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Sample records for mri implants causing

  1. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  2. Wrong detection of ventricular fibrillation in an implantable cardioverter defibrillator caused by the movement near the MRI scanner bore.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Mancini, Matteo; Napolitano, Antonio; Genovese, Elisabetta; Cannata, Vittorio; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The static magnetic field generated by MRI systems is highly non-homogenous and rapidly decreases when moving away from the bore of the scanner. Consequently, the movement around the MRI scanner is equivalent to an exposure to a time-varying magnetic field at very low frequency (few Hz). For patients with an implanted cardiac stimulators, such as an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the movements inside the MRI environment may thus induce voltages on the loop formed by the leads of the device, with the potential to affect the behavior of the stimulator. In particular, the ICD's detection algorithms may be affected by the induced voltage and may cause inappropriate sensing, arrhythmia detections, and eventually inappropriate ICD therapy.We performed in-vitro measurements on a saline-filled humanshaped phantom (male, 170 cm height), equipped with an MRconditional ICD able to transmit in real-time the detected cardiac activity (electrograms). A biventricular implant was reproduced and the ICD was programmed in standard operating conditions, but with the shock delivery disabled. The electrograms recorded in the atrial, left and right ventricle channels were monitored during rotational movements along the vertical axis, in close proximity of the bore. The phantom was also equipped with an accelerometer and a magnetic field probe to measure the angular velocity and the magnetic field variation during the experiment. Pacing inhibition, inappropriate detection of tachyarrhythmias and of ventricular fibrillation were observed. Pacing inhibition began at an angular velocity of about 7 rad/s, (dB/dt of about 2 T/s). Inappropriate detection of ventricular fibrillation occurred at about 8 rad/s (dB/dt of about 3 T/s). These findings highlight the need for a specific risk assessment of workers with MR-conditional ICDs, which takes into account also effects that are generally not considered relevant for patients, such as the movement around the scanner bore.

  3. rf enhancement and shielding in MRI caused by conductive implants: dependence on electrical parameters for a tube model.

    PubMed

    Graf, Hansjörg; Steidle, Günter; Lauer, Ulrike A; Schick, Fritz

    2005-02-01

    Radio frequency (rf) eddy-currents induced in implants made of conductive material might cause significant image artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) such as shielding of the lumen of vascular stents. rf alteration near metal parts was assessed theoretically in the approximation of alternating current electrodynamics: The implant was modeled as tube with diameter d(o), resistance R, and reactance Y, constituting the secondary winding of a transformer. The transmitter coil of the scanner acted as primary winding and generated the linearly polarized rf field B1,app. Tube axis was assumed parallel to B1,app. The results of the calculations were as follows: Ninety percent of the applied rf-field amplitude is reached in the lumen at a ratio chi=R/Y approximately 2. A rapid drop occurs with the reduction of chi, whereas a further increase of chi causes only a small effect. With chi approximately 1/d(o)(Y approximately d2o,R approximately d(o)), conditions for rf alteration clearly depend on the diameter of the tube. Inside tubes with smaller diameter, rf shielding is less pronounced. rf alteration increases in good approximation with the square root of the strength of the static field B0. The following experiments were carried out: Tubes of similar diameter (d(o) approximately 8 mm) made of material of different conductivity (Cu, Nitinol, carbon fiber reinforced plastic with three different fiber structures) were examined at B0=0.2 and 1.5 T in water phantoms. Tube axis was aligned perpendicular to B0 and spin-echo technique was applied. Local rf enhancement near the outer surface of the metal tubes was detected applying manual reduction of the transmitter amplitude. Shielding inside a carbon fiber tube with d(o) approximately 8 mm and inside a smaller tube with d(o)=3.3 mm was compared. Both tubes showed the same wall structure and thickness (d(w)=0.4 mm). All measurements confirmed the theoretical results. Consequences for the construction of vascular stents

  4. Central nervous system MRI and cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Cadieu, Romain; Peron, Marilyne; Le Ven, Florent; Kerdraon, Sébastien; Boutet, Claire; Mansourati, Jacques; Ben Salem, Douraied

    2017-02-01

    As the population ages and indications for MRI increase, it is estimated that 50 to 75% of patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) - pacemaker (PM) or implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD) - will need an MRI during their CIED's lifetime. Three categories of materials are defined: MRI compatible, MRI non-compatible, and MRI conditional. MRI compatible CIEDs without electrodes have been developed, but do not allow battery changes, so that they are exclusively indicated for patients whose life expectancy is less than that of the battery (6-7years). For MRI conditional CIEDs, all manufacturers publish restrictions. These restrictions can relate to the patient (size, position in the MRI, body temperature), the MRI parameters (magnetic field), or the examination in itself (gradients, specific absorption rate, duration, isocenter). The neuroradiologist can expect to be confronted with the issue of MRI in patients with a CIED. The purpose of this review is to provide them with updated information on MRI and CIEDs.

  5. Safety of active implantable devices during MRI examinations: a finite element analysis of an implantable pump.

    PubMed

    Büchler, Philippe; Simon, Anne; Burger, Jürgen; Ginggen, Alec; Crivelli, Rocco; Tardy, Yanik; Luechinger, Roger; Olsen, Sigbjørn

    2007-04-01

    The goal of this study was to propose a general numerical analysis methodology to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-safety of active implants. Numerical models based on the finite element (FE) technique were used to estimate if the normal operation of an active device was altered during MRI imaging. An active implanted pump was chosen to illustrate the method. A set of controlled experiments were proposed and performed to validate the numerical model. The calculated induced voltages in the important electronic components of the device showed dependence with the MRI field strength. For the MRI radiofrequency fields, significant induced voltages of up to 20 V were calculated for a 0.3T field-strength MRI. For the 1.5 and 3.0OT MRIs, the calculated voltages were insignificant. On the other hand, induced voltages up to 11 V were calculated in the critical electronic components for the 3.0T MRI due to the gradient fields. Values obtained in this work reflect to the worst case situation which is virtually impossible to achieve in normal scanning situations. Since the calculated voltages may be removed by appropriate protection circuits, no critical problems affecting the normal operation of the pump were identified. This study showed that the proposed methodology helps the identification of the possible incompatibilities between active implants and MR imaging, and can be used to aid the design of critical electronic systems to ensure MRI-safety.

  6. Use of brain MRI after deep brain stimulation hardware implantation.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro, Jules M; Lyons, Kelly E; Wetzel, Louis H; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the experience with and safety of brain 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) patients. This was a retrospective review of brain MRI scanning performed on DBS patients at the University of Kansas Medical Center between January 1995 and December 2007. A total of 249 DBS patients underwent 445 brain 1.5 T MRI scan sessions encompassing 1,092 individual scans using a transmit-receive head coil, representing the cumulative scanning of 1,649 DBS leads. Patients with complete implanted DBS systems as well as those with externalized leads underwent brain imaging. For the majority of scans, specific absorption rates localized to the head (SAR(H)) were estimated and in all cases SAR(H) were higher than that specified in the present product labeling. There were no clinical or hardware related adverse events secondary to brain MRI scanning. Our data should not be extrapolated to encourage MRI scanning beyond the present labeling. Rather, our data may contribute to further defining safe MRI scanning parameters that might ultimately be adopted in future product labeling as more centers report in detail their experiences.

  7. [Enucleation: causes of extrusion of orbital implants (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hanselmayer, H; Ritzinger, I

    1978-02-01

    The frequency and the causes of extrusion of orbital implants have been investigated. Of the 294 patients in which enucleation was done, in 17 cases (5.8%) extrusion of the first implant developed; in 9 cases with second or third implantations another 5 implants have been extruded. The extrusion of implants is caused mainly by the operative technique and only rarely by intolerance reactions. For a reliable healing exact sutures of the muscles and also exact closure of the implant with plenty of covering tissue is important.

  8. Deformable registration of x-ray to MRI for post-implant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    Post-implant dosimetric assessment in prostate brachytherapy is typically performed using CT as the standard imaging modality. However, poor soft tissue contrast in CT causes significant variability in target contouring, resulting in incorrect dose calculations for organs of interest. CT-MR fusion-based approach has been advocated taking advantage of the complementary capabilities of CT (seed identification) and MRI (soft tissue visibility), and has proved to provide more accurate dosimetry calculations. However, seed segmentation in CT requires manual review, and the accuracy is limited by the reconstructed voxel resolution. In addition, CT deposits considerable amount of radiation to the patient. In this paper, we propose an X-ray and MRI based post-implant dosimetry approach. Implanted seeds are localized using three X-ray images by solving a combinatorial optimization problem, and the identified seeds are registered to MR images by an intensity-based points-to-volume registration. We pre-process the MR images using geometric and Gaussian filtering. To accommodate potential soft tissue deformation, our registration is performed in two steps, an initial affine transformation and local deformable registration. An evolutionary optimizer in conjunction with a points-to-volume similarity metric is used for the affine registration. Local prostate deformation and seed migration are then adjusted by the deformable registration step with external and internal force constraints. We tested our algorithm on six patient data sets, achieving registration error of (1.2+/-0.8) mm in < 30 sec. Our proposed approach has the potential to be a fast and cost-effective solution for post-implant dosimetry with equivalent accuracy as the CT-MR fusion-based approach.

  9. Altered sensation caused by peri-implantitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Shim, Ji-Suk; Huh, Jung-Bo; Rim, Jae-Suk; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2013-07-01

    Frequently reported is a case wherein a lesion caused by periodontitis or periapical lesion in a natural tooth enlarged, invaded the inferior alveolar nerve canal, and induced paresthesia. Cases wherein paresthesia occurred because of peri-implantitis have been rarely reported. The patient in this case report had experienced transient paresthesia after implant placement and recovered normal sensation 3 months later. Thirteen years later, this patient visited the authors' hospital with paresthesia in the same region because the peri-implantitis progressed to the apex of the implant. One week after removal of the implant, sense recovery and pain relief started, and 15 days after removal, the paresthesia and pain completely disappeared. For patients who experience transient paresthesia and recovery owing to nerve damage caused by the placement of an implant in the mandibular molar or premolar area, or in patients in whom the implant is close to the inferior alveolar nerve canal or the mental nerve, the spread of inflammation caused by peri-implantitis can induce paresthesia.

  10. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants.

    PubMed

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-21

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient's anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant's RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B(1)(+) field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient's anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  11. Transapical Perceval S Sutureless Aortic Valve Implantation under MRI guidance: Acute and Short-term Results

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Keith A.; Mazilu, Dumitru; Cai, Junfeng; Kindzelski, Bogdan; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Despite the increasing success and applicability of TAVR, two critical issues remain unanswered; the durability of the valves and the ideal imaging to aid implantation. This study was designed to investigate the transapical implantation of a device of known durability using rtMRI guidance. Methods The Sorin Perceval S valve employs a self-expanding nitinol stent and is amenable to transapical delivery. A 1.5T MRI was used to identify the anatomic landmarks in 60kg Yucatan swine. Prostheses were loaded into an MRI compatible delivery device with an active guidewire to enhance visualization. A series of acute feasibility experiments were conducted (n=10). Additional animals (n=6) were allowed to survive and had follow-up MRI scans and echocardiography at 90-days postoperatively. Postmortem gross examination was then performed. Results The Perceval S valve is MRI compatible and creates no significant MRI artifacts. The three commissural struts were visible on short axis view, therefore coronary ostia obstruction was easily avoided. The average implantation time was 65 seconds. Final results demonstrated stability of the implants with preservation of myocardial perfusion and function over 90 days: EF was 48±15%; peak gradient was 17.3±11.3 mm Hg; mean gradient was 9.8±7.2 mm Hg. Mild aortic regurgitation was seen in 4 cases, trace in 1 case, and severe central jet in 1 case. Prosthesis positioning was evaluated during gross examination. Conclusions We demonstrated that the Perceval S valve can be safely and expeditiously implanted through a transapical approach under rtMRI guidance. Post-implantation results showed a well-functioning prosthesis with minimal regurgitation and stability over time. PMID:25466854

  12. MRI image characteristics of materials implanted at sellar region after transsphenoidal resection of pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bladowska, Joanna; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Sokolska, Violetta; Badowski, Roman; Moroń, Krzysztof; Bonicki, Wiesław; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Post-surgical evaluation of the pituitary gland in MRI is difficult because of a change in anatomical conditions. It depends also on numerous other factors, including: size and expansion of the tumour before surgery, type of surgical access, quality and volume of implanted materials and time of its resorption. The purpose was to demonstrate the characteristics of the implanted materials on MRI performed after transsphenoidal resection of pituitary tumours and to identify imaging criteria helpful in differential diagnosis of masses within the sellar region. Material/Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients after transsphenoidal resection of pituitary tumours were included in the study. In general, 469 MRI examinations were performed with a 1.5T scanner. We obtained T1-weighted sagittal and coronal, enhanced and unenhanced images. In 102 cases, additional T2-weighted coronal, unenhanced images with 1.5 T unit were obtained as well. Results: The implanted materials appeared in 95 patient: fat in 86 and muscle with fascia in 3 patients. We could recognise implanted muscle and fascia in T2-weighted images, because of high signal intensity of the degenerating muscle and the line of low signal representing fascia. The implanted titanium mesh was found in 4 patients. Haemostatic materials were visible only in 2 patients in examinations performed at an early postoperative stage (1 month after the procedure). Conclusions: The knowledge of MRI characteristics of the materials implanted at the sellar region is very important in postoperative diagnosis of pituitary tumours and may help discriminate between tumorous and non-tumorous involvement of the sellar region. Some implanted materials, like fat, could be seen on MRI for as long as 10 years after the operation, others, like haemostatic materials, for only 1 month after surgery. T2-weighted imaging is a useful assessment method of the implanted muscle and fascia for a long time after surgery. PMID

  13. Convex optimization of MRI exposure for mitigation of RF-heating from active medical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Local RF-heating of elongated medical implants during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may pose a significant health risk to patients. The actual patient risk depends on various parameters including RF magnetic field strength and frequency, MR coil design, patient’s anatomy, posture, and imaging position, implant location, RF coupling efficiency of the implant, and the bio-physiological responses associated with the induced local heating. We present three constrained convex optimization strategies that incorporate the implant’s RF-heating characteristics, for the reduction of local heating of medical implants during MRI. The study emphasizes the complementary performances of the different formulations. The analysis demonstrates that RF-induced heating of elongated metallic medical implants can be carefully controlled and balanced against MRI quality. A reduction of heating of up to 25 dB can be achieved at the cost of reduced uniformity in the magnitude of the B1+ field of less than 5%. The current formulations incorporate a priori knowledge of clinically-specific parameters, which is assumed to be available. Before these techniques can be applied practically in the broader clinical context, further investigations are needed to determine whether reduced access to a priori knowledge regarding, e.g. the patient’s anatomy, implant routing, RF-transmitter, and RF-implant coupling, can be accepted within reasonable levels of uncertainty.

  14. MRI-Based Multiscale Model for Electromagnetic Analysis in the Human Head with Implanted DBS

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Makris, Nikos; Mainardi, Luca; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established procedure for the treatment of movement and affective disorders. Patients with DBS may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate injuries or comorbidities. However, the MRI radio-frequency (RF) energy may cause excessive tissue heating particularly near the electrode. This paper studies how the accuracy of numerical modeling of the RF field inside a DBS patient varies with spatial resolution and corresponding anatomical detail of the volume surrounding the electrodes. A multiscale model (MS) was created by an atlas-based segmentation using a 1 mm3 head model (mRes) refined in the basal ganglia by a 200 μm2 ex-vivo dataset. Four DBS electrodes targeting the left globus pallidus internus were modeled. Electromagnetic simulations at 128 MHz showed that the peak of the electric field of the MS doubled (18.7 kV/m versus 9.33 kV/m) and shifted 6.4 mm compared to the mRes model. Additionally, the MS had a sixfold increase over the mRes model in peak-specific absorption rate (SAR of 43.9 kW/kg versus 7 kW/kg). The results suggest that submillimetric resolution and improved anatomical detail in the model may increase the accuracy of computed electric field and local SAR around the tip of the implant. PMID:23956789

  15. MRI induced torque and demagnetization in retention magnets for a bone conduction implant.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Taghavi, Hamidreza; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2014-06-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations in patients who use implantable medical devices involve safety risks both for the patient and the implant. Hearing implants often use two permanent magnets, one implanted and one external, for the retention of the external transmitter coil to the implanted receiver coil to achieve an optimal signal transmission. The implanted magnet is subjected to both demagnetization and torque, magnetically induced by the MRI scanner. In this paper, demagnetization and a comparison between measured and simulated induced torque is studied for the retention magnet used in a bone conduction implant (BCI) system. The torque was measured and simulated in a uniform static magnetic field of 1.5 T. The magnetic field was generated by a dipole electromagnet and permanent magnets with two different types of coercive fields were tested. Demagnetization and maximum torque for the high coercive field magnets was 7.7% ± 2.5% and 0.20 ± 0.01 Nm, respectively and 71.4% ± 19.1% and 0.18 ± 0.01 Nm for the low coercive field magnets, respectively. The simulated maximum torque was 0.34 Nm, deviating from the measured torque in terms of amplitude, mainly related to an insufficient magnet model. The BCI implant with high coercive field magnets is believed to be magnetic resonance (MR) conditional up to 1.5 T if a compression band is used around the skull to fix the implant. This is not approved and requires further investigations, and if removal of the implant is needed, the surgical operation is expected to be simple.

  16. An implanted 8-channel array coil for high-resolution macaque MRI at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, T.; Keil, B.; Farivar, R.; McNab, J.A.; Polimeni, J. R.; Gerits, A.; Arsenault, J.T.; Wald, L. L.; Vanduffel, W.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-channel receive coil array was constructed and implanted adjacent to the skull in a male rhesus monkey in order to improve the sensitivity of (functional) brain imaging. The permanent implant was part of an acrylic headpost assembly and only the coil element loop wires were implanted. The tuning, matching, and preamplifier circuitry was connected via a removable external assembly. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification for parallel imaging were compared to a single-, 4-, and 8-channel external receive-only coil routinely used for macaque fMRI. In vivo measurements showed significantly improved SNR within the brain for the implanted versus the external coils. Within a region-of-interest covering the cerebral cortex, we observed a 5.4-, 3.6-fold, and 3.4-fold increase in SNR compared to the external single-, 4-, and 8-channel coil, respectively. In the center of the brain, the implanted array maintained a 2.4×, 2.5×, and 2.1× higher SNR, respectively compared to the external coils. The array performance was evaluated for anatomical, diffusion tensor and functional brain imaging. This study suggests that a stable implanted phased-array coil can be used in macaque MRI to substantially increase the spatial resolution for anatomical, diffusion tensor, and functional imaging. PMID:22609793

  17. Using bimodal MRI/fluorescence imaging to identify host angiogenic response to implants

    PubMed Central

    Berdichevski, Alexandra; Simaan Yameen, Haneen; Dafni, Hagit; Neeman, Michal; Seliktar, Dror

    2015-01-01

    Therapies that promote angiogenesis have been successfully applied using various combinations of proangiogenic factors together with a biodegradable delivery vehicle. In this study we used bimodal noninvasive monitoring to show that the host response to a proangiogenic biomaterial can be drastically affected by the mode of implantation and the surface area-to-volume ratio of the implant material. Fluorescence/MRI probes were covalently conjugated to VEGF-bearing biodegradable PEG-fibrinogen hydrogel implants and used to document the in vivo degradation and liberation of bioactive constituents in an s.c. rat implantation model. The hydrogel biodegradation and angiogenic host response with three types of VEGF-bearing implant configurations were compared: preformed cylindrical plugs, preformed injectable microbeads, and hydrogel precursor, injected and polymerized in situ. Although all three were made with identical amounts of precursor constituents, the MRI data revealed that in situ polymerized hydrogels were fully degraded within 2 wk; microbead degradation was more moderate, and plugs degraded significantly more slowly than the other configurations. The presence of hydrogel degradation products containing the fluorescent label in the surrounding tissues revealed a distinct biphasic release profile for each type of implant configuration. The purported in vivo VEGF release profile from the microbeads resulted in highly vascularized s.c. tissue containing up to 16-fold more capillaries in comparison with controls. These findings demonstrate that the configuration of an implant can play an important role not only in the degradation and resorption properties of the materials, but also in consequent host angiogenic response. PMID:25825771

  18. Focused tight dressing does not prevent cochlear implant magnet migration under 1.5 Tesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Cuda, D; Murri, A; Succo, G

    2013-04-01

    We report a retrospective case of inner magnet migration, which occurred after 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning in an adult recipient of a bilateral cochlear implant (CI) despite a focused head dressing. The patient, bilaterally implanted with Nucleus 5 CIs (Cochlear LTD, Sydney, Australia), underwent a 1.5 Tesla cholangio-MRI scan for biliary duct pathology. In subsequent days, a focal skin alteration appeared over the left inner coil. Plain skull radiographs showed partial magnet migration on the left side. Surgical exploration confirmed magnet twisting; the magnet was effectively repositioned. Left CI performance was restored to pre-migration level. The wound healed without complications. Thus, focused dressing does not prevent magnet migration in CI recipients undergoing 1.5 Tesla MRI. All patients should be counselled on this potential complication. A minor surgical procedure is required to reposition the magnet. Nevertheless, timely diagnosis is necessary to prevent skin breakdown and subsequent device contamination. Plain skull radiograph is very effective in identifying magnet twisting; it should be performed systematically after MRI or minimally on all suspected cases.

  19. Cochlear implantation for severe sensorineural hearing loss caused by lightning.

    PubMed

    Myung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Il-Woo; Goh, Eui-Kyung; Kong, Soo-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Lightning strike can produce an array of clinical symptoms and injuries. It may damage multiple organs and cause auditory injuries ranging from transient hearing loss and vertigo to complete disruption of the auditory system. Tympanic-membrane rupture is relatively common in patients with lightning injury. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of auditory lesions in lightning survivors have not been fully elucidated. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss caused by a lightning strike, who was successfully rehabilitated after a cochlear implantation.

  20. Ensuring Safety of Implanted Devices under MRI using Reversed RF Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Overall, William R.; Pauly, John M.; Stang, Pascal P.; Scott, Greig C.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with long-wire medical implants are currently prevented from undergoing MRI scans due to the risk of RF heating. We have developed a simple technique for determining the heating potential for these implants using reversed RF polarization. This technique could be used on a patient-to-patient basis as a part of the standard pre-scan procedure to ensure that the subject’s device does not pose a heating risk. By using reversed quadrature polarization, the MR scan can be sensitized exclusively to the potentially dangerous currents in the device. Here, we derive the physical principles governing the technique and explore the primary sources of inaccuracy. These principles are verified through finite-difference simulations and through phantom scans of implant leads. These studies demonstrate the potential of the technique for sensitively detecting potentially dangerous coupling conditions before they can do harm. PMID:20593374

  1. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  2. MRI of mediastinal parathyroid cystic adenoma causing hyperparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Bargiela, A.; Cordido, F.; Aguilera, C.; Argueeso, R.; Cao, I.

    1996-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common disorder that results from an increased secretion of parathyroid hormone, most often due to a solitary and solid parathyroid adenoma usually found in the inferior group of parathyroid glands. Parathyroid gland is ectopic in approximately 10 to 20% of the cases, and the retrosternal and prevascular mediastinum is the most common location. Most mediastinal parathyroid adenomas are solid and <3 cm, but mediastinal parathyroid cysts are very uncommon and rarely cause hyperparathyroidism. We know of 18 cases of mediastinal parathyroid cysts that have been previously reported and only four of them presented with hyperparathyroidism. We report an unusual case of hyperparathyroidism due to a large cystic parathyroid adenoma located in the anterior mediastinum diagnosed by MRI. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Tracking the Fate of Stem Cell Implants with Fluorine-19 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Ribot, Emeline J.; Chen, Yuhua; Gilbert, Kyle M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study we used cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) labeled with a Fluorine-19 (19F) agent. 19F-MRI offers unambiguous detection and in vivo quantification of labeled cells. Methods We investigated two common stem cell transplant mouse models: an immune competent, syngeneic transplant model and an immune compromised, xenograft transplant model. 19F labelled stem cells were implanted intramuscularly into the hindlimb of healthy mice. The transplant was then monitored for up to 17 days using 19F-MRI, after which the tissue was excised for fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemisty. Results Immediately following transplantation, 19F-MRI quantification correlated very well with the expected cell number in both models. The 19F signal decreased over time in both models, with a more rapid decrease in the syngeneic model. By endpoint, only 2/7 syngeneic mice had any detectable 19F signal. In the xenograft model, all mice had detectable signal at endpoint. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to show that the 19F signal was related to the presence of bystander labeled macrophages, and not original MSC. Conclusions Our results show that 19F-MRI is an excellent tool for verifying the delivery of therapeutic cells early after transplantation. However, in certain circumstances the transfer of cellular label to other bystander cells may confuse interpretation of the long-term fate of the transplanted cells. PMID:25767871

  4. [Influence of implants on human body during MRI examinations: fundamental experiment using metal balls].

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Osamu; Usui, Shuji; Ueda, Yoshitake; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2005-07-20

    It is increasingly the case that patients who have implants feel pain during high-field MRI examinations. A probable reason for the pain is the generation by irradiation of RF pulses and changing of the magnetic field gradient. As a fundamental study on the effect of implants on the human body under MRI procedures, temperature measurements were obtained from metal balls incorporated into gel-filled phantoms by using two kinds of measuring instruments, a copper-constantan thermocouple and a fluorescence fiber thermometer. At first we pursued a correlation between a copper-constantan thermocouple (absolute measurement) and fluoroptic thermometer and confirmed the precision and stability of the fluoroptic thermometer under MRI procedures. When a stainless steel ball with or without a loop antenna was used, only in the former case did the temperature rise during RF pulse irradiation. There was no significant difference between the magnetic field gradient ON and OFF. Furthermore, differences in metal (steel, aluminum, brass, stainless steel, copper) and size (5, 10, 20 mmPhi) were affected according to the increase of temperature. In conclusion, both RF pulse irradiation and a loop antenna are necessary for heat generation on the surface of metals.

  5. Positive Contrast MRI Techniques for Visualization of Iron-Loaded Hernia Mesh Implants in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ciritsis, Alexander; Truhn, Daniel; Hansen, Nienke L.; Otto, Jens; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Kraemer, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Object In MRI, implants and devices can be delineated via susceptibility artefacts. To discriminate susceptibility voids from proton-free structures, different positive contrast techniques were implemented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pulse sequence-based positive contrast technique (PCSI) and a post-processing susceptibility gradient mapping algorithm (SGM) for visualization of iron loaded mesh implants in patients. Material and Methods Five patients with iron-loaded MR-visible inguinal hernia mesh implants were examined at 1.5 Tesla. A gradient echo sequence (GRE; parameters: TR: 8.3ms; TE: 4.3ms; NSA:2; FA:20°; FOV:350mm²) and a PCSI sequence (parameters: TR: 25ms; TE: 4.6ms; NSA:4; FA:20°; FOV:350mm²) with on-resonant proton suppression were performed. SGM maps were calculated using two algorithms. Image quality and mesh delineation were independently evaluated by three radiologists. Results On GRE, the iron-loaded meshes generated distinct susceptibility-induced signal voids. PCSI exhibited susceptibility differences including the meshes as hyperintense signals. SGM exhibited susceptibility differences with positive contrast. Visually, the different algorithms presented no significant differences. Overall, the diagnostic value was rated best in GRE whereas PCSI and SGM were barely “sufficient”. Conclusion Both “positive contrast” techniques depicted implanted meshes with hyperintense signal. SGM comes without additional acquisition time and can therefore be utilized in every patient. PMID:27192201

  6. Correlation of histological findings with gadolinium enhanced MRI scans during healing of a PHEMA orbital implant in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, C.; Morris, I.; Vijayasekaran, S.; Fallon, M.; McAllister, J.; Clayton, A.; Chirila, T.; Crawford, G.; Constable, I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—To investigate a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) orbital implant with a spongy anterior hemisphere and a smooth gel posterior hemisphere, by histology correlated with magnetic resonance images.
METHODS—Following enucleation, eight rabbits received PHEMA implants to which the muscles were directly sutured, and underwent gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from 3 to 52 weeks. After the rabbits were killed, the implants were removed, cut in a plane corresponding to the scan, and processed for light and electron microscopy.
RESULTS—All eight rabbits retained their implant to the end of the study period without complications. The scans demonstrated muscle attachment to the anterior half of the implant, and enhancement was seen on injection of gadolinium chelate. Histology confirmed muscle attachment, and cellular and vascular ingrowth. Over time, a transformation from reactive inflammatory to relatively non-vascular scar tissue was seen within the implant. Calcium deposits in one implant were detected by imaging and histology.
CONCLUSION—The implants are readily visualised on MRI. Muscle attachment and fibrovascular ingrowth into the anterior hemisphere are seen, while encapsulation of the posterior hemisphere is minimal. Histological findings confirm the progress of the healing response, with initial inflammation and marked vascularisation, developing later into quiescent scar tissue predominantly of fibroblasts.

 PMID:10216066

  7. Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, Mohammad; Rayati, Farshid; Najafi, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion (IPL) that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess. IPL is a pathologic phenomenon that rarely involves implants. This event first described in 1992 with an incidence rate of 0.26-9.9% and the origin is not well known. The most likely suggested causes are presence of preexisting bone pathology, contamination of implant surface, bone overheating during implant surgery, vascular ischemia, excessive tightening of the implant, fenestration of the buccal plate and different implant surface designs. In the present case report, we describe relatively large periapical lesions involving several implants caused severe abscess accompanied by transient inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia and its successful management. A brief review of the literature and a discussion of possible causes and different treatment plans are also included. PMID:27076835

  8. Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess.

    PubMed

    Jafarian, Mohammad; Rayati, Farshid; Najafi, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of a large implant periapical lesion (IPL) that caused paraesthesia and perimandibular abscess. IPL is a pathologic phenomenon that rarely involves implants. This event first described in 1992 with an incidence rate of 0.26-9.9% and the origin is not well known. The most likely suggested causes are presence of preexisting bone pathology, contamination of implant surface, bone overheating during implant surgery, vascular ischemia, excessive tightening of the implant, fenestration of the buccal plate and different implant surface designs. In the present case report, we describe relatively large periapical lesions involving several implants caused severe abscess accompanied by transient inferior alveolar nerve paraesthesia and its successful management. A brief review of the literature and a discussion of possible causes and different treatment plans are also included.

  9. Penile Implants among Prisoners—A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Lorraine; Butler, Tony; Richters, Juliet; Malacova, Eva; Wand, Handan; Smith, Anthony M. A.; Grant, Luke; Richards, Alun; Donovan, Basil

    2013-01-01

    Background We report the prevalence of penile implants among prisoners and determine the independent predictors for having penile implants. Questions on penile implants were included in the Sexual Health and Attitudes of Australian Prisoners (SHAAP) survey following concerns raised by prison health staff that increasing numbers of prisoners reported having penile implants while in prison. Methods Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) of a random sample of prisoners was carried out in 41 prisons in New South Wales and Queensland (Australia). Men were asked, “Have you ever inserted or implanted an object under the skin of your penis?” If they responded Yes: “Have you ever done so while you were in prison?” Univariate logistic regression and logistic regression were used to determine the factors associated with penile implants. Results A total of 2,018 male prisoners were surveyed, aged between 18 and 65 years, and 118 (5.8%) reported that they had inserted or implanted an object under the skin of their penis. Of these men, 87 (73%) had this done while they were in prison. In the multivariate analysis, a younger age, birth in an Asian country, and prior incarceration were all significantly associated with penile implants (p<0.001). Men with penile implants were also more likely to report being paid for sex (p<0.001), to have had body piercings (p<0.001) or tattoos in prison (p<0.001), and to have taken non-prescription drugs while in prison (p<0.05). Conclusions Penile implants appear to be fairly common among prisoners and are associated with risky sexual and drug use practices. As most of these penile implants are inserted in prison, these men are at risk of blood borne viruses and wound infection. Harm reduction and infection control strategies need to be developed to address this potential risk. PMID:23326383

  10. Pelvic hydatid disease: CT and MRI findings causing sciatica.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica (1, 2). We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings.

  11. Rupture of silicone-gel breast implants: causes, sequelae, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L; Silverman, B G; Berg, W A

    1997-11-22

    Silicone-gel-filled breast implants have been widely used for breast augmentation and reconstruction after mastectomy. The rate of implant rupture and its sequelae are not known. We review the frequency, causes, sequelae, and detection of implant rupture. Materials testing of removed implants provides evidence that as implants age in vivo, they weaken and may rupture. Sequelae of rupture include migration of gel accompanied by inflammation and silicone granuloma formation. The role of free silicone gel in relation to idiopathic or atypical connective tissue disease is not clear. Magnetic resonance imaging is substantially more sensitive in the detection of rupture than is mammography or ultrasonography.

  12. Localization of neurosurgically implanted electrodes via photograph-MRI-radiograph coregistration.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sarang S; Edwards, Erik; Kirsch, Heidi E; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Knight, Robert T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2008-09-15

    Intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) is clinically indicated for medically refractory epilepsy and is a promising approach for developing neural prosthetics. These recordings also provide valuable data for cognitive neuroscience research. Accurate localization of iEEG electrodes is essential for evaluating specific brain regions underlying the electrodes that indicate normal or pathological activity, as well as for relating research findings to neuroimaging and lesion studies. However, electrodes are frequently tucked underneath the edge of a craniotomy, inserted via a burr hole, or placed deep within the brain, where their locations cannot be verified visually or with neuronavigational systems. We show that one existing method, registration of postimplant computed tomography (CT) with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can result in errors exceeding 1cm. We present a novel method for localizing iEEG electrodes using routinely acquired surgical photographs, X-ray radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Known control points are used to compute projective transforms that link the different image sets, ultimately allowing hidden electrodes to be localized, in addition to refining the location of manually registered visible electrodes. As the technique does not require any calibration between the different image modalities, it can be applied to existing image databases. The final result is a set of electrode positions on the patient's rendered MRI yielding locations relative to sulcal and gyral landmarks on individual anatomy, as well as MNI coordinates. We demonstrate the results of our method in eight epilepsy patients implanted with electrode grids spanning the left hemisphere.

  13. Lethal Hemorrhage Caused by Aortoenteric Fistula Following Endovascular Stent Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlke, Volker; Brossmann, Joachim; Klomp, Hans-Juergen

    2002-06-15

    A 55-year-old women developed an aortointestinal fistula between the bifurcation of the aorta and the distal ileum following implantation of multiple endovascular stents into both common iliac arteries for treatment of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Ten months before the acute onset of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage two balloon-expandable steel stents had been implanted into both common iliac arteries. Due to restenosis and recurrent intermittent claudication, three balloon-expandable covered stents were implanted 4 months later on reintervention. The patient presented with abdominal pain and melena, and fell into hemorrhagic shock with signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After transfer to our hospital, she again developed hemorrhagic shock with massive upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding and died during emergency laparotomy. The development of aortoenteric fistulas following endovascular surgery/stent implantation is very rare and has to be considered in cases of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

  14. SU-C-17A-02: Sirius MRI Markers for Prostate Post-Implant Assessment: MR Protocol Development

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T; Wang, J; Kudchadker, R; Stafford, R; Bathala, T; Pugh, T; Ibbott, G; Frank, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Currently, CT is used to visualize prostate brachytherapy sources, at the expense of accurate structure contouring. MRI is superior to CT for anatomical delineation, but the sources appear as voids on MRI images. Previously we have developed Sirius MRI markers (C4 Imaging) to replace spacers to assist source localization on MRI images. Here we develop an MRI pulse sequence protocol that enhances the signal of these markers to enable MRI-only post-implant prostate dosimetric analysis. Methods: To simulate a clinical scenario, a CIRS multi-modality prostate phantom was implanted with 66 markers and 86 sources. The implanted phantom was imaged on both 1.5T and 3.0T GE scanners under various conditions, different pulse sequences (2D fast spin echo [FSE], 3D balanced steadystate free precession [bSSFP] and 3D fast spoiled gradient echo [FSPGR]), as well as varying amount of padding to simulate various patient sizes and associated signal fall-off from the surface coil elements. Standard FSE sequences from the current clinical protocols were also evaluated. Marker visibility, marker size, intra-marker distance, total scan time and artifacts were evaluated for various combinations of echo time, repetition time, flip angle, number of excitations, bandwidth, slice thickness and spacing, fieldof- view, frequency/phase encoding steps and frequency direction. Results: We have developed a 3D FSPGR pulse sequence that enhances marker signal and ensures the integrity of the marker shape while maintaining reasonable scan time. For patients contraindicated for 3.0T, we have also developed a similar sequence for 1.5T scanners. Signal fall-off with distance from prostate to coil can be compensated mainly by decreasing bandwidth. The markers are not visible using standard FSE sequences. FSPGR sequences are more robust for consistent marker visualization as compared to bSSFP sequences. Conclusion: The developed MRI pulse sequence protocol for Sirius MRI markers assists source

  15. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing infection of a biventricular pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuhning L; Bridge, Bronwyn; Wang, Jeffrey; Jovin, Ion S

    2012-12-01

    Increased utilization of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) has seen a corresponding rise in related infections. Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely the cause. Treatment involves susceptibilities, antimicrobials, and device removal. This study presents a patient who underwent a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator upgrade with a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium fortuitum located at the pocket site and a lead infection.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Neurofibromatosis Type 2 Patient with a Novel MRI-Compatible Auditory Brainstem Implant

    PubMed Central

    Shew, Matthew; Bertsch, Judson; Camarata, Paul; Staecker, Hinrich

    2017-01-01

    Auditory brainstem implantation has become a key technique for the rehabilitation of hearing in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. The nature of this devastating genetic disease requires ongoing MRI for the patient's lifespan. Today, most auditory brainstem implants require removal of the magnet that connects the internal device to the external speech processor to undergo imaging as their disease progresses. Patients have the option of having a short procedure to have the magnet taken out and replaced each time, or alternately using a headband to secure the processor over the receiver coil of the internal device. Novel magnet technology has led to the development of a freely rotating magnet that can be used inside the magnetic field of an MRI scanner without losing magnet strength and without being displaced from the body of the device. We report one of the first patients implanted with a Med-El Synchrony ABI in the United States who subsequently underwent successful imaging with MRI 1.5 tesla to follow for other existing schwannomas. PMID:28210535

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Neurofibromatosis Type 2 Patient with a Novel MRI-Compatible Auditory Brainstem Implant.

    PubMed

    Shew, Matthew; Bertsch, Judson; Camarata, Paul; Staecker, Hinrich

    2017-01-01

    Auditory brainstem implantation has become a key technique for the rehabilitation of hearing in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. The nature of this devastating genetic disease requires ongoing MRI for the patient's lifespan. Today, most auditory brainstem implants require removal of the magnet that connects the internal device to the external speech processor to undergo imaging as their disease progresses. Patients have the option of having a short procedure to have the magnet taken out and replaced each time, or alternately using a headband to secure the processor over the receiver coil of the internal device. Novel magnet technology has led to the development of a freely rotating magnet that can be used inside the magnetic field of an MRI scanner without losing magnet strength and without being displaced from the body of the device. We report one of the first patients implanted with a Med-El Synchrony ABI in the United States who subsequently underwent successful imaging with MRI 1.5 tesla to follow for other existing schwannomas.

  18. Halofuginone inhibits angiogenesis and growth in implanted metastatic rat brain tumor model--an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Rinat; Itzik, Anna; Harel, Hila; Nagler, Arnon; Vlodavsky, Israel; Siegal, Tali

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF) is a potent inhibitor of collagen type alpha1(I). In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001). Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001). In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05). Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03). Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  19. Technical complications of implant-causes and management: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Gupta, Hemant; Tandan, Amrit

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing popularity of dental implants, the number of failures due to late implant fracture is also expected to increase. Hence, the scope for prevention and management needs to be emphasized. The objective of this review article is to analyze the various causes of failure of dental implants due to implant fixture/abutment screw fractures and also to enumerate the management and the preventive options for these failures, thereby aiming to help the clinicians to properly plan the implant-supported prosthesis treatment by considering the important biomechanical aspects of this type of rehabilitation. The present review emphasizes the causes and management of technical complications and not the incidence of such complications. PMID:26668445

  20. MRI scanning in patients implanted with a round window or stapes coupled floating mass transducer of the Vibrant Soundbridge.

    PubMed

    Renninger, Daniel; Ernst, Arne; Todt, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion MRI examinations in patients with an alternatively coupled VSB can lead to unpleasant side-effects. However, the residual hearing was not impaired, whereas the hearing performance with the VSB was decreased in one patient which could be fixed by a surgical revision. Different experiences for the VSB 503 can be expected. Objective To investigate the in vivo effects of MRI scanning on the Vibrant Soundbridge system (VSB) with an alternatively coupled Floating Mass Transducer (FMT). Method Sixty-five VSB (502) implantees were included in this study. Of them, 42 questionnaires could be evaluated with the patients' statements about their medical, otological, and general condition before, during, and after an MRI scan which was indicated for different medical reasons, despite the previous implantation of an alternatively coupled Vibrant Soundbridge System. Results In four patients (9.5%), five MRI examinations were performed. These were done for different indications (e.g. knee and shoulder joint diagnostics). During the scanning, noise and subjectively perceived distortion of the implant were described. A deterioration of the hearing gain with the VSB in place was found in one patient. A decrease of the hearing threshold was not observed.

  1. [Aberrant internal carotid artery as a cause of pulsatile tinnitus: a difficult diagnosis in MRI?].

    PubMed

    Soyka, M B; Schuknecht, B; Huber, A M

    2010-02-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old patient with sensorineural hearing loss and the finding of an aberrant internal carotid artery in the left tympanic cavity that was causing pulsatile tinnitus. The aberrant vessel was initially invisible on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography and MR angiography (MRA). Recognition of an aberrant course of an internal carotid artery often requires a combination of MRI and MRA to establish the diagnosis and rule out other differential diagnoses.

  2. Image-guided tissue engineering of anatomically shaped implants via MRI and micro-CT using injection molding.

    PubMed

    Ballyns, Jeffery J; Gleghorn, Jason P; Niebrzydowski, Vicki; Rawlinson, Jeremy J; Potter, Hollis G; Maher, Suzanne A; Wright, Timothy M; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2008-07-01

    This study demonstrates for the first time the development of engineered tissues based on anatomic geometries derived from widely used medical imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computer-aided design and tissue injection molding techniques have demonstrated the ability to generate living implants of complex geometry. Due to its complex geometry, the meniscus of the knee was used as an example of this technique's capabilities. MRI and microcomputed tomography (microCT) were used to design custom-printed molds that enabled the generation of anatomically shaped constructs that retained shape throughout 8 weeks of culture. Engineered constructs showed progressive tissue formation indicated by increases in extracellular matrix content and mechanical properties. The paradigm of interfacing tissue injection molding technology can be applied to other medical imaging techniques that render 3D models of anatomy, demonstrating the potential to apply the current technique to engineering of many tissues and organs.

  3. On the estimation of the worst-case implant-induced RF-heating in multi-channel MRI.

    PubMed

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2017-03-02

    The increasing use of multiple radiofrequency (RF) transmit channels in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems makes it necessary to rigorously assess the risk of RF-induced heating. This risk is especially aggravated with inclusions of medical implants within the body. The worst-case RF-heating scenario is achieved when the local tissue deposition in the at-risk region (generally in the vicinity of the implant electrodes) reaches its maximum value while MRI exposure is compliant with predefined general specific absorption rate (SAR) limits or power requirements. This work first reviews the common approach to estimate the worst-case RF-induced heating in multi-channel MRI environment, based on the maximization of the ratio of two Hermitian forms by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. It is then shown that the common approach is not rigorous and may lead to an underestimation of the worst-case RF-heating scenario when there is a large number of RF transmit channels and there exist multiple SAR or power constraints to be satisfied. Finally, this work derives a rigorous SAR-based formulation to estimate a preferable worst-case scenario, which is solved by casting a semidefinite programming relaxation of this original non-convex problem, whose solution closely approximates the true worst-case including all SAR constraints. Numerical results for 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 RF channels in a 3T-MRI volume coil for a patient with a deep-brain stimulator under a head imaging exposure are provided as illustrative examples.

  4. Construction and modeling of a reconfigurable MRI coil for lowering SAR in patients with deep brain stimulation implants.

    PubMed

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Iacono, Maria Ida; Keil, Boris; Angelone, Leonardo M; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Fox, Michael D; Herrington, Todd; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; LaPierre, Cristen; Mareyam, Azma; Wald, Lawrence L

    2017-02-15

    Post-operative MRI of patients with deep brain simulation (DBS) implants is useful to assess complications and diagnose comorbidities, however more than one third of medical centers do not perform MRIs on this patient population due to stringent safety restrictions and liability risks. A new system of reconfigurable magnetic resonance imaging head coil composed of a rotatable linearly-polarized birdcage transmitter and a close-fitting 32-channel receive array is presented for low-SAR imaging of patients with DBS implants. The novel system works by generating a region with low electric field magnitude and steering it to coincide with the DBS lead trajectory. We demonstrate that the new coil system substantially reduces the SAR amplification around DBS electrodes compared to commercially available circularly polarized coils in a cohort of 9 patient-derived realistic DBS lead trajectories. We also show that the optimal coil configuration can be reliably identified from the image artifact on B1(+) field maps. Our preliminary results suggest that such a system may provide a viable solution for high-resolution imaging of DBS patients in the future. More data is needed to quantify safety limits and recommend imaging protocols before the novel coil system can be used on patients with DBS implants.

  5. Pinpointing synaptic loss caused by Alzheimer's disease with fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Adam M.; Small, Scott A.; Fleisher, Adam

    2010-01-01

    During its earliest stage, before cell loss and independent of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes synaptic loss affecting the basal functional properties of neurons. In principle, synaptic loss can be detected by measuring AD-induced changes in basal function, or by measuring stimulus-evoked responses on top of basal changes. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is sensitive to both basal changes and evoked-responses, and there are therefore two experimental approaches in which fMRI can be used to pinpoint synaptic loss in AD. In this review, we will compare and contrast both approaches for pinpointing when and where synaptic loss in AD begins and for monitoring therapeutic efficacy. PMID:19847048

  6. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  7. Categorization of Pathology Causing Low Back Pain using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Nadhamuni, Kulasekaran; Karthikeyan, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low backache is the most common ailment flooding the orthopaedic clinic. Most of the population at least once seek medical attention for low back ache. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non invasive, commonly used diagnosing modality and accurate in diagnosing pathology causing low back ache. Aim: To classify and quantify the causes of low back pain referred to radiology department by MRI. Materials and Methods: Patients with back pain referred to radiology department were subjected to single MRI scan after ruling out any contraindications using the following sequences: T1W Turbo Spin Echo, T2W Turbo Spin Echo, Gradient-echo, Myelogram and short TI inversion recovery (STIR), in all imaging planes. Gadolinium enhanced T1W turbo spin echo sequence was used wherever necessary. Results: Data were analysed using Excel 2007, SPSS 14, Students t-test. Degenerative disc diseases were the commonest pathology followed by congenital and traumatic lesions. Neoplastic lesions were the least common. Commonest herniation type being the disc bulge (79%) followed by disc protrusion (15%), disc extrusion (6%) and disc sequestration (<1%). The posterolateral disc herniation as the commonest and foraminal the least. Sacralisation was the most common congenital spinal anomaly, followed by lumbar scoliosis and perineural cyst. There is no sex difference in disc protrusion but male preponderance in disc extrusion with subligmentous extrusion. Conclusion: MRI is useful in classifying the spinal lesions which again influences the treatment modality and clinical outcome. Degenerative disc disease is the single most common category which accounts for most the Low Back Ache for which a preventing strategy should be drafted. PMID:25738056

  8. External beam radiotherapy boosts to reduce the impact caused by edema in prostate permanent seed implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ning; Mori, Jonathan; Nath, Ravinder; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2006-05-01

    In prostate permanent seed implants, it has been shown that edema caused by the surgical procedure decreases dose coverage and hence may reduce treatment efficacy. This reduction in treatment efficacy has been characterized by an increase in tumour cell survival, and biomathematical models have been developed to calculate the tumour cell survival increases in seed implanted prostates of different edema magnitudes and durations. External beam boosts can be utilized to neutralize the negative impact of edema so that originally desired treatment efficacy can be achieved. In this study, a linear quadratic model is used to determine fractionation sizes of the external beam boosts for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants. Calculations were performed for prostates of different edema magnitudes and durations, and for tumour cells of different repair rates and repopulation rates.

  9. Silicone granuloma from ruptured breast implants as a cause of cervical lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Borghol, K; Gallagher, G; Skelly, B L

    2016-09-01

    A 56-year-old woman with a 10-year history of bilateral silicone breast implants presented to the ear, nose and throat outpatient clinic with a 2-month history of a right-sided neck lump. She was found to have a 1.3cm supraclavicular lymph node that gave the clinical impression of being reactive. Ultrasonography guided fine needle aspiration was inconclusive and initial review of subsequent computed tomography failed to identify a cause. This was followed by excisional biopsy of the lymph node, which revealed a silicone granuloma that was linked to a ruptured right-sided breast implant placed ten years previously. This case highlights the importance for otolaryngologists to consider silicone granuloma among the differential diagnoses of cervical lymphadenopathy in patients with a history of silicone breast implants. Recognising this differential diagnosis could avoid undue anxiety for patient and clinician regarding more serious pathology.

  10. CT-negative, MRI GRE-positive primary motor cortex contusion causing isolated foot drop

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Alexander M.; Niu, Tianyi; Nagasawa, Daniel T.; Everson, Richard; Sedighim, Shaina; Buitrago Blanco, Manuel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Isolated acute foot drop due to traumatic brain injury is exceedingly rare and is often misdiagnosed during initial evaluation. Here, we present the case of a patient who presented with left foot drop after falling off a bicycle. Case Description: The patient is a 55-year-old male who was mountain biking when he fell, hit his head, and lost consciousness. Neurologic examination of the left leg revealed foot drop, no sensory deficits, and 3+ reflexes at the knee and ankle with clonus. Electroencephalography, computed tomography (CT) of the head, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine, and CT of the lower extremities were all negative. Only MRI of the brain with a gradient echo sequence revealed microhemorrhages focused around the right precentral gyrus. The patient underwent physical therapy, and by 3 months had regained full strength in his left leg. Conclusion: Central causes of foot drop are exceptionally rare, however, they should be considered in all cases of post-traumatic dorsiflexion paresis. The key to the accurate diagnosis is a high index of suspicion as well as thorough and careful physical examination including reflex and sensory testing. Selective imaging modalities such as MRI or CT can then be used to verify the diagnosis. PMID:27904756

  11. Implanted, inductively-coupled, radiofrequency coils fabricated on flexible polymeric material: Application to in vivo rat brain MRI at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginefri, J.-C.; Rubin, A.; Tatoulian, M.; Woytasik, M.; Boumezbeur, F.; Djemaï, B.; Poirier-Quinot, M.; Lethimonnier, F.; Darrasse, L.; Dufour-Gergam, E.

    2012-11-01

    Combined with high-field MRI scanners, small implanted coils allow for high resolution imaging with locally improved SNR, as compared to external coils. Small flexible implantable coils dedicated to in vivo MRI of the rat brain at 7 T were developed. Based on the Multi-turn Transmission Line Resonator design, they were fabricated with a Teflon substrate using copper micromolding process and a specific metal-polymer adhesion treatment. The implanted coils were made biocompatible by PolyDimethylSiloxane (PDMS) encapsulation. The use of low loss tangent material achieves low dielectric losses within the substrate and the use of the PDMS layer reduces the parasitic coupling with the surrounding media. An implanted coil was implemented in a 7 T MRI system using inductive coupling and a dedicated external pick-up coil for signal transmission. In vivo images of the rat brain acquired with in plane resolution of (150 μm)2 thanks to the implanted coil revealed high SNR near the coil, allowing for the visualization of fine cerebral structures.

  12. Causes and correction of dissatisfaction after implantation of presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Allister; Ali, Tayyeba K; Waren, Daniel P; Donaldson, Kendall E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the causes and possible solutions for patient dissatisfaction after the implantation of presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses (IOLs). Methods This study was a retrospective review of clinical records. All patients who were seen between January 2009 and December 2013 whose primary reason for consultation was dissatisfaction with visual performance after presbyopia-correcting IOL implantation were included in the study. A single treating physician, who determined the most probable cause of dissatisfaction, decided which interventions to pursue following the initial consultation. Results Data from 74 eyes of 49 patients were analyzed. The most common cause for complaint was blurry or foggy vision both for distance and near (68%). Complaints were most frequently attributed to residual refractive error (57%) and dry eye (35%). The most common interventions pursued were treatment of refractive error with glasses or contact lenses (46%) and treatment for dry eye (24%). Corneal laser vision correction was done in 8% of eyes; 7% required an IOL exchange. After the interventions, 45% of patients had completed resolution of symptoms, 23% of patients were partially satisfied with the results, and 32% remained completely dissatisfied with the final results. Conclusion The most identifiable causes of dissatisfaction after presbyopia-correcting IOL implantation are residual refractive error and dry eye. Most patients can be managed with conservative treatment, though a significant number of patients remained unsatisfied despite multiple measures. PMID:27784985

  13. Evaluation of the susceptibility artifacts and tissue injury caused by implanted microchips in dogs on 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Saito, Miyoko; Ono, Shin; Kayanuma, Hideki; Honnami, Muneki; Muto, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2010-05-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a metallic implant raises concern over the potential complications, including susceptibility artifacts, implant migration, and heat injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate these complications in dogs with implanted microchips by evaluating MR images and the histopathological changes after 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI. Five dogs underwent microchip implantation in the cervicothoracic area. One month later, the area was imaged using 1.5T MRI in three dogs. The microchips were removed surgically together with the surrounding tissue in all dogs. There was significant signal loss and image distortion over a wide range around the area where the microchip was implanted. This change was consistent with susceptibility artifacts, which rendered the affected area including the spinal cord undiagnostic. The artifact was more extensive in T2*-weighted images (gradient-echo) and less extensive in proton density-weighted images (fast spin-echo with short echo time). Histopathologically, all microchips were well-encapsulated with granulation tissue, and there were no evidence of migration of microchips. Cell debris and a moderate number of degenerated cells with fibrin were seen in the inner layer of the granulation tissue in each dog that underwent MRI. These changes were very subtle and did not seem to be clinically significant. The results of this study suggest that, in 1.5T MRI, susceptibility artifacts produced by implanted microchips can be marked, although the dogs with implants appeared to be scanned safely.

  14. Revision of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: implants used and causes of failure☆

    PubMed Central

    Mozella, Alan de Paula; Borges Gonçalves, Felipe; Osterno Vasconcelos, Jansen; de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Objective to determine the causes of unicondylar knee arthroplasty failures, as well as identify the implants used and the need of bone grafting in patients undergoing revision UKA in Center of Knee Surgery at the Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia (INTO) in the period between January 1990 and January 2013. Methods a retrospective analysis of the medical documentation and imaging, determining the cause of failure of UKA and the time of its occurrence, as well as prosthetic components implanted during the review and the need for bone grafting. Results in this study, 27 UKA failures in 26 patients were included. Collapse of one or more components was the main cause of failure, occurring in 33% of patients. Aseptic failure was identified in 30% of cases, progression of osteoarthrosis in 15%, infection and pain 7% each, and osteolysis and polyethylene failure in 4% each. Early failure occurred in 41% of all revisions of UKA and late failure in 59%. 23 patients have undergone revision of UK. Conclusion in 35% of revisions the use of bone grafting was needed in tibial area; in 3 cases we needed allograft from Tissue Bank. We did not use metal increase in any of the revision. In one patient we used implant constraint for instability. PMID:26229792

  15. Fracture and migration of implantable venous access port catheters: Cause analysis and management of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-ping; Xiong, Bin; Chu, Jun; Li, Xiao-fang; Yao, Qi; Zheng, Chuan-sheng

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the causes and managements of the fractures and migrations of the implantable venous access port catheter (IVAPC). The fracture or migration of IVAPC occurred in 4 patients who were treated between May 2012 and January 2014 in Union Hospital, Wuhan, China. The port catheter leakage was found in 2 cases during drug infusion. Catheters that dislodged to the superior vena cava and right atrium were confirmed by port angiogram. The two dislodged catheters were successfully retrieved by interventional procedures. Catheter fracture occurred in two cases during port removal. One catheter was eventually removed from the subclavian vein through right clavicle osteotomy and subclavian venotomy, and the other removed by external jugular venotomy. Flushing the port in high pressure and injury of the totally implantable venous access port (TIVP) during implantation are usually responsible for catheter displacement. Interventional retrieval procedure can be used if the catheter dislodges to the vena cava and right atrium. Catheter fracture may occur during removal if clipping syndrome occurs or the catheter is sutured very tight during implantation.

  16. MRI-induced heating of selected thin wire metallic implants-- laboratory and computational studies-- findings and new questions raised.

    PubMed

    Bassen, H; Kainz, W; Mendoza, G; Kellom, T

    2006-01-01

    We performed experiments and computer modeling of heating of a cardiovascular stent and a straight, thin wire by RF fields in a 1.5 T MRI birdcage coil at 64 MHz. We used ASTM F2182-02a standard and normalized results to 4 W/kg whole body average. We used a rectangular saline-gel filled phantom and a coiled, double stent (Intracoil by ev3 Inc) 11 cm long. The stent had thin electrical insulation except for bare ends (simulating drug eluting coating). The stent and phantom were placed close to the wall of the RF Coil and had approximately 0.5 degrees C initial temperature rise at the ends (local SAR = 320 W/kg). We exposed a wire (24.1 cm, 0.5 mm diameter) with 0.5 mm insulation and saw an 8.6 degrees C temperature rise (local SAR = 5,680 W/kg) at the bare ends. All heating was within 1 mm3 of the ends, so the position of our fiber optic temperature probe was critical for repeatability. Our computational study used finite difference time domain software with a thermodynamics solver. We modeled a coiled bare-wire stent as a spiral with a rectangular cross section and found a maximum increase of 0.05 degrees C induced at the tips for plane wave exposures. A maximum local SAR of up to 200 W/kg occurred in a volume of only 8 x 10(-3) mm. We developed improved computational exposure sources-- optimized birdcage coils and quasi-MRI fields that may eliminate the need to model an RF coil. We learned that local (point) SAR (initial linear temperature rise) is the most reliable indicator of the maximum heating of an implant. Local SAR depends greatly on implant length, insulation and shape, and position in the MRI coil. Accurate heating must be measured with sensors or software having millimeter resolution. Many commercially available fiber optic temperature probes do meet this requirement.

  17. [Effect of vibration caused by time-varying magnetic fields on diffusion-weighted MRI].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Akio; Maeda, Fumie; Miyai, Akira; Hayashi, Kohji; Hongoh, Takaharu

    2006-04-20

    Diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) with high b-factor in the body are often used to detect and diagnose cancer at MRI. The echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence and high motion probing gradient pulse are used at diffusion weighted imaging, causing high table vibration. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the diffusion signal and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values are influenced by this vibration because of time-varying magnetic fields. Two DWIs were compared. In one, phantoms were fixed on the MRI unit's table transmitting the vibration. In the other, phantoms were supported in air, in the absence of vibration. The phantoms called "solution phantoms" were made from agarose of a particular density. The phantoms called "jelly phantoms" were made from agarose that was heated. The diffusion signal and ADC value of each image were compared. The results showed that the signal of DWI units using the solution phantom was not affected by vibration. However, the signal of DWI and ADC were increased in the low-density jelly phantom as a result of vibration, causing the jelly phantom to vibrate. The DWIs of vibrating regions such as the breast maybe be subject to error. A countermeasure seems to be to support the region adequately.

  18. Peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload: repair of the peri-implant defect following correction of the traumatic occlusion. A case report.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Georges

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the relation between occlusal overload and peri-implant bone loss and the reversal of the situation after removal of the offending forces. The placement of an unstable removable prosthesis on 3 well-integrated implants that had been stable for 9 years caused noticeable bone loss after 6 months. The elimination of the traumatic occlusion reversed the situation, and a remarkable healing of the peri-implant tissue occurred until the pretrauma condition was nearly restored. The condition has been stable for the past 4 years.

  19. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... sweatpants and a t-shirt). Certain types of metal can cause blurry images. You will lie on ... placed artificial joints Vascular stents Worked with sheet metal in the past (you may need tests to ...

  20. Implanted neural electrodes cause chronic, local inflammation that is correlated with local neurodegeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, George C.; Rees, Howard D.; Levey, Allan I.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-10-01

    Prosthetic devices that are controlled by intracortical electrodes recording one's 'thoughts' are a reality today, and no longer merely in the realm of science fiction. However, widespread clinical use of implanted electrodes is hampered by a lack of reliability in chronic recordings, independent of the type of electrodes used. One major hypothesis has been that astroglial scar electrically impedes the electrodes. However, there is a temporal discrepancy between stabilization of scar's electrical properties and recording failure with recording failure lagging by 1 month. In this study, we test a possible explanation for this discrepancy: the hypothesis that chronic inflammation, due to the persistent presence of the electrode, causes a local neurodegenerative state in the immediate vicinity of the electrode. Through modulation of chronic inflammation via stab wound, electrode geometry and age-matched control, we found that after 16 weeks, animals with an increased level of chronic inflammation were associated with increased neuronal and dendritic, but not axonal, loss. We observed increased neuronal and dendritic loss 16 weeks after implantation compared to 8 weeks after implantation, suggesting that the local neurodegenerative state is progressive. After 16 weeks, we observed axonal pathology in the form of hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau in the immediate vicinity of the microelectrodes (as observed in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies). The results of this study suggest that a local, late onset neurodegenerative disease-like state surrounds the chronic electrodes and is a potential cause for chronic recording failure. These results also inform strategies to enhance our capability to attain reliable long-term recordings from implantable electrodes in the CNS.

  1. Visual fatigue caused by watching 3DTV: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the visual fatigue caused by watching 3DTV using the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The data of fMRI during three kinds of visual stimulation tasks were obtained from twenty subjects. At first, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes during stimuli of checkerboard task were compared before and after one-hour watching 3D/2DTV, and subjective evaluation was conducted based on the questionnaire simultaneously. Then 3D and 2D images were used to stimulate healthy individuals to measure brain activities that correlated with stereoscopic vision. Finally, the relationship between front or back depth of field images and visual fatigue was investigated. The results reveal that the 3D group shows more significant differences of brain activities in BA8, BA17, BA18 and BA19 than the 2D group during the checkerboard stimulation. BA5, BA6, BA7 and BA8 were testified to have close relationship with stereoscopic perception via the 2D/3D images stimulation. Furthermore, the front depth of field image was proven to impose a more serious impact on visual fatigue than the back one. These conclusions are useful for healthy and reasonable 3DTV watching as well as properly designing of 3D scenes. PMID:25603496

  2. Stent Implantation for Superior Vena Cava Syndrome of Malignant Cause.

    PubMed

    Büstgens, Felix A; Loose, Reinhard; Ficker, Joachim H; Wucherer, Michael; Uder, Michael; Adamus, Ralf

    2017-02-02

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is the retrospective analysis of endovascular therapy for the treatment of superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) of malignant cause. This study focuses on the effectiveness of the therapy regarding the duration of remission, symptom control and practicability. Materials and Methods From January 2003 to November 2012, therapeutic implantation of one or more stents was performed in 141 patients suffering from SVCS. The medical history was retrospectively researched using digitalized patient files. If those were incomplete, secondary research was conducted using the cancer registry of the General Hospital Nuremberg, the cancer registry of the tumor center at Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU) or information given by physicians in private practice. This data was collected using Microsoft Office Excel(®) and statistically analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22(®). Results 168 stents were implanted in 141 patients (median age: 64.6 years; range: 36 - 84), 86 being male and 55 being female. In 121 patients, SVCS was caused by lung cancer (85.8 %), in 9 patients by mediastinal metastasis of an extrathoracic carcinoma (6.4 %), in 3 patients by mesothelioma of the pleura (2.1 %) and in 1 patient by Hodgkin's disease (0.7 %). There was no histological diagnosis in 7 cases (4.9 %). The primary intervention was successful in 138 patients (97.9 %). Immediate thrombosis in the stent occurred in the remaining 3 cases. Recurrence of SVCS was observed in 22 patients (15.6 %), including 5 early and 17 late occlusions. Stent dislocation or breakage was not observed. As expected, the survival after implantation was poor. The median survival was 101 days, and the median occlusion-free survival was 80 days. Conclusion The symptomatic therapy of SVCS with endovascular stents is effective and safe. Despite effective symptom control and a low rate of recurrence, the patients' prognosis is poor. Key Points

  3. Review of the principal extra spinal pathologies causing sciatica and new MRI approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ailianou, A; Fitsiori, A; Syrogiannopoulou, A; Toso, S; Viallon, M; Merlini, L; Beaulieu, J Y; Vargas, M I

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate the principal extraspinal pathologies causing sciatica and new approaches for the study of structures such as the lumbosacral plexus (LSP). Visualisation of the LSP in its entirety is difficult with conventional two-dimensional MRI sequences owing to its oblique orientation. In our institution, we have found that the utilisation of three-dimensional short tau inversion-recovery sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolutions sequence is helpful, allowing multiplanar and maximum intensity projection reconstructions in the coronal oblique plane and curvilinear reformats through the plexus. Diffusion tensor imaging enables the observation of microstructural changes and can be useful in surgical planning. The normal anatomy of the LSP, its different extraspinal pathologies and differential diagnoses are thoroughly presented. PMID:22374280

  4. Effect of stent implantation on upstream coronary artery compliance--a cause of late plaque rupture?

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael R; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Shaw, James A; Furukawa, Eri; Resnic, Frederic S; Kimura, Kazuo

    2005-09-01

    Stent implantation in the rabbit aorta has been shown to increase vessel wall compliance at the inflow to the stent, but it is uncertain whether similar effects might be seen in the coronary arteries of humans and whether this would have any significant clinical consequences. First, we measured vessel compliance (systolic lumen area--diastolic lumen area/pulse pressure) before, immediately after, and at the 6-month follow-up visit at a site 5 mm upstream of the proximal edge of an implanted coronary stent in patients undergoing coronary intervention using motorized pull-back intravascular ultrasound recordings. Compliance in the upstream segment increased significantly immediately after stenting (before 7.13 +/- 1.49 vs after 10.73 +/- 1.36 mm2/mm Hg, p = 0.03), an effect that was unchanged at 6 months of follow-up (11.84 +/- 2.11 mm2/mm Hg, p = 0.08 vs before stenting). Second, we examined the site of plaque rupture in all patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome in whom the culprit lesion was in a vessel that had had a stent implanted >12 months previously (n = 31). Plaque rupture was statistically more likely at the inflow to the stent (n = 22) than at other sites within the culprit vessel (n = 9, p <0.01). We conclude that stenting causes an increase in vessel compliance immediately proximal to the stent, and that when a vessel has been previously stented, plaque rupture is most likely to occur at the stent inflow site.

  5. Inhibition of implantation caused by methylmercury and mercuric chloride in mouse embryos in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajiwara, Yuji; Inouye, Minoru

    1992-10-01

    Methylmercury, an environmental pollutant, produces a wide spectrum of fetotoxic effects in men and laboratory animals. Experimental studies have shown that the exposure to methylmercury in the gestation period causes fetal death, gross malformation, growth retardation of the fetuses, and stillbirth. Although the effects of methylmercury on fetuses have been well documented, only a few experiments have been performed on the embryo toxicity at the early gestation periods. Because the embryos at preimplantation period are known to be highly sensitive to methylmercury in vitro and in vivo, in the present experiment, the embryonic development after implantation was investigated following treatment with methylmercury during the preimplantation period. Since the previous report showed that methylmercury and inorganic mercury were different in their manifestation of toxicity on preimplantation and mercuric chloride on embryos were investigated in vivo in the present study. 22 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. [Urethral injuries secondary to implantation of penile prosthesis. Analysis of the causes, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Vitarelli, Antonio; Divenuto, Lucia; Palminteri, Enzo; Lorusso, Giovanni; Pagliarulo, Arcangelo

    2014-01-01

    Urethral injuries due to penile prosthesis implant represent a rare complication of the intervention to position penile prosthesis, but unfortunately scientific literature about this is poor. This rare complication may occur during surgery and in the postoperative period, both early and late. It recognizes a variety of causes that may include anatomical or functional conditions, for example cavernosal fibrosis or outcomes of inflammations or previous urethral lesions and pathological sensibility due to diabetic neuropathy or other forms of neuropathy including those from spinal cord injury or myelopathy. This review evaluates the possible predisposing conditions, the clinical presentations, and the devices in the surgical procedures to use to minimize the risk of onset of this lesions and the measures to take if they occur.

  7. Medial temporal lobe heterotopia as a cause of increased hippocampal and amygdaloid MRI volumes.

    PubMed

    Watson, C; Nielsen, S L; Cobb, C; Burgerman, R; Williamson, B

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based volumetric measurements of the hippocampus and amygdala are useful in detecting hippocampal and amygdaloid sclerosis in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. In these pathological entities, volumetric MRI analysis shows the epileptogenic structures to be atrophic when compared to the normal, nonepileptogenic side. Described are 2 patients with increased hippocampal and amygdaloid volumes on the side of seizure onset due to medial temporal lobe heteroto pias. Care must be taken in the interpretation of volumetric MRI data to make certain that asymmetries in hippocampal and amygdaloid measurements are due to atrophy and sclerosis of the abnormal side and not to increased tissue such as heterotopic gray matter.

  8. TU-AB-201-11: A Novel Theoretical Framework for MRI-Only Image Guided LDR Prostate and Breast Brachytherapy Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a novel framework for accurate model-based dose calculations using only MR images for LDR prostate and breast seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: Model-based dose calculation methodologies recommended by TG-186 require further knowledge about specific tissue composition, which is challenging with MRI. However, relying on MRI-only for implant dosimetry would reduce the soft tissue delineation uncertainty, costs, and uncertainties associated with multi-modality registration and fusion processes. We propose a novel framework to address this problem using quantitative MRI acquisitions and reconstruction techniques. The framework includes three steps: (1) Identify the locations of seeds(2) Identify the presence (or absence) of calcification(s)(3) Quantify the water and fat content in the underlying tissueSteps (1) and (2) consider the sources that limit patient dosimetry, particularly the inter-seed attenuation and the calcified regions; while step (3) targets the quantification of the tissue composition to consider the heterogeneities in the medium. Our preliminary work has shown that the seeds and the calcifications can be identified with MRI using both the magnitude and the phase images. By employing susceptibility-weighted imaging with specific post-processing techniques, the phase images can be further explored to distinguish the seeds from the calcifications. Absolute quantification of tissue, water, and fat content is feasible and was previously demonstrated in phantoms and in-vivo applications, particularly for brain diseases. The approach relies on the proportionality of the MR signal to the number of protons in an image volume. By employing appropriate correction algorithms for T1 - and T2*-related biases, B1 transmit and receive field inhomogeneities, absolute water/fat content can be determined. Results: By considering calcification and interseed attenuation, and through the knowledge of water and fat mass density, accurate patient

  9. Re-implantation of a degloving amputation of distal index finger caused by fireworks: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Cao, X C

    2013-07-01

    Amputations associated with fireworks are customarily treated by stump revision resulting in permanent disability. In this case report, we present an eight-year old boy who suffered an amputation of his right distal index finger at the level of the epiphyseal disk with degloving injury of the amputated finger caused by fireworks. Successful re-implantation was achieved. Two-year follow-up revealed fair cosmesis and acceptable functional and aesthetic recovery though the free distal phalanx had been absorbed completely. Re-implantation of a degloving amputation finger caused by fireworks is possible and can provide good distal soft tissue coverage and recovery of sensory and motor functions.

  10. Pseudophakic pupillary block caused by pupillary capture after phacoemulsification and in-the-bag AcrySof lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Sethi, Harinder Singh; Sony, Parul; Sudan, Rajeev; Soni, Ambrish

    2002-07-01

    We describe a 50-year-old patient who developed pupillary block caused by pupillary capture 1 week after uneventful phacoemulsification and implantation of an AcrySof foldable intraocular lens (IOL). The patient had a large but intact capsulorhexis with the haptics lying in the bag; the optic lay in the pupillary area anterior to the capsulorhexis. This case was successfully managed by a neodymium: YAG laser iridotomy, IOL explantation, and subsequent implantation of a poly(methyl methacrylate) posterior chamber IOL. To prevent this complication, we suggest the optic be larger than the capsulorhexis and advocate correct, gentle insertion of the foldable IOL.

  11. SU-E-J-214: MR Protocol Development to Visualize Sirius MRI Markers in Prostate Brachytherapy Patients for MR-Based Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T; Wang, J; Frank, S; Stafford, R; Bruno, T; Bathala, T; Mahmood, U; Pugh, T; Ibbott, G; Kudchadker, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current CT-based post-implant dosimetry allows precise seed localization but limited anatomical delineation. Switching to MR-based post-implant dosimetry is confounded by imprecise seed localization. One approach is to place positive-contrast markers (Sirius) adjacent to the negative-contrast seeds. This patient study aims to assess the utility of a 3D fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) sequence to visualize Sirius markers for post-implant dosimetry. Methods: MRI images were acquired in prostate implant patients (n=10) on Day 0 (day-of-implant) and Day 30. The post-implant MR protocol consisted of 3D T2-weighted fast-spin-echo (FSE), T2-weighted 2D-FSE (axial) and T1-weighted 2D-FSE (axial/sagittal/coronal). We incorporated a 3D-FSPGR sequence into the post-implant MR protocol to visualize the Sirius markers. Patients were scanned with different number-of-excitations (6, 8, 10), field-of-view (10cm, 14cm, 18cm), slice thickness (1mm, 0.8mm), flip angle (14 degrees, 20 degrees), bandwidth (122.070 Hz/pixel, 325.508 Hz/pixel, 390.625 Hz/pixel), phase encoding steps (160, 192, 224, 256), frequency-encoding direction (right/left, anterior/posterior), echo-time type (minimum-full, out-of-phase), field strength (1.5T, 3T), contrast (with, without), scanner vendor (Siemens, GE), coil (endorectal-coil only, endorectal-and-torso-coil, torsocoil only), endorectal-coil filling (30cc, 50cc) and endorectal-coil filling type (air, perfluorocarbon [PFC]). For post-implant dosimetric evaluation with greater anatomical detail, 3D-FSE images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. For comparison with CT-based post-implant dosimetry, CT images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. Results: The 3D-FSPGR sequence facilitated visualization of markers in patients. Marker visualization helped distinguish signal voids as seeds versus needle tracks for more definitive MR-based post-implant dosimetry. On the CT-MR fused images, the distance between the seed on CT to MR images was 3

  12. A Novel Operative Procedure for Pelvic Organ Prolapse Utilizing a MRI-Visible Mesh Implant: Safety and Outcome of Modified Laparoscopic Bilateral Sacropexy

    PubMed Central

    Meyberg-Solomayer, Gabriele; Radosa, Julia; Bader, Werner; Schneider, Guenther; Solomayer, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sacropexy is a generally applied treatment of prolapse, yet there are known possible complications of it. An essential need exists for better alloplastic materials. Methods. Between April 2013 and June 2014, we performed a modified laparoscopic bilateral sacropexy (MLBS) in 10 patients using a MRI-visible PVDF mesh implant. Selected patients had prolapse POP-Q stages II-III and concomitant OAB. We studied surgery-related morbidity, anatomical and functional outcome, and mesh-visibility in MRI. Mean follow-up was 7.4 months. Results. Concomitant colporrhaphy was conducted in 1/10 patients. Anatomical success was defined as POP-Q stage 0-I. Apical success rate was 100% and remained stable. A recurrent cystocele was seen in 1/10 patients during follow-up without need for intervention. Out of 6 (6/10) patients with preoperative SUI, 5/6 were healed and 1/6 persisted. De-novo SUI was seen in 1/10 patients. Complications requiring a relaparoscopy were seen in 2/10 patients. 8/10 patients with OAB were relieved postoperatively. The first in-human magnetic resonance visualization of a prolapse mesh implant was performed and showed good quality of visualization. Conclusion. MLBS is a feasible and safe procedure with favorable anatomical and functional outcome and good concomitant healing rates of SUI and OAB. Prospective data and larger samples are required. PMID:25961042

  13. Silicone implant incompatibility syndrome (SIIS): a frequent cause of ASIA (Shoenfeld's syndrome).

    PubMed

    Cohen Tervaert, J W; Kappel, R M

    2013-07-01

    Silicon has a molecular mass of 28 daltons. In nature, silicon is found as silicon dioxide (silica) or in a variety of silicates (e.g., in talc or asbestos). Furthermore, silicon is present in silicones, polymerized siloxanes, which are often used as medical silicones in breast implants. Silicon exposure is associated with different systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, and vasculitis. Remarkably, silicon in silicone-filled breast implants is considered to be safe, not increasing the risk of developing autoimmune diseases. We analyzed the impact of silicone-filled breast implants on the immune system in 32 consecutive patients attending a specialized autoimmunity clinic. All 32 patients had silicone implant incompatibility syndrome and complaints fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of ASIA (autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants). Furthermore, in 17 of the 32 patients, a systemic autoimmune disease was diagnosed, and 15 of the 32 patients had an impaired humoral immune system. Patients developed symptoms and signs after long-term follow-up, suggesting that these symptoms and signs started after implant aging and/or rupture. We postulate that silicon in silicone-filled breast implants may increase the risk of developing (auto) immune diseases and immune deficiencies.

  14. How MRI Compatible is 'MRI Compatible'? A Systematic Comparison of Artifacts Caused by Biopsy Needles at 3.0 and 1.5 T

    SciTech Connect

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Peykan, Nilufar; Schmidt, Katja; Krombach, Gabriele; Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to systematically investigate artifacts caused by interventional needles recommended for use in MRI, with focus on field strength, needle/mandrin type, orientation and sequence. Methods: Eight different MRI compatible needles were placed in porcine tissue and examined at 1.5 and 3.0 T with balanced-steady-state-free-precession (B-SSFP) and T1-weighted-spoiled-gradient-echo (T1-SPGR) sequences in different orientations to B{sub 0}. Artifact diameters with regards to the primary, inner, and secondary, outer artifacts were assessed and statistically evaluated. Results: The types and degree of artifacts varied considerably, especially between different mandrin types even for the same needles. Orientation of the needle in the magnetic field was another main contributor to the artifact dimensions. Less important factors were the type of pulse sequence and field strength. Artifacts ranged from 0.7 mm (steel, 0 Degree-Sign , B-SSFP, 3.0 T, inner) to 71.4 mm (nitinol, 90 Degree-Sign , B-SSFP, 1.5 T, outer). Inner artifact diameters in B-SSFP were slightly larger (8.2 {+-} 5.7 mm) than those in T1-SPGR (7.6 {+-} 5.4 mm) and comparable between 1.5 and 3.0 T (e.g., 8.0 vs. 8.4 mm, B-SSFP). Conclusions: Although all were sold as 'MR compatible,' the artifacts differed greatly between needle types, and even more so for different mandrins. The results suggest an empirical approach to the needle choice based on lesion type and approach angle.

  15. Long-Term Implanted cOFM Probe Causes Minimal Tissue Reaction in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hochmeister, Sonja; Asslaber, Martin; Kroath, Thomas; Pieber, Thomas R.; Sinner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the histological tissue reaction to long-term implanted cerebral open flow microperfusion (cOFM) probes in the frontal lobe of the rat brain. Most probe-based cerebral fluid sampling techniques are limited in application time due to the formation of a glial scar that hinders substance exchange between brain tissue and the probe. A glial scar not only functions as a diffusion barrier but also alters metabolism and signaling in extracellular brain fluid. cOFM is a recently developed probe-based technique to continuously sample extracellular brain fluid with an intact blood-brain barrier. After probe implantation, a 2 week healing period is needed for blood-brain barrier reestablishment. Therefore, cOFM probes need to stay in place and functional for at least 15 days after implantation to ensure functionality. Probe design and probe materials are optimized to evoke minimal tissue reaction even after a long implantation period. Qualitative and quantitative histological tissue analysis revealed no continuous glial scar formation around the cOFM probe 30 days after implantation and only a minor tissue reaction regardless of perfusion of the probe. PMID:24621608

  16. Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background partial-thickness rotator cuff tears frequently enlarge due to increased local strain and often progress to full-thickness tears. Studies suggest the addition of new tendinous tissue to injured cuff tendons would significantly decrease peak strain, possibly protecting against tear progression. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a highly-porous collagen implant to induce new tissue formation and limit tear progression when placed on the bursal surface of partial-thickness cuff tears. Methods following arthroscopic subacromial decompression, the implant was attached to the bursal surface of the supraspinatus tendon in a prospective series of 13 consecutive patients with intermediate – (3–6 mm) to high-grade (>6 mm) partial – thickness cuff tears (5 articular, 3 bursal, 5 intra-substance). Tendon thickness, defect size, and tendon quality were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Society scores at the same preoperative and follow-up times. All 13 patients completed all follow-up exams (mean length of follow-up 27.0 months, range 23.3–32.0); no patients were lost to follow-up. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months (mean increase in tendon thickness 2.2 ± 0.26 mm). This tissue matured over time and became radiologically indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. The partial-thickness cuff tears showed consistent filling of the defects, with complete healing in 7 patients at 12 months, and a progressive improvement in tendon quality in the remaining patients. No tear progression was observed by MRI in any of the patients at 24 months. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. At 24 months, 12 of 13 patients (92%) had satisfactory or better results. Conclusions the results of this clinical study demonstrated

  17. Measurement of lattice damage caused by ion-implantation doping of semiconductors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunsperger, R. G.; Wolf, E. D.; Shifrin, G. A.; Marsh, O. J.; Jamba, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of two new techniques used to measure the lattice damage produced in GaAs by the implantation of 60 keV cadmium ions. In the first method, optical reflection spectra of the ion-implanted samples were measured in the wavelength range from 2000 to 4600 A. The decrease in reflectivity resulting from ion-implantation was used to determine the relative amount of lattice damage as a function of ion dose. The second technique employed the scanning electron microscope. Patterns very similar in appearance to Kikuchi electron diffraction patterns are obtained when the secondary and/or backscattered electron intensity is displayed as a function of the angle of incidence of the electron beam on a single crystal surface. The results of measurements made by both methods are compared with each other and with data obtained by the method of measuring lattice damage by Rutherford scattering of 1 MeV helium ions.

  18. Allergic contact stomatitis caused by a titanium nitride-coated implant abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Lee, Kwang-Min; Koh, Young-Il; Park, Sang-Won

    2012-10-01

    A patient developed contact mucositis after being treated with a titanium nitride implant abutment. Patch testing disclosed a positive reaction to titanium nitride. After removal of the titanium nitride-coated abutment and placement of an uncoated abutment, all signs and symptoms disappeared. This clinical report suggests that titanium nitride-coated abutments may be a potential allergen in some patients.

  19. Bruxism: its multiple causes and its effects on dental implants - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Van Der Zaag, J; Naeije, M

    2006-04-01

    There is a growing interest in bruxism, as evidenced by the rapidly increasing number of papers about this subject during the past 5 years. The aim of the present review was to provide an update of two previous reviews from our department (one about the aetiology of bruxism and the other about the possible role of this movement disorder in the failure of dental implants) and to describe the details of the literature search strategies used, thus enabling the readers to judge the completeness of the review. Most studies that were published about the etiology during the past 5 years corroborate the previously drawn conclusions. Similarly, the update of the review about the possible causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure reveals no new points of view. Thus, there is no reason to assume otherwise than that bruxism is mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally, and that there is still insufficient evidence to support or refute a causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure. This illustrates that there is a vast need for well-designed studies to study both the aetiology of bruxism and its purported relationship with implant failure.

  20. Diffusional kurtosis MRI of the lower leg: changes caused by passive muscle elongation and shortening.

    PubMed

    Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C; Boss, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Diffusional kurtosis MRI (DKI) quantifies the deviation of water diffusion from a Gaussian distribution. We investigated the influence of passive elongation and shortening of the lower leg muscles on the DKI parameters D (diffusion coefficient) and K (kurtosis). After approval by the local ethics committee, eight healthy volunteers (age, 29.1 ± 2.9 years) underwent MRI of the lower leg at 3 T. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with 10 different b values at three ankle positions (passive dorsiflexion 10°, neutral position 0°, passive plantar flexion 40°). Parametrical maps of D and K were obtained by voxel-wise fitting of the signal intensities using a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. D and K were measured in the tibialis anterior, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles. In the neutral position, D and K values were in the range between 1.66-1.79 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s and 0.21-0.39, respectively. D and K increased with passive shortening, and decreased with passive elongation, which could also be illustrated on the parametrical maps. In dorsiflexion, D (p < 0.01) and K (p = 0.036) were higher in the tibialis anterior than in the medial gastrocnemius. In plantar flexion, the opposite was found for K (p = 0.035). DKI parameters in the lower leg muscles are significantly influenced by the ankle joint position, indicating that the diffusion of water molecules in skeletal muscle deviates from a Gaussian distribution depending on muscle tonus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Physiotherapy as a Rare Cause of Twiddler’s Syndrome in a Patient With an Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Schernthaner, Christiana; Danmayr, Franz; Krausler, Richard; Strohmer, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old male patient with a history of ischemic cardiomyopathy developed ventricular tachycardia resulting in presyncope. An ICD was indicated for secondary prophylaxis of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. A dual chamber ICD was implanted from the right side because insertion of the device from the left side was unfeasible after surgery of a left subscapularis tendon lesion. ICD implantation and testing of defibrillation threshold were uneventful. During early follow-up a progressive increase of the stimulation threshold was detected. On chest X-ray coiling of both atrial and ventricular leads was noted and caused inadvertently by active shoulder-arm physiotherapy. Complete revision of the ICD system was necessary for restoration of the pacemaker function of the ICD. This unique case highlights important steps for early recognition and prevention of Twiddler’s syndrome that may occur due to physiotherapy treatment even without abnormal manipulations by the patient.

  2. An 8-week brain MRI follow-up analysis of rat eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Shyu, L Y; Tsai, H H; Lin, D P; Chang, H H; Tyan, Y S; Weng, J C

    2014-09-01

    Early differential diagnosis and timely follow-up are advantageous in the management of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection. This study aimed to characterize angiostrongyliasis in the rat brain for an 8-week period using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and R2 mapping sequences. The data were analysed with Mathematica and Matlab software programs for weekly changes in each brain following the infection of 20, 50, 100 and 300 third-stage larvae (L3), respectively. The results showed that the average subarachnoid space detected by T2WI technique was peaked up to 10% increase of original size on day 35 after 100 or 300 larvae infection, while those infected with 20 or 50 larvae showed less than 4% increase during the entire course of observation. This increase was relevant to the mortality of the infected rats, because those with 100 or 300 larvae infections showed a sharp decrease in survival rate before day 40. After day 40, the average subarachnoid space was decreased, but the average ventricle size was persistently increased, with the highest increase observed in the group infected with 300 larvae on day 56. Furthermore, the R2 mapping mean and R2 mapping size were significantly different between the brains with severe infection (100 and 300 larvae groups together) and those with mild infection (20 and 50 larvae groups together) on day 49, but not on day 35. Our results showed that diagnosis for different quantity of larvae infection using MRI is possible and follow-up characterization is informative in revealing the effects of angiostrongyliasis on different brain areas. In conclusion, our results support the use of MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic technique for eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection.

  3. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations.

    PubMed

    Saetrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between "substitution processes," which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and "exclusion processes," which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees.

  4. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations

    PubMed Central

    Sætrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between “substitution processes,” which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and “exclusion processes,” which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees. PMID:25352319

  5. Mast cells rescue implantation defects caused by c-kit deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Woidacki, K; Popovic, M; Metz, M; Schumacher, A; Linzke, N; Teles, A; Poirier, F; Fest, S; Jensen, F; Rabinovich, G A; Maurer, M; Zenclussen, A C

    2013-01-01

    Various physiologically relevant processes are regulated by the interaction of the receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) and its ligand stem cell factor (SCF), with SCF known to be the most important growth factor for mast cells (MCs). In spite of their traditional role in allergic disorders and innate immunity, MCs have lately emerged as versatile modulators of a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes. Here we show that MCs are critical for pregnancy success. Uterine MCs presented a unique phenotype, accumulated during receptivity and expanded upon pregnancy establishment. KitW-sh/W-sh mice, whose MC deficiency is based on restricted c-Kit gene expression, exhibited severely impaired implantation, which could be completely rescued by systemic or local transfer of wild-type bone marrow-derived MCs. Transferred wild-type MCs favored normal implantation, induced optimal spiral artery remodeling and promoted the expression of MC proteases, transforming growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor. MCs contributed to trophoblast survival, placentation and fetal growth through secretion of the glycan-binding protein galectin-1. Our data unveil unrecognized roles for MCs at the fetomaternal interface with critical implications in reproductive medicine. PMID:23328669

  6. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  7. A Biodistribution and Toxicity Study of Cobalt Dichloride-N-Acetyl Cysteine in an Implantable MRI Marker for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Johansen, Mary J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Gagea, Mihai; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Borne, Agatha; Carmazzi, Yudith; Madden, Timothy

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: C4, a cobalt dichloride-N-acetyl cysteine complex, is being developed as a positive-signal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) marker to localize implanted radioactive seeds in prostate brachytherapy. We evaluated the toxicity and biodistribution of C4 in rats with the goal of simulating the systemic effects of potential leakage from C4 MRI markers within the prostate. Methods and Materials: 9-μL doses (equivalent to leakage from 120 markers in a human) of control solution (0.9% sodium chloride), 1% (proposed for clinical use), and 10% C4 solution were injected into the prostates of male Sprague-Dawley rats via laparotomy. Organ toxicity and cobalt disposition in plasma, tissues, feces, and urine were evaluated. Results: No C4-related morbidity or mortality was observed in the biodistribution arm (60 rats). Biodistribution was measurable after 10% C4 injection: cobalt was cleared rapidly from periprostatic tissue; mean concentrations in prostate were 163 μg/g and 268 μg/g at 5 and 30 minutes but were undetectable by 60 minutes. Expected dual renal-hepatic elimination was observed, with percentages of injected dose recovered in tissues of 39.0 ± 5.6% (liver), >11.8 ± 6.5% (prostate), and >5.3 ± 0.9% (kidney), with low plasma concentrations detected up to 1 hour (1.40 μg/mL at 5-60 minutes). Excretion in urine was 13.1 ± 4.6%, with 3.1 ± 0.54% recovered in feces by 24 hours. In the toxicity arm, 3 animals died in the control group and 1 each in the 1% and 10% groups from surgical or anesthesia-related complications; all others survived to scheduled termination at 14 days. No C4-related adverse clinical signs or organ toxicity were observed. Conclusion: C4-related toxicity was not observed at exposures at least 10-fold the exposure proposed for use in humans. These data demonstrating lack of systemic toxicity with dual routes of elimination in the event of in situ rupture suggest that C4 warrants further investigation as an MRI marker for prostate

  8. A Rare Complication of Cochlear Implantation After Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Reversion of the Magnet.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Erkan; Doruk, Can; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Çelik, Mehmet; Polat, Beldan; Güldiken, Yahya

    2017-03-21

    Cochlear implants are mechanical devices used for patients with severe sensory-neural hearing loss, which has an inner magnet. It is proven that 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are safe to use in patients with cochlear implant. In our patient, the authors aim to introduce a rare complication caused after a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning and the management of this situation; the reversion of the magnet of the implant without displacement and significance of surgery in management.

  9. Abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Vestibular Schwannoma as the Most Common Cause of MRI Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Jin Woo; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear in most cases. This study aimed to assess abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with SSNHL and evaluate the value of MRI in identifying the cause of SSNHL.A retrospective analysis of the charts and MRI findings of 291 patients with SSNHL was performed.In 291 patients, MRI abnormality, which was considered a cause of SSNHL, was detected in 13 patients. Vestibular schwannoma involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) and/or cerebellopontine angle was observed in 9 patients. All 9 patients had intrameatal tumors, and 6 of the 9 patients displayed extrameatal extension of their tumors. The tumor was small (<1 cm) or medium-sized (1.1-2.9 cm) in these 6 patients. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma, labyrinthine hemorrhage, IAC metastasis, and a ruptured dermoid cyst were each observed in 1 patient.The most commonly observed MRI abnormality in patients with SSNHL was vestibular schwannoma, and all of the lesions were small or medium-sized tumors involving the IAC.

  10. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI.

  11. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  12. CUSTOM-FIT RADIOLUCENT CRANIAL IMPLANTS FOR NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL RECORDING AND STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, Grant H; Bichot, Narcisse P; Ghadooshahy, Azriel; Sharma, Jitendra; Kornblith, Simon; Philcock, Michael; Desimone, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Recording and manipulating neural activity in awake behaving animal models requires long-term implantation of cranial implants that must address a variety of design considerations, which include preventing infection, minimizing tissue damage, mechanical strength of the implant, and MRI compatibility. New Method Here we address these issues by designing legless, custom-fit cranial implants using structural MRI-based reconstruction of the skull and that are made from carbon-reinforced PEEK. Results We report several novel custom-fit radiolucent implant designs, which include a legless recording chamber, a legless stimulation chamber, a multi-channel microdrive and a head post. The fit to the skull was excellent in all cases, with no visible gaps between the base of the implants and the skull. The wound margin was minimal in size and showed no sign of infection or skin recession. Comparison with Existing Methods Cranial implants used for neurophysiological investigation in awake behaving animals often employ methyl methacrylate (MMA) to serve as a bonding agent to secure the implant to the skull. Other designs rely on radially extending legs to secure the implant. Both of these methods have significant drawbacks. MMA is toxic to bone and frequently leads to infection while radially extending legs cause the skin to recede away from the implant, ultimately exposing bone and proliferating granulation tissue. Conclusions These radiolucent implants constitute a set of technologies suitable for reliable long-term recording, which minimize infection and tissue damage. PMID:25542350

  13. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant (Supprelin LA) is used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP; a condition causing children to enter puberty too soon, resulting in faster than normal bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls ...

  14. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  15. Endovascular Repair of a Perforation of the Vena Caval Wall Caused by the Retrieval of a Gunther Tulip Filter After Long-Term Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Hiroyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    Symptomatic penetration of the inferior vena cava (IVC) wall reportedly occurs in 0.3% of patients in whom a filter has been implanted, and it causes injury to the adjacent structures (Bogue et al. in Pediatr Radiol 39(10):1110-1113, 1; Brzezinski et al. in Burns 32(5):640-643, 2). We succeeded in the endovascular repair of perforation of the IVC wall occurring during the retrieval of a penetrated Gunther tulip vena cava filter (Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) after long-term implantation.

  16. Delayed low frequency hearing loss caused by cochlear implantation interventions via the round window but not cochleostomy.

    PubMed

    Rowe, David; Chambers, Scott; Hampson, Amy; Eastwood, Hayden; Campbell, Luke; O'Leary, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear implant recipients show improved speech perception and music appreciation when residual acoustic hearing is combined with the cochlear implant. However, up to one third of patients lose their pre-operative residual hearing weeks to months after implantation, for reasons that are not well understood. This study tested whether this "delayed" hearing loss was influenced by the route of electrode array insertion and/or position of the electrode array within scala tympani in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation. Five treatment groups were monitored over 12 weeks: (1) round window implant; (2) round window incised with no implant; (3) cochleostomy with medially-oriented implant; (4) cochleostomy with laterally-oriented implant; and (5) cochleostomy with no implant. Hearing was measured at selected time points by the auditory brainstem response. Cochlear condition was assessed histologically, with cochleae three-dimensionally reconstructed to plot electrode paths and estimate tissue response. Electrode array trajectories matched their intended paths. Arrays inserted via the round window were situated nearer to the basilar membrane and organ of Corti over the majority of their intrascalar path compared with arrays inserted via cochleostomy. Round window interventions exhibited delayed, low frequency hearing loss that was not seen after cochleostomy. This hearing loss appeared unrelated to the extent of tissue reaction or injury within scala tympani, although round window insertion was histologically the most traumatic mode of implantation. We speculate that delayed hearing loss was related not to the electrode position as postulated, but rather to the muscle graft used to seal the round window post-intervention, by altering cochlear mechanics via round window fibrosis.

  17. Immediate changes of bone density caused by the implantation of a femoral stem--a DEXA study. Ulf.Leichtle@med.uni-tuebingen.de.

    PubMed

    Leichtle, Ulf G; Leasure, Jeremi; Martini, Franz; Leichtle, Carmen I

    2011-01-01

    Considerable immediate periprosthetic bone density changes after implantation of femoral stems have been observed comparing DEXA measurements taken pre- and post-operatively. This is important in relation to the interpretation of DEXA studies. We analysed these density changes under standardised experimental conditions. Five human femora were implanted with a custom made femoral stem and ten femora with a standard cementless prosthesis. Densitometry was performed at various stages of implantation. Following rasping only slight density changes were noted (-2.7% to +0.7%). Comparing post-implantation and pre-operative measurements, all custom made stems with a proximal press-fit demonstrated clear increases in proximal periprosthetic bone density of +11% and +14%. In contrast, the standard prosthesis with a distal press-fit showed a loss of -5% and -2% in the proximal zones. Measurements following removal of the implants demonstrated hardly any density changes (0% to -4%) compared to the pre-operative measurements. We concluded that compacting of trabecular bone or bone loss due to rasping are not the main causes of density changes. Substantial measuring errors exist. For examination of periprosthetic bone density changes, pre-operative initial measurements should not be used as a baseline for comparison. Studies should commence with an immediate postoperative measurement.

  18. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  19. Adhesive arachnoiditis causing cauda equina syndrome in ankylosing spondylitis: CT and MRI demonstration of dural calcification and a dorsal dural diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, I G; Yunten, N; Ustun, E E; Oksel, F; Gumusdis, G

    1999-07-01

    We present the radiological features of a 42-year-old man with long-standing inactive ankylosing spondylitis (AS), demonstrating that arachnoiditis is a cause of a cauda equina syndrome (CES) in this disease. CT showed a dorsal arachnoid diverticulum causing scalloped erosion of the laminae, and punctate and curvilinear dural calcification. MRI revealed adhesion and convergence of the cauda equina dorsally into the arachnoid pouch, causing the dural sac to appear empty canal. To the best of our knowledge, dural calcification on CT is a new finding in AS, which may be related to the CES. Our findings support the hypothesis that chronic adhesive arachnoiditis with subsequent loss of meningeal elasticity may be the main cause of CES in AS.

  20. A Case of Ovarian Pregnancy Diagnosed by MRI.

    PubMed

    Io, Shingo; Hasegawa, Masaaki; Koyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy, causing a great diagnostic challenge. We report a case of ovarian pregnancy in a 42-year-old woman, in whom MRI successfully demonstrated the implantation in the ovary. Transvaginal ultrasonography showed an echogenic mass in the right ovary but failed to demonstrate tubal pregnancy. T2-weighted MR images disclosed a gestational sac structure in the right ovary, which exhibited heterogeneous high intensity intermingled with punctate foci of distinct low intensity. MRI may be a useful tool for diagnosing ovarian pregnancy, by demonstrating a gestational sac in the ovary.

  1. SU-E-J-205: Dose Distribution Differences Caused by System Related Geometric Distortion in MRI-Guided Radiation Treatment System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, J; Wen, Z; Marshall, S; Court, L; Ibbott, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has superb soft tissue contrast but is also known for geometric distortions. The concerns and uncertainty about MRI’s geometric distortion have contributed to the hesitation of using only MRI for simulation in radiation therapy. There are two major categories of geometric distortion in MRI; system related and patient related. In this presentation, we studied the impact of system-related geometric distortion on dose distribution in a digital body phantom under an MR-Linac environment. Methods: Residual geometric distortion (after built-in geometric correction) was modeled based on phantom measurements of the system-related geometric distortions of a MRI scanner of a combined MR guided Radiation Therapy (MRgRT) system. A digital oval shaped phantom (40×25 cm) as well as one ellipsoid shaped tumor volume was created to simulate a simplified human body. The simulated tumor volume was positioned at several locations between the isocenter and the body surface. CT numbers in HUs that approximate soft tissue and tumor were assigned to the respective regions in the digital phantom. To study the effect of geometric distortion caused by system imperfections, an IMRT plan was optimized with the distorted image set with the B field. Dose distributions were re-calculated on the undistorted image set with the B field (as in MR-Linac). Results: The maximum discrepancies in both body contour and tumor boundary was less than 2 mm, which leads to small dose distribution change. For the target in the center, coverage was reduced from 98.8% (with distortion) to 98.2%; for the other peripheral target coverage was reduced from 98.4% to 95.9%. Conclusion: System related geometric distortions over the 40×25 area were within 2mm and the resulted dosimetric effects were minor for the two tumor locations in the phantom. Patient study will be needed for further investigation. The authors received a corporate research grant from Elekta.

  2. A Novel Brain Stimulation Technology Provides Compatibility with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Serano, Peter; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Katnani, Husam; Eskandar, Emad; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical electrical stimulation systems — such as pacemakers and deep brain stimulators (DBS) — are an increasingly common therapeutic option to treat a large range of medical conditions. Despite their remarkable success, one of the significant limitations of these medical devices is the limited compatibility with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a standard diagnostic tool in medicine. During an MRI exam, the leads used with these devices, implanted in the body of the patient, act as an electric antenna potentially causing a large amount of energy to be absorbed in the tissue, which can lead to serious heat-related injury. This study presents a novel lead design that reduces the antenna effect and allows for decreased tissue heating during MRI. The optimal parameters of the wire design were determined by a combination of computational modeling and experimental measurements. The results of these simulations were used to build a prototype, which was tested in a gel phantom during an MRI scan. Measurement results showed a three-fold decrease in heating when compared to a commercially available DBS lead. Accordingly, the proposed design may allow a significantly increased number of patients with medical implants to have safe access to the diagnostic benefits of MRI. PMID:25924189

  3. Sodium MRI.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Sodium ((23)Na) imaging has a place somewhere between (1)H-MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Like MRS it potentially provides information on metabolic processes, but only one single resonance of ionic (23)Na is observed. Therefore pulse sequences do not need to code for a chemical shift dimension, allowing (23)Na images to be obtained at high resolutions as compared to MRS. In this chapter the biological significance of sodium in the brain will be discussed, as well as methods for observing it with (23)Na-MRI. Many vital cellular processes and interactions in excitable tissues depend on the maintenance of a low intracellular and high extracellular sodium concentration. Healthy cells maintain this concentration gradient at the cost of energy. Leaky cell membranes or an impaired energy metabolism immediately leads to an increase in cytosolic total tissue sodium. This makes sodium a biomarker for ischemia, cancer, excessive tissue activation, or tissue damage as might be caused by ablation therapy. Special techniques allow quantification of tissue sodium for the monitoring of disease or therapy in longitudinal studies or preferential observation of the intracellular component of the tissue sodium. New methods and high-field magnet technology provide new opportunities for (23)Na-MRI in clinical and biomedical research.

  4. Quinolinic acid released from polymeric brain implants causes behavioral and neuroanatomical alterations in a rodent model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Haik, K L; Shear, D A; Schroeder, U; Sabel, B A; Dunbar, G L

    2000-06-01

    Quinolinic acid (QA) is an N-methyl-d-aspartate agonist that has been shown to produce neurotoxic effects that mimic certain neurodegenerative diseases when administered to laboratory animals. Intrastriatal injections of QA in rats have been used extensively to produce some of the neuropathological and behavioral deficits that are analogous to Huntington's disease (HD). However, acute intrastriatal injections of QA produce symptoms that are not analogous to the progressive nature of HD. Thus far, models using chronic administration of QA that produce HD-like behavioral and neuroanatomical changes have necessitated the use of a relatively bulky and fragile microdialytic pump apparatus. The present study tested an alternative way of chronically administering QA. Specifically, this study tested whether gradual release of QA from ethylene vinylacetate (EVA) polymers could produce symptoms analogous to HD. Rats received either no implants or bilateral intrastriatal implants of polymers with or without QA. Subsequent tests for spontaneous motor activity (SMA), grip strength, balance, and learning ability in a radial-arm-water-maze task revealed QA-induced impairments in balance and learning ability, but did not affect grip strength or SMA. Histological analysis revealed QA-induced enlargement of lateral ventricles, striatal atrophy, and striatal neuronal loss, with relative sparing of NADPH-diaphorase-positive neurons. These results suggest that QA released from polymers can produce behavioral and neuropathological profiles analogous to early stages of HD and that EVA polymers offer a useful means of chronically delivering QA in rodent models of neurodegeneration.

  5. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  6. Evaluation and analysis of graft hypertrophy by means of arthroscopy, biochemical MRI and osteochondral biopsies in a patient following autologous chondrocyte implantation for treatment of a full-thickness-cartilage defect of the knee.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Uhl, Markus; Salzmann, Gian M; Morscheid, Yannik P; Südkamp, Norbert P; Madry, Henning

    2015-06-01

    Graft hypertrophy represents a characteristic complication following autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for treatment of cartilage defects. Although some epidemiological data suggest that incidence is associated with first-generation ACI using autologous chondrocyte implantation, it has also been reported in other technical modifications of ACI using different biomaterials. Nevertheless, it has not been described in autologous, non-periosteum, implant-free associated ACI. In addition, little is known about histological and T2-relaxation appearance of graft hypertrophy. The present case report provides a rare case of extensive graft hypertrophy following ACI using an autologous spheres technique with clinical progression over time. Detailed clinical, MR tomographic and histological evaluation has been performed, which demonstrates a high quality of repair tissue within the hypertrophic as well as non-hypertrophic transplanted areas of the repair tissue. No expression of collagen type X (a sign of chondrocyte hypertrophy), only slight changes of the subchondral bone and a nearly normal cell-matrix ratio suggest that tissue within the hypertrophic area does not significantly differ from intact and high-quality repair tissue and therefore seems not to cause graft hypertrophy. This is in contrast to the assumption that histological hypertrophy might cause or contribute to an overwhelming growth of the repair tissue within the transplantation site. Data presented in this manuscript might contribute to further explain the etiology of graft hypertrophy following ACI.

  7. Outcome of penile prosthesis implantation: are malleable prostheses an appropriate treatment option in patients with erectile dysfunction caused by prior radical surgery?

    PubMed

    Sevinc, Cuneyd; Ozkaptan, Orkunt; Balaban, Muhsin; Yucetas, Ugur; Karadeniz, Tahir

    2016-04-26

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcome of penile prosthesis implantation in patients with various comorbidities as a cause of erectile dysfunction (ED). The data of 181 patients who underwent surgery between 1998 and 2012 in two centers were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 52.2 years (range: 31-71 years). The study group contained 162 patients (89.5%) with malleable prostheses and 19 (10.5%) with inflatable implants. All patients were re-evaluated 1 month later to assess prosthesis function and complications, and further re-examinations were performed if needed. Satisfaction was defined as having satisfactory intercourse and happiness with the device in general. The follow-up period was at least 12 months for each patient. The postoperative complication rate was 32% (n = 58). The number of complications with inflatable and malleable prostheses was 7 (3.9%) and 51 (28.1%), respectively. Overall, 21 prostheses (11.6%) had to be removed because of various complications and patient dissatisfaction. Patients with prior radical surgery had higher extraction rates (ƛ = 14.606, P < 0.05, Chi-square test). The main reasons for removal were erosion (n = 11; 6.1%) and infection (n = 3; 2.1%). With respect to satisfaction during intercourse, we found that 104 (57.5%) patients described themselves as very satisfied with the prosthesis, while 21 (11.6%) were unsatisfied. The high explantation rate in patients with prior surgery was remarkable in our study. Our results revealed that a malleable prosthesis should not be the preferred type of implant for patients with prior surgery.

  8. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  9. Case report and brief review of literature on sonographic detection of accidentally implanted wooden foreign body causing persistent sinus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in imaging techniques, the detection of vegetative foreign bodies in soft tissues remains a difficult and sometimes even a challenging task. Clinical evaluation of such patient may present several months or even years after the initial injury and clinician may fail to elicit an antecedent skin puncture. X-ray examination will miss radiolucent foreign bodies. A 15-year-old boy presented with a draining non-healing sinus at the lateral aspect of his right thigh for 9 months. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography was ordered after ruling out chronic osteomyelitis to detect possible lesions around the thigh. High-frequency linear ultrasonic probe readily detected an elongated foreign body within the vastus lateralis muscle. A long piece of wood was confirmed at surgery. Non-healing sinus with normal finding in radiograph following old trauma should raise the suspicion of implanted radiolucent foreign body/bodies. The role of diagnostic ultrasound as a valuable screening tool for the detection of foreign body is briefly reviewed. PMID:22871025

  10. Temporal bone histopathology in a case of sensorineural hearing loss caused by superficial siderosis of the central nervous system and treated by cochlear implantation

    PubMed Central

    Nadol, Joseph B.; Adams, Joe C.; O'Malley, Jennifer T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the histopathology of the temporal bones of a patient with documented superficial siderosis of the central nervous system who underwent right cochlear implantation six years before death. Background Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system is due to chronic or repeated subarachnoid hemorrhage and results in sensorineural deafness in 95% of affected individuals in addition to other neurologic findings. The deposition of hemosiderin in the meninges and around cranial nerves is thought to be causative. There have been no previous reports of temporal bone pathology in this disorder. This 57 year old man developed progressive, bilateral hearing loss starting in his 30's with loss of pure tone thresholds and word recognition. He underwent a right cochlear implant at age 51 with full insertion of the device. Methods The temporal bones and brainstem were fixed in formalin and prepared for histologic study by standard techniques. Special stains, including Gomori stain for iron were performed on sections of the temporal bones and cochlear nucleus. Results There was severe bilateral degeneration of the organ of Corti, spiral ligament, stria vascularis, and spiral ganglion cells. Gomori stain revealed iron deposits within the spiral ligament, stria vascularis and in the subepithelial mesenchymal tissue of the maculae of the vestibular system. Evaluation of the cochlear nucleus revealed iron deposits within glial cells and larger cells, probably macrophages, near the CSF surface. On the right side, the track created by the cochlear implant entered the scala tympani and continued to mm17, as measured from the round window. Discussion and Conclusions This is the first known case of superficial siderosis with documented temporal bone histopathology. Hearing loss was likely caused by severe degeneration of spiral ganglion cells in both ears, despite the presence of remaining hair cells in the middle and apical turns. This was consistent with

  11. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age.

  12. Cochlear implantation in superficial siderosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong-Sun; Song, Jae-Jun; Park, Min-Hyun; Kim, Young Ho; Koo, Ja-Won

    2006-08-01

    Superficial siderosis (SS) of the central nervous system has been thought to be a rare condition that generates progressive hearing loss, ataxia, pyramidal signs, and dementia. The main cause of hearing loss by SS is thought to be neuronal. Because there is no histopathologic report of the human temporal bone in SS, there is a debate about the possibility of cochlear involvement. We present a 25-year-old man who was investigated for bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular failure after head trauma. On brain MRI, SS of the central nervous system was detected. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed no response on both sides. However, integrity of the eighth nerve was proved by the electrical ABR test on the right side and the patient benefited significantly from cochlear implantation. The sensorineural hearing loss in SS seems to be related to cochlear damage as well as neuronal damage. So, cochlear implantation would be a hearing rehabilitation modality for the sensorineural hearing loss caused by SS.

  13. Meta-Analysis of the Relation of Ventricular Arrhythmias to All-Cause Mortality After Implantation of a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Makki, Nader; Mesubi, Olurotimi; Steyers, Curtis; Olshansky, Brian; Abraham, William T

    2015-11-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) are commonly reported after implantation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). Their relation to all-cause mortality and potential risk factors remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies with the primary objective of evaluating the association of post-LVAD VAs with all-cause mortality at 60, 120, and 180 days. The secondary end point was the association of potential risk factors (cause of cardiomyopathy, indication for LVAD, and history of VA) with mortality in patients with post-LVAD VAs. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central from 2001 to 2015. Two reviewers independently searched, selected, and assessed quality of included studies with differences resolved by consensus. Data were collected and analyzed using random- and fixed-effect model, as appropriate, with inverse-variance weighting. Of 2,393 studies identified, 9 observational studies were eligible including 1,179 patients with a mean follow-up of 220 days. Post-LVAD VAs were associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality after adjusting for competing risk factors at 60 days (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18 to 3.11, p = 0.001), 120 days (adjusted OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.01 to 3.85, p = 0.05), and 180 days (adjusted OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 4.15, p = 0.05). Using meta-regression analysis, it was found that only history of VA was a risk factor for mortality after LVAD implantation. In conclusion, post-LVAD VA is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality with pre-LVAD VAs acting as a risk factor. This meta-analysis, despite being only hypothesis generating, sets the stage for prospective collection of VA information in a prospective device trial or in the Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support.

  14. Assessing Timing and Causes of Neonatal Lamb Losses in a Bighorn Sheep Ovis canadensis canadensis Herd via Use of Vaginal Implant Transmitters.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Jamin L; Wolfe, Lisa L; Fox, Karen A; Killion, Halcyon J; Jennings-Gaines, Jessica; Miller, Michael W; P Dreher, Brian

    2017-02-13

    We evaluated the use of vaginal implant transmitters (VITs) as a means of detecting, capturing, and radio collaring Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep ( Ovis canadensis canadensis) lambs to estimate survival and to facilitate carcass recovery to assess causes of mortality. We focused on one of several bighorn herds in Colorado, USA, suffering from depressed recruitment that was not preceded by a classic all-age die-off. We captured, radio-collared, diagnosed pregnancy by ultrasound examination, and inserted VITs into 15 pregnant ewes from a herd residing near Granite, Colorado. We were subsequently able to collar a lamb from each of 13 VITs, and two additional lambs opportunistically from ewes without transmitters. As lambs died, we recovered and submitted carcasses for necropsy and laboratory assessment. All lambs captured and one additional lamb (carcass found opportunistically) were dead by about 130 d of age: 11 died of apparent pneumonia (all within 8-10 wk of age), one died from trauma after being kicked or trampled, one was killed by a mountain lion ( Puma concolor ), and three died of starvation likely caused by abandonment after capture. Pneumonic lambs had involvement of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and leukotoxigenic Bibersteinia trehalosi . The use of VITs and lamb collars enabled us to efficiently identify pneumonia as the predominant cause of depressed lamb recruitment in this herd; however, we urge care in neonatal lamb handling to minimize abandonment.

  15. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  16. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  17. The silicone breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Guerette, P H

    1995-02-01

    Feminists call it objectification. Consumer advocates call it victimization. Medical personnel call it augmentation. Women, implantation. Whatever the term, media hype and the increasing number of lawsuits against U.S. manufacturers of silicone breast implants has caused widespread concern among women and raised serious questions about the long term health risks and safety of breast implant devices.

  18. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  19. Heterotopic ossification associated with myelopathy following cervical disc prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2016-04-01

    This case report presents a 37-year-old man with clinical signs of myelopathy almost 9 years after implantation of a Bryan disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) for C5/C6 soft disc herniation. As demonstrated on MRI and CT scan, spinal cord compression was caused by bony spurs due to heterotopic ossification posterior to the still moving prosthesis. The device, as well as the ectopic bone deposits, had to be removed because of myelopathy and its imminent aggravation. Conversion to anterior spondylodesis was performed.

  20. Evaluation of 39 medical implants at 7.0 T

    PubMed Central

    Feng, David X; McCauley, Joseph P; Morgan–Curtis, Fea K; Salam, Redoan A; Pennell, David R; Loveless, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: With increased signal to noise ratios, 7.0-T MRI has the potential to contribute unique information regarding anatomy and pathophysiology of a disease. However, concerns for the safety of subjects with metallic medical implants have hindered advancement in this field. The purpose of the present research was to evaluate the MRI safety for 39 commonly used medical implants at 7.0 T. Methods: Selected metallic implants were tested for magnetic field interactions, radiofrequency-induced heating and artefacts using standardized testing techniques. Results: 5 of the 39 implants tested may be unsafe for subjects undergoing MRI at 7.0 T. Conclusion: Implants were deemed either “MR Conditional” or “MR Unsafe” for the 7.0-T MRI environment. Further research is needed to expand the existing database categorizing implants that are acceptable for patients referred for MRI examinations at 7.0 T. Advances in knowledge: Lack of MRI testing for common metallic medical implants limits the translational potential of 7.0-T MRI. For safety reasons, patients with metallic implants are not allowed to undergo a 7.0-T MRI scan, precluding part of the population that can benefit from the detailed resolution of ultra-high-field MRIs. This investigation provides necessary MRI testing of common medical implants at 7.0 T. PMID:26481696

  1. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Safety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, You Mi; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Minsu; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) have become recently available, non-MRI conditional devices and the presence of epicardial and abandoned leads remain a contraindication for MRIs. Subjects and Methods This was a single center retrospective study, evaluating the clinical outcomes and device parameter changes in patients with CIEDs who underwent an MRI from June 1992 to March 2015. Clinical and device related information was acquired by a thorough chart review. Results A total of 40 patients, 38 with a pacemaker (including epicardially located pacemaker leads) and 2 with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, underwent 50 MRI examinations. Among the patients, 11 had MRI conditional CIEDs, while the remaining had non-MRI conditional devices. Among these patients, 23 patients had traditional contraindications for an MRI: (1) nonfunctional leads (n=1, 2.5%), (2) epicardially located leads (n=9, 22.5%), (3) scanning area in proximity to a device (n=9, 22.5%), (4) devices implanted within 6 weeks (n=2, 5%), and (5) MRI field strength at 3.0 Tesla (n=6, 15%). All patients underwent a satisfactory MRI examination with no adverse events during or after the procedure. There were no significant changes in parameters or malfunctioning devices in any patients with CIEDs. Conclusion Under careful monitoring, MRI is safe to perform on patients with non-MRI conditional CIEDs, remnant leads, and epicardially located leads, as well as MRI-conditional devices. PMID:27826339

  2. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  3. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  4. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... are better able to hear, comprehend sound and music, and speak than their peers who receive implants ...

  5. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  6. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  7. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  8. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the shoulder uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  9. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation. Instead, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, rapidly changing magnetic fields, and a computer to ... in most of the body's tissues. The applied radio waves then cause these protons to produce signals that ...

  11. MRI renaissance.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S

    1997-12-01

    A few years ago, magnetic resonance imaging was healthcare's version of a foreign sports car-flashy, expensive and impractical. Now, after years in the doldrums, sales of MRI systems are roaring back. An aging fleet of MRI scanners due for replacement and a hearty increase in doctors' use of the versatile imaging tools are combining to fuel the surge in demand, vendors and customers say.

  12. Cardiac MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Defects Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Heart Failure Heart Valve Disease Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... Disease Echocardiography Heart Attack Heart Failure Heart Palpitations Heart Valve Disease Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Pacemaker Pericarditis Stress Testing Rate ...

  13. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Aneurysm Chest CT Scan Chest X Ray Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders Pulmonary Hypertension Send a ... X Ray Clinical Trials Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators Pacemaker Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders Pulmonary Hypertension Rate This ...

  14. Linguine sign in musculoskeletal imaging: calf silicone implant rupture.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Dennis; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth E; Walker, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    Imaging findings of breast silicone implant rupture are well described in the literature. On MRI, the linguine sign indicates intracapsular rupture, while the presence of silicone particles outside the fibrous capsule indicates extracapsular rupture. The linguine sign is described as the thin, wavy hypodense wall of the implant within the hyperintense silicone on T2-weighted images indicative of rupture of the implant within the naturally formed fibrous capsule. Hyperintense T2 signal outside of the fibrous capsule is indicative of an extracapsular rupture with silicone granuloma formation. We present a rare case of a patient with a silicone calf implant rupture and discuss the MRI findings associated with this condition.

  15. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  16. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  17. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  18. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications. PMID:27879873

  19. Endodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Tikku, A. P.; Chandra, Anil; Wadhwani, K. K.; Ashutosh kr; Singh, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic implants were introduced back in 1960. Endodontic implants enjoyed few successes and many failures. Various reasons for failures include improper case selection, improper use of materials and sealers and poor preparation for implants. Proper case selection had given remarkable long-term success. Two different cases are being presented here, which have been treated successfully with endodontic implants and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (Andreaus, Brazil), an MTA based sealer. We suggest that carefully selected cases can give a higher success rate and this method should be considered as one of the treatment modalities. PMID:25298723

  20. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... sale in the United States: saline-filled and silicone gel-filled. Both types have a silicone outer shell. They vary in size, shell thickness, ... implant them. Provide information on saline-filled and silicone gel-filled breast implants, including data supporting a ...

  1. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, H; Keshvari, J; Lappalainen, R

    2007-03-07

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg(-1)) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  2. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, H.; Keshvari, J.; Lappalainen, R.

    2007-03-01

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg-1) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  3. Battlefield MRI

    DOE PAGES

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  4. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board

    PubMed Central

    Seckler, Tobias; Jagielski, Kai; Stunder, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine-bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi-A13-Board) in two operating modes “power transfer” and “pinging”. With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi-A13-Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi-A13-Board exceed the performance limits. PMID:26024360

  5. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  6. WE-B-BRD-00: MRI for Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  7. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration in the presurgical evaluation of refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Donaire, A; Serès, E; Setoain, X; Bargalló, N; Falcón, C; Sanmartí, F; Maestro, I; Rumià, J; Pintor, L; Boget, T; Aparicio, J; Carreño, M

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the usefulness of coregistration of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (PET/MRI) and of coregistration of PET/MRI with subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) (PET/MRI/SISCOM) in localizing the potential epileptogenic zone in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. We prospectively included 35 consecutive patients with refractory focal epilepsy whose presurgical evaluation included a PET study. Separately acquired PET and structural MRI images were coregistered for each patient. When possible, ictal SPECT and SISCOM were obtained and coregistered with PET/MRI. The potential location of the epileptogenic zone determined by neuroimaging was compared with the seizure onset zone determined by long-term video-EEG monitoring and with invasive EEG studies in patients who were implanted. Structural MRI showed no lesions in 15 patients. In these patients, PET/MRI coregistration showed a hypometabolic area in 12 (80%) patients that was concordant with seizure onset zone on EEG in 9. In 7 patients without MRI lesions, PET/MRI detected a hypometabolism that was undetected on PET alone. SISCOM, obtained in 25 patients, showed an area of hyperperfusion concordant with the seizure onset zone on EEG in 7 (58%) of the 12 of these patients who had normal MRI findings. SISCOM hyperperfusion was less extensive than PET hypometabolism. A total of 19 patients underwent surgery; 11 of these underwent invasive-EEG monitoring and the seizure onset zone was concordant with PET/MRI in all cases. PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration, performed in 4 of these patients, was concordant in 3 (75%). After epilepsy surgery, 13 (68%) patients are seizure-free after a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration are useful for determining the potential epileptogenic zone and thus for planning invasive EEG studies and surgery more precisely, especially in

  8. Arteriovenous fistula complication following MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Danielle; Junglee, Naushad; Mullins, Paul; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Health professionals should be aware of medical procedures that cause vascular access complications. This case describes a haemodialysis patient who experienced pain, swelling and bruising over a radiocephalic fistula following MRI. Exactly the same signs and symptoms were evident following a second scan performed 3 months later. Plausible explanations include a radio frequency-induced electrical current being formed at the arteriovenous fistula, or varying gradients of the MRI sequence stimulating peripheral nerves, leading to a site of increased tissue stimulation. Of note, a juxta-anastomotic venous stenosis was confirmed by fistulogram 4 days after the second scan, although whether this access failure was due to the MRI scan per se could not be ascertained. Nevertheless, these previously undocumented observations suggest that careful patient and fistula monitoring is required when completing MRI scans in those with an arteriovenous fistula. PMID:22927271

  9. Penile Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... placed inside the penis to allow men with erectile dysfunction (ED) to get an erection. Penile implants are ... complications and follow-up care. For most men, erectile dysfunction can be successfully treated with medications or use ...

  10. QUANTIFICATION OF LOCAL HEMODYNAMIC ALTERATIONS CAUSED BY VIRTUAL IMPLANTATION OF THREE COMMERCIALLY-AVAILABLE STENTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF AORTIC COARCTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sung; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.; Dholakia, Ronak J.; LaDisa, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with coarctation of the aorta (CoA) are prone to morbidity including atherosclerotic plaque that has been shown to correlate with altered wall shear stress (WSS) in the descending thoracic aorta (dAo). We created the first patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a CoA patient treated by Palmaz stenting to date, and compared resulting WSS distributions to those from virtual implantation of GenesisXD and modified NumedCP stents also commonly used for CoA. CFD models were created from magnetic resonance imaging, fluoroscopy and blood pressure (BP) data. Simulations incorporated vessel deformation, downstream vascular resistance and compliance to match measured data and generate blood flow velocity and time-averaged WSS (TAWSS) results. TAWSS was quantified longitudinally and circumferentially in the stented region and dAo. While modest differences were seen in the distal portion of the stented region, marked differences were observed downstream along the posterior dAo and depended on stent type. The GenesisXD model had the least area of TAWSS values exceeding the threshold for platelet aggregation in vitro, followed by the Palmaz and NumedCP stents. Alterations in local blood flow patterns and WSS imparted on the dAo appear to depend on the type of stent implanted for CoA. Following confirmation in larger studies, these findings may aid pediatric interventional cardiologists in selecting the most appropriate stent for each patient, and ultimately reduce long-term morbidity following treatment for CoA by stenting. PMID:24259013

  11. Cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sarah S; Balkany, Thomas J

    2006-08-01

    Cochlear implants are cost-effective auditory prostheses that safely provide a high-quality sensation of hearing to adults who are severely or profoundly deaf. In the past 5 years, progress has been made in hardware and software design, candidate selection, surgical techniques, device programming, education and rehabilitation,and, most importantly, outcomes. Cochlear implantation in the elderly is well tolerated and provides marked improvement in auditory performance and psychosocial functioning.

  12. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  13. Ectopic cervical thymus as a rare cause of pediatric neck mass: the role of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Alper; Akdur, Pinar Ozdemır; Celebi, Irfan; Karasu, Rabia; Yilmaz, Banu; Basak, Muzaffer

    2015-06-01

    Ectopic cervical thymus (ECT) is an uncommon cause for cervical mass in the pediatric age group. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings of the mass (located along the thymic descent pathway along the thymopharyngeal tract and has identical echostructure and signal intensities to the native thymus in the superior mediastinum) would lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by fine needle aspiration biopsy or histopathology after resection. The management of ECT is a conservative follow up, except in symptomatic cases with tracheal compression and histologically confirmed neoplasia where surgery is indicated. We present the case of ECT presenting as a left upper neck mass in a 12 year old girl.

  14. Implant fractures: Rare but not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kuntcham, Rupa Sruthi; Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of dentures aided with implants has become a preferred treatment option for rehabilitation of completely and partially edentulous patients when durability is concerned. Simulation to natural teeth in terms of esthetics and to a greater extent in function can be considered as key elements in the raise of implant dentistry worldwide. Despite its high success rate, therapy with osseointegrated dental implants is not free of complications. Implant failure can occur for other reasons, with implant fracture being one of the major reasons for late failure. Although the incidence of implant fractures may be low, it invariably effects the patient and also clinician. Thus, sound evidence based knowledge of cause of fracture is mandatory for that careful treatment that can reduce the incidence of fracture helping in a better treatment plan. The aim of this review is to enlighten the various causes of implant fracture. PMID:27041830

  15. Safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Sarantitis, Ioannis; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices is sometimes a risky procedure. Thus MRI in these patients should be performed when it is the only examination able to help with the diagnosis. Moreover the diagnostic benefit must outweigh the risks. Coronary artery stents, prosthetic cardiac valves, metal sternal sutures, mediastinal vascular clips, and epicardial pacing wires are not contraindications for MRI, in contrast to pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Appropriate patient selection and precautions ensure MRI safety. However it is commonly accepted that although hundreds of patients with pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators have undergone safe MRI scanning, it is not a safe procedure. Currently, heating of the pacemaker lead is the major problem undermining MRI safety. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there are currently neither "MRI-safe" nor "MRI-compatible" pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. In this article we review the international literature in regard to safety during MRI of patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices.

  16. MRI analyses show that kinesio taping affects much more than just the targeted superficial tissues and causes heterogeneous deformations within the whole limb.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Uluç; Yucesoy, Can A

    2015-12-16

    Kinesio taping (KT) is widely used in the treatment of sports injuries and various neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. However, it is considered as selectively effective on targeted tissues and its mechanical effects have not been quantified objectively. Ascribed to continuity of muscular and connective tissues, mechanical loading imposed can have widespread heterogeneous effects. The aim was to characterize the mechanical effects of KT objectively and to test the hypotheses that KT causes acutely, local deformations not necessarily (I) in agreement with tape adhering direction and (II) limited to the directly targeted tissues. High-resolution 3D magnetic resonance image sets were acquired in healthy human subjects (n=5) prior to and acutely after KT application over the skin along m. tibialis anterior (TA). Hip, knee and ankle angles were kept constant. Demons image registration algorithm was used to calculate local tissue deformations within the lower leg, in vivo. Mean peak tissue strains were significantly higher than strain artifacts. Only KT-to-TA region in part shows local deformations in agreement with tape adhering direction whereas, superficial skin, the rest of KT-to-TA and TA regions show deformations (up to 51.5% length change) in other directions. Non-targeted tissues also show sizable heterogeneous deformations, but in smaller amplitudes. Inter-subject variability is notable. Magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for a detailed assessment of local tissue deformation occurring acutely after KT application. The findings confirm our hypotheses and characterize how KT affects the underlying tissues, both immediately targeted and distant. This allows revealing mechanisms that can affect clinical outcomes of KT objectively.

  17. Behaviour of implantable coronary stents during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Matthias G; Strohm, Oliver; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Gross, Werner; Wagner, Anja; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Liu, Xiaomeng; Hamm, Bernd

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) becomes more and more a routine diagnostic tool in clinical cardiology. In patients undergoing MRI, metallic implants may be harmful by motion or heating under certain circumstances. Many cardiac patients have implanted intracoronary stents. However, the safety of these metallic implants and especially their temperature behaviour during MRI has not been sufficiently tested. METHODS: This study investigated motion and temperature changes of 14 different stents for intracoronary application in two clinical scanners at field strengths of 1.0 and 1.5 T. At 1.5 T these studies were repeated after implantation of the stents into the coronary arteries of excised porcine hearts. Furthermore, the clinical status of 33 patients was assessed after a cardiac MR study and compared with a group of 33 patients matched for age, sex and risk factors for restenosis. RESULTS: No visible motion of the stents was observed. Furthermore, using a highly sensitive infrared camera any significant heating of the stents during MRI could be excluded. The rate of clinical events was not different in patients after MRI as compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that MRI is safe in patients with the currently available intracoronary stents.

  18. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  19. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  20. Hip Implant Modified To Increase Probability Of Retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canabal, Francisco, III

    1995-01-01

    Modification in design of hip implant proposed to increase likelihood of retention of implant in femur after hip-repair surgery. Decreases likelihood of patient distress and expense associated with repetition of surgery after failed implant procedure. Intended to provide more favorable flow of cement used to bind implant in proximal extreme end of femur, reducing structural flaws causing early failure of implant/femur joint.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause a problem near a strong magnetic field. Electronic devices aren't permitted in the MRI room. ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  2. Safety of Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Implantation of Stainless Steel Embolization Coils.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Timothy C; Schreier, Jenna; Soriano, Brian D; Kutty, Shelby; Nutting, Arni C; Kim, Dennis W; Powell, Andrew J; Valente, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Stainless steel embolization coils (SSEC) have been used for over four decades for vascular occlusion. Recently, the safety of these coils in a magnetic resonance environment has been called into question, with important ramifications for thousands of patients with existing coils in place. We performed a retrospective chart review at five tertiary care pediatric centers evaluating all children and young adults with implanted SSEC who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data reviewed included demographics, coil implantation, MRI studies, and follow-up evaluations. Complications such as heating, discomfort, or device migration were specifically sought. Two hundred and ninety-seven patients with implanted SSEC underwent 539 MRI examinations. The median age at SSEC implantation was 2.3 years (1 week-23.2 years). The MRI studies were performed a median of 7.4 years (4 days-23.1 years) after implantation. No patients experienced any reported complications associated with their MRI examinations during the study or at median follow-up post-MRI of 4.8 years (1 day-23 years). In this large, retrospective review of patients with implanted SSEC undergoing MRI, there were no reported adverse events. These findings support the recent change by Cook Medical Inc. of their standard embolization coils from a designation of magnetic resonance unsafe to conditional.

  3. Determinants of all-cause mortality in different age groups in patients with severe systolic left ventricular dysfunction receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (from the Italian ClinicalService Multicenter Observational Project).

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Gasparini, Maurizio; Landolina, Maurizio; Lunati, Maurizio; Boriani, Giuseppe; Proclemer, Alessandro; Santini, Massimo; Mangoni, Lorenza; Padeletti, Margherita; Marchionni, Niccolò; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common condition in elderly patients. Despite great improvements in medical therapy, HF mortality remains high. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) significantly lengthens the survival rate of subjects with severe HF, but little evidence exists on its effect in elderly persons. Aim of this study was to compare the age-related determinants of prognosis in a large population of patients with ICD. We divided all patients who underwent an ICD implantation in 117 Italian centers of the "ClinicalService Project" into 3 age groups (<65, 65 to 74, ≥ 75 years), and collected clinical and instrumental variables at baseline and during follow-up (median length: 27 months). Between 2004 and 2011, 6,311 patients were enrolled (5,174 men; left ventricular ejection fraction 29% ± 9%); 1,510 subjects were ≥ 75 years (23.9%; mean age 78 ± 3 years). The prevalence of co-morbidities increased with age. HF was most frequently due to coronary artery disease in the elderly, who also showed the worst New York Heart Association class. At multivariate analysis, older age, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic renal failure, diabetes, complex ventricular arrhythmias, and left ventricular ejection fraction were significant predictors of all-cause mortality. After adjustment, the hazard ratio(age group) for mortality was 22.6% less than at univariate analysis. When groups were analyzed separately, age alone predicted mortality in the oldest. In conclusion, a large proportion of our population was aged ≥ 75 years. Mortality was related to age and several co-morbidities, except for the oldest patients in whom age alone resulted predictive.

  4. An assessment of hazards caused by electromagnetic interaction on humans present near short-wave physiotherapeutic devices of various types including hazards for users of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMD).

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs) may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W) or general public (GP) members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons). Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators) were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users). Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated). Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both-GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment).

  5. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  6. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  7. Biomedical Imaging in Implantable Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haoyan; Hernandez, Christopher; Goss, Monika; Gawlik, Anna; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems (DDS) provide a platform for sustained release of therapeutic agents over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years. Such strategies are typically used clinically to increase patient compliance by replacing frequent administration of drugs such as contraceptives and hormones to maintain plasma concentration within the therapeutic window. Implantable or injectable systems have also been investigated as a means of local drug administration which favors high drug concentration at a site of interest, such as a tumor, while reducing systemic drug exposure to minimize unwanted side effects. Significant advances in the field of local DDS have led to increasingly sophisticated technology with new challenges including quantification of local and systemic pharmacokinetics and implant-body interactions. Because many of these sought-after parameters are highly dependent on the tissue properties at the implantation site, and rarely represented adequately with in vitro models, new nondestructive techniques that can be used to study implants in situ are highly desirable. Versatile imaging tools can meet this need and provide quantitative data on morphological and functional aspects of implantable systems. The focus of this review article is an overview of current biomedical imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and their application in evaluation of implantable DDS. PMID:25418857

  8. Stability, Visibility, and Histologic Analysis of a New Implanted Fiducial for Use as a Kilovoltage Radiographic or Radioactive Marker for Patient Positioning and Monitoring in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadter, David; Tune, Michal; Zaretsky, Asaph; Shofti, Rona; Kushnir, Arnon; Harel, Tami; Carmi-Yinon, Dafna; Corn, Ben M.S.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the stability, visibility, and histology of a novel implantable soft-tissue marker (nonradioactive and radioactive) implanted in dog prostate and rabbit liver. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 nonradioactive and 35 radioactive markers were implanted in 1 dog and 16 rabbits. Stability was assessed by measuring intermarker distance (IMD) variation relative to IMDs at implantation. The IMDs were measured weekly for 4 months in the dog and biweekly for 2-4 weeks in the rabbits. Ultrasound and X-ray imaging were performed on all subjects. Computed tomography and MRI were performed on the dog. Histologic analysis was performed on the rabbits after 2 or 4 months. Results: A total of 139 measurements had a mean ({+-} SD) absolute IMD variation of 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm. These IMD variations are consistent with those reported in the literature as due to random organ deformation. The markers were visible, identifiable, and induced minimal or no image artifacts in all tested imaging modalities. Histologic analysis revealed that all pathologic changes were highly localized and not expected to be clinically significant. Conclusions: The markers were stable from the time of implantation. The markers were found to be compatible with all common medical imaging modalities. The markers caused no significant histologic effects. With respect to marker stability, visibility, and histologic analysis these implanted fiducials are appropriate for soft-tissue target positioning in radiotherapy.

  9. Noninvasive management of cochlear implant's inner magnet displacement after magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, Walter; Giannantonio, Sara; Schinaia, Lorenzo; De Corso, Eugenio; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2013-03-01

    MRI is a widespread and greatly helpful diagnostic tool, yet its use on cochlear implant patients is restricted by the presence of an inner magnet. We report on a case of magnet dislodgment after 1.5T MRI in a 31-year-old female with a Hi-Res 90K cochlear implant. In this case, it was possible to implement an alternative, totally noninvasive approach based on an external manual repositioning rather than a surgical procedure of the displaced magnet.

  10. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  11. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  12. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20 to 40 minutes. top of page Contrast material For some MRI exams, a contrast material called gadolinium will need to be injected into a vein in the arm. While contrast material sometimes improves the MRI images, during pregnancy the ...

  13. [Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury: a study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings].

    PubMed

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerbral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with 15O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO2 between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO2 of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of "relative luxury perfusion". Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO2 between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO2 of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the normal group in the bilateral frontal, temporal, and occipital lobe. After

  14. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots with ... look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  15. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... devices available with different bearing surfaces. These are: Metal-on-Polyethylene: The ball is made of metal ...

  16. [Bruxism and overload of periodontium and implants].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; De Laat, A

    2000-07-01

    Bruxism is responsible for occlusal tooth wear but can not induce nor aggravate gingivitis or periodontitis. Bruxism induces jiggling forces, which cause a clinical tooth hypermobility, radiologically seen as a widened periodontal space. Although there is no direct causal relation between bruxism and implant failure, implant overload may lead to fractures of the components and bone loss.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  18. The Clinical Implications of Poly Implant Prothèse Breast Implants: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wazir, Umar; Kasem, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Mammary implants marketed by Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) were found to contain industrial grade silicone and this caused heightened anxiety and extensive publicity regarding their safety in humans. These implants were used in a large number of patients worldwide for augmentation or breast reconstruction. We reviewed articles identified by searches of Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases up to May 2014 using the terms: "PIP", "Poly Implant Prothèse", "breast implants" and "augmentation mammoplasty" "siloxanes" or "silicone". In addition the websites of regulating bodies in Europe, USA, and Australia were searched for reports related to PIP mammary implants. PIP mammary implants are more likely to rupture than other implants and can cause adverse effects in the short to the medium term related to the symptoms of rupture such as pain, lumps in the breast and axilla and anxiety. Based on peer-reviewed published studies we have calculated an overall rupture rate of 14.5% (383/2,635) for PIP implants. However, there is no evidence that PIP implant rupture causes long-term adverse health effects in humans so far. Silicone lymphadenopathy represents a foreign body reaction and should be treated conservatively. The long-term adverse effects usually arise from inappropriate extensive surgery, such as axillary lymph node dissection or extensive resection of breast tissue due to silicone leakage. PMID:25606483

  19. MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy.

    PubMed

    Gulko, Edwin; Collins, Lee K; Murphy, Robyn C; Thornhill, Beverly A; Taragin, Benjamin H

    2015-02-01

    In modern times scurvy is a rarely encountered disease caused by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) deficiency. However, sporadic cases of scurvy persist, particularly within the pediatric population. Recent individual case reports highlight an increased incidence of scurvy among patients with autism or developmental delay, with isolated case reports detailing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of scurvy in these pediatric populations. We present the MRI findings of scurvy in four patients with autism or developmental delay, and review the literature on MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Despite its rarity, the radiologist must consider scurvy in a pediatric patient with a restricted diet presenting with arthralgia or myalgia.

  20. Multimodal MRI of experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. Brain imaging data from experimental stroke models and stroke patients have shown that there is often a gradual progression of potentially reversible ischemic injury toward infarction. Reestablishing tissue perfusion and/or treating with neuroprotective drugs in a timely fashion are expected to salvage some ischemic tissues. Diffusion-weighted imaging based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in which contrast is based on water motion can detect ischemic injury within minutes after onsets, whereas computed tomography and other imaging modalities fail to detect stroke injury for at least a few hours. Along with quantitative perfusion imaging, the perfusion-diffusion mismatch which approximates the ischemic penumbra could be imaged non-invasively. This review describes recent progresses in the development and application of multimodal MRI and image analysis techniques to study ischemic tissue at risk in experimental stroke in rats. PMID:24323751

  1. Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda; Song, Zhiyang; Nilsson, David; Meyerson, Björn A.; Simon, Daniel T.; Linderoth, Bengt; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. PMID:26601181

  2. The breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Cook, R R; Harrison, M C; LeVier, R R

    1994-02-01

    The breast implant issue is a "bad news/good news" story. For many women with implants, the controversy has caused a fair degree of anxiety which may or may not be resolved as further information becomes available. It has also taken its toll on Dow Corning. Whole lines of medical products have been eliminated or are being phase out. The development of new medical applications has been terminated. As a consequence, employees have lost their jobs. What the effect will be on the biomedical industry as a whole remains to be seen (11). While silicones have been an important component in various medical devices, it is likely that other materials can be used as replacements. However, suppliers of non-silicone materials are also reevaluating their role in this market. For example, Du Pont, the nation's largest chemical company, has determined that the unpredictable and excessive costs of doing business with manufacturers of implantable medical devices no longer justifies the unrestricted sale of standard raw materials into this industry. Other companies are quietly following suit. On the up side, it is possible that the research being driven by this controversy will result in a greater understanding of the immunologic implications of xenobiotics, of the importance of nonbiased observations, of the need for ready access to valid data sets, and of the opportunity for valid scientific information to guide legal decisions. Only time will tell.

  3. Occlusal considerations in implant therapy: clinical guidelines with biomechanical rationale.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongsik; Oh, Tae-Ju; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2005-02-01

    Due to lack of the periodontal ligament, osseointegrated implants, unlike natural teeth, react biomechanically in a different fashion to occlusal force. It is therefore believed that dental implants may be more prone to occlusal overloading, which is often regarded as one of the potential causes for peri-implant bone loss and failure of the implant/implant prosthesis. Overloading factors that may negatively influence on implant longevity include large cantilevers, parafunctions, improper occlusal designs, and premature contacts. Hence, it is important to control implant occlusion within physiologic limit and thus provide optimal implant load to ensure a long-term implant success. The purposes of this paper are to discuss the importance of implant occlusion for implant longevity and to provide clinical guidelines of optimal implant occlusion and possible solutions managing complications related to implant occlusion. It must be emphasized that currently there is no evidence-based, implant-specific concept of occlusion. Future studies in this area are needed to clarify the relationship between occlusion and implant success.

  4. Deep brain stimulation in the setting of cochlear implants: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Thomas J.; Ksendzovsky, Alexander; Shah, Binit B.; Kesser, Bradley W.; Elias, W. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims As technology continues to advance for our aging population, an increasing number of DBS candidates will have preexisting implanted electrical devices. In this article, we discuss safe and successful DBS in a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) and bilateral cochlear implants. Methods A 70 year-old male with PD and bilateral cochlear implants underwent successful microelectrode-guided DBS implantation into bilateral subthalamic nuclei (STN). The patient's cochlear implant magnets were removed and replaced in outpatient clinic for pre-operative MRI and stereotactic targeting. The cochlear implants were turned off intraoperatively for STN microelectrode recordings. Results Precise, MRI-guided stereotactic DBS implantation was possible. Intraoperative high-fidelity microelectrode recordings confirmed STN neurons with the cochlear implants turned off. These recordings were not possible with active cochlear implant devices. Our literature review describes the other approaches/techniques that have been used to manage DBS surgery in the setting of cochlear implants. Conclusions Despite the risk of electrical interference between implanted medical devices, DBS and cochlear implants may be safe and compatible in the same patient if necessary precautions are taken. PMID:25998722

  5. Cochlear implants: our experience and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão; de Lima, Francis Vinicius Fontes; Santos, Ronaldo Carvalho; Santos, Arlete Cristina Granizo; Barreto, Valéria Maria Prado; de Jesus, Eduardo Passos Fiel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Cochlear Implants are important for individuals with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Objective: Evaluate the experience of cochlear implant center of Otorhinolaryngology through the analysis of records of 9 patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed with the patients records. Number 0191.0.107.000-11 ethics committee approval. We evaluated gender, etiology, age at surgery, duration of deafness, classification of deafness, unilateral or bilateral surgery, intraoperative and postoperative neural response and impedance of the electrodes in intraoperative and preoperative tests and found those that counter-indicated surgery. Results: There were 6 pediatric and 3 adult patients. Four male and 5 female. Etiologies: maternal rubella, cytomegalovirus, ototoxicity, meningitis, and sudden deafness. The age at surgery and duration of deafness ranged from 2–46 years and 2–18 years, respectively. Seven patients were pre-lingual. All had profound bilateral PA. There were 7 bilateral implants. Intraoperative complications: hemorrhage. Complications after surgery: vertigo and internal device failure. In 7 patients the electrodes were implanted through. Telemetry showed satisfactory neural response and impedance. CT and MRI was performed in all patients. We found enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct in a patient and incudomalleolar malformation. Conclusion: The cochlear implant as a form of auditory rehabilitation is well established and spreading to different centers specialized in otoaudiology. Thus, the need for structured services and trained professionals in this type of procedure is clear. PMID:25991976

  6. Dental implants in patients with bruxing habits.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E I G; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2006-02-01

    Bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence for this is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly because of the large variation in the literature in terms of both the technical aspects and the biological aspects of the study material. Although there is still no proof for the suggestion that bruxism causes an overload of dental implants and of their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. There are a few practical guidelines as to minimize the chance of implant failure. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these guidelines concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the protection of the final result with a hard occlusal stabilization splint (night guard).

  7. Clinical outcome following DIAM implantation for symptomatic lumbar internal disk disruption: a 3-year retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Te-Yuan; Huang, Ruyi; Chen, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background/objective Internal disk disruption (IDD), an early event of lumbar disk degeneration, is the most common cause of low back pain. Since increased intradiskal pressure (IDP) is associated with symptoms and progression of disk degeneration, unloading a painful disk with an interspinous process device (IPD) is a rational treatment option. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dynamic stabilization with an IPD in the treatment of symptomatic IDD of the lumbar spine. Patients and methods Patients with symptomatic IDD were treated with implantation of an IPD, the device for intervertebral assisted motion (DIAM). Diagnosis of IDD was based on typical MRI finding of posterior annular high-intensity zone and positive provocative test on discography. IDP was analyzed intraoperatively. Axial back and leg pain was evaluated with visual analog scale, functional status with Oswestry Disability Index, and final clinical outcomes with Odom criteria. Data from 34 patients followed up for at least 3 years were collected. Results DIAM implantation significantly reduced IDP (n=11, P<0.0001). All 34 patients reported symptom relief. Thirty-one patients (91%) remained symptom free until the last followups. Three patients (9%) experienced recurrence of pain, of which the causes were unrelated to the IDD or surgery. Disk status at the DIAM-implanted segments remained stable. Segmental flexion/extension mobility was preserved in 27 of 30 patients with preoperative mobility. No proximal or distal adjacent segment degeneration was observed. The final clinical outcomes were excellent/good in 31 and fair/poor in three patients. Conclusion For patients with symptomatic IDD, dynamic stabilization with DIAM provides pain relief and functional improvement. The implantation maintains disk status and prevents progression of disk degeneration, without compromising segmental flexion/extension mobility or causing adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:27826214

  8. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging safety in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Ritter, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been regarded a general contraindication in patients with cardiovascular implanted electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) due to the risk of severe complications and even deaths caused by interactions of the magnetic resonance (MR) surrounding and the electric devices. Over the last decade, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for such potentially life-threatening complications as well as technical advances have allowed an increasing number of pacemaker and ICD patients to safely undergo MRI. This review lists the key findings from basic research and clinical trials over the last 20 years, and discusses the impact on current day clinical practice. With ‘MR-conditional’ devices being the new standard of care, MRI in pacemaker and ICD patients has been adopted to clinical routine today. However, specific precautions and specifications of these devices should be carefully followed if possible, to avoid patient risks which might appear with new MR technology and further increasing indications and patient numbers. PMID:25796053

  10. Reversing the polarity of a cochlear implant magnet after magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ju Hyun; Bae, Mi Ran; Chang, Jae Won; Choi, Jae Young

    2012-08-01

    The number of patients with cochlear implant (CI) has been rapidly increasing in recent years, and these patients show a growing need of examination by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the use of MRI on patients with CI is restricted by the internal magnet of the CI. Many studies have investigated the safety of performing 1.5T MRI on patients with CI, which is now being practiced in a clinical setting. We experienced a case in which the polarity of the cochlear implant magnet was reversed after the patient was examined using 1.5T MRI. The external device was attached to the internal device oppositely. We could not find displacement of the internal device, magnet, or electrode upon radiological evaluation. We came up with two possible mechanisms by which the polarity of the magnet reversed. The first possibility was that the magnetic field of MRI reversed the polarity of the magnet. The second was that the internal magnet was physically realigned while interacting with the MRI. We believe the second hypothesis to be more reliable. A removable magnet and a loose magnet boundary of a CI device may have allowed for physical reorientation of the internal magnet. Therefore, in order to avoid these complications, first, the internal magnet must not be aligned anti-parallel with the magnetic polarity of MRI. In the Siemens MRI, the vector of the magnetic field is downward, so implant site should be placed in facing upwards to minimize demagnetization. In the GE Medical Systems MRI, the vector of the magnetic field is upward, so the implant site should be placed facing downwards. Second, wearing of a commercial mold which is fixed to the internal device before performing MRI can be helpful. In addition, any removable internal magnets in a CI device should be removed before MRI, especially in the trunk. However, to ultimately solve this problem, the pocket of the internal magnet should be redesigned for safety.

  11. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    PubMed Central

    Burke, B; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2010-01-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts. PMID:20071754

  12. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  13. Rat model of cholelithiasis with human gallstones implanted in cholestasis-induced virtual gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; Liu, Yewei; Yin, Ting; Feng, Yuanbo; Chen, Feng; Mulier, Stefaan; Li, Yue; Zhang, Jian; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To facilitate translational research on cholelithiasis, we have developed a rat model of human gallstones by exploiting the unique biliopancreatic features of this species. METHODS: Under anesthesia, 16 adult rats of equal genders underwent two times of abdominal surgery. First, their common bile duct (CBD) was ligated to cause cholestasis by total biliary obstruction (TBO). On day 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after TBO, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted to monitor the dilatation of the CBD, and blood was sampled to analyze total serum bilirubin (TSB). Secondly, on day 30, the abdomen was re-opened and gallstone(s) collected from human patients were implanted in the dilated CBD as a virtual gallbladder (VGB), which was closed by suture ligation. This rat cholelithiasis model was examined by MRI, clinical observation, microcholangiography and histology. RESULTS: All rats survived two laparotomies. After ligation, the CBD was dilated to a stable size of 4 to 30 mm in diameter on day 21-28, which became a VGB. The rats initially showed signs of jaundice that diminished over time, which paralleled with the evolving TSB levels from 0.6 ± 0.3 mg/dL before ligation, through a peak of 10.9 ± 1.9 mg/dL on day 14, until a nearly normalized value after day 28. The dilated CBD with thickened wall allowed an incision for implantation of human gallstones of 1-10 mm in diameter. The rat cholelithiasis was proven by in vivo MRI and postmortem microcholangiography and histomorphology. CONCLUSION: A rat model cholelithiasis with human gallstones has been established, which proves feasible, safe, reliable, nontoxic and cost-effective. Given the gallstones of human origin, applications of this model may be of help in translational research such as optical detection and lysis of gallstones by systemic drug administration. PMID:27376020

  14. Implant failure associated with actinomycosis in a medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chun-Xiao; Henkin, Jeffrey M; Ririe, Craig; Javadi, Elham

    2013-04-01

    Oral actinomycosis is not a common disease, but it can cause massive destruction. This article reports a case of implant failure associated with actinomycosis. A 55-year-old Caucasian male patient had tooth #20 extracted years ago and an implant placed 3 years ago. The #20 implant area developed an abscess about 1½ years after implant placement. Radiographic findings revealed a large radiolucency on the mesial aspect of the #20 implant. The implant was surgically removed and the lesion thoroughly debrided. The patient experienced severe pain when the apical soft tissue was curreted following implant removal. A periapical radiograph revealed that the lesion approached the mental foramen. A short course of antibiotics was prescribed. Histological observation found sulfur granules, which were found to be actinomycotic colonies. Peri-implant actinomycosis was diagnosed. No recurrence had occurred at the 1-year follow-up.

  15. Assessment of magnetic field interactions and radiofrequency-radiation-induced heating of metallic spinal implants in 7 T field.

    PubMed

    Tsukimura, Itsuko; Murakami, Hideki; Sasaki, Makoto; Endo, Hirooki; Yamabe, Daisuke; Oikawa, Ryosuke; Doita, Minoru

    2016-10-21

    The safety of metallic spinal implants in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed using ultrahigh fields has not been established. Hence, we examined whether the displacement forces caused by a static magnetic field and the heating induced by radiofrequency radiation are substantial for spinal implants in a 7 T field. We investigated spinal rods of various lengths and materials, a screw, and a cross-linking bridge in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials guidelines. The displacement forces of the metallic implants in static 7 T and 3 T static magnetic fields were measured and compared. The temperature changes of the implants during 15-min-long fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo image acquisition sequences were measured in the 7 T field. The deflection angles of the metallic spinal materials in the 7 T field were 5.0-21.0° [median: 6.7°], significantly larger than those in the 3 T field (1.0-6.3° [2.2°]). Among the metallic rods, the cobalt-chrome rods had significantly larger deflection angles (17.8-21.0° [19.8°]) than the pure titanium and titanium alloy rods (5.0-7.7° [6.2°]). The temperature changes of the implants, including the cross-linked rods, were 0.7-1.0°C [0.8°C] and 0.6-1.0°C [0.7°C] during the fast spin-echo and balanced gradient-echo sequences, respectively; these changes were slightly larger than those of the controls (0.4-1.1°C [0.5°C] and 0.3-0.9°C [0.6°C], respectively). All of the metallic spinal implants exhibited small displacement forces and minimal heating, indicating that MRI examinations using 7 T fields may be performed safely on patients with these implants. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  16. On the heating of inductively coupled resonators (stents) during MRI examinations.

    PubMed

    Busch, Martin; Vollmann, Wolfgang; Bertsch, Thomas; Wetzler, Rainer; Bornstedt, Axel; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Schnorr, Jörg; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Taupitz, Matthias; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2005-10-01

    Stents that have been implanted to preserve the results of vascular dilatation are frequently affected by in-stent restenosis, which ideally should be followed up by a noninvasive diagnostic modality. Active MRI stents can enable this kind of follow-up, while normal metallic stents can not. The prototype stents investigated in this study were designed as electric resonating circuits without a direct connection to the MR imager, and function as inductively coupled transmit coils. The model of a long solenoid coil is used to describe the additional power loss caused by such resonators. The theoretically estimated temperature increase is verified by measurements for different resonators and discussed for worst-case conditions. The RF power absorption of an active resonator is negligible compared to the total power absorbed during MRI. The local temperature increase observed for prototypes embedded in phantoms is in a range that excludes direct tissue damage. However, ruptures in the conducting structure of a resonator can cause hot spots, which may establish a high local temperature. This hazard can be reduced by designing resonators with a low quality (Q) factor or by setting the circuit slightly off resonance; however, this would lower the nominal amplification for which the resonator was designed.

  17. Learning distance function for regression-based 4D pulmonary trunk model reconstruction estimated from sparse MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Tsymbal, Alexey; Ionasec, Razvan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, Shaohua K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-03-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common birth defect and a frequent cause of death for children. Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) is the most often occurring CHD which affects in particular the pulmonary valve and trunk. Emerging interventional methods enable percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, which constitute an alternative to open heart surgery. While minimal invasive methods become common practice, imaging and non-invasive assessment tools become crucial components in the clinical setting. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) are techniques with complementary properties and ability to acquire multiple non-invasive and accurate scans required for advance evaluation and therapy planning. In contrary to CT which covers the full 4D information over the cardiac cycle, cMRI often acquires partial information, for example only one 3D scan of the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase and two 2D planes (long and short axes) over the whole cardiac cycle. The data acquired in this way is called sparse cMRI. In this paper, we propose a regression-based approach for the reconstruction of the full 4D pulmonary trunk model from sparse MRI. The reconstruction approach is based on learning a distance function between the sparse MRI which needs to be completed and the 4D CT data with the full information used as the training set. The distance is based on the intrinsic Random Forest similarity which is learnt for the corresponding regression problem of predicting coordinates of unseen mesh points. Extensive experiments performed on 80 cardiac CT and MR sequences demonstrated the average speed of 10 seconds and accuracy of 0.1053mm mean absolute error for the proposed approach. Using the case retrieval workflow and local nearest neighbour regression with the learnt distance function appears to be competitive with respect to "black box" regression with immediate prediction of coordinates, while providing transparency to the

  18. Can MRI accurately detect pilon articular malreduction? A quantitative comparison between CT and 3T MRI bone models

    PubMed Central

    Radzi, Shairah; Dlaska, Constantin Edmond; Cowin, Gary; Robinson, Mark; Pratap, Jit; Schuetz, Michael Andreas; Mishra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Background Pilon fracture reduction is a challenging surgery. Radiographs are commonly used to assess the quality of reduction, but are limited in revealing the remaining bone incongruities. The study aimed to develop a method in quantifying articular malreductions using 3D computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) models. Methods CT and MRI data were acquired using three pairs of human cadaveric ankle specimens. Common tibial pilon fractures were simulated by performing osteotomies to the ankle specimens. Five of the created fractures [three AO type-B (43-B1), and two AO type-C (43-C1) fractures] were then reduced and stabilised using titanium implants, then rescanned. All datasets were reconstructed into CT and MRI models, and were analysed in regards to intra-articular steps and gaps, surface deviations, malrotations and maltranslations of the bone fragments. Results Initial results reveal that type B fracture CT and MRI models differed by ~0.2 (step), ~0.18 (surface deviations), ~0.56° (rotation) and ~0.4 mm (translation). Type C fracture MRI models showed metal artefacts extending to the articular surface, thus unsuitable for analysis. Type C fracture CT models differed from their CT and MRI contralateral models by ~0.15 (surface deviation), ~1.63° (rotation) and ~0.4 mm (translation). Conclusions Type B fracture MRI models were comparable to CT and may potentially be used for the postoperative assessment of articular reduction on a case-to-case basis. PMID:28090442

  19. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  20. The effect of bruxism on treatment planning for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Misch, Carl E

    2002-09-01

    Bruxism is a potential risk factor for implant failure. Excessive force is the primary cause of late implant complications. An appreciation of the etiology of crestal bone loss, failure of implants, failure to retain implant restorations, and fracture of components will lead the practitioner to develop a treatment plan that reduces force on implants and their restorations. The forces are considered in terms of magnitude, duration, direction, type, and magnification. Once the dentist has identified the source(s) of additional force on the implant system, the treatment plan is altered to contend with and reduce the negative sequelae on the bone, implant, and final restoration. One viable approach is to increase the implant-bone surface area. Additional implants can be placed to decrease stress on any one implant, and implants in molar regions should have an increased width. Use of more and wider implants decreases the strain on the prosthesis and also dissipates stress to the bone, especially at the crest. The additional implants should be positioned with intent to eliminate cantilevers when possible. Greater surface area implant designs made of titanium alloy and with an external hex design can also prove advantageous. Anterior guidance in mandibular excursions further decreases force and eliminates or reduces lateral posterior force. Metal occlusal surfaces decrease the risk of porcelain fracture and do not require as much abutment reduction, which in turn enhances prosthesis retention. The retention of the final prosthesis or super-structure is also improved with additional implant abutments. Night guards designed with specific features also are a benefit to initially diagnose the influence of occlusal factors for the patient, and as importantly, to reduce the influence of extraneous stress on implants and implant-retained restorations.

  1. Emerging MRI methods in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Camilo G; Mountz, James M; Mountz, John D

    2011-02-01

    New MRI techniques have been developed to assess not only the static anatomy of synovial hyperplasia, bone changes and cartilage degradation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but also the activity of the physiological events that cause these changes. This enables an estimation of the rate of change in the synovium, bone and cartilage as a result of disease activity or in response to therapy. Typical MRI signs of RA in the pre-erosive phase include synovitis, bone marrow edema and subchondral cyst formation. Synovitis can be assessed by T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI or diffusion tensor imaging. Bone marrow edema can be detected on fluid-sensitive sequences such as short-tau inversion recovery or T2-weighted fast-spin echo sequences. Detection of small bone erosions in the early erosive phase using T1-weighted MRI has sensitivity comparable to CT. Numerous MRI techniques have been developed for quantitative assessment of potentially pathologic changes in cartilage composition that occur before frank morphologic changes. In this Review, we summarize the advances and new directions in the field of MRI, with an emphasis on their current state of development and application in RA.

  2. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    MedlinePlus

    ... to women of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with ... likely be inserted at the same time. Ruptured silicone implant If a silicone breast implant ruptures, you ...

  3. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot’s accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  4. The Hamster as a Model for Embryo Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Jeff; Wang, Hehai; Ding, Tianbing; Paria, B. C.

    2008-01-01

    Defects in preimplantation embryonic development, uterine receptivity, and implantation are the leading cause of infertility, pregnancy problems and birth defects. Significant progress has been made in our basic understanding of these processes using the mouse model, where implantation is ovarian estrogen-dependent in the presence of progesterone. However, an animal model where implantation is progesterone-dependent must also be studied to gain a full understanding of the embryo and uterine events that are required for implantation. In this regard, the hamster is a useful model and this review summarizes the information currently available regarding mechanisms involved in synchronous preimplantation embryo and uterine development for implantation in this species. PMID:18178492

  5. Light and scanning electron microscopic report of four fractured implants.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Piattelli, M; Scarano, A; Montesani, L

    1998-01-01

    Although they are fortunately rare, implant fractures can cause significant problems for both clinicians and patients. The authors present a light and scanning electron microscopic study of four fractured implants in two patients. Both patients had parafunctional habits (bruxism), hypertrophic masticatory muscles, and wear of occlusal surfaces. The scanning electron microscopic study of the fractured surfaces of all four implants showed the presence of fatigue striations. Bending overload was probably created by a combination of parafunctional forces, bone resorption, posterior location of the implants, and implant diameter.

  6. Implants for lucky few

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, David

    2011-08-01

    In his article "Vision of beauty" (May pp22-27), Richard Taylor points the way to fractal design for retinal implants and makes an enthusiastic case for incorporating such features into the next generation of such implants.

  7. Metal-related artifacts in instrumented spine. Techniques for reducing artifacts in CT and MRI: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Stradiotti, P.; Curti, A.; Castellazzi, G.

    2009-01-01

    The projectional nature of radiogram limits its amount of information about the instrumented spine. MRI and CT imaging can be more helpful, using cross-sectional view. However, the presence of metal-related artifacts at both conventional CT and MRI imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and disease. We reviewed the literature about overcoming artifacts from metallic orthopaedic implants at high-field strength MRI imaging and multi-detector CT. The evolution of multichannel CT has made available new techniques that can help minimizing the severe beam-hardening artifacts. The presence of artifacts at CT from metal hardware is related to image reconstruction algorithm (filter), tube current (in mA), X-ray kilovolt peak, pitch, hardware composition, geometry (shape), and location. MRI imaging has been used safely in patients with orthopaedic metallic implants because most of these implants do not have ferromagnetic properties and have been fixed into position. However, on MRI imaging metallic implants may produce geometric distortion, the so-called susceptibility artifact. In conclusion, although 140 kV and high milliamperage second exposures are recommended for imaging patients with hardware, caution should always be exercised, particularly in children, young adults, and patients undergoing multiple examinations. MRI artifacts can be minimized by positioning optimally and correctly the examined anatomy part with metallic implants in the magnet and by choosing fast spin-echo sequences, and in some cases also STIR sequences, with an anterior to posterior frequency-encoding direction and the smallest voxel size. PMID:19437043

  8. Metal-related artifacts in instrumented spine. Techniques for reducing artifacts in CT and MRI: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Stradiotti, P; Curti, A; Castellazzi, G; Zerbi, A

    2009-06-01

    The projectional nature of radiogram limits its amount of information about the instrumented spine. MRI and CT imaging can be more helpful, using cross-sectional view. However, the presence of metal-related artifacts at both conventional CT and MRI imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and disease. We reviewed the literature about overcoming artifacts from metallic orthopaedic implants at high-field strength MRI imaging and multi-detector CT. The evolution of multichannel CT has made available new techniques that can help minimizing the severe beam-hardening artifacts. The presence of artifacts at CT from metal hardware is related to image reconstruction algorithm (filter), tube current (in mA), X-ray kilovolt peak, pitch, hardware composition, geometry (shape), and location. MRI imaging has been used safely in patients with orthopaedic metallic implants because most of these implants do not have ferromagnetic properties and have been fixed into position. However, on MRI imaging metallic implants may produce geometric distortion, the so-called susceptibility artifact. In conclusion, although 140 kV and high milliamperage second exposures are recommended for imaging patients with hardware, caution should always be exercised, particularly in children, young adults, and patients undergoing multiple examinations. MRI artifacts can be minimized by positioning optimally and correctly the examined anatomy part with metallic implants in the magnet and by choosing fast spin-echo sequences, and in some cases also STIR sequences, with an anterior to posterior frequency-encoding direction and the smallest voxel size.

  9. Ion-implantation studies on perpendicular media.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Nikita; Maurer, Siegfried L; Nunes, Ronald W; Piramanayagam, S N; Bhatia, C S

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic and structural properties of ion implanted perpendicular recording media have been investigated. Effects of 12C+ ion implantation with the doses of 2 x 10(11), 10(13), 10(14) and 10(16) ions/cm2 in the magnetic recording layer of conventional granular and continuous perpendicular media are reported in this paper. Implantation with the highest fluence of 10(16) ions/cm2 resulted in change of the magnetization reversal mechanism, thereby reducing coercivity. In continuous media the implanted ions cause increase in pinning defects, leading to an increase in coercivity. In contrast, high dose was found to cause similar change in the crystallographic properties of both the granular and continuous media.

  10. MRI manifestations of bowler's thumb.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Martha F; Flemming, Donald J; Bernard, Stephanie A

    2011-01-01

    Bowler's thumb is a rare perineural fibrosis involving the ulnar digital nerve of the thumb. Affected patients present with pain, neuropathy, and mass lesion. The condition is caused by chronic repetitive impaction of the ulnar soft tissues of the thumb against the thumbhole of a bowling ball. In our case, MRI showed decreased signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images surrounding an enlarged ulnar digital nerve of the thumb. The findings can be confused with giant-cell tumor of the tendon sheath or peripheral-nerve-sheath tumor.

  11. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  12. Late extrusion of alloplastic orbital floor implants.

    PubMed

    Brown, A E; Banks, P

    1993-06-01

    Complications following the use of alloplastic orbital floor implants are well documented but it is not widely recognised that these can occur many years after initial treatment. Three patients who presented with late extrusion of an implant through the facial skin are reported. This complication occurred 10, 16 and 17 years respectively after treatment of the orbital floor fracture. The tissue reaction to silicone rubber and Teflon inplants is reviewed and the possible cause for this late complication is discussed.

  13. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Frohwein, Lynn J. Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  14. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants

    PubMed Central

    Koitschev, Assen; Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Braun, Angelika; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Sachs, Helmut; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Zrenner, Eberhart; Besch, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply. PMID:26783453

  15. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore

  16. MRI Mode Programming for Safe Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With a Magnetic Resonance Conditional Cardiac Device.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Toshiko; Kurokawa, Sayaka; Ikeya, Yukitoshi; Iso, Kazuki; Takahashi, Keiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Ashino, Sonoko; Okubo, Kimie; Okumura, Yasuo; Kunimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although diagnostically indispensable, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been, until recently, contraindicated in patients with an implantable cardiac device. MR conditional cardiac devices are now widely used, but the mode programming needed for safe MRI has yet to be established. We reviewed the details of 41 MRI examinations of patients with a MR conditional device. There were no associated adverse events. However, in 3 cases, paced beats competed with the patient's own beats during the MRI examination. We describe 2 of the 3 specific cases because they illustrate these potentially risky situations: a case in which the intrinsic heart rate increased and another in which atrial fibrillation occurred. Safe MRI in patients with an MR conditional device necessitates detailed MRI mode programming. The MRI pacing mode should be carefully and individually selected.

  17. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  18. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  19. MRI of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems (in men)Path to improved healthIf your primary care doctor determines that you should have an MRI, ... may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to ...

  2. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the breast uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  3. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  4. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  5. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  6. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  7. Delivering optical power to subcutaneous implanted devices.

    PubMed

    Ayazian, Sahar; Hassibi, Arjang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new, easy-to-implement, and MRI-compatible approach for delivering power to implantable devices is presented. The idea is to harvest the energy of light within the therapeutic window wavelengths, where the optical absorption is small, by using subcutaneous photovoltaic (PV) cells. Depending on the application, this energy can then be used to directly drive the embedded electronics of an implanted device or recharge its battery. To show the feasibility of this system, a CMOS chip based on this concept has been implemented and tested. The experimental results demonstrate that μW's of power in ambient light conditions can be harvested using mm(2)-size PV cells. This amount of power is sufficient to address the needs of many low-power applications.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause a problem near a strong magnetic field. Electronic devices aren't permitted in the MRI room. ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  9. Molecular fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Barandov, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of brain function depends on understanding the dynamics of diverse neural signaling processes over large tissue volumes in intact animals and humans. Most existing approaches to measuring brain signaling suffer from limited tissue penetration, poor resolution, or lack of specificity for well-defined neural events. Here we discuss a new brain activity mapping method that overcomes some of these problems by combining MRI with contrast agents sensitive to neural signaling. The goal of this “molecular fMRI” approach is to permit noninvasive whole-brain neuroimaging with specificity and resolution approaching current optical neuroimaging methods. In this article, we describe the context and need for molecular fMRI as well as the state of the technology today. We explain how major types of MRI probes work and how they can be sensitized to neurobiological processes, such as neurotransmitter release, calcium signaling, and gene expression changes. We comment both on past work in the field and on challenges and promising avenues for future development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain researchers currently have a choice between measuring neural activity using cellular-level recording techniques, such as electrophysiology and optical imaging, or whole-brain imaging methods, such as fMRI. Cellular level methods are precise but only address a small portion of mammalian brains; on the other hand, whole-brain neuroimaging techniques provide very little specificity for neural pathways or signaling components of interest. The molecular fMRI techniques we discuss have particular potential to combine the specificity of cellular-level measurements with the noninvasive whole-brain coverage of fMRI. On the other hand, molecular fMRI is only just getting off the ground. This article aims to offer a snapshot of the status and future prospects for development of molecular fMRI techniques. PMID:27076413

  10. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  11. Safety of a dedicated brain MRI protocol in patients with a vagus nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Melis, Gerrit I; Gebbink, Tineke A; de Kort, Gérard A P; Leijten, Frans S S

    2014-11-01

    Although implanted metallic devices constitute a relative contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, the safety of brain imaging in a patient with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) is classified as "conditional," provided that specific manufacturer guidelines are followed when a transmit and receive head coil is used at 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing brain MRI scans in patients with the VNS. From September 2009 until November 2011, 101 scans were requested in 73 patients with the VNS in The Netherlands. Patients were scanned according to the manufacturer's guidelines. No patient reported any side effect, discomfort, or pain during or after the MRI scan. In one patient, a lead break was detected based on device diagnostics after the MRI-scan. However, because no system diagnostics had been performed prior to MR scanning in this patient, it is unclear whether MR scanning was responsible for the lead break. The indication for most scans was epilepsy related. Twenty-six scans (26%) were part of a (new) presurgical evaluation and could probably better have been performed prior to VNS implantation. Performing brain MRI scans in patients with an implanted VNS is safe when a modified MRI protocol is followed.

  12. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Type I Collagen Scaffold in Rat: Improving Visualization of Bladder and Subcutaneous Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Geutjes, Paul; Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive monitoring of implanted scaffolds is important to understand their behavior and role in tissue engineering, in particular to follow their degradation and interaction with host tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited for this goal, but its application is often hampered by the low contrast of scaffolds that are prepared from biomaterials such as type I collagen. The aim of this study was to test iron oxide particles incorporation in improving their MRI contrasts, and to follow their degradation and tissue interactions. Scaffolds with and without iron oxide particles were implanted either subcutaneously or on the bladder of rats. At predetermined time points, in vivo MRI were obtained and tissues were then harvested for histology analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The result showed that the incorporation of iron oxide particles improved MRI contrast of the implants, providing information on their location, shapes, and degradation. Second, the host tissue reaction to the type I collagen implants could be observed in both MRI and histology. Finally, MRI also revealed that the degradation and host tissue reaction of iron particles-loaded scaffolds differed between subcutaneous and bladder implantation, which was substantiated by histology. PMID:24625324

  13. Bioactive coatings for orthopaedic implants-recent trends in development of implant coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bill G X; Myers, Damian E; Wallace, Gordon G; Brandt, Milan; Choong, Peter F M

    2014-07-04

    Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracellular matrix proteins, biological peptides or growth factors impart bioactivity and biocompatibility to the metallic surface of conventional orthopaedic prosthesis that promote bone ingrowth and differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts leading to enhanced osteointegration of the implant. Furthermore, coatings such as silver, nitric oxide, antibiotics, antiseptics and antimicrobial peptides with anti-microbial properties have also been developed, which show promise in reducing bacterial adhesion and prosthetic infections. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in coatings for orthopaedic implants.

  14. Histopathology of the inner ear relevant to cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Nadol, Joseph B; Eddington, Donald K

    2006-01-01

    The most common forms of severe hearing loss and deafness are related to morphological changes in the cochlea. Many individuals with such forms of hearing disorders have received cochlear implants. It has been assumed that preservation of spiral ganglion cells is important for success of cochlear implants. Preservation of ganglion cells is negatively correlated with the duration of the hearing loss. It has, however, not been possible to reveal a relationship between the degree of survival of spiral ganglion cells and performance of cochlear implants. It is important to understand the histopathological changes that follow cochlear implantation. Insertion of cochlear implants may cause trauma to the basilar membrane, the spiral lamina, and the spiral ligament. Rupture of the basilar membrane may occur. Over time, new bone forms at the cochleostomy and along the implant track. Further investigation is necessary to evaluate the causes of variability of behavioral measures of performance.

  15. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed.

  16. Indications of implant removal: A study of 83 cases

    PubMed Central

    Haseeb, Muhammad; Butt, Muhammad Farooq; Altaf, Tariq; Muzaffar, Khalid; Gupta, Anil; Jallu, Aleena

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture fixation has become advanced with the advent of new and custom metal implants for each type of bone/fracture. After union though, the implant ceases to be important and may be removed. Routine removal is advocated by some and opposed by others. Nevertheless, some patients require removal of the hardware because of various implant-related problems. Our study was aimed at identifying the most common causes for implant removal. Objective: To investigate the common indications of orthopedic implant removal surgeries. Methods: Adult patients admitted for implant removal in our department were included in the study. They were operated in the next OT list. They were then followed for an average 4 months for resolutions of symptoms or appearance of new problems. Results: A total of 83 patients were studied. 71 of them were males. The mean age was 38 years. The reasons for removal of implants were found to lie in five categories: Pain/discomfort/prominent hardware, infected hardware, implant failure, elective (patient’s insistence), and other reasons. Overall, the most frequently removed implants in our series were distal tibial/ankle plates (14.45% of implants removed), femoral intramedullary (IM) nails (13.25%), olecranon wires and plates (12.04%), and tibial IM nails and patellar tension band wirings (9.53% each). Discussion and Conclusion: The clinical indications of implant removal are not well established, and few definitive data exist to guide whether routine implant removal is appropriate. Symptomatic hardware frequently needs removal. We found that pain and implant prominence (mechanical symptoms) are the most common indications. Infection is the next most common, followed by hardware failure. Other indications are implant failure, bone resorption due to excessive stress shielding and patient’s will. Removal is, however, not an easy surgery, and several factors such as bone ingrowth and wear of the implant may make its removal difficult

  17. Safety of magnetic resonance imaging of patients with a new Medtronic EnRhythm MRI SureScan pacing system: clinical study design

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Richard; Kanal, Emanuel; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Bello, David; Luechinger, Roger; Jenniskens, Inge; Hull, Michael; Sommer, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of patients with implanted cardiac devices is currently considered hazardous due to potential for electromagnetic interference to the patient and pacemaker system. With approximately 60 million MRI scans performed worldwide per year, an estimated majority of pacemaker patients may develop an indication for an MRI during the lifetime of their pacemakers, suggesting that safe use of pacemakers in the MRI environment would be clinically valuable. A new pacing system (Medtronic EnRhythm MRI™ SureScan™ and CapSureFix MRI™ leads) has been designed and pre-clinically tested for safe use in the MRI environment. The EnRhythm MRI study is designed to confirm the safety and efficacy of this new pacing system. Methods The EnRhythm MRI study is a prospective, randomized controlled, unblinded clinical trial to confirm the safety and efficacy of MRI at 1.5 Tesla in patients implanted with a specifically designed pacemaker and lead system. The patients have standard indications for dual chamber pacemaker implantation. Successfully implanted patients are randomized in a 2:1 ratio to undergo MRI (MRI group) or to have no MRI scan (control group) at 9–12 weeks after pacemaker system implantation. Magnetic resonance (MR) scanning includes 14 head and lumbar scan sequences representing clinically relevant scans while maximizing the gradient slew rate up to 200 T/m/s, and/or the transmitted radiofrequency (RF) power up to SAR (specific absorption rate) levels of 2 W/kg body weight (upper limit of normal operating mode). Full interrogation of all device information and sensing and capture function are measured at device implantation, every follow-up and before and immediately after MRI in the MRI group and at the same time points in the control group. Complete pacemaker and lead evaluations are also done at one week and one month after the scan for the MRI and control group patients. The primary endpoint is safe and successful

  18. [Cochlear implant in adults].

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Mosnier, I; Bernardeschi, D; Ferrary, E; Sterkers, O

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear implant in adults is a procedure, dedicated to rehabilitate severe to profound hearing loss. Because of technological progresses and their applications for signal strategies, new devices can improve hearing, even in noise conditions. Binaural stimulation, cochlear implant and hearing aid or bilateral cochlear implants are the best opportunities to access to better level of comprehension in all conditions and space localisation. By now minimally invasive surgery is possible to preserve residual hearing and use a double stimulation modality for the same ear: electrical for high frequencies and acoustic for low frequencies. In several conditions, cochlear implant is not possible due to cochlear nerve tumour or major malformations of the inner ear. In these cases, a brainstem implantation can be considered. Clinical data demonstrate that improvement in daily communication, for both cochlear and brainstem implants, is correlated with cerebral activation of auditory cortex.

  19. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  20. Implant treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T

    2008-04-01

    As dental implants become a more accepted treatment modality, there is a need for all parties involved with implant dentistry to be familiar with various treatment planning issues. Though the success can be highly rewarding, failure to forecast treatment planning issues can result in an increase of surgical needs, surgical cost, and even case failure. In this issue, the focus is on implant treatment planning considerations.

  1. Osseointegrated implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Rogoff, G S

    1992-06-01

    This review covers recent literature on prosthodontic aspects of osseointegrated implants. Long-term prognosis, diagnosis and treatment planning, and clinical impression techniques and fabrication technology are discussed.

  2. The reversed internal magnet of cochlear implant after magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kong, Soo-Keun; Oh, Se-Joon; Lee, Il-Woo; Goh, Eui-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have now become a standard method of treating severe to profound hearing loss. Recently, the number of patients with CI has been rapidly increasing as the big benefits of CI become more widely known. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become a routine diagnostic imaging modality, used in the diagnosis of common conditions, including stroke, back pain, and headache. We report our recent experience with a case in which internal magnet of the cochlear implant was reversed after 1.5-T lumbar spine MRI. This complication is managed successfully by reversing the orientation of the external magnet in the head coil.

  3. Comparative analysis of changes in MR imaging of pre and post intrauterine progesterone implants in adenomyosis cases

    PubMed Central

    Dashottar, S.; Singh, A.K.; Debnath, J.; Muralidharan, C.G.; Singh, R.K.; Kumar, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the evaluation and management of adenomyosis. In this study, we first diagnosed the adenomyosis on MRI and then we analyzed the MRI changes in the uterus in pre and post intrauterine progesterone implants cases. Method All the patients with clinical diagnosis of menorrhagia or dysmenorrhea were screened by Ultrasonography (USG) of the pelvis. Patients with heterogeneous echo texture of the uterus were then evaluated by the MRI of the pelvis. All patients with MRI findings suggestive of adenomyosis formed the study group. Result On MRI study 60 patients were diagnosed as adenomyosis, 68.33% had diffuse adenomyosis and 31.66% had focal adenomyosis. 83% of diagnosed adenomyosis cases had high intensity signal foci which were seen in 75% cases of diffuse adenomyosis and 100% cases of focal adenomyosis. 50 diagnosed adenomyosis cases were then reviewed after 03 months, 06 months and 12 months to see for any change in the MRI findings in the post intrauterine implant cases. On follow up MRI after post progesterone intrauterine implant, 50% of the cases showed reduction in the high intensity signals, 10% of the cases showed mild reduction in the junctional zone thickness with no significant change in the uterine size. Conclusions It is inferred that MR imaging is not only helpful in diagnosing but also helpful in monitoring the effects of hormonal therapy in adenomyosis. PMID:25859077

  4. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  5. Incorporating MRI structural information into bioluminescence tomography: system, heterogeneous reconstruction and in vivo quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Xue, Huadan; Lei, Jing; Wang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Ming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Combining two or more imaging modalities to provide complementary information has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic biomedical research. By incorporating the structural information provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the ill poseness nature of bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be reduced significantly, thus improve the accuracies of reconstruction and in vivo quantification. In this paper, we present a small animal imaging system combining multi-view and multi-spectral BLT with MRI. The independent MRI-compatible optical device is placed at the end of the clinical MRI scanner. The small animal is transferred between the light tight chamber of the optical device and the animal coil of MRI via a guide rail during the experiment. After the optical imaging and MRI scanning procedures are finished, the optical images are mapped onto the MRI surface by interactive registration between boundary of optical images and silhouette of MRI. Then, incorporating the MRI structural information, a heterogeneous reconstruction algorithm based on finite element method (FEM) with L 1 normalization is used to reconstruct the position, power and region of the light source. In order to validate the feasibility of the system, we conducted experiments of nude mice model implanted with artificial light source and quantitative analysis of tumor inoculation model with MDA-231-GFP-luc. Preliminary results suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of the prototype system. PMID:24940545

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MRI table. A specially trained technician (or "tech") operates the MRI machine. He or she may ... can't stay still during MRI. Sometimes MRI techs sedate teens who have trouble relaxing inside the ...

  7. Muscle atrophy and metal-on-metal hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Reshid; Khoo, Michael; Cook, Erica; Guppy, Andrew; Hua, Jia; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Muscle atrophy is seen in patients with metal-on-metal (MOM) hip implants, probably because of inflammatory destruction of the musculo-tendon junction. However, like pseudotumors, it is unclear when atrophy occurs and whether it progresses with time. Our objective was to determine whether muscle atrophy associated with MOM hip implants progresses with time. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 74 hips in 56 patients (32 of them women) using serial MRI. Median age was 59 (23–83) years. The median time post-implantation was 83 (35–142) months, and the median interval between scans was 11 months. Hip muscles were scored using the Pfirrmann system. The mean scores for muscle atrophy were compared between the first and second MRI scans. Blood cobalt and chromium concentrations were determined. Results The median blood cobalt was 6.84 (0.24–90) ppb and median chromium level was 4.42 (0.20–45) ppb. The median Oxford hip score was 34 (5–48). The change in the gluteus minimus mean atrophy score between first and second MRI was 0.12 (p = 0.002). Mean change in the gluteus medius posterior portion (unaffected by surgical approach) was 0.08 (p = 0.01) and mean change in the inferior portion was 0.10 (p = 0.05). Mean pseudotumor grade increased by 0.18 (p = 0.02). Interpretation Worsening muscle atrophy and worsening pseudotumor grade occur over a 1-year period in a substantial proportion of patients with MOM hip implants. Serial MRI helps to identify those patients who are at risk of developing worsening soft-tissue pathology. These patients should be considered for revision surgery before irreversible muscle destruction occurs. PMID:25588091

  8. 21 CFR 882.5860 - Implanted neuromuscular stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... neuromuscular stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted neuromuscular stimulator is a device that provides electrical stimulation to a patient's peroneal or femoral nerve to cause muscles in the leg to contract, thus... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted neuromuscular stimulator....

  9. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  10. Teeth and implants.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R

    1999-08-28

    An osseointegrated implant restoration may closely resemble a natural tooth. However, the absence of a periodontal ligament and connective tissue attachment via cementum, results in fundamental differences in the adaptation of the implant to occlusal forces, and the structure of the gingival cuff.

  11. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  12. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  13. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  14. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  15. Dynamic lumbar spinal stenosis : the usefulness of axial loaded MRI in preoperative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Jin-Sung; Jung, Byungjoo; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2009-09-01

    Two cases of dynamic lumbar spinal stenosis were identified by the authors using axial loaded magnetic resonance image (MRI). In both cases, the patients presented with neurogenic claudication but MRI in decumbency showed no definite pathologic condition associated with their symptoms. In contrast, axial loaded MRI demonstrated constrictive spinal stenosis and a significantly decreased dural sac caused by epidural fat buckling and thickening of the ligamentum flavum in both cases. In the second case, a more prominent disc protrusion was also demonstrated compared with decumbent MRI. After decompressive surgery, both patients had satisfactory outcomes. Axial loaded MRI can therefore give decisive information in dynamic spinal disorders by allowing simulation of an upright position.

  16. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Madsen, Mikkel Lænsø; Traberg, Anders; Meisner, Bjarne; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Tanderup, Kari; Spejlborg, Harald; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Nørrevang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary-interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented and exemplified by a stage IVA cervical cancer with superior dose distribution.

  17. Peri-implant diseases: Consensus Report of the Sixth European Workshop on Periodontology.

    PubMed

    Lindhe, Jan; Meyle, Joerg

    2008-09-01

    Issues related to peri-implant disease were discussed. It was observed that the most common lesions that occur, i.e. peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis are caused by bacteria. While the lesion of peri-implant mucositis resides in the soft tissues, peri-implantitis also affects the supporting bone. Peri-implant mucositis occurs in about 80% of subjects (50% of sites) restored with implants, and peri-implantitis in between 28% and 56% of subjects (12-40% of sites). A number of risk indicators were identified including (i) poor oral hygiene, (ii) a history of periodontitis, (iii) diabetes and (iv) smoking. It was concluded that the treatment of peri-implant disease must include anti-infective measures. With respect to peri-implant mucositis, it appeared that non-surgical mechanical therapy caused the reduction in inflammation (bleeding on probing) but also that the adjunctive use of antimicrobial mouthrinses had a positive effect. It was agreed that the outcome of non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis was unpredictable. The primary objective of surgical treatment in peri-implantitis is to get access to the implant surface for debridement and decontamination in order to achieve resolution of the inflammatory lesion. There was limited evidence that such treatment with the adjunctive use of systemic antibiotics could resolve a number of peri-implantitis lesions. There was no evidence that so-called regenerative procedures had additional beneficial effects on treatment outcome.

  18. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  19. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  20. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  1. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  2. Assessment of corrosion in retrieved spine implants.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, V C; Hothi, H S; Anwar, H A; Molloy, S; Noordeen, H; Rezajooi, K; Sutcliffe, J; Skinner, J A; Hart, A J

    2017-03-09

    Recently the use of dissimilar metals in spine instrumentation has increased, especially in the case of adult deformities, where rods made from Cobalt Chrome alloys (CoCr) are used with Titanium (Ti) screws. The use of dissimilar metals increases the risk of galvanic corrosion and patients have required revision spine surgery due to severe metallosis that may have been caused by corrosion. We aimed to assess the presence of corrosion in spine implant retrievals from constructs with two types of material combinations: similar (Ti/Ti) and dissimilar (CoCr/Ti). First, we devised a grading score for corrosion of the rod-fixture junctions. Then, we applied this score to a collection of retrieved spine implants. Our proposed corrosion grading score was proven reliable (kappa > 0.7). We found no significant difference in the scores between 4 CoCr and 11 Ti rods (p = 0.0642). There was no indication that time of implantation had an effect on the corrosion score (p = 0.9361). We recommend surgeons avoid using implants designs with dissimilar metals to reduce the risk of corrosion whilst a larger scale study of retrieved spine implants is conducted. Future studies can now use our scoring system for spine implant corrosion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  3. Tolerance and Long-Term MRI Imaging of Gadolinium-Modified Meshes Used in Soft Organ Repair

    PubMed Central

    Letouzey, Vincent; Huberlant, Stéphanie; Cornille, Arnaud; Blanquer, Sébastien; Guillaume, Olivier; Lemaire, Laurent; Garric, Xavier; de Tayrac, Renaud

    2015-01-01

    Background Synthetic meshes are frequently used to reinforce soft tissues. The aim of this translational study is to evaluate tolerance and long-term MRI visibility of two recently developed Gadolinium-modified meshes in a rat animal model. Materials and Methods Gadolinium-poly-ε-caprolactone (Gd-PCL) and Gadolinium-polymethylacrylate (Gd-PMA) modified meshes were implanted in Wistar rats and their tolerance was assessed daily. Inflammation and biocompatibility of the implants were assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry after 30 days post implantation. Implants were visualised by 7T and 3T MRI at day 30 and at day 90. Diffusion of Gadolinium in the tissues of the implanted animals was assessed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Results Overall Gd-PMA coated implants were better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL. In fact, Gd-PMA implants were characterised by a high ratio collagen I/III and good vascularisation of the integration tissues. High resolution images of the coated mesh were obtained in vivo with experimental 7T as well as 3T clinical MRI. Mass spectrometry analyses showed that levels of Gadolinium in animals implanted with coated mesh were similar to those of the control group. Conclusions Meshes coated with Gd-PMA are better tolerated as compared to those coated with Gd-PCL as no signs of erosion or significant inflammation were detected at 30 days post implantation. Also, Gd-PMA coated meshes were clearly visualised with both 7T and 3T MRI devices. This new technique of mesh optimisation may represent a valuable tool in soft tissue repair and management. PMID:25811855

  4. NH2 + implantations induced superior hemocompatibility of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Meixian; Li, Dejun; Zhao, Mengli; Zhang, Yiteng; Deng, Xiangyun; Geng, Dongsheng; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang; Gu, Hanqing; Wan, Rongxin

    2013-05-01

    NH2 + implantation was performed on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The hemocompatibility of MWCNTs and NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs was evaluated based on in vitro hemolysis, platelet adhesion, and kinetic-clotting tests. Compared with MWCNTs, NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs displayed more perfect platelets and red blood cells in morphology, lower platelet adhesion rate, lower hemolytic rate, and longer kinetic blood-clotting time. NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs with higher fluency of 1 × 1016 ions/cm2 led to the best thromboresistance, hence desired hemocompatibility. Fourier transfer infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed that NH2 + implantation caused the cleavage of some pendants and the formation of some new N-containing functional groups. These results were responsible for the enhanced hemocompatibility of NH2 +-implanted MWCNTs.

  5. In vitro assessment of tissue heating near metallic medical implants by exposure to pulsed radio frequency diathermy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggera, P. S.; Witters, D. M.; von Maltzahn, G.; Bassen, H. I.

    2003-09-01

    A patient with bilateral implanted neurostimulators suffered significant brain tissue damage, and subsequently died, following diathermy treatment to hasten recovery from teeth extraction. Subsequent MRI examinations showed acute deterioration of the tissue near the deep brain stimulator (DBS) lead's electrodes which was attributed to excessive tissue heating induced by the diathermy treatment. Though not published in the open literature, a second incident was reported for a patient with implanted neurostimulators for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. During a diathermy treatment for severe kyphosis, the patient had a sudden change in mental status and neurological deficits. The diathermy was implicated in causing damage to the patient's brain tissue. To investigate if diathermy induced excessive heating was possible with other types of implantable lead systems, or metallic implants in general, we conducted a series of in vitro laboratory tests. We obtained a diathermy unit and also assembled a controllable laboratory exposure system. Specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements were performed using fibre optic thermometry in proximity to the implants to determine the rate of temperature rise using typical diathermy treatment power levels. Comparisons were made of the SAR measurements for a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) lead, a pacemaker lead and three types of bone prosthesis (screws, rods and a plate). Findings indicate that temperature changes of 2.54 and 4.88 °C s-1 with corresponding SAR values of 9129 and 17 563 W kg-1 near the SCS and pacemaker electrodes are significantly higher than those found in the proximity of the other metallic implants which ranged from 0.04 to 0.69 °C s-1 (129 to 2471 W kg-1). Since the DBS leads that were implanted in the reported human incidents have one-half the electrode surface area of the tested SCS lead, these results imply that tissue heating at rates at least equal to or up to twice as much as those reported here for

  6. Acupressure magnets: a possible MRI hazard.

    PubMed

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Mallon, Kara; Brown, Julie C

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets as a component of complementary and alternative medicine is increasingly common. Magnet therapy is used to treat a variety of conditions and often involves tiny magnets adhered to the skin. In auriculotherapy, magnets are placed in specific locations of the ear pinnae which represent particular parts of the body. While generally considered safe, these magnets have the potential to cause imaging problems and serious injury during MRI. We report a case of auriculotherapy magnets which escaped detection despite the use of screening forms and a walk-through metal detector. The magnets caused image artifact but no other patient harm. We recommend updating patient screening practices and educating providers placing therapeutic magnets and performing MRIs of this new potential MRI hazard.

  7. Speech quality evaluation of subcutaneously implanted microphone using in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seong Tak; Lee, Gihyoun; Jung, Eui Sung; Lim, Hyung-Gyu; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Kim, Myoung Nam; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The microphone in a fully implantable hearing device (FIHD) is generally implanted under the skin covering the temporal bone. However, the implanted microphone can be affected by the skin, which causes both sound attenuation and distortion, particularly at high frequencies. As the degree of attenuation and distortion through the skin is severe, speech quality evaluation parameters are needed for the received signal when designing an implantable microphone. However, the performance of most implantable microphones is only assessed based on the sensitivity and frequency response. Thus, practical indicators based on human auditory characteristics are needed for an objective evaluation of the performance of implantable microphones. In this study, a subcutaneously implantable microphone was designed, and its frequency response investigated using an in vivo experiment. Plus, to evaluate the objective indicators, the speech quality of the signals measured by the implanted microphone was calculated using a MATLAB program, and the indicators compared before and after implantation.

  8. A technique to eliminate subgingival cement adhesion to implant abutments by using polytetrafluoroethylene tape.

    PubMed

    Hess, Timothy A

    2014-08-01

    Residual excess cement adhered subgingivally to an implant abutment has the potential to cause periimplant mucositis or periimplant disease. This article describes a procedure in which polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape is used to protect dental cements from adhering to the implant abutment. This technique ensures complete removal of cement from the implant abutment after seating of the crown.

  9. Self-Assembling Nanocomplexes by combining Ferumoxytol, Heparin And Protamine For Cell Tracking by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Mya S.; Bryant, L. Henry; Coppola, Tiziana; Jordan, E. Kay; Budde, Matthew D.; Lewis, Bobbi K.; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Ren, Jiaqiang; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Arbab, Ali S.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a novel and straightforward magnetic cell labeling approach that combines three FDA-approved drugs, ferumoxytol (F), heparin (H) and protamine (P) in serum free media to form self-assembling nanocomplexes that effectively label cells for in vivo MRI. We observed that the HPF nanocomplexes were stable in serum free cell culture media. HPF nanocomplexes exhibited a three-fold increase in T2 relaxivity compared to F. Electron Microscopy revealed internalized HPF within endosomes, confirmed by Prussian blue staining of labeled cells. There was no long-term effect or toxicity on cellular physiology or function of HPF-labeled hematopoietic stem cells, bone marrow stromal cells, neural stem cells, and T-cells when compared to controls. In vivo MRI detected 1000 HPF-labeled cells implanted in rat brains. HPF labeling method should facilitate the monitoring by MRI of infused or implanted cells in clinical trials. PMID:22366951

  10. Suppression of human spermatogenesis by testosterone implants.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, D J; Conway, A J; Boylan, L M

    1992-11-01

    Hormonally induced azoospermia is an effective, reversible form of male contraception; however, some men treated with weekly im testosterone enanthate (TE) injections fail to become azoospermic. As weekly injections cause widely fluctuating and supraphysiological testosterone levels, we tested the hypothesis that more stable, physiological testosterone levels would consistently produce azoospermia. Using a depot testosterone formulation which provides stable, physiological range testosterone levels for up to 6 months, we studied nine men before and after insertion of six 200 mg testosterone implants under the abdominal wall skin and compared the results with 38 men treated in a previous study with weekly im injections of 200 mg TE. Testosterone implants suppressed sperm output to near-azoospermia between the second to fourth postimplant months returning to normal by the sixth postimplant month. The fall in sperm output at the first month was greater after testosterone implants than TE injections (58% vs. 17%, P = 0.011) but similar proportions of men became azoospermic (5/9 vs. 25/38) or severely oligozoospermic (< 1 million/ml; 9/9 vs. 37/38). Plasma testosterone and estradiol levels remained mostly within the eugonadal range after implants but were markedly supraphysiological during TE injections. Both treatments suppressed immunoreactive LH and FSH to undetectable levels by ultrasensitive fluoroimmunoassay. Sex hormone-binding globulin levels were decreased and PRL levels increased by TE injections but neither was changed by testosterone implants. Prostate-specific antigen demonstrated a small rise of marginal significance (P = 0.065) after testosterone implants. Fewer men experienced acne after implants (0/9 vs. 25/38, p = 0.0004). Therefore a depot testosterone preparation with quasi-zero-order release demonstrates higher dose efficiency with similar (but not uniform) efficacy at inducing azoospermia but may cause fewer androgenic side-effects than weekly TE

  11. Evaluation of the Etiologies of Implant Fracture in Patients With Fractures of the Implants of Lower Limbs’ Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Ali; Otoukesh, Babak; Kaghazian, Peyman; Yeganeh, Nima; Boddohi, Bahram; Moghtadaei, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Orthopedics implants are important tools for treatment of bone fractures. Despite available recommendations for designing and making the implants, there are multiple cases of fracture of these implants in the body. Hence, in this study the frequency of failure of implants in long bones of lower extremities was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this cross-sectional study, two types of fractured implants in the body were analyzed and underwent metalogical, mechanical, and modeling and stress-bending analysis. Results: The results revealed that the main cause of fractures was decreased mechanical resistance due to inappropriate chemical composition (especially decreased percentages of Nickel and Molybdenum). Conclusions: It may be concluded that following the standard chemical composition and use of optimal making method are the most important works for prevention of failure of implants. PMID:26843735

  12. In vitro MRI of brain development.

    PubMed

    Rados, Marko; Judas, Milos; Kostović, Ivica

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we demonstrate the developmental appearance, structural features, and reorganization of transient cerebral zones and structures in the human fetal brain using a correlative histological and MRI analysis. The analysis of postmortem aldehyde-fixed specimens (age range: 10 postovulatory weeks to term) revealed that, at 10 postovulatory weeks, the cerebral wall already has a trilaminar appearance and consists of: (1) a ventricular zone of high cell-packing density; (2) an intermediate zone; (3) the cortical plate (in a stage of primary consolidation) with high MRI signal intensity. The anlage of the hippocampus is present as a prominent bulging in the thin limbic telencephalon. The early fetal telencephalon impar also contains the first commissural fibers and fornix bundles in the septal area. The ganglionic eminence is clearly visible as an expanded continuation of the proliferative ventricular zone. The basal ganglia showed an initial aggregation of cells. The most massive fiber system is in the hemispheric stalk, which is in continuity with thalamocortical fibers. During the mid-fetal period (15-22 postovulatory weeks), the typical fetal lamination pattern develops and the cerebral wall consists of the following zones: (a) a marginal zone (visible on MRI exclusively in the hippocampus); (b) the cortical plate with high cell-packing density and high MRI signal intensity; (c) the subplate zone, which is the most prominent zone rich in extracellular matrix and with a very low MRI signal intensity; (d) the intermediate zone (fetal "white matter"); (e) the subventricular zone; (f) the periventricular fiber-rich zone; (g) the ventricular zone. The ganglionic eminence is still a very prominent structure with an intense proliferative activity. During the next period (22-26 postovulatory weeks), there is the developmental peak of transient MRI features, caused by the high content of hydrophyllic extracellular matrix in the subplate zone and the accumulation

  13. Prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant candidates

    PubMed Central

    Aldhafeeri, Ahmad M.; Alsanosi, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of inner ear anomalies and the frequency of different anomaly types among cochlear implant recipients. Methods: This study included a retrospective chart review of all patients who received cochlear implants between January 2009 and January 2013 in King Abdulaziz University Hospital cochlear implant program in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All subjects underwent thin-cut CT of the temporal bone and MRI. The collected data included age, gender, and CT and MRI findings regarding temporal bone anomalies. Patients with any identified congenital inner ear anomalies were included in the study. Results: In total, 316 patients’ cases were reviewed. Inner ear malformations were identified in 24 patients, which represented a prevalence of 7.5%. Among these 24 patients, 8 (33.3%) presented with a large vestibular aqueduct (LVA), 8 (33.3%) semicircular canal (SCC) dysplasia, 7 (29.1%) classical Mondini deformity, and one (4.1%) cochlear hypoplasia. Conclusion: The prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant recipients was 7.5%. This result is consistent with findings worldwide. The most common anomalies were LVA and SCC hypoplasia; by contrast, in other regions, the most common anomaly is either the Mondini deformity, or LVA. PMID:27652360

  14. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor.

  15. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  16. Single implant tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Briley, T F

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that direct bone anchorage of dental implants will provide long-term predictability for single tooth implants and multi-unit implants. The function of implant-supported restoration is now routinely achieved. The real challenge facing the restorative dentist and laboratory technician is to achieve optimal aesthetics. The learning objective of this article is to review the prosthodontic procedures essential to maximizing natural aesthetics in implant supported restorations. It will provide a review of master impression techniques, prepable titanium abutments and designing the cement on restoration. Particular emphasis is directed to the soft tissue model from which a series of sequenced techniques can be followed to achieve optimal aesthetics. Analysis of the implant alignment with regard to the neighboring teeth will result in having to make a choice of which prepable abutment will maximize the aesthetic result. The following case outlines how to replace a single missing tooth using an externally hexed implant system and a prefabricated titanium abutment on a 26-year-old male patient.

  17. Boron implanted strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. J. M.

    Single crystals of strontium titanate implanted with boron were found to have highly conductive surface layers. The effects of varying dose from 10 to the 16th power to 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm, implantation voltage from 50 to 175 keV and annealing conditions on the room temperature surface resistance and Hall mobility are presented. Variation of the implantation voltage did not have a major effect on the sheet resistances obtained by boron implantation of strontium titanate, while dose and annealing conditions have major effects. Doses of 5 x 10 to the 16th power ions/sq cm required annealing on the order of one hour at 500 K for maximum reduction of the room temperature resistance in the implanted layer. Samples implanted with a dose of 1 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm required slightly higher temperatures (approximately 575 K) to obtain a minimum resistance at room temperature. Long term (several weeks) room temperature annealing was found to occur in high dose samples. After one to two months at room temperature followed by an anneal to 575 K, the surface resistances were found to be lower than those produced by the annealing of a freshly implanted sample to 575 K.

  18. MRI assessment of bone structure and microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Chang, Gregory; Boone, Sean; Martel, Dimitri; Rajapakse, Chamith S; Hallyburton, Robert S; Valko, Mitch; Honig, Stephen; Regatte, Ravinder R

    2017-02-06

    Osteoporosis is a disease of weak bone and increased fracture risk caused by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue. The standard-of-care test used to diagnose osteoporosis, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) estimation of areal bone mineral density (BMD), has limitations as a tool to identify patients at risk for fracture and as a tool to monitor therapy response. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of bone structure and microarchitecture has been proposed as another method to assess bone quality and fracture risk in vivo. MRI is advantageous because it is noninvasive, does not require ionizing radiation, and can evaluate both cortical and trabecular bone. In this review article, we summarize and discuss research progress on MRI of bone structure and microarchitecture over the last decade, focusing on in vivo translational studies. Single-center, in vivo studies have provided some evidence for the added value of MRI as a biomarker of fracture risk or treatment response. Larger, prospective, multicenter studies are needed in the future to validate the results of these initial translational studies.

  19. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  20. Biomedical implantable microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Meindl, J D

    1980-10-17

    Innovative applications of microelectronics in new biomedical implantable instruments offer a singular opportunity for advances in medical research and practice because of two salient factors: (i) beyond all other types of biomedical instruments, implants exploit fully the inherent technical advantages--complex functional capability, high reliability, lower power drain, small size and weight-of microelectronics, and (ii) implants bring microelectronics into intimate association with biological systems. The combination of these two factors enables otherwise impossible new experiments to be conducted and new paostheses developed that will improve the quality of human life.

  1. Development and Evaluation of an Actuated MRI-Compatible Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Axel; Song, Sang-Eun; Cho, Nathan B.; Iordachita, Iulian; Guion, Peter; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the design, development, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatibility evaluation of an actuated transrectal prostate robot for MRI-guided needle intervention in the prostate. The robot performs actuated needle MRI-guidance with the goals of providing (i) MRI compatibility, (ii) MRI-guided needle placement with accuracy sufficient for targeting clinically significant prostate cancer foci, (iii) reducing interventional procedure times (thus increasing patient comfort and reducing opportunity for needle targeting error due to patient motion), (iv) enabling real-time MRI monitoring of interventional procedures, and (v) reducing the opportunities for error that arise in manually actuated needle placement. The design of the robot, employing piezo-ceramic-motor actuated needle guide positioning and manual needle insertion, is reported. Results of a MRI compatibility study show no reduction of MRI signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) with the motors disabled. Enabling the motors reduces the SNR by 80% without RF shielding, but SNR is only reduced by 40% to 60% with RF shielding. The addition of radio-frequency shielding is shown to significantly reduce image SNR degradation caused by the presence of the robotic device. An accuracy study of MRI-guided biopsy needle placements in a prostate phantom is reported. The study shows an average in-plane targeting error of 2.4 mm with a maximum error of 3.7 mm. These data indicate the system’s needle targeting accuracy is similar to that obtained with a previously reported manually actuated system, and is sufficient to reliably sample clinically significant prostate cancer foci under MRI-guidance. PMID:23326181

  2. Complications of Cardiac Perforation and Lead Dislodgement with an MRI-Conditional Pacing Lead: a Korean Multi-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Medtronic CapSureFix MRI 5086 pacing lead (5086; Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) has been reported to be associated with increased cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement. This study aimed to compare the incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement within 30 days after pacemaker implantation between 5086 MRI lead and previous Medtronic CapSureFix Novus 5076 non-MRI pacing lead. This was a nationwide, multicenter retrospective study in which we compared the incidence of adverse events between 277 patients implanted with 5086 lead and 205 patients implanted with 5076 lead between March 2009 and September 2014. Cardiac perforation within 30 days of pacemaker implantation occurred in 4 patients (1.4%) with the 5086 lead and in no patient with the 5076 lead (P = 0.084). Lead dislodgement occurred in 8 patients (2.9%) with the 5086 lead and in 5 patients (2.4%) with the 5076 lead (P = 0.764). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, age was significantly associated with cardiac perforation. Congestive heart failure and implantation of right atrial (RA) lead at RA free wall or septum were significant factors for the incidence of lead dislodgement and lead revision. The incidence of cardiac perforation and lead dislodgement were not statistically different between the patients with 5086 lead and the patients with 5076 lead. However, careful attention for cardiac perforation may be needed when using the 5086 MRI lead, especially in elderly patients. PMID:27510382

  3. Stress and strain distribution in three different mini dental implant designs using in implant retained overdenture: a finite element analysis study

    PubMed Central

    AUNMEUNGTONG, W.; KHONGKHUNTHIAN, P.; RUNGSIYAKULL, P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used for prediction of stress and strain between dental implant components and bone in the implant design process. Purpose Purpose of this study was to characterize and analyze stress and strain distribution occurring in bone and implants and to compare stress and strain of three different implant designs. Materials and methods Three different mini dental implant designs were included in this study: 1. a mini dental implant with an internal implant-abutment connection (MDIi); 2. a mini dental implant with an external implant-abutment connection (MDIe); 3. a single piece mini dental implant (MDIs). All implant designs were scanned using micro-CT scans. The imaging details of the implants were used to simulate models for FEA. An artificial bone volume of 9×9 mm in size was constructed and each implant was placed separately at the center of each bone model. All bone-implant models were simulatively loaded under an axial compressive force of 100 N and a 45-degree force of 100 N loading at the top of the implants using computer software to evaluate stress and strain distribution. Results There was no difference in stress or strain between the three implant designs. The stress and strain occurring in all three mini dental implant designs were mainly localized at the cortical bone around the bone-implant interface. Oblique 45° loading caused increased deformation, magnitude and distribution of stress and strain in all implant models. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, the average stress and strain in bone and implant models with MDIi were similar to those with MDIe and MDIs. The oblique 45° load played an important role in dramatically increased average stress and strain in all bone-implant models. Clinical implications Mini dental implants with external or internal connections have similar stress distribution to single piece mini dental implants. In clinical situations, the three types of mini dental implant

  4. Specific Language Impairment, Nonverbal IQ, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Cochlear Implants, Bilingualism, and Dialectal Variants: Defining the Boundaries, Clarifying Clinical Conditions, and Sorting Out Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this research forum article is to provide an overview of a collection of invited articles on the topic “specific language impairment (SLI) in children with concomitant health conditions or nonmainstream language backgrounds.” Topics include SLI, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, cochlear implants, bilingualism, and dialectal language learning contexts. Method The topic is timely due to current debates about the diagnosis of SLI. An overarching comparative conceptual framework is provided for comparisons of SLI with other clinical conditions. Comparisons of SLI in children with low-normal or normal nonverbal IQ illustrate the unexpected outcomes of 2 × 2 comparison designs. Results Comparative studies reveal unexpected relationships among speech, language, cognitive, and social dimensions of children's development as well as precise ways to identify children with SLI who are bilingual or dialect speakers. Conclusions The diagnosis of SLI is essential for elucidating possible causal pathways of language impairments, risks for language impairments, assessments for identification of language impairments, linguistic dimensions of language impairments, and long-term outcomes. Although children's language acquisition is robust under high levels of risk, unexplained individual variations in language acquisition lead to persistent language impairments. PMID:26502218

  5. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23265327 . Swerdlow CD, Wang PJ, Zipes DP. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. ... and lifestyle Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart ...

  6. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  7. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... has traveled to other parts of the body. Connective Tissue Disease The FDA has not detected any association between silicone gel-filled breast implants and connective tissue disease, breast cancer, or reproductive problems. In order ...

  8. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone gel or salt water (saline) — to reshape your breasts. Breast reconstruction ...

  9. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  10. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of well-being and your quality of life. Alternative Names Breast implants surgery References Roehl KR, Wilhelmi BJ, Phillips LG. Breast reconstruction. ...

  11. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  12. Frequency-specific electrocorticographic correlates of working memory delay period fMRI activity.

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Faraz; Tandon, Nitin; Tertel, Kathrin; Pieters, Thomas A; Disano, Michael A; Ellmore, Timothy M

    2011-06-01

    Electrocorticography (ECoG) and functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI) have been used previously to measure brain activity during working memory delay periods. These studies have separately reported oscillation changes in the theta (4-8 Hz) band and BOLD-fMRI increases during delay periods when information is maintained in memory. However, it is not known how intracranial cortical field potential (CFP) changes relate to BOLD-fMRI responses during delay periods. To answer this question, fMRI was obtained from six epilepsy patients during a visual working memory task. Then, following subdural macroelectrode implant, continuous ECoG was used to record CFPs during the same task. Time-frequency analyses showed delay period gamma band oscillation amplitude increases on electrodes located near fMRI activity, while in the theta band changes were higher for electrodes located away from fMRI activation. The amplitude of the ECoG gamma band response was significantly positively correlated with the fMRI response, while a negative correlation was found for the theta band. The findings are consistent with previous reports of local field potential (LFP) coupling in the gamma band with BOLD-fMRI responses during visual stimulation in monkeys, but are novel in that the relationship reported here persists after the disappearance of visual stimuli while information is being maintained in memory. We conclude that there is a relationship between BOLD-fMRI increases and human working memory delay period gamma oscillation increases and theta decreases. The spectral profile change provides a basis for comparison of working memory delay period BOLD-fMRI with field potential recordings in animals and other human intracranial EEG studies.

  13. RANKL in the osteolysis of AES total ankle replacement implants.

    PubMed

    Koivu, H; Mackiewicz, Z; Takakubo, Y; Trokovic, N; Pajarinen, J; Konttinen, Y T

    2012-09-01

    Peri-implant tissue reactions in failed total ankle replacement (TAR) are characterized by early developing peri-implant osteolysis. The hypothesis of the study was that this reaction is mediated by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). Samples of peri-prosthetic tissues from failed TAR implants were stained for macrophages, RANKL, its receptor RANK and osteoprotegerin (OPG), and compared to control samples. The failed TAR implants were surrounded by implant capsule, synovial lining-like interface membrane or necrotic tissues. Infiltrating scavenger receptor I positive CD163(+) macrophages were frequent, in particular around necrotic soft tissues or bone sequestrate, and possibly in part formed due to ischemia and mechanical factors. In contrast, implant-derived wear debris was scanty. Still many RANK(+) macrophages were often seen in close contact with RANKL(+) mesenchymal cells, whereas OPG was mostly located at a distance in vascular endothelial cells. Foreign body giant cells were frequent. RANKL seems to stimulate locally accumulated CD163(+) RANK-expressing cells to fusion, which leads to the local formation of multinuclear foreign body giant cells (and probably of osteoclasts). Therefore, peri-implant osteolysis in early TAR implant failure seems to be caused by the RANKL-driven chronic foreign body inflammation directed against, not implant-derived particles, but against necrotic autologous tissues.

  14. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  15. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  16. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  17. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restricted to English language articles published from 1990 to December 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major dental implant journals was performed. When considering studies, clinical studies were preferred followed by histological human studies, animal studies, and in vitro studies. A total of 115 articles were selected after elimination: clinical studies, 24; human histomorphometric studies, 11; animal histomorphometric studies, 46; in vitro studies, 34. The following observations were made in this review: · The focus has shifted from surface roughness to surface chemistry and a combination of chemical manipulations on the porous structure. More investigations are done regarding surface coatings. · Bone response to almost all the surface treatments was favorable. · Future trend is focused on the development of osteogenic implant surfaces. Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  18. [Larynx: implants and stents].

    PubMed

    Sittel, C

    2009-05-01

    There is a wide variety of devices and materials to be implanted into the human larynx. Some are intended to remain only for a period of time, like laryngeal stents. If removal is not intended the device meets the definition for a medical implant. The majority of implants is used for the treatment of unilateral vocal fold immobility. There a 2 types of implants serving this purpose: Implants in a stricter sense are devices of solid material, which are brought into the paraglottic space through a window in the laryngeal framework (medialization thyroplasty). Several different products are presented in this review. In contrast, there are different substances available for endoscopic injection into the paralyzed vocal fold (injection laryngoplasty). Since some of these substances show a corpuscular consistency and a high viscosity they need to be deposited into the lateral paraglottic space. Therefore, the term "injectable implants" has been coined for these materials. The different substances available are discussed in detail in this review. Laryngeal stents are primarily used in the early postoperative phase after open reconstruction of the larynx. The different devices available on the market are described with their specific characteristics and intended use.

  19. [How safe is magnetic resonance imaging in patients with contraceptive implants?].

    PubMed

    Mühler, M; Taupitz, M

    2006-07-01

    When patients with an implanted contraceptive device undergo MRI, it must be ensured that the examination involves no risk to the patient (MR safety) and that the diagnosis is not affected by artifacts or the function of the device compromised (MR compatibility). Two basic types of intrauterine devices can be distinguished: the metal-containing/metal-free intrauterine device (IUD) and the hormone-containing implant, the fully metal-free intrauterine system (IUS), as well as the ESSURE insert made of stainless steel, which has been approved for use in Europe since February 2001. The metal-containing and metal-free IUDs and ESSURE are MRI compatible up to a magnetic field strength of 1.5 T. They do not interact in any relevant way with the external magnetic or high-frequency field and the temperature increase is within the physiologic range. The implants merely produce a local signal void with a shape that depends on their orientation relative to the magnetic field lines. At 3 T, only the metal-free IUD and the IUS are MRI safe in terms of the material used. In contrast, metal-containing IUDs and the ESSURE have not yet been fully evaluated in the 3 T field, which is why they represent a contraindication to MRI. No data are available on the MRI compatibility at 3 T for any of these devices.

  20. Silicone breast implants and immune disease.

    PubMed

    Shons, A R; Schubert, W

    1992-05-01

    Silicone was originally regarded as inert in the human body. Silicone medical devices have been associated with various complications that may involve an immune reaction to silicone or a silicone organic complex. There have been more than 80 cases reported in the medical literature of a varied systemic autoimmune illness in patients who have had various foreign materials placed in the breast. Controversy exists as to which complications have a cause and effect relationship, and which represent coincidental findings. It is difficult to distinguish between nonspecific local reactions and reactions that have an immunological basis. Approximately 1,000,000 to 2,000,000 women in the United States have had silicone breast implants inserted for reconstruction or augmentation mammaplasty; 28 of those patients have been reported to have developed a systemic autoimmune disease. Data on the 28 reported cases do not in any way prove a causal relationship between breast implants and immune disease. Given the natural incidence of autoimmune diseases, we would expect a coincidental occurrence in the United States of more than 1,000 cases of autoimmune disease in women who had undergone breast implant surgery. Additional information must be obtained to resolve the question. The true incidence of autoimmune disease in patients with implants needs to be determined. A prospective registry of implant patients should be established and comprehensive retrospective information obtained on the implant patient population. Further experimental work is necessary on the bioreactivity of silicone. Patients with implants and autoimmune disease, once identified, must be carefully evaluated by physicians who are experienced in the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  1. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoob, Faisal; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ˜150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 1016 cm-2, close to the depth ˜250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  2. Effect of cantilever length on stress distribution around implants in mandibular overdentures supported by two and three implants

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Mosharraf, Ramin; Khodaeian, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is no definitive study comparing stress distribution around two versus three implants in implant-retained overdentures with different cantilever length. The purpose of this finite element study was to evaluate stress pattern around the implants of the 2 or 3 implant- supported mandibular overdenture with different cantilevered length. Materials and Methods: The models used in this study were 2 and 3 implant-supported overdenture with bar and clip attachment system on an edentulous mandibular arch. Each model was modified according to cantilever length (0 mm, 7 mm, and 13 mm); thus, 6 models were obtained. The vertical load of 15 and 30 pounds were applied unilaterally to the first molar and 15 pounds to the first premolar, and the stress in bone was analyzed. Results: With increasing cantilever length, no similar stress pattern changes were observed in different areas, but in most instances, an increase in cantilever length did not increase the stress around the implant adjacent to cantilever. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that increasing of cantilever length in mandibular overdentures retained by 2–3 implants did not cause distinct increasing in stress, especially around the implant adjacent to cantilever, it may be helpful to use cantilever in cases of mandibular overdenture supported by splinted implants with insufficient retention and stability. Based on the findings of this study, optimal cantilever length in mandibular overdenture cannot be determined. PMID:27403049

  3. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  4. New approach towards mini dental implants and small-diameter implants: an option for long-term prostheses.

    PubMed

    Gleiznys, Alvydas; Skirbutis, Gediminas; Harb, Ali; Barzdziukaite, Ingrida; Grinyte, Ieva

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Mini dental implants (MDI) and small diameter implants (SDI) have been extensively used as temporary or orthodontic anchorage; however there have been studies that proved their availability as a mean for long term prosthodontics. Our aim was to review the indications, advantages of MDI and SDI, and their long-term survival. METHODS. Computerized searches were conducted for clinical studies between year 2000 and 2011 that involved either implants with 3.3 mm diameter or less, used in prosthodontics; or provided a follow up of MDI or SDI duration of at least 4 months following implant placement including survival rate data. All studies about implants used in orthodontics were excluded. The range of available MDI and SDI has been found in cataloges of the companies: 3M ESPE IMTEC, Bicon Dental, Zimmer, Implant Direct, Intra lock, Hiossen, Simpler Implant, KAT Implants, OCO Biomedical, American Dental Implant. RESULTS. 41 studies meeting the above criteria were selected, 22 out of them reviewed survival rates of MDI and SDI. The follow up duration varried from 4 months to 8 years with survival rates between 91.17 and 100%. Nevertheless, the companies showed a big variety of MDI and SDI provided in the market for long term prostheses. CONCLUSIONS. Implants with small diameters can be used successfully in a variety of clinical situations. Less surgical time, less postoperative pain, ability of direct loading after surgery with no harm to bone and cost effectiveness are the advantages. The reduced surface implants require correct treatment planning so that the loading force would not cause bone loss or implant failure. MDI and SDI show high survival rates, but special cautions for bone quality and good oral hygiene should be maintained.

  5. Segmentation of knee MRI using structure enhanced local phase filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Mikhiel; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker

    2016-03-01

    The segmentation of bone surfaces from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has applications in the quanti- tative measurement of knee osteoarthritis, surgery planning for patient specific total knee arthroplasty and its subsequent fabrication of artificial implants. However, due to the problems associated with MRI imaging such as low contrast between bone and surrounding tissues, noise, bias fields, and the partial volume effect, segmentation of bone surfaces continues to be a challenging operation. In this paper, a new framework is presented for the enhancement of knee MRI scans prior to segmentation in order to obtain high contrast bone images. During the first stage, a new contrast enhanced relative total variation (RTV) regularization method is used in order to remove textural noise from the bone structures and surrounding soft tissue interface. This salient bone edge information is further enhanced using a sparse gradient counting method based on L0 gradient minimization, which globally controls how many non-zero gradients are resulted in order to approximate prominent bone structures in a structure-sparsity-management manner. The last stage of the framework involves incorporation of local phase bone boundary information in order to provide an intensity invariant enhancement of contrast between the bone and surrounding soft tissue. The enhanced images are segmented using a fast random walker algorithm. Validation against expert segmentation was performed on 10 clinical knee MRI images, and achieved a mean dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.975.

  6. Temporal Cortex Activation to Audiovisual Speech in Normal-Hearing and Cochlear Implant Users Measured with Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    van de Rijt, Luuk P. H.; van Opstal, A. John; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Straatman, Louise V.; Hu, Hai Yin; Snik, Ad F. M.; van Wanrooij, Marc M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Speech understanding may rely not only on auditory, but also on visual information. Non-invasive functional neuroimaging techniques can expose the neural processes underlying the integration of multisensory processes required for speech understanding in humans. Nevertheless, noise (from functional MRI, fMRI) limits the usefulness in auditory experiments, and electromagnetic artifacts caused by electronic implants worn by subjects can severely distort the scans (EEG, fMRI). Therefore, we assessed audio-visual activation of temporal cortex with a silent, optical neuroimaging technique: functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Methods: We studied temporal cortical activation as represented by concentration changes of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in four, easy-to-apply fNIRS optical channels of 33 normal-hearing adult subjects and five post-lingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users in response to supra-threshold unisensory auditory and visual, as well as to congruent auditory-visual speech stimuli. Results: Activation effects were not visible from single fNIRS channels. However, by discounting physiological noise through reference channel subtraction (RCS), auditory, visual and audiovisual (AV) speech stimuli evoked concentration changes for all sensory modalities in both cohorts (p < 0.001). Auditory stimulation evoked larger concentration changes than visual stimuli (p < 0.001). A saturation effect was observed for the AV condition. Conclusions: Physiological, systemic noise can be removed from fNIRS signals by RCS. The observed multisensory enhancement of an auditory cortical channel can be plausibly described by a simple addition of the auditory and visual signals with saturation. PMID:26903848

  7. Ulnar nerve compression in Guyon's canal: MRI does not always have the answer

    PubMed Central

    Paget, James; Patel, Neil; Manushakian, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Lipoma is a rare cause of ulnar nerve compression in Guyon's canal. All four previously reported cases from 2000 to 2009 have been accurately diagnosed on MRI. We present a case report where the MRI and surgical findings differed and a summary of the previous cases in the literature. We conclude that although MRI remains the best investigation for this condition, it is not always accurate and clinical findings still provide the best basis for surgical treatment. PMID:24963936

  8. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  9. [CT and MRI of hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Agten, C A; Sutter, R; Pfirrmann, C W A

    2014-07-01

    Metal-induced artifacts impair image quality of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with hip prostheses. Due to new developments in metal artifact reduction both methods can now be used for evaluation of a painful hip prosthesis. Iterative reconstruction algorithms and dual-energy scans are among the newer CT techniques for artifact reduction, while slice-encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) and multi-acquisition variable-resonance image combination (MAVRIC) have introduced substantial improvements for MRI. Loosening of the hip prosthesis, osteolysis from small wear particles and pseudotumors in metal-on-metal prostheses are specific pathologies in patients with total hip arthroplasty. Other causes of painful hip prostheses are infections, fractures, tendinopathies, tendon ruptures, muscle and nerve alterations and heterotopic ossifications.

  10. Mechanical and morphological evaluation of osteochondral implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bavaresco, Vanessa P; Garrido, Luiz; Batista, Nilza A; Malmonge, Sônia M; Belangero, William D

    2008-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of osteochondral defects was evaluated in this study with the intention of developing alternative procedures. Cylindrical pins (5.00 mm in diameter and in height) made of pHEMA hydrogel covered ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) or beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) matrix were used. Ostoechondral defects were caused in the knees of adult dogs and the evaluation was carried out after a 9-month follow-up period. The mechanical behavior of the implants was evaluated by means of an indentation creep test that showed that the UHMWPE matrix maintained its viscoelastic behavior even after follow-up time, while the beta-TCP matrix osteochondral implants presented significant alterations. It is believed that the beta-TCP osteochondral implants were unable to withstand the load applied, causing an increase of complacency when compared to the UHMWPE osteochondral implants. Based on micro and macroscopic analysis, no significant wear was observed in either of the osteochondral implants when compared to the controls. However, morphological alterations, with fragmentation indices in the patella, were observed either due to friction with the hydrogel in the first postoperative months or due to forming of a dense conjunctive tissue. This wear mechanism caused on the counterface of the implant (patella) was observed, notwithstanding the osteochondral implant studied.

  11. Ohmic contacts to Si-implanted and un-implanted n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J; Ramer, J.; Zheng, L.F.; Hersee, S.D.; Zolper, J.

    1996-02-01

    We report on ohmic contacts to Si-implanted and un-implanted n-type GaN on sapphire. A ring shaped contact design avoids the need to isolate the contact structures by additional implantation or etching. Metal layers of Al and Ti/Al were investigated. On un-implanted GaN, post metalization annealing was performed in an RTA for 30 seconds in N{sub 2} at 700, 800, and 900 C. A minimum specific contact resistance (r{sub c}) of 1.4{times}10{sup -5} {Omega}{minus}cm{sup 2} was measured for Ti/Al at an annealing temperature of 800 C. Although these values are reasonably low, variations of 95% in specific contact resistance were measured within a 500 {mu}m distance on the wafer. These results are most likely caused by the presence of compensating hydrogen. Specific contact resistance variation was reduced from 95 to 10% by annealing at 900 C prior to metalization. On Si-implanted GaN, un-annealed ohmic contacts were formed with Ti/Al metalization. The implant activation anneal of 1120 C generates nitrogen vacancies that leave the surface heavily n-type, which makes un-annealed ohmic contacts with low contact resistivity possible.

  12. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  13. The effect of metallic implants on radiation therapy in spinal tumor patients with metallic spinal implants

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Seok Hyun; Kang, Young Nam; Ryu, Mi-Ryeong

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metallic implants on the dose calculation for radiation therapy in patients with metallic implants and to find a way to reduce the error of dose calculation. We made a phantom in which titanium implants were inserted into positions similar to the implant positions in spinal posterior/posterolateral fusion. We compared the calculated dose of the treatment planning systems with the measured dose in the treatment equipment. We used 3 kinds of computed tomography (CT) (kilovoltage CT, extended-scaled kilovoltage CT, and megavoltage CT) and 3 kinds of treatment equipment (ARTISTE, TomoTherapy Hi-Art, and Cyberknife). For measurement of doses, we used an ionization chamber and Gafchromic external beam therapy film. The absolute doses that were measured using an ionization chamber at the isocenter in the titanium phantom were on average 1.9% lower than those in the reference phantom (p = 0.002). There was no statistically significant difference according to the kinds of CT images, the treatment equipment, and the size of the targets. As the distance from the surface of the titanium implants became closer, the measured doses tended to decrease (p < 0.001), and this showed a statistically significant difference among the kinds of CT images: the effect of metallic implants was less in the megavoltage CT than in the kilovoltage CT or the extended-scaled kilovoltage CT. The error caused by the titanium implants was beyond a clinically acceptable range. To reduce the error of dose calculation, we suggest that the megavoltage CT be used for planning. In addition, it is necessary to consider the distance between the titanium implants and the targets or the organs at risk to prescribe the dose for the target and the dose constraint for the organs at risk.

  14. Application of uniform design to improve dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of uniform experimental design to improve dental implant systems subjected to dynamic loads. The dynamic micromotion of the Zimmer dental implant system is calculated and illustrated by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. Endogenous and exogenous factors influence the success rate of dental implant systems. Endogenous factors include: bone density, cortical bone thickness and osseointegration. Exogenous factors include: thread pitch, thread depth, diameter of implant neck and body size. A dental implant system with a crest module was selected to simulate micromotion distribution and stress behavior under dynamic loads using conventional and proposed methods. Finally, the design which caused minimum micromotion was chosen as the optimal design model. The micromotion of the improved model is 36.42 μm, with an improvement is 15.34% as compared to the original model.

  15. Charge state defect engineering of silicon during ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.; Ravi, J.; Erokhin, Y.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; White, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of in situ interventions which alter defect interactions during implantation, and thereby affect the final damage state, have been investigated. Specifically, we examined effects of internal electric fields and charge carrier injection on damage accumulation in Si. First, we implanted H or He ions into diode structures which were either reverse or forward biased during implantation. Second, we implanted B or Si ions into plain Si wafers while illuminating them with UV light. In each case, the overall effect is one of damage reduction. Both the electric field and charge carrier injection effects may be understood as resulting from changes in defect interactions caused in part by changes to the charge state of defects formed during implantation.

  16. Occurrence of discal and non-discal changes after sequestrectomy alone versus sequestrectomy and implantation of an anulus closure device.

    PubMed

    Barth, Martin; Fontana, Johann; Thomé, Claudius; Bouma, Gerrit J; Schmieder, Kirsten

    2016-12-01

    Sequestrectomy alone represents a procedure for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. For selected cases, an anulus closure device (ACD) can be implanted which may result in lower reoperation rates. However, comparative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes and their clinical relevance of both procedures are unclear and have not been reported so far. Clinical and MRI data of patients after limited discectomy with ACD implantation (group ACD; N=45) and patients after sequestrectomy alone (group S; N=40) with primary lumbar disc herniation were compared retrospectively. Pain intensity on the visual analogue pain scale (VAS), oswestry disability index (ODI) or the patient satisfaction index (PSI) were collected. Disc signal intensity, Modic type changes, endplate reactions, anular tears and reherniations were investigated using MRI before and <18months postoperative. Morphologic changes were correlated with clinical outcome. There was no difference in VAS back, VAS leg or ODI/PSI after the operation although group S showed significantly more reherniations in MRI. The overall rate of repeated surgery at the same level was similar with a trend in favour of the ACD group (P=0.729). Significantly more patients of the ACD group experienced endplate erosions after surgery (P<0.001). Both groups experienced progression of disc signal intensity, Modic type changes, and anular tears with most MRI signs being without clinical relevance. ACD implantation is associated with a significantly lower reherniation rate in MRI but showed a significantly higher rate of endplate erosions. The structural changes do not appear to be clinically relevant.

  17. Cyclic generalized projection MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarty, Gordon E

    2015-04-01

    Progress in the development of portable MRI hinges on the ability to use lightweight magnets that have non-uniform magnetic fields. An image encoding method and mathematical procedure for recovering the image from the NMR signal from non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours is given. Individual frequencies in an NMR signal from an object in a non-uniform magnetic field give rise to integrals of the object along contours of constant magnetic field: generalized projections. With closed isomagnetic field contours a simple, cyclic, direct reconstruction of the image from the generalized projections is possible when the magnet and RF transmit coil are held fixed relative to the imaged object while the RF receive coil moves. Numerical simulations, using the Shepp and Logan mathematical phantom, were completed to show that the mathematical method works and to illustrate numerical limitations. The method is numerically verified and exact reconstruction demonstrated for discrete mathematical image phantoms. Correct knowledge of the RF receive field is necessary or severe image distortions will result. The cyclic mathematical reconstruction method presented here will be useful for portable MRI schemes that use non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours along with mechanically or electronically moving the RF receive coils.

  18. Extraoral prostheses using extraoral implants.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, G; Tuna, S H; Oghan, F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate extraoral prostheses and the use of extraoral implants in patients with facial defects. 10 cases were treated utilizing maxillofacial prostheses employing extraoral implants in five cases. 16 extraoral implants were installed. Seven implants were placed in irradiated sites in the orbital regions. Six implants were placed in mastoid regions and three in a zygoma region that was irradiated. Two implants failed before initial integration was achieved in irradiated areas. Using 14 extraoral implants as anchors, five extraoral prostheses were set. The other five cases were treated with extraoral prostheses without using extraoral implants due to cost and patient-related factors. The data included age, sex, primary disease, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. The use of extraoral implants for the retention of extraoral prostheses has simplified the placement, removal, and cleaning of the prosthesis by the patient. The stability of the prostheses was improved by anchors. Clinical and technical problems are presented with the techniques used for their resolution. Using extraoral implants resulted in a high rate of success in retaining facial prostheses and gave good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.

  19. Chemokines Associated with Pathologic Responses to Orthopedic Implant Debris

    PubMed Central

    Hallab, Nadim J.; Jacobs, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success in returning people to health saving mobility and high quality of life, the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after approximately 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation to implant debris compromising the bone implant interface. This local inflammatory pseudo disease state is primarily caused by implant debris interaction with innate immune cells, i.e., macrophages. This implant debris can also activate an adaptive immune reaction giving rise to the concept of implant-related metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agree the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris danger signaling (danger-associated molecular pattern) eliciting cytokine-based and chemokine inflammatory responses. This review covers implant debris-induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive) immune system and how this leads to subsequent implant failure through loosening and osteolysis, i.e., what is known of central chemokines (e.g., IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, MIP-1, CCL9, CCL10, CCL17, and CCL22) associated with implant debris reactivity as related to the innate immune system activation/cytokine expression, e.g., danger signaling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc.), toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, etc.), bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b), and hypoxia responses (HIF-1α). More study is needed, however, to fully understand these interactions to effectively counter cytokine- and chemokine-based orthopedic implant-related inflammation. PMID:28154552

  20. Towards biodegradable wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clémentine M; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Streit, Patrick; Schinhammer, Michael; Hänzi, Anja C; Hierold, Christofer

    2012-05-28

    A new generation of partially or even fully biodegradable implants is emerging. The idea of using temporary devices is to avoid a second surgery to remove the implant after its period of use, thereby improving considerably the patient's comfort and safety. This paper provides a state-of-the-art overview and an experimental section that describes the key technological challenges for making biodegradable devices. The general considerations for the design and synthesis of biodegradable components are illustrated with radiofrequency-driven resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) resonators made of biodegradable metals (Mg, Mg alloy, Fe, Fe alloys) and biodegradable conductive polymer composites (polycaprolactone-polypyrrole, polylactide-polypyrrole). Two concepts for partially/fully biodegradable wireless implants are discussed, the ultimate goal being to obtain a fully biodegradable sensor for in vivo sensing.

  1. Cochlear implant in Cogan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Rajesh; Shawn, T Joseph

    2007-10-01

    Post-lingual deafness is a stressful condition which is rendered even more painful by the sudden emotional isolation that the patient suffers. Cogan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune cause for post-lingual deafness characterized by non-syphilitic interstitial keratitis, bilateral audio vestibular deficiencies and systemic vasculitis. World over very few cases of Cogan's syndrome have been reported. Cochlear implant surgery in such a patient is a challenging but highly satisfactory experience due to the multitude of clinical problems the patient faces. This demands a proper work up, meticulous surgery and stringent post-operative follow-up. Here we present a patient with atypical Cogan's syndrome, diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. She went into a major depression with suicidal tendency following the complete loss of hearing. We performed cochlear implant surgery in this patient, but not before facing several clinical obstacles, helped by a dedicated team consisting of a rheumatologist, endocrinologist, neurophysician, psychiatrist, anaesthetists and audiologist. The results are extremely satisfying for the patient and all the people involved. This case underlines the prime importance of hearing in maintaining the psychological well being of a human being.

  2. Biocompatibility of implantable biomedical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Suping

    2008-03-01

    Biomedical devices have been broadly used to treat human disease, especially chronic diseases where pharmaceuticals are less effective. Heart valve and artificial joint are examples. Biomedical devices perform by delivering therapies such as electric stimulations, mechanical supports and biological actions. While the uses of biomedical devices are highly successful they can trigger adverse biological reactions as well. The property that medical devices perform with intended functions but not causing unacceptable adverse effects was called biocompatibility in the early time. As our understanding of biomaterial-biological interactions getting broader, biocompatibility has more meanings. In this talk, I will present some adverse biological reactions observed with implantable biomedical devices. Among them are surface fouling of implantable sensors, calcification with vascular devices, restenosis with stents, foreign particle migration and mechanical fractures of devices due to inflammation reactions. While these effects are repeatable, there are very few quantitative data and theories to define them. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce this biocompatibility concept to biophysicists to stimulate research interests at different angles. An open question is how to quantitatively understand the biocompatibility that, like many other biological processes, has not been quantified experimentally.

  3. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  4. The Safety of MR Conditional Cochlear Implant at 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Seino, Shinya; Kawai, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the patients with the cochlear implant, only limited data have a mention for safety information in the instruction manual supplied by the manufacturers. Therefore, imaging operators require more detailed safety information for implant device. We conducted detailed examination about displacement force, torque, and demagnetizing of the cochlear implant magnet based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard using the PULSAR and CONCERTO (MED-EL) with 1.5 tesla MRI system. As a result, the displacement force and the torque of the implant magnet were less than the numerical values descried in the manual. Therefore, these have almost no effect on the body under the condition described in a manual. In addition, the demagnetizing factor of the cochlear implant magnet occurred by a change magnetic field. The demagnetization depended on the direction of a line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field and the implant magnet. In conclusion, the operator must warn the position of the patients on inducing in the magnet room.

  5. MRI atlas of ectopic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Dallaudière, B; Salut, C; Hummel, V; Pouquet, M; Piver, P; Rouanet, J-P; Maubon, A

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic endometriosis is a common condition which is often underdiagnosed, where MRI can help make a diagnosis simply, non-invasively and without irradiation. However, imagery signs of it are enormously polymorphic with a wide range of possible locations. In this paper, we have tried to illustrate comprehensively all its MRI appearances depending on the different locations where it occurs.

  6. One-step surgical placement of Brånemark implants: a prospective multicenter clinical study.

    PubMed

    Becker, W; Becker, B E; Israelson, H; Lucchini, J P; Handelsman, M; Ammons, W; Rosenberg, E; Rose, L; Tucker, L M; Lekholm, U

    1997-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal multicenter study evaluated the clinical outcomes after placement and restoration of one-step Brånemark implants into the maxillae and mandibles of completely and partially edentulous patients. Six surgical treatment centers participated in this study, in which 135 implants were placed into 63 adult patients. All implants were stable after placement. The majority of implants were placed into type B bone with minimal jaw resorption and type 2 bone quality. After implant placement, standard transmucosal healing abutments were firmly placed. The average amount of time between implant placement and prosthetic abutment connection was 170 days in the maxillae and 147 days in the mandibles. To evaluate crestal bone changes caused by implant placement, a periodontal probe was used to measure midbuccally from the top of the implant cylinder to the alveolar crest; in 29 patients, 54 midbuccal bone crest sites were remeasured following prosthetic abutment connection. Crestal bone changes in mandibles and maxillae were statistically and clinically insignificant. Six implants were lost prior to loading and one implant has not been restored. No implants or restorations were lost after loading. At 1 year, the implant success rate was 95.6%. Mesiodistal radiographic measurements from 34 patients were averaged, and changes from prosthetic abutment connection to, on average, 12 months follow-up were compared. The radiographs, which were digitalized, measured from the bottom of the implant cylinder to the most coronal bone in contact with implant thread. For mandibular implants, the mean radiographic bone level at prosthetic abutment connection was 1.07 mm; after loading, it was 1.35 mm. For maxillary implants, the mean radiographic bone height at prosthetic abutment connection was 1.16 mm; after loading, it was 1.36 mm. These changes were not statistically significant. The 1-year outcomes from this patient series indicate that one-step Br

  7. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  8. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  9. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance. PMID:26583117

  10. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  11. MRI findings in Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Raval, Monali; Kumari, Rima; Dung, Aldrin Anthony Dung; Guglani, Bhuvnesh; Gupta, Nitij; Gupta, Rohit

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7), abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  12. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Watts, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the 2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:26981069

  13. Unusual MRI Findings in a Polio Survivor

    PubMed Central

    Kubosawa, Hitoshi; Ishii, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old male consulted our institution due to worsening of right hip pain for approximately one month. The patient had no apparent functional disorders besides rigidity of the right ankle secondary to childhood poliomyelitis. Plain radiographs demonstrated narrowing of the right hip joint space. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed unusual findings in the right gluteus medius muscle, suspecting a malignant musculoskeletal tumor. Further examinations clarified acute inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus with no atypia. After treatment, serum inflammatory markers normalized and MRI showed homogeneous fat signal intensity in the muscle, which was consistent with poliomyelitis. Total hip arthroplasty was performed due to progression of osteoarthritis. Intraoperative findings showed flaccidity of the gluteus medius muscle, and histological examination of the specimen also was compatible with poliomyelitis. Postoperatively there was no hip instability and the patient has been able to resume his previous physical activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding polio survivors combined with septic arthritis, and sole MRI examination was unable to lead to the diagnosis. The current patient demonstrates the possibility that the involved muscles in poliomyelitis exist even in asymptomatic regions, which will be helpful for accurate diagnosis and life guidance in polio survivors. PMID:27069705

  14. Prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): multidisciplinary standpoint.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Liang; Feng, Zhaoyan; Hu, Zhiquan; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xianglin; Wang, He; Hu, Daoyu

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men and a leading cause of death. Accurate assessment is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management and therapy selection of prostate cancer. There are several parameters and nomograms to differentiate between patients with clinically insignificant disease and patients in need of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique which provides more detailed anatomical images due to high spatial resolution, superior contrast resolution, and multiplanar capability. State-of-the-art MRI techniques, such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), improve interpretation of prostate cancer imaging. In this article, we review the major role of MRI in the advanced management of prostate cancer to noninvasively improve tumor staging, biologic potential, treatment planning, therapy response, local recurrence, and to guide target biopsy for clinical suspected cancer with previous negative biopsy. Finally, future challenges and opportunities in prostate cancer management in the area of functional MRI are discussed as well.

  15. Use of low-energy hydrogen ion implants in high-efficiency crystalline-silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.; Sigh, R.; Mu, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of low-energy hydrogen implants in the fabrication of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells was investigated. Low-energy hydrogen implants result in hydrogen-caused effects in all three regions of a solar cell: emitter, space charge region, and base. In web, Czochralski (Cz), and floating zone (Fz) material, low-energy hydrogen implants reduced surface recombination velocity. In all three, the implants passivated the space charge region recombination centers. It was established that hydrogen implants can alter the diffusion properties of ion-implanted boron in silicon, but not ion-implated arsenic.

  16. Complications Associated With Arthroscopic Labral Repair Implants: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jerrod J; Elliott, Michael P; Mair, Scott D

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair in the shoulder has become commonplace in recent years. A variety of implants have evolved in parallel with arthroscopic techniques. Any orthopedic implant that is placed in close proximity to the joint has the potential to cause subsequent damage to the articular surface if it is left prominent or dislodges secondary to improper surgical technique. This article focuses on a series of implant-related complications of labral surgery and their subsequent management. Additionally, correct patient selection and surgical technique are discussed.

  17. A Cellular Automata Model of Infection Control on Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Langarica, Alicia; Kojouharov, Hristo; Chen-Charpentier, Benito; Tang, Liping

    2011-06-01

    S. epidermidis infections on medically implanted devices are a common problem in modern medicine due to the abundance of the bacteria. Once inside the body, S. epidermidis gather in communities called biofilms and can become extremely hard to eradicate, causing the patient serious complications. We simulate the complex S. epidermidis-Neutrophils interactions in order to determine the optimum conditions for the immune system to be able to contain the infection and avoid implant rejection. Our cellular automata model can also be used as a tool for determining the optimal amount of antibiotics for combating biofilm formation on medical implants.

  18. Improved device performance by multistep or carbon Co-implants

    SciTech Connect

    Liefting, R. . MESA Research Inst. FOM Inst. for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Amsterdam ); Wijburg, R.C.M.; Wallinga, H. . MESA Research Inst.); Custer, J.S.; Saris, F.W. )

    1994-01-01

    High-energy ion implantation is used for forming the collector in vertical bipolar transistors in a BiCMOS process. Secondary defects, remaining after annealing the implant damage, give rise to an increased leakage current and to collector-emitter shorts. These shorts reduce the transistor yield. The use of multiple step implants or the introduction of a C gettering layer are demonstrated to avoid dislocation formation. Experimental results show that these schemes subsequently lower the leakage current and dramatically increase device yield. The presence of C can cause increased collector/substrate leakage, indicating that the C profile needs to be optimized with respect to the doping profiles.

  19. Advanced MRI for Pediatric Brain Tumors with Emphasis on Clinical Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ra, Young-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Conventional anatomic brain MRI is often limited in evaluating pediatric brain tumors, the most common solid tumors and a leading cause of death in children. Advanced brain MRI techniques have great potential to improve diagnostic performance in children with brain tumors and overcome diagnostic pitfalls resulting from diverse tumor pathologies as well as nonspecific or overlapped imaging findings. Advanced MRI techniques used for evaluating pediatric brain tumors include diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging. Because pediatric brain tumors differ from adult counterparts in various aspects, MRI protocols should be designed to achieve maximal clinical benefits in pediatric brain tumors. In this study, we review advanced MRI techniques and interpretation algorithms for pediatric brain tumors. PMID:28096729

  20. Total MRI load of cerebral small vessel disease and cognitive ability in older people.

    PubMed

    Staals, Julie; Booth, Tom; Morris, Zoe; Bastin, Mark E; Gow, Alan J; Corley, Janie; Redmond, Paul; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) may cause cognitive dysfunction. We tested the association between the combined presence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of SVD and cognitive ability in older age. Cognitive testing and brain MRI were performed in 680 older participants. MRI presence of lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were summed in a score of 0-4 representing all SVD features combined. We also applied latent variable modeling to test whether the 4 MRI features form a unitary SVD construct. The SVD score showed significant associations with general cognitive ability. Latent variable modeling indicated that the 4 MRI markers formed a unitary construct, which showed consistent associations with cognitive ability compared with the SVD score. Total MRI load of SVD is associated with lower general cognitive ability in older age. The total SVD score performed consistently with the more complex latent variable model, suggesting validity and potential utility in future research for determining total SVD load.

  1. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  2. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  3. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  4. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  5. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  6. Practicing implant dentistry profitably.

    PubMed

    Stump, G; Adams, M; Alwan, M

    1997-03-01

    The success of dental implants has opened up countless treatment possibilities for restorative dentists to offer to their patients. Just as our clinical paradigms have had to change because of this new technology, so too must our paradigms concerning the way we communicate with our patients change if we are to get them to say "yes" to treatment that we know that they need. Success in clinical treatment using implants requires a systematic approach. A systematic approach to communicating with your patients will allow you to have the same high degree of success with treatment acceptance that is possible with dental implants. The key to the systems we have discussed is Relationship Centered Care. A relationship is fostered and enhanced through a Comprehensive Examination Process, a structured Consultation Process utilizing the influencing process and Financial Arrangements that allow the patient to receive what they want while the office maintains the profitability that it needs. A system for calculating rational fees can be utilized that allows the practice to have control over an area that traditionally was controlled by anecdotal factors. The Pride Institute has developed this material and is presenting it to the profession so that restorative dentists can truly practice implant dentistry profitably.

  7. Impact of implantation geometry and fluence on structural properties of AlxGa1-xN implanted with thulium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialho, M.; Magalhães, S.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2016-10-01

    AlxGa1-xN (x = 0.15 and 0.77) films, grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy, were implanted with 300 keV Tm ions. Implantation damage accumulation is investigated with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry/channeling (RBS/C), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD). Distinct damage behavior for samples with different AlN contents was found. Surface nanocrystallization occurs for samples with x = 0.15, similar to implantation effects observed in GaN. Samples with x = 0.77 approach the behavior of AlN. In particular, surface nanocrystallization is suppressed and the depth range of the stacking fault network, typical for implanted III-nitrides, is decreased. The crystalline quality of the sample with x = 0.15 was investigated to compare random and channeled implantation, showing less concentration of damage but with a higher range for channeled implantation. Surprisingly, the strain field caused by the implantation reaches much deeper into the sample than the defect profiles measured by RBS/C and TEM. This is attributed to the fact that XRD is much more sensitive to low defect densities caused by ions which are channeled to deep regions of the sample.

  8. Scattering effects of irradiation on surroundings calculated for a small dental implant.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Todorovic, Manuel; Heiland, Max; Scheuer, Hanna A; Krüll, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    A fundamental improvement of restorative dentistry is the compensation of missing teeth by insertion of artificial dental roots allowing retention of dental prosthesis. The function of dental implants conserves a permanent perforation of the mucosa and upholds a non-physiological contact of bone with foreign material and oral micro-organisms. Occasionally head and neck cancer patients are scheduled to receive radiotherapy but are wearing dental implants. An earlier study had shown that the distribution of x-rays is noteworthily changed when dental implants are present in the irradiation field. New implants of smaller size are currently being designed that allow sufficient retention for dental prosthesis. The aim of this consecutive study was to calculate alterations in the irradiated bone caused by a foreign body, representing an implant of reduced size and physical qualities equivalent to titanium, using a stochastic (Monte Carlo) simulation. A clinical linear accelerator was simulated using BEAM/EGS4. The calculations showed that the presence of a dimension-reduced implant results in remarkable differences of the dose distribution all around the implant. Titanium dental implants of reduced size located in the field of irradiation were capable of causing significant radiation scattering. Similar to standard implants, the risk for dose enhancement was notably important for the bone in direct contact with the implant. All therapists involved in the therapy of cancer patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy should consider the impact of dental implants on the radiation beam as a catalyst of osteoradionecrosis.

  9. Surgical treatment of an exposed orbital implant with vascularized superficial temporal fascia flap.

    PubMed

    Basterzi, Yavuz; Sari, Ayca; Sari, Alper

    2009-03-01

    Orbital implants are often used for the correction of volume deficit after enucleation or evisceration. An orbital implant enhances aesthetics and improves mobility of the subsequent prosthetic eye. With advancements in technology and techniques, implant-related complication rates have been decreased. However, implant exposition as one of the most common complications of socket surgery is still a problem for the oculoplastic surgeon. Many factors are thought to cause orbital implant exposure: Large implants, tension on the wound, and textured surface of the implant may cause a breakdown of the covering layers over the implant. Inadequate fibrovascular ingrowth into the porous implant is the most important factor. Various surgical methods have been described to cover the defect, most offering the use of various tissues as a graft, which are not always satisfactory. We describe a case with silicone implant exposition that was managed with a vascularized superficial temporal fascia flap. According to our knowledge, this is the first article reporting the usage of a vascular tissue in the management of an orbital implant exposure.

  10. The Effect of Study Design Biases on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Silicone Breast Implant Ruptures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae W.; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Bellfi, Lillian T.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Background All silicone breast implant recipients are recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration to undergo serial screening to detect implant rupture with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the quality of diagnostic accuracy studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture and conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of study design biases on the estimation of MRI diagnostic accuracy measures. Method Studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of MRI and ultrasound in evaluating ruptured silicone breast implants were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases. Two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion and extracted data. Study design biases were assessed using the QUADAS tool and the STARDS checklist. Meta-analyses estimated the influence of biases on diagnostic odds ratios. Results Among 1175 identified articles, 21 met the inclusion criteria. Most studies using MRI (n= 10 of 16) and ultrasound (n=10 of 13) examined symptomatic subjects. Meta-analyses revealed that MRI studies evaluating symptomatic subjects had 14-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using an asymptomatic sample (RDOR 13.8; 95% CI 1.83–104.6) and 2-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using a screening sample (RDOR 1.89; 95% CI 0.05–75.7). Conclusion Many of the published studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture are flawed with methodological biases. These methodological shortcomings may result in overestimated MRI diagnostic accuracy measures and should be interpreted with caution when applying the data to a screening population. PMID:21364405

  11. Single lead catheter of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator with floating atrial sensing dipole implanted via persistent left superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Malagù, Michele; Toselli, Tiziano; Bertini, Matteo

    2016-04-26

    Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) is a congenital anomaly with 0.3%-1% prevalence in the general population. It is usually asymptomatic but in case of transvenous lead positioning, i.e., for pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), may be a cause for significant complications or unsuccessful implantation. Single lead ICD with atrial sensing dipole (ICD DX) is a safe and functional technology in patients without congenital abnormalities. We provide a review of the literature and a case report of successful implantation of an ICD DX in a patient with LSVC and its efficacy in treating ventricular arrhythmias.

  12. Single lead catheter of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator with floating atrial sensing dipole implanted via persistent left superior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Malagù, Michele; Toselli, Tiziano; Bertini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) is a congenital anomaly with 0.3%-1% prevalence in the general population. It is usually asymptomatic but in case of transvenous lead positioning, i.e., for pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), may be a cause for significant complications or unsuccessful implantation. Single lead ICD with atrial sensing dipole (ICD DX) is a safe and functional technology in patients without congenital abnormalities. We provide a review of the literature and a case report of successful implantation of an ICD DX in a patient with LSVC and its efficacy in treating ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:27152145

  13. MRI of plants and foods.

    PubMed

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  14. MRI findings following metal on metal hip arthroplasty and their relationship with metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ciara M; Bergin, Karen M; Kelly, Gabrielle E; McCoy, Gerry F; Ryan, Anthony G; Quinlan, John F

    2014-08-01

    Following the global recall of all ASR metal on metal hip products, our aim was to correlate MRI findings with acetabular inclination angles and metal ion levels in patients with these implants. Both cobalt and chromium levels were significantly higher in the presence of a periprosthetic fluid collection. There was no association between the presence of a periprosthetic mass, bone marrow oedema, trochanteric bursitis or greater levels of abductor muscle destruction for cobalt or chromium. There was no association between the level of periprosthetic tissue reaction and the acetabular inclination angle with any of the pathologies identified on MRI. The relationship between MRI pathology, metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles in patients with ASR implants remains unclear adding to the complexity of managing patients.

  15. Effect of implant design on initial stability of tapered implants.

    PubMed

    Chong, Linus; Khocht, Ahmed; Suzuki, Jon B; Gaughan, John

    2009-01-01

    Implant design is one of the parameters for achieving successful primary stability. This study aims to examine the effect of a self-tapping blades implant design on initial stability in tapered implants. Polyurethane blocks of different densities were used to simulate different bone densities. The two different implant designs included one with self-tapping blades and one without self-tapping blades. Implants were placed at 3 different depths: apical third, middle third, and fully inserted at 3 different densities of polyurethane blocks. A resonance frequency (RF) analyzer was then used to measure stability of the implants. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the effect of implant design, insertion depth, and block density on RF. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the strength of association between RF and the aforementioned factors. In both medium-density (P = .017) and high-density (P = .002) blocks, fully inserted non-self-tapping implants showed higher initial stability than self-tapping implants. No differences were noted between the 2 implant designs that were not fully inserted. The highest strength of association was with insertion depth (standardized beta [std beta] = -0.60, P = .0001), followed by block density (std beta = -0.15, P = .0002). Implant design showed a weak association (std beta = -0.07, P = .09). In conclusion, fully inserted implants without self-tapping blades have higher initial stability than implants with self-tapping blades. However, the association strength between implant design and initial stability is less relevant than other factors, such as insertion depth and block density. Thus, if bone quality and quantity are optimal, they may compensate for design inadequacy.

  16. Arrhythmias in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electrical Devices after Implantation of a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Andrew N; Kremers, Walter K; Duval, Sue; Sakaguchi, Scott; John, Ranjit; Eckman, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) for advanced heart failure is increasing, and the role of cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIED) is unclear. Prior studies of the incidence of arrhythmias and shocks are frequently limited by ascertainment. One hundred and seventy-eight patients were examined with a previous CIED who were implanted with a CF-LVAD. Medical history, medications, and CIED data from device interrogations were gathered. A cardiac surgery control group (n = 38) was obtained to control for surgical factors. Several clinically significant events increased after LVAD implantation: treated-zone ventricular arrhythmias (VA; p < 0.01), monitored-zone VA (p < 0.01), antitachycardia pacing (ATP)-terminated episodes (p < 0.01), and shocks (p = 0.01), although administered shocks later decreased (p < 0.01). Presence of a preimplant VA was associated with postoperative VA (odds ratio [OR]: 4.31; confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-12.3, p < 0.01). Relative to cardiac surgery, LVAD patients experienced more perioperative events (i.e., monitored VAs and shocks, p < 0.01 and p = 0.04). Neither implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks before implant nor early or late postimplant arrhythmias or shocks predicted survival (p = 0.07, p = 0.55, and p = 0.55). Our experience demonstrates time-dependent effects on clinically significant arrhythmias after LVAD implantation, including evidence that early LVAD-related arrhythmias may be caused by the unique arrhythmogenic effects of VAD implant.

  17. The Role of Post-Mortem MRI in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Kristen; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; White, Frances V.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Khanna, Geetika; Shimony, Joshua S.; Mathur, Amit M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Post-mortem examination can provide important information about the cause of death and play a significant role in the bereavement process. Autopsies reveal previous unknown medical problems approximately 20–30% of the time. A non-invasive MRI-based post-mortem examination (PM-MRI) may provide an alternative for families who do not consent to an autopsy. Study Design This study was a prospective observational study of recently expired neonates and infants. Subjects underwent a full body MRI scan (brain, chest, abdomen and pelvis) followed by conventional autopsy if the family desired to have one. MRI results were compared to autopsy findings and the ante mortem clinical diagnosis. A follow-up survey was conducted to investigate family perceptions of the PM-MRI process. Result Thirty-one infants underwent full PM-MRI. 19/31 (61%) of infants had complete agreement between the clinician’s impression and PM-MRI. Twenty-four infants also had conventional autopsy, with 14/24 (58%) infants having PM-MRI results consistent with autopsy findings. PM-MRI was superior at detection of free intraperitoneal/intrathoracic air and hepatic iron overload. Whole body PM-MRI did not have the resolution to detect focal/microscopic injury, vascular remodeling and some forms of brain injury. Of those families who remembered the PM-MRI findings, the majority felt that the information was useful. Conclusion PM-MRI studies may provide an important adjunct to conventional autopsy and a substitute when the latter is not possible for personal or religious reasons. Clinicians should be aware of, and communicate with the family, the resolution limits of the whole body PM-MRI to detect certain types of injury. PMID:27654494

  18. SU-E-J-232: Feasibility of MRI-Based Preplan On Low Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y; Tward, J; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Huang, L; Szegedi, M; Kokeny, K; Salter, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using MRI-based preplan for low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Methods: 12 patients who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate brachytherapy with Pd-103 were retrospectively studied. Our care-standard of the TRUS-based preplan served as the control. One or more prostate T2-weighted wide and/or narrow-field of view MRIs obtained within the 3 months prior to the implant were imported into the MIM Symphony software v6.3 (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH) for each patient. In total, 37 MRI preplans (10 different image sequences with average thickness of 4.8mm) were generated. The contoured prostate volume and the seed counts required to achieve adequate dosimetric coverage from TRUS and MRI preplans were compared for each patient. The effects of different MRI sequences and image thicknesses were also investigated statistically using Student’s t-test. Lastly, the nomogram from the MRI preplan and TRUS preplan from our historical treatment data were compared. Results: The average prostate volume contoured on the TRUS and MRI were 26.6cc (range: 12.6∼41.3cc), and 27.4 cc (range: 14.3∼50.0cc), respectively. Axial MRI thicknesses (range: 3.5∼8.1mm) did not significantly affect the contoured volume or the number of seeds required on the preplan (R2 = 0.0002 and 0.0012, respectively). Four of the MRI sequences (AX-T2, AX-T2-Whole-Pelvis, AX-T2-FSE, and AXIALT2- Hi-Res) showed statistically significant better prostate volume agreement with TRUS than the other seven sequences (P <0.01). Nomogram overlay between the MRI and TRUS preplans showed good agreement; indicating volumes contoured on MRI preplan scan reliably predict how many seeds are needed for implant. Conclusion: Although MRI does not allow for determination of the actual implant geometry, it can give reliable volumes for seed ordering purposes. Our future work will investigate if MRI is sufficient to reliably replace TRUS preplanning in patients

  19. Role of implants in the treatment of diabetic macular edema: focus on the dexamethasone intravitreal implant

    PubMed Central

    Cebeci, Zafer; Kir, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the leading cause of sight-threatening complication in diabetic patients, and several treatment modalities have been developed and evaluated to treat this pathology. Intravitreal agents, such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF) or corticosteroids, have become more popular in recent years and are widely used for treating DME. Sustained release drugs appear to be mentioned more often nowadays for extending the period of intravitreal activity, and corticosteroids play a key role in inhibiting the inflammatory process in DME. A potent corticosteroid, dexamethasone (Ozurdex®), in the form of an intravitreal implant, has been approved for various ocular etiologies among which DME is also one. This review evaluates the role of implants in the treatment of DME, mainly focusing on the dexamethasone intravitreal implant. PMID:26604809

  20. MRI gadolinium enhancement precedes neuroradiological findings in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Tamura, Takuya; Nagai, Yuhki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Shibata, Minoru; Kato, Takeo; Heike, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a 2-year-old Japanese boy with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) triggered by human herpes virus-6, who presented insightful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. He was admitted due to impaired consciousness and a convulsion, 2 days after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. At admission, cranial MRI showed marked gadolinium enhancement at the bilateral thalami, brainstem and periventricular white matter without abnormal findings in noncontrast MRI sequences. On the following day, noncontrast computed tomography demonstrated homogeneous low-density lesions in the bilateral thalami and severe diffuse brain edema. The patient progressively deteriorated and died on the 18th day of admission. The pathogenesis of ANE remains mostly unknown, but it has been suggested that hypercytokinemia may play a major role. Overproduced cytokines cause vascular endothelial damage and alter the permeability of the vessel wall in the multiple organs, including the brain. The MRI findings in our case demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeability was altered prior to the appearance of typical neuroradiological findings. This suggests that alteration of blood-brain barrier permeability is the first step in the development of the brain lesions in ANE, and supports the proposed mechanism whereby hypercytokinemia causes necrotic brain lesions. This is the first report demonstrating MRI gadolinium enhancement antecedent to typical neuroradiological findings in ANE.

  1. [Allergic reactions to implant materials].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2003-01-01

    The extent of the immune response upon implantation of metallic devices depends on the individual reactivity and on material characteristics. If specific T-cellular sensitization occurs or an allergy to metal preexists, hypersensitive reactions to implant components may develop. They include eczema, impaired wound healing, and sterile osteomyelitis. The existence of allergy-induced implant loosening is still an open question. Further improvement of clinical allergological diagnostics, better understanding of peri-implantar immune reactions, and interdisciplinary collection of epidemiological data concerning allergy to implants will contribute to a better knowledge about tolerance of implant material in humans.

  2. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements.

  3. MRI Meets MPI: a bimodal MPI-MRI tomograph.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Lother, Steffen; Rückert, Martin A; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Fidler, Florian; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic particle imaging (MPI) constitutes a novel biomedical imaging technique for tracking superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vivo, unlike magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it cannot provide anatomical background information. Until now these two modalities have been performed in separate scanners and image co-registration has been hampered by the need to reposition the sample in both systems as similarly as possible. This paper presents a bimodal MPI-MRI-tomograph that combines both modalities in a single system.MPI and MRI images can thus be acquired without moving the sample or replacing any parts in the setup. The images acquired with the presented setup show excellent agreement between the localization of the nanoparticles in MPI and the MRI background data. A combination of two highly complementary imaging modalities has been achieved.

  4. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-10-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient's body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  5. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient’s body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  6. Impression techniques for implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chee, W; Jivraj, S

    2006-10-07

    The object of making an impression in implant dentistry is to accurately relate an analogue of the implant or implant abutment to the other structures in the dental arch. This is affected by use of an impression coping which is attached to the implant or implant abutment. This impression coping is incorporated in an impression - much as a metal framework is 'picked up' in a remount impression for fixed prosthodontics. With implant copings the coping is usually attached to the implant or abutment with screws. The impression material used is usually an elastomeric impression material; the two types most widely used and shown to be the most appropriate are polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  7. Engineered porous metals for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamsi Krishna, B.; Xue, Weichang; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2008-05-01

    Interest is significant in patient-specific implants with the possibility of guided tissue regeneration, particularly for load-bearing implants. For such implants to succeed, novel design approaches and fabrication technologies that can achieve balanced mechanical and functional performance in the implants are necessary. This article is focused on porous load-bearing implants with tailored micro-as well as macrostructures using laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication or rapid prototyping technique that can be used to manufacture patient-specific implants. This review provides an insight into LENS, some properties of porous metals, and the potential applications of this process to fabricate unitized structures which can eliminate longstanding challenges in load-bearing implants to increase their in-vivo lifetime, such as in a total hip prosthesis.

  8. Implantable rhythm devices and electromagnetic interference: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Katia; Khairy, Paul

    2008-07-01

    Current medical guidelines have prompted implementation of increasing numbers of implantable rhythm devices, be they pacemakers, internal cardioverter-defibrillators or loop recorders. These devices rely on complex microcircuitry and use electromagnetic waves for communication. They are, therefore, susceptible to interference from surrounding electromagnetic radiation and magnetic energy. Hermetic shielding in metallic cases, filters, interference rejection circuits and bipolar sensing have contributed to their relative resistance to electromagnetic interference (EMI) in household and workplace environments. Device interactions have occurred in hospitals where EMI sources are ubiquitous, including radiation, electrocautery and MRI exposures. However, with rapidly evolving technology, devices and potential sources of EMI continue to change. This review provides a contemporary overview of the current state of knowledge regarding risks attributable to EMI; highlights current limitations of implantable rhythm devices; and attempts to distinguish myths from realities.

  9. MRI Technologies in Recent Human Brain Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yuka

    The recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology and techniques used in human brain mapping are remarkable. They are getting, faster, stronger and better. The advanced MRI technologies and techniques include, but not to limited to, the magnetic resonance imaging at higher magnetic field strengths, diffusion tensor imaging, multimodal neuroimaging, and monkey functional MRI. In this article, these advanced MRI techniques are briefly overviewed.

  10. Role of MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of osteomyelitis in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Pugmire, Brian S; Shailam, Randheer; Gee, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a significant cause of morbidity in children throughout the world. Multiple imaging modalities can be used to evaluate for suspected osteomyelitis, however magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has distinct advantages over other modalities given its ability to detect early changes related to osteomyelitis, evaluate the true extent of disease, depict extraosseous spread of infection, and help guide surgical management. MRI has assumed a greater role in the evaluation of osteomyelitis with the increase in musculoskeletal infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus which have unique imaging features that are well-demonstrated with MRI. This review focuses primarily on the use of MRI in the evaluation of osteomyelitis in children and will include a discussion of the clinically important and characteristic findings on MRI of acute bacterial osteomyelitis and related conditions. PMID:25170391

  11. TH-C-19A-09: Quantification of Transmission and Backscatter Factors as a function of Distance to Inhomogeneity Interface for Three Types of Surgical Implant Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D; Mills, M; Wang, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Carbon fiber materials have been increasingly used clinically, mainly in orthopedics, as an alternative to metallic implants because of their minimal artifacts on CT and MRI images. This study characterizes the transmission and backscatter property of carbon fiber plates (CarboFix Orthopedics, Herzeliya, Israel) with measurements for radiation therapy applications, and compares them to traditional Stainless Steel (SS) and Titanium (Ti) metal materials. Methods: For the transmission measurements, 1-mm-thick test plate was placed upstream from a plane parallel Markus chamber, separated by various thicknesses of polystyrene plates in 0.5 cm increments between 0 and 5 cm. With this setup, we quantified the radiation transmission as a function of distance to the inhomogeneity interface. The LINAC source to detector distance was maintained at 100 cm and 200 MU was delivered for each measurement. Two 3-cm solid water phantoms were placed at the top and bottom to provide build up. All the measurements were performed for 6 MV and 18 MV photons. The backscatter measurements had the identical setup, except that the test plate was downstream of the chamber from radiation. Results: The carbon fiber plates did not introduce any measureable inhomogeneity effect on the transmission and backscatter factor because of its low atomic number. In contrast, traditional metal implant materials caused up to 15% dose difference at upstream and 25% backscatter at downstream from radiation. Such differences decrease as the distance to the inhomogeneity interface increases and become unmeasurable at distance of 3 cm and 1 cm for upstream and downstream, respectively. Conclusion: A new type of carbon fiber implant plate was evaluated and found to have minimal inhomogeneity effect in MV radiation beams. Patients would benefit from a carbon based implant over metal for radiation therapy due to their minimal backscatter and imaging artifacts.

  12. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (<70 dB) small-scale animal imager. Results serve as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  13. Long-term vascular access ports as a means of sedative administration in a rodent fMRI survival model.

    PubMed

    Hettinger, Patrick C; Li, Rupeng; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S; Cho, Younghoon R; Pawela, Christopher P; Rowe, Daniel B; Hyde, James S

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rodent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) survival model with the use of heparin-coated vascular access devices. Such a model would ease the administration of sedative agents, reduce the number of animals required in survival experiments and eliminate animal-to-animal variability seen in previous designs. Seven male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical placement of an MRI-compatible vascular access port, followed by implantable electrode placement on the right median nerve. Functional MRI during nerve stimulation and resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) were performed at times 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively using a 9.4T scanner. Anesthesia was maintained using intravenous dexmedetomidine and reversed using atipamezole. There were no fatalities or infectious complications during this study. All vascular access ports remained patent. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation by electrical stimulation of the median nerve using implanted electrodes was seen within the forelimb sensory region (S1FL) for all animals at all time points. The number of activated voxels decreased at time points 4 and 8 weeks, returning to a normal level at 12 weeks, which is attributed to scar tissue formation and resolution around the embedded electrode. The applications of this experiment extend far beyond the scope of peripheral nerve experimentation. These vascular access ports can be applied to any survival MRI study requiring repeated medication administration, intravenous contrast, or blood sampling.

  14. [Standartization of MRI studies in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bryukhov, V V; Krotenkova, I A; Morozova, S N; Krotenkova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis has markedly increased in recent years. The main task of the MRI studies after the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is to assess the dynamics of MRI for determining disease progression and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. In this regard, it is very important to obtain the most identical baseline and follow-up MRI that is possible when a single standard protocol is used. This article presents the protocol of brain MRI and spinal cord MRI and interpretation of MRI studies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  15. Low-cost ion implantation and annealing technology for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. H.; Minnucci, J. A.; Greenwald, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ion implantation and thermal annealing techniques for processing junctions and back surface layers in solar cells are discussed. Standard 10 keV (31)p(+) junction implants and 25 keV (11)B(+) back surface implants in combination with three-step furnace annealing are used for processing a range of silicon materials and device structures. Cells with efficiencies up to 16.5% AM1 are being produced, and large-area terrestrial cells with implanted junctions and back fields being fabricated in pilot production exhibit average efficiencies in excess of 15% AM1. Thermal annealing methods for removal of the radiation damage caused by implantation should be replaced by transient processing techniques in future production. Design studies have been completed for solar cell processing implanters to support 10 MW/yr and 100 MW/yr production lines, and analyses indicate that implantation costs can be reduced to approximately 1 cent/watt.

  16. In-vitro MRI detectability of interbody test spacers made of carbon fibre-reinforced polymers, titanium and titanium-coated carbon fibre-reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Thorsten; Buchhorn, Gottfried; Baums, Mike Herbert; Heidrich, Gabert

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how different materials affect the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detectability of interbody test spacers (ITS). We evaluated the post-implantation MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences for three different ITS made of titanium, carbon fibre-reinforced polymers (CFRP) and titanium-coated CFRP, respectively. The main target variables were total artefact volume (TAV) and median artefact area (MAA). Additionally, implant volume (IV)/TAV and cross section (CS)/MAA ratio were determined. The t test and Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons were used for statistical analysis. TAV and MAA did not differ significantly between CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but were approximately twice as high for the titanium ITS (p < 0.001). MRI detectability was optimum for CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but was limited at the implant-bone interface of the titanium ITS. The material's susceptibility and the implant's dimensions affected MRI artefacting. Based on TAV, the volume of titanium surface coating in the ITS studied has no influence on susceptibility in MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences.

  17. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  20. A tonsillolith seen on MRI.

    PubMed

    el-Sherif, I; Shembesh, F M

    1997-01-01

    A case of a large tonsillolith visualized by magnetic resonance imaging is presented. Although otolaryngologists are well aware of this entity, few radiologists are. The importance of distinguishing tonsilloliths from other structures by MRI is discussed.

  1. Potential Clinical Applications for Spinal Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kornelsen, Jennifer; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of the spinal cord is a noninvasive technique for obtaining information regarding spinal cord neuronal function. This article provides a brief overview of recent developments in spinal cord fMRI and outlines potential applications, as well as the limitations that must be overcome, for using spinal fMRI in the clinic. This technique is currently used for research purposes, but significant potential exists for spinal fMRI to become an important clinical tool. PMID:17504642

  2. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  3. Annealing effects on the migration of ion-implanted cadmium in glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Sebitla, L. D.; Njoroge, E. G.; Mlambo, M.; Malherbe, J. B.

    2017-03-01

    The migration behaviour of cadmium (Cd) implanted into glassy carbon and the effects of annealing on radiation damage introduced by ion implantation were investigated. The glassy carbon substrates were implanted with Cd at a dose of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2 and energy of 360 keV. The implantation was performed at room temperature (RT), 430 °C and 600 °C. The RT implanted samples were isochronally annealed in vacuum at 350, 500 and 600 °C for 1 h and isothermally annealed at 350 °C up to 4 h. The as-implanted and annealed samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Raman results revealed that implantation at room temperature amorphized the glassy carbon structure while high temperature implantations resulted in slightly less radiation damage. Isochronal annealing of the RT implanted samples resulted in some recrystallization as a function of increasing temperature. The original glassy carbon structure was not achieved at the highest annealing temperature of 600 °C. Diffusion of Cd in glassy carbon was already taking place during implantation at 430 °C. This diffusion of Cd was accompanied by significant loss from the surface during implantation at 600 °C. Isochronal annealing of the room temperature implanted samples at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while isothermal annealing at 500 and 600 °C resulted in the migration of implanted Cd toward the surface accompanied by a loss of Cd from the surface. Isothermal annealing at 350 °C for 1 h caused Cd to diffuse towards the bulk while for annealing time >1 h Cd diffused towards the surface. These results were interpreted in terms of trapping and de-trapping of implanted Cd by radiation damage.

  4. Toxicity test of biodegradable polymers by implantation in rabbit cornea.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Shiraki, K; Ikada, Y

    1992-11-01

    To evaluate whether or not the corneal micropocket implantation is effective for determining the toxicity of polymeric materials, currently used biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA), LA-GA copolymers, and three kinds of poly(2-cyano-acrylate)s (PCA) were implanted in a rabbit corneal pouch and the tissue responses were observed macroscopically and microscopically. It was found that PLA induced no vascularization, whereas a residual solvent and ethylene oxide gas remaining in the PLA matrix invoked vascularization. Vascularization clearly took place when PGA was implanted in the cornea, which became opaque, probably because of cellular infiltration. In the case of PCA implantation, severe inflammation as well as vascular invasion occurred in the initial stage. It is likely that these tissue reactions were caused by the leachables from the implanted materials, the extent being dependent on the leaching rate and the toxicity. It was concluded that the corneal micropocket assay is a good means to detect trace amounts of leachables from implanted materials without sacrificing the animals with the implanted materials.

  5. MEMS-based power generation techniques for implantable biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  6. Influence of hernioplastic implants on male fertility in rats.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, T; Lechner, W

    2007-05-01

    This study explored the vulnerability of the ductus deferens due to mesh induced inflammation and shrinkage after hernia repair in the rodent model. Two commonly used types of hernioplastic implants (Prolene and Vypro II) were surgically wrapped around the ductus deferentes on both sides in 20 juvenile and 20 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Twenty male rats underwent sham surgeries as controls. After 3 months, each male was mated with 2-3 adult females, which were subsequently sacrificed and oocytes or embryos were flushed and counted. Histochemical investigations of the implants and the ductus recovered surgically 4 weeks after implantation (one side) and after the fertility test (second side) were conducted. All groups exhibited 1-3 males with decreased or restricted fertility but there was no difference between groups. Histochemical analysis of the implants and the ductus recovered 4 weeks and 4 months after implantation revealed some sperm granulomes due to lesions of the spermatic cord caused by the implant in the Prolene group. There was no inflammatory reaction in the mucosa or blockage of the spermatic cord visible. Both types of hernioplastic implants tested in this investigation do not give an indication of a negative influence on male fertility in juvenile or adult rats.

  7. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied A.

    2011-01-01

    Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS)-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient. PMID:22319362

  8. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods - ion implantation - is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  9. Split-Framework in Mandibular Implant-Supported Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    During oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with an implant-supported prosthesis, mandibular flexure must be considered an important biomechanical factor when planning the metal framework design, especially if implants are installed posterior to the interforaminal region. When an edentulous mandible is restored with a fixed implant-supported prosthesis connected by a fixed full-arch framework, mandibular flexure may cause needless stress in the overall restorative system and lead to screw loosening, poor fit of prosthesis, loss of the posterior implant, and patient's discomfort due to deformation properties of the mandible during functional movements. The use of a split-framework could decrease the stress with a precise and passive fit on the implants and restore a more natural functional condition of the mandible, helping in the longevity of the prosthesis. Therefore, the present clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient by a mandibular fixed implant-supported prosthesis with a split-framework to compensate for mandibular flexure. Clinical Significance. The present clinical report shows that the use of a split-framework reduced the risk of loss of the posterior implants or screws loosening with acceptable patient comfort over the period of a year. The split-framework might have compensated for the mandibular flexure during functional activities. PMID:26770841

  10. [Recent advances in newborn MRI].

    PubMed

    Morel, B; Hornoy, P; Husson, B; Bloch, I; Adamsbaum, C

    2014-07-01

    The accurate morphological exploration of the brain is a major challenge in neonatology that advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now provide. MRI is the gold standard if an hypoxic ischemic pathology is suspected in a full term neonate. In prematures, the specific role of MRI remains to be defined, secondary to US in any case. We present a state of the art of hardware and software technical developments in MRI. The increase in magnetic field strength (3 tesla) and the emergence of new MRI sequences provide access to new information. They both have positive and negative consequences on the daily clinical data acquisition use. The semiology of brain imaging in full term newborns and prematures is more extensive and complex and thereby more difficult to interpret. The segmentation of different brain structures in the newborn, even very premature, is now available. It is now possible to dissociate the cortex and basal ganglia from the cerebral white matter, to calculate the volume of anatomical structures, which improves the morphometric quantification and the understanding of the normal and abnormal brain development. MRI is a powerful tool to analyze the neonatal brain. The relevance of the diagnostic contribution requires an adaptation of the parameters of the sequences to acquire and of the image processing methods.

  11. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  12. Chronic Inflammation in an Anophthalmic Socket due to a Room Temperature Vulcanized Silicone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; AlGhafri, Laila; Elkhamary, Sahar M.; Maktabi, Azza; Gálvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Galindo-Alonso, Julio; Schellini Proff, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    Two case reports are used to illustrate the signs and symptoms, complications and treatments of chronic socket inflammation due to intraorbital implants. The ophthalmic examination, surgeries and treatments are documented. Two anophthalmic cases that underwent enucleation and multiple orbital surgeries to enhance the anophthalmic socket volume developed pain, intense discharge and contracted cavities with chronic inflammation in the socket which was nonresponsive to medical therapy. Computed tomography indicated a hypodense foreign body in both cases causing an intense inflammatory reaction. The implants were removed by excisional surgery and a room temperature vulcanized silicone implant was retrieved in both cases. Socket inflammation resolved in both cases after implant removal. An intraorbital inflammatory reaction against an intraorbital implant can cause chronic socket inflammation in patients with a history of multiple surgeries. Diagnosis requires imaging and the definitive treatment is implant removal. PMID:27462246

  13. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  14. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  15. Tubo-uterine implantation.

    PubMed

    Green-armytage, V G

    1957-02-01

    After characterizing 2 types of patients presenting with tubal infertility (1 that is "as a rule overweight (the uterus is fixed (and there is easily palpable tubo-uterine pathology," and 1 that is "slim, young, intelligent and often beautiful", 12 1-sentence suggestions are made to increase the success of tubo-uterine implantations in the second type of presenting patient (because the first group has, in the author's mind, disappointing prognosis). Figures are the bulk of the document, with 3 figures demonstrating the type of operation, 3 showing the scheme of the operation, 1 figure showing a posterior view of the implanted tube in utero with a polyethylene prosthesis in situ down to the cervix, and 1 figure showing the instruments used in the operation. A few points of experience the author shares are: 1) operate immediately after a menstrual period; 2) give antibiotics prophylactically and after the procedure; 3) use a Bonney Myomectomy Clamp to elevate the uterus; 4) never use a knife or bistoury at the cornua; 5) use polyethylene rods, when available; and 6) caesarean section is the indicated delivery route after tubo-uterine implantation. Out of 38 patients with the requisite history and findings who have been operated on by this author, 14 have gone to full-term, i.e., 36.1%; 2 have aborted, giving a pregnancy rate of 42.2%, and there was 1 ectopic pregnancy.

  16. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pâmela Letícia; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos; Telles, Cristino da Silva; Betoni Júnior, Walter; Chiacchio Buchignani, Vivian; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration. PMID:24454377

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging metallic artifact of commonly encountered surgical implants and foreign material.

    PubMed

    Sutherland-Smith, James; Tilley, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) artifacts secondary to metallic implants and foreign bodies are well described. Herein, we provide quantitative data from veterinary implants including total hip arthroplasty implants, cranial cruciate repair implants, surgical screws, a skin staple, ligation clips, an identification microchip, ameroid constrictor, and potential foreign bodies including air gun and BB projectiles and a sewing needle. The objects were scanned in a gelatin phantom with plastic grid using standardized T2-weighted turbo-spin echo (TSE), T1-weighted spin echo, and T2*-weighted gradient recalled echo (GRE) image acquisitions at 1.5 T. Maximum linear dimensions and areas of signal voiding and grid distortion were calculated using a DICOM workstation for each sequence and object. Artifact severity was similar between the T2-weighted TSE and T1-weighted images, while the T2*-weighted images were most susceptible to artifact. Metal type influenced artifact size with the largest artifacts arising from steel objects followed by surgical stainless steel, titanium, and lead. For animals with metallic surgical implants or foreign bodies, the quantification of the artifact size will help guide clinicians on the viability of MRI.

  18. Ultra-high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): a potential examination for deep brain stimulation devices and the limitation study concerning MRI-related heating injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chuan; Li, Jun-Ju; Zhu, Guan-Yu; Shi, Lin; Yang, An-Chao; Jiang, Yin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices are restricted to undertake 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the guideline. Nevertheless, we conducted an experiment to test pathological change near the leads in different field-strength MRI. Twenty-four male New Zealand rabbits were assigned to Group 1 (G1, n = 6, 7.0T, DBS), Group 2 (G2, n = 6, 3.0T, DBS), Group 3 (G3, n = 6, 1.5T, DBS), and Group 4 (G4, n = 6, 1.5T, paracentesis). DBS leads were implanted in G1, G2 and G3, targeting left nucleus ventralis posterior thalami. Paracentesis was performed in G4. 24 h after MRI scan, all animals were killed for examining pathological alternation (at different distance from lead) via transmission electron microscopy. Our results suggest that the severity of tissue injury correlates with the distance to electrode instead of field strength of MRI. Up to now, the reason for the restriction of MRI indicated no significantly different pathological change.

  19. Imaging Modality of Choice for Pre-Operative Cochlear Imaging: HRCT vs. MRI Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Rajendra N.; Shah, Dipali C.; Vishwakarma, Rajesh; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Congenital inner ear malformations occur as a result of the arrest or aberrance of inner ear development due to the heredity, gene mutation or other factors. Ever since the availability of cochlear implants, pre-operative evaluation by imaging of temporal bone has gained much attention. Precise selection of the candidate for cochlear implant dependent on preoperative radiological investigations. Only CT (Computed Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) can provide a better picture of anatomy and pathology. Aim To compare pre-operative imaging findings of both MRI and High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) temporal bone and to find the best modality of choice in patients with bilateral profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SNHL). Materials and Methods This was a prospective, longitudinal, observational study conducted between June 2010 to November 2012. A total of 144 temporal bones were evaluated in 72 children with bilateral profound SNHL with congenital inner ear malformations. Each temporal bone was considered as a single case (144 cases). All the patients underwent HRCT and high field MRI study. MRI study included T2 W axial 3D FIESTA (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition) sequence. Anatomic abnormalities in each temporal bone were described and noted. For complete and better evaluation of Vestibulo-Cochlear Nerve (VCN) additional 3D oblique parasagittal view was taken perpendicular to the internal auditory canal with a small Field Of View (FOV). Results HRCT and MRI allowed accurate detection of inner ear malformations in children with bilateral SNHL. Majority of the patients presented with multiple structural abnormalities of inner ear. The common pathologies detected in the study were semicircular canal abnormality (89/144) followed by cochlear abnormalities (39/144). Most common cochlear abnormality was Mondini’s deformity (14/144). MRI demonstrated absent of vestibulo-cochlear nerve in 15 cases. Conclusion Few

  20. Design of radio frequency pulse waveforms for mitigating signal inhomogeneity in magnetic resonance imaging due to metallic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Taeseong; Kim, Dongmin; Someya, Takao; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Metallic implants can result in considerable inhomogeneity in the signal intensity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because the implant generates a shielding effect to the applied radio-frequency (RF) magnetic fields. In this study, we propose an acquisition method to mitigate the signal inhomogeneities using an adaptive RF pulse waveform. The effectiveness of the method was investigated using both numerical simulations and experiments. The RF pulse waveform was calculated based on inverse analyses of the Bloch equation incorporating the measured RF field distribution within the object. A simulation was carried out using a simplified numerical model of RF field inhomogeneity assumed at the center of model. An RF pulse waveform was designed to recover the attenuated signal region in the given model, and we show a significant improvement in the signal homogeneity compared with that obtained using a conventional pulse. We implemented the proposed method on a 7T-MRI system to show the efficacy experimentally. Test samples were fabricated from agarose gel with inserted copper or aluminum implants of different thicknesses. The RF pulse for selective excitation was calculated after mapping the RF field distribution of each imaging object. The acquired images exhibit an improvement in the homogeneity at the region of metallic implants. These results indicate that the proposed method is effective for MRI measurements of objects containing metallic implants.

  1. The issue of corrosion in dental implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Déborah R; Duffó, Gustavo; Guglielmotti, Maria B; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2009-01-01

    Pure titanium or titanium alloys, and to a lesser extent, zirconium, are metals that are often used in direct contact with host tissues. These metallic biomaterials are highly reactive, and on exposure to fluid media or air, quickly develop a layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) or zirconium dioxide (ZrO2). This layer of dioxide forms a boundary at the interface between the biological medium and the metal structure, determining the degree of biocompatibility and the biological response of the implant. Corrosion is the deterioration a metal undergoes as a result of the surrounding medium (electrochemical attack), which causes the release of ions into the microenvironment. No metal or alloy is entirely inert in vivo. Corrosion phenomena at the interlace are particularly important in the evolution of both dental and orthopedic implants and one of the possible causes of implant failure after initial success. This paper comprises a review of literature and presents results of our laboratory experiments related to the study of corrosion, with special emphasis on dental implants. In situ degradation of a metallic implant is undesirable because it alters the structural integrity of the implant. The issue of corrosion is not limited to a local problem because the particles pmduced as a result could migrate to distant sites, whose evolution would require further studies.

  2. Head Motion and Correction Methods in Resting-state Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamasue, Hidenori; Gomi, Tsutomu; Takeda, Tohoru

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) is used to investigate brain functional connectivity at rest. However, noise from human physiological motion is an unresolved problem associated with this technique. Following the unexpected previous result that group differences in head motion between control and patient groups caused group differences in the resting-state network with RS-fMRI, we reviewed the effects of human physiological noise caused by subject motion, especially motion of the head, on functional connectivity at rest detected with RS-fMRI. The aim of the present study was to review head motion artifact with RS-fMRI, individual and patient population differences in head motion, and correction methods for head motion artifact with RS-fMRI. Numerous reports have described new methods [e.g., scrubbing, regional displacement interaction (RDI)] for motion correction on RS-fMRI, many of which have been successful in reducing this negative influence. However, the influence of head motion could not be entirely excluded by any of these published techniques. Therefore, in performing RS-fMRI studies, head motion of the participants should be quantified with measurement technique (e.g., framewise displacement). Development of a more effective correction method would improve the accuracy of RS-fMRI analysis.

  3. Bone ingrowth in well-fixed retrieved porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Hanzlik, Josa A; Day, Judd S

    2013-06-01

    While first generation porous coatings have had clinical success, aseptic loosening remains a leading cause of revision. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reasons for revision and to assess the amount of bone ingrowth in retrieved porous tantalum components. In a prospective multicenter retrieval program, 76 porous tantalum acetabular shells, 5 femoral stems, 7 patellas and 36 tibial trays were collected from revision surgeries. A subset of the implants was analyzed for bone ingrowth. The main reason for revision was infection for acetabular shells (1.4 years implantation time) and instability for tibial trays (1.8 years implantation time). Two of the thirty primary surgery acetabular shells and one of the thirty-six primary surgery tibial trays were revised for implant loosening. We observed full depth penetration of bone into the porous tantalum layer for the acetabular shells and femoral stems.

  4. A case of TURBT after penile prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Senda, Motohiro; Otani, Toshikazu; Ito, Yuichi

    2006-08-01

    The patient was a 66-year-old man who had undergone implantation of a penile prosthesis for organic erectile dysfunction 7 years prior to consulting our hospital with a complaint of gross hematuria. Since a pedunculated, superficial tumor 1 cm in diameter was noted lateral to the left ureteral orifice, transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) was performed. In this patient, we were able to insert the sheath with no difficulty, and the surgical procedure was done smoothly, resulting in complete resection of the tumor. However, the location of the tumor in the anterior or posterior wall of the bladder predicted difficulty of the tumor resection. Therefore, we consider it important to sufficiently evaluate the feasibility of complete TURBT before surgery and to thoroughly examine the patient for benign prostatic hyperplasia and bladder cancer, which can cause difficulty with post-implantation ransurethral procedures, and to perform transurethral surgery before implantation, if prosthesis implantation is planned.

  5. Bone Ingrowth in Well-Fixed Retrieved Porous Tantalum Implants

    PubMed Central

    Hanzlik, Josa A.; Day, Judd S.

    2013-01-01

    While first generation porous coatings have had clinical success, aseptic loosening remains a leading cause of revision. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reason for revision and to assess the amount of bone ingrowth in retrieved porous tantalum components. In a prospective multicenter retrieval program, 76 porous tantalum acetabular shells, 5 femoral stems, 7 patellas and 36 tibial trays were collected from revision surgeries. A subset of the implants were analyzed for bone ingrowth. The main reason for revision was infection for acetabular shells (1.4 year implantation time) and instability for tibial trays (1.8 years implantation time). Two of the thirty primary surgery acetabular shells and one of the thirty-six primary surgery tibial trays were revised for implant loosening. We observed full depth penetration of bone into the porous tantalum layer for the acetabular shells and femoral stems. PMID:23518432

  6. Complications of Zygomatic Implants: Our Clinical Experience with 4 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Tzerbos, Fotios; Theologie-Lygidakis, Nadia; Fakitsas, Dimitrios; Fakitsas, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Zygomatic implants have been used for rehabilitation of the edentulous atrophic maxilla as an alternative to bone grafting for almost two decades resulting in satisfactory clinical outcomes. However, the patients with edentulous atrophic maxilla treated using this technique may present serious complications that could put the prosthetic restoration at risk. Four cases are reported in this paper, one case with a cutaneous fistula in the left zygomatic-orbital area caused by aseptic necrosis at the apical part of the implant, which was treated with the surgical removal of this part, a second case with loss of the right zygomatic implant due to failure of osseointegration and two cases of periimplantitis that resulted in partial and complete removal of the implant, respectively. All patients who had complications were treated without compromising the restoration which remained functional after appropriately modified treatment. PMID:27847399

  7. Iterative Method for Predistortion of MRI Gradient Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, Kevin D.; Does, Mark D.; Grissom, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to correct for transient gradient waveform errors in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether from eddy currents, group delay, or gradient amplifier nonlinearities, which are known to affect image quality. An iterative method is proposed to minimize error between desired and measured gradient waveforms, whose success does not depend on accurate knowledge of the gradient system impulse response. The method was applied to half-pulse excitation for 2-D ultra-short echo time (UTE) imaging on a small animal MRI system and to spiral 2-D excitation on a human 7T MRI system. Predistorted gradient waveforms reduced temporal signal variation caused by excitation gradient trajectory errors in 2-D UTE, and improved the quality of excitation patterns produced by spiral excitation pulses. Iterative gradient predistortion is useful for minimizing transient gradient errors without requiring accurate characterization of the gradient system impulse response. PMID:24801945

  8. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... to wear a hospital gown or clothing without metal fasteners. Certain types of metal can cause inaccurate images. You lie on your ... joints Vascular stents Pain pumps Worked with sheet metal in the past (you may need tests to ...

  9. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... will wear a hospital gown or clothes without metal zippers or snaps (such as sweatpants and a ... your watches, jewelry, and wallet. Certain types of metal can cause blurry images. You will lie on ...

  10. Auditory neuroplasticity, hearing loss and cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Ryugo, David

    2015-07-01

    Data from our laboratory show that the auditory brain is highly malleable by experience. We establish a base of knowledge that describes the normal structure and workings at the initial stages of the central auditory system. This research is expanded to include the associated pathology in the auditory brain stem created by hearing loss. Utilizing the congenitally deaf white cat, we demonstrate the way that cells, synapses, and circuits are pathologically affected by sound deprivation. We further show that the restoration of auditory nerve activity via electrical stimulation through cochlear implants serves to correct key features of brain pathology caused by hearing loss. The data suggest that rigorous training with cochlear implants and/or hearing aids offers the promise of heretofore unattained benefits.

  11. Development of vertical compact ion implanter for gemstones applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intarasiri, S.; Wijaikhum, A.; Bootkul, D.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Tippawan, U.; Yu, L. D.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation technique was applied as an effective non-toxic treatment of the local Thai natural corundum including sapphires and rubies for the enhancement of essential qualities of the gemstones. Energetic oxygen and nitrogen ions in keV range of various fluences were implanted into the precious stones. It has been thoroughly proved that ion implantation can definitely modify the gems to desirable colors together with changing their color distribution, transparency and luster properties. These modifications lead to the improvement in quality of the natural corundum and thus its market value. Possible mechanisms of these modifications have been proposed. The main causes could be the changes in oxidation states of impurities of transition metals, induction of charge transfer from one metal cation to another and the production of color centers. For these purposes, an ion implanter of the kind that is traditionally used in semiconductor wafer fabrication had already been successfully applied for the ion beam bombardment of natural corundum. However, it is not practical for implanting the irregular shape and size of gem samples, and too costly to be economically accepted by the gem and jewelry industry. Accordingly, a specialized ion implanter has been requested by the gem traders. We have succeeded in developing a prototype high-current vertical compact ion implanter only 1.36 m long, from ion source to irradiation chamber, for these purposes. It has been proved to be very effective for corundum, for example, color improvement of blue sapphire, induction of violet sapphire from low value pink sapphire, and amelioration of lead-glass-filled rubies. Details of the implanter and recent implantation results are presented.

  12. Changes in uterine estrogen and progesterone receptors during delayed implantation and early implantation in the spotted skunk.

    PubMed

    Mead, R A; Eroschenko, V P

    1995-10-01

    Although the exact cause(s) of embryonic diapause in the western spotted skunk and other carnivores remains unknown, it has been hypothesized that it may be due to levels of ovarian hormone secretion that are insufficient to promote a uterine environment conducive to continuous embryonic development and implantation. Immunocytochemistry was used to determine whether changes in abundance or distribution of estrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) may be associated with the cessation or renewal of embryonic development. Thirty pregnant skunks were killed during delayed implantation and periimplantation periods. ER and PR were detected in luminal and glandular epithelium, endometrial stroma, vasculature, and myometrium of the uterus during the period of delayed implantation. There was a significant reduction of both ER and PR receptors during the periimplantation period. The most pronounced change was the complete loss or reduction in staining intensity for PR and ER in the luminal epithelium during the first 2-3 days after implantation. These findings suggest that the failure of skunk blastocysts to undergo continuous development and implant without a prolonged period of diapause is not the result of an insufficient number of ER or PR in the uterus. The data also indicate that renewed embryonic development and implantation is not associated with an increase in these uterine steroid receptors.

  13. Who gets afraid in the MRI-scanner? Neurogenetics of state-anxiety changes during an fMRI experiment.

    PubMed

    Mutschler, Isabella; Wieckhorst, Birgit; Meyer, Andrea H; Schweizer, Tina; Klarhöfer, Markus; Wilhelm, Frank H; Seifritz, Erich; Ball, Tonio

    2014-11-07

    Experiments using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) play a fundamental role in affective neuroscience. When placed in an MR scanner, some volunteers feel safe and relaxed in this situation, while others experience uneasiness and fear. Little is known about the basis and consequences of such inter-individually different responses to the general experimental fMRI setting. In this study emotional stimuli were presented during fMRI and subjects' state-anxiety was assessed at the onset and end of the experiment while they were within the scanner. We show that Val/Val but neither Met/Met nor Val/Met carriers of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val(158)Met polymorphism-a prime candidate for anxiety vulnerability-became significantly more anxious during the fMRI experiment (N=97 females: 24 Val/Val, 51 Val/Met, and 22 Met/Met). Met carriers demonstrated brain responses with increased stability over time in the right parietal cortex and significantly better cognitive performances likely mediated by lower levels of anxiety. Val/Val, Val/Met and Met/Met did not significantly differ in state-anxiety at the beginning of the experiment. The exposure of a control group (N=56 females) to the same experiment outside the scanner did not cause a significant increase in state-anxiety, suggesting that the increase we observe in the fMRI experiment may be specific to the fMRI setting. Our findings reveal that genetics may play an important role in shaping inter-individual different emotional, cognitive and neuronal responses during fMRI experiments.

  14. Risk Factors Associated With Complication Rates of Becker-Type Expander Implants in Relation to Implant Survival: Review of 314 Implants in 237 Patients.

    PubMed

    Taboada-Suarez, Antonio; Brea-García, Beatriz; Magán-Muñoz, Fernando; Couto-González, Iván; González-Álvarez, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Although autologous tissue reconstruction is the best option for breast reconstruction, using implants is still a reliable and simple method, offering acceptable aesthetic results. Becker-type implants are permanent implants that offer a 1-stage reconstructive option. A retrospective study was carried out in our center reviewing the clinical reports of 237 patients, in whom a total of 314 Becker-type prostheses were implanted. Overall survival was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier estimate. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios. At the end of the study, 214 expanders (68.15%) presented no complications, 40 (12.47%) developed significant capsular contracture, in 27 (8.60%) infection occurred, 24 (7.64%) suffered minor complications, and 9 (2.87%) ruptured. The mean survival time of the expanders was 120.41 months (95% CI: 109.62, 131.19). Radiotherapy, chemotherapy, high Molecular Immunology Borstel, age, mastectomy performed previously to the implant, ductal carcinoma, advanced tumoral stage, experience of the surgeon, and Becker 35-type implants were significantly related to a high number of complications in relation to the survival of the implants. Cox regression analysis revealed that the main risk factors for the survival of expander implants included radiotherapy and surgeon experience. The complication hazard ratio or relative risk caused by these 2 factors was 1.976 and 1.680, respectively. One-stage reconstruction using Becker-type expanders is an appropriate, simple, and reliable option in delayed breast reconstruction in patients who have not received radiotherapy and as long as the procedure is carried out by surgeons skilled in the technique.

  15. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  16. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  17. Diagnostic imaging and pacemaker implantation in a domestic goat with persistent left cranial vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Ravi; Dosdall, Derek; Norlund, Layne; Higuchi, Koji; Silvernagel, Joshua M.; Olsen, Aaron L.; Davies, Christopher J.; MacLeod, Rob; Marrouche, Nassir F.

    2014-01-01

    Difficulty was encountered with the insertion of a right atrial pacing lead via the left jugular vein during lead and pacemaker implantation in a clinically normal goat as part of an ongoing rapid atrial pacing - induced atrial fibrillation research project. Fluoroscopic visualization of an abnormal lead advancement path prompted angiographic assessment which revealed a persistent left cranial vena cava (PLCVC) and prominent coronary sinus communicating with the right atrium. Angiography facilitated successful advancement and securing of the pacing lead into the right side of the interatrial septum. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography (MRI/MRA) allowed further characterization of this rare venous anomaly. Even though PLCVC has been reported once in a goat, to the authors’ knowledge this is the first report to include MRI/MRA characterization of PLCVC and prominent coronary sinus with successful cardiac pacemaker implantation using the PLCVC. PMID:24480717

  18. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  19. Novel brain MRI abnormalities in Gitelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Norbash, Alexander; Vattoth, Surjith

    2015-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The syndrome is caused by a defective thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubules of the kidneys. Gitelman syndrome could be confused with Bartter syndrome; the main differentiating feature is the presence of low urinary calcium excretion in the former. Descriptions of neuroradiological imaging findings associated with Gitelman syndrome are very scarce in the literature and include basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic intracranial hypertension and sclerochoroidal calcification. Cauda equina syndrome-like presentation has been reported, but without any corresponding imaging findings on lumbar spine MRI. We report a 13-year-old male with Gitelman syndrome who presented with altered mental status following a fall and scalp laceration and unremarkable brain CT, followed during hospitalization by somnolence and seizures. Metabolically the patient demonstrated hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. MRI demonstrated features of encephalopathy including predominantly right-sided cerebral hemispheric signal abnormality and cytotoxic edema, with bilateral symmetric involvement of the thalami, midbrain tegmentum and tectum and cerebellar dentate nuclei. MRI after five months obtained during a later episode of encephalopathy showed resolution of the signal abnormalities with setting in of brain atrophy and also areas of newly developed cytotoxic edema in the left thalamus, bilateral dorsal midbrain and right greater than left dentate nuclei. The described abnormalities, either recurrent or in isolation, have not previously been published in patients with Gitelman syndrome. We believe that the findings are due to alteration of respiratory chain function secondary to the metabolic derangement and hence have a similar imaging appearance as encephalopathy related to mitochondrial cytopathy or

  20. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  1. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  2. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  3. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  4. The implant infection paradox: why do some succeed when others fail? Opinion and discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Yue, C; Zhao, B; Ren, Y; Kuijer, R; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Rochford, E T J

    2015-06-05

    Biomaterial-implants are frequently used to restore function and form of human anatomy. However, the presence of implanted biomaterials dramatically elevates infection risk. Paradoxically, dental-implants placed in a bacteria-laden milieu experience moderate failure-rates, due to infection (0.0-1.1%), similar to the ones of joint-arthroplasties placed in a near-sterile environment (0.1-1.3%). Transcutaneous bone-fixation pins breach the immune-barrier of the epidermis, exposing underlying sterile-tissue to an unsterile external environment. In contrast to dental-implants, also placed in a highly unsterile environment, these pins give rise to relatively high infection-associated failure-rates of up to 23.0%. Herein, we attempt to identify causes as to why dental-implants so often succeed, where others fail. The major part of all implants considered are metal-made, with similar surface-finishes. Material choice was therefore discarded as underlying the paradox. Antimicrobial activity of saliva has also been suggested as a cause for the success of dental-implants, but was discarded because saliva is the implant-site-fluid from which viable bacteria adhere. Crevicular fluid was discarded as it is largely analogous to serum. Instead, we attribute the relative success of dental-implants to (1) ability of oral tissues to heal rapidly in the continuous presence of commensal bacteria and opportunistic pathogens, and (2) tolerance of the oral immune-system. Inability of local tissue to adhere, spread and grow in presence of bacteria and an intolerant immune-system are identified as the likely main causes explaining the susceptibility of other implants to infection-associated failure. In conclusion, it is the authors' belief that new anti-infection strategies for a wide range of biomaterial-implants may be derived from the relative success of dental-implants.

  5. Haplotypes in BMP4 and FGF Genes Increase the Risk of Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Renata Barboza; Gonçalves, Roberto; Villas-Boas, Ricardo de Mello; Bonato, Leticia Ladeira; Quinelato, Valquiria; Pinheiro, Aristides da Rosa; Machado, Aldir; Nunes, Carlos Henrique Ramirez; Gonçalves, Rackel; Vieira, Alexandre Resende; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Casado, Priscila Ladeira

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of osseointegrated implants, failures have increased significantly, associated with development of peri-implantitis. Multiple factors influence the peri-implant bone loss, including environmental and genetic causes. BMPs (Bone morphogenetic proteins) are growth factors that induce bone formation. FGF (fibroblast growth factors) and their receptors (FGFRs) play important roles by controlling the levels of cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. BMP/FGF relationship is responsible for promoting bone regeneration and bone loss. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between BMP4, FGF3, FGF10 and FGFR1 genes and peri-implant bone loss. Two hundred and fifteen volunteers, with 754 dental implants, were submitted to oral examination and divided in healthy group (n=129) and peri-implantitis group (n=86). Thirteen polymorphisms in BMP4, FGF3, FGF10 and FGFR1 genes were analyzed individually and in haplotype. The chi-square test correlated genotypes, allelic and haplotype frequencies. Values of p<0.05 were considered significant. Volunteers with peri-implantitis demonstrated high incidence of total edentulism (p<0.0001) and thin peri-implant phenotype (p<0.04). Higher incidence of spontaneous bleeding, plaque and implant mobility was observed in peri-implantitis group (p<0.0001 for all). The TT polymorphic genotype for BMP4 rs2761884 was associated with healthy peri-implant (p=0.01). FGF3 rs4631909 (TT+CT genotype) also showed association with the control group (p=0.04). The frequency of C allele for FGF3 rs4631909 showed a tendency for association with peri-implantitis (p=0.08). FGF10 CCTG (p=0.03), BMP4 GAAA (p=0.05) and GGGA (p=0.02) haplotypes were associated with peri-implantitis (p=0.03). Therefore, it may be concluded that BMP4 and FGF10 haplotypes are associated with peri-implantitis.

  6. Biomechanics and strain mapping in bone as related to immediately-loaded dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Lee, Jihyun; Jang, Andrew; Gu, Allen; Hossaini-Zadeh, Mehran; Prevost, Richard; Curtis, Don; Ho, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The effects of alveolar bone socket geometry and bone-implant contact on implant biomechanics, and resulting strain distributions in bone were investigated. Following extraction of lateral incisors on a cadaver mandible, immediate implants were placed and bone-implant contact area, stability and bone strain were measured. In situ biomechanical testing coupled with micro X-ray microscope (μ-XRM) illustrated less stiff bone-implant complexes (701-822 N/mm) compared with bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth complexes (791-913 N/mm). X-ray tomograms illustrated that the cause of reduced stiffness was due to reduced and limited bone-implant contact. Heterogeneous elemental composition of bone was identified by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The novel aspect of this study was the application of a new experimental mechanics method, that is, digital volume correlation, which allowed mapping of strains in volumes of alveolar bone in contact with a loaded implant. The identified surface and subsurface strain concentrations were a manifestation of load transferred to bone through bone-implant contact based on bone-implant geometry, quality of bone, implant placement, and implant design. 3D strain mapping indicated that strain concentrations are not exclusive to the bone-implant contact regions, but also extend into bone not directly in contact with the implant. The implications of the observed strain concentrations are discussed in the context of mechanobiology. Although a plausible explanation of surgical complications for immediate implant treatment is provided, extrapolation of results is only warranted by future systematic studies on more cadaver specimens and/or in vivo small scale animal models. PMID:26162549

  7. A 16-year study of the microgap between 272 human titanium implants and their abutments.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Assenza, Bartolomeo; Piattelli, Maurizio; Iezzi, Giovanna; Leghissa, Giulio C; Quaranta, Alessandro; Tortora, Pietro; Piattelli, Adriano

    2005-01-01

    A microgap has been described at the level of the implant-abutment connection. This microgap can be colonized by bacteria, and this fact could have relevance on the remodeling of the peri-implant crestal bone and on the long-term health of the peri-implant tissues. The authors report on 272 implants with screw- or cement-retained abutments retrieved from humans for different causes during a 16-year period. In the implants with screw-retained abutments, a 60-microm microgap was present at the level of implant-abutment connection. In some areas the titanium had sheared off from the surface and from the internal threads. The contact between the threads of the implant and those of the abutment was limited to a few areas. Bacteria were often present in the microgaps between implant and abutment and in the internal portion of the implants. In implants with cement-retained abutments, a 40-microm microgap was found at the level of the implant-abutment connection. No mechanical damage was observed at the level of the implant or of the abutment. All the internal voids were always completely filled by the cement. No bacteria were observed in the internal portion of the implants or at the level of the microgap. The differences in the size of the microgap between the two groups were statistically significant (P < .05). In conclusion, in screw-retained abutments the microgap can be a critical factor for colonization of bacteria, whereas in cement-retained abutments all the internal spaces were filled by cement. In these retrieved implants, the size of the microgap was markedly variable and much larger than that observed in vitro.

  8. [Implant rehabilitation of distal mandibular atrophy using a blade implant].

    PubMed

    Veron, C; Chanavaz, M

    1997-11-01

    After a brief revision of the anatomy of the posterior mandible and its natural resorption pattern, the ramus plate-form implant would be the implant of choice for the rehabilitation of this region. This "site specific" implant is inserted on the top of the crest and superficially impacted within the residual alveolar bone at the distal segment of the horizontal branch and guided to climb parallel to the anterior aspect of the ascending ramus. Its form and specific dimensions are perfectly compatible with the frequently limited quantity of available bone above the nerve canal in patients with advanced atrophy of the posterior mandible. It provides a predictable abutment for the implant-supported or dento-implant-supported prostheses of the posterior mandible.

  9. Differences between conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Baglieri, Annalisa; Marino, Maria Adele; Morabito, Rosa; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an in vivo assessment of cortical and subcortical regions affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review summarizes the most important conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques applied in this field. Standard neuroimaging techniques have played a marginal role in the diagnosis and follow-up of PD, essentially being used only to discriminate atypical syndromes from PD, to exclude secondary causes such as vascular lesions, and to confirm the absence of specific imaging features found in atypical parkinsonisms. However, non-conventional MRI techniques, i.e. new neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and functional MRI, may allow the detection of structural, functional and metabolic changes useful not only for differential diagnosis, but also for early diagnosis and outcome and treatment monitoring in PD. In addition, we illustrate the advantages of high-field MRI over lower magnetic fields, highlighting the great potential of advanced neuroimaging techniques. PMID:24125556

  10. The clinical significance of preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Il Joon; Kim, Eun Yeon; Park, Ga-Young; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jeehun; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Although central nervous system abnormalities are incidentally detected in preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in pediatric cochlear implant (CI) candidates, the clinical significance of the abnormalities remains unclear. We aimed to assess post-implantation auditory and speech performance in patients with brain lesions seen on MRI. Pediatric CI recipients (n = 177) who underwent preoperative MRI scans of the brain between January 2002 and June 2009 were included in this study. Patients with brain lesions on MRI were reviewed and categorized into the following groups: brain parenchymal lesions (focal vs. diffuse), ventriculomegaly, and extra-axial lesion. The main communication mode as well as progress in auditory perception and speech production were evaluated preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Performance in patients with brain lesions was compared with the age- and sex-matched control group. Various brain lesions were found in 27 out of 177 patients. Children with brain lesions who received CIs showed gradual progress in auditory and speech outcomes for 2 years, though performance was reduced compared with the control group. In addition, there was a significant difference in the main communication mode between the two groups at 2 years following cochlear implantation. This difference was especially significant in patients with diffuse brain parenchymal lesions after further stratification of the brain lesion group. Preoperative brain MRI may have a role in improving the prediction of adverse outcomes in pediatric CI recipients. In particular, children with diffuse brain parenchymal lesions should be counseled regarding the poor prognosis preoperatively, and followed up with special attention.

  11. The use of phentolamine mesylate to evaluate mandibular nerve damage following implant placement.

    PubMed

    Froum, Stuart J; Froum, Scott H; Malamed, Stanley F

    2010-09-01

    High success rates and long-term predictability of implant therapy have been well documented in the literature. However, complications in implant treatment can arise and include sensory disturbances, especially in the posterior mandible in areas close to the inferior alveolar nerve. Treatment efficacy of sensory disturbances caused by implant placement in this area relies on the expeditious diagnosis of an induced paresthesia. Recently, phentolamine mesylate has been introduced as a reversal agent of local anesthesia with the ability to decrease the requisite time for a patient to return to normal sensation. This article introduces a method for faster detection of a potential paresthesia induced by implant placement in the posterior mandible.

  12. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bertoli, Elizangela; Medynski, Denielle C; Khalaf, Mohd W

    2015-01-01

    Nerve trauma caused by dental implant placement is associated with altered sensation and chronic pain. Complete or partial loss of sensation is often reported by patients who have experienced nerve trauma during implant surgery. Some patients report persistent pain and neurosurgery disturbance long after the normal healing time has passed. In addition, neuropathic pain is reported after implant surgery. Practitioners who place dental implants must be familiar with the differential diagnosis, prevention, and management of neuropathic pain. This article provides insights into the prevention and management of neurosensory deficits and chronic persistent neuropathic pain and considerations for patient referral.

  13. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  14. [MRI of the pineal gland].

    PubMed

    Langevad, Line; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Siebner, Hartwig; Garde, Ellen

    2014-11-10

    The pineal gland (CP) is located centrally in the brain and produces melatonin. Cysts and concrements are frequent findings on MRI but their significance is still unclear. The visualization of CP is difficult due to its location and surrounding structures and so far, no standardized method exists. New studies suggest a correlation between CP-morphology and melatonin secretion as well as a connection between melatonin, disturbed circadian rhythm, and the development of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, underlining the need for a standardized approach to CP on MRI.

  15. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  16. Photoelastic stress analysis in screwed and cemented implant-supported dentures with external hexagon implants.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Tonella, Bianca Piccolotto; Ferraço, Renato; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Alves-Rezende, Maria Cristina Rosifini

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution of the retention systems (screwed and cemented) for implant-supported fixed partial dentures by means of photoelastic method. Two models were made of photoelastic resin PL-2 with 2 implants (phi = 4.00 x 10 mm) located in the second premolar and molar region in each photoelastic model, varying the retention system (screwed and cemented). The implant-supported fixed partial dentures were standardized and made of Ni-Cr alloy. Axial and oblique (45 degrees) forces of 100 N were applied on the occlusal surface by means of a Universal Testing Machine (EMIC-DL 3000; São José dos Pinhais, Paraná, Brazil). The results were observed and photographed in the field of a circular polariscope and qualitatively analyzed with the aid of computer software (Adobe Photoshop, San Jose, CA). The screw retention system presented the highest number of fringes when the loads were applied on the premolar, pontic, and molar and showed this behavior in all load applications, under axial and oblique loads. It was concluded that there was a better stress distribution and lower magnitude of stress on the cemented implant-supported dentures, under axial and oblique loads. Oblique load caused an increase in stress concentrations in all the models.

  17. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  18. MRI for Crohn's Disease: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kichul; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Hong J.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with relapsing-remitting behavior, often causing strictures or penetrating bowel damage. Its lifelong clinical course necessitates frequent assessment of disease activity and complications. Computed tomography (CT) enterography has been used as primary imaging modality; however, the concern for radiation hazard limits its use especially in younger population. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has advantages of avoiding radiation exposure, lower incidence of adverse events, ability to obtain dynamic information, and good soft-tissue resolution. MR enterography (MRE) with oral contrast agent has been used as primary MR imaging modality of CD with high sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement. The extent of inflammation as well as transmural ulcers and fibrostenotic diseases can be detected with MRE. Novel MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), motility study, PET-MRI, and molecular imaging are currently investigated for further improvement of diagnosis and management of CD. MR spectroscopy is a remarkable molecular imaging tool to analyze metabolic profile of CD with human samples such as plasma, urine, or feces, as well as colonic mucosa itself. PMID:26413543

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  20. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  1. Modeling of electrodes and implantable pulse generator cases for the analysis of implant tip heating under MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Acikel, Volkan Atalar, Ergin; Uslubas, Ali

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The authors’ purpose is to model the case of an implantable pulse generator (IPG) and the electrode of an active implantable medical device using lumped circuit elements in order to analyze their effect on radio frequency induced tissue heating problem during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Methods: In this study, IPG case and electrode are modeled with a voltage source and impedance. Values of these parameters are found using the modified transmission line method (MoTLiM) and the method of moments (MoM) simulations. Once the parameter values of an electrode/IPG case model are determined, they can be connected to any lead, and tip heating can be analyzed. To validate these models, both MoM simulations and MR experiments were used. The induced currents on the leads with the IPG case or electrode connections were solved using the proposed models and the MoTLiM. These results were compared with the MoM simulations. In addition, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor. The dissipated power on the electrode was calculated using the MoTLiM by changing the inductance and the results were compared with the specific absorption rate results that were obtained using MoM. Then, MRI experiments were conducted to test the IPG case and the electrode models. To test the IPG case, a bare lead was connected to the case and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the lead was measured by changing the lead length. The power at the lead tip for the same scenario was also calculated using the IPG case model and MoTLiM. Then, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the electrode was measured by changing the inductance and compared with the dissipated power on the electrode resistance. Results: The induced currents on leads with the IPG case or electrode connection were solved for using the combination of the MoTLiM and

  2. Progestin implants for female contraception.

    PubMed

    Croxatt, Horacio B

    2002-01-01

    Four different implants, in the form of capsules or covered rods, that release one of the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, etonogestrel, Nestorone, or Elcometrine and nomegestrol acetate were reviewed. Biocompatible polymers or copolymers of polydimethyl/polymethylvinyl-siloxanes or ethylvinylacetate are used to hold the steroid crystals and to control the rate of release. Once inserted under the skin, these implants release the corresponding steroid continuously over prolonged periods, a process that can be readily interrupted by implant removal. During long-term use of the implant, the released steroid circulates in blood at a fairly stable level. The physical characteristics of the implants, including drug contents and rate of release, serum levels of the progestin during use, and the duration of their effective life are described. Total steroid loads vary in the range of 50 mg to 216 mg; average release rates are in the range of 30-100 ug/day, and effective lives from 6 months to 7 years.

  3. Bimodal fitting or bilateral implantation?

    PubMed

    Ching, Teresa Y C; Massie, Robyn; Van Wanrooy, Emma; Rushbrooke, Emma; Psarros, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarises findings from studies that evaluated the benefits of bimodal fitting (combining a hearing aid and a cochlear implant in opposite ears) or bilateral cochlear implantation, relative to unilateral implantation, for children (Ching et al., 2007). On average, the size of binaural speech intelligibility advantages due to redundancy and head shadow was similar for the two bilateral conditions. An added advantage of bimodal fitting was that the low-frequency cues provided by acoustic hearing complemented the high-frequency cues conveyed by electric hearing in perception of voice and music. Some children with bilateral cochlear implants were able to use spatial separation between speech and noise to improve speech perception in noise. This is possibly a combined effect of the directional microphones in their implant systems and their ability to use spatial cues. The evidence to date supports the provision of hearing in two ears as the standard of care.

  4. Cochlear implantation following cerebellar surgery.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Shahad; Mawman, Deborah; Green, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with known central nervous system conditions can result in wide-ranging outcomes. The aim of this study is to report two cases of cochlear implantation outcomes in patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia following cerebellar surgery. The first is a female implanted with the Nucleus 24 implant in September 2000 and the second is a male implanted with a MED-EL Sonata Flexsoft electro-acoustic stimulation in July 2009. Programming these patients resulted in significant non-auditory stimulation which resulted in less than optimum map fittings. The patients did not gain any open set speech perception benefit although both of them gained an awareness of sound with the device. However, patient 2 elected to become a non-user because of the limited benefit.

  5. The history of biodegradable magnesium implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Today, more than 200years after the first production of metallic magnesium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, biodegradable magnesium-based metal implants are currently breaking the paradigm in biomaterial science to develop only highly corrosion resistant metals. This groundbreaking approach to temporary metallic implants is one of the latest developments in biomaterials science that is being rediscovered. It is a challenging topic, and several secrets still remain that might revolutionize various biomedical implants currently in clinical use. Magnesium alloys were investigated as implant materials long ago. A very early clinical report was given in 1878 by the physician Edward C. Huse. He used magnesium wires as ligature for bleeding vessels. Magnesium alloys for clinical use were explored during the last two centuries mainly by surgeons with various clinical backgrounds, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and general surgery. Nearly all patients benefited from the treatment with magnesium implants. Although most patients experienced subcutaneous gas cavities caused by rapid implant corrosion, most patients had no pain and almost no infections were observed during the postoperative follow-up. This review critically summarizes the in vitro and in vivo knowledge and experience that has been reported on the use of magnesium and its alloys to advance the field of biodegradable metals.

  6. Reprint of: The history of biodegradable magnesium implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Witte, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Today, more than 200 years after the first production of metallic magnesium by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, biodegradable magnesium-based metal implants are currently breaking the paradigm in biomaterial science to develop only highly corrosion resistant metals. This groundbreaking approach to temporary metallic implants is one of the latest developments in biomaterials science that is being rediscovered. It is a challenging topic, and several secrets still remain that might revolutionize various biomedical implants currently in clinical use. Magnesium alloys were investigated as implant materials long ago. A very early clinical report was given in 1878 by the physician Edward C. Huse. He used magnesium wires as ligature for bleeding vessels. Magnesium alloys for clinical use were explored during the last two centuries mainly by surgeons with various clinical backgrounds, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and general surgery. Nearly all patients benefited from the treatment with magnesium implants. Although most patients experienced subcutaneous gas cavities caused by rapid implant corrosion, most patients had no pain and almost no infections were observed during the postoperative follow-up. This review critically summarizes the in vitro and in vivo knowledge and experience that has been reported on the use of magnesium and its alloys to advance the field of biodegradable metals.

  7. [Preoperative and surgical protocols for better implant integration].

    PubMed

    Takács, G

    1994-01-01

    In implant placement, different bone densities require different implant types in order to achieve maximum stability. Therefore, careful preoperative planning is essential to diagnose and/or augment the bone, to select the correct size and type of implant for each individual case, and to establish the appropriate surgical protocol. This paper and presentation discuss the essentials for establishing such protocol, ie, the quality and quantity of bone, type and size of implants, surgery, progressive loading, and shifting of the mastication forces. Serious errors in planning first appear as short-term failures, and they indicate inadequacy in osseointegration in the healing phase or overloading caused by the superstructure. Less grave errors occur later as long-term failures, due to the width, depth, and density of the bone and the angulation of the implant. Appropriate components have to be used for different types of bone: Uncoated screws are the best solution for D1 and D2 types of bone; coated screws should be used in the presinus area and after nerve transpositioning. Cylindrical implants are best suited for subantral augmentation, using a narrow drill; the bone bed is progressively widened by a conic osteotome, and the technique provides a good stability. Free gingival transplant is indicated in cases with insufficient keratinized gingiva. Masticatory overloading can be avoided by reducing the occlusal table, decreasing cusp inclination, and anteriorizing the upper mastication areas.

  8. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pathological assessment of periprosthetic tissues is important, not only for diagnosis, but also for understanding the pathobiology of implant failure. The host response to wear particle deposition in periprosthetic tissues is characterised by cell and tissue injury, and a reparative and inflammatory response in which there is an innate and adaptive immune response to the material components of implant wear. Physical and chemical characteristics of implant wear influence the nature of the response in periprosthetic tissues and account for the development of particular complications that lead to implant failure, such as osteolysis which leads to aseptic loosening, and soft-tissue necrosis/inflammation, which can result in pseudotumour formation. The innate response involves phagocytosis of implant-derived wear particles by macrophages; this is determined by pattern recognition receptors and results in expression of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors promoting inflammation and osteoclastogenesis; phagocytosed particles can also be cytotoxic and cause cell and tissue necrosis. The adaptive immune response to wear debris is characterised by the presence of lymphoid cells and most likely occurs as a result of a cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to cell and tissue components altered by interaction with the material components of particulate wear, particularly metal ions released from cobalt-chrome wear particles. Cite this article: Professor N. A. Athanasou. The pathobiology and pathology of aseptic implant failure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:162–168. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.BJR-2016-0086. PMID:27146314

  9. Corrosion processes of physical vapor deposition-coated metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Protecting metallic implants from the harsh environment of physiological fluids is essential to guaranteeing successful long-term use in a patient's body. Chemical degradation may lead to the failure of an implant device in two different ways. First, metal ions may cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues surrounding the implant and, in extreme cases, these reactions may inflict acute pain on the patient and lead to loosening of the device. Therefore, increasing wear strength is beneficial to the performance of the metallic implant. Second, localized corrosion processes contribute to the nucleation of fatigue cracks, and corrosion fatigue is the main reason for the mechanical failure of metallic implants. Common biomedical alloys such as stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloys, and titanium alloys are prone to at least one of these problems. Vapor-deposited hard coatings act directly to improve corrosion, wear, and fatigue resistances of metallic materials. The effectiveness of the corrosion protection is strongly related to the structure of the physical vapor deposition layer. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the correlation between the structure of physical vapor deposition layers and the corrosion properties of metallic implants.

  10. Effects of Calcium Phosphate Nanocrystals on Osseointegration of Titanium Implant in Irradiated Bone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun Yuan; Pow, Edmond Ho Nang; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Cheung, Lim Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy may compromise the integration of implant and cause implant loss. Implant surface modifications have the possibility of promoting cell attachment, cell growth, and bone formation which ultimately enhance the osseointegration process. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium phosphate nanocrystals on implant osseointegration in irradiated bone. Sixteen rabbits were randomly assigned into control and nano-CaP groups, receiving implants with dual acid-etched surface or dual acid-etched surface discretely deposited of nanoscale calcium-phosphate crystals, respectively. The left leg of all the rabbits received 15 Gy radiation, followed by implants placement one week after. Four animals in each group were sacrificed after 4 and 12 weeks, respectively. Implant stability quotient (ISQ), ratio of bone volume to total volume (BV/TV), bone growth rate, and bone-to-implant contact (BIC) were evaluated. The nano-CaP group showed significantly higher ISQ (week 12, P = 0.031) and bone growth rate (week 6, P = 0.021; week 9, P = 0.001) than that in control group. No significant differences in BV/TV and BIC were found between two groups. Titanium implant surface modified with CaP nanocrystals provides a potential alternative to improve bone healing around implant in irradiated bone. PMID:25685809

  11. A contact mechanics model for ankle implants with inclusion of surface roughness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodaei, M.; Farhang, K.; Maani, N.

    2014-02-01

    Total ankle replacement is recognized as one of the best procedures to treat painful arthritic ankles. Even though this method can relieve patients from pain and reproduce the physiological functions of the ankle, an improper design can cause an excessive amount of metal debris due to wear, causing toxicity in implant recipient. This paper develops a contact model to treat the interaction of tibia and talus implants in an ankle joint. The contact model describes the interaction of implant rough surfaces including both elastic and plastic deformations. In the model, the tibia and the talus surfaces are viewed as macroscopically conforming cylinders or conforming multi-cylinders containing micrometre-scale roughness. The derived equations relate contact force on the implant and the minimum mean surface separation of the rough surfaces. The force is expressed as a statistical integral function of asperity heights over the possible region of interaction of the roughness of the tibia and the talus implant surfaces. A closed-form approximate equation relating contact force and minimum separation is used to obtain energy loss per cycle in a load-unload sequence applied to the implant. In this way implant surface statistics are related to energy loss in the implant that is responsible for internal void formation and subsequent wear and its harmful toxicity to the implant recipient.

  12. Implants in children with ectodermal dysplasia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Franz-Josef; Baethge, Carola; Tschernitschek, Harald

    2007-02-01

    The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. Implant insertions in children or adolescents are circumvented due to several unfavorable potential effects including trauma to tooth germs, tooth eruption disorders and multidimensional restrictions of skeletal craniofacial growth. Moreover, the functional and esthetic results of the oral rehabilitation are only temporary acceptable. However, to a small number of pediatric patients suffering congenitally from severe hypodontia caused by syndromes such as ectodermal dysplasia, conventional prosthodontic rehabilitations are insufficient. We report the case of a boy with ectodermal dysplasia who exhibited a severe hypodontia and who was treated with implants inserted into the anterior mandible at the age of 8 years. The implants were functionally loaded and resulted in a high patient satisfaction. We recommend the early insertion of dental implants in children with severe hypodontia. Reviewing the current literature, several aspects of syndromic hypodontia, patient selection and implant planning are discussed.

  13. Fracture of a HTR-PMI cranioplastic implant after severe TBI.

    PubMed

    López González, Antonio; Pérez Borredá, Pedro; Conde Sardón, Rebeca

    2015-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a large left fronto-parietal hard-tissue replacement patient-matched implant (HTR®-PMI) cranioplasty-since she suffered from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) 6 years ago-had a new severe TBI that detached and fractured the implant as well as caused a left subdural hematoma and a large frontal contusion. The hematoma and contusion were removed and the implant was substituted by a provisional titanium mesh. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported about an HTR®-PMI fracture. It is theorized that the bone ingrowth into the macroporous implants, like those of hydroxyapatite, gives strength and resistance to the implant. But in the case we describe, no macroscopic bone ingrowth was detected 6 years after implantation and the traumatic force that impacted over the cranioplasty exceeded its properties.

  14. Insights on Metal Based Dental Implants and their Interaction with the Surrounding Tissues.

    PubMed

    Popa, Marcela; Hussien, Mohamed D; Cirstea, Alexandra; Grigore, Raluca; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Sakizlian, Monica; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Bertesteanu, Serban

    2015-01-01

    At present, the use of dental implants is a very common practice as tooth loss is a frequent problem and can occur as a result of disease or trauma. An implant is usually made of biocompatible materials that do not cause rejection reactions and allow the implant union with the respective bone. To achieve this goal, the implant surface may have different structures and coatings, generally used to increase the adherence of the implant to the bone and to decrease the risk of the periimplantar inflammatory reactions. This review gives some insights of the metal based materials used for dental implants, their limits, improvement strategies as well as the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of periimplantary diseases.

  15. PIXE microbeam analysis of the metallic debris release around endosseous implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buso, G. P.; Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Passi, P.; Zadro, A.; Uzunov, N. M.; Doyle, B. L.; Rossi, P.; Provencio, P.

    2005-10-01

    The mechanical friction that occurs during the surgical insertion of endosseous implants, both in dentistry and orthopaedics, may cause the detachment of metal debris which are dislodged into the peri-implant tissues and can lead to adverse clinical effects. This phenomenon more likely happens with coated or roughened implants that are the most widely employed. In the present study were studied dental implants screws made of commercially pure titanium and coated using titanium plasma-spray (TPS) technique. The implants were inserted in the tibia of rabbits, and removed "en bloc" with the surrounding bone after one month. After proper processing and mounting on plastic holders, samples from bones were analysed by EDXRF setup at of National Laboratories of Legnaro, INFN, Italy, and consequently at 3 MeV proton microbeam setup at Sandia National Laboratories. Elemental maps were drawn, showing some occasional presence of metal particles in the peri-implant bone.

  16. Electromagnetic irradiation may be a new approach to therapy for peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhensheng; Chen, Yijia; Chen, Yuxue; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Xiaomei; Chen, Yangxi

    2012-03-01

    Peri-implantitis can lead to bone destruction around a dental implant through inflammation and immune reactions caused by bacteria adhering to the surface of the implant abutment. Electromagnetic irradiation can inhibit bacterial growth, increase bone formation, decrease bone resorption and reduce the inflammatory response. Our hypothesis is that electromagnetic irradiation may be a new treatment approach for peri-implantitis and may simultaneously maintain bone mass around the dental implant. The results would be more significant when combined with other agents, because the effect of some antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs is strengthened by electromagnetic irradiation. This non-invasive therapy is expected to be conducted in a convenient manner, and even by patients at home, thereby facilitating the prevention and treatment of peri-implantitis.

  17. Lattice modification in KTiOPO4 by hydrogen and helium sequentially implantation in submicrometer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Xu, Bo; Fan, Ranran

    2016-05-01

    We investigated lattice modification and its physical mechanism in H and He co-implanted, z-cut potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO4). The samples were implanted with 110 keV H and 190 keV He, both to a fluence of 4 × 1016 cm-2, at room temperature. Rutherford backscattering/channeling, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the implantation-induced structural changes and strain. Experimental and simulated x-ray diffraction results show that the strain in the implanted KTiOPO4 crystal is caused by interstitial atoms. The strain and stress are anisotropic and depend on the crystal's orientation. Transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that ion implantation produces many dislocations in the as-implanted samples. Annealing can induce ion aggregation to form nanobubbles, but plastic deformation and ion out-diffusion prevent the KTiOPO4 surface from blistering.

  18. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, Paulus S.; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders. PMID:26106306

  19. The role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nadeem; Carrick, David; Layland, Jamie; Oldroyd, Keith G; Berry, Colin

    2013-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world, despite the rate having significantly declined over the past decade. The aim of this review is to consider the emerging diagnostic and clinical utility of cardiac MRI in patients with recent AMI. Cardiac MRI has high reproducibility and accuracy, allowing detailed functional assessment and characterisation of myocardial tissue. In addition to traditional measures including infarct size (IS), transmural extent of necrosis and microvascular obstruction (MVO), other infarct characteristics can now be identified using innovative MRI techniques. These novel pathologies include myocardial oedema and myocardial haemorrhage which also have functional and prognostic implications for patients. In addition to its diagnostic utility in ordinary clinical practice, cardiac MRI has been increasingly used to provide information on surrogate outcome measures, such as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and volumes, in clinical trials. MRI is becoming more available in secondary care, however, the potential clinical utility and cost effectiveness of MRI in post-MI patients remains uncertain. Cardiac MRI is most likely to be useful in high risk patients with risk factors for heart failure (HF). This includes individuals with early signs of pump failure and risk factors for adverse remodelling, such as MVO. This review focuses on the role of cardiac MRI in the assessment of patients with AMI.

  20. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia.

    PubMed

    Rommer, Paulus S; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders.

  1. Cortical feature analysis and machine learning improves detection of "MRI-negative" focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bilal; Brodley, Carla E; Blackmon, Karen E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Barash, Gilad; Carlson, Chad; Quinn, Brian T; Doyle, Werner; French, Jacqueline; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is the most common cause of pediatric epilepsy and the third most common lesion in adults with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Advances in MRI have revolutionized the diagnosis of FCD, resulting in higher success rates for resective epilepsy surgery. However, many patients with histologically confirmed FCD have normal presurgical MRI studies ('MRI-negative'), making presurgical diagnosis difficult. The purpose of this study was to test whether a novel MRI postprocessing method successfully detects histopathologically verified FCD in a sample of patients without visually appreciable lesions. We applied an automated quantitative morphometry approach which computed five surface-based MRI features and combined them in a machine learning model to classify lesional and nonlesional vertices. Accuracy was defined by classifying contiguous vertices as "lesional" when they fell within the surgical resection region. Our multivariate method correctly detected the lesion in 6 of 7 MRI-positive patients, which is comparable with the detection rates that have been reported in univariate vertex-based morphometry studies. More significantly, in patients that were MRI-negative, machine learning correctly identified 14 out of 24 FCD lesions (58%). This was achieved after separating abnormal thickness and thinness into distinct classifiers, as well as separating sulcal and gyral regions. Results demonstrate that MRI-negative images contain sufficient information to aid in the in vivo detection of visually elusive FCD lesions.

  2. In vitro and in vivo imaging of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene orbital implants.

    PubMed

    Olszycki, Marek; Kozakiewicz, Marcin; Elgalal, Marcin; Majos, Agata; Stefanczyk, Ludomir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT) for visualization of an orbital alloplastic prosthesis made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) both in vitro and in vivo. A study of 15 test implants from UHMW-PE visualized in vitro in CT and MRI and an in vivo visualization in a patient who suffered from orbital injury and underwent reconstructive surgery is presented. The postsurgery MRI showed the UHMW-PE material clearly, with no significant artifacts. The surrounding tissues could be satisfactorily evaluated. The CT scans did not present the graft material. Both techniques were sufficient tools for in vitro evaluation of the shape and measurement of the prosthesis.

  3. Hydrogen Implants for Layer Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherekdjian, S.; Couillard, J. G.; Wilcox, C.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at Corning Incorporated have developed a process whereby single crystal silicon thin films are transferred onto a flat panel display glass substrate using hydrogen ion implantation. The energy of the implant controls the effective exfoliation thickness, agreeing well with SRIM calculations, while the hydrogen ion dose controls the size of the platelets formed. The ion dose was found to influence the final void defect count in exfoliated films. Finally, the ion beam and ion implant end-station cooling characteristics were investigated. These parameters control the effective implant heat load generated during ion beam processing. The temperature at which exfoliation occurs during an exfoliation heat cycle was found to be inversely proportional to the hydrogen ion dose when the temperature during ion implantation is <100 °C. The most sensitive exfoliation temperature to ion dose dependence was observed for cooler implants, i.e. <35 °C. Data indicates that at the minimum exfoliation dose the exfoliation temperature is reduced significantly by increasing the implant heat generated during ion beam processing. Higher hydrogen doses than the minimum required for exfoliation exhibit only a small exfoliation temperature variation with ion dose. By optimizing the implant heat load generated during ion beam processing it is observed that the efficiency of the exfoliation process is also enhanced. Implant temperatures of 150 to 160 °C were found to further reduce the minimum implant dose required for exfoliation by an additional 5%, as verified by calorimetric measurements. These results enable us to further conclude that hydrogen out-diffusion is not significant in this process.

  4. Macrophage polarization following chitosan implantation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniela P; Fonseca, Ana C; Costa, Madalena; Amaral, Isabel F; Barbosa, Mário A; Águas, Artur P; Barbosa, Judite N

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages are a key cell in the host response to implants and can be polarized into different phenotypes capable of inducing both detrimental and beneficial outcomes in tissue repair and remodeling, being important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the macrophage response to 3D porous chitosan (Ch) scaffolds with different degrees of acetylation (DA, 5% and 15%). The M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages was investigated in vivo using a rodent air-pouch model. Our results show that the DA affects the macrophage response. Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced the adhesion of lower numbers of inflammatory cells, being the M2 the predominant phenotypic profile among the adherent macrophages. In the inflammatory exudates F4/80(+)/CD206(+) cells (M2 macrophages) appeared in higher numbers then F4/80(+)/CCR7(+) cells (M1 macrophages), in addition, lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines together with higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines were found. Ch scaffolds with DA 15% showed opposite results, since M1 were the predominant macrophages both adherent to the scaffold and in the exudates, together with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced a benign M2 anti-inflammatory macrophage response, whereas Ch scaffolds with DA 15% caused a macrophage M1 pro-inflammatory response.

  5. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  6. Simulation of scattering effects of irradiation on surroundings using the example of titanium dental implants: a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Todorovic, Manuel; Todrovic, Manuel; Krüll, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Occasionally, head and neck cancer patients treated with high-energy X-rays and gamma rays have titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to calculate alterations in the irradiated bone caused by a foreign body, representing a titanium implant in size and physical qualities, using a stochastic (Monte Carlo) simulation. A clinical linear accelerator was simulated using BEAM/EGS4. The calculations showed that the presence of an implant results in differences of the dose distribution all around the implant. Titanium dental implants in the field of irradiation were capable of causing significant radiation scattering. The risk for dose enhancement was notably important for the bone in direct contact with the foreign body. Therapists involved in radiation planning should consider the impact of dental implants on the radiation beam as a putative cause of osteoradionecrosis.

  7. Tribological properties of nitrogen implanted and boron implanted steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, K.T.; Walter, K.C.; Griffin, A.J. Jr.; Kung, H.; Lu, Y.; Nastasi, M.; Tesmer, J.R.; Fayeulle, S.

    1996-06-01

    Samples of a steel with high chrome content was implanted separately with 75 keV nitrogen ions and with 75 keV boron ions. Implanted doses of each ion species were 2-, 4-, and 8 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. Retained doses were measured using resonant non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Tribological properties were determined using a pin-on-disk test with a 6-mm diameter ruby pin with a velocity of 0.94 m/min. Testing was done at 10% humidity with a load of 377 g. Wear rate and coefficient of friction were determined from these tests. While reduction in the wear rate for nitrogen implanted materials was observed, greater reduction (more than an order of magnitude) was observed for boron implanted materials. In addition, reduction in the coefficient of friction for high-dose boron implanted materials was observed. Nano-indentation revealed a hardened layer near the surface of the material. Results from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction suggest the formation of Fe{sub 2}N and Fe{sub 3}N in the nitrogen implanted materials and Fe{sub 3}B in the boron implanted materials. Results from transmission electron microscopy will be presented.

  8. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  9. Double valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Stassano, Paolo; Mannacio, Vito; Musumeci, Antonino; Golino, Alessandro; Maida, Piero; Ferrigno, Vincenzo; Buonocore, Gaetano; Spampinato, Nicola

    1991-01-01

    From January 1976 through December 1987, 194 patients with a mean age of 43.3 ± 13.7 years (range, 11 to 74 years) underwent double (mitral and aortic) replacement of native valves with 8 types of bioprostheses: Carpentier-Edwards, 127 valves; Hancock, 76 valves; Liotta-Bioimplant, 57 valves; Ionescu-Shiley, 53 valves; Vascor, 27 valves; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 22 valves; Angell-Shiley, 20 valves; and Implamedic, 6 valves. Concomitant cardiac procedures were performed in 25 patients (12.8%). There were 18 operative deaths (9.27%). Our retrospective analysis was restricted to 352 bioprostheses implanted in the 176 patients who survived surgery and were considered at risk for valve tissue failure. The overall cumulative duration of follow-up was 1,174.1 patient-years (range, 1 to 13 years). The durations of follow-up for specific valves were: Carpentier-Edwards, 920.2 valve-years; Hancock, 383.8 valve-years; Liotta-Bioimplant, 310.2 valve-years; Ionescu-Shiley, 357.7 valve-years; Vascor, 131.2 valve-years; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 52.0 valve-years; Angell-Shiley, 167.0 valve-years; and Implamedic, 31.0 valve-years. Thirty patients had thromboembolic accidents, for a linearized incidence of 2.5% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from thromboembolic accidents was 85.8% ± 10.7%. Nine patients had endocarditis, for a linearized incidence of 0.7% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from endocarditis was 92.0% ± 1.5%. Twenty-four patients had valve tissue failure, for a cumulative linearized incidence of 1.87% per valve-year. The cumulative actuarial probability of freedom from valve tissue failure was 78.6% ± 3.7% at 10 years and 51.2% ± 10.7% at 13 years. The 24 patients with valve tissue failure all underwent reoperation: 20 of these had double valve replacement, 3 had aortic valve replacement alone, and 1 had mitral valve replacement alone. The mean interval between initial valve implantation and reoperation was

  10. Periodontal considerations in restorative and implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P V; Higginbottom, F L; Wilson, T G

    2001-01-01

    The successful integration of periodontal and restorative dentistry for both natural teeth and implants requires knowledge and application of both mechanical and biological principles. In areas of aesthetic concern, an adequate band of attached gingiva can increase patient comfort, reduce the probability of gingival recession following tooth preparation and simplify restorative procedures. While some restorative margins need to be placed at or below the margin of the free gingiva, this should be considered to be a compromise, and margins should not be placed more than 0.5 mm into a healthy gingival sulcus. Approximately 2-3 mm of healthy, natural supra-alveolar tooth surface is needed for attachment of the gingival tissues to the tooth. This dimension is called the biological width. If adequate biological width does not exist, surgical or orthodontic procedures to expose healthy tooth structure are recommended before final restorations are placed. Retraction of soft tissues for impressions is best accomplished with mechanical methods rather than lasers or electrosurgery because of the potentially harmful effects of these devices to the cementum, bone and soft tissues surrounding the teeth. Implants function best and withstand occlusal forces optimally when loaded in a vertical direction. Therefore, planning implant placement is critical for success. Because of increased proprioception, it is suggested that natural teeth be used to guide the occlusion in partially edentulous patients. Cantilevers should be used with caution and with appropriate attention to occlusal forces. While occlusal trauma does not cause periodontal disease, it may contribute to bone loss around teeth and implants. In the opinion of the authors, provisional restorations are an integral part of dental and periodontal therapy. They can be used to establish aesthetic and physiological contours that can be easily cleaned by patients and they can also be used as a guide for any needed surgical

  11. Evaluation of the peri-implant bone around parallel-walled dental implants with a condensing thread macrodesign and a self-tapping apex: a 10-year retrospective histological analysis.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Perrotti, Vittoria; Shibli, Jamil A; Mortellaro, Carmen; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    The long-term high percentages of survival and success of dental implants reported in the literature are related mainly to new, innovative implant and thread designs, and new implant surfaces that allow to obtain very good primary and secondary stability in most anatomical and clinical situations, even in low quality and quantity of bone, promoting a more rapid osseointegration. The aim of this retrospective study was a histological and histomorphometrical evaluation of the bone response around implants with a parallel-wall configuration, condensing thread macrodesign, and self-tapping apex, retrieved from man for different causes. A total of 10 implants were reported in the present study, and these implants had been retrieved after a loading period comprised between a few weeks to about 8 years. Mineralized newly formed bone was found at the interface of all the implants, in direct contact with the implant surface, with no gaps or connective fibrous tissue. This bone adapted very well to the microirregularities of the implant surface. Areas of bone remodeling were present in some regions of the interface, with many reversal lines. High bone-implant contact percentages were found. In conclusion, both the macrostructure and the microstructure of this specific type of implant could be very helpful in the long-term high survival and success implant percentages.

  12. Septic lens implantation syndrome in a cat.

    PubMed

    Dalesandro, Nicole; Stiles, Jean; Miller, Margaret

    2011-09-01

    A 13-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented initially for a change in the appearance of the left eye. On initial examination, a small penetrating wound was suspected as the cause for a corneal scar, an anterior cortical incipient cataract and mild iritis. The cat was not re-presented until 1 year later at which time ocular pain was marked. Severe anterior uveitis and glaucoma were diagnosed and the eye enucleated. Histopathology documented intralenticular coccoid bacteria and septic lens implantation syndrome.

  13. [Use of autotransplants and implants in ossiculoplasty].

    PubMed

    Sitnikov, V P; Anikin, I A; Chernushevich, I I; Zavarzin, B A; Anikin, M I

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative analysis of efficacy of ossiculoplasty (OP) using different transplants. A total of 202 operations were performed. Prostheses made of the fragments of the auditory ossicles, or a cortical layer of the temporal bone (n=81), of nail plate (n=56), titanium implants (n=65) were applied. A satisfactory result was achieved in 72-87% ossiculoplasties. Functional outcomes of OP did not vary significantly with type and material of the prosthesis. Main causes of poor OP results were fixation or displacement of the prosthesis with fibrous tissue; in case of titanium prostheses -- perforation of the tympanic membrane with prosthesis extrusion.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need for contrast material. See the MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. ...

  15. Anti-infection activity of nanostructured titanium percutaneous implants with a postoperative infection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jing; Li, Yiting; Liu, Zhiyuan; Qu, Shuxin; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2015-07-01

    The titanium percutaneous implants were widely used in clinic; however, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Lack of complete skin integration with the implants can cause infection and implant removal. In this work, three titania nanotubes (TNT) with different diameters, 50 nm (TNT-50), 100 nm (TNT-100) and 150 nm (TNT-150) arrays were prepared on titanium surfaces by anodization, pure titanium (pTi) was used as control. Samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle analysis. The antibacterial efficiency of TNT was evaluated in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus under the visible light. The results indicated that TNT-100 had the highest antibacterial efficiency under the visible light. Subsequently, TNT implants and pTi implants were placed subcutaneously to the dorsum of New Zealand White rabbits, 108 CFU S. aureus was inoculated into the implant sites 4 h after surgery. The TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha were determined using enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). TNT implants revealed less inflammatory factor release than pTi implants with or without injected S. aureus liquid. According to the histological results, the TNT implants displayed excellent tissue integration. Whereas, pTi implants were surrounded with fibrotic capsule, and the skin tissue was almost separated from the implant surface. Therefore, the TNT significantly inhibited the infection risk and enhanced tissue integration of the percutaneous implants compared to pTi. The immersion test in the culture medium suggested that one of causes be probably more proteins adsorbed on TNT than on pTi.

  16. Management of fluocinolone implant dissociation during implant exchange.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Steven; Cebulla, Colleen M; Witherspoon, S Robert; Emerson, Geoffrey G; Emerson, M Vaughn; Suhler, Eric B; Albini, Thomas A; Flaxel, Christina J

    2009-09-01

    Three patients with chronic, noninfectious uveitis requiring immunosuppressive therapy underwent fluocinolone acetonide (FA) implant exchange complicated by dissociation of the medication reservoir from its anchoring strut. In 2 patients, the medication reservoir descended into the vitreous cavity and required pars plana vitrectomy with intraocular foreign body removal techniques for its retrieval. The use of viscoelastic or perfluorocarbon to elevate the device was helpful in the safe removal of the FA implant device. Surgeons performing FA implant exchange should be aware of this potential complication and anticipate the possible need for vitreoretinal instrumentation and personnel. Patients undergoing FA explantation or exchange should be counseled regarding this potential complication prior to surgery.

  17. Phenotypic characterization of the Komeda miniature rat Ishikawa, an animal model of dwarfism caused by a mutation in Prkg2.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Atsuko; Yokoi, Norihide; Namae, Misako; Fuse, Masanori; Masuyama, Taku; Sasaki, Masashi; Kawazu, Shoji; Komeda, Kajuro

    2008-12-01

    The Komeda miniature rat Ishikawa (KMI) is a spontaneous animal model of dwarfism caused by a mutation in Prkg2, which encodes cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII). This strain has been maintained as a segregating inbred strain for the mutated allele mri. In this study, we characterized the phenotype of the KMI strain, particularly growth traits, craniofacial measurements, and organ weights. The homozygous mutant (mri/mri) animals were approximately 70% to 80% of the size of normal, heterozygous (mri/+) animals in regard to body length, weight, and naso-occipital length of the calvarium, and the retroperitoneal fat of mri/mri rats was reduced greatly. In addition, among progeny of the (BNxKMI-mri/mri)F1xKMI-mri/mri backcross, animals with the KMI phenotype (mri/mri) were easily distinguished from those showing the wild-type phenotype (mri/+) by using growth traits such as body length and weight. Genetic analysis revealed that all of the backcrossed progeny exhibiting the KMI phenotype were homozygous for the KMI allele in the 1.2-cM region between D14Rat5 and D14Rat80 on chromosome 14, suggesting strongly that mri acts in a completely recessive manner. The KMI strain is the first and only rat model with a confirmed mutation in Prkg2 and is a valuable model for studying dwarfism and longitudinal growth traits in humans and for functional studies of cGKII.

  18. Utilization and likelihood of radiologic diagnostic imaging in patients with implantable cardiac defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Ryan, Michael P.; Wolff, Steven D.; Mollenkopf, Sarah A.; Turakhia, Mintu P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine imaging utilization in a matched cohort of patients with and without implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and to project magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilization over a 10‐year period. Materials and Methods The Truven Health MarketScan Commercial claims and Medicare Supplemental health insurance claims data were used to identify patients with continuous health plan enrollment in 2009–2012. Patients with ICDs were identified using ICD‐9 and CPT codes, and matched to patients with the same demographic and comorbidity profile, but no record of device implantation. Diagnostic imaging utilization was compared across the matched cohorts, in total, by imaging categories, and in subpopulations of stroke, back pain, and joint pain. MRI use in the nonimplant group over the 4‐year period was extrapolated out to 10 years for ICD‐indicated patients. Results A cohort of 18,770 matched patients were identified; average age 65.5 ± 13.38 and 21.9% female. ICD patients had significantly less MRI imaging (0.23 0.70 SD vs. 0.00 0.08 SD, P < 0.0001) than nonimplant patients. Among patients with records of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) (ICD 5%, nonimplant 4%) and accompanying diagnostic imaging, 44% of nonimplant patients underwent MRI vs. 1% of ICD patients (P < 0.0001). Forecast models estimated that 53% to 64% of ICD‐eligible patients may require an MRI within 10 years. Conclusion MRI utilization is lower in ICD patients compared to nonimplant patients, yet the burden of incident stroke/TIA, back, and joint pain suggests an unmet need for MR‐conditional devices. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:115–127. PMID:26118943

  19. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  20. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Micol; Rosignoli, Monica; Castiglione, Alessandro; Minazzi, Federica; Trevisi, Patrizia; Aimoni, Claudia; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Martini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. Methods. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations) on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Results. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years). Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males) presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children) ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0). Conclusions. Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities, even if central

  1. Can Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DW-MRI) Evaluate Inflammation Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianguo; Zhang, Faming; Luan, Yun; Cao, Peng; Liu, Fei; He, Wenwen; Wang, Dehang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate diagnosis efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in Crohn's disease (CD). To find out the correlations between functional MRI parameters including Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with a serologic biomarker. The relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC were also studied. Thirty-two patients with CD (22 men, 10 women; mean age: 30.5 years) and 18 healthy volunteers without any inflammatory disease (10 men, 8 women; mean age, 34.11 years) were enrolled into this approved prospective study. Pearson analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and C-reactive protein (CRP), ADC, and CRP respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of the functional MRI parameters in terms of sensitivity and specificity were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Optimal cut-off values of each functional MRI parameters for differentiation of inflammatory from normal bowel were determined according to the Youden criterion. Mean value of Ktrans in the CD group was significantly higher than that of normal control group. Similar results were observed for Kep and Ve. On the contrary, the ADC value was lower in the CD group than that in the control group. Ktrans and Ve were shown to be correlated with CRP (r = 0.725, P < 0.001; r = 0.533, P = 0.002), meanwhile ADC showed negative correlation with CRP (r = −0.630, P < 0.001). There were negative correlations between the pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC, such as Ktrans to ADC (r = −0.856, P < 0.001), and Ve to ADC (r = −0.451, P = 0.01). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.994 for Ktrans (P < 0.001), 0.905 for ADC (P < 0.001), 0.806 for Ve (P < 0.001), and 0.764 for Kep (P = 0.002). The cut-off point of the Ktrans was found to be 0.931 min–1. This value provided the best trade-off between

  2. Variability of the Relationship between Electrophysiology and BOLD-fMRI across Cortical Regions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Christopher R.; Ellmore, Timothy M.; Pieters, Thomas A.; DiSano, Michael A.; Tandon, Nitin

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signal and the underlying neural electrical activity in humans is a topic of intense interest to systems neuroscience. This relationship has generally been assumed to be invariant regardless of the brain region and the cognitive task being studied. We critically evaluated these assumptions by comparing the BOLD-fMRI response with local field potential (LFP) measurements during visually cued common noun and verb generation in 11 humans in whom 1210 subdural electrodes were implanted. As expected, power in the mid-gamma band (60 –120 Hz) correlated positively (r2 = 0.16, p < 10−16) and power in the beta band (13–30 Hz) correlated negatively (r2 = 0.09, p < 10−16) with the BOLD signal change. Beta and mid-gamma band activity independently explain different components of the observed BOLD signal. Importantly, we found that the location (i.e., lobe) of the recording site modulates the relationship between the electrocorticographic (ECoG) signal and the observed fMRI response (p < 10−16, F21,1830 = 52.7), while the type of language task does not. Across all brain regions, ECoG activity in the gamma and beta bands explains 22% of the fMRI response, but if the lobar location is considered, 28% of the variance can be explained. Further evaluation of this relationship at the level of individual gyri provides additional evidence of differences in the BOLD-LFP relationship by cortical locus. This spatial variability in the relationship between the fMRI signal and neural activity carries implications for modeling of the hemodynamic response function, an essential step for interregional fMRI comparisons. PMID:21900564

  3. Repeated BOLD-fMRI Imaging of Deep Brain Stimulation Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Tzu-Hao Harry; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a picture of the global spatial activation pattern of the brain. Interest is growing regarding the application of fMRI to rodent models to investigate adult brain plasticity. To date, most rodent studies used an electrical forepaw stimulation model to acquire fMRI data, with α-chloralose as the anesthetic. However, α-chloralose is harmful to animals, and not suitable for longitudinal studies. Moreover, peripheral stimulation models enable only a limited number of brain regions to be studied. Processing between peripheral regions and the brain is multisynaptic, and renders interpretation difficult and uncertain. In the present study, we combined the medetomidine-based fMRI protocol (a noninvasive rodent fMRI protocol) with chronic implantation of an MRI-compatible stimulation electrode in the ventroposterior (VP) thalamus to repetitively sample thalamocortical responses in the rat brain. Using this model, we scanned the forebrain responses evoked by the VP stimulation repeatedly of individual rats over 1 week. Cortical BOLD responses were compared between the 2 profiles obtained at day1 and day8. We discovered reproducible frequency- and amplitude-dependent BOLD responses in the ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1). The S1 BOLD responses during the 2 sessions were conserved in maximal response amplitude, area size (size ratio from 0.88 to 0.91), and location (overlap ratio from 0.61 to 0.67). The present study provides a long-term chronic brain stimulation protocol for studying the plasticity of specific neural circuits in the rodent brain by BOLD-fMRI. PMID:24825464

  4. Counterfactual thinking and quality of life among women with silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Parker, Patricia A; Middleton, Michael S; Kulik, James A

    2002-08-01

    This study examined the relationship of counterfactual thinking (thoughts about how one's current situation might have turned out differently) with psychosocial adjustment and quality of life in a sample of women with silicone breast implants. Seventy-four women who were concerned about or who were experiencing problems with their implants were recruited following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation. Participants completed measures of counterfactual thinking, psychosocial adjustment, and quality of life (QOL). Results indicated that counterfactual thinking was significantly associated with more psychosocial adjustment difficulties, more perceived implant-related health problems, and poorer QOL in the physical health domain. These findings provide additional insight into the factors that may influence adjustment in a complex and poorly understood population and also have implications for understanding the adjustment process to other types of illnesses.

  5. Effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the formation of mouse dentin and bone

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong-Hing, A.; Sandhu, H.S.; Prato, F.S.; Frappier, J.R.; Kavaliers, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on dentin and bone formation in mice were examined using standard autoradiographic and liquid scintillation procedures. It was observed that exposure to a standard 23.2 min clinical multislice MRI (0.15T) procedure caused a significant increase in the synthesis of the collagenous matrix of dentin in the incisors of mice. There were no significant effects on alveolar and tibial bone matrix synthesis. These results suggest that the magnetic fields associated with MRI can affect the activity of cells and/or tissues that are involved in rapid synthetic activity.

  6. Shock whilst gardening--implantable defibrillators & lawn mowers.

    PubMed

    Von Olshausen, G; Lennerz, C; Grebmer, C; Pavaci, H; Kolb, C

    2014-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) can cause inappropriate shock delivery or temporary inhibition of ICD functions. We present a case of electromagnetic interference between a lawn mower and an ICD resulting in an inappropriate discharge of the device due to erroneous detection of ventricular fibrillation.

  7. Corrosion of phosphate-enriched titanium oxide surface dental implants (TiUnite) under in vitro inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Seta, Francesca; Mickalonis, John; Brown, Yolanda; Lewis, Jill B; Wataha, John C

    2010-02-01

    Endosseous dental implants use is increasing in patients with systemic conditions that compromise wound healing. Manufacturers recently have redesigned implants to ensure more reliable and faster osseointegration. One design strategy has been to create a porous phosphate-enriched titanium oxide (TiUnite) surface to increase surface area and enhance interactions with bone. In the current study, the corrosion properties of TiUnite implants were studied in cultures of monocytic cells and solutions simulating inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. Furthermore, to investigate whether placement into bone causes enough mechanical damage to alter implant corrosion properties, the enhanced surface implants as well as machined titanium implants were placed into human cadaver mandibular bone, the bone removed, and the corrosion properties measured. Implant corrosion behavior was characterized by open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance, and electrical impedance spectroscopy. In selected samples, THP1 cells were activated with lipopolysaccharide prior to implant exposure to simulate an inflammatory environment. No significant differences in corrosion potentials were measured between the TiUnite implants and the machined titanium implants in previous studies. TiUnite implants exhibited lower corrosion rates in all simulated conditions than observed in PBS, and EIS measurements revealed two time constants which shifted with protein-containing electrolytes. In addition, the TiUnite implants displayed a significantly lower corrosion rate than the machined titanium implants after placement into bone. The current study suggests that the corrosion risk of the enhanced oxide implant is lower than its machined surface titanium implant counterpart under simulated conditions of inflammation, elevated dextrose concentrations, and after implantation into bone.

  8. TH-C-18C-01: MRI Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Pooley, R; Bernstein, M; Shu, Y; Gorny, K; Felmlee, J; Panda, A

    2014-06-15

    Clinical diagnostic medical physicists may be responsible for implementing and maintaining a comprehensive MR safety program. Accrediting bodies including the ACR, IAC, Radsite and The Joint Commission each include aspects of MR Safety into their imaging accreditation programs; MIPPA regulations further raise the significance of non-compliance. In addition, The Joint Commission recently announced New and Revised Diagnostic Imaging Standards for accredited health care organizations which include aspects of MR Safety. Hospitals and clinics look to the physicist to understand guidelines, regulations and accreditation requirements related to MR safety. The clinical medical physicist plays a significant role in a clinical practice by understanding the physical basis for the risks and acting as a facilitator to successfully implement a safety program that provides well-planned siting, allows for the safe scanning of certain implanted devices, and helps radiologists manage specific patient exams. The MRI scanning of specific devices will be discussed including cardiac pacemakers and neurostimulators such as deep brain stimulators. Furthermore for sites involved in MR guided interventional procedures, the MR physicist plays an essential role to establish safe practices. Creating a framework for a safe MRI practice includes the review of actual safety incidents or close calls to determine methods for prevention in the future. Learning Objectives: Understand the requirements and recommendations related to MR safety from accrediting bodies and federal regulations. Understand the Medical Physicist's roles to ensure MR Safety. Identify best practices for dealing with implanted devices, including pacemakers and deep brain stimulators. Review aspects of MR safety involved in an MR guided interventional environment. Understand the important MR safety aspects in actual safety incidents or near misses.

  9. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  10. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  11. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  12. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries.

  13. [Considerations for optimizing joint implants].

    PubMed

    Tensi, H M; Orloff, S; Gese, H; Hooputra, H

    1994-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of orthopaedic implants, there is still a lack of adequate testing procedures and legal guidelines. Examples of the consequences of this neglect are given. Modern techniques for the calculation of stresses (finite element method [FEM]) and the prediction of life cycle duration are presented. Such methods, applied in the development and manufacturing phases of standard and special implants, may ensure an adequate prosthetic life cycle, with particular emphasis being placed on the biomedical optimization of the implant/bone interface and surrounding bone.

  14. PET/MRI in the infarcted mouse heart with the Cambridge split magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Methner, Carmen; Krieg, Thomas; Hawkes, Robert C.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Chronic heart failure, as a result of acute myocardial infarction, is a leading cause of death worldwide. Combining diagnostic imaging modalities may aid the direct assessment of experimental treatments targeting heart failure in vivo. Here we present preliminary data using the Cambridge combined PET/MRI imaging system in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. The split-magnet design can deliver uncompromised MRI and PET performance, for better assessment of disease and treatment in a preclinical environment.

  15. Accidental Implant Screwdriver Ingestion: A Rare Complication during Implant Placement

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshul; Baliga, Shridhar D

    2014-01-01

    One of the complications during a routine dental implant placement is accidental ingestion of the implant instruments, which can happen when proper precautions are not taken. Appropriate radiographs should be taken to locate the correct position of foreign body; usually the foreign body passes asymptomatically from gastrointestinal tract but sometimes it may lead to intestinal obstruction, perforations and impactions. The aim of this article is to report accidental ingestion of 19 mm long screw driver by a senile patient. PMID:25628702

  16. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  17. Occlusion on oral implants: current clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Koyano, K; Esaki, D

    2015-02-01

    Proper implant occlusion is essential for adequate oral function and the prevention of adverse consequences, such as implant overloading. Dental implants are thought to be more prone to occlusal overloading than natural teeth because of the loss of the periodontal ligament, which provides shock absorption and periodontal mechanoreceptors, which provide tactile sensitivity and proprioceptive motion feedback. Although many guidelines and theories on implant occlusion have been proposed, few have provided strong supportive evidence. Thus, we performed a narrative literature review to ascertain the influence of implant occlusion on the occurrence of complications of implant treatment and discuss the clinical considerations focused on the overloading factors at present. The search terms were 'dental implant', 'dental implantation', 'dental occlusion' and 'dental prosthesis'. The inclusion criteria were literature published in English up to September 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), prospective cohort studies and case-control studies with at least 20 cases and 12 months follow-up interval were included. Based on the selected literature, this review explores factors related to the implant prosthesis (cantilever, crown/implant ratio, premature contact, occlusal scheme, implant-abutment connection, splinting implants and tooth-implant connection) and other considerations, such as the number, diameter, length and angulation of implants. Over 700 abstracts were reviewed, from which more than 30 manuscripts were included. We found insufficient evidence to establish firm clinical guidelines for implant occlusion. To discuss the ideal occlusion for implants, further well-designed RCTs are required in the future.

  18. Rehabilitation of malpositioned implants with a CAD/CAM milled implant overdenture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Mauricio S; Duff, Renee E; Razzoog, Michael E

    2011-03-01

    Dentists may be faced with the challenge of restoring unfavorably placed implants. In some instances, previously integrated implants may be from different manufacturers. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of a patient with a maxillary CAD/CAM implant bar-supported overdenture that presented with malpositioned implants, from different manufacturers, including one from a discontinued implant system.

  19. A robotic assistant system for cardiac interventions under MRI guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Mazilu, Dumitru; Wood, Bradford J.; Horvath, Keith A.; Kapoor, Ankur

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we present a surgical assistant system for implanting prosthetic aortic valve transapically under MRI guidance, in a beating heart. The system integrates an MR imaging system, a robotic system, as well as user interfaces for a surgeon to plan the procedure and manipulate the robot. A compact robotic delivery module mounted on a robotic arm is used for delivering both balloon-expandable and self-expanding prosthesis. The system provides different user interfaces at different stages of the procedure. A compact fiducial pattern close to the volume of interest is proposed for robot registration. The image processing and the transformation recovery methods using this fiducial in MRI are presented. The registration accuracy obtained by using this compact fiducial is comparable to the larger multi-spherical marker registration method. The registration accuracy using these two methods is less than 0.62+/-0.50 deg (mean +/- std. dev.) and 0.63+/-0.72 deg (mean +/- std. dev.), respectively. We evaluated each of the components and show that they can work together to form a complete system for transapical aortic valve replacement.

  20. Approaches to creating and controlling motion in MRI.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gregory S; Cole, Gregory; Su, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can provide three dimensional (3D) imaging with excellent resolution and sensitivity making it ideal for guiding and monitoring interventions. The development of MRI-compatible interventional devices is complicated by factors including: the high magnetic field strength, the requirement that such devices should not degrade image quality, and the confined physical space of the scanner bore. Numerous MRI guided actuated devices have been developed or are currently being developed utilizing piezoelectric actuators as their primary means of mechanical energy generation to enable better interventional procedure performance. While piezoelectric actuators are highly desirable for MRI guided actuation for their precision, high holding force, and non-magnetic operation they are often found to cause image degradation on a large enough to scale to render live imaging unusable. This paper describes a newly developed piezoelectric actuator driver and control system designed to drive a variety of both harmonic and non-harmonic motors that has been demonstrated to be capable of operating both harmonic and non-harmonic piezoelectric actuators with less than 5% SNR loss under closed loop control. The proposed system device allows for a single controller to control any supported actuator and feedback sensor without any physical hardware changes.