current through the body may interfere with the concurrent detection of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, which is sensitive to local magnetic fields. To test whether these currents can affect concurrent fMRI recordings we performed conventional gradient echo-planar imaging (EPI) during transcranial direct current (tDCS) and alternating current stimulation (tACS) on two post-mortem subjects. TDCS induced signals in both superficial and deep structures. The signal was specific to the electrode montage, with the strongest signal near cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and scalp. The direction of change relative to non-stimulation reversed with tDCS stimulation polarity. For tACS there was no net effect of the MRI signal. High-resolution individualized modeling of current flow and induced static magnetic fields suggested a strong coincidence of the change EPI signal with regions of large current density and magnetic fields. These initial results indicate that: 1) fMRI studies of tDCS must consider this potentially confounding interference from current flow and 2) conventional MRI imaging protocols can be potentially used to measure current flow during transcranial electrical stimulation. The optimization of current measurement and artifact correction techniques, including consideration of the underlying physics, remains to be addressed. PMID:23099102

  10. Accuracy of Percutaneous Lumbosacral Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Oblique Fluoroscopic View Based on Computed Tomography Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koji; Kanemura, Tokumi; Iwase, Toshiki; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the oblique fluoroscopic view, based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) images for accurate placement of lumbosacral percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS). Overview of Literature Although PPS misplacement has been reported as one of the main complications in minimally invasive spine surgery, there is no comparative data on the misplacement rate among different fluoroscopic techniques, or comparing such techniques with open procedures. Methods We retrospectively selected 230 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw construct for degenerative lumbar disease, and divided them into 3 groups, those who had undergone: minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using biplane (lateral and anterior-posterior views using a single C-arm) fluoroscope views (group M-1), minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using the oblique fluoroscopic view based on preoperative CT (group M-2), and conventional open procedure using a lateral fluoroscopic view (group O: controls). The relative position of the screw to the pedicle was graded for the pedicle breach as no breach, <2 mm, 2–4 mm, or >4 mm. Inaccuracy was calculated and assessed according to the spinal level, direction and neurological deficit. Inter-group radiation exposure was estimated using fluoroscopy time. Results Inaccuracy involved an incline toward L5, causing medial or lateral perforation of pedicles in group M-1, but it was distributed relatively equally throughout multiple levels in groups M-2 and controls. The mean fluoroscopy time/case ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 minutes. Conclusions Minimally invasive lumbosacral PPS placement using the conventional fluoroscopic technique carries an increased risk of inaccurate screw placement and resultant neurological deficits, compared with that of the open procedure. Inaccuracy tended to be distributed between medial and lateral perforations of the L5 pedicle

  11. In Vivo Imaging of Stepwise Vessel Occlusion in Cerebral Photothrombosis of Mice by 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter M.; Stoll, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Background 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared 19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT) at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation. Methods/Principal Findings Perfluorocarbons (PFC) or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong 19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like 19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the 19F markers (infarct core/rim) could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage. Conclusion Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by 19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement. PMID:22194810

  12. Motion Compensated Abdominal Diffusion Weighted MRI by Simultaneous Image Registration and Model Estimation (SIR-ME).

    PubMed

    Kurugol, Sila; Freiman, Moti; Afacan, Onur; Domachevsky, Liran; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M; Callahan, Michael J; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of water molecule's mobility variations by quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) signal decay in the abdomen has the potential to serve as a biomarker in gastrointestinal and oncological applications. Accurate and reproducible estimation of the signal decay model parameters is challenging due to the presence of respiratory, cardiac, and peristalsis motion. Independent registration of each b-value image to the b-value=0 s/mm(2) image prior to parameter estimation might be sub-optimal because of the low SNR and contrast difference between images of varying b-value. In this work, we introduce a motion-compensated parameter estimation framework that simultaneously solves image registration and model estimation (SIR-ME) problems by utilizing the interdependence of acquired volumes along the diffusion weighting dimension. We evaluated the improvement in model parameters estimation accuracy using 16 in-vivo DW-MRI data sets of Crohn's disease patients by comparing parameter estimates obtained using the SIR-ME model to the parameter estimates obtained by fitting the signal decay model to the acquired DW-MRI images. The proposed SIR-ME model reduced the average root-mean-square error between the observed signal and the fitted model by more than 50%. Moreover, the SIR-ME model estimates discriminate between normal and abnormal bowel loops better than the standard parameter estimates.

  13. A high accuracy multi-image registration method for tracking MRI-guided robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Weijian; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated an increasing number of functional surgical robots and other devices operating in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) environment. Calibration and tracking of the robotic device is essential during such MRI-guided procedures. A fiducial tracking module is placed on the base or the end effector of the robot to localize it within the scanner, and thus the patient coordinate system. The fiducial frame represents a Z shape and is made of seven tubes filled with high contrast fluid. The frame is highlighted in the MR images and is used in localization. Compared to the former single image registration method, multiple images are used in this algorithm to calculate the position and orientation of the frame, and thus the robot. By using multiple images together, measurement error is reduced and the rigid requirement of slow to acquire high quality of images is not required. Accuracy and performance were evaluated in experiments which were operated with a Philips 3T MRI scanner. Presented is an accuracy comparison of the new method with varied number of images, and a comparison to more traditional single image registration techniques.

  14. Measurement of Strain in the Left Ventricle during Diastole withcine-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2005-07-20

    The assessment of regional heart wall motion (local strain) can localize ischemic myocardial disease, evaluate myocardial viability and identify impaired cardiac function due to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. The objectives of this research were to develop and validate a technique known as Hyperelastic Warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle from clinical cine-MRI image datasets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image datasets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target image. To validate the technique, MRI image datasets representing two deformation states of a left ventricle were created such that the deformation map between the states represented in the images was known. A beginning diastoliccine-MRI image dataset from a normal human subject was defined as the template. A second image dataset (target) was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a forward FE model of diastolic filling. Fiber stretch and strain predictions from Hyperelastic Warping showed good agreement with those of the forward solution. The technique had low sensitivity to changes in material parameters, with the exception of changes in bulk modulus of the material. The use of an isotropic hyperelastic constitutive model in the Warping analyses degraded the predictions of fiber stretch. Results were unaffected by simulated noise down to an SNR of 4.0. This study demonstrates that Warping in conjunction with cine-MRI imaging can be used to determine local ventricular strains during diastole.

  15. Imaging techniques: MRI illuminated by γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowtell, Richard

    2016-09-01

    A technique that combines magnetic resonance with nuclear medicine has been used to image the distribution of a radioactive tracer, potentially opening up a powerful and innovative approach to medical imaging. See Letter p.652

  16. Imaging of adult flatfoot: correlation of radiographic measurements with MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lamb, Joshua; Kung, Justin W; Yablon, Corrie M; Wu, Jim S

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to determine whether radiographic foot measurements can predict injury of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) and the supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch as diagnosed on MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS. After institutional review board approval, 100 consecutive patients with radiographic and MRI examinations performed within a 2-month period were enrolled. Thirty-one patients had PTT dysfunction clinically, and 69 patients had other causes of ankle pain. Talonavicular uncoverage angle, incongruency angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Meary angle, cuneiform-to-fifth metatarsal height, and talar tilt were calculated on standing foot or ankle radiographs. MRI was used to assess for abnormalities of the PTT (tenosynovitis, tendinosis, and tear) and supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch (spring ligament, deltoid ligament, and sinus tarsi). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and Fisher exact tests for categoric variables; the Student t test was used for continuous variables. RESULTS. There was a statistically significant association of PTT tear with abnormal talonavicular uncoverage angle, calcaneal pitch angle, Meary angle, and cuneiform-to-fifth metatarsal height. PTT tendinosis and isolated tenosynovitis had a poor association with most radiologic measurements. If both calcaneal pitch and Meary angles were normal, no PTT tear was present. An abnormal calcaneal pitch angle had the best association with injury to the supporting medial longitudinal arch structures. CONCLUSION. Radiographic measurements, especially calcaneal pitch and Meary angles, can be useful in detecting PTT tears. Calcaneal pitch angle provides the best assessment of injury to the supporting structures of the medial longitudinal arch.

  17. Image Registration for Quantitative Analysis of Kidney Function using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sance, Rosario; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J.; Lundervold, Arvid; Santos, Andrés

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the possibilities of registration algorithms to compensate respiratory motion and deformation in abdominal DCE-MRI 3D temporary series. The final objective is that from registered data, appropriate intensity curves of local renal activity along the time could be represented for each kidney voxel. Assuming a relation between the voxel intensity and the contrast media concentration, this non-invasive renographic method could be used to evaluate the local renal function, and to calculate typical renal parameters like glomerular filtration rate.

  18. Philips 3T Intera Magnetic Resonance Imaging System and Upgrade of existing MRI equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Evanochko, William T

    2004-05-14

    The objective of this proposal was twofold. First, upgrade existing MRI equipment, specifically a research 4.1T whole-body system. Second, purchase a clinical, state-of-the-art 3T MRI system tailored specifically to cardiovascular and neurological applications. This project was within the guidelines of ''Medical Applications and Measurement Science''. The goals were: [1] to develop beneficial applications of magnetic resonance imaging; [2] discover new applications of MR strategies for medical research; and [2] apply them for clinical diagnosis. Much of this proposal searched for breakthroughs in this noninvasive and nondestructive imaging technology. Finally, this proposal's activities focused on research in the basic science of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, and engineering as applied to bioengineering. The centerpiece of this grant was our 4.1T ultra-high field whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance system and the newly acquired state-of-the-art, heart and head dedicated 3T clinical MRI system. We have successfully upgraded the equipment for the 4.1T system so that it is now state-of-the-art with new gradient and radio frequency amplifiers. We also purchase a unique In Vivo EKG monitoring unit that will permit tracking clinical quality EKG signals while the patient is in a high field MR scanner. Important upgrades of a peripheral vascular coil and a state-of-the-art clinical workstation for processing complex heart images were implemented. The most recent acquisition was the purchase of a state-of-the-art Philips 3T Intera clinical MRI system. This system is unique in that the magnet is only 5 1/2 feet long compare to over 12 feet long magnet of our 4.1T MRI system. The 3T MRI system is fully functional and its use and applications are already greatly benefiting the UAB with 200-300 micron resolution brain images and diagnostic quality MR angiography of coronary arteries in less than 5 minutes.

  19. Imaging Patterns in MRI in Recent Bone Injuries Following Negative or Inconclusive Plain Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Sadineni, Raghu Teja; Bellapa, Narayan Chander; Velicheti, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Background Few bony injuries and most soft tissue injuries cannot be detected on plain radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect such occult bony injuries due to signal changes in bone marrow. In addition to excluding serious bony injuries, it can also identify tendon, ligament, cartilage and other soft tissue injuries and thus help in localizing the cause of morbidity. Aims and Objectives To determine the MRI imaging patterns in recent bone injuries (less than 4 weeks) following negative or inconclusive plain radiographs. To determine the role of MRI in recent fractures. Results Out of the 75 individuals with history of recent injury of less than 4 weeks duration, fracture line was demonstrated in 16 patients (21%) who had no obvious evidence of bone injury on plain radiographs. Bone contusion or bruising of the bone was demonstrated in 39 (52%) patients. This was the commonest abnormality detected in MRI. The remaining 20 patients did not show any obvious injury to the bone on MR imaging however, soft tissue injury could be demonstrated in 12 (16%) patients which show that the extent of soft tissue injury was relatively well demonstrated by MR imaging. The present study showed that occult injuries commonly occur at the Knee followed by Ankle, Wrist, Foot, Elbow, Leg, Hands, Hips & Spine. Conclusion The study showed that MR is efficient in the detection of occult bone injuries which are missed on radiography. Compared to radiographs, MRI clearly depicted the extent of injuries and associated soft tissue involvement. MRI demonstrates both acute and chronic injuries and also differentiates both, whereas radiography has poor sensitivity for acute injuries. Also, the soft tissue injuries like tendionous and ligamentous injuries cannot be identified on radiographs. PMID:26557590

  20. Functional MRI of long-term potentiation: imaging network plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Salvado, Efrén; Pallarés, Vicente; Moreno, Andrea; Canals, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Neurons are able to express long-lasting and activity-dependent modulations of their synapses. This plastic property supports memory and conveys an extraordinary adaptive value, because it allows an individual to learn from, and respond to, changes in the environment. Molecular and physiological changes at the cellular level as well as network interactions are required in order to encode a pattern of synaptic activity into a long-term memory. While the cellular mechanisms linking synaptic plasticity to memory have been intensively studied, those regulating network interactions have received less attention. Combining high-resolution fMRI and in vivo electrophysiology in rats, we have previously reported a functional remodelling of long-range hippocampal networks induced by long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic plasticity in the perforant pathway. Here, we present new results demonstrating an increased bilateral coupling in the hippocampus specifically supported by the mossy cell commissural/associational pathway in response to LTP. This fMRI-measured increase in bilateral connectivity is accompanied by potentiation of the corresponding polysynaptically evoked commissural potential in the contralateral dentate gyrus and depression of the inactive convergent commissural pathway to the ipsilateral dentate. We review these and previous findings in the broader context of memory consolidation. PMID:24298154

  1. Optimal sampling with prior information of the image geometry in microfluidic MRI.

    PubMed

    Han, S H; Cho, H; Paulsen, J L

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in MRI acquisition for microscopic flows enable unprecedented sensitivity and speed in a portable NMR/MRI microfluidic analysis platform. However, the application of MRI to microfluidics usually suffers from prolonged acquisition times owing to the combination of the required high resolution and wide field of view necessary to resolve details within microfluidic channels. When prior knowledge of the image geometry is available as a binarized image, such as for microfluidic MRI, it is possible to reduce sampling requirements by incorporating this information into the reconstruction algorithm. The current approach to the design of the partial weighted random sampling schemes is to bias toward the high signal energy portions of the binarized image geometry after Fourier transformation (i.e. in its k-space representation). Although this sampling prescription is frequently effective, it can be far from optimal in certain limiting cases, such as for a 1D channel, or more generally yield inefficient sampling schemes at low degrees of sub-sampling. This work explores the tradeoff between signal acquisition and incoherent sampling on image reconstruction quality given prior knowledge of the image geometry for weighted random sampling schemes, finding that optimal distribution is not robustly determined by maximizing the acquired signal but from interpreting its marginal change with respect to the sub-sampling rate. We develop a corresponding sampling design methodology that deterministically yields a near optimal sampling distribution for image reconstructions incorporating knowledge of the image geometry. The technique robustly identifies optimal weighted random sampling schemes and provides improved reconstruction fidelity for multiple 1D and 2D images, when compared to prior techniques for sampling optimization given knowledge of the image geometry.

  2. MRI-coupled spectrally-resolved fluorescence tomography for in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott C.; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Tuttle, Stephen B.; Jiang, Shudong; Springett, Roger; Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2008-02-01

    A unique fluorescence imaging system incorporates multi-channel spectrometer-based optical detection directly into clinical MRI for simultaneous MR and spectrally-resolved fluorescence tomography acquisition in small animal and human breast-sized volumes. A custom designed MRI rodent coil adapted to accommodate optical fibers in a circular geometry for contact mode acquisition provides small animal imaging capabilities, and human breast-sized volumes are imaged using a clinical breast coil modified with an optical fiber patient array. Spectroscopy fibers couple light emitted from the tissue surface to sixteen highly sensitive CCD-based spectrometers operating in parallel. Tissue structural information obtained from standard and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images is used to spatially constrain the diffuse fluorescence tomography reconstruction algorithm, improving fluorescence imaging capabilities qualitatively and quantitatively. Simultaneous acquisition precludes the use of complex co-registration processes. Calibration procedures for the optical acquisition system are reviewed and the imaging limits of the system are investigated in homogeneous and heterogeneous gelatin phantoms containing Indocyanine Green (ICG). Prior knowledge of fluorescence emission spectra is used to de-couple fluorescence emission from residual excitation laser cross-talk. Preliminary in vivo data suggests improved fluorescence imaging in mouse brain tumors using MR-derived spatial priors. U-251 human gliomas were implanted intracranially into nude mice and combined contrast enhanced MRI/fluorescence tomography acquisition was completed at 24 hour intervals over the course of 72 hours after administration of an EGFR targeted NIR fluorophore. Reconstructed images demonstrate an inability to recover reasonable images of fluorescence activity without the use of MRI spatial priors.

  3. Optimal sampling with prior information of the image geometry in microfluidic MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S. H.; Cho, H.; Paulsen, J. L.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in MRI acquisition for microscopic flows enable unprecedented sensitivity and speed in a portable NMR/MRI microfluidic analysis platform. However, the application of MRI to microfluidics usually suffers from prolonged acquisition times owing to the combination of the required high resolution and wide field of view necessary to resolve details within microfluidic channels. When prior knowledge of the image geometry is available as a binarized image, such as for microfluidic MRI, it is possible to reduce sampling requirements by incorporating this information into the reconstruction algorithm. The current approach to the design of the partial weighted random sampling schemes is to bias toward the high signal energy portions of the binarized image geometry after Fourier transformation (i.e. in its k-space representation). Although this sampling prescription is frequently effective, it can be far from optimal in certain limiting cases, such as for a 1D channel, or more generally yield inefficient sampling schemes at low degrees of sub-sampling. This work explores the tradeoff between signal acquisition and incoherent sampling on image reconstruction quality given prior knowledge of the image geometry for weighted random sampling schemes, finding that optimal distribution is not robustly determined by maximizing the acquired signal but from interpreting its marginal change with respect to the sub-sampling rate. We develop a corresponding sampling design methodology that deterministically yields a near optimal sampling distribution for image reconstructions incorporating knowledge of the image geometry. The technique robustly identifies optimal weighted random sampling schemes and provides improved reconstruction fidelity for multiple 1D and 2D images, when compared to prior techniques for sampling optimization given knowledge of the image geometry.

  4. Optimal sampling with prior information of the image geometry in microfluidic MRI.

    PubMed

    Han, S H; Cho, H; Paulsen, J L

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in MRI acquisition for microscopic flows enable unprecedented sensitivity and speed in a portable NMR/MRI microfluidic analysis platform. However, the application of MRI to microfluidics usually suffers from prolonged acquisition times owing to the combination of the required high resolution and wide field of view necessary to resolve details within microfluidic channels. When prior knowledge of the image geometry is available as a binarized image, such as for microfluidic MRI, it is possible to reduce sampling requirements by incorporating this information into the reconstruction algorithm. The current approach to the design of the partial weighted random sampling schemes is to bias toward the high signal energy portions of the binarized image geometry after Fourier transformation (i.e. in its k-space representation). Although this sampling prescription is frequently effective, it can be far from optimal in certain limiting cases, such as for a 1D channel, or more generally yield inefficient sampling schemes at low degrees of sub-sampling. This work explores the tradeoff between signal acquisition and incoherent sampling on image reconstruction quality given prior knowledge of the image geometry for weighted random sampling schemes, finding that optimal distribution is not robustly determined by maximizing the acquired signal but from interpreting its marginal change with respect to the sub-sampling rate. We develop a corresponding sampling design methodology that deterministically yields a near optimal sampling distribution for image reconstructions incorporating knowledge of the image geometry. The technique robustly identifies optimal weighted random sampling schemes and provides improved reconstruction fidelity for multiple 1D and 2D images, when compared to prior techniques for sampling optimization given knowledge of the image geometry. PMID:25676820

  5. Non-invasive functional imaging of Cerebral Blood Volume with Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Hua, Jun; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) based on changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) can directly probe vasodilatation and vasoconstriction during brain activation or physiologic challenges, and can provide important insights into the mechanism of Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal changes. At present, the most widely used CBV fMRI technique in humans is called Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI and this article provides a technical review of this method. VASO MRI utilizes T1 differences between blood and tissue to distinguish these two compartments within a voxel and uses blood-nulling inversion recovery sequence to yield an MR signal proportional to 1-CBV. As such, vasodilatation will result in a VASO signal decrease and vasoconstriction will have the reverse effect. The VASO technique can be performed dynamically with a temporal resolution comparable to several other fMRI methods such as BOLD or Arterial-Spin-Labeling (ASL), and is particularly powerful when conducted in conjunction with these complementary techniques. The pulse sequence and imaging parameters of VASO can be optimized such that the signal change is predominantly of CBV origin, but careful considerations should be taken to minimize other contributions, such as those from the BOLD effect, CBF, and CSF. Sensitivity of the VASO technique remains to be the primary disadvantage when compared to BOLD, but this technique is increasingly demonstrating utility in neuroscientific and clinical applications. PMID:23355392

  6. DCE-MRI in hepatocellular carcinoma-clinical and therapeutic image biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bang-Bin; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) enables tumor vascular physiology to be assessed. Within the tumor tissue, contrast agents (gadolinium chelates) extravasate from intravascular into the extravascular extracellular space (EES), which results in a signal increase on T1-weighted MRI. The rate of contrast agents extravasation to EES in the tumor tissue is determined by vessel leakiness and blood flow. Thus, the signal measured on DCE-MRI represents a combination of permeability and perfusion. The semi-quantitative analysis is based on the calculation of heuristic parameters that can be extracted from signal intensity-time curves. These enhancing curves can also be deconvoluted by mathematical modeling to extract quantitative parameters that may reflect tumor perfusion, vascular volume, vessel permeability and angiogenesis. Because hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a hypervascular tumor, many emerging therapies focused on the inhibition of angiogenesis. DCE-MRI combined with a pharmacokinetic model allows us to produce highly reproducible and reliable parametric maps of quantitative parameters in HCC. Successful therapies change quantitative parameters of DCE-MRI, which may be used as early indicators of tumor response to anti-angiogenesis agents that modulate tumor vasculature. In the setting of clinical trials, DCE-MRI may provide relevant clinical information on the pharmacodynamic and biologic effects of novel drugs, monitor treatment response and predict survival outcome in HCC patients. PMID:24695624

  7. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-01

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL-1 were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  8. Three-dimensional correlation of MR images to muscle tissue response for interventional MRI thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Michael S.; Lancaster, Tanya L.; Lazebnik, Roee S.; Ashcroft, Andrik J.; Gamal Nour, Sherif; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Wilson, David L.

    2001-05-01

    We are treating tumors using radiofrequency (RF) ablation under interventional MRI (iMRI) guidance. We investigated the ability of MR to monitor the treated region by comparing MR thermal lesion images to cellular damage as seen histologically. Our new methodology allows 3D registration that should enable more accurate correlation than previous 2D methods. Using a low-field (0.2T) open magnet iMRI system for probe guidance, we applied RF ablation to the thigh muscle of four New Zealand White rabbits. To relate in vivo MR and histology images, we obtained intermediate ex vivo MR images and pictures of thick tissue slices obtained using a specially designed apparatus. Registration was done with a computer algorithm that matches tracks of needle fiducials placed near the tissue of interest. After registration, we determined the region inside the circular, hyperintense rim in MR closely corresponds to the region of necrosis as determined by histology on animals sacrificed 30 minutes after ablation. This is good evidence that iMRI images can be used for real-time feedback during thermal RF ablation treatments.

  9. Application of Good's buffers to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C MRI.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; von Morze, Cornelius; Blecha, Joseph E; Korenchan, David E; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sriram, Renuka; Gordon, Jeremy W; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Subramaniam, Sukumar; Bok, Robert A; Wang, Zhen J; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E; Kurhanewicz, John; Wilson, David M

    2015-09-25

    N-(2-Acetamido)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (ACES), one of Good's buffers, was applied to pH imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rapid NMR- and MRI-based pH measurements were obtained by exploiting the sensitive pH-dependence of its (13)C chemical shift within the physiologic range.

  10. Atlas-registration based image segmentation of MRI human thigh muscles in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ezak; Yap, Moi Hoon; Degens, Hans; McPhee, Jamie S.

    2014-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of anatomic structures of magnetic resonance thigh scans can be a challenging task due to the potential lack of precisely defined muscle boundaries and issues related to intensity inhomogeneity or bias field across an image. In this paper, we demonstrate a combination framework of atlas construction and image registration methods to propagate the desired region of interest (ROI) between atlas image and the targeted MRI thigh scans for quadriceps muscles, femur cortical layer and bone marrow segmentations. The proposed system employs a semi-automatic segmentation method on an initial image in one dataset (from a series of images). The segmented initial image is then used as an atlas image to automate the segmentation of other images in the MRI scans (3-D space). The processes include: ROI labeling, atlas construction and registration, and morphological transform correspondence pixels (in terms of feature and intensity value) between the atlas (template) image and the targeted image based on the prior atlas information and non-rigid image registration methods.

  11. Neuroimaging of pediatric brain tumors: from basic to advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Blüml, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    In this review, the basic magnetic resonance concepts used in the imaging approach of a pediatric brain tumor are described with respect to different factors including understanding the significance of the patient's age. Also discussed are other factors directly related to the magnetic resonance scan itself including evaluating the location of the tumor, determining if the lesion is extra-axial or intra-axial, and evaluating the contrast characteristics of the lesion. Of note, there are key imaging features of pediatric brain tumors, which can give information about the cellularity of the lesion, which can then be confirmed with advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The second part of this review will provide an overview of the major advanced MRI techniques used in pediatric imaging, particularly, magnetic resonance diffusion, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance perfusion. The last part of the review will provide more specific information about the use of advanced magnetic resonance techniques in the evaluation of pediatric brain tumors.

  12. Cross-modality assessment and planning for pulmonary trunk treatment using CT and MRI imaging.

    PubMed

    Vitanovski, Dime; Tsymbal, Alexey; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Hubert, Martin; Taylor, Andrew; Schievano, Silvia; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defect is the primary cause of death in newborns, due to typically complex malformation of the cardiac system. The pulmonary valve and trunk are often affected and require complex clinical management and in most cases surgical or interventional treatment. While minimal invasive methods are emerging, non-invasive imaging-based assessment tools become crucial components in the clinical setting. For advanced evaluation and therapy planning purposes, cardiac Computed Tomography (CT) and cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI) are important non-invasive investigation techniques with complementary properties. Although, characterized by high temporal resolution, cMRI does not cover the full motion of the pulmonary trunk. The sparse cMRI data acquired in this context include only one 3D scan of the heart in the end-diastolic phase and two 2D planes (long and short axes) over the whole cardiac cycle. In this paper we present a cross-modality framework for the evaluation of the pulmonary trunk, which combines the advantages of both, cardiac CT and cMRI. A patient-specific model is estimated from both modalities using hierarchical learning-based techniques. The pulmonary trunk model is exploited within a novel dynamic regression-based reconstruction to infer the incomplete cMRI temporal information. Extensive experiments performed on 72 cardiac CT and 74 cMRI sequences demonstrated the average speed of 110 seconds and accuracy of 1.4mm for the proposed approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first dynamic model of the pulmonary trunk and right ventricle outflow track estimated from sparse 4D cMRI data.

  13. Cross-modality assessment and planning for pulmonary trunk treatment using CT and MRI imaging.

    PubMed

    Vitanovski, Dime; Tsymbal, Alexey; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Hubert, Martin; Taylor, Andrew; Schievano, Silvia; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defect is the primary cause of death in newborns, due to typically complex malformation of the cardiac system. The pulmonary valve and trunk are often affected and require complex clinical management and in most cases surgical or interventional treatment. While minimal invasive methods are emerging, non-invasive imaging-based assessment tools become crucial components in the clinical setting. For advanced evaluation and therapy planning purposes, cardiac Computed Tomography (CT) and cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI) are important non-invasive investigation techniques with complementary properties. Although, characterized by high temporal resolution, cMRI does not cover the full motion of the pulmonary trunk. The sparse cMRI data acquired in this context include only one 3D scan of the heart in the end-diastolic phase and two 2D planes (long and short axes) over the whole cardiac cycle. In this paper we present a cross-modality framework for the evaluation of the pulmonary trunk, which combines the advantages of both, cardiac CT and cMRI. A patient-specific model is estimated from both modalities using hierarchical learning-based techniques. The pulmonary trunk model is exploited within a novel dynamic regression-based reconstruction to infer the incomplete cMRI temporal information. Extensive experiments performed on 72 cardiac CT and 74 cMRI sequences demonstrated the average speed of 110 seconds and accuracy of 1.4mm for the proposed approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first dynamic model of the pulmonary trunk and right ventricle outflow track estimated from sparse 4D cMRI data. PMID:20879263

  14. Fusion of rat brain histology and MRI using weighted multi-image mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Christoph; Penney, Graeme P.; Crum, William R.; Schnabel, Julia A.; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Hawkes, David J.

    2008-03-01

    Introduction - Fusion of histology and MRI is frequently demanded in biomedical research to study in vitro tissue properties in an in vivo reference space. Distortions and artifacts caused by cutting and staining of histological slices as well as differences in spatial resolution make even the rigid fusion a difficult task. State-of- the-art methods start with a mono-modal restacking yielding a histological pseudo-3D volume. The 3D information of the MRI reference is considered subsequently. However, consistency of the histology volume and consistency due to the corresponding MRI seem to be diametral goals. Therefore, we propose a novel fusion framework optimizing histology/histology and histology/MRI consistency at the same time finding a balance between both goals. Method - Direct slice-to-slice correspondence even in irregularly-spaced cutting sequences is achieved by registration-based interpolation of the MRI. Introducing a weighted multi-image mutual information metric (WI), adjacent histology and corresponding MRI are taken into account at the same time. Therefore, the reconstruction of the histological volume as well as the fusion with the MRI is done in a single step. Results - Based on two data sets with more than 110 single registrations in all, the results are evaluated quantitatively based on Tanimoto overlap measures and qualitatively showing the fused volumes. In comparison to other multi-image metrics, the reconstruction based on WI is significantly improved. We evaluated different parameter settings with emphasis on the weighting term steering the balance between intra- and inter-modality consistency.

  15. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  16. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  17. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2007-10-01

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  18. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G; Sharp, Gregory C; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-10-21

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  19. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  20. Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for tumor cell imaging based on gadolinium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shan; Wu, Chen; Dai, Yue; Hou, Pingfu; Han, Cuiping; Xu, Kai

    2016-12-15

    Activatable molecular MRI nanoprobe for intracellular GSH sensing was designed. As an alternative to "always on" nanoprobe, activatable imaging nanoprobes which are designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to the targets have attracted more and more attention. In this paper, we designed a novel activatable molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanoprobe for tumor cell recognization based on a MRI signal variation induced by the distance change between T1 and T2 contrast agents (CAs) in the presence of glutathione (GSH). To achieve this aim, carboxyl group functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and polyethylene glycol-coated gadolinium oxide (PEG-Gd2O3) NPs as T2 and T1 MRI CA were connected by cystamine which contains a disulfide linkage. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), mass spectra and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were introduced for their characterizations. The formation of Fe3O4-cystamine-Gd2O3 (Fe3O4-SS-Gd2O3) nanocomplex resulted in a quenched T1 signal due to the near proximity of PEG-Gd2O3 NPs to Fe3O4 NPs and a "light-up" T1 signal with the cleavage of disulfide bond in the presence of GSH. These results provide not only an easy way to realize MRI of tumor cells based on the overexpressed intracellular GSH level, but also a new insight for the design of activatable MRI nanoprobe. PMID:27501342

  1. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  2. Free-breathing 3D cardiac MRI using iterative image-based respiratory motion correction.

    PubMed

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Roujol, Sébastien; Chan, Raymond H; Hong, Susie N; Bello, Natalie; Henningsson, Markus; Ngo, Long H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory motion compensation using diaphragmatic navigator gating with a 5 mm gating window is conventionally used for free-breathing cardiac MRI. Because of the narrow gating window, scan efficiency is low resulting in long scan times, especially for patients with irregular breathing patterns. In this work, a new retrospective motion compensation algorithm is presented to reduce the scan time for free-breathing cardiac MRI that increasing the gating window to 15 mm without compromising image quality. The proposed algorithm iteratively corrects for respiratory-induced cardiac motion by optimizing the sharpness of the heart. To evaluate this technique, two coronary MRI datasets with 1.3 mm(3) resolution were acquired from 11 healthy subjects (seven females, 25 ± 9 years); one using a navigator with a 5 mm gating window acquired in 12.0 ± 2.0 min and one with a 15 mm gating window acquired in 7.1 ± 1.0 min. The images acquired with a 15 mm gating window were corrected using the proposed algorithm and compared to the uncorrected images acquired with the 5 and 15 mm gating windows. The image quality score, sharpness, and length of the three major coronary arteries were equivalent between the corrected images and the images acquired with a 5 mm gating window (P-value > 0.05), while the scan time was reduced by a factor of 1.7. PMID:23132549

  3. Small BODIPY Probes for Combined Dual (19) F MRI and Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Anh Minh; Müller, Andreas; Kessler, Sonja M; Henrikus, Sarah; Hoffmann, Caroline; Kiemer, Alexandra K; Bücker, Arno; Jung, Gregor

    2016-07-19

    The combination of the two complementary imaging modalities (19) F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging (FLI) possesses high potential for biological and medical applications. Herein we report the first design, synthesis, dual detection validation, and cytotoxic testing of four promising BODIPY dyes for dual (19) F MRI-fluorescence detection. Using straightforward Steglich reactions, small fluorinated alcohols were easily covalently tethered to a BODIPY dye in high yields, leaving its fluorescence properties unaffected. The synthesized compounds were analyzed with various techniques to demonstrate their potential utility in dual imaging. As expected, the chemically and magnetically equivalent trifluoromethyl groups of the agents exhibited a single NMR signal. The determined longitudinal relaxation times T1 and the transverse relaxation times T2 , both in the lower second range, enabled the imaging of four compounds in vitro. The most auspicious dual (19) F MRI-fluorescence agent was also successfully imaged in a mouse post-mortem within a 9.4 T small-animal tomograph. Toxicological assays with human cells (primary HUVEC and HepG2 cell line) also indicated the possibility for animal testing. PMID:27347843

  4. Registration of structurally dissimilar images in MRI-based brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendsen, F. F.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; de Leeuw, A. A. C.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Viergever, M. A.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2014-08-01

    A serious challenge in image registration is the accurate alignment of two images in which a certain structure is present in only one of the two. Such topological changes are problematic for conventional non-rigid registration algorithms. We propose to incorporate in a conventional free-form registration framework a geometrical penalty term that minimizes the volume of the missing structure in one image. We demonstrate our method on cervical MR images for brachytherapy. The intrapatient registration problem involves one image in which a therapy applicator is present and one in which it is not. By including the penalty term, a substantial improvement in the surface distance to the gold standard anatomical position and the residual volume of the applicator void are obtained. Registration of neighboring structures, i.e. the rectum and the bladder is generally improved as well, albeit to a lesser degree.

  5. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-03-23

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  6. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  7. Progress in the development of a new angiography suite including the high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF): a control, acquisition, processing, and image display system (CAPIDS), and a new detector changer integrated into a commercial C-arm angiography unit to enable clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use.

  8. MRI and FDG PET/CT imaging manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Sweiss, Nadera J

    2015-12-01

    A 52-year-old man had biopsy-proven sarcoidosis of mediastinal lymph nodes. Cardiac sarcoidosis was confirmed on cardiac MRI with typical imaging features as delayed gadolinium enhancement. Follow-up FDG PET/CT with a 3-day pretest diet modification showed suppression of overall myocardial uptake of FDG but with multifocal abnormal FDG uptake in the myocardium regions corresponding to the previous MRI findings. Additional noncardiac active sarcoidosis involving multiple organ and lymph nodes were also visualized on FDG PET/CT. PMID:26544904

  9. MRI Mode Programming for Safe Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With a Magnetic Resonance Conditional Cardiac Device.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Toshiko; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Ikeya, Yukitoshi; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Ashino, Sonoko; Okubo, Kimie; Okumura, Yasuo; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although diagnostically indispensable, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been, until recently, contraindicated in patients with an implantable cardiac device. MR conditional cardiac devices are now widely used, but the mode programming needed for safe MRI has yet to be established. We reviewed the details of 41 MRI examinations of patients with a MR conditional device. There were no associated adverse events. However, in 3 cases, paced beats competed with the patient's own beats during the MRI examination. We describe 2 of the 3 specific cases because they illustrate these potentially risky situations: a case in which the intrinsic heart rate increased and another in which atrial fibrillation occurred. Safe MRI in patients with an MR conditional device necessitates detailed MRI mode programming. The MRI pacing mode should be carefully and individually selected.

  10. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Jason A.; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  11. Synergistic role of simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS in soft tissue sarcoma metabolism imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yen-Lin E; Lim, Ruth; Huang, Chuan; Chebib, Ivan A; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop and validate simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS as a novel biological image-guided approach to neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemoradiation (chemoRT) in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). A patient with sarcoma of the right thigh underwent PET/MRI scan before and after neoadjuvant (preoperative) radiotherapy. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-D-glucose-Positron Emission Tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) scans were performed simultaneously. In the post-radiation scan, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was subsequently acquired with volume of interest positioned in a residual hyper-metabolic region detected by PET. Post-radiation PET/MRI showed a residual T2-hyperintense mass with significantly reduced (18)F-FDG-uptake, compatible with near complete response to radiotherapy. However, a small region of residual high (18)F-FDG uptake was detected at the tumor margin. MRS of this region had similar metabolite profile as normal tissue, and was thus considered false positive on PET scan. Pathology results were obtained after surgery for confirmation of imaging findings.

  12. Real-time 3D imaging of microstructure growth in battery cells using indirect MRI.

    PubMed

    Ilott, Andrew J; Mohammadi, Mohaddese; Chang, Hee Jung; Grey, Clare P; Jerschow, Alexej

    2016-09-27

    Lithium metal is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity and low potential. The growth of dendrites is a major barrier to the development of high capacity, rechargeable Li batteries with lithium metal anodes, and hence, significant efforts have been undertaken to develop new electrolytes and separator materials that can prevent this process or promote smooth deposits at the anode. Central to these goals, and to the task of understanding the conditions that initiate and propagate dendrite growth, is the development of analytical and nondestructive techniques that can be applied in situ to functioning batteries. MRI has recently been demonstrated to provide noninvasive imaging methodology that can detect and localize microstructure buildup. However, until now, monitoring dendrite growth by MRI has been limited to observing the relatively insensitive metal nucleus directly, thus restricting the temporal and spatial resolution and requiring special hardware and acquisition modes. Here, we present an alternative approach to detect a broad class of metallic dendrite growth via the dendrites' indirect effects on the surrounding electrolyte, allowing for the application of fast 3D (1)H MRI experiments with high resolution. We use these experiments to reconstruct 3D images of growing Li dendrites from MRI, revealing details about the growth rate and fractal behavior. Radiofrequency and static magnetic field calculations are used alongside the images to quantify the amount of the growing structures.

  13. Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) using image-based respiratory surrogate: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhiheng; Paul Segars, William; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in radiation therapy to assess patient-specific breathing motion for determining individual safety margins. However, it has two major drawbacks: low soft-tissue contrast and an excessive imaging dose to the patient. This research aimed to develop a clinically feasible four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) technique to overcome these limitations. Methods: The proposed 4D-MRI technique was achieved by continuously acquiring axial images throughout the breathing cycle using fast 2D cine-MR imaging, and then retrospectively sorting the images by respiratory phase. The key component of the technique was the use of body area (BA) of the axial MR images as an internal respiratory surrogate to extract the breathing signal. The validation of the BA surrogate was performed using 4D-CT images of 12 cancer patients by comparing the respiratory phases determined using the BA method to those determined clinically using the Real-time position management (RPM) system. The feasibility of the 4D-MRI technique was tested on a dynamic motion phantom, the 4D extended Cardiac Torso (XCAT) digital phantom, and two healthy human subjects. Results: Respiratory phases determined from the BA matched closely to those determined from the RPM: mean (±SD) difference in phase: −3.9% (±6.4%); mean (±SD) absolute difference in phase: 10.40% (±3.3%); mean (±SD) correlation coefficient: 0.93 (±0.04). In the motion phantom study, 4D-MRI clearly showed the sinusoidal motion of the phantom; image artifacts observed were minimal to none. Motion trajectories measured from 4D-MRI and 2D cine-MRI (used as a reference) matched excellently: the mean (±SD) absolute difference in motion amplitude: −0.3 (±0.5) mm. In the 4D-XCAT phantom study, the simulated “4D-MRI” images showed good consistency with the original 4D-XCAT phantom images. The motion trajectory of the hypothesized “tumor” matched

  14. Angiomia Imaging and Diagnostics, Angiography and Functional MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer these procedures and interpret the results. As technology and understanding of disease pathology evolves, combinations of ... integrated and layered approach. In some cases, imaging technology, which has been around for a decade or ...

  15. Image homogenization using pre-emphasis method for high field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Wang, Chunsheng; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) field (B1) inhomogeneity due to shortened wavelength at high field is a major cause of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nonuniformity in high dielectric biological samples (e.g., human body). In this work, we propose a method to improve the B1 and MRI homogeneity by using pre-emphasized non-uniform B1 distribution. The intrinsic B1 distribution that could be generated by a RF volume coil, specifically a microstrip transmission line (MTL) coil used in this work, was pre-emphasized in the sample’s periphery region of interest to compensate for the central brightness induced by high frequency interference effect due to shortened wave length. This pre-emphasized non-uniform B1 can be realized by varying the parameters of microstrip elements, such as the substrate thickness of MTL volume coil. Both numerical simulation and phantom MR imaging studies were carried out to investigate the feasibility and merit of the proposed method in achieving homogeneous MR images. The simulation results demonstrate that by using a pre-emphasized B1 distribution generated by the MTL volume coil, relatively uniform B1 distribution and homogeneous MR image (98% homogeneity) within the spherical phantom (15 cm diameter) were achieved with 4.5 mm thickness. The B1 and MRI intensity distributions of a 16-element MTL volume coil with fixed substrate thickness and five varied saline loads were modeled and experimentally tested. Similar results from both simulation and experiments were obtained, suggesting substantial improvements of B1 and MRI homogeneities within the phantom containing 125 mM saline. The overall results demonstrate an efficient B1 shimming approach for improving high field MRI. PMID:24040618

  16. Reprint of "Quantitative evaluation of brain development using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging".

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Yoshida, Shoko; Chang, Linda; Mori, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The development of the brain is structure-specific, and the growth rate of each structure differs depending on the age of the subject. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to evaluate brain development because of the high spatial resolution and contrast that enable the observation of structure-specific developmental status. Currently, most clinical MRIs are evaluated qualitatively to assist in the clinical decision-making and diagnosis. The clinical MRI report usually does not provide quantitative values that can be used to monitor developmental status. Recently, the importance of image quantification to detect and evaluate mild-to-moderate anatomical abnormalities has been emphasized because these alterations are possibly related to several psychiatric disorders and learning disabilities. In the research arena, structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely applied to quantify brain development of the pediatric population. To interpret the values from these MR modalities, a "growth percentile chart," which describes the mean and standard deviation of the normal developmental curve for each anatomical structure, is required. Although efforts have been made to create such a growth percentile chart based on MRI and DTI, one of the greatest challenges is to standardize the anatomical boundaries of the measured anatomical structures. To avoid inter- and intra-reader variability about the anatomical boundary definition, and hence, to increase the precision of quantitative measurements, an automated structure parcellation method, customized for the neonatal and pediatric population, has been developed. This method enables quantification of multiple MR modalities using a common analytic framework. In this paper, the attempt to create an MRI- and a DTI-based growth percentile chart, followed by an application to investigate developmental abnormalities related to cerebral palsy, Williams syndrome, and Rett syndrome, have been introduced. Future

  17. Quantitative evaluation of brain development using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Yoshida, Shoko; Chang, Linda; Mori, Susumu

    2013-11-01

    The development of the brain is structure-specific, and the growth rate of each structure differs depending on the age of the subject. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used to evaluate brain development because of the high spatial resolution and contrast that enable the observation of structure-specific developmental status. Currently, most clinical MRIs are evaluated qualitatively to assist in the clinical decision-making and diagnosis. The clinical MRI report usually does not provide quantitative values that can be used to monitor developmental status. Recently, the importance of image quantification to detect and evaluate mild-to-moderate anatomical abnormalities has been emphasized because these alterations are possibly related to several psychiatric disorders and learning disabilities. In the research arena, structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely applied to quantify brain development of the pediatric population. To interpret the values from these MR modalities, a "growth percentile chart," which describes the mean and standard deviation of the normal developmental curve for each anatomical structure, is required. Although efforts have been made to create such a growth percentile chart based on MRI and DTI, one of the greatest challenges is to standardize the anatomical boundaries of the measured anatomical structures. To avoid inter- and intra-reader variability about the anatomical boundary definition, and hence, to increase the precision of quantitative measurements, an automated structure parcellation method, customized for the neonatal and pediatric population, has been developed. This method enables quantification of multiple MR modalities using a common analytic framework. In this paper, the attempt to create an MRI- and a DTI-based growth percentile chart, followed by an application to investigate developmental abnormalities related to cerebral palsy, Williams syndrome, and Rett syndrome, have been introduced. Future

  18. MRI superresolution using self-similarity and image priors.

    PubMed

    Manjón, José V; Coupé, Pierrick; Buades, Antonio; Collins, D Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2010-01-01

    In Magnetic Resonance Imaging typical clinical settings, both low- and high-resolution images of different types are routinarily acquired. In some cases, the acquired low-resolution images have to be upsampled to match with other high-resolution images for posterior analysis or postprocessing such as registration or multimodal segmentation. However, classical interpolation techniques are not able to recover the high-frequency information lost during the acquisition process. In the present paper, a new superresolution method is proposed to reconstruct high-resolution images from the low-resolution ones using information from coplanar high resolution images acquired of the same subject. Furthermore, the reconstruction process is constrained to be physically plausible with the MR acquisition model that allows a meaningful interpretation of the results. Experiments on synthetic and real data are supplied to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. A comparison with classical state-of-the-art interpolation techniques is presented to demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed methodology. PMID:21197094

  19. MRI Superresolution Using Self-Similarity and Image Priors

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick; Buades, Antonio; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2010-01-01

    In Magnetic Resonance Imaging typical clinical settings, both low- and high-resolution images of different types are routinarily acquired. In some cases, the acquired low-resolution images have to be upsampled to match with other high-resolution images for posterior analysis or postprocessing such as registration or multimodal segmentation. However, classical interpolation techniques are not able to recover the high-frequency information lost during the acquisition process. In the present paper, a new superresolution method is proposed to reconstruct high-resolution images from the low-resolution ones using information from coplanar high resolution images acquired of the same subject. Furthermore, the reconstruction process is constrained to be physically plausible with the MR acquisition model that allows a meaningful interpretation of the results. Experiments on synthetic and real data are supplied to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. A comparison with classical state-of-the-art interpolation techniques is presented to demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed methodology. PMID:21197094

  20. Role of Percutaneous Image Guided Biopsy in Spinal Lesions: Adequacy and Correlation with MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although, MRI has increased our understanding of spinal pathologies, accurate diagnosis of spinal lesions need biopsy, so that early treatment can be initiated. Aim To evaluate the accuracy of biopsy, safety and yield of percutaneously done image guided spinal biopsy using a large bore needle and correlate between MRI findings and biopsy as well as the importance of various MRI findings in establishing the diagnosis. Materials and Methods All spinal lesions after clinical and MRI evaluation were subjected to Jamshidi Needle biopsy using 11 gauge needles. Biopsy material was sent for culture/sensitivity, AFB smear and histopathological examination. The outcome assessment included percentage of patients in whom diagnosis was changed after biopsy, yield in biopsy and complications of biopsy. MRI findings, biopsy findings and final diagnosis were correlated to know the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and biopsy diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the importance of each of MRI findings in making a diagnosis. Results Forty five patients with spinal lesions underwent biopsy using an 11 gauge Jamshidi needle. Initial biopsy was inconclusive in 4 patients giving a positive yield in about 91.2% of cases and a repeat biopsy ensured conclusive report in all cases. Following biopsy there was a change in diagnosis in 8% cases. MRI showed sensitivity of 85.71% and specificity of 93.54% for the diagnosis of malignancy and sensitivity of 85.71% and specificity of 86.48% for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. In contrast, initial biopsy had sensitivity of 92.85% and specificity of 100% for the diagnosis of malignancy and sensitivity of 71.42% and specificity of 100 % for the diagnosis of infection. Logistic regression analysis showed good correlation between malignancy and posterior bugle in the vertebral body in the absence of a fracture (p = 0.007), involvement of pedicles and posterior elements (p = 0.001) and soft tissue extension (p = 0

  1. Comparison of functional MRI image realignment tools using a computer-generated phantom.

    PubMed

    Morgan, V L; Pickens, D R; Hartmann, S L; Price, R R

    2001-09-01

    This study discusses the development of a computer-generated phantom to compare the effects of image realignment programs on functional MRI (fMRI) pixel activation. The phantom is a whole-head MRI volume with added random noise, activation, and motion. It allows simulation of realistic head motions with controlled areas of activation. Without motion, the phantom shows the effects of realignment on motion-free data sets. Prior to realignment, the phantom illustrates some activation corruption due to motion. Finally, three widely used realignment packages are examined. The results showed that the most accurate algorithms are able to increase specificity through accurate realignment while maintaining sensitivity through effective resampling techniques. In fact, accurate realignment alone is not a powerful indicator of the most effective algorithm in terms of true activation.

  2. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children.

  3. A novel image analysis method based on Bayesian segmentation for event-related functional MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lejian; Comer, Mary L.; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the application of the expectation-maximization/maximization of the posterior marginals (EM/MPM) algorithm to signal detection for functional MRI (fMRI). On basis of assumptions for fMRI 3-D image data, a novel analysis method is proposed and applied to synthetic data and human brain data. Synthetic data analysis is conducted using two statistical noise models (white and autoregressive of order 1) and, for low contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) data, reveals better sensitivity and specificity for the new method than for the traditional General Linear Model (GLM) approach. When applied to human brain data, functional activation regions are found to be consistent with those obtained using the GLM approach.

  4. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children. PMID:25895913

  5. Segmentation of MRI Brain Images with an Improved Harmony Searching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhang; Li, Guo; Weifeng, Ding

    2016-01-01

    The harmony searching (HS) algorithm is a kind of optimization search algorithm currently applied in many practical problems. The HS algorithm constantly revises variables in the harmony database and the probability of different values that can be used to complete iteration convergence to achieve the optimal effect. Accordingly, this study proposed a modified algorithm to improve the efficiency of the algorithm. First, a rough set algorithm was employed to improve the convergence and accuracy of the HS algorithm. Then, the optimal value was obtained using the improved HS algorithm. The optimal value of convergence was employed as the initial value of the fuzzy clustering algorithm for segmenting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain images. Experimental results showed that the improved HS algorithm attained better convergence and more accurate results than those of the original HS algorithm. In our study, the MRI image segmentation effect of the improved algorithm was superior to that of the original fuzzy clustering method. PMID:27403428

  6. Segmentation of MRI Brain Images with an Improved Harmony Searching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhang; Shufan, Ye; Li, Guo; Weifeng, Ding

    2016-01-01

    The harmony searching (HS) algorithm is a kind of optimization search algorithm currently applied in many practical problems. The HS algorithm constantly revises variables in the harmony database and the probability of different values that can be used to complete iteration convergence to achieve the optimal effect. Accordingly, this study proposed a modified algorithm to improve the efficiency of the algorithm. First, a rough set algorithm was employed to improve the convergence and accuracy of the HS algorithm. Then, the optimal value was obtained using the improved HS algorithm. The optimal value of convergence was employed as the initial value of the fuzzy clustering algorithm for segmenting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain images. Experimental results showed that the improved HS algorithm attained better convergence and more accurate results than those of the original HS algorithm. In our study, the MRI image segmentation effect of the improved algorithm was superior to that of the original fuzzy clustering method. PMID:27403428

  7. Tissue Necrosis Monitoring for HIFU Ablation with T1 Contrast MRI Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, San-Chao; Yao, Ching; Kuo, Ih-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Hsu

    2011-09-01

    In MR-guided HIFU ablation, MTC (Magnetization Transfer Contrast) or perfusion imaging is usually used after ablation to evaluate the ablated area based on the thermally induced necrosis contrast. In our MR-guided HIFU ablation study, a T1 contrast MRI scan sequence has been used to distinguish between necrotic and non-necrotic tissue. The ablation of porcine meat in-vitro and in-vivo pig leg muscle show that the necrotic area of T1 contrast MRI image coincides with the photographs of sliced specimen. The sequence is considerably easier to apply than MTC or perfusion imaging, while giving good necrosis contrast. In addition, no injection of contrast agent is needed, allowing multiple scans to be applied throughout the entire ablation procedure.

  8. Rapid dynamic radial MRI via reference image enforced histogram constrained reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaass, Thomas; Bauman, Grzegorz; Potdevin, Guillaume; Noël, Peter B.; Haase, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Exploiting spatio-temporal redundancies in sub-Nyquist sampled dynamic MRI for the suppression of undersampling artifacts was shown to be of great success. However, temporally averaged and blurred structures in image space composite data poses the risk of false information in the reconstruction. Within this work we assess the possibility of employing the composite image histogram as a measure of undersampling artifacts and as basis of their suppression. The proposed algorithm utilizes a histogram, computed from a composite image within a dynamically acquired interleaved radial MRI measurement as reference to compensate for the impact of undersampling in temporally resolved data without the incorporation of temporal averaging. In addition an image space regularization utilizing a single frame low-resolution reconstruction is implemented to enforce overall contrast fidelity. The performance of the approach was evaluated on a simulated radial dynamic MRI acquisition and on two functional in vivo radial cardiac acquisitions. Results demonstrate that the algorithm maintained contrast properties, details and temporal resolution in the images, while effectively suppressing undersampling artifacts.

  9. Iterative image reconstruction that includes a total variation regularization for radial MRI.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shinya; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Hirata, Masami; Ueno, Eiko

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an iterative image reconstruction method for radial encodings in MRI based on a total variation (TV) regularization. The algebraic reconstruction method combined with total variation regularization (ART_TV) is implemented with a regularization parameter specifying the weight of the TV term in the optimization process. We used numerical simulations of a Shepp-Logan phantom, as well as experimental imaging of a phantom that included a rectangular-wave chart, to evaluate the performance of ART_TV, and to compare it with that of the Fourier transform (FT) method. The trade-off between spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was investigated for different values of the regularization parameter by experiments on a phantom and a commercially available MRI system. ART_TV was inferior to the FT with respect to the evaluation of the modulation transfer function (MTF), especially at high frequencies; however, it outperformed the FT with regard to the SNR. In accordance with the results of SNR measurement, visual impression suggested that the image quality of ART_TV was better than that of the FT for reconstruction of a noisy image of a kiwi fruit. In conclusion, ART_TV provides radial MRI with improved image quality for low-SNR data; however, the regularization parameter in ART_TV is a critical factor for obtaining improvement over the FT.

  10. Normalization of T2W-MRI prostate images using Rician a priori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Guillaume; Rastgoo, Mojdeh; Massich, Joan; Vilanova, Joan C.; Walker, Paul M.; Freixenet, Jordi; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Mériaudeau, Fabrice; Martí, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is reported to be the second most frequently diagnosed cancer of men in the world. In practise, diagnosis can be affected by multiple factors which reduces the chance to detect the potential lesions. In the last decades, new imaging techniques mainly based on MRI are developed in conjunction with Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems to help radiologists for such diagnosis. CAD systems are usually designed as a sequential process consisting of four stages: pre-processing, segmentation, registration and classification. As a pre-processing, image normalization is a critical and important step of the chain in order to design a robust classifier and overcome the inter-patients intensity variations. However, little attention has been dedicated to the normalization of T2W-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) prostate images. In this paper, we propose two methods to normalize T2W-MRI prostate images: (i) based on a Rician a priori and (ii) based on a Square-Root Slope Function (SRSF) representation which does not make any assumption regarding the Probability Density Function (PDF) of the data. A comparison with the state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The normalization of the data is assessed by comparing the alignment of the patient PDFs in both qualitative and quantitative manners. In both evaluation, the normalization using Rician a priori outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods.

  11. Iterative image reconstruction that includes a total variation regularization for radial MRI.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shinya; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Takeyuki; Hirata, Masami; Ueno, Eiko

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an iterative image reconstruction method for radial encodings in MRI based on a total variation (TV) regularization. The algebraic reconstruction method combined with total variation regularization (ART_TV) is implemented with a regularization parameter specifying the weight of the TV term in the optimization process. We used numerical simulations of a Shepp-Logan phantom, as well as experimental imaging of a phantom that included a rectangular-wave chart, to evaluate the performance of ART_TV, and to compare it with that of the Fourier transform (FT) method. The trade-off between spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was investigated for different values of the regularization parameter by experiments on a phantom and a commercially available MRI system. ART_TV was inferior to the FT with respect to the evaluation of the modulation transfer function (MTF), especially at high frequencies; however, it outperformed the FT with regard to the SNR. In accordance with the results of SNR measurement, visual impression suggested that the image quality of ART_TV was better than that of the FT for reconstruction of a noisy image of a kiwi fruit. In conclusion, ART_TV provides radial MRI with improved image quality for low-SNR data; however, the regularization parameter in ART_TV is a critical factor for obtaining improvement over the FT. PMID:25990884

  12. Repeated BOLD-fMRI imaging of deep brain stimulation responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tzu-Hao Harry; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a picture of the global spatial activation pattern of the brain. Interest is growing regarding the application of fMRI to rodent models to investigate adult brain plasticity. To date, most rodent studies used an electrical forepaw stimulation model to acquire fMRI data, with α-chloralose as the anesthetic. However, α-chloralose is harmful to animals, and not suitable for longitudinal studies. Moreover, peripheral stimulation models enable only a limited number of brain regions to be studied. Processing between peripheral regions and the brain is multisynaptic, and renders interpretation difficult and uncertain. In the present study, we combined the medetomidine-based fMRI protocol (a noninvasive rodent fMRI protocol) with chronic implantation of an MRI-compatible stimulation electrode in the ventroposterior (VP) thalamus to repetitively sample thalamocortical responses in the rat brain. Using this model, we scanned the forebrain responses evoked by the VP stimulation repeatedly of individual rats over 1 week. Cortical BOLD responses were compared between the 2 profiles obtained at day1 and day8. We discovered reproducible frequency- and amplitude-dependent BOLD responses in the ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1). The S1 BOLD responses during the 2 sessions were conserved in maximal response amplitude, area size (size ratio from 0.88 to 0.91), and location (overlap ratio from 0.61 to 0.67). The present study provides a long-term chronic brain stimulation protocol for studying the plasticity of specific neural circuits in the rodent brain by BOLD-fMRI. PMID:24825464

  13. Calibration standard of body tissue with magnetic nanocomposites for MRI and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Helene; Woodward, Robert; House, Michael; Engineer, Diana; Feindel, Kirk; Dutz, Silvio; Odenbach, Stefan; StPierre, Tim

    2016-05-01

    We present a first study of a long-term phantom for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging of biological tissues with magnetic nanocomposites (MNC) suitable for 3-dimensional and quantitative imaging of tissues after, e.g. magnetically assisted cancer treatments. We performed a cross-calibration of X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) and MRI with a joint calibration standard for both imaging techniques. For this, we have designed a phantom for MRI and X-ray computed tomography which represents biological tissue enriched with MNC. The developed phantoms consist of an elastomer with different concentrations of multi-core MNC. The matrix material is a synthetic thermoplastic gel, PermaGel (PG). The developed phantoms have been analyzed with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Relaxometry (Bruker minispec mq 60) at 1.4 T to obtain R2 transverse relaxation rates, with SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to verify the magnetite concentration, and with XμCT and 9.4 T MRI to visualize the phantoms 3-dimensionally and also to obtain T2 relaxation times. A specification of a sensitivity range is determined for standard imaging techniques X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and MRI as well as with NMR. These novel phantoms show a long-term stability over several months up to years. It was possible to suspend a particular MNC within the PG reaching a concentration range from 0 mg/ml to 6.914 mg/ml. The R2 relaxation rates from 1.4 T NMR-relaxometry show a clear connection (R2=0.994) with MNC concentrations between 0 mg/ml and 4.5 mg/ml. The MRI experiments have shown a linear correlation of R2 relaxation and MNC concentrations as well but in a range between MNC concentrations of 0 mg/ml and 1.435 mg/ml. It could be shown that XμCT displays best moderate and high MNC concentrations. The sensitivity range for this particular XμCT apparatus yields from 0.569 mg/ml to 6.914 mg/ml. The

  14. Simultaneous imaging of locus coeruleus and substantia nigra with a quantitative neuromelanin MRI approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangchuan; Huddleston, Daniel E; Langley, Jason; Ahn, Sinyeob; Barnum, Christopher J; Factor, Stewart A; Levey, Allan I; Hu, Xiaoping

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative MRI of neuromelanin (NM) containing structures (referred to as NM-MRI) in the brainstem, namely the locus coeruleus (LC) and substantia nigra (SN), may assist with the early detection of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as differential diagnosis in the early disease stages. In this study, two gradient echo (GRE) sequences with magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) preparation pulses were developed to simultaneously image the LC and SN. This has been a challenge with NM-MRI techniques used in previous studies due to the relatively high specific absorption rate (SAR) induced by these techniques. In addition, a semi-automated quantitative analysis scheme was applied to estimate volumes and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the LC and SN based on segmentation of both structures. Compared to a T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence typically used for simultaneous imaging of the LC and SN, the two GRE-MTC sequences exhibited improved performance in terms of higher sensitivity (in CNR) in imaging the SN and lower SAR during the scans. A multiple-measurement protocol was adopted as well so that motion degraded measurements could be removed and artifacts associated with motion could be corrected. The present approach has demonstrated advantages in image acquisition (lower SAR and higher sensitivity), image pre-processing (with motion correction) and quantitative image analysis (segmentation-based estimation of volume and CNR) when compared with existing NM-MRI approaches. This approach has potential for detection and monitoring of neurodegeneration in LC and SN in disease states including AD and PD.

  15. Update of diagnostic preoperative images using low-field interventional MRI for navigation in neurosurgery: rigid-body registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavec, Martin; Wikler, David; Phillips, Christophe L. M.; Vigneron, Lara M.; Levivier, Marc; Verly, Jacques G.

    2005-04-01

    This study looks into the rigid-body registration of pre-operative anatomical high field and interventional low field magnetic resonance images (MRI). The accurate 3D registration of these modalities is required to enhance the content of interventional images with anatomical (CT, high field MRI, DTI), functional (DWI, fMRI, PWI), metabolic (PET) or angiography (CTA, MRA) pre-operative images. The specific design of the interventional MRI scanner used in the present study, a PoleStar N20, induces image artifacts, such as ellipsoidal masking and intensity inhomogeneities, which affect registration performance. On MRI data from eleven patients, who underwent resection of a brain tumor, we quantitatively evaluated the effects of artifacts in the image registration process based on a normalized mutual information (NMI) metric criterion. The results show that the quality of alignment of pre-operative anatomical and interventional images strongly depends on pre-processing carried out prior to registration. The registration results scored the highest in visual evaluation only if intensity variations and masking were considered in image registration. We conclude that the alignment of anatomical high field MRI and PoleStar interventional images is the most accurate when the PoleStar's induced image artifacts are corrected for before registration.

  16. Automated localization of vertebra landmarks in MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Akshay; Narasimhamurthy, Anand; Rao, V. S. Veeravasarapu; Vaidya, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    The identification of key landmark points in an MR spine image is an important step for tasks such as vertebra counting. In this paper, we propose a template matching based approach for automatic detection of two key landmark points, namely the second cervical vertebra (C2) and the sacrum from sagittal MR images. The approach is comprised of an approximate localization of vertebral column followed by matching with appropriate templates in order to detect/localize the landmarks. A straightforward extension of the work described here is an automated classification of spine section(s). It also serves as a useful building block for further automatic processing such as extraction of regions of interest for subsequent image processing and also in aiding the counting of vertebra.

  17. Prioritization of brain MRI volumes using medical image perception model and tumor region segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Irfan; Ejaz, Naveed; Sajjad, Muhammad; Baik, Sung Wook

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore prioritization methods in diagnostic imaging modalities to automatically determine the contents of medical images. In this paper, we propose an efficient prioritization of brain MRI. First, the visual perception of the radiologists is adapted to identify salient regions. Then this saliency information is used as an automatic label for accurate segmentation of brain lesion to determine the scientific value of that image. The qualitative and quantitative results prove that the rankings generated by the proposed method are closer to the rankings created by radiologists. PMID:24034739

  18. Ultra-fast MRI of the human brain with simultaneous multi-slice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, David A.; Setsompop, Kawin

    2013-04-01

    The recent advancement of simultaneous multi-slice imaging using multiband excitation has dramatically reduced the scan time of the brain. The evolution of this parallel imaging technique began over a decade ago and through recent sequence improvements has reduced the acquisition time of multi-slice EPI by over ten fold. This technique has recently become extremely useful for (i) functional MRI studies improving the statistical definition of neuronal networks, and (ii) diffusion based fiber tractography to visualize structural connections in the human brain. Several applications and evaluations are underway which show promise for this family of fast imaging sequences.

  19. Robust Fluoroscopic Tracking of Fiducial Markers: Exploiting the Spatial Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Two new fluoroscopic fiducial tracking methods that exploit the spatial relationship among the multiple implanted fiducial to achieve fast, accurate and robust tracking are proposed in this paper. The spatial relationship between multiple implanted markers are modeled as Gaussian distributions of their pairwise distances over time. The means and standard deviations of these distances are learned from training sequences, and pairwise distances that deviate from these learned distributions are assigned a low spatial matching score. The spatial constraints are incorporated in two different algorithms: a stochastic tracking method and a detection based method. In the stochastic method, hypotheses of the “true” fiducial position are sampled from a pre-trained respiration motion model. Each hypothesis is assigned an importance value based on image matching score and spatial matching score. Learning the parameters of the motion model is needed in addition to the learning the distribution parameters of the pairwise distances in the proposed stochastic tracking approach. In the detection based method, a set of possible marker locations are identified by using a template matching based fiducial detector. The best location is obtained by optimizing the image matching score and spatial matching score through non-serial dynamic programming. In this detection based approach, there is no need to learn the respiration motion model. The two proposed algorithms are compared with a recent work using multiple hypothesis tracking algorithm which is denoted by MHT[19]. Phantom experiments were performed using fluoroscopic videos captured with known motion relative to an anthropomorphic phantom. The patient experiments were performed using a retrospective study of 16 fluoroscopic videos of liver cancer patients with implanted fiducials. For the motion phantom data sets, the detection based approach has the smallest tracking error (μerr: 0.78 – 1.74 mm, σerr: 0.39 – 1.16 mm) for

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Markers for MRI-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Novel Marker-Flange for Cervical Cancer and Marker Catheters for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schindel, Joshua; Muruganandham, Manickam; Pigge, F. Christopher; Anderson, James; Kim, Yusung

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To present a novel marker-flange, addressing source-reconstruction uncertainties due to the artifacts of a titanium intracavitary applicator used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT); and to evaluate 7 different MRI marker agents used for interstitial prostate BT and intracavitary gynecologic HDR BT when treatment plans are guided by MRI. Methods and Materials: Seven MRI marker agents were analyzed: saline solution, Conray-60, copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) (1.5 g/L), liquid vitamin E, fish oil, 1% agarose gel (1 g agarose powder per 100 mL distilled water), and a cobalt–chloride complex contrast (C4) (CoCl{sub 2}/glycine = 4:1). A plastic, ring-shaped marker-flange was designed and tested on both titanium and plastic applicators. Three separate phantoms were designed to test the marker-flange, interstitial catheters for prostate BT, and intracavitary catheters for gynecologic HDR BT. T1- and T2-weighted MRI were analyzed for all markers in each phantom and quantified as percentages compared with a 3% agarose gel background. The geometric accuracy of the MR signal for the marker-flange was measured using an MRI-CT fusion. Results: The CuSO{sub 4} and C4 markers on T1-weighted MRI and saline on T2-weighted MRI showed the highest signals. The marker-flange showed hyper-signals of >500% with CuSO{sub 4} and C4 on T1-weighted MRI and of >400% with saline on T2-weighted MRI on titanium applicators. On T1-weighted MRI, the MRI signal inaccuracies of marker-flanges were measured <2 mm, regardless of marker agents, and that of CuSO{sub 4} was 0.42 ± 0.14 mm. Conclusion: The use of interstitial/intracavitary markers for MRI-guided prostate/gynecologic BT was observed to be feasible, providing accurate source pathway reconstruction. The novel marker-flange can produce extremely intense, accurate signals, demonstrating its feasibility for gynecologic HDR BT.

  1. Single-Step Assembly of Multi-Modal Imaging Nanocarriers: MRI and Long-Wavelength Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, Nathalie M.; Gindy, Marian E.; Calero-DdelC, Victoria L.; Wolfson, Theodore; Pagels, Robert F.; Adler, Derek; Gao, Dayuan; Li, Shike; Wang, Ruobing; Zevon, Margot; Yao, Nan; Pacheco, Carlos; Therien, Michael J.; Rinaldi, Carlos; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    MRI and NIR-active, multi-modal Composite NanoCarriers (CNCs) are prepared using a simple, one-step process, Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP). The FNP process allows for the independent control of the hydrodynamic diameter, co-core excipient and NIR dye loading, and iron oxide-based nanocrystal (IONC) content of the CNCs. In the controlled precipitation process, 10 nm IONCs are encapsulated into poly(ethylene glycol) stabilized CNCs to make biocompatible T2 contrast agents. By adjusting the formulation, CNC size is tuned between 80 and 360 nm. Holding the CNC size constant at an intensity weighted average diameter of 99 ± 3 nm (PDI width 28 nm), the particle relaxivity varies linearly with encapsulated IONC content ranging from 66 to 533 mM-1s-1 for CNCs formulated with 4 to 16 wt% IONC. To demonstrate the use of CNCs as in vivo MRI contrast agents, CNCs are surface functionalized with liver targeting hydroxyl groups. The CNCs enable the detection of 0.8 mm3 non-small cell lung cancer metastases in mice livers via MRI. Incorporating the hydrophobic, NIR dye PZn3 into CNCs enables complementary visualization with long-wavelength fluorescence at 800 nm. In vivo imaging demonstrates the ability of CNCs to act both as MRI and fluorescent imaging agents. PMID:25925128

  2. Gray matter myelination of 1555 human brains using partial volume corrected MRI images

    PubMed Central

    Shafee, Rebecca; Buckner, Randy L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The myelin content of the cortex changes over the human lifetime and aberrant cortical myelination is associated with diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Recently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential in differentiating between myeloarchitectonically distinct cortical regions in vivo. Here we introduce a new algorithm for correcting partial volume effects present in mm-scale MRI images which was used to investigate the myelination pattern of the cerebral cortex in 1555 clinically normal subjects using the ratio of T1-weighted (T1w) and T2-weighted (T2w) MRI images. A significant linear cross-sectional age increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin was detected across an 18 to 35 year age span (highest value of ~ 1%/year compared to mean T1w/T2w myelin value at 18 years). The cortex was divided at mid-thickness and the value of T1w/T2w myelin calculated for the inner and the outer layers separately. The increase in T1w/T2w estimated myelin occurs predominantly in the inner layer for most cortical regions. The ratio of the inner and outer layer T1w/T12w myelin was further validated using high-resolution in vivo MRI scans and also a high-resolution MRI scan of a postmortem brain. Additionally, the relationships between cortical thickness, curvature and T1w/T2w estimated myelin were found to be significant, although the relationships varied across the cortex. We discuss these observations as well as limitations of using the T1w/T2w ratio as an estimate of cortical myelin. PMID:25449739

  3. Ultra-small gadolinium oxide nanoparticles to image brain cancer cells in vivo with MRI.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Luc; Guay-Bégin, Andrée-Anne; Lagueux, Jean; Côté, Marie-France; Petitclerc, Eric; Fortin, Marc-André

    2011-01-01

    The majority of contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is based on the rare-earth element gadolinium. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles could find promising applications in pre-clinical diagnostic procedures of certain types of cancer, such as glioblastoma multiforme. This is one of the most malignant, lethal and poorly accessible forms of cancer. Recent advances in colloidal nanocrystal synthesis have led to the development of ultra-small crystals of gadolinium oxide (US-Gd(2)O(3), 2-3 nm diameter). As of today, this is the smallest and the densest of all Gd-containing nanoparticles. Cancer cells labeled with a sufficient quantity of this compound appear bright in T(1)-weighted MRI images. Here we demonstrate that US-Gd(2)O(3) can be used to label GL-261 glioblastoma multiforme cells, followed by localization and visualization in vivo using MRI. Very high amounts of Gd are efficiently internalized and retained in cells, as confirmed with TEM and ICP-MS. Labeled cells were visualized in vivo at 1.5 T using the chicken embryo model. This is one more step toward the development of "positively contrasted" cell tracking procedures with MRI.

  4. Refinement of Optical Imaging Spectroscopy Algorithms using concurrent BOLD and CBV fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Kennerley, Aneurin J; Berwick, Jason; Martindale, John; Johnston, David; Zheng, Ying; Mayhew, John E

    2009-01-01

    We describe the use of the three dimensional characteristics of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) MRI signal changes to refine a two dimensional optical imaging spectroscopy (OIS) algorithm. The cortical depth profiles of the BOLD and CBV changes following neural activation were used to parameterise a 5-layer heterogeneous tissue model used in the Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) of light transport through tissue in the OIS analysis algorithm. To transform the fMRI BOLD and CBV measurements into deoxy-haemoglobin (Hbr) profiles we inverted an MCS of extravascular MR signal attenuation under the assumption that the extra-/intravascular ratio is 2:1 at a magnetic field strength of 3T. The significant improvement in the quantitative accuracy of haemodynamic measurements using the new heterogeneous tissue model over the original homogeneous tissue model OIS algorithm was demonstrated on new concurrent OIS and fMRI data covering a range of stimulus durations. PMID:19505581

  5. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI to Image Inflammation within Human Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: A Pilot Investigation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, David M; Amans, Matthew; Tihan, Tarik; Hess, Christopher; Guo, Yi; Cha, Soonmee; Su, Hua; Martin, Alastair J; Lawton, Michael T; Neuwelt, Edward A; Saloner, David A; Young, William L

    2012-07-01

    Inflammation cell infiltration and cytokine expression are seen in the vascular walls and intervening stroma of resected brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) specimens, even in unruptured and previously untreated lesions. Macrophages may play a critical role in bAVM progression to rupture, and could serve as a marker for rupture risk. We assessed feasibility of imaging macrophages within the bAVM nidus using ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI in four patients with already diagnosed bAVMs using iron-sensitive imaging (ISI; T2*-GE-MRI sequence). Patients were imaged at baseline and at either 1 day (n=2) or 5 days (n=2) after infusion of 5mg/kg of ferumoxytol. Residual intravascular ferumoxytol obscured evaluation for uptake in bAVM vascular walls and stroma at the 1-day time point. The two cases imaged at 5 days showed less intravascular tracer but had signal loss in the nidal region consistent with ferumoxytol localization. One case underwent surgical resection; there was prominent vascular wall CD68 staining. Ferumoxytol-enhanced-MRI for assessing bAVM inflammatory cell burden appears feasible and has the potential to be developed as a biomarker to study lesional inflammatory events. PMID:23002401

  6. Tyrosinase as a multifunctional reporter gene for Photoacoustic/MRI/PET triple modality molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chunxia; Cheng, Kai; Chen, Kai; Hu, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Lan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yongxue; Liu, Hongguang; Xu, Yingding; Bu, Lihong; Su, Xinhui; Zhu, Xiaohua; Meng, Shuxian; Cheng, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Development of reporter genes for multimodality molecular imaging is highly important. In contrast to the conventional strategies which have focused on fusing several reporter genes together to serve as multimodal reporters, human tyrosinase (TYR) – the key enzyme in melanin production – was evaluated in this study as a stand-alone reporter gene for in vitro and in vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Human breast cancer cells MCF-7 transfected with a plasmid that encodes TYR (named as MCF-7-TYR) and non-transfected MCF-7 cells were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Melanin targeted N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-18F-5-fluoropicolinamide was used as a PET reporter probe. In vivo PAI/MRI/PET imaging studies showed that MCF-7-TYR tumors achieved significant higher signals and tumor-to-background contrasts than those of MCF-7 tumor. Our study demonstrates that TYR gene can be utilized as a multifunctional reporter gene for PAI/MRI/PET both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23508226

  7. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI to Image Inflammation within Human Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: A Pilot Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, David M.; Amans, Matthew; Tihan, Tarik; Hess, Christopher; Guo, Yi; Cha, Soonmee; Su, Hua; Martin, Alastair J.; Lawton, Michael T.; Neuwelt, Edward A.; Saloner, David A.; Young, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation cell infiltration and cytokine expression are seen in the vascular walls and intervening stroma of resected brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) specimens, even in unruptured and previously untreated lesions. Macrophages may play a critical role in bAVM progression to rupture, and could serve as a marker for rupture risk. We assessed feasibility of imaging macrophages within the bAVM nidus using ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI in four patients with already diagnosed bAVMs using iron-sensitive imaging (ISI; T2*-GE-MRI sequence). Patients were imaged at baseline and at either 1 day (n=2) or 5 days (n=2) after infusion of 5mg/kg of ferumoxytol. Residual intravascular ferumoxytol obscured evaluation for uptake in bAVM vascular walls and stroma at the 1-day time point. The two cases imaged at 5 days showed less intravascular tracer but had signal loss in the nidal region consistent with ferumoxytol localization. One case underwent surgical resection; there was prominent vascular wall CD68 staining. Ferumoxytol-enhanced-MRI for assessing bAVM inflammatory cell burden appears feasible and has the potential to be developed as a biomarker to study lesional inflammatory events. PMID:23002401

  8. 2D Imaging in a Lightweight Portable MRI Scanner without Gradient Coils

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman; Stockmann, Jason P.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lev, Michael H.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as Intensive Care Units, physician offices, surgical suites, ambulances, emergency rooms, sports facilities, or rural healthcare sites. Methods We construct and validate a truly portable (<100kg) and silent proof-of-concept MRI scanner which replaces conventional gradient encoding with a rotating lightweight cryogen-free, low-field magnet. When rotated about the object, the inhomogeneous field pattern is used as a rotating Spatial Encoding Magnetic field (rSEM) to create generalized projections which encode the iteratively reconstructed 2D image. Multiple receive channels are used to disambiguate the non-bijective encoding field. Results The system is validated with experimental images of 2D test phantoms. Similar to other non-linear field encoding schemes, the spatial resolution is position dependent with blurring in the center, but is shown to be likely sufficient for many medical applications. Conclusion The presented MRI scanner demonstrates the potential for portability by simultaneously relaxing the magnet homogeneity criteria and eliminating the gradient coil. This new architecture and encoding scheme shows convincing proof of concept images that are expected to be further improved with refinement of the calibration and methodology. PMID:24668520

  9. Clinical cell therapy imaging using a perfluorocarbon tracer and fluorine-19 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Eric T; Helfer, Brooke M; O'Hanlon, Charles F; Schirda, Claudiu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cellular therapeutics are emerging as a treatment option for a host of serious human diseases. To accelerate clinical translation, noninvasive imaging of cell grafts in clinical trials can potentially be used to assess the initial delivery and behavior of cells. Methods The use of a perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer agent for clinical fluorine-19 (19F) MRI cell detection is described. This technology was used to detect immunotherapeutic dendritic cells (DCs) delivered to colorectal adenocarcinoma patients. Autologous DC vaccines were labeled with a PFC MRI agent ex vivo. Patients received DCs intradermally, and 19F spin-density-weighted MRI at 3 Tesla (T) was used to observe cells. Results Spin-density-weighted 19F images at the injection site displayed DCs as background-free “hot-spot” images. 19F images were acquired in clinically relevant scan times (<10 min). Apparent DC numbers could be quantified in two patients from the 19F hot-spots and were observed to decrease by ∼50% at injection site by 24 h. From 3T phantom studies, the sensitivity limit for DC detection is estimated to be on the order of ∼105 cells/voxel in this study. Conclusion These results help to establish a clinically applicable means to track a broad range of cell types used in cell therapy. Magn Reson Med 72:1696–1701, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:25241945

  10. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Feiglin, D.H.I.; Moodie, D.S.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Sterba, R.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied 11 adult patients (pts) with atrial septal defect (ASD) and 4 adult pts with ventricular septal defect (VSD) using cine magnetic resonance. All studies were performed using a .6T superconducting magnet with ECG gating and electronic axial rotation when appropriate. Repeated multislice image with no change in physiologic delay of the spin echo pulse sequence, but varying the time by offsetting one slice at each imaging stage allowed for an N x N collection of data where N is the number of slices in one collection set and is equal to the number of sets collected. Algebraic manipulation of the T1 weighted images (TE=30mSec TRimaging of the atrial septum than does conventional MRI. Using this technique, the authors have identified both atrial and ventricular septal defects in all pts preoperatively and have noted an intact atrial septum following surgery. Standard MRI produced 4 false positive studies postoperatively because only 1 phase of the cardiac cycle was reviewed. Cine MRI allows better identification of septal defects than standard static acquisitions. The cine technique also provides better definition and delineation of right sided abnormalities which are maximized when viewed in a cardiac major axis obtained by electronic axial rotation.

  11. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves high accuracy brain tumor segmentation results.

  12. Model for B1 Imaging in MRI Using the Rotating RF Field

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed by pulsing gradient coils, which invariably leads to strong acoustic noise, patient safety concerns due to induced currents, and costly power/space requirements. This modeling study investigates a new silent, gradient coil-free MR imaging method, in which a radiofrequency (RF) coil and its nonuniform field (B 1 +) are mechanically rotated about the patient. The advantage of the rotating B 1 + field is that, for the first time, it provides a large number of degrees of freedom to aid a successful B 1 + image encoding process. The mathematical modeling was performed using flip angle modulation as part of a finite-difference-based Bloch equation solver. Preliminary results suggest that representative MR images with intensity deviations of <5% from the original image can be obtained using rotating RF field approach. This method may open up new avenues towards anatomical and functional imaging in medicine. PMID:24963336

  13. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    PubMed Central

    Mera Iglesias, Moisés; Aramburu Núñez, David; del Olmo Claudio, José Luis; Salvador Gómez, Francisco; Driscoll, Brandon; Coolens, Catherine; Alba Castro, José L.; Muñoz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets. PMID:25788972

  14. Assessment of bias for MRI diffusion tensor imaging using SIMEX.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Carolyn B; Asman, Andrew J; Crainiceanu, Ciprian; Caffo, Brian C; Landman, Bennett A

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is a Magnetic Resonance Imaging method for measuring water diffusion in vivo. One powerful DTI contrast is fractional anisotropy (FA). FA reflects the strength of water's diffusion directional preference and is a primary metric for neuronal fiber tracking. As with other DTI contrasts, FA measurements are obscured by the well established presence of bias. DTI bias has been challenging to assess because it is a multivariable problem including SNR, six tensor parameters, and the DTI collection and processing method used. SIMEX is a modem statistical technique that estimates bias by tracking measurement error as a function of added noise. Here, we use SIMEX to assess bias in FA measurements and show the method provides; i) accurate FA bias estimates, ii) representation of FA bias that is data set specific and accessible to non-statisticians, and iii) a first time possibility for incorporation of bias into DTI data analysis. PMID:21995019

  15. Three-dimensional correlation of MR images to muscle tissue response for interventional MRI thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Michael S.; Lazebnik, Roee S.; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Wilson, David L.

    2003-05-01

    Solid tumors and other pathologies are being treated using radio-frequency (RF) ablation under interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) guidance. In animal experiments, we are investigating the ability of MR to monitor ablation treatments by comparing MR images of thermal lesions to histologically assayed cellular damage. We developed a new methodology using three-dimensional registration for making spatial correlations. A low-field, open MRI system was used to guide an ablation probe into the thigh muscle of 10 rabbits and acquire MR volumes post ablation. After the in vivo MR and histology images were aligned with a registration accuracy of 1.32 +/- 0.39 mm (mean +/- SD), a boundary of necrosis identified in histology images was compared with manually segmented boundaries of the elliptical hyperintense region in MR images. For 14 MR images, we determined that the outer boundary of the hyperintense region in MR closely corresponds to the region of cell death, with a mean absolute distance between boundaries of 0.97 mm. Since this distance may be less than our ability to measure such differences, boundaries may match perfectly. This is good evidence that MR lesion images can localize the region of cell death during RF ablation treatments.

  16. Towards fluoroscopic respiratory gating for lung tumours without radiopaque markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Mostafavi, Hassan; Sharp, Gregory C.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2005-10-01

    Due to the risk of pneumothorax, many clinicians are reluctant to implant radiopaque markers within patients' lungs for the purpose of radiographic or fluoroscopic tumour localization. We propose a method of gated therapy using fluoroscopic information without the implantation of radiopaque markers. The method presented here does not rely on any external motion signal either. Breathing phase information is found by analysing the fluoroscopic intensity fluctuations in the lung. As the lungs fill/empty, the radiological pathlength through them shortens/lengthens, giving brighter/darker fluoroscopic intensities. The phase information is combined with motion-enhanced template matching to turn the beam on when the tumour is in the desired location. A study based on patient data is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this procedure. The resulting beam-on pattern is similar to that produced by an external gating system. The only discrepancies occur briefly and at the gate edges.

  17. Molecular imaging of atherosclerosis with nanoparticle-based fluorinated MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Palekar, Rohun U; Jallouk, Andrew P; Lanza, Gregory M; Pan, Hua; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    As atherosclerosis remains one of the most prevalent causes of patient mortality, the ability to diagnose early signs of plaque rupture and thrombosis represents a significant clinical need. With recent advances in nanotechnology, it is now possible to image specific molecular processes noninvasively with MRI, using various types of nanoparticles as contrast agents. In the context of cardiovascular disease, it is possible to specifically deliver contrast agents to an epitope of interest for detecting vascular inflammatory processes, which serve as predecessors to atherosclerotic plaque development. Herein, we review various applications of nanotechnology in detecting atherosclerosis using MRI, with an emphasis on perfluorocarbon nanoparticles and fluorine imaging, along with theranostic prospects of nanotechnology in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26080701

  18. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    PubMed

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively. PMID:26736354

  19. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural

  20. Integrating carthage-specific T1rho MRI into knee clinic diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Douglas R; Klocke, Noelle F; Thedens, Daniel R; Martin, James A; Williams, Glenn N; Amendola, Annunziato

    2011-01-01

    With a rise in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, OA no longer is considered just a disease of aging. The 'gold standard' for OA diagnosis has long been planar radiographs for visualizing osteophytes, joint space narrowing and sclerotic changes. A typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol will acquire proton density, T1, T2, and fat suppressed images that give a comprehensive picture of morphologic changes associated with injury and subsequent degenerative processes. However, the earliest events of cartilage degeneration occur within the tissue, before measureable changes in morphology. MRI methods have been proposed to display and quantify changes in composition and integrity of such elements of cartilage extracellular matrix as collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content in vivo. T1ρ the spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame, has come to the forefront for visualizing water proton-PG interactions in articular cartilage. The purpose of this T1ρ MRI study was to define an objective femoral condyle-specific registration method, in which zone-dependent cartilage compositional changes could be assessed from the bone outward through the existing cartilage, at pre-ACL reconstruction and subsequent follow-up times, when the loss of thickness to surface-down cartilage erosion might occur later in the OA pathogenesis. Additionally, this study explores the effects of reducing the number of spin-lock times on the absolute T1ρ relaxation times; a major parameter in expanding T1ρ coverage to the whole joint while satisfying clinical imaging time and specific absorption rate (SAR) safety constraints. The developed image analysis tools serve as the first step toward quantitative functional assessment of cartilage health with noninvasive T1ρ MRI, which has the potential to become an important new tool for the early diagnosis of cartilage degeneration following ACL trauma.

  1. Imaging and 3-D dosimetry: top tips for MRI and optical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Simon J.

    2010-11-01

    The conference "refresher session" associated with this abstract reviews the main principles of the two most important imaging readout modalities for 3-D dosimetry: MRI and optical CT. Best practices for both these techniques are already described in several different places in the literature, but, for the uninitiated, there are a number of pitfalls. Here, I list some of the important considerations required to obtain good results from these methods and point to relevant prior work.

  2. Robust segmentation of 4D cardiac MRI-tagged images via spatio-temporal propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Zhen; Huang, Xiaolei; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Axel, Leon

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we present a robust method for segmenting and tracking cardiac contours and tags in 4D cardiac MRI tagged images via spatio-temporal propagation. Our method is based on two main techniques: the Metamorphs Segmentation for robust boundary estimation, and the tunable Gabor filter bank for tagging lines enhancement, removal and myocardium tracking. We have developed a prototype system based on the integration of these two techniques, and achieved efficient, robust segmentation and tracking with minimal human interaction.

  3. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  4. 3D segmentation of masses in DCE-MRI images using FCM and adaptive MRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengjie; Li, Lihua

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a sensitive imaging modality for the detection of breast cancer. Automated segmentation of breast lesions in DCE-MRI images is challenging due to inherent signal-to-noise ratios and high inter-patient variability. A novel 3D segmentation method based on FCM and MRF is proposed in this study. In this method, a MRI image is segmented by spatial FCM, firstly. And then MRF segmentation is conducted to refine the result. We combined with the 3D information of lesion in the MRF segmentation process by using segmentation result of contiguous slices to constraint the slice segmentation. At the same time, a membership matrix of FCM segmentation result is used for adaptive adjustment of Markov parameters in MRF segmentation process. The proposed method was applied for lesion segmentation on 145 breast DCE-MRI examinations (86 malignant and 59 benign cases). An evaluation of segmentation was taken using the traditional overlap rate method between the segmented region and hand-drawing ground truth. The average overlap rates for benign and malignant lesions are 0.764 and 0.755 respectively. Then we extracted five features based on the segmentation region, and used an artificial neural network (ANN) to classify between malignant and benign cases. The ANN had a classification performance measured by the area under the ROC curve of AUC=0.73. The positive and negative predictive values were 0.86 and 0.58, respectively. The results demonstrate the proposed method not only achieves a better segmentation performance in accuracy also has a reasonable classification performance.

  5. Recent advances in MRI technology: Implications for image quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Wlad T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in MRI technology are presented, with emphasis on how this new technology impacts clinical operations (better image quality, faster exam times, and improved throughput). In addition, implications for patient safety are discussed with emphasis on the risk of patient injury due to either high local specific absorption rate (SAR) or large cumulative energy doses delivered during long exam times. Patient comfort issues are examined as well. PMID:23961024

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Perianal Fistulae with Surgical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Navdeep; Thukral, CL; Singh, Kunwar Pal; Bhalla, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in detection and characterization of perianal fistulae and correlating it with surgical findings. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with suspected perianal fistulae having one or more external openings were prospectively selected for MRI evaluation. Previously operated or patients with recurrent perianal disease were excluded from the study. MRI findings were recorded according to “St. James’s University Hospital MR Imaging Classification of Perianal Fistulae” and correlated with surgical observations. Finally, comparison between T2-weighted fat saturated and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences was done. Results: Amongst the total of 50 patients, per-operative findings confirmed perianal fistulae in 45 patients. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI in correctly detecting and grading the primary tract was found to be 95.56% and 80% respectively; for abscess, it was 87.50% and 95.24% respectively. High sensitivity was also discerned in identification of secondary tract (93.75%), correct localization of internal opening (95.83%) and for correctly detecting the horse-shoeing (87.50%). Our assumption of null hypothesis was accepted on comparing results of T2-weighted fat saturated sequences and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences. Conclusion: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was highly accurate in assessment of surgically important parameters (primary tract and its grading, internal opening, secondary tract, abscess, horseshoeing) of perianal fistulae. Comparison of results of imaging findings on T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted fat saturated sequences were statistically similar, so contrast study can be omitted, particularly while evaluating primary / previously unoperated perianal fistulae. PMID:25121040

  7. Fluoroscopically Guided Balloon Dilation for Postintubation Tracheal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyoung Park, Jung-Hun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Little was known about the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods: From February 2000 to November 2010, 14 patients underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were evaluated. Patients were followed up for recurrent symptoms. Results: In all patients, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was technically and clinically successful with no major complications. Following the initial procedure, six patients (43 %) remained asymptomatic during a follow-up period. Obstructive symptoms recurred in eight patients (57 %) within 6 months (mean, 1.7 months), who were treated with repeat balloon dilation (n = 4) and other therapies. Of the four patients who underwent repeat balloon dilation, three became asymptomatic. One patient became asymptomatic after a third balloon dilation. On long-term (mean, 74 months) follow-up, 71 % of patients experienced relief of symptoms following fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation may be safe, is easy to perform, and resulted in effective treatment in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis.

  8. MRI of trabecular bone using a DDIF contrast imaging sequence

    PubMed Central

    Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the DDIF (Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field) method using intact animal trabecular bone specimens of varying trabecular structure and porosity, under ex vivo conditions closely resembling in vivo physiological conditions. The DDIF method provides a diffusion contrast which is related to the surface-to-volume ratio of the porous structure of bones. DDIF has previously been used successfully to study marrow-free trabecular bone, but the DDIF contrast hitherto had not been tested in intact specimens containing marrow and surrounded by soft tissue. Materials and Methods DDIF imaging was implemented on a 4.7 T small-bore, horizontal, animal scanner. Ex vivo results on fresh bone specimens containing marrow were obtained at body temperature. Control measurements were carried out in surrounding tissue and saline. Results Significant DDIF effect was observed for trabecular bone samples, while it was considerably smaller for soft tissue outside the bone and for lipids. Additionally, significant differences were observed between specimens of different trabecular structure. Conclusion The DDIF contrast is feasible despite the reduction of the diffusion constant and of T1 in such conditions, increasing our confidence that DDIF imaging in vivo may be clinically viable for bone characterization. PMID:21780229

  9. Is your system calibrated? MRI gradient system calibration for pre-clinical, high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, James; Wells, Jack; Richardson, Simon; Holmes, Holly; Yu, Yichao; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Siow, Bernard; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    High-field, pre-clinical MRI systems are widely used to characterise tissue structure and volume in small animals, using high resolution imaging. Both applications rely heavily on the consistent, accurate calibration of imaging gradients, yet such calibrations are typically only performed during maintenance sessions by equipment manufacturers, and potentially with acceptance limits that are inadequate for phenotyping. To overcome this difficulty, we present a protocol for gradient calibration quality assurance testing, based on a 3D-printed, open source, structural phantom that can be customised to the dimensions of individual scanners and RF coils. In trials on a 9.4 T system, the gradient scaling errors were reduced by an order of magnitude, and displacements of greater than 100 µm, caused by gradient non-linearity, were corrected using a post-processing technique. The step-by-step protocol can be integrated into routine pre-clinical MRI quality assurance to measure and correct for these errors. We suggest that this type of quality assurance is essential for robust pre-clinical MRI experiments that rely on accurate imaging gradients, including small animal phenotyping and diffusion MR.

  10. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold Flooding During Continuous Fuel Cell Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Majors, Paul D.; Wang, Li Q.; Rieke, Peter C.

    2006-10-27

    The methods, apparatus, and results are reported for in-situ, near real time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of MEA dehydration and gas manifold flooding in an operating PEM fuel cell. To acquire high-resolution, artifact-free images for visualizing water distribution, acquisition parameters for a standard, two-dimensional (2D), spin-echo sequence were first optimized for the measured magnetic field heterogeneity induced by fuel cell components. 2D images of water inside the fuel cell were then acquired every 128 seconds during 11.4 hours of continuous operation under constant load. Collected images revealed that MEA dehydration proceeded non-uniformly across its plane, starting from gas inlets and ending at gas outlets, and that upon completion of this dehydration process manifold flooding began. To understand these observations, acquired images were correlated to the current output and operating characteristics of the fuel cell. Results demonstrate the power of MRI for in-situ, near real-time imaging of water distribution and non-uniformity in operating PEM fuel cells, and highlight its utility for understanding PEM fuel cell operation, the causes of cell failure, and for developing new strategies of water management.

  12. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET–MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  ‑1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  ‑19.9  ±  11.8% and  ‑8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  13. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  14. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  15. Atlas-guided generation of pseudo-CT images for MRI-only and hybrid PET-MRI-guided radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Hossein; Koutsouvelis, Nikolaos; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation correction (AC) of positron emission tomography (PET) data and/or radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning is challenged by the lack of a direct link between MRI voxel intensities and electron density. Therefore, even if this is not a trivial task, a pseudo-computed tomography (CT) image must be predicted from MRI alone. In this work, we propose a two-step (segmentation and fusion) atlas-based algorithm focusing on bone tissue identification to create a pseudo-CT image from conventional MRI sequences and evaluate its performance against the conventional MRI segmentation technique and a recently proposed multi-atlas approach. The clinical studies consisted of pelvic CT, PET and MRI scans of 12 patients with loco-regionally advanced rectal disease. In the first step, bone segmentation of the target image is optimized through local weighted atlas voting. The obtained bone map is then used to assess the quality of deformed atlases to perform voxel-wise weighted atlas fusion. To evaluate the performance of the method, a leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) scheme was devised to find optimal parameters for the model. Geometric evaluation of the produced pseudo-CT images and quantitative analysis of the accuracy of PET AC were performed. Moreover, a dosimetric evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy photon treatment plans calculated using the different pseudo-CT images was carried out and compared to those produced using CT images serving as references. The pseudo-CT images produced using the proposed method exhibit bone identification accuracy of 0.89 based on the Dice similarity metric compared to 0.75 achieved by the other atlas-based method. The superior bone extraction resulted in a mean standard uptake value bias of  -1.5  ±  5.0% (mean  ±  SD) in bony structures compared to  -19.9  ±  11.8% and  -8.1  ±  8.2% achieved by MRI segmentation-based (water

  16. A spatio-temporal detective quantum efficiency and its application to fluoroscopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S. N.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopic x-ray imaging systems are used extensively in spatio-temporal detection tasks and require a spatio-temporal description of system performance. No accepted metric exists that describes spatio-temporal fluoroscopic performance. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is a metric widely used in radiography to quantify system performance and as a surrogate measure of patient ''dose efficiency.'' It has been applied previously to fluoroscopic systems with the introduction of a temporal correction factor. However, the use of a temporally-corrected DQE does not provide system temporal information and it is only valid under specific conditions, many of which are not likely to be satisfied by suboptimal systems. The authors propose a spatio-temporal DQE that describes performance in both space and time and is applicable to all spatio-temporal quantum-based imaging systems. Methods: The authors define a spatio-temporal DQE (two spatial-frequency axes and one temporal-frequency axis) in terms of a small-signal spatio-temporal modulation transfer function (MTF) and spatio-temporal noise power spectrum (NPS). Measurements were made on an x-ray image intensifier-based bench-top system using continuous fluoroscopy with an RQA-5 beam at 3.9 {mu}R/frame and hardened 50 kVp beam (0.8 mm Cu filtration added) at 1.9 {mu}R/frame. Results: A zero-frequency DQE value of 0.64 was measured under both conditions. Nonideal performance was noted at both larger spatial and temporal frequencies; DQE values decreased by {approx}50% at the cutoff temporal frequency of 15 Hz. Conclusions: The spatio-temporal DQE enables measurements of decreased temporal system performance at larger temporal frequencies analogous to previous measurements of decreased (spatial) performance. This marks the first time that system performance and dose efficiency in both space and time have been measured on a fluoroscopic system using DQE and is the first step toward the generalized use of DQE on

  17. Developing a quality control protocol for diffusion imaging on a clinical MRI system.

    PubMed

    Delakis, Ioannis; Moore, Elizabeth M; Leach, Martin O; De Wilde, Janet P

    2004-04-21

    This work describes the development of a quality control protocol, which can be implemented to assess the accuracy, precision and reproducibility of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement on a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. The precision and accuracy of the ADC measurement are analysed with regard to MRI system noise, signal reproducibility and differences between nominal and effective b values. Two aqueous test-solutions of CuSO4 and sucrose are prepared for the quality control protocol. ADC measurement with the CuSO4 solution is more sensitive to differences between nominal and effective b values, on account of the solution's high ADC. ADC measurement with the sucrose solution is more sensitive to signal reproducibility due to the solution's low baseline signal intensity. The ADC of the test-solutions is measured on an MRI system at our centre with a sequence used for clinical studies using diffusion imaging. Two parameters, Q and R, are defined for the analysis of the quality control ADC values. The Q parameter is the ratio of the standard deviation of the quality control mean ADC values over time to the optimal standard deviation, as derived from the effect of thermal noise on the ADC measurement uncertainty. Analysis with the Q parameter indicates that signal reproducibility errors contribute to ADC variations on our MRI system when imaging with high b values (b > 500 mm s(-2)), whereas differences between nominal and effective b values have a greater impact on the ADC measurement when imaging with low b values (b < 500 mm s(-2)). The R parameter is defined as the ratio of the directional variation of the ADC quality control values to the uncertainty of the ADC measurement. Analysis with the R parameter shows that the effect of directional variation of the ADC measurement on our MRI system is more pronounced when imaging with low b values. The quality control protocol identified a systematic error, which introduced a small

  18. Vision 20/20: Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction in PET/MRI: Challenges, solutions, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-03-01

    Attenuation correction is an essential component of the long chain of data correction techniques required to achieve the full potential of quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems mandated the widespread interest in developing novel strategies for deriving accurate attenuation maps with the aim to improve the quantitative accuracy of these emerging hybrid imaging systems. The attenuation map in PET/MRI should ideally be derived from anatomical MR images; however, MRI intensities reflect proton density and relaxation time properties of biological tissues rather than their electron density and photon attenuation properties. Therefore, in contrast to PET/computed tomography, there is a lack of standardized global mapping between the intensities of MRI signal and linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. Moreover, in standard MRI sequences, bones and lung tissues do not produce measurable signals owing to their low proton density and short transverse relaxation times. MR images are also inevitably subject to artifacts that degrade their quality, thus compromising their applicability for the task of attenuation correction in PET/MRI. MRI-guided attenuation correction strategies can be classified in three broad categories: (i) segmentation-based approaches, (ii) atlas-registration and machine learning methods, and (iii) emission/transmission-based approaches. This paper summarizes past and current state-of-the-art developments and latest advances in PET/MRI attenuation correction. The advantages and drawbacks of each approach for addressing the challenges of MR-based attenuation correction are comprehensively described. The opportunities brought by both MRI and PET imaging modalities for deriving accurate attenuation maps and improving PET quantification will be elaborated. Future prospects and potential clinical applications of these techniques and their integration in commercial

  19. Optical motion tracking to improve image quality in MRI of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclaren, Julian; Aksoy, Murat; Ooi, Melvyn; Bammer, Roland

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is highly sensitivity to head motion. Prospective motion correction is a promising new method to prevent artifacts resulting from this effect. The image volume is continuously updated based on head tracking information, ensuring that the magnetic fields used for imaging maintain a constant geometric relationship relative to the object. This paper reviews current developments and methods of performing prospective correction. Optical tracking using cameras has major advantages over other methods used to obtain head pose information, as it does not affect the MR imaging process or interfere with the sequence timing. Results show that motion artifacts can be almost completely prevented for most imaging sequences. Despite this success, there are still engineering challenges to be solved before the technique becomes widely accepted in the clinic. These include improvements in miniaturization, marker fixation and MR compatibility.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Developmental Delay in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Naziya P.; Murthy, G.S.N.; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B.K.; Venkateswarlu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the developmental delay in Indian children which will help the clinicians in providing an estimation of the child’s ultimate developmental potential and organize specific treatment requirement and also relieve parental apprehension. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of normal and abnormal MRI in pediatric patients presenting with developmental delay and further categorize the abnormal MRI based on its morphological features. Materials and Methods: It is a prospective, observational & descriptive study of MRI Brain in 81 paediatric patients (46 Males and 35 Females), aged between three months to 12 years; presenting with developmental delay in Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad; over a period of three years (Sept 2011 to Sept 2014). MRI brain was done on 1.5T Siemens Magnetom Essenza & 0.35T Magnetom C with appropriate sequences and planes after making the child sleep/sedated/ anesthetized. Various anatomical structures like Ventricles, Corpus callosum, etc were systematically assessed. The MRI findings were divided into various aetiological subgroups. Results: Normal MRI findings were seen in 32% cases and 68% had abnormal findings of which the proportion of Traumatic/ Neurovascular Diseases, Congenital & Developmental, Metabolic and Degenerative, neoplastic and non specific were 31%, 17%, 10%, 2.5% and 7.5% respectively. The ventricles and white matter mainly the corpus callosum were the most commonly affected anatomical structures. The diagnostic yield was

  1. Graph-based retrospective 4D image construction from free-breathing MRI slice acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Ciesielski, Krzysztof C.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Mong, Andrew; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    4D or dynamic imaging of the thorax has many potential applications [1, 2]. CT and MRI offer sufficient speed to acquire motion information via 4D imaging. However they have different constraints and requirements. For both modalities both prospective and retrospective respiratory gating and tracking techniques have been developed [3, 4]. For pediatric imaging, x-ray radiation becomes a primary concern and MRI remains as the de facto choice. The pediatric subjects we deal with often suffer from extreme malformations of their chest wall, diaphragm, and/or spine, as such patient cooperation needed by some of the gating and tracking techniques are difficult to realize without causing patient discomfort. Moreover, we are interested in the mechanical function of their thorax in its natural form in tidal breathing. Therefore free-breathing MRI acquisition is the ideal modality of imaging for these patients. In our set up, for each coronal (or sagittal) slice position, slice images are acquired at a rate of about 200-300 ms/slice over several natural breathing cycles. This produces typically several thousands of slices which contain both the anatomic and dynamic information. However, it is not trivial to form a consistent and well defined 4D volume from these data. In this paper, we present a novel graph-based combinatorial optimization solution for constructing the best possible 4D scene from such data entirely in the digital domain. Our proposed method is purely image-based and does not need breath holding or any external surrogates or instruments to record respiratory motion or tidal volume. Both adult and children patients' data are used to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the reconstructed 4D scenes are smooth and consistent spatially and temporally, agreeing with known shape and motion of the lungs.

  2. Iron-Loaded Magnetic Nanocapsules for pH-Triggered Drug Release and MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanocapsules were synthesized for controlled drug release, magnetically assisted delivery, and MRI imaging. These magnetic nanocapsules, consisting of a stable iron nanocore and a mesoporous silica shell, were synthesized by controlled encapsulation of ellipsoidal hematite in silica, partial etching of the hematite core in acid, and reduction of the core by hydrogen. The iron core provided a high saturation magnetization and was stable against oxidation for at least 6 months in air and 1 month in aqueous solution. The hollow space between the iron core and mesoporous silica shell was used to load anticancer drug and a T1-weighted MRI contrast agent (Gd-DTPA). These multifunctional monodispersed magnetic “nanoeyes” were coated by multiple polyelectrolyte layers of biocompatible poly-l-lysine and sodium alginate to control the drug release as a function of pH. We studied pH-controlled release, magnetic hysteresis curves, and T1/T2 MRI contrast of the magnetic nanoeyes. They also served as MRI contrast agents with relaxivities of 8.6 mM–1 s–1 (r1) and 285 mM–1 s–1 (r2). PMID:24748722

  3. Synthesis of Gd2O3:Eu nanoplatelets for MRI and fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalej, Nabil M.; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Assadi, Achraf Amir; Maalej, Ramzi; Shaikh, Mohammed Nasiruzzaman; Ilyas, Muhammad; Gondal, Mohammad A.

    2015-05-01

    We synthesized Gd2O3 and Gd2O3 doped by europium (Eu) (2% to 10%) nanoplatelets using the polyol chemical method. The synthesized nanoplatelets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FESEM, TEM, and EDX techniques. The optical properties of the synthesized nanoplatelets were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy. We also studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of T1 relaxivity using 3 T MRI. The XRD for Gd2O3 revealed a cubic crystalline structure. The XRD of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanoplatelets were highly consistent with Gd2O3 indicating the total incorporation of the Eu3+ ions in the Gd2O3 matrix. The Eu doping of Gd2O3 produced red luminescence around 612 nm corresponding to the radiative transitions from the Eu-excited state 5D0 to the 7F2. The photoluminescence was maximal at 5% Eu doping concentration. The stimulated CIE chromaticity coordinates were also calculated. Judd-Ofelt analysis was used to obtain the radiative properties of the sample from the emission spectra. The MRI contrast enhancement due to Gd2O3 was compared to DOTAREM commercial contrast agent at similar concentration of gadolinium oxide and provided similar contrast enhancement. The incorporation of Eu, however, decreased the MRI contrast due to replacement of gadolinium by Eu.

  4. Synthesis of Gd2O3:Eu nanoplatelets for MRI and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Maalej, Nabil M; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Assadi, Achraf Amir; Maalej, Ramzi; Shaikh, Mohammed Nasiruzzaman; Ilyas, Muhammad; Gondal, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized Gd2O3 and Gd2O3 doped by europium (Eu) (2% to 10%) nanoplatelets using the polyol chemical method. The synthesized nanoplatelets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FESEM, TEM, and EDX techniques. The optical properties of the synthesized nanoplatelets were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy. We also studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of T1 relaxivity using 3 T MRI. The XRD for Gd2O3 revealed a cubic crystalline structure. The XRD of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanoplatelets were highly consistent with Gd2O3 indicating the total incorporation of the Eu(3+) ions in the Gd2O3 matrix. The Eu doping of Gd2O3 produced red luminescence around 612 nm corresponding to the radiative transitions from the Eu-excited state (5)D0 to the (7)F2. The photoluminescence was maximal at 5% Eu doping concentration. The stimulated CIE chromaticity coordinates were also calculated. Judd-Ofelt analysis was used to obtain the radiative properties of the sample from the emission spectra. The MRI contrast enhancement due to Gd2O3 was compared to DOTAREM commercial contrast agent at similar concentration of gadolinium oxide and provided similar contrast enhancement. The incorporation of Eu, however, decreased the MRI contrast due to replacement of gadolinium by Eu.

  5. Development of fluoroscopic registration in spinal neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Hamid R.; Grzeszczuk, Robert; Chin, Shao; Holz, H.; Hariri, Sanaz; Badr, Rana; Kim, Daniel; Adler, John R.; Shahidi, Ramin

    2001-05-01

    We present a system involving a computer-instrumented fluoroscope for the purpose of 3D navigation and guidance using pre-operative diagnostic scans as a reference. The goal of the project is to devise a computer-assisted tool that will improve the accuracy, reduce risk, minimize the invasiveness, and shorten the time it takes to perform a variety of neurosurgical and orthopedic procedures of the spine. For this purpose we propose an apparatus that will track surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy and pre-operative 3D diagnostic scans using intraoperative fluoroscopy for in situ registration and localization of embedded fiducials. Preliminary studies have found a fiducial registration error (FRE) of 1.41 mm and a Target Localization Error (TLE) of 0.48 mm. The resulting system leverages equipment already commonly available in the operating room (OR), providing an important new functionality that is free of many current limitations, such as the inadequacy of skin fiducials for spinal neuronavigation, while keeping costs contained.

  6. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - pelvis; MRI - hips; Pelvic MRI with prostate probe; Magnetic resonance imaging - pelvis ... care provider if you are afraid of close spaces (have claustrophobia). You may be given a medicine ...

  7. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... the same breast or the other breast after breast cancer has been diagnosed Distinguish between scar tissue and ...

  8. Automatic image-driven segmentation of cardiac ventricles in cine anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocosco, Chris A.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Netsch, Thomas; Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Viergever, Max A.

    2005-08-01

    The automatic segmentation of the heart's two ventricles from dynamic ("cine") cardiac anatomical images, such as 3D+time short-axis MRI, is of significant clinical importance. Previously published automated methods have various disadvantages for routine clinical use. This work reports about a novel automatic segmentation method that is very fast, and robust against anatomical variability and image contrast variations. The method is mostly image-driven: it fully exploits the information provided by modern 4D (3D+time) balanced Fast Field Echo (bFFE) cardiac anatomical MRI, and makes only few and plausible assumptions about the images and the imaged heart. Specifically, the method does not need any geometrical shape models nor complex gray-level appearance models. The method simply uses the two ventricles' contraction-expansion cycle, as well as the ventricles' spatial coherence along the time dimension. The performance of the cardiac ventricles segmentation method was demonstrated through a qualitative visual validation on 32 clinical exams: no gross failures for the left-ventricle (right-ventricle) on 32 (30) of the exams were found. Also, a clinical validation of resulting quantitative cardiac functional parameters was performed against a manual quantification of 18 exams; the automatically computed Ejection Fraction (EF) correlated well to the manually computed one: linear regression with RMS=3.7% (RMS expressed in EF units).

  9. Automated Robust Image Segmentation: Level Set Method Using Nonnegative Matrix Factorization with Application to Brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Dera, Dimah; Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M

    2016-07-01

    We address the problem of fully automated region discovery and robust image segmentation by devising a new deformable model based on the level set method (LSM) and the probabilistic nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). We describe the use of NMF to calculate the number of distinct regions in the image and to derive the local distribution of the regions, which is incorporated into the energy functional of the LSM. The results demonstrate that our NMF-LSM method is superior to other approaches when applied to synthetic binary and gray-scale images and to clinical magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain with and without a malignant brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme. In particular, the NMF-LSM method is fully automated, highly accurate, less sensitive to the initial selection of the contour(s) or initial conditions, more robust to noise and model parameters, and able to detect as small distinct regions as desired. These advantages stem from the fact that the proposed method relies on histogram information instead of intensity values and does not introduce nuisance model parameters. These properties provide a general approach for automated robust region discovery and segmentation in heterogeneous images. Compared with the retrospective radiological diagnoses of two patients with non-enhancing grade 2 and 3 oligodendroglioma, the NMF-LSM detects earlier progression times and appears suitable for monitoring tumor response. The NMF-LSM method fills an important need of automated segmentation of clinical MRI. PMID:27417984

  10. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  11. Characterizing growth patterns in longitudinal MRI using image contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhan, Avantika; Prastawa, Marcel; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Gerig, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the growth patterns of the early brain is crucial to the study of neuro-development. In the early stages of brain growth, a rapid sequence of biophysical and chemical processes take place. A crucial component of these processes, known as myelination, consists of the formation of a myelin sheath around a nerve fiber, enabling the effective transmission of neural impulses. As the brain undergoes myelination, there is a subsequent change in the contrast between gray matter and white matter as observed in MR scans. In this work, gray-white matter contrast is proposed as an effective measure of appearance which is relatively invariant to location, scanner type, and scanning conditions. To validate this, contrast is computed over various cortical regions for an adult human phantom. MR (Magnetic Resonance) images of the phantom were repeatedly generated using different scanners, and at different locations. Contrast displays less variability over changing conditions of scan compared to intensity-based measures, demonstrating that it is less dependent than intensity on external factors. Additionally, contrast is used to analyze longitudinal MR scans of the early brain, belonging to healthy controls and Down's Syndrome (DS) patients. Kernel regression is used to model subject-specific trajectories of contrast changing with time. Trajectories of contrast changing with time, as well as time-based biomarkers extracted from contrast modeling, show large differences between groups. The preliminary applications of contrast based analysis indicate its future potential to reveal new information not covered by conventional volumetric or deformation-based analysis, particularly for distinguishing between normal and abnormal growth patterns.

  12. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  13. Masking level differences--a diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wack, David S; Polak, Paul; Furuyama, Jon; Burkard, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study we investigated Masking Level Differences (MLD) using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), but were unable to confirm neural correlations for the MLD within the auditory cortex and inferior colliculus. Here we have duplicated conditions from our previous study, but have included more participants and changed the study site to a new location with a newer scanner and presentation system. Additionally, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is included to allow investigation of fiber tracts that may be involved with MLDs. Twenty participants were included and underwent audiometric testing and MRI scanning. The current study revealed regions of increased and decreased activity within the auditory cortex when comparing the combined noise and signal of the dichotic MLD stimuli (N0Sπ and NπS0) with N0S0. Furthermore, we found evidence of inferior colliculus involvement. Our DTI findings show strong correlations between DTI measures within the brainstem and signal detection threshold levels. Patterns of correlation when the signal was presented only to the right ear showed an extensive network in the left hemisphere; however, the opposite was not true for the signal presented only to the left ear. Our current study was able to confirm what we had previously hypothesized using fMRI, while extending our investigation of MLDs to include the characteristics of connecting neural pathways. PMID:24558392

  14. Imaging the accumulation and suppression of tau pathology using multiparametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Holly E.; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Ma, Da; Powell, Nick M.; O'Callaghan, James M.; Harrison, Ian F.; Johnson, Ross A.; Murray, Tracey K.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Heggenes, Morton; Fisher, Alice; Cardoso, M.J.; Modat, Marc; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Ourselin, Sebastien; O'Neill, Michael J.; Wells, Jack A.; Collins, Emily C.; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of Alzheimer's disease have served as valuable tools for investigating pathogenic mechanisms relating to neurodegeneration, including tau-mediated and neurofibrillary tangle pathology—a major hallmark of the disease. In this work, we have used multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a longitudinal study of neurodegeneration in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, a subset of which were treated with doxycycline at different time points to suppress the tau transgene. Using this paradigm, we investigated the sensitivity of multiparametric MRI to both the accumulation and suppression of pathologic tau. Tau-related atrophy was discernible from 5.5 months within the cortex and hippocampus. We observed markedly less atrophy in the treated rTg4510 mice, which was enhanced after doxycycline intervention from 3.5 months. We also observed differences in amide proton transfer, cerebral blood flow, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters in the rTg4510 mice, which were significantly less altered after doxycycline treatment. We propose that these non-invasive MRI techniques offer insight into pathologic mechanisms underpinning Alzheimer's disease that may be important when evaluating emerging therapeutics targeting one of more of these processes. PMID:26923415

  15. Microfluidic laminate-based phantom for diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI).

    PubMed

    Samuel, R; Sant, H J; Jiao, F; Johnson, C R; Gale, B K

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports fabrication of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom created by stacking of multiple thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers. PDMS is spin coated on SU-8 molds to obtain the desired layer thickness and imprints of the microchannel patterns that define the phantom geometry. This paper also identifies the unique challenges related to the fabrication and assembly of multiple thin layers and reports for the first time assembly of a large number of thin laminates of this nature. Use of photolithography techniques allows us to create a wide range of phantom geometries. The target dimensions of the phantoms reported here are (i) a stack of 30 thin PDMS layers of 10 µm thickness (ii) curved 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 8.7 µm spacing, and (iii) straight 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 3.6 µm spacing. SEM scans of the assembled phantoms show open microchannels and a monolithic cross-section with no visible interface between PDMS layers. Based on the results of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) scan, the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules due to the physical restriction of the microchannels was detected, which means that the phantom can be used to calibrate and optimize MRI instrumentation. PMID:22865956

  16. MRI-guided fiber-based fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frederic

    2014-09-01

    Multi-modal imaging combining fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) with MRI could provide information in these two modalities as well as optimize the recovery of functional information with MR-guidance. Here, we present a MRI-guided FMT system. An optical probe was designed consisting of a fiber plate on the top and bottom sides of the animal bed, respectively. In experiment, animal was installed between the two plates. Mounting fibers on each plate, transmission measuring could be conducted from both sides of the animal. Moreover, an accurate fluorescence reconstruction was achieved with MRI-derived anatomical guidance. The sensitivity of the FMT system was evaluated with a phantom showing that with long fibers, it was sufficient to detect 10nM Cy5.5 solution with ~28.5 dB in the phantom. The system was eventually used to image MMP activity involved in atherosclerosis with two ATX mice and two control mice. The reconstruction results were in agreement with ex vivo measurement.

  17. Computer-aided assessment of anomalies in the scoliotic spine in 3-D MRI images.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Florian; Hornegger, Joachim; Schwab, Siegfried; Janka, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of anomalies in the scoliotic spine using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an essential task during the planning phase of a patient's treatment and operations. Due to the pathologic bending of the spine, this is an extremely time consuming process as an orthogonal view onto every vertebra is required. In this article we present a system for computer-aided assessment (CAA) of anomalies in 3-D MRI images of the spine relying on curved planar reformations (CPR). We introduce all necessary steps, from the pre-processing of the data to the visualization component. As the core part of the framework is based on a segmentation of the spinal cord we focus on this. The proposed segmentation method is an iterative process. In every iteration the segmentation is updated by an energy based scheme derived from Markov random field (MRF) theory. We evaluate the segmentation results on public available clinical relevant 3-D MRI data sets of scoliosis patients. In order to assess the quality of the segmentation we use the angle between automatically computed planes through the vertebra and planes estimated by medical experts. This results in a mean angle difference of less than six degrees.

  18. Imaging the accumulation and suppression of tau pathology using multiparametric MRI.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Holly E; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Ma, Da; Powell, Nick M; O'Callaghan, James M; Harrison, Ian F; Johnson, Ross A; Murray, Tracey K; Ahmed, Zeshan; Heggenes, Morton; Fisher, Alice; Cardoso, M J; Modat, Marc; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Ourselin, Sebastien; O'Neill, Michael J; Wells, Jack A; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2016-03-01

    Mouse models of Alzheimer's disease have served as valuable tools for investigating pathogenic mechanisms relating to neurodegeneration, including tau-mediated and neurofibrillary tangle pathology-a major hallmark of the disease. In this work, we have used multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a longitudinal study of neurodegeneration in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, a subset of which were treated with doxycycline at different time points to suppress the tau transgene. Using this paradigm, we investigated the sensitivity of multiparametric MRI to both the accumulation and suppression of pathologic tau. Tau-related atrophy was discernible from 5.5 months within the cortex and hippocampus. We observed markedly less atrophy in the treated rTg4510 mice, which was enhanced after doxycycline intervention from 3.5 months. We also observed differences in amide proton transfer, cerebral blood flow, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters in the rTg4510 mice, which were significantly less altered after doxycycline treatment. We propose that these non-invasive MRI techniques offer insight into pathologic mechanisms underpinning Alzheimer's disease that may be important when evaluating emerging therapeutics targeting one of more of these processes. PMID:26923415

  19. Microfluidic laminate-based phantom for diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, R; Sant, H J; Jiao, F; Johnson, C R; Gale, B K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports fabrication of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom created by stacking of multiple thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers. PDMS is spin coated on SU-8 molds to obtain the desired layer thickness and imprints of the microchannel patterns that define the phantom geometry. This paper also identifies the unique challenges related to the fabrication and assembly of multiple thin layers and reports for the first time assembly of a large number of thin laminates of this nature. Use of photolithography techniques allows us to create a wide range of phantom geometries. The target dimensions of the phantoms reported here are (i) a stack of 30 thin PDMS layers of 10 µm thickness (ii) curved 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 8.7 µm spacing, and (iii) straight 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 3.6 µm spacing. SEM scans of the assembled phantoms show open microchannels and a monolithic cross-section with no visible interface between PDMS layers. Based on the results of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) scan, the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules due to the physical restriction of the microchannels was detected, which means that the phantom can be used to calibrate and optimize MRI instrumentation. PMID:22865956

  20. Mean Apparent Propagator (MAP) MRI: a novel diffusion imaging method for mapping tissue microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Özarslan, Evren; Koay, Cheng Guan; Shepherd, Timothy M.; Komlosh, Michal E.; İrfanoğlu, M. Okan; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Basser, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) signals reflect information about underlying tissue microstructure and cytoarchitecture. We propose a quantitative, efficient, and robust mathematical and physical framework for representing diffusion-weighted MR imaging (MRI) data obtained in “q-space,” and the corresponding “mean apparent propagator (MAP)” describing molecular displacements in “r-space.” We also define and map novel quantitative descriptors of diffusion that can be computed robustly using this MAP-MRI framework. We describe efficient analytical representation of the three-dimensional q-space MR signal in a series expansion of basis functions that accurately describes diffusion in many complex geometries. The lowest order term in this expansion contains a diffusion tensor that characterizes the Gaussian displacement distribution, equivalent to diffusion tensor MRI (DTI). Inclusion of higher order terms enables the reconstruction of the true average propagator whose projection onto the unit “displacement” sphere provides an orientational distribution function (ODF) that contains only the orientational dependence of the diffusion process. The representation characterizes novel features of diffusion anisotropy and the non-Gaussian character of the three-dimensional diffusion process. Other important measures this representation provides include the return-to-the-origin probability (RTOP), and its variants for diffusion in one- and two-dimensions—the return-to-the-plane probability (RTPP), and the return-to-the-axis probability (RTAP), respectively. These zero net displacement probabilities measure the mean compartment (pore) volume and cross-sectional area in distributions of isolated pores irrespective of the pore shape. MAP-MRI represents a new comprehensive framework to model the three-dimensional q-space signal and transform it into diffusion propagators. Experiments on an excised marmoset brain specimen demonstrate that MAP-MRI

  1. Assessment of MRI Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers for Radiation Necrosis in the Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Silun; Tryggestad, Erik; Zhou Tingting; Armour, Michael; Wen Zhibo; Fu Dexue; Ford, Eric; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Zhou Jinyuan

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation necrosis is a major complication of radiation therapy. We explore the features of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat, using multiple MRI approaches, including T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion constant (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), and amide proton transfer (APT) of endogenous mobile proteins and peptides. Methods and Materials: Adult rats (Fischer 344; n = 15) were irradiated with a single, well-collimated X-ray beam (40 Gy; 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2}) in the left brain hemisphere. MRI was acquired on a 4.7-T animal scanner at {approx}25 weeks' postradiation. The MRI signals of necrotic cores and perinecrotic regions were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance. Histological evaluation was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results: ADC and CBF MRI could separate perinecrotic and contralateral normal brain tissue (p < 0.01 and < 0.05, respectively), whereas T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and APT could not. MRI signal intensities were significantly lower in the necrotic core than in normal brain for CBF (p < 0.001) and APT (p < 0.01) and insignificantly higher or lower for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and ADC. Histological results demonstrated coagulative necrosis within the necrotic core and reactive astrogliosis and vascular damage within the perinecrotic region. Conclusion: ADC and CBF are promising imaging biomarkers for identifying perinecrotic regions, whereas CBF and APT are promising for identifying necrotic cores.

  2. Imaging of acute myocardial infarction in pigs with Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin scintigraphy and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    ten Kate, C.I.; van Kroonenburgh, M.J.; Schipperheyn, J.J.; Doornbos, J.; Hoedemaeker, P.J.; Maes, A.; v.d. Nat, K.H.; Camps, J.A.; Huysmans, H.A.; Pauwels, E.K. )

    1990-07-01

    Indium-111 antimyosin F(ab')2 was used in a series of scintigraphic studies on experimentally induced myocardial infarctions in pigs. Antimyosin distribution recorded by planar images of in vivo pigs and by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of excised hearts delineated areas of myocardial necrosis if infarct volume exceeded 3.3 cm3. Scintigraphic images were compared with magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from excised hearts and with photographs of slices of the hearts. Infarct size and localization determined with antimyosin were compared. The MR images, with or without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), of the in vivo pigs were all false-negative; some myocardial wall thinning and high bloodpool signals were visible. Results show that both the antimyosin and the MR technique are specific methods for the visualization of induced myocardial necrosis in this animal model. However, the use of antimyosin is limited to a period ranging from 24 to 72 hours after infarction.

  3. Voltage-based Device Tracking in a 1.5 Tesla MRI during Imaging: Initial validation in swine models

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Tse, Zion TH; Reichlin, Tobias R; Michaud, Gregory F; Watkins, Ronald D; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Kwong, Raymond Y; Stevenson, William; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Byrd, Israel; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Voltage-based device-tracking (VDT) systems are commonly used for tracking invasive devices in electrophysiological (EP) cardiac-arrhythmia therapy. During EP procedures, electro-anatomic-mapping (EAM) workstations provide guidance by integrating VDT location and intra-cardiac-ECG information with X-ray, CT, Ultrasound, and MR images. MR assists navigation, mapping and radio-frequency-ablation. Multi-modality interventions require multiple patient transfers between an MRI and the X-ray/ultrasound EP suite, increasing the likelihood of patient-motion and image mis-registration. An MRI-compatible VDT system may increase efficiency, since there is currently no single method to track devices both inside and outside the MRI scanner. Methods An MRI-compatible VDT system was constructed by modifying a commercial system. Hardware was added to reduce MRI gradient-ramp and radio-frequency-unblanking-pulse interference. VDT patches and cables were modified to reduce heating. Five swine cardiac VDT EAM-mapping interventions were performed, navigating inside and thereafter outside the MRI. Results Three-catheter VDT interventions were performed at >12 frames-per-second both inside and outside the MRI scanner with <3mm error. Catheters were followed on VDT- and MRI-derived maps. Simultaneous VDT and imaging was possible in repetition-time (TR) >32 msec sequences with <0.5mm errors, and <5% MRI SNR loss. At shorter TRs, only intra-cardiac-ECG was reliable. RF Heating was <1.5C°. Conclusion An MRI-compatible VDT system is feasible. PMID:23580479

  4. Multimodal image registration of ex vivo 4 Tesla MRI with whole mount histology for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappelow, Jonathan; Madabhushi, Anant; Rosen, Mark; Tomaszeweski, John; Feldman, Michael

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we present novel methods for registration and subsequent evaluation of whole mount prostate histological sections to corresponding 4 Tesla ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices to complement our existing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for detection of prostatic adenocarcinoma from high resolution MRI. The CAD system is trained using voxels labeled as cancer on MRI by experts who visually aligned histology with MRI. To address voxel labeling errors on account of manual alignment and delineation, we have developed a registration method called combined feature ensemble mutual information (COFEMI) to automatically map spatial extent of prostate cancer from histology onto corresponding MRI for prostatectomy specimens. Our method improves over intensity-based similarity metrics (mutual information) by incorporating unique information from feature spaces that are relatively robust to intensity artifacts and which accentuate the structural details in the target and template images to be registered. Our registration algorithm accounts for linear gland deformations in the histological sections resulting from gland fixing and serial sectioning. Following automatic registration of MRI and histology, cancer extent from histological sections are mapped to the corresponding registered MRI slices. The manually delineated cancer areas on MRI obtained via manual alignment of histological sections and MRI are compared with corresponding cancer extent obtained via COFEMI by a novel registration evaluation technique based on use of non-linear dimensionality reduction (locally linear embedding (LLE)). The cancer map on MRI determined by COFEMI was found to be significantly more accurate compared to the manually determined cancer mask. The performance of COFEMI was also found to be superior compared to image intensity-based mutual information registration.

  5. Advances in functional and structural imaging of the human lung using proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Wilson; Mugler, John P; Sá, Rui C; Altes, Talissa A; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2014-12-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measurement. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demonstrate potential for accurate and meaningful measurements of lung function, this technique was used to study gravitational gradients of ventilation, perfusion, and ventilation-perfusion ratio in healthy subjects, yielding quantitative results consistent with expected regional variations. Such techniques can also be applied in the time domain, providing new tools for studying temporal dynamics of lung function. Temporal ASL measurements showed increased spatial-temporal heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia, suggesting sensitivity to active control mechanisms such as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and illustrating that to fully examine the factors that govern lung function it is necessary to consider temporal as well as spatial variability. Further development to increase spatial coverage and improve robustness would enhance the clinical applicability of these new functional imaging tools. In the realm of structural imaging, pulse sequence techniques such as ultrashort echo-time radial k-space acquisition, ultrafast steady-state free precession, and imaging-based diaphragm triggering can be combined to overcome the significant challenges associated with proton MRI in the lung, enabling high-quality three-dimensional imaging of the whole lung in a clinically reasonable scan time. Images of healthy and cystic fibrosis subjects using these techniques demonstrate substantial promise for non-contrast pulmonary angiography and detailed

  6. MRI 3D CISS– A Novel Imaging Modality in Diagnosing Trigeminal Neuralgia – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Besta, Radhika; Shankar, Y. Uday; Kumar, Ashwini; Prakash, S. Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) is considered as one of the most painful neurologic disorders affecting oro-facial region. TN is often diagnosed clinically based on the patients complete history of pain (severity, duration, episodes etc), relief of pain on test dose of Carbamazepine, regional block of long acting anaesthetic. However, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays an important and confirmatory role in showing Neuro Vascular Conflict (NVC) which is the commonest causative factor for TN. This article reviews the effectiveness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady-state (3D-CISS) MRI in diagnosing the exact location, degree of neurovascular conflict responsible for classical as well as atypical TN and possible pre-treatment evaluation and treatment outcome. PMID:27135019

  7. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  8. Glucosamine and N-acetyl glucosamine as new CEST MRI agents for molecular imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivlin, Michal; Navon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) as agents for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance molecular imaging of tumors is demonstrated. Both agents reflect the metabolic activity and malignancy of the tumors. The method was tested in two types of tumors implanted orthotopically in mice: 4T1 (mouse mammary cancer cells) and MCF7 (human mammary cancer cells). 4T1 is a more aggressive type of tumor than MCF7 and exhibited a larger CEST effect. Two methods of administration of the agents, intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), gave similar results. The CEST MRI observation of lung metastasis was confirmed by histology. The potential of the clinical application of CEST MRI with these agents for cancer diagnosis is strengthened by their lack of toxicity as can be indicated from their wide use as food supplements. PMID:27600054

  9. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  10. Breast MRI in Community Practice: Equipment and Imaging Techniques at Facilities in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC)

    PubMed Central

    DeMartini, Wendy B.; Ichikawa, Laura; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Buist, Diana; Kerlikowske, Karla; Geller, Berta; Onega, Tracy; Rosenberg, Robert D.; Lehman, Constance D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose MRI is increasingly used for detection of breast carcinoma. Little is known about breast MRI techniques among community practice facilities. This study evaluated equipment and acquisition techniques used by community facilities across the U.S., including compliance with minimum standards by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6667 Trial and the European Society of Breast Imaging (EUSOBI). Methods Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) facilities performing breast MRI were identified and queried by survey regarding breast MRI equipment and technical parameters. Variables included scanner field strength, coil type, acquisition coverage, slice thickness and timing of initial post-contrast sequence. Results were tallied and percentages of facilities meeting ACRIN and EUSOBI standards were calculated Results From 23 facilities performing breast MRI, results were obtained from 14 (61%) facilities with 16 MRI scanners reporting 18 imaging parameters. Compliance with equipment recommendations of ≥1.5T field strength was 94% and of a dedicated breast coil was 100%. Eight-three percent of acquisitions used bilateral post-contrast technique and 78% used slice thickness <= 3 mm. Timing of initial post-contrast sequences ranged from 58 seconds to eight minutes 30 seconds, with 63% meeting recommendations for completion within four minutes. Conclusions Nearly all surveyed facilities met ACRIN and EUSOBI standards for breast MRI equipment. The majority met standards for acquisition parameters, although techniques varied, in particular for timing of initial post-contrast imaging. Further guidelines by the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program will be of importance in facilitating standardized and high quality breast MRI. PMID:21040870

  11. Transferring Cognitive Tasks Between Brain Imaging Modalities: Implications for Task Design and Results Interpretation in fMRI Studies

    PubMed Central

    Warbrick, Tracy; Reske, Martina; Shah, N. Jon

    2014-01-01

    As cognitive neuroscience methods develop, established experimental tasks are used with emerging brain imaging modalities. Here transferring a paradigm (the visual oddball task) with a long history of behavioral and electroencephalography (EEG) experiments to a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment is considered. The aims of this paper are to briefly describe fMRI and when its use is appropriate in cognitive neuroscience; illustrate how task design can influence the results of an fMRI experiment, particularly when that task is borrowed from another imaging modality; explain the practical aspects of performing an fMRI experiment. It is demonstrated that manipulating the task demands in the visual oddball task results in different patterns of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation. The nature of the fMRI BOLD measure means that many brain regions are found to be active in a particular task. Determining the functions of these areas of activation is very much dependent on task design and analysis. The complex nature of many fMRI tasks means that the details of the task and its requirements need careful consideration when interpreting data. The data show that this is particularly important in those tasks relying on a motor response as well as cognitive elements and that covert and overt responses should be considered where possible. Furthermore, the data show that transferring an EEG paradigm to an fMRI experiment needs careful consideration and it cannot be assumed that the same paradigm will work equally well across imaging modalities. It is therefore recommended that the design of an fMRI study is pilot tested behaviorally to establish the effects of interest and then pilot tested in the fMRI environment to ensure appropriate design, implementation and analysis for the effects of interest. PMID:25285453

  12. Imaging of prostate cancer: a platform for 3D co-registration of in-vivo MRI ex-vivo MRI and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orczyk, Clément; Mikheev, Artem; Rosenkrantz, Andrew; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Rusinek, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: Multi-parametric MRI is emerging as a promising method for prostate cancer diagnosis. prognosis and treatment planning. However, the localization of in-vivo detected lesions and pathologic sites of cancer remains a significant challenge. To overcome this limitation we have developed and tested a system for co-registration of in-vivo MRI, ex-vivo MRI and histology. Materials and Methods: Three men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (ages 54-72, PSA levels 5.1-7.7 ng/ml) were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent 3T multi-parametric MRI that included T2W, DCEMRI, and DWI prior to robotic-assisted prostatectomy. Ex-vivo multi-parametric MRI was performed on fresh prostate specimen. Excised prostates were then sliced at regular intervals and photographed both before and after fixation. Slices were perpendicular to the main axis of the posterior capsule, i.e., along the direction of the rectal wall. Guided by the location of the urethra, 2D digital images were assembled into 3D models. Cancer foci, extra-capsular extensions and zonal margins were delineated by the pathologist and included in 3D histology data. A locally-developed software was applied to register in-vivo, ex-vivo and histology using an over-determined set of anatomical landmarks placed in anterior fibro-muscular stroma, central. transition and peripheral zones. The mean root square distance across corresponding control points was used to assess co-registration error. Results: Two specimens were pT3a and one pT2b (negative margin) at pathology. The software successfully fused invivo MRI. ex-vivo MRI fresh specimen and histology using appropriate (rigid and affine) transformation models with mean square error of 1.59 mm. Coregistration accuracy was confirmed by multi-modality viewing using operator-guided variable transparency. Conclusion: The method enables successful co-registration of pre-operative MRI, ex-vivo MRI and pathology and it provides initial evidence

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  14. Redox-responsive branched-bottlebrush polymers for in vivo MRI and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, Molly A.; McCombs, Jessica R.; Wang, Ying; Paletta, Joseph T.; Morton, Stephen W.; Dreaden, Erik C.; Boska, Michael D.; Ottaviani, M. Francesca; Hammond, Paula T.; Rajca, Andrzej; Johnson, Jeremiah A.

    2014-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive multimodality imaging agents have broad potential in medical diagnostics. Herein, we report the development of a new class of branched-bottlebrush polymer dual-modality organic radical contrast agents—ORCAFluors—for combined magnetic resonance and near-infrared fluorescence imaging in vivo. These nitroxide radical-based nanostructures have longitudinal and transverse relaxation times that are on par with commonly used heavy-metal-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Furthermore, these materials display a unique compensatory redox response: fluorescence is partially quenched by surrounding nitroxides in the native state; exposure to ascorbate or ascorbate/glutathione leads to nitroxide reduction and a concomitant 2- to 3.5-fold increase in fluorescence emission. This behaviour enables correlation of MRI contrast, fluorescence intensity and spin concentration with tissues known to possess high concentrations of ascorbate in mice. Our in vitro and in vivo results, along with our modular synthetic approach, make ORCAFluors a promising new platform for multimodality molecular imaging. PMID:25403521

  15. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content with changing postures.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Jalil; Pope, Malcolm H; Graveling, Richard A

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities to evaluate spinal loading in vivo are limited and a large majority of studies on the mechanical functions of the spine have been in vitro cadaveric studies and/or models based on many assumptions that are difficult to validate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obtaining nucleus pulposus (NP) water content measurements with changing postures. MRI studies were conducted on 25 healthy males with no history of low back pain (age 20-38). The L1 to S1 intradiscal levels were imaged in supine, sitting and standing postures using an upright 0.6 Tesla magnet, where a set of H2O: D2O7 phantoms were mounted on the back of the subjects. A calibration curve, provided from these phantoms, was applied to the absolute proton density image, yielding a pixel-by-pixel map of the water content of the NP. The NP at all levels showed a highly significant water loss (p<0.001) in sitting and standing postures compared with the supine posture. A trend towards higher levels of water was observed at all levels in the standing posture relative to sitting postures, however statistically significant differences were found only at L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels. This study demonstrates that variations in water content of the NP in different postures are in agreement with those determined from published invasive disc pressure measurements. The result of study demonstrates the feasibility of using MRI to determine the water content of the NP with changing postures and to use these data to evaluate spinal loading in these postures. This measurement method of water content by quantitative MR imaging could become a powerful tool for both clinical and ergonomic applications. The proposed methodology does not require invasive pressure measurement techniques.

  16. Sodium and T1rho MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2006-11-01

    In this article, both sodium magnetic resonance (MR) and T1rho relaxation mapping aimed at measuring molecular changes in cartilage for the diagnostic imaging of osteoarthritis are reviewed. First, an introduction to structure of cartilage, its degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA) and an outline of diagnostic imaging methods in quantifying molecular changes and early diagnostic aspects of cartilage degeneration are described. The sodium MRI section begins with a brief overview of the theory of sodium NMR of biological tissues and is followed by a section on multiple quantum filters that can be used to quantify both bi-exponential relaxation and residual quadrupolar interaction. Specifically, (i) the rationale behind the use of sodium MRI in quantifying proteoglycan (PG) changes, (ii) validation studies using biochemical assays, (iii) studies on human OA specimens, (iv) results on animal models and (v) clinical imaging protocols are reviewed. Results demonstrating the feasibility of quantifying PG in OA patients and comparison with that in healthy subjects are also presented. The section concludes with the discussion of advantages and potential issues with sodium MRI and the impact of new technological advancements (e.g. ultra-high field scanners and parallel imaging methods). In the theory section on T1rho, a brief description of (i) principles of measuring T1rho relaxation, (ii) pulse sequences for computing T1rho relaxation maps, (iii) issues regarding radio frequency power deposition, (iv) mechanisms that contribute to T1rho in biological tissues and (v) effects of exchange and dipolar interaction on T1rho dispersion are discussed. Correlation of T1rho relaxation rate with macromolecular content and biomechanical properties in cartilage specimens subjected to trypsin and cytokine-induced glycosaminoglycan depletion and validation against biochemical assay and histopathology are presented. Experimental T1rho data from osteoarthritic specimens, animal models

  17. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  18. MRI Inner Ear Imaging and Tone Burst Electrocochleography in the Diagnosis of Ménière’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hornibrook, Jeremy; Flook, Edward; Greig, Sam; Babbage, Melissa; Goh, Tony; Coates, Mark; Care, Rachel; Bird, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the sensitivity of gadolinium MRI inner imaging with tone burst electrocochleography (EcochG) for diagnosing endolymphatic hydrops. Study Design A prospective study on patients who were to have an MRI scan to exclude retrocochlear pathology. Setting Tertiary care center. Patients One hundred and two patients: 57 patients with Possible, Probable, or Definite Ménière’s Disease, 25 with asymmetrical hearing loss, 18 with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, and 2 with unilateral tinnitus had additional MRI inner ear imaging and click and tone burst stimulus EcochG testing. Intervention Diagnostic. Main Outcome Measure To compare the sensitivity of the two techniques. Results In 30 patients with symptom-based Definite Ménière’s Disease, tone burst EcochG was positive in 25 (83%) and the click EcochG was positive in 9/30 (30%), and gadolinium MRI imaging diagnosed hydrops in 14 (47%). A positive result for either MRI imaging or tone burst EcochG was seen in 26 patients (87%). In 14 subjects with symptom-based Probable Ménière’s Disease, 10 (71%) had either a positive EcochG or MRI. In 13 with Possible Ménière’s Disease, four (31%) had a positive EcochG or MRI. Conclusion This study confirms the greatly enhanced diagnostic sensitivity of tone burst EcochG over click response in diagnosing endolymphatic hydrops in Ménière’s disease. Even though adequate MRI imaging was achieved in 90%, tone burst EcochG was a more sensitive test. PMID:25985318

  19. Simultaneous steering and imaging of magnetic particles using MRI toward delivery of therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Felfoul, Ouajdi; Becker, Aaron T.; Fagogenis, Georgios; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance navigation (MRN) offers the potential for real-time steering of drug particles and cells to targets throughout the body. In this technique, the magnetic gradients of an MRI scanner perform image-based steering of magnetically-labelled therapeutics through the vasculature and into tumours. A major challenge of current techniques for MRN is that they alternate between pulse sequences for particle imaging and propulsion. Since no propulsion occurs while imaging the particles, this results in a significant reduction in imaging frequency and propulsive force. We report a new approach in which an imaging sequence is designed to simultaneously image and propel particles. This sequence provides a tradeoff between maximum propulsive force and imaging frequency. In our reported example, the sequence can image at 27 Hz while still generating 95% of the force produced by a purely propulsive pulse sequence. We implemented our pulse sequence on a standard clinical scanner using millimetre-scale particles and demonstrated high-speed (74 mm/s) navigation of a multi-branched vascular network phantom. Our study suggests that the magnetic gradient magnitudes previously demonstrated to be sufficient for pure propulsion of micron-scale therapeutics in magnetic resonance targeting (MRT) could also be sufficient for real-time steering of these particles. PMID:27666666

  20. MRI Based Preterm White Matter Injury Classification: The Importance of Sequential Imaging in Determining Severity of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Biarge, Miriam; Groenendaal, Floris; Kersbergen, Karina J.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Foti, Francesca; Cowan, Frances M.; de Vries, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The evolution of non-hemorrhagic white matter injury (WMI) based on sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been well studied. Our aim was to describe sequential MRI findings in preterm infants with non-hemorrhagic WMI and to develop an MRI classification system for preterm WMI based on these findings. Methods Eighty-two preterm infants (gestation ≤35 weeks) were retrospectively included. WMI was diagnosed and classified based on sequential cranial ultrasound (cUS) and confirmed on MRI. Results 138 MRIs were obtained at three time-points: early (<2 weeks; n = 32), mid (2–6 weeks; n = 30) and term equivalent age (TEA; n = 76). 63 infants (77%) had 2 MRIs during the neonatal period. WMI was non-cystic in 35 and cystic in 47 infants. In infants with cystic-WMI early MRI showed extensive restricted diffusion abnormalities, cysts were already present in 3 infants; mid MRI showed focal or extensive cysts, without acute diffusion changes. A significant reduction in the size and/or extent of the cysts was observed in 32% of the infants between early/mid and TEA MRI. In 4/9 infants previously seen focal cysts were no longer identified at TEA. All infants with cystic WMI showed ≥2 additional findings at TEA: significant reduction in WM volume, mild-moderate irregular ventriculomegaly, several areas of increased signal intensity on T1-weighted-images, abnormal myelination of the PLIC, small thalami. Conclusion In infants with extensive WM cysts at 2–6 weeks, cysts may be reduced in number or may even no longer be seen at TEA. A single MRI at TEA, without taking sequential cUS data and pre-TEA MRI findings into account, may underestimate the extent of WMI; based on these results we propose a new MRI classification for preterm non-hemorrhagic WMI. PMID:27257863

  1. Cilengitide inhibits progression of experimental breast cancer bone metastases as imaged noninvasively using VCT, MRI and DCE-MRI in a longitudinal in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bäuerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Merz, Maximilian; Berger, Martin R; Goodman, Simon L; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inhibiting αvβ(3)/α(v) β(5) integrins by cilengitide in experimentally induced breast cancer bone metastases using noninvasive imaging techniques. For this purpose, nude rats bearing established breast cancer bone metastases were treated with cilengitide, a small molecule inhibitor of αvβ(3) and αvβ(5) integrins (75 mg/kg, five days per week; n = 12 rats) and compared to vehicle-treated control rats (n = 12). In a longitudinal study, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and flat panel volumetric computed tomography were used to assess the volume of the soft tissue tumor and osteolysis, respectively, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI was performed to determine functional parameters of the tumor vasculature reflecting blood volume and blood vessel permeability. In rats treated with cilengitide, VCT and MRI showed that osteolytic lesions and the respective bone metastatic soft tissue tumors progressed more slowly than in vehicle-treated controls. DCE-MRI indicated a decrease in blood volume and an increase in vessel permeability and immunohistology revealed increased numbers of immature vessels in cilengitide-treated rats compared to vehicle controls. In conclusion, treatment of experimental breast cancer bone metastases with cilengitide resulted in pronounced antiresorptive and antitumor effects, suggesting that αvβ(3)/αvβ(5) inhibition may be a promising therapeutic approach for bone metastases. PMID:20648558

  2. Complimentary aspects of diffusion imaging and fMRI: II. Elucidating contributions to the fMRI signal with diffusion sensitization.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert V; Haker, Steven J; Maier, Stephan E

    2007-07-01

    Tissue water molecules reside in different biophysical compartments. For example, water molecules in the vasculature reside for variable periods of time within arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venuoles and veins, and may be within blood cells or blood plasma. Water molecules outside of the vasculature, in the extravascular space, reside, for a time, either within cells or within the interstitial space between cells. Within these different compartments, different types of microscopic motion that water molecules may experience have been identified and discussed. These range from Brownian diffusion to more coherent flow over the time scales relevant to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments, on the order of several 10s of milliseconds. How these different types of motion are reflected in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods developed for "diffusion" imaging studies has been an ongoing and active area of research. Here we briefly review the ideas that have developed regarding these motions within the context of modern "diffusion" imaging techniques and, in particular, how they have been accessed in attempts to further our understanding of the various contributions to the fMRI signal changes sought in studies of human brain activation. PMID:17442520

  3. Evaluating pH in the Extracellular Tumor Microenvironment Using CEST MRI and Other Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liu Qi; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor acidosis is a consequence of altered metabolism, which can lead to chemoresistance and can be a target of alkalinizing therapies. Noninvasive measurements of the extracellular pH (pHe) of the tumor microenvironment can improve diagnoses and treatment decisions. A variety of noninvasive imaging methods have been developed for measuring tumor pHe. This review provides a detailed description of the advantages and limitations of each method, providing many examples from previous research reports. A substantial emphasis is placed on methods that use MR spectroscopy and MR imaging, including recently developed methods that use chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI that combines some advantages of MR spectroscopy and imaging. Together, this review provides a comprehensive overview of methods for measuring tumor pHe, which may facilitate additional creative approaches in this research field. PMID:27761517

  4. Fat Imaging via Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Young Children (Ages 1-4 Years) without Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Shearrer, Grace E.; House, Benjamin T.; Gallas, Michelle C.; Luci, Jeffrey J.; Davis, Jaimie N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This pilot study developed techniques to perform Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of specific fat deposition in 18 children (age 18 months to 4 years). Methods The children engaged in a series of practice tests to become acclimated to the scanner noises, reduce claustrophobia, and rehearse holding still for a set time. The practice tests assessed if the child could remain still for two minutes while watching a video, first while lying on a blanket, second, on the blanket with headphones, and third, in the mock scanner. The children who passed the three practice tests were then scanned with a 3T Siemens Skyra magnet. Abdominal fat distribution (region of interest (ROI) from the top of the ileac crest to the bottom of the ribcage) volume was measured using 2-point DIXON technique. This region was chosen to give an indication of the body composition around the liver. Results Twelve out of eighteen participants successfully completed the actual MRI scan. Chi-squared test showed no significant difference between male and female pass-fail rates. The median age of completed scans was 36 months, whereas the median age for children unable to complete a scan was 28 months. The average total trunk fat was 240.9±85.2mL and the average total VAT was 37.7±25.9mLand liver fat was not quantifiable due to physiological motion. Several strategies (modeling, videos, and incentives) were identified to improve pediatric imaging in different age ranges. Conclusion Using an age-specific and tailored protocol, we were able to successfully use MRI for fat imaging in a majority of young children. Development of such protocols enables researchers to better understand the etiology of fat deposition in young children, which can be used to aid in the prevention and treatment of adiposity. PMID:26901881

  5. Prediction of background parenchymal enhancement on breast MRI using mammography, ultrasonography, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akiko; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Satoko; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Kimura, Reiko; Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This retrospective study assessed the effects of menopausal status and menstrual cycle on background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and investigated whether the degree of BPE can be predicted by findings of mammography, ultrasonography (US), and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). There were 160 study patients (80 premenopausal, 80 postmenopausal). Degree of BPE was classified into minimal, mild, moderate, or marked. Mammographic density was classified into fatty, scattered, heterogeneously dense, and extremely dense. BP echotexture on US and BP intensity on DWI were visually classified as homogeneous or heterogeneous. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal breast tissue were measured. Associations of the degree of BPE with menopausal status, menstrual cycle, or imaging features were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. No significant correlation was found between mammographic density and BPE (p=0.085), whereas menopausal status (p=0.000), BP echotexture (p=0.000), and BP intensity on DWI (p= 0.000), and ADC values (p=0.000) showed significant correlations with BPE. Multivariate analysis showed that postmenopausal status was an independent predictor of minimal BPE (p=0.002, OR=3.743). In premenopausal women, there was no significant correlation between menstrual cycle and BPE, whereas BP echotexture was an independent predictor of whether BPE was less than mild or greater than moderate (p=0.001, OR=26.575). BPE on breast MRI is associated with menopausal status and the findings of US and DWI. Because premenopausal women with heterogeneous BP echotexture may be predicted to show moderate or marked BPE, scheduling of breast MRI should preferentially be adjusted to the menstrual cycle. PMID:26412889

  6. Effect of Imaging Parameter Thresholds on MRI Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ella F.; Newitt, David C.; Kornak, John; Wilmes, Lisa J.; Esserman, Laura J.; Hylton, Nola M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predictive performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers in breast cancer patients by subtype. Sixty-four patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. Each patient received a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy and before surgery. Functional tumor volume (FTV), the imaging marker measured by DCE-MRI, was computed at various thresholds of percent enhancement (PEt) and signal-enhancement ratio (SERt). Final FTV before surgery and percent changes of FTVs at the early and final treatment time points were used to predict patients’ recurrence-free survival. The full cohort and each subtype defined by the status of hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HR+/HER2-, HER2+, triple negative) were analyzed. Predictions were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazard model when PEt changed from 30% to 200% in steps of 10% and SERt changed from 0 to 2 in steps of 0.2. Predictions with high hazard ratios and low p-values were considered as strong. Different profiles of FTV as predictors for recurrence-free survival were observed in each breast cancer subtype and strong associations with survival were observed at different PEt/SERt combinations that resulted in different FTVs. Findings from this retrospective study suggest that the predictive performance of imaging markers based on FTV may be improved with enhancement thresholds being optimized separately for clinically-relevant subtypes defined by HR and HER2 receptor expression. PMID:26886725

  7. 1.5 Tesla MRI-Conditional 12-lead ECG for MR Imaging and Intra-MR Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Clifford, Gari D.; Schweitzer, Jeff; Qin, Lei; Oster, Julien; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Michaud, Gregory; Stevenson, William G.; Schmidt, Ehud J.

    2013-01-01

    Propose High-fidelity 12-lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) is important for physiological monitoring of patients during MR-guided intervention and cardiac MR imaging. Issues in obtaining non-corrupted ECGs inside MRI include a superimposed Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) voltage, gradient-switching induced-voltages, and radiofrequency (RF) heating. These problems increase with magnetic field. We intended to develop and clinically validate a 1.5T MRI-conditional 12-lead ECG system. Methods The system was constructed, including transmission-lines to reduce radio-frequency induction, and switching-circuits to remove induced voltages. Adaptive filters, trained by 12-lead measurements outside MRI and in two orientations inside MRI, were used to remove MHD. The system was tested on ten (one exercising) volunteers and four arrhythmia patients. Results Switching circuits removed most imaging-induced voltages (residual noise <3% of the R-wave). MHD removal provided intra-MRI ECGs that varied by <3.8% from those outside the MRI, preserving the true ST segment. In premature-ventricular-contraction (PVC) patients, clean ECGs separated PVC and sinus-rhythm beats. Measured heating was <1.5 C0. The system reliably acquired multiphase (SSFP) wall-motion-cine and phase-contrast-cine scans, including in subjects where 4-lead gating failed. The system required a minimum TR of 4ms to allow robust ECG processing. Conclusion High-fidelity intra-MRI 12-lead ECG is possible. PMID:23580148

  8. A robust independent component analysis (ICA) model for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Jingqi; Mitra, Sunanda; Liu, Zheng; Nutter, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The coupling of carefully designed experiments with proper analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data provides us with a powerful as well as noninvasive tool to help us understand cognitive processes associated with specific brain regions and hence could be used to detect abnormalities induced by a diseased state. The hypothesisdriven General Linear Model (GLM) and the data-driven Independent Component Analysis (ICA) model are the two most commonly used models for fMRI data analysis. A hybrid ICA-GLM model combines the two models to take advantages of benefits from both models to achieve more accurate mapping of the stimulus-induced activated brain regions. We propose a modified hybrid ICA-GLM model with probabilistic ICA that includes a noise model. In this modified hybrid model, a probabilistic principle component analysis (PPCA)-based component number estimation is used in the ICA stage to extract the intrinsic number of original time courses. In addition, frequency matching is introduced into the time course selection stage, along with temporal correlation, F-test based model fitting estimation, and time course combination, to produce a more accurate design matrix for GLM. A standard fMRI dataset is used to compare the results of applying GLM and the proposed hybrid ICA-GLM in generating activation maps.

  9. A Novel liposomal nanoparticle for the imaging of amyloid plaque by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tanifum, Eric A.; Ghaghada, Ketan; Vollert, Craig; Head, Elizabeth; Eriksen, Jason L.; Annapragada, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid binding molecules with greater hydrophilicity than existing ligands were synthesized. The lead candidate ET6-21 bound amyloid fibrils, and amyloid deposits in dog brain and human brain tissue ex vivo. The ligand was used to prepare novel amyloid-targeted liposomal nanoparticles. The preparation was tested in the Tg2576 and TetO/APP mouse models of amyloid deposition. Gd chelates and Indocyanine green were included in the particles for visualization by MRI and near-infrared microscopy. Upon intravenous injection, the particles successfully traversed the blood-brain barrier in these mice, and bound to the plaques. Magnetic resonance imaging (T1-MRI) conducted 4 days after injection demonstrated elevated signal in the brains of mice with amyloid plaques present. No signal was observed in amyloid-negative mice, or in amyloid-positive mice injected with an untargeted version of the same agent. The MRI results were confirmed by immunohistochemical and fluorescent microscopic examination of mouse brain sections, showing colocalization of the fluorescent tags and amyloid deposits. PMID:27031484

  10. A Quantitative MRI Method for Imaging Blood-Brain Barrier Leakage in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Lora Talley; Jiang, Zhao; Shen, Qiang; Li, Yunxia; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI can longitudinally measure the transport coefficient Ktrans which reflects BBB permeability. Ktrans measurements however are not widely used in TBI research because it is generally considered to be noisy and possesses low spatial resolution. We improved spatiotemporal resolution and signal sensitivity of Ktrans MRI in rats by using a high-sensitivity surface transceiver coil. To overcome the signal drop off profile of the surface coil, a pre-scan module was used to map the flip angle (B1 field) and magnetization (M0) distributions. A series of T1-weighted gradient echo images were acquired and fitted to the extended Kety model with reversible or irreversible leakage, and the best model was selected using F-statistics. We applied this method to study the rat brain one hour following controlled cortical impact (mild to moderate TBI), and observed clear depiction of the BBB damage around the impact regions, which matched that outlined by Evans Blue extravasation. Unlike the relatively uniform T2 contrast showing cerebral edema, Ktrans shows a pronounced heterogeneous spatial profile in and around the impact regions, displaying a nonlinear relationship with T2. This improved Ktrans MRI method is also compatible with the use of high-sensitivity surface coil and the high-contrast two-coil arterial spin-labeling method for cerebral blood flow measurement, enabling more comprehensive investigation of the pathophysiology in TBI. PMID:25478693

  11. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  12. PROMO: Real-time prospective motion correction in MRI using image-based tracking.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan; Roddey, Cooper; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Han, Eric; Rettmann, Dan; Santos, Juan; Kuperman, Josh; Dale, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts caused by patient motion during scanning remain a serious problem in most MRI applications. The prospective motion correction technique attempts to address this problem at its source by keeping the measurement coordinate system fixed with respect to the patient throughout the entire scan process. In this study, a new image-based approach for prospective motion correction is described, which utilizes three orthogonal two-dimensional spiral navigator acquisitions, along with a flexible image-based tracking method based on the extended Kalman filter algorithm for online motion measurement. The spiral navigator/extended Kalman filter framework offers the advantages of image-domain tracking within patient-specific regions-of-interest and reduced sensitivity to off-resonance-induced corruption of rigid-body motion estimates. The performance of the method was tested using offline computer simulations and online in vivo head motion experiments. In vivo validation results covering a broad range of staged head motions indicate a steady-state error of less than 10% of the motion magnitude, even for large compound motions that included rotations over 15 deg. A preliminary in vivo application in three-dimensional inversion recovery spoiled gradient echo (IR-SPGR) and three-dimensional fast spin echo (FSE) sequences demonstrates the effectiveness of the spiral navigator/extended Kalman filter framework for correcting three-dimensional rigid-body head motion artifacts prospectively in high-resolution three-dimensional MRI scans.

  13. Registering fNIR data to brain surface image using MRI templates.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Hasan; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Platek, Steven M; Bunce, Scott; Izzetoglu, Kurtulus; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Onaral, Banu

    2006-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIR) measures changes in the relative levels of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and has increasingly been used to assess neural functioning in the brain. In addition to the ongoing technological developments, investigators have also been conducting studies on functional mapping and refinement of data analytic strategies in order to better understand the relationship between the fNIR signal and brain activity. However, since fNIR is a relatively new functional brain imaging modality as compared to positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), it still lacks brain-mapping tools designed to allow researchers and clinicians to easily interact with their data. The aim of this study is to develop a registration technique for the fNIR measurements using anatomical landmarks and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) templates in order to visualize the brain activation when and where it happens. The proposed registration technique utilizes chain-code algorithm and depicts activations over respective locations based on sensor geometry. Furthermore, registered data locations have been used to create spatiotemporal visualization of fNIR measurements.

  14. Assessment of Geometrical Accuracy of Multimodal Images Used for Treatment Planning in Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery: CT, MRI and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Celis, M. A.; Suarez-Campos, J. J.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.

    2006-09-08

    An acrylic phantom was designed and constructed to assess the geometrical accuracy of CT, MRI and PET images for stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The phantom was suited for each image modality with a specific tracer and compared with CT images to measure the radial deviation between the reference marks in the phantom. It was found that for MRI the maximum mean deviation is 1.9 {+-} 0.2 mm compared to 2.4 {+-} 0.3 mm reported for PET. These results will be used for margin outlining in SRS and SRT treatment planning.

  15. Cardiac Amyloidosis: Typical Imaging Findings and Diffuse Myocardial Damage Demonstrated by Delayed Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Eijun Sakamoto, Ichiro; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Tanaka, Kyouei; Toda, Genji

    2006-08-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare systemic disease. However, involvement of the heart is a common finding and is the most frequent cause of death in amyloidosis. We report the sonographic, scintigraphic, and MRI features of a pathologically proven case of cardiac amyloidosis. Delayed contrast-enhanced MR images, using an inversion recovery prepped gradient-echo sequence, revealed diffuse enhancement in the wall of both left and right ventricles. This enhancement suggested expansion of the extracellular space of the myocardium caused by diffuse myocardial necrosis secondary to deposition of amyloid.

  16. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  17. Genetic engineered molecular imaging probes for applications in cell therapy: emphasis on MRI approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In K; Wang, Silun; Mao, Hui; Chan, Anthony WS

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in stem cell-based regenerative medicine, cell replacement therapy, and genome editing technologies (i.e. CRISPR-Cas 9) have sparked great interest in in vivo cell monitoring. Molecular imaging promises a unique approach to noninvasively monitor cellular and molecular phenomena, including cell survival, migration, proliferation, and even differentiation at the whole organismal level. Several imaging modalities and strategies have been explored for monitoring cell grafts in vivo. We begin this review with an introduction describing the progress in stem cell technology, with a perspective toward cell replacement therapy. The importance of molecular imaging in reporting and assessing the status of cell grafts and their relation to the local microenvironment is highlighted since the current knowledge gap is one of the major obstacles in clinical translation of stem cell therapy. Based on currently available imaging techniques, we provide a brief discussion on the pros and cons of each imaging modality used for monitoring cell grafts with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the reporter gene approach. Finally, we conclude with a comprehensive discussion of future directions of applying molecular imaging in regenerative medicine to emphasize further the importance of correlating cell graft conditions and clinical outcomes to advance regenerative medicine. PMID:27766183

  18. Shape based MRI prostate image segmentation using local information driven directional distance Bayesian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present a shape based segmentation methodology for magnetic resonance prostate images. We first propose a new way to represent shapes via the hyperbolic tangent of the signed distance function. This effectively corrects the drawbacks of the signed distance function and yields very reasonable results for the shape registration and learning. Secondly, under a Bayesian statistical framework, instead of computing the posterior using a uniform prior, a directional distance map is introduced in order to incorporate a priori knowledge of image content as well as the estimated center of target object. Essentially, the image is modeled as a Finsler manifold and the metric is computed out of the directional derivative of the image. Then the directional distance map is computed to suppress the posterior remote from the object center. Thirdly, in the posterior image, a localized region based cost functional is designed to drive the shape based segmentation. Such cost functional utilizes the local regional information and is robust to both image noise and remote/irrelevant disturbances. With these three major components, the entire shape based segmentation procedure is provided as a complete open source pipeline and is applied to magnetic resonance image (MRI) prostate data.

  19. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in focal therapy for prostate cancer: recommendations from a consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Berrend G.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.; Gupta, Rajan T.; Katz, Aaron; Kirkham, Alexander; Kurhanewicz, John; Moul, Judd W.; Pinto, Peter A.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Robertson, Cary; de la Rosette, Jean; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Jones, J. Stephen; Ukimura, Osamu; Verma, Sadhna; Wijkstra, Hessel; Marberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a consensus on the utility of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to identify patients for focal therapy. Methods Urological surgeons, radiologists, and basic researchers, from Europe and North America participated in a consensus meeting about the use of mpMRI in focal therapy of prostate cancer.The consensus process was face-to-face and specific clinical issues were raised and discussed with agreement sought when possible. All participants are listed among the authors.Topics specifically did not include staging of prostate cancer, but rather identifying the optimal requirements for performing MRI, and the current status of optimally performed mpMRI to (i) determine focality of prostate cancer (e.g. localising small target lesions of ≥0.5 mL), (ii) to monitor and assess the outcome of focal ablation therapies, and (iii) to identify the diagnostic advantages of new MRI methods.In addition, the need for transperineal template saturation biopsies in selecting patients for focal therapy was discussed, if a high quality mpMRI is available. In other words, can mpMRI replace the role of transperineal saturation biopsies in patient selection for focal therapy? Results Consensus was reached on most key aspects of the meeting; however, on definition of the optimal requirements for mpMRI, there was one dissenting voice.mpMRI is the optimum approach to achieve the objectives needed for focal therapy, if made on a high quality machine (3T with/without endorectal coil or 1.5T with endorectal coil) and judged by an experienced radiologist.Structured and standardised reporting of prostate MRI is paramount.State of the art mpMRI is capable of localising small tumours for focal therapy.State of the art mpMRI is the technique of choice for follow-up of focal ablation. Conclusions The present evidence for MRI in focal therapy is limited.mpMRI is not accurate enough to consistently grade tumour aggressiveness.Template-guided saturation biopsies

  20. Imaging of Intratumoral Inflammation during Oncolytic Virotherapy of Tumors by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Michael; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Seubert, Carolin; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Sturm, Volker Jörg Friedrich; Ye, Yuxiang; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter Michael; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors is an up-coming, promising therapeutic modality of cancer therapy. Unfortunately, non-invasive techniques to evaluate the inflammatory host response to treatment are rare. Here, we evaluate 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables the non-invasive visualization of inflammatory processes in pathological conditions by the use of perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC) for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy. Methodology/Principal Findings The Vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 was used as an oncolytic agent for the treatment of different tumor models. Systemic application of PFC emulsions followed by 1H/19F MRI of mock-infected and GLV-1h68-infected tumor-bearing mice revealed a significant accumulation of the 19F signal in the tumor rim of virus-treated mice. Histological examination of tumors confirmed a similar spatial distribution of the 19F signal hot spots and CD68+-macrophages. Thereby, the CD68+-macrophages encapsulate the GFP-positive viral infection foci. In multiple tumor models, we specifically visualized early inflammatory cell recruitment in Vaccinia virus colonized tumors. Furthermore, we documented that the 19F signal correlated with the extent of viral spreading within tumors. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest 19F MRI as a non-invasive methodology to document the tumor-associated host immune response as well as the extent of intratumoral viral replication. Thus, 19F MRI represents a new platform to non-invasively investigate the role of the host immune response for therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy and individual patient response. PMID:23441176

  1. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  2. Incidental Memory Encoding Assessed with Signal Detection Theory and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Benjamin; Regenbogen, Christina; Koch, Kathrin; Backes, Volker; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Pauly, Katharina; Shah, N. Jon; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute; Kellermann, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that apply a “subsequent memory” approach, successful encoding is indicated by increased fMRI activity during the encoding phase for hits vs. misses, in areas underlying memory encoding such as the hippocampal formation. Signal-detection theory (SDT) can be used to analyze memory-related fMRI activity as a function of the participant’s memory trace strength (d′). The goal of the present study was to use SDT to examine the relationship between fMRI activity during incidental encoding and participants’ recognition performance. To implement a new approach, post-experimental group assignment into High- or Low Performers (HP or LP) was based on 29 healthy participants’ recognition performance, assessed with SDT. The analyses focused on the interaction between the factors group (HP vs. LP) and recognition performance (hits vs. misses). A whole-brain analysis revealed increased activation for HP vs. LP during incidental encoding for remembered vs. forgotten items (hits > misses) in the insula/temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and the fusiform gyrus (FFG). Parameter estimates in these regions exhibited a significant positive correlation with d′. As these brain regions are highly relevant for salience detection (insula), stimulus-driven attention (TPJ), and content-specific processing of mnemonic stimuli (FFG), we suggest that HPs’ elevated memory performance was associated with enhanced attentional and content-specific sensory processing during the encoding phase. We provide first correlative evidence that encoding-related activity in content-specific sensory areas and content-independent attention and salience detection areas influences memory performance in a task with incidental encoding of facial stimuli. Based on our findings, we discuss whether the aforementioned group differences in brain activity during incidental encoding might constitute the basis of general differences in memory performance

  3. Fluoroscopic management of complications after colorectal stent placement.

    PubMed

    Lopera, Jorge E; De Gregorio, Miguel Angel

    2010-09-01

    Colorectal self-expanding metal stents have been widely used as a bridge to surgery in patients with acute malignant colonic obstruction by allowing a single-stage operation, or as a definitive palliative procedure in patients with inoperable tumors. Colonic stents are placed under either fluoroscopic or combined endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance, with similar technical-success and complication rates. Placement of colonic stents is a very safe procedure with a low procedure-related mortality rate, but serious complications can develop and reinterventions are not uncommon. Most of the complications can be treated by minimally invasive or conservative techniques, while surgical interventions are required for most patients with perforation.

  4. Content-based image retrieval utilizing explicit shape descriptors: applications to breast MRI and prostate histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Rachel; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems, in the context of medical image analysis, allow for a user to compare a query image to previously archived database images in terms of diagnostic and/or prognostic similarity. CBIR systems can therefore serve as a powerful computerized decision support tool for clinical diagnostics and also serve as a useful learning tool for medical students, residents, and fellows. An accurate CBIR system relies on two components, (1) image descriptors which are related to a previously defined notion of image similarity and (2) quantification of image descriptors in order to accurately characterize and capture the a priori defined image similarity measure. In many medical applications, the morphology of an object of interest (e.g. breast lesions on DCE-MRI or glands on prostate histopathology) may provide important diagnostic and prognostic information regarding the disease being investigated. Morphological attributes can be broadly categorized as being (a) model-based (MBD) or (b) non-model based (NMBD). Most computerized decision support tools leverage morphological descriptors (e.g. area, contour variation, and compactness) which belong to the latter category in that they do not explicitly model morphology for the object of interest. Conversely, descriptors such as Fourier descriptors (FDs) explicitly model the object of interest. In this paper, we present a CBIR system that leverages a novel set of MBD called Explicit Shape Descriptors (ESDs) which accurately describe the similarity between the morphology of objects of interest. ESDs are computed by: (a) fitting shape models to objects of interest, (b) pairwise comparison between shape models, and (c) a nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme to extract a concise set of morphological descriptors in a reduced dimensional embedding space. We utilized our ESDs in the context of CBIR in three datasets: (1) the synthetic MPEG-7 Set B containing 1400 silhouette images, (2) DCE-MRI of

  5. Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Aichler, Michaela; Huber, Katharina; Schilling, Franz; Lohöfer, Fabian; Kosanke, Katja; Meier, Reinhard; Rummeny, Ernst J; Walch, Axel; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2015-03-27

    Gadolinium(III)-based contrast agents improve the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially when targeted contrast agents are applied. Because of nonlinear correlation between the contrast agent concentration in tissue and the MRI signal obtained in vivo, quantification of certain biological or pathophysiological processes by MRI remains a challenge. Up to now, no technology has been able to provide a spatially resolved quantification of MRI agents directly within the tissue, which would allow a more precise verification of in vivo imaging results. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry for spatially resolved in situ quantification of gadolinium(III) agents, in correlation to in vivo MRI, were evaluated. Enhanced kinetics of Gadofluorine M were determined dynamically over time in a mouse model of myocardial infarction. MALDI imaging was able to corroborate the in vivo imaging MRI signals and enabled in situ quantification of the gadolinium probe with high spatial resolution.

  6. WE-G-18C-08: Real Time Tumor Imaging Using a Novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI Reconstruction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Whelan, B; Keall, P; Greer, P; Kim, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI reconstruction technique can accelerate image acquisition whilst maintaining high image quality for lung cancer patients. Methods: 18 MRI datasets from 5 lung cancer patients were acquired using a 3T MRI scanner. These datasets were retrospectively reconstructed using (A) The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique, (B) The conventional keyhole technique and (C) the conventional zero filling technique. The dynamic keyhole technique in MRI refers to techniques in which previously acquired k-space data is used to supplement under sampled data obtained in real time. The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique utilizes a previously acquired a library of kspace datasets in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in realtime. A simultaneously acquired respiratory signal is utilized to sort, match and combine the two k-space streams with respect to respiratory displacement. Reconstruction performance was quantified by (1) comparing the keyhole size (which corresponds to imaging speed) required to achieve the same image quality, and (2) maintaining a constant keyhole size across the three reconstruction methods to compare the resulting image quality to the ground truth image. Results: (1) The dynamic keyhole method required a mean keyhole size which was 48% smaller than the conventional keyhole technique and 60% smaller than the zero filling technique to achieve the same image quality. This directly corresponds to faster imaging. (2) When a constant keyhole size was utilized, the Dynamic Keyhole technique resulted in the smallest difference of the tumor region compared to the ground truth. Conclusion: The dynamic keyhole is a simple and adaptable technique for clinical applications requiring real-time imaging and tumor monitoring such as MRI guided radiotherapy. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the imaging frequency by a factor of five compared with full k

  7. Silica micro/nanospheres for theranostics: from bimodal MRI and fluorescent imaging probes to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Shanka

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nano-theranostics offer remarkable potential for future biomedical technology with simultaneous applications for diagnosis and therapy of disease sites. Through smart and careful chemical modifications of the nanoparticle surface, these can be converted to multifunctional tiny objects which in turn can be used as vehicle for delivering multimodal imaging agents and therapeutic material to specific target sites in vivo. In this sense, bimodal imaging probes that simultaneously enable magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging have gained tremendous attention because disease sites can be characterized quick and precisely through synergistic multimodal imaging. But such hybrid nanocomposite materials have limitations such as low chemical stability (magnetic component) and harsh cytotoxic effects (fluorescent component) and, hence, require a biocompatible protecting agent. Silica micro/nanospheres have shown promise as protecting agent due to the high stability and low toxicity. This review will cover a full description of MRI-active and fluorescent multifunctional silica micro/nanospheres including the design of the probe, different characterization methods and their application in imaging and treatment in cancer. PMID:25821696

  8. Improving Brain Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Segmentation via a Novel Algorithm based on Genetic and Regional Growth

    PubMed Central

    A., Javadpour; A., Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Regarding the importance of right diagnosis in medical applications, various methods have been exploited for processing medical images solar. The method of segmentation is used to analyze anal to miscall structures in medical imaging. Objective This study describes a new method for brain Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) segmentation via a novel algorithm based on genetic and regional growth. Methods Among medical imaging methods, brains MRI segmentation is important due to high contrast of non-intrusive soft tissue and high spatial resolution. Size variations of brain tissues are often accompanied by various diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. As our knowledge about the relation between various brain diseases and deviation of brain anatomy increases, MRI segmentation is exploited as the first step in early diagnosis. In this paper, regional growth method and auto-mate selection of initial points by genetic algorithm is used to introduce a new method for MRI segmentation. Primary pixels and similarity criterion are automatically by genetic algorithms to maximize the accuracy and validity in image segmentation. Results By using genetic algorithms and defining the fixed function of image segmentation, the initial points for the algorithm were found. The proposed algorithms are applied to the images and results are manually selected by regional growth in which the initial points were compared. The results showed that the proposed algorithm could reduce segmentation error effectively. Conclusion The study concluded that the proposed algorithm could reduce segmentation error effectively and help us to diagnose brain diseases. PMID:27672629

  9. Improving Brain Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Segmentation via a Novel Algorithm based on Genetic and Regional Growth

    PubMed Central

    A., Javadpour; A., Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Background Regarding the importance of right diagnosis in medical applications, various methods have been exploited for processing medical images solar. The method of segmentation is used to analyze anal to miscall structures in medical imaging. Objective This study describes a new method for brain Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) segmentation via a novel algorithm based on genetic and regional growth. Methods Among medical imaging methods, brains MRI segmentation is important due to high contrast of non-intrusive soft tissue and high spatial resolution. Size variations of brain tissues are often accompanied by various diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. As our knowledge about the relation between various brain diseases and deviation of brain anatomy increases, MRI segmentation is exploited as the first step in early diagnosis. In this paper, regional growth method and auto-mate selection of initial points by genetic algorithm is used to introduce a new method for MRI segmentation. Primary pixels and similarity criterion are automatically by genetic algorithms to maximize the accuracy and validity in image segmentation. Results By using genetic algorithms and defining the fixed function of image segmentation, the initial points for the algorithm were found. The proposed algorithms are applied to the images and results are manually selected by regional growth in which the initial points were compared. The results showed that the proposed algorithm could reduce segmentation error effectively. Conclusion The study concluded that the proposed algorithm could reduce segmentation error effectively and help us to diagnose brain diseases.

  10. Predicting axillary lymph node metastasis from kinetic statistics of DCE-MRI breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Ahmed B.; Lin, Lilie; Gavenonis, Sara C.; Mies, Carolyn; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Kontos, Despina

    2012-03-01

    The presence of axillary lymph node metastases is the most important prognostic factor in breast cancer and can influence the selection of adjuvant therapy, both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this work we present a set of kinetic statistics derived from DCE-MRI for predicting axillary node status. Breast DCE-MRI images from 69 women with known nodal status were analyzed retrospectively under HIPAA and IRB approval. Axillary lymph nodes were positive in 12 patients while 57 patients had no axillary lymph node involvement. Kinetic curves for each pixel were computed and a pixel-wise map of time-to-peak (TTP) was obtained. Pixels were first partitioned according to the similarity of their kinetic behavior, based on TTP values. For every kinetic curve, the following pixel-wise features were computed: peak enhancement (PE), wash-in-slope (WIS), wash-out-slope (WOS). Partition-wise statistics for every feature map were calculated, resulting in a total of 21 kinetic statistic features. ANOVA analysis was done to select features that differ significantly between node positive and node negative women. Using the computed kinetic statistic features a leave-one-out SVM classifier was learned that performs with AUC=0.77 under the ROC curve, outperforming the conventional kinetic measures, including maximum peak enhancement (MPE) and signal enhancement ratio (SER), (AUCs of 0.61 and 0.57 respectively). These findings suggest that our DCE-MRI kinetic statistic features can be used to improve the prediction of axillary node status in breast cancer patients. Such features could ultimately be used as imaging biomarkers to guide personalized treatment choices for women diagnosed with breast cancer.

  11. Comparing deflection measurements of a magnetically steerable catheter using optical imaging and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel Caton, Curtis; Martin, Alastair J.; Losey, Aaron D.; Evans, Leland; Saeed, Maythem; Cooke, Daniel L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging modality for interventional radiology, giving clinicians another tool for minimally invasive image-guided interventional procedures. Difficulties associated with endovascular catheter navigation using MRI guidance led to the development of a magnetically steerable catheter. The focus of this study was to mechanically characterize deflections of two different prototypes of the magnetically steerable catheterin vitro to better understand their efficacy. Methods: A mathematical model for deflection of the magnetically steerable catheter is formulated based on the principle that at equilibrium the mechanical and magnetic torques are equal to each other. Furthermore, two different image based methods for empirically measuring the catheter deflection angle are presented. The first, referred to as the absolute tip method, measures the angle of the line that is tangential to the catheter tip. The second, referred to the base to tip method, is an approximation that is used when it is not possible to measure the angle of the tangent line. Optical images of the catheter deflection are analyzed using the absolute tip method to quantitatively validate the predicted deflections from the mathematical model. Optical images of the catheter deflection are also analyzed using the base to tip method to quantitatively determine the differences between the absolute tip and base to tip methods. Finally, the optical images are compared to MR images using the base to tip method to determine the accuracy of measuring the catheter deflection using MR. Results: The optical catheter deflection angles measured for both catheter prototypes using the absolute tip method fit very well to the mathematical model (R{sup 2} = 0.91 and 0.86 for each prototype, respectively). It was found that the angles measured using the base to tip method were consistently smaller than those measured using the absolute tip method. The deflection angles measured

  12. Protein MRI contrast agent with unprecedented metal selectivity and sensitivity for liver cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shenghui; Yang, Hua; Qiao, Jingjuan; Pu, Fan; Jiang, Jie; Hubbard, Kendra; Hekmatyar, Khan; Langley, Jason; Salarian, Mani; Long, Robert C; Bryant, Robert G; Hu, Xiaoping Philip; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J

    2015-05-26

    With available MRI techniques, primary and metastatic liver cancers that are associated with high mortality rates and poor treatment responses are only diagnosed at late stages, due to the lack of highly sensitive contrast agents without Gd(3+) toxicity. We have developed a protein contrast agent (ProCA32) that exhibits high stability for Gd(3+) and a 10(11)-fold greater selectivity for Gd(3+) over Zn(2+) compared with existing contrast agents. ProCA32, modified from parvalbumin, possesses high relaxivities (r1/r2: 66.8 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1)/89.2 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1) per particle). Using T1- and T2-weighted, as well as T2/T1 ratio imaging, we have achieved, for the first time (to our knowledge), robust MRI detection of early liver metastases as small as ∼0.24 mm in diameter, much smaller than the current detection limit of 10-20 mm. Furthermore, ProCA32 exhibits appropriate in vivo preference for liver sinusoidal spaces and pharmacokinetics for high-quality imaging. ProCA32 will be invaluable for noninvasive early detection of primary and metastatic liver cancers as well as for monitoring treatment and guiding therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery.

  13. A permanent MRI magnet for magic angle imaging having its field parallel to the poles.

    PubMed

    McGinley, John V M; Ristic, Mihailo; Young, Ian R

    2016-10-01

    A novel design of open permanent magnet is presented, in which the magnetic field is oriented parallel to the planes of its poles. The paper describes the methods whereby such a magnet can be designed with a field homogeneity suitable for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Its primary purpose is to take advantage of the Magic Angle effect in MRI of human extremities, particularly the knee joint, by being capable of rotating the direction of the main magnetic field B0 about two orthogonal axes around a stationary subject and achieve all possible angulations. The magnet comprises a parallel pair of identical profiled arrays of permanent magnets backed by a flat steel yoke such that access in lateral directions is practical. The paper describes the detailed optimization procedure from a target 150mm DSV to the achievement of a measured uniform field over a 130mm DSV. Actual performance data of the manufactured magnet, including shimming and a sample image, is presented. The overall magnet system mounting mechanism is presented, including two orthogonal axes of rotation of the magnet about its isocentre. PMID:27552556

  14. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus. PMID:20068582

  15. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-04-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus.

  16. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B 0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained. PMID:27034951

  17. Magnetosomes, biogenic magnetic nanomaterials for brain molecular imaging with 17.2 T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Mériaux, Sébastien; Boucher, Marianne; Marty, Benjamin; Lalatonne, Yoann; Prévéral, Sandra; Motte, Laurence; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Geffroy, Françoise; Lethimonnier, Franck; Péan, Michel; Garcia, Daniel; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The fast development of sensitive molecular diagnostic tools is currently paving the way for a personalized medicine. A new class of ultrasensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T₂-contrast agents based on magnetosomes, magnetite nanocrystals biomineralized by magnetotactic bacteria, is proposed here. The contrast agents can be injected into the blood circulation and detected in the picomolar range. Purified magnetosomes are water-dispersible and stable within physiological conditions and exhibit at 17.2 T a transverse relaxivity r₂ four times higher than commercial ferumoxide. The subsequent gain in sensitivity by T₂(*) -weighted imaging at 17.2 T of the mouse brain vasculature is evidenced in vivo after tail vein injection of magnetosomes representing a low dose of iron (20 μmoliron kg(-1)), whereas no such phenomenon with the same dose of ferumoxide is observed. Preclinical studies of human pathologies in animal models will benefit from the combination of high magnetic field MRI with sensitive, low dose, easy-to-produce biocompatible contrast agents derived from bacterial magnetosomes. PMID:25676134

  18. Structure-function relationships underlying calculation: a combined diffusion tensor imaging and fMRI study.

    PubMed

    van Eimeren, L; Grabner, R H; Koschutnig, K; Reishofer, G; Ebner, F; Ansari, D

    2010-08-01

    Both neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies have identified brain regions that are critical for the neurocognitive processes related to the calculation of arithmetic problems. In particular, the left angular gyrus (lAG) has been repeatedly implicated in arithmetic problem solving and found to be most activated during the retrieval of arithmetic facts. While significant progress has been made in determining the functional role of specific grey matter areas underlying calculation, very little is known about the relationship between these activated regions and their underlying white matter structures. In this study, we collected both diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data while participants performed a mental arithmetic task. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values were extracted from predefined, hypothesis-driven, white matter regions and correlated with fMRI activation values, which were extracted from anatomically defined grey matter regions. Results indicated structure-function relationships on multiple levels. Specifically, a link between the integrity of the left superior corona radiata (SCR) and neural activity in the lAG during calculation was observed, which was found to be particularly strong for problems that have a high probability of being solved via the retrieval of arithmetic facts (problems with a relatively small problem size). The findings reported provide a link between functional activation and structural integrity of grey and white matter regions in the left temporoparietal cortex, thereby contributing to our understanding of the role of both the function and structure of this brain region in calculation. PMID:20382234

  19. A permanent MRI magnet for magic angle imaging having its field parallel to the poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinley, John V. M.; Ristic, Mihailo; Young, Ian R.

    2016-10-01

    A novel design of open permanent magnet is presented, in which the magnetic field is oriented parallel to the planes of its poles. The paper describes the methods whereby such a magnet can be designed with a field homogeneity suitable for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Its primary purpose is to take advantage of the Magic Angle effect in MRI of human extremities, particularly the knee joint, by being capable of rotating the direction of the main magnetic field B0 about two orthogonal axes around a stationary subject and achieve all possible angulations. The magnet comprises a parallel pair of identical profiled arrays of permanent magnets backed by a flat steel yoke such that access in lateral directions is practical. The paper describes the detailed optimization procedure from a target 150 mm DSV to the achievement of a measured uniform field over a 130 mm DSV. Actual performance data of the manufactured magnet, including shimming and a sample image, is presented. The overall magnet system mounting mechanism is presented, including two orthogonal axes of rotation of the magnet about its isocentre.

  20. A permanent MRI magnet for magic angle imaging having its field parallel to the poles.

    PubMed

    McGinley, John V M; Ristic, Mihailo; Young, Ian R

    2016-10-01

    A novel design of open permanent magnet is presented, in which the magnetic field is oriented parallel to the planes of its poles. The paper describes the methods whereby such a magnet can be designed with a field homogeneity suitable for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Its primary purpose is to take advantage of the Magic Angle effect in MRI of human extremities, particularly the knee joint, by being capable of rotating the direction of the main magnetic field B0 about two orthogonal axes around a stationary subject and achieve all possible angulations. The magnet comprises a parallel pair of identical profiled arrays of permanent magnets backed by a flat steel yoke such that access in lateral directions is practical. The paper describes the detailed optimization procedure from a target 150mm DSV to the achievement of a measured uniform field over a 130mm DSV. Actual performance data of the manufactured magnet, including shimming and a sample image, is presented. The overall magnet system mounting mechanism is presented, including two orthogonal axes of rotation of the magnet about its isocentre.

  1. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained. PMID:27034951

  2. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  3. Penile fracture: penoscrotal approach with degloving of penis after Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Antonini, Gabriele; Vicini, Patrizio; Sansalone, Salvatore; Garaffa, Giulio; Vitarelli, Antonio; De Berardinis, Ettore; Von Heland, Magnus; Giovannone, Riccardo; Casciani, Emanuele; Gentile, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    Fracture of the penis, a relatively uncommon emergency in Urology, consists in the traumatic rupture of the tunica albuginea of the corpus cavernosum. Examination and clinical history can be highly suspicious of penile fracture in the majority of cases and ultrasonography (USS) can be useful to identify the exact location of the tunical rupture, which is proximal in 2/3 of cases and therefore manageable through a penoscrotal approach. Although expensive and not readily available in the acute setting, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) may play a role in the differential diagnosis with rupture of a circumflex or dorsal vein of the penis or when the tunical rupture is not associated with tear of the overlying Buck's fascia. This form of imaging is more sensitive than USS at identifying the presence of a tunical tear. The treatment of choice is immediate surgical repair, which allows preserving erectile function and minimizing corporeal fibrosis.

  4. MRI-Derived 3-D-Printed Breast Phantom for Microwave Breast Imaging Validation.

    PubMed

    Burfeindt, Matthew J; Colgan, Timothy J; Mays, R Owen; Shea, Jacob D; Behdad, Nader; Van Veen, Barry D; Hagness, Susan C

    2012-01-01

    We propose a 3-D-printed breast phantom for use in preclinical experimental microwave imaging studies. The phantom is derived from an MRI of a human subject; thus, it is anthropomorphic, and its interior is very similar to an actual distribution of fibroglandular tissues. Adipose tissue in the breast is represented by the solid plastic (printed) regions of the phantom, while fibroglandular tissue is represented by liquid-filled voids in the plastic. The liquid is chosen to provide a biologically relevant dielectric contrast with the printed plastic. Such a phantom enables validation of microwave imaging techniques. We describe the procedure for generating the 3-D-printed breast phantom and present the measured dielectric properties of the 3-D-printed plastic over the frequency range 0.5-3.5 GHz. We also provide an example of a suitable liquid for filling the fibroglandular voids in the plastic.

  5. PCA and level set based non-rigid image registration for MRI and Paxinos-Watson atlas of rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chao; Liu, Ailing; Ding, Mingyue; Zhou, Chengping

    2007-12-01

    Image registration provides the ability to geometrically align one dataset with another. It is a basic task in a great variety of biomedical imaging applications. This paper introduced a novel three-dimensional registration method for Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) and Paxinos-Watson Atlas of rat brain. For the purpose of adapting to a large range and non-linear deformation between MRI and atlas in higher registration accuracy, based on the segmentation of rat brain, we chose the principle components analysis (PCA) automatically performing the linear registration, and then, a level set based nonlinear registration correcting some small distortions. We implemented this registration method in a rat brain 3D reconstruction and analysis system. Experiments have demonstrated that this method can be successfully applied to registering the low resolution and noise affection MRI with Paxinos-Watson Atlas of rat brain.

  6. Interleaved EPI Based fMRI Improved by Multiplexed Sensitivity Encoding (MUSE) and Simultaneous Multi-Band Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Gaur, Pooja; Chou, Ying-hui; Chu, Mei-Lan; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive and powerful imaging tool for detecting brain activities. The majority of fMRI studies are performed with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) due to its high temporal resolution. Recent studies have demonstrated that, by increasing the spatial-resolution of fMRI, previously unidentified neuronal networks can be measured. However, it is challenging to improve the spatial resolution of conventional single-shot EPI based fMRI. Although multi-shot interleaved EPI is superior to single-shot EPI in terms of the improved spatial-resolution, reduced geometric distortions, and sharper point spread function (PSF), interleaved EPI based fMRI has two main limitations: 1) the imaging throughput is lower in interleaved EPI; 2) the magnitude and phase signal variations among EPI segments (due to physiological noise, subject motion, and B0 drift) are translated to significant in-plane aliasing artifact across the field of view (FOV). Here we report a method that integrates multiple approaches to address the technical limitations of interleaved EPI-based fMRI. Firstly, the multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE) post-processing algorithm is used to suppress in-plane aliasing artifacts resulting from time-domain signal instabilities during dynamic scans. Secondly, a simultaneous multi-band interleaved EPI pulse sequence, with a controlled aliasing scheme incorporated, is implemented to increase the imaging throughput. Thirdly, the MUSE algorithm is then generalized to accommodate fMRI data obtained with our multi-band interleaved EPI pulse sequence, suppressing both in-plane and through-plane aliasing artifacts. The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal detectability and the scan throughput can be significantly improved for interleaved EPI-based fMRI. Our human fMRI data obtained from 3 Tesla systems demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed methods. It is expected that future fMRI studies requiring high

  7. Deformable and rigid registration of MRI and microPET images for photodynamic therapy of cancer in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fei Baowei; Wang Hesheng; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr.

    2006-03-15

    We are investigating imaging techniques to study the tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT). Positron emission tomography (PET) can provide physiological and functional information. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide anatomical and morphological changes. Image registration can combine MRI and PET images for improved tumor monitoring. In this study, we acquired high-resolution MRI and microPET {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) images from C3H mice with RIF-1 tumors that were treated with Pc 4-based PDT. We developed two registration methods for this application. For registration of the whole mouse body, we used an automatic three-dimensional, normalized mutual information algorithm. For tumor registration, we developed a finite element model (FEM)-based deformable registration scheme. To assess the quality of whole body registration, we performed slice-by-slice review of both image volumes; manually segmented feature organs, such as the left and right kidneys and the bladder, in each slice; and computed the distance between corresponding centroids. Over 40 volume registration experiments were performed with MRI and microPET images. The distance between corresponding centroids of organs was 1.5{+-}0.4 mm which is about 2 pixels of microPET images. The mean volume overlap ratios for tumors were 94.7% and 86.3% for the deformable and rigid registration methods, respectively. Registration of high-resolution MRI and microPET images combines anatomical and functional information of the tumors and provides a useful tool for evaluating photodynamic therapy.

  8. Comparison of manual vs. automated multimodality (CT-MRI) image registration for brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhirup; Santiago, Roberto J.; Smith, Ryan; Kassaee, Alireza . E-mail: Kassaee@xrt.upenn.edu

    2005-03-31

    Computed tomgoraphy-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) registrations are routinely used for target-volume delineation of brain tumors. We clinically use 2 software packages based on manual operation and 1 automated package with 2 different algorithms: chamfer matching using bony structures, and mutual information using intensity patterns. In all registration algorithms, a minimum of 3 pairs of identical anatomical and preferably noncoplanar landmarks is used on each of the 2 image sets. In manual registration, the program registers these points and links the image sets using a 3-dimensional (3D) transformation. In automated registration, the 3 landmarks are used as an initial starting point and further processing is done to complete the registration. Using our registration packages, registration of CT and MRI was performed on 10 patients. We scored the results of each registration set based on the amount of time spent, the accuracy reported by the software, and a final evaluation. We evaluated each software program by measuring the residual error between 'matched' points on the right and left globes and the posterior fossa for fused image slices. In general, manual registration showed higher misalignment between corresponding points compared to automated registration using intensity matching. This error had no directional dependence and was, most of the time, larger for a larger structure in both registration techniques. Automated algorithm based on intensity matching also gave the best results in terms of registration accuracy, irrespective of whether or not the initial landmarks were chosen carefully, when compared to that done using bone matching algorithm. Intensity-matching algorithm required the least amount of user-time and provided better accuracy.

  9. [Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children and adolescents – study design of a feasibility study concerning examination related emotions].

    PubMed

    Jaite, Charlotte; Bachmann, Christian; Dewey, Marc; Weschke, Bernhard; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Napp, Adriane; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Kappel, Viola

    2013-11-01

    Numerous research centres apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for research purposes in children. In view of this practical research, ethical concerns regarding the strains the study participants are exposed to during the MRI examination are discussed. The study evaluates whether an MRI examination induces negative emotions in children and adolescents which are more intense than the ones caused by electroencephalography (EEG), an examination method currently classified as causing "minimal stress." Furthermore, the emotional stress induced by the MRI examination in children and adolescents is compared with that induced in adults. The study gathers data on examination-related emotions in children (age 8-17;11, male and female) who undergo an MRI examination of the cerebrum with a medical indication. The comparison group is a sample of children and adolescents examined with EEG (age 8-17;11, male and female) as well as a sample of adults (age 18-65, male and female) examined with MRI. At present, the study is in the stage of data collection. This article presents the study design of the MRI research project.

  10. Implicit reference-based group-wise image registration and its application to structural and functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiujuan; Christensen, Gary E; Gu, Hong; Ross, Thomas J; Yang, Yihong

    2009-10-01

    In this study, an implicit reference group-wise (IRG) registration with a small deformation, linear elastic model was used to jointly estimate correspondences between a set of MRI images. The performance of pair-wise and group-wise registration algorithms was evaluated for spatial normalization of structural and functional MRI data. Traditional spatial normalization is accomplished by group-to-reference (G2R) registration in which a group of images are registered pair-wise to a reference image. G2R registration is limited due to bias associated with selecting a reference image. In contrast, implicit reference group-wise (IRG) registration estimates correspondences between a group of images by jointly registering the images to an implicit reference corresponding to the group average. The implicit reference is estimated during IRG registration eliminating the bias associated with selecting a specific reference image. Registration performance was evaluated using segmented T1-weighted magnetic resonance images from the Nonrigid Image Registration Evaluation Project (NIREP), DTI and fMRI images. Implicit reference pair-wise (IRP) registration-a special case of IRG registration for two images-is shown to produce better relative overlap than IRG for pair-wise registration using the same small deformation, linear elastic registration model. However, IRP-G2R registration is shown to have significant transitivity error, i.e., significant inconsistencies between correspondences defined by different pair-wise transformations. In contrast, IRG registration produces consistent correspondence between images in a group at the cost of slightly reduced pair-wise RO accuracy compared to IRP-G2R. IRG spatial normalization of the fractional anisotropy (FA) maps of DTI is shown to have smaller FA variance compared with G2R methods using the same elastic registration model. Analyses of fMRI data sets with sensorimotor and visual tasks show that IRG registration, on average, increases the

  11. Fast pseudo-CT synthesis from MRI T1-weighted images using a patch-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrado-Carvajal, A.; Alcain, E.; Montemayor, A. S.; Herraiz, J. L.; Rozenholc, Y.; Hernandez-Tamames, J. A.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Wald, L. L.; Malpica, N.

    2015-12-01

    MRI-based bone segmentation is a challenging task because bone tissue and air both present low signal intensity on MR images, making it difficult to accurately delimit the bone boundaries. However, estimating bone from MRI images may allow decreasing patient ionization by removing the need of patient-specific CT acquisition in several applications. In this work, we propose a fast GPU-based pseudo-CT generation from a patient-specific MRI T1-weighted image using a group-wise patch-based approach and a limited MRI and CT atlas dictionary. For every voxel in the input MR image, we compute the similarity of the patch containing that voxel with the patches of all MR images in the database, which lie in a certain anatomical neighborhood. The pseudo-CT is obtained as a local weighted linear combination of the CT values of the corresponding patches. The algorithm was implemented in a GPU. The use of patch-based techniques allows a fast and accurate estimation of the pseudo-CT from MR T1-weighted images, with a similar accuracy as the patient-specific CT. The experimental normalized cross correlation reaches 0.9324±0.0048 for an atlas with 10 datasets. The high NCC values indicate how our method can accurately approximate the patient-specific CT. The GPU implementation led to a substantial decrease in computational time making the approach suitable for real applications.

  12. Post-mortem CT and MRI: appropriate post-mortem imaging appearances and changes related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Offiah, Curtis E; Dean, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Post-mortem cross-sectional imaging in the form of CT and, less frequently, MRI is an emerging facility in the evaluation of cause-of-death and human identification for the coronial service as well as in assisting the forensic investigation of suspicious deaths and homicide. There are marked differences between the radiological evaluation and interpretation of the CT and MRI features of the live patient (i.e. antemortem imaging) and the evaluation and interpretation of post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. In addition to the absence of frequently utilized tissue enhancement following intravenous contrast administration in antemortem imaging, there are a number of variable changes which occur in the tissues and organs of the body as a normal process following death, some of which are, in addition, affected significantly by environmental factors. Many patients and victims will also have undergone aggressive attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the perimortem period which will also significantly alter post-mortem CT and MRI appearances. It is paramount that the radiologist and pathologist engaged in the interpretation of such post-mortem imaging are familiar with the appropriate non-pathological imaging changes germane to death, the post-mortem interval and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in order to avoid erroneously attributing such changes to trauma or pathology. Some of the more frequently encountered radiological imaging considerations of this nature will be reviewed. PMID:26562099

  13. A survey of MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Nolte, Lutz-P; Reyes, Mauricio

    2013-07-01

    MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies is gaining attention in recent times due to an increased need for efficient and objective evaluation of large amounts of data. While the pioneering approaches applying automated methods for the analysis of brain tumor images date back almost two decades, the current methods are becoming more mature and coming closer to routine clinical application. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview by giving a brief introduction to brain tumors and imaging of brain tumors first. Then, we review the state of the art in segmentation, registration and modeling related to tumor-bearing brain images with a focus on gliomas. The objective in the segmentation is outlining the tumor including its sub-compartments and surrounding tissues, while the main challenge in registration and modeling is the handling of morphological changes caused by the tumor. The qualities of different approaches are discussed with a focus on methods that can be applied on standard clinical imaging protocols. Finally, a critical assessment of the current state is performed and future developments and trends are addressed, giving special attention to recent developments in radiological tumor assessment guidelines. PMID:23743802

  14. Histological Basis of Laminar MRI Patterns in High Resolution Images of Fixed Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark N.; Cronin, Matthew J.; Bowtell, Richard W.; Scott, Ian S.; Palmer, Alan R.; Gowland, Penny A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of the auditory region of the temporal lobe would benefit from the availability of image contrast that allowed direct identification of the primary auditory cortex, as this region cannot be accurately located using gyral landmarks alone. Previous work has suggested that the primary area can be identified in magnetic resonance (MR) images because of its relatively high myelin content. However, MR images are also affected by the iron content of the tissue and in this study we sought to confirm that different MR image contrasts did correlate with the myelin content in the gray matter and were not primarily affected by iron content as is the case in the primary visual and somatosensory areas. By imaging blocks of fixed post-mortem cortex in a 7 T scanner and then sectioning them for histological staining we sought to assess the relative contribution of myelin and iron to the gray matter contrast in the auditory region. Evaluating the image contrast in T2*-weighted images and quantitative R2* maps showed a reasonably high correlation between the myelin density of the gray matter and the intensity of the MR images. The correlation with T1-weighted phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images was better than with the previous two image types, and there were clearly differentiated borders between adjacent cortical areas in these images. A significant amount of iron was present in the auditory region, but did not seem to contribute to the laminar pattern of the cortical gray matter in MR images. Similar levels of iron were present in the gray and white matter and although iron was present in fibers within the gray matter, these fibers were fairly uniformly distributed across the cortex. Thus, we conclude that T1- and T2*-weighted imaging sequences do demonstrate the relatively high myelin levels that are characteristic of the deep layers in primary auditory cortex and allow it and some of the surrounding areas to be

  15. Imaging After GliaSite Brachytherapy: Prognostic MRI Indicators of Disease Control and Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Yoon, Geoffrey; Weingart, John D.; Parisi, Michele; Olivi, Alessandro; Detorie, Nicholas A.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: In this study, we analyzed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes in patients after GliaSite treatment and characterized the prognostic MRI indicators in these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 25 patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme were treated with the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. Patients at the Johns Hopkins Hospital with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme underwent surgical resection followed by GliaSite balloon implantation. Available MRI scans for 20 patients were obtained throughout the post-GliaSite treatment course. These were reviewed and analyzed for prognostic significance. Results: After GliaSite treatment, all patients developed some degree of T{sub 1}-weighted contrast and T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintensity around the resection cavity. The development of enhancement on T{sub 1}-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and the size of these lesions, in the absence of increasing T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintensity, before clinical progression was not associated with decreased survival. Patients with T{sub 1}-weighted enhancement >1 cm had a median survival of 13.6 months and those with T{sub 1}-weighted lesions <=1 cm had a median survival of 8.5 months (p = .014). In contrast, the development of larger areas of T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintensity surrounding the resection cavity was significantly associated with poorer survival (p = .027). Conclusion: After GliaSite treatment, characteristic T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-weighted changes are seen on MRI. Greater T{sub 1}-weighted changes in the absence of increasing edema appears not to indicate disease progression; however, greater T{sub 2}-weighted changes were associated with decreased survival. These findings suggest that T{sub 1}-weighted enhancement in the absence of concomitant edema after GliaSite treatment might represent pseudoprogression. Conversely, increasing T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintensity might reflect infiltrative disease progression. These results provide a

  16. Monitoring the Growth of an Orthotopic Tumour Xenograft Model: Multi-Modal Imaging Assessment with Benchtop MRI (1T), High-Field MRI (9.4T), Ultrasound and Bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Daniel J.; David, Anna L.; Pedley, R. Barbara; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Siow, Bernard; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Research using orthotopic and transgenic models of cancer requires imaging methods to non-invasively quantify tumour burden. As the choice of appropriate imaging modality is wide-ranging, this study aimed to compare low-field (1T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a novel and relatively low-cost system, against established preclinical techniques: bioluminescence imaging (BLI), ultrasound imaging (US), and high-field (9.4T) MRI. Methods A model of colorectal metastasis to the liver was established in eight mice, which were imaged with each modality over four weeks post-implantation. Tumour burden was assessed from manually segmented regions. Results All four imaging systems provided sufficient contrast to detect tumours in all of the mice after two weeks. No significant difference was detected between tumour doubling times estimated by low-field MRI, ultrasound imaging or high-field MRI. A strong correlation was measured between high-field MRI estimates of tumour burden and all the other modalities (p < 0.001, Pearson). Conclusion These results suggest that both low-field MRI and ultrasound imaging are accurate modalities for characterising the growth of preclinical tumour models. PMID:27223614

  17. Integration of EEG source imaging and fMRI during continuous viewing of natural movies.

    PubMed

    Whittingstall, Kevin; Bartels, Andreas; Singh, Vanessa; Kwon, Soyoung; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2010-10-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are noninvasive neuroimaging tools which can be used to measure brain activity with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, respectively. By combining the neural and hemodynamic recordings from these modalities, we can gain better insight into how and where the brain processes complex stimuli, which may be especially useful in patients with different neural diseases. However, due to their vastly different spatial and temporal resolutions, the integration of EEG and fMRI recordings is not always straightforward. One fundamental obstacle has been that paradigms used for EEG experiments usually rely on event-related paradigms, while fMRI is not limited in this regard. Therefore, here we ask whether one can reliably localize stimulus-driven EEG activity using the continuously varying feature intensities occurring in natural movie stimuli presented over relatively long periods of time. Specifically, we asked whether stimulus-driven aspects in the EEG signal would be co-localized with the corresponding stimulus-driven BOLD signal during free viewing of a movie. Secondly, we wanted to integrate the EEG signal directly with the BOLD signal, by estimating the underlying impulse response function (IRF) that relates the BOLD signal to the underlying current density in the primary visual area (V1). We made sequential fMRI and 64-channel EEG recordings in seven subjects who passively watched 2-min-long segments of a James Bond movie. To analyze EEG data in this natural setting, we developed a method based on independent component analysis (ICA) to reject EEG artifacts due to blinks, subject movement, etc., in a way unbiased by human judgment. We then calculated the EEG source strength of this artifact-free data at each time point of the movie within the entire brain volume using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). This provided for every voxel in the brain (i.e., in 3D space) an

  18. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion.

  19. An image warping technique for rodent brain MRI-histology registration based on thin-plate splines with landmark optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yutong; Uberti, Mariano; Dou, Huanyu; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.; Boska, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    Coregistration of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histology provides validation of disease biomarker and pathobiology studies. Although thin-plate splines are widely used in such image registration, point landmark selection is error prone and often time-consuming. We present a technique to optimize landmark selection for thin-plate splines and demonstrate its usefulness in warping rodent brain MRI to histological sections. In this technique, contours are drawn on the corresponding MRI slices and images of histological sections. The landmarks are extracted from the contours by equal spacing then optimized by minimizing a cost function consisting of the landmark displacement and contour curvature. The technique was validated using simulation data and brain MRI-histology coregistration in a murine model of HIV-1 encephalitis. Registration error was quantified by calculating target registration error (TRE). The TRE of approximately 8 pixels for 20-80 landmarks without optimization was stable at different landmark numbers. The optimized results were more accurate at low landmark numbers (TRE of approximately 2 pixels for 50 landmarks), while the accuracy decreased (TRE approximately 8 pixels for larger numbers of landmarks (70- 80). The results demonstrated that registration accuracy decreases with the increasing landmark numbers offering more confidence in MRI-histology registration using thin-plate splines.

  20. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion. PMID:23980505

  1. Focused Ultrasound Simultaneous Irradiation/MRI Imaging, and Two-Stage General Kinetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Yao; Ko, Chia-En; Chen, Gin-Shin; Chung, I-Fang; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have investigated how to use focused ultrasound (FUS) to temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in order to facilitate the delivery of medication into lesion sites in the brain. In this study, through the setup of a real-time system, FUS irradiation and injections of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) and Gadodiamide (Gd, an MRI contrast agent) can be conducted simultaneously during MRI scanning. By using this real-time system, we were able to investigate in detail how the general kinetic model (GKM) is used to estimate Gd penetration in the FUS irradiated area in a rat's brain resulting from UCA concentration changes after single FUS irradiation. Two-stage GKM was proposed to estimate the Gd penetration in the FUS irradiated area in a rat's brain under experimental conditions with repeated FUS irradiation combined with different UCA concentrations. The results showed that the focal increase in the transfer rate constant of Ktrans caused by BBB disruption was dependent on the doses of UCA. Moreover, the amount of in vivo penetration of Evans blue in the FUS irradiated area in a rat's brain under various FUS irradiation experimental conditions was assessed to show the positive correlation with the transfer rate constants. Compared to the GKM method, the Two-stage GKM is more suitable for estimating the transfer rate constants of the brain treated with repeated FUS irradiations. This study demonstrated that the entire process of BBB disrupted by FUS could be quantitatively monitored by real-time dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). PMID:24949997

  2. Three-band MRI image fusion utilizing the wavelet-based method optimized with two quantitative fusion metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Elmaghraby, Adel S.; Frigui, Hichem

    2006-03-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there are three bands of images ("MRI triplet") available, which are T1-, T2- and PD-weighted images. The three images of a MRI triplet provide complementary structure information and therefore it is useful for diagnosis and subsequent analysis to combine three-band images into one. We propose an advanced discrete wavelet transform (αDWT) for three-band MRI image fusion and the αDWT algorithm is further optimized utilizing two quantitative fusion metrics - the image quality index (IQI) and ratio spatial frequency error (rSFe). In the aDWT method, principle component analysis (PCA) and morphological processing are incorporated into a regular DWT fusion algorithm. Furthermore, the αDWT has two adjustable parameters - the level of DWT decomposition (L d) and the length of the selected wavelet (L w) that determinately affect the fusion result. The fused image quality can be quantitatively measured with the established metrics - IQI and rSFe. Varying the control parameters (L d and L w), an iterative fusion procedure can be implemented and running until an optimized fusion is achieved. We fused and analyzed several MRI triplets from the Visible Human Project ® female dataset. From the quantitative and qualitative evaluations of fused images, we found that (1) the αDWTi-IQI algorithm produces a smoothed image whereas the αDWTi-rSFe algorithm yields a sharpened image, (2) fused image "T1+T2" is the most informative one in comparison with other two-in-one fusions (PD+T1 and PD+T2), (3) for three-in-one fusions, no significant difference is observed among the three fusions of (PD+T1)+T2, (PD+T2)+T1 and (T1+T2)+PD, thus the order of fusion does not play an important role. The fused images can significantly benefit medical diagnosis and also the further image processing such as multi-modality image fusion (with CT images), visualization (colorization), segmentation, classification and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD).

  3. Fast imaging of laboratory core floods using 3D compressed sensing RARE MRI.

    PubMed

    Ramskill, N P; Bush, I; Sederman, A J; Mantle, M D; Benning, M; Anger, B C; Appel, M; Gladden, L F

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the fluid distributions within the rock is essential to enable the unambiguous interpretation of core flooding data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to image fluid saturation in rock cores; however, conventional acquisition strategies are typically too slow to capture the dynamic nature of the displacement processes that are of interest. Using Compressed Sensing (CS), it is possible to reconstruct a near-perfect image from significantly fewer measurements than was previously thought necessary, and this can result in a significant reduction in the image acquisition times. In the present study, a method using the Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence with CS to provide 3D images of the fluid saturation in rock core samples during laboratory core floods is demonstrated. An objective method using image quality metrics for the determination of the most suitable regularisation functional to be used in the CS reconstructions is reported. It is shown that for the present application, Total Variation outperforms the Haar and Daubechies3 wavelet families in terms of the agreement of their respective CS reconstructions with a fully-sampled reference image. Using the CS-RARE approach, 3D images of the fluid saturation in the rock core have been acquired in 16min. The CS-RARE technique has been applied to image the residual water saturation in the rock during a water-water displacement core flood. With a flow rate corresponding to an interstitial velocity of vi=1.89±0.03ftday(-1), 0.1 pore volumes were injected over the course of each image acquisition, a four-fold reduction when compared to a fully-sampled RARE acquisition. Finally, the 3D CS-RARE technique has been used to image the drainage of dodecane into the water-saturated rock in which the dynamics of the coalescence of discrete clusters of the non-wetting phase are clearly observed. The enhancement in the temporal resolution that has

  4. Fast imaging of laboratory core floods using 3D compressed sensing RARE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramskill, N. P.; Bush, I.; Sederman, A. J.; Mantle, M. D.; Benning, M.; Anger, B. C.; Appel, M.; Gladden, L. F.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the fluid distributions within the rock is essential to enable the unambiguous interpretation of core flooding data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to image fluid saturation in rock cores; however, conventional acquisition strategies are typically too slow to capture the dynamic nature of the displacement processes that are of interest. Using Compressed Sensing (CS), it is possible to reconstruct a near-perfect image from significantly fewer measurements than was previously thought necessary, and this can result in a significant reduction in the image acquisition times. In the present study, a method using the Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence with CS to provide 3D images of the fluid saturation in rock core samples during laboratory core floods is demonstrated. An objective method using image quality metrics for the determination of the most suitable regularisation functional to be used in the CS reconstructions is reported. It is shown that for the present application, Total Variation outperforms the Haar and Daubechies3 wavelet families in terms of the agreement of their respective CS reconstructions with a fully-sampled reference image. Using the CS-RARE approach, 3D images of the fluid saturation in the rock core have been acquired in 16 min. The CS-RARE technique has been applied to image the residual water saturation in the rock during a water-water displacement core flood. With a flow rate corresponding to an interstitial velocity of vi = 1.89 ± 0.03 ft day-1, 0.1 pore volumes were injected over the course of each image acquisition, a four-fold reduction when compared to a fully-sampled RARE acquisition. Finally, the 3D CS-RARE technique has been used to image the drainage of dodecane into the water-saturated rock in which the dynamics of the coalescence of discrete clusters of the non-wetting phase are clearly observed. The enhancement in the temporal resolution

  5. Fast imaging of laboratory core floods using 3D compressed sensing RARE MRI.

    PubMed

    Ramskill, N P; Bush, I; Sederman, A J; Mantle, M D; Benning, M; Anger, B C; Appel, M; Gladden, L F

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the fluid distributions within the rock is essential to enable the unambiguous interpretation of core flooding data. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to image fluid saturation in rock cores; however, conventional acquisition strategies are typically too slow to capture the dynamic nature of the displacement processes that are of interest. Using Compressed Sensing (CS), it is possible to reconstruct a near-perfect image from significantly fewer measurements than was previously thought necessary, and this can result in a significant reduction in the image acquisition times. In the present study, a method using the Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) pulse sequence with CS to provide 3D images of the fluid saturation in rock core samples during laboratory core floods is demonstrated. An objective method using image quality metrics for the determination of the most suitable regularisation functional to be used in the CS reconstructions is reported. It is shown that for the present application, Total Variation outperforms the Haar and Daubechies3 wavelet families in terms of the agreement of their respective CS reconstructions with a fully-sampled reference image. Using the CS-RARE approach, 3D images of the fluid saturation in the rock core have been acquired in 16min. The CS-RARE technique has been applied to image the residual water saturation in the rock during a water-water displacement core flood. With a flow rate corresponding to an interstitial velocity of vi=1.89±0.03ftday(-1), 0.1 pore volumes were injected over the course of each image acquisition, a four-fold reduction when compared to a fully-sampled RARE acquisition. Finally, the 3D CS-RARE technique has been used to image the drainage of dodecane into the water-saturated rock in which the dynamics of the coalescence of discrete clusters of the non-wetting phase are clearly observed. The enhancement in the temporal resolution that has

  6. Evaluation of an image-based tracking workflow with Kalman filtering for automatic image plane alignment in interventional MRI.

    PubMed

    Neumann, M; Cuvillon, L; Breton, E; de Matheli, M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a workflow for magnetic resonance (MR) image plane alignment based on tracking in real-time MR images was introduced. The workflow is based on a tracking device composed of 2 resonant micro-coils and a passive marker, and allows for tracking of the passive marker in clinical real-time images and automatic (re-)initialization using the microcoils. As the Kalman filter has proven its benefit as an estimator and predictor, it is well suited for use in tracking applications. In this paper, a Kalman filter is integrated in the previously developed workflow in order to predict position and orientation of the tracking device. Measurement noise covariances of the Kalman filter are dynamically changed in order to take into account that, according to the image plane orientation, only a subset of the 3D pose components is available. The improved tracking performance of the Kalman extended workflow could be quantified in simulation results. Also, a first experiment in the MRI scanner was performed but without quantitative results yet.

  7. Golden-Angle Radial Sparse Parallel MRI: Combination of Compressed Sensing, Parallel Imaging, and Golden-Angle Radial Sampling for Fast and Flexible Dynamic Volumetric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Grimm, Robert; Block, Kai Tobias; Chandarana, Hersh; Kim, Sungheon; Xu, Jian; Axel, Leon; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Otazo, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a fast and flexible free-breathing dynamic volumetric MRI technique, iterative Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel MRI (iGRASP), that combines compressed sensing, parallel imaging, and golden-angle radial sampling. Methods Radial k-space data are acquired continuously using the golden-angle scheme and sorted into time series by grouping an arbitrary number of consecutive spokes into temporal frames. An iterative reconstruction procedure is then performed on the undersampled time series where joint multicoil sparsity is enforced by applying a total-variation constraint along the temporal dimension. Required coil-sensitivity profiles are obtained from the time-averaged data. Results iGRASP achieved higher acceleration capability than either parallel imaging or coil-by-coil compressed sensing alone. It enabled dynamic volumetric imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution for various clinical applications, including free-breathing dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging in the abdomen of both adult and pediatric patients, and in the breast and neck of adult patients. Conclusion The high performance and flexibility provided by iGRASP can improve clinical studies that require robustness to motion and simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:24142845

  8. A Comparison of Hyperelastic Warping of PET Images with Tagged MRI for the Analysis of Cardiac Deformation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Veress, Alexander I.; Klein, Gregory; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2013-01-01

    Tmore » he objectives of the following research were to evaluate the utility of a deformable image registration technique known as hyperelastic warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle through the analysis of clinical, gated PET image datasets.wo normal human male subjects were sequentially imaged with PET and tagged MRI imaging. Strain predictions were made for systolic contraction using warping analyses of the PET images and HARP based strain analyses of the MRI images. Coefficient of determination R 2 values were computed for the comparison of circumferential and radial strain predictions produced by each methodology.here was good correspondence between the methodologies, with R 2 values of 0.78 for the radial strains of both hearts and from an R 2 = 0.81 and R 2 = 0.83 for the circumferential strains.he strain predictions were not statistically different ( P ≤ 0.01 ) . A series of sensitivity results indicated that the methodology was relatively insensitive to alterations in image intensity, random image noise, and alterations in fiber structure.his study demonstrated that warping was able to provide strain predictions of systolic contraction of the LV consistent with those provided by tagged MRI Warping.« less

  9. Locally homogenized and de-noised vector fields for cardiac fiber tracking in DT-MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhbardeh, Alireza; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Bayer, Jason; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2009-02-01

    In this study we develop a methodology to accurately extract and visualize cardiac microstructure from experimental Diffusion Tensor (DT) data. First, a test model was constructed using an image-based model generation technique on Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DT-MRI) data. These images were derived from a dataset having 122x122x500 um3 voxel resolution. De-noising and image enhancement was applied to this high-resolution dataset to clearly define anatomical boundaries within the images. The myocardial tissue was segmented from structural images using edge detection, region growing, and level set thresholding. The primary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor for each voxel, which represents the longitudinal direction of the fiber, was calculated to generate a vector field. Then an advanced locally regularizing nonlinear anisotropic filter, termed Perona-Malik (PEM), was used to regularize this vector field to eliminate imaging artifacts inherent to DT-MRI from volume averaging of the tissue with the surrounding medium. Finally, the vector field was streamlined to visualize fibers within the segmented myocardial tissue to compare the results with unfiltered data. With this technique, we were able to recover locally regularized (homogenized) fibers with a high accuracy by applying the PEM regularization technique, particularly on anatomical surfaces where imaging artifacts were most apparent. This approach not only aides in the visualization of noisy complex 3D vector fields obtained from DT-MRI, but also eliminates volume averaging artifacts to provide a realistic cardiac microstructure for use in electrophysiological modeling studies.

  10. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4T

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, S.E.; Tomasi, D.; Solis, S.E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A.O.

    2011-07-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  11. In vivo confirmation of hydration based contrast mechanisms for terahertz medical imaging using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Nowroozi, Bryan; Tewari, Priyamvada; Ennis, Daniel B.; Alger, Jeffery; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2014-09-01

    Terahertz (THz) detection has been proposed and applied to a variety of medical imaging applications in view of its unrivaled hydration profiling capabilities. Variations in tissue dielectric function have been demonstrated at THz frequencies to generate high contrast imagery of tissue, however, the source of image contrast remains to be verified using a modality with a comparable sensing scheme. To investigate the primary contrast mechanism, a pilot comparison study was performed in a burn wound rat model, widely known to create detectable gradients in tissue hydration through both injured and surrounding tissue. Parallel T2 weighted multi slice multi echo (T2w MSME) 7T Magnetic Resonance (MR) scans and THz surface reflectance maps were acquired of a full thickness skin burn in a rat model over a 5 hour time period. A comparison of uninjured and injured regions in the full thickness burn demonstrates a 3-fold increase in average T2 relaxation times and a 15% increase in average THz reflectivity, respectively. These results support the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for measuring in vivo burn tissue water content and the use of this modality to verify and understand the hydration sensing capabilities of THz imaging for acute assessments of the onset and evolution of diseases that affect the skin. A starting point for more sophisticated in vivo studies, this preliminary analysis may be used in the future to explore how and to what extent the release of unbound water affects imaging contrast in THz burn sensing.

  12. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, S. E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2011-06-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  13. Occipital sulci patterns in patients with schizophrenia and migraine headache using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Sulejmanpašić, Gorana; Suljić, Enra; Šabanagić-Hajrić, Selma

    2016-08-01

    Aim To examine the presence of morphologic variations of occipital sulci patternsin patients with schizophrenia and migraine headacheregarding gender and laterality using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods This study included 80 patients and brain scans were performed to analyze interhemispheric symmetry and the sulcal patterns of the occipital region of both hemispheres. Average total volumes of both hemispheres of the healthy population were used for comparison. Results There was statistically significant difference between subjects considering gender (p=0.012)with no difference regarding age(p=0.1821). Parameters of parieto-occipital fissure (p=0.0314), body of the calcarine sulcus (p=0.0213), inferior sagittal sulcus (p=0.0443), and lateral occipital sulcus (p=0.0411) showed statistically significant difference only of left hemisphere in male patients with schizophrenia with shallowerdepth of the sulcus. Conclusion Representation of neuroanatomical structures suggests the existence of structural neuroanatomic disorders with focal brain changes. Comparative analysis of occipital lobe and their morphologic structures (cortical dysmorphology) in patients with schizophreniausing MRI, according to genderindicates a significant cortical reduction in the left hemisphere only in the group of male patients compared to female patients and the control group. PMID:27313112

  14. Acoustically induced tissue displacement for shear wave elasticity imaging using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Kevin; Kripfgans, Oliver; Steele, Derek; Swanson, Scott; Sutin, Alexander; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2005-09-01

    Palpitation detects tissue abnormalities by exploiting the vast range of elastic properties found in vivo. The method is limited by tactile sensitivity and the inability to probe tissues at depth. Recent efforts seek to remove these limitation by developing a medical imaging modality based on radiation force shear wave excitation. Our approach uses an acoustic source to launch a shear wave in a tissue-mimicking phantom and MRI to record microscopic displacements. Gelatin (10% wt/vol) was used for the tissue-mimicking phantom. Results for in situ elasticity were obtained using an air-backed 10-cm-diam piezoelectric crystal. To correct for future in vivo beam aberrations, we also employ a high-pressure 1-bit time-reversal cavity. Frequency and pulse duration were selected to optimize the TRA system for acoustic output pressure. Shear wave displacements were recorded by MRI in 1-ms time increments in a complete basis that allowed for 3-D reconstruction and analysis. The Lamé coefficients are then derived from the shear wave velocity and attenuation.

  15. Automatic alignment of renal DCE-MRI image series for improvement of quantitative tracer kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikic, Darko; Sourbron, Steven; Feng, Xinxing; Michaely, Henrik J.; Khamene, Ali; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Tracer kinetic modeling with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and the quantification of the kinetic parameters are active fields of research which have the potential to improve the measurement of renal function. However, the strong coronal motion of the kidney in the time series inhibits an accurate assessment of the kinetic parameters. Automatic motion correction is challenging due to the large movement of the kidney and the strong intensity changes caused by the injected bolus. In this work, we improve the quantification results by a template matching motion correction method using a gradient-based similarity measure. Thus, a tedious manual motion correction is replaced by an automatic procedure. The only remaining user interaction is reduced to a selection of a reference slice and a coarse manual segmentation of the kidney in this slice. These steps do not present an overhead to the interaction needed for the assessment of the kinetic parameters. In order to achieve reliable and fast results, we constrain the degrees of freedom for the correction method as far as possible. Furthermore, we compare our method to deformable registration using the same similarity measure. In all our tests, the presented template matching correction was superior to the deformable approach in terms of reliability, leading to more accurate parameter quantification. The evaluation on 10 patient data series with 180-230 images each demonstrate that the quantitative analysis by a two-compartment model can be improved by our method.

  16. Discriminative analysis of schizophrenia using support vector machine and recursive feature elimination on structural MRI images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaobing; Yang, Yongzhe; Wu, Fengchun; Gao, Minjian; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Yue; Yao, Yongcheng; Du, Xin; Li, Chengwei; Wu, Lei; Zhong, Xiaomei; Zhou, Yanling; Fan, Ni; Zheng, Yingjun; Xiong, Dongsheng; Peng, Hongjun; Escudero, Javier; Huang, Biao; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yuping; Wu, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Structural abnormalities in schizophrenia (SZ) patients have been well documented with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region of interest (ROI) analyses. However, these analyses can only detect group-wise differences and thus, have a poor predictive value for individuals. In the present study, we applied a machine learning method that combined support vector machine (SVM) with recursive feature elimination (RFE) to discriminate SZ patients from normal controls (NCs) using their structural MRI data. We first employed both VBM and ROI analyses to compare gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) between 41 SZ patients and 42 age- and sex-matched NCs. The method of SVM combined with RFE was used to discriminate SZ patients from NCs using significant between-group differences in both GMV and WMV as input features. We found that SZ patients showed GM and WM abnormalities in several brain structures primarily involved in the emotion, memory, and visual systems. An SVM with a RFE classifier using the significant structural abnormalities identified by the VBM analysis as input features achieved the best performance (an accuracy of 88.4%, a sensitivity of 91.9%, and a specificity of 84.4%) in the discriminative analyses of SZ patients. These results suggested that distinct neuroanatomical profiles associated with SZ patients might provide a potential biomarker for disease diagnosis, and machine-learning methods can reveal neurobiological mechanisms in psychiatric diseases. PMID:27472673

  17. Configurable automatic detection and registration of fiducial frames for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Junichi; Song, Sang-Eun; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel automatic fiducial frame detection and registration method for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions. The proposed method does not require any manual selection of markers, and can be applied to a variety of fiducial frames, which consist of multiple cylindrical MR-visible markers placed in different orientations. The key idea is that automatic extraction of linear features using a line filter is more robust than that of bright spots by thresholding; by applying a line set registration algorithm to the detected markers, the frame can be registered to the MRI. The method was capable of registering the fiducial frame to the MRI with an accuracy of 1.00 +/- 0.73 mm and 1.41 +/- 1.06 degrees in a phantom study, and was sufficiently robust to detect the fiducial frame in 98% of images acquired in clinical cases despite the existence of anatomical structures in the field of view.

  18. Cardiac imaging using clinical 1.5 t MRI scanners in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model.

    PubMed

    Voelkl, Jakob G J; Haubner, Bernhard J; Kremser, Christian; Mayr, Agnes; Klug, Gert; Loizides, Alexander; Müller, Silvana; Pachinger, Otmar; Schocke, Michael; Metzler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    To perform cardiac imaging in mice without having to invest in expensive dedicated equipment, we adapted a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for use in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model. Phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) sequence facilitated the determination of infarct sizes in vivo by late gadolinium enhancement. Results were compared to histological infarct areas in mice after ischemia/reperfusion procedure with a good correlation (r = 0.807, P < .001). In addition, fractional area change (FAC) was assessed with single slice cine MRI and was matched to infarct size (r = -0.837) and fractional shortening (FS) measured with echocardiography (r = 0.860); both P < .001. Here, we demonstrate the use of clinical 1.5 MRI scanners as a feasible method for basic phenotyping in mice. These widely available scanners are capable of investigating in vivo infarct dimensions as well as assessment of cardiac functional parameters in mice with reasonable throughput.

  19. Is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) necessary to exclude occult hip fracture?

    PubMed

    Hossain, M; Barwick, C; Sinha, A K; Andrew, J G

    2007-10-01

    The possibility of occult hip fracture in older patients after a fall is a common problem in emergency and orthopaedic departments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning is the best investigation, but is expensive and may be difficult to obtain. The value of various clinical signs to determine which patients are at risk of occult hip fracture has not been reported. We reviewed all patients who had MRI scan for suspected hip fractures but had normal initial X-rays over a 6-year period. We identified 76 patients. Twelve patients were excluded. Two patients had MRI scan for suspected stress fracture and two patients had metastatic fractures. Eight patients had inadequate or untraceable clinical notes. Each patient's personal details, mobility, independence and detail clinical details were recorded. Following case review of 64 patients we excluded 5 patients with associated osteoarthritis of the hip joint, 1 patient with fibromyalgia and 1 patient with pre-existing multiple myeloma. Thirty-five patients had occult proximal femoral fractures. Of them four patients had isolated pubic ramus fractures and five patients had isolated greater trochanter fractures. Twenty-two patients had no fracture. The value of the individual tests was evaluated using Fisher exact and chi square analysis; with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (10 tests) p<0.005 was deemed significant. Pain on axial loading of the limb and pre-fracture restricted patient mobility were both associated with the presence of a fracture (p<0.005). Both factors had identical positive predictive value=0.76, a negative predictive value=0.69 and post-test probability of disease given a negative test=0.30. Predictive values remained the same when both factors were considered together. Patients who were independently mobile before the fall and who do not have pain on axial compression of the limb are less likely to have a fracture, but these signs alone or in combination do not exclude a fracture. The

  20. A practical MRI grading system for cervical foraminal stenosis based on oblique sagittal images

    PubMed Central

    Park, H-J; Kim, S S; Lee, S-Y; Chung, E-C; Rho, M-H; Kwon, H-J; Kook, S-H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To propose a new and practical MRI grading method for cervical neural foraminal stenosis and to evaluate its reproducibility. Methods: We evaluated 50 patients (37 males and 13 females, mean age 49 years) who visited our institution and underwent oblique sagittal MRI of the cervical spine. A total of 300 foramina and corresponding nerve roots in 50 patients were qualitatively analysed from C4–5 to C6–7. We assessed the grade of cervical foraminal stenosis at the maximal narrowing point according to the new grading system based on T2 weighted oblique sagittal images. The incidence of each of the neural foraminal stenosis grades according to the cervical level was analysed by χ2 tests. Intra- and interobserver agreements between two radiologists were analysed using kappa statistics. Kappa value interpretations were poor (κ<0.1), slight (0.1≤κ≤0.2), fair (0.2<κ≤0.4), moderate (0.4<κ≤0.6), substantial (0.6<κ≤0.8) and almost perfect (0.8<κ≤1.0). Results: Significant stenoses (Grades 2 and 3) were rarely found at the C4–5 level. The incidence of Grade 3 at the C5–6 level was higher than that at other levels, a difference that was statistically significant. The overall intra-observer agreement according to the cervical level was almost perfect. The agreement at each level was almost perfect, except for only substantial agreement at the right C6–7 by Reader 2. No statistically significant differences were seen according to the cervical level. Overall kappa values of interobserver agreement according to the cervical level were almost perfect. In addition, the agreement of each level was almost perfect. Overall intra- and interobserver agreement for the presence of foraminal stenosis (Grade 0 vs Grades 1, 2 and 3) and for significant stenosis (Grades 0 and 1 vs Grades 2 and 3) showed similar results and were almost perfect. However, only substantial agreement was seen in the right C6–7. Conclusion: A new grading system for cervical

  1. Noninvasive functional cardiac electrical source imaging: combining MRI and ECG mapping for imaging electrical function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilg, Bernhard; Modre, Robert; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Roithinger, Franz

    2002-04-01

    Inverse electrocardiography has been developing for several years. By coupling electrocardiographic mapping and 3D+time anatomical data, the electrical excitation sequence can be imaged completely noninvasively in the human heart. In this study, a bidomain theory based surface heart model activation time imaging approach was applied to single beat data of atrial and ventricular depolarization. For sinus and paced rhythms, the sites of early activation and the areas with late activation were estimated with sufficient accuracy. In particular for focal arrhythmias, this model-based imaging approach might allow the guidance and evaluation of antiarrhythmic interventions, for instance, in case of catheter ablation or drug therapy.

  2. Feasibility of an intracranial EEG-fMRI protocol at 3T: risk assessment and image quality.

    PubMed

    Boucousis, Shannon M; Beers, Craig A; Cunningham, Cameron J B; Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Pittman, Daniel J; Goodyear, Bradley G; Federico, Paolo

    2012-11-15

    Integrating intracranial EEG (iEEG) with functional MRI (iEEG-fMRI) may help elucidate mechanisms underlying the generation of seizures. However, the introduction of iEEG electrodes in the MR environment has inherent risk and data quality implications that require consideration prior to clinical use. Previous studies of subdural and depth electrodes have confirmed low risk under specific circumstances at 1.5T and 3T. However, no studies have assessed risk and image quality related to the feasibility of a full iEEG-fMRI protocol. To this end, commercially available platinum subdural grid/strip electrodes (4×5 grid or 1×8 strip) and 4 or 6-contact depth electrodes were secured to the surface of a custom-made phantom mimicking the conductivity of the human brain. Electrode displacement, temperature increase of electrodes and surrounding phantom material, and voltage fluctuations in electrode contacts were measured in a GE Discovery MR750 3T MR scanner during a variety of imaging sequences, typical of an iEEG-fMRI protocol. An electrode grid was also used to quantify the spatial extent of susceptibility artifact. The spatial extent of susceptibility artifact in the presence of an electrode was also assessed for typical imaging parameters that maximize BOLD sensitivity at 3T (TR=1500 ms; TE=30 ms; slice thickness=4mm; matrix=64×64; field-of-view=24 cm). Under standard conditions, all electrodes exhibited no measurable displacement and no clinically significant temperature increase (<1°C) during scans employed in a typical iEEG-f